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Sample records for cholinergic receptor expression

  1. Involvement of M3 Cholinergic Receptor Signal Transduction Pathway in Regulation of the Expression of Chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1 Genes in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海; 陈道达; 张景輝; 田原

    2004-01-01

    Whether M3 cholinergic receptor signal transduction pathway is involved in regulation of the activation of NF-κB and the expression of chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1genes in pancreatic acinar cells was investigated. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated, cultured and treated with carbachol, atropine and PDTC in vitro. The MOB-1 and MCP-1 mRNA expression was detected by using RT-PCR. The activation of NF-κB was monitored by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay.The results showed that as compared with control group, M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (103mol/L, 104-4ol/L carbachol) could induce a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in the expression of MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA in pancreatic acinar cells. After treatment with 10 -3mol/L carbachol for 2 h, the expression of MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA was strongest. The activity of NF-κB in pancreatic acinar cells was significantly increased (P<0.01) after treated with M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (10-3 mol/L carbachol) in vitro for 30 min. Either M3 cholinergic receptor antagonist (10-5 mol/L atropine) or NF-κB inhibitor (10-2 mol/L PDTC) could obviously inhibit the activation of NF-κB and the chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA expression induced by carbachol (P <0.05). This inhibitory effect was significantly increased by atropine plus PDTC (P<0.01). The results of these studies indicated that M3 cholinergic receptor signal transduction pathway was likely involved in regulation of the expression of chemokine MOB-1 and MCP-1genes in pancreatic acinar cells in vitro through the activation of NF-κB.

  2. Central cholinergic regulation of respiration: nicotinic receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuesi M SHAO; Jack L FELDMAN

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in brainstem and spinal cord regions involved in the control of breathing. These receptors mediate central cholinergic regulation of respiration and effects of the exogenous ligand nicotine on respiratory pattern. Activation of a4* nAChRs in the preBotzinger Complex (preBotC), an essential site for normal respiratory rhythm generation in mammals, modulates excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission and depolarizes preBotC inspiratory neurons, leading to increases in respiratory frequency. nAChRs are also present in motor nuclei innervating respiratory muscles. Activation of post- and/or extra-synaptic a4* nAChRs on hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons depolarizes these neurons, potentiating tonic and respiratory-related rhythmic activity. As perinatal nicotine exposure may contribute to the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), we discuss the effects of perinatal nicotine exposure on development of the cholinergic and other neurotransmitter systems involved in control of breathing. Advances in understanding of the mechanisms underlying central cholinergic/nicotinic modulation of respiration provide a pharmacological basis for exploiting nAChRs as therapeutic targets for neurological disorders related to neural control of breathing such as sleep apnea and SIDS.

  3. The involvement of ventral tegmental area cholinergic muscarinic receptors in classically conditioned fear expression as measured with fear-potentiated startle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greba, Q; Munro, L J; Kokkinidis, L

    2000-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) contribute to the complex amygdala-based neurocircuitry that mediates fear-motivated behaviors. Because of acetylcholine's (ACh) role in DA neuronal activation, the involvement of VTA cholinergic muscarinic receptors in Pavlovian conditioned fear responding was evaluated in the present study. Fear-potentiated startle was used to assess the effects of intraVTA infused methylscopolamine on conditioned fear performance in laboratory rats. Application of this nonspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist to VTA neurons was observed to inhibit the ability of a conditioned stimulus (CS) previously paired with footshock to enhance the amplitude of the acoustic startle reflex. Doses of methylscopolamine that blocked conditioned fear expression did not alter baseline sensorimotor responding. These results identify ACh neurotransmission in the VTA as a potential excitatory mechanism underlying the fear-arousing properties of threatening environmental stimuli.

  4. Cholinergic cells in the nucleus basalis of mice express the N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor subunit NR2C and its replacement by the NR2B subunit enhances frontal and amygdaloid acetylcholine levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Souza Silva, M. A.; Dolga, Amalia; Pieri, I.; Marchetti, L.; Eisel, U. L. M.; Huston, J. P.; Dere, E.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that glutamatergic and cholinergic systems interact functionally at the level of the cholinergic basal forebrain. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) is a multiprotein complex composed of NR1, NR2 and/or NR3 subunits. The subunit composition of NMDA-R of cholinergic cells in the n

  5. The cholinergic system, sigma-1 receptors and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K.; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of present knowledge regarding the relationship between the cholinergic system and sigma-1 receptors, and discusses potential applications of sigma-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of memory deficits and cognitive disorders. Sigma-1 receptors, initially consider

  6. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjun Zuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4. These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  7. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD. PMID:27827986

  8. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-11-07

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4,CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  9. Muscarinic and dopaminergic receptor subtypes on striatal cholinergic interneurons

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    Dawson, V.L.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K. (Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, ND (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Unilateral stereotaxic injection of small amounts of the cholinotoxin, AF64A, caused minimal nonselective tissue damage and resulted in a significant loss of the presynaptic cholinergic markers (3H)hemicholinium-3 (45% reduction) and choline acetyltransferase (27% reduction). No significant change from control was observed in tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase activity; presynaptic neuronal markers for dopamine- and serotonin-containing neurons, respectively. The AF64A lesion resulted in a significant reduction of dopamine D2 receptors as evidenced by a decrease in (3H)sulpiride binding (42% reduction) and decrease of muscarinic non-M1 receptors as shown by a reduction in (3H)QNB binding in the presence of 100 nM pirenzepine (36% reduction). Saturation studies revealed that the change in (3H)sulpiride and (3H)QNB binding was due to a change in Bmax not Kd. Intrastriatal injection of AF64A failed to alter dopamine D1 or muscarinic M1 receptors labeled with (3H)SCH23390 and (3H)pirenzepine, respectively. In addition, no change in (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase was observed. These results demonstrate that a subpopulation of muscarinic receptors (non-M1) are presynaptic on cholinergic interneurons (hence, autoreceptors), and a subpopulation of dopamine D2 receptors are postsynaptic on cholinergic interneurons. Furthermore, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase are not localized to striatal cholinergic interneurons.

  10. Involvement of cholinergic nicotinic receptors in the menthol-induced gastric relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Antonella; Serio, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-12-15

    We have previously demonstrated that menthol reduces murine gastric tone in part through a neural mechanism, involving adrenergic pathways and reduction of ongoing release of acetylcholine from enteric nerves. In the present study we aimed to verify whether the gastric relaxation to menthol may be triggered by interaction with neural receptors or ionic channels proteins, such as transient receptor potential (TRP)-melastatin8 (TRPM8), TRP-ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), 5-hydroxytriptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor or cholinergic nicotinic receptors. Spontaneous mechanical activity was detected in vitro as changes in intraluminal pressure from isolated mouse stomach. Menthol (0.3-30 mM) induced gastric relaxation which was not affected by 5-benzyloxytryptamine, a TRPM8 receptor antagonist, HC030031, a TRPA1 channel blocker. In addition, allylisothiocyanate, a TRPA1 agonist, but not (2S,5R)-2-Isopropyl-N-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methylcyclohexanecarboximide, a selective TRPM8 agonist, induced gastric relaxation. Genic expression of TRPA1, but not of TRPM8, was revealed in mouse stomach. Indeed, menthol-induced gastric relaxation was significantly reduced by hexamethonium, cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist. Menthol, at concentrations that failed to affect gastric tone, reduced the contraction induced by dimethylphenylpiperazinium, nicotinic receptor agonist. The joint application of hexamethonium and atropine, muscarinc receptor antagonist, or hexamethonium and phentholamine, α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, did not produce any additive reduction of the relaxant response to menthol. Lastly, ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, was ineffective. In conclusion, our study suggests that nicotinic receptors, but not TRP and 5-HT3 receptors, are molecular targets for menthol inducing murine gastric relaxation, ultimately due to the reduction of acetylcholine release from enteric nerves.

  11. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  12. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2 plays a crucial role in the development of myopia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veluchamy A. Barathi

    2013-09-01

    Myopia is a huge public health problem worldwide, reaching the highest incidence in Asia. Identification of susceptible genes is crucial for understanding the biological basis of myopia. In this paper, we have identified and characterized a functional myopia-associated gene using a specific mouse-knockout model. Mice lacking the muscarinic cholinergic receptor gene (M2; also known as Chrm2 were less susceptible to lens-induced myopia compared with wild-type mice, which showed significantly increased axial length and vitreous chamber depth when undergoing experimental induction of myopia. The key findings of this present study are that the sclera of M2 mutant mice has higher expression of collagen type I and lower expression of collagen type V than do wild-type mice and mice that are mutant for other muscarinic subtypes, and, therefore, M2 mutant mice were resistant to the development of experimental myopia. Pharmacological blockade of M2 muscarinic receptor proteins retarded myopia progression in the mouse. These results suggest for the first time a role of M2 in growth-related changes in extracellular matrix genes during myopia development in a mammalian model. M2 receptor antagonists might thus provide a targeted therapeutic approach to the management of this refractive error.

  13. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in esophagus: Early alteration during carcinogenesis and prognostic value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianello Nicolau, Marina; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro; Nicolau-Neto, Pedro; de Pinho, Paulo Roberto Alves; Rossini, Ana; de Almeida Simão, Tatiana; Soares Lima, Sheila Coelho

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare expression of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (CHRNs) in healthy and squamous cell carcinoma-affected esophagus and determine the prognostic value. METHODS We performed RT-qPCR to measure the expression of CHRNs in 44 esophageal samples from healthy individuals and in matched normal surrounding mucosa, and in tumors from 28 patients diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Next, we performed correlation analysis for the detected expression of these receptors with the habits and clinico-pathological characteristics of all study participants. In order to investigate the possible correlations between the expression of the different CHRN subunits in both healthy esophagus and tissues from ESCC patients, correlation matrices were generated. Subsequently, we evaluated whether the detected alterations in expression of the various CHRNs could precede histopathological modifications during the esophageal carcinogenic processes by using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Finally, we evaluated the impact of CHRNA5 and CHRNA7 expression on overall survival by using multivariate analysis. RESULTS CHRNA3, CHRNA5, CHRNA7 and CHRNB4, but not CHRNA1, CHRNA4, CHRNA9 or CHRNA10, were found to be expressed in normal (healthy) esophageal mucosa. In ESCC, CHRNA5 and CHRNA7 were overexpressed as compared with patient-matched surrounding non-tumor mucosa (ESCC-adjacent mucosa; P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0091, respectively). Positive correlations were observed between CHRNA3 and CHRNB4 expression in all samples analyzed. Additionally, CHRNB4 was found to be differentially expressed in the healthy esophagus and the normal-appearing ESCC-adjacent mucosa, allowing for distinguishment between these tissues with a sensitivity of 75.86% and a specificity of 78.95% (P = 0.0002). Finally, CHRNA5 expression was identified as an independent prognostic factor in ESCC; patients with high CHRNA5 expression showed an increased overall survival, in comparison with

  14. The effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine, and antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan, on the spinal cholinergic receptor system in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists produce spinal antinociception via mechanisms involving an increased release of intraspinal acetylcholine. The cholinergic receptor system interacts with several other receptor types, such as alpha2-adrenergic receptors. To fully understand these interactions, the effects...... of various receptor ligands on the cholinergic system must be investigated in detail. This study was initiated to investigate the effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine and the alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan on spinal cholinergic receptors...... in the rat. Spinal microdialysis was used to measure in vivo changes of acetylcholine after administration of the ligands, with or without nicotinic receptor blockade. In addition, in vitro binding properties of the ligands on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors were investigated. It was found that clonidine...

  15. Evidence for dopamine D-2 receptors on cholinergic interneurons in the rat caudate-putamen

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    Dawson, V.L.; Dawson, T.M.; Filloux, F.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    The aziridinium ion of ethylcholine (AF64A) is a neurotoxin that has demonstrated selectivity for cholinergic neurons. Unilateral stereotaxic injection of AF64A into the caudate-putamen of rats, resulted in a decrease in dopamine D-2 receptors as evidenced by a decrease in (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding. Dopamine D-1 receptors, labeled with (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, were unchanged. The efficacy of the lesion was demonstrated by the reduction of Na/sup +/-dependent high affinity choline uptake sites labeled with (/sup 3/H)-hemicholinium-3. These data indicate that a population of D-2 receptors are postsynaptic on cholinergic interneurons within the striatum of rat brain.

  16. Pharmacological identification of cholinergic receptor subtypes on Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Cole A; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; English, Connor; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster heart is a popular model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. Progress has been made in understanding the role of endogenous compounds in regulating cardiac function in this model. It is well characterized that common neurotransmitters act on many peripheral and non-neuronal tissues as they flow through the hemolymph of insects. Many of these neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), have been shown to act directly on the D. melanogaster larval heart. ACh is a primary neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates and at the neuromuscular junctions on skeletal and cardiac tissue. In insects, ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of sensory neurons and is also prominent in the CNS. A full understanding regarding the regulation of the Drosophila cardiac physiology by the cholinergic system remains poorly understood. Here we use semi-intact D. melanogaster larvae to study the pharmacological profile of cholinergic receptor subtypes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), in modulating heart rate (HR). Cholinergic receptor agonists, nicotine and muscarine both increase HR, while nAChR agonist clothianidin exhibits no significant effect when exposed to an open preparation at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In addition, both nAChR and mAChR antagonists increase HR as well but also display capabilities of blocking agonist actions. These results provide evidence that both of these receptor subtypes display functional significance in regulating the larval heart's pacemaker activity.

  17. Cholinergic excitation in mouse primary vs. associative cortex: region-specific magnitude and receptor balance.

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    Tian, Michael K; Bailey, Craig D C; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2014-08-01

    Cholinergic stimulation of the cerebral cortex is essential for tasks requiring attention; however, there is still some debate over which cortical regions are required for such tasks. There is extensive cholinergic innervation of both primary and associative cortices, and transient release of acetylcholine (ACh) is detected in deep layers of the relevant primary and/or associative cortex, depending on the nature of the attention task. Here, we investigated the electrophysiological effects of ACh in layer VI, the deepest layer, of the primary somatosensory cortex, the primary motor cortex, and the associative medial prefrontal cortex. Layer VI pyramidal neurons are a major source of top-down modulation of attention, and we found that the strength and homogeneity of their direct cholinergic excitation was region-specific. On average, neurons in the primary cortical regions showed weaker responses to ACh, mediated by a balance of contributions from both nicotinic and muscarinic ACh receptors. Conversely, neurons in the associative medial prefrontal cortex showed significantly stronger excitation by ACh, mediated predominantly by nicotinic receptors. The greatest diversity of responses to ACh was found in the primary somatosensory cortex, with only a subset of neurons showing nicotinic excitation. In a mouse model with attention deficits only under demanding conditions, cholinergic excitation was preserved in primary cortical regions but not in the associative medial prefrontal cortex. These findings demonstrate that the effect of ACh is not uniform throughout the cortex, and suggest that its ability to enhance attention performance may involve different cellular mechanisms across cortical regions.

  18. Cross-talk between oxidative stress and modifications of cholinergic and glutaminergic receptors in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-zhong GUAN

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, and its pathogenesis is likely to be associated with multiple etiologies and mechanisms in which oxidative stress and deficits of neurotransmitter receptors may play impor-tant roles. It has been indicated that a high level of free radicals can influence the expressions of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), muscarinic receptors (mAChRs), and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, exhibiting disturbances of cellular mem-brane by lipid peroxidation, damages of the protein receptors by protein oxidation, and possible modified gene expressions of these receptors by DNA oxidation. nAChRs have shown an antioxidative effect by a direct or an indirect pathway; mAChR stimulation may generate reactive oxygen species, which might be a physi-ological compensative reaction, or improve oxidative stress; and high stimulation to NMDA receptors can increase the sensitivity of oxidative stress of neurons. This review may provide complemental information" for understanding the correla-tion between oxidative stress and changed cholinergic and glutaminergic recep-tors in AD processing, and for revealing the underlying molecular mechanisms of these factors in the multiple etiologies and pathophysiology of the disorder.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF MUSCARINIC CHOLINERGIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN RAT PROSTATE

    OpenAIRE

    Pontari, M.A.; LUTHIN, G. R.; Braverman, A. S.; Ruggieri, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the muscarinic receptor subtypes in the individual lobes of the rat prostate. Immunoprecipitation was performed on homogenates of these 3 lobes using antibodies to the m1-m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays (RT-PCR) were also performed using primers specific for each of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5). The susceptibility of the receptors to degradation by endogenous prostate proteas...

  20. Orexin receptor activation generates gamma band input to cholinergic and serotonergic arousal system neurons and drives an intrinsic Ca2+-dependent resonance in LDT and PPT cholinergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eIshibashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculopontine (PPT tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4 - 14 Hz and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep and intracortical

  1. Dose-dependent effect of donepezil administration on long-term enhancement of visually evoked potentials and cholinergic receptor overexpression in rat visual cortex.

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    Chamoun, Mira; Groleau, Marianne; Bhat, Menakshi; Vaucher, Elvire

    2016-09-01

    Stimulation of the cholinergic system tightly coupled with periods of visual stimulation boosts the processing of specific visual stimuli via muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in terms of intensity, priority and long-term effect. However, it is not known whether more diffuse pharmacological stimulation with donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is an efficient tool for enhancing visual processing and perception. The goal of the present study was to potentiate cholinergic transmission with donepezil treatment (0.5 and 1mg/kg) during a 2-week visual training to examine the effect on visually evoked potentials and to profile the expression of cholinergic receptor subtypes. The visual training was performed daily, 10min a day, for 2weeks. One week after the last training session, visual evoked potentials were recorded, or the mRNA expression level of muscarinic (M1-5) and nicotinic (α/β) receptors subunits was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The visual stimulation coupled with any of the two doses of donepezil produced significant amplitude enhancement of cortical evoked potentials compared to pre-training values. The enhancement induced by the 1mg/kg dose of donepezil was spread to neighboring spatial frequencies, suggesting a better sensitivity near the visual detection threshold. The M3, M4, M5 and α7 receptors mRNA were upregulated in the visual cortex for the higher dose of donepezil but not the lower one, and the receptors expression was stable in the somatosensory (non-visual control) cortex. Therefore, higher levels of acetylcholine within the cortex sustain the increased intensity of the cortical response and trigger the upregulation of cholinergic receptors.

  2. Differential actions of orexin receptors in brainstem cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons revealed by receptor knockouts: implications for orexinergic signaling in arousal and narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi A Kohlmeier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orexin neuropeptides influence multiple homeostatic functions and play an essential role in the expression of normal sleep-wake behavior. While their two known receptors (OX1 and OX2 are targets for novel pharmacotherapeutics, the actions mediated by each receptor remain largely unexplored. Using brain slices from mice constitutively lacking either receptor, we used whole-cell and Ca2+ imaging methods to delineate the cellular actions of each receptor within cholinergic (laterodorsal tegmental nucleus; LDT and monoaminergic (dorsal raphe; DR and locus coeruleus; LC brainstem nuclei – where orexins promote arousal and suppress REM sleep. In slices from OX2-/- mice, orexin-A (300 nM elicited wild-type responses in LDT, DR and LC neurons consisting of a depolarizing current and augmented voltage-dependent Ca2+ transients. In slices from OX1-/- mice, the depolarizing current was absent in LDT and LC neurons and was attenuated in DR neurons, although Ca2+-transients were still augmented. Since orexin-A produced neither of these actions in slices lacking both receptors, our findings suggest that orexin-mediated depolarization is mediated by both receptors in DR, but is exclusively mediated by OX1 in LDT and LC neurons, even though OX2 is present and OX2 mRNA appears elevated in brainstems from OX1-/- mice. Considering published behavioral data, these findings support a model in which orexin-mediated excitation of mesopontine cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons contributes little to stabilizing spontaneous waking and sleep bouts, but functions in context-dependent arousal and helps restrict muscle atonia to REM sleep. The augmented Ca2± transients mediated by both receptors appeared mediated by influx via L-type Ca2+ channels, which is often linked to transcriptional signaling. This could provide an adaptive signal to compensate for receptor loss or prolonged antagonism and may contribute to the reduced severity of narcolepsy in single receptor

  3. Measurement of functional cholinergic innervation in rat heart with a novel vesamicol receptor ligand

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    Coffeen, Paul R.; Efange, S.M.N.; Haidet, George C.; McKnite, Scott; Langason, Rosemary B.; Khare, A.B.; Pennington, Jennifer; Lurie, Keith G

    1996-10-01

    Regional differences in cholinergic activity in the cardiac conduction system have been difficult to study. We tested the utility of (+)-m-[{sup 125}I]iodobenzyl)trozamicol(+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT), a novel radioligand that binds to the vesamicol receptor located on the synaptic vesicle in presynaptic cholinergic neurons, as a functional marker of cholinergic activity in the conduction system. The (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT was injected intravenously into four rats. Three hours later, the rats were killed and their hearts were frozen. Quantitative autoradiography was performed on 20-micron-thick sections that were subsequently stained for acetylcholinesterase to identify specific conduction-system elements. Marked similarities existed between (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT uptake and acetylcholinesterase-positive regions. Optical densitometric analysis of regional (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT uptake revealed significantly greater (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT binding (nCi/mg) in the atrioventricular node (AVN) and His bundle regions compared with other conduction and contractile elements (AVN: 3.43 {+-} 0.37; His bundle: 2.16 {+-} 0.30; right bundle branch: 0.95 {+-} 0.13; right atrium: 0.68 {+-} 0.05; right ventricle: 0.57 {+-} 0.03; and left ventricle: 0.57 {+-} 0.03; p < 0.05 comparing conduction elements with ventricular muscle). This study demonstrates that (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT binds avidly to cholinergic nerve tissue innervating specific conduction-system elements. Thus, (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT may be a useful functional marker in studies on cholinergic innervation in the cardiac conduction system.

  4. C. elegans dopaminergic D2-like receptors delimit recurrent cholinergic-mediated motor programs during a goal-oriented behavior.

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    Paola Correa

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans male copulation requires coordinated temporal-spatial execution of different motor outputs. During mating, a cloacal circuit consisting of cholinergic sensory-motor neurons and sex muscles maintains the male's position and executes copulatory spicule thrusts at his mate's vulva. However, distinct signaling mechanisms that delimit these behaviors to their proper context are unclear. We found that dopamine (DA signaling directs copulatory spicule insertion attempts to the hermaphrodite vulva by dampening spurious stimulus-independent sex muscle contractions. From pharmacology and genetic analyses, DA antagonizes stimulatory ACh signaling via the D2-like receptors, DOP-2 and DOP-3, and Gα(o/i proteins, GOA-1 and GPA-7. Calcium imaging and optogenetics suggest that heightened DA-expressing ray neuron activities coincide with the cholinergic cloacal ganglia function during spicule insertion attempts. D2-like receptor signaling also attenuates the excitability of additional mating circuits to reduce the duration of mating attempts with unproductive and/or inappropriate partners. This suggests that, during wild-type mating, simultaneous DA-ACh signaling modulates the activity threshold of repetitive motor programs, thus confining the behavior to the proper situational context.

  5. Neuroligin 2 is expressed in synapses established by cholinergic cells in the mouse brain.

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    Virág T Takács

    Full Text Available Neuroligin 2 is a postsynaptic protein that plays a critical role in the maturation and proper function of GABAergic synapses. Previous studies demonstrated that deletion of neuroligin 2 impaired GABAergic synaptic transmission, whereas its overexpression caused increased inhibition, which suggest that its presence strongly influences synaptic function. Interestingly, the overexpressing transgenic mouse line showed increased anxiety-like behavior and other behavioral phenotypes, not easily explained by an otherwise strengthened GABAergic transmission. This suggested that other, non-GABAergic synapses may also express neuroligin 2. Here, we tested the presence of neuroligin 2 at synapses established by cholinergic neurons in the mouse brain using serial electron microscopic sections double labeled for neuroligin 2 and choline acetyltransferase. We found that besides GABAergic synapses, neuroligin 2 is also present in the postsynaptic membrane of cholinergic synapses in all investigated brain areas (including dorsal hippocampus, somatosensory and medial prefrontal cortices, caudate putamen, basolateral amygdala, centrolateral thalamic nucleus, medial septum, vertical- and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca, substantia innominata and ventral pallidum. In the hippocampus, the density of neuroligin 2 labeling was similar in GABAergic and cholinergic synapses. Moreover, several cholinergic contact sites that were strongly labeled with neuroligin 2 did not resemble typical synapses, suggesting that cholinergic axons form more synaptic connections than it was recognized previously. We showed that cholinergic cells themselves also express neuroligin 2 in a subset of their input synapses. These data indicate that mutations in human neuroligin 2 gene and genetic manipulations of neuroligin 2 levels in rodents will potentially cause alterations in the cholinergic system as well, which may also have a profound effect on the functional properties

  6. GABAA receptors are located in cholinergic terminals in the nucleus pontis oralis of the rat: implications for REM sleep control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2014-01-16

    The oral pontine reticular formation (PnO) of rat is one region identified in the brainstem as a rapid eye movement (REM) sleep induction zone. Microinjection of GABA(A) receptor antagonists into PnO induces a long lasting increase in REM sleep, which is similar to that produced by cholinergic agonists. We previously showed that this REM sleep-induction can be completely blocked by a muscarinic antagonist, indicating that the REM sleep-inducing effect of GABA(A) receptor antagonism is dependent upon the local cholinergic system. Consistent with these findings, it has been reported that GABA(A) receptor antagonists microdialyzed into PnO resulted in increased levels of acetylcholine. We hypothesize that GABA(A) receptors located on cholinergic boutons in the PnO are responsible for the REM sleep induction by GABA(A) receptor antagonists through blocking GABA inhibition of acetylcholine release. Cholinergic, varicose axon fibers were studied in the PnO by immunofluorescence and confocal, laser scanning microscopy. Immunoreactive cholinergic boutons were found to be colocalized with GABA(A) receptor subunit protein γ2. This finding implicates a specific subtype and location of GABA(A) receptors in PnO of rat in the control of REM sleep.

  7. Differential effects of selective lesions of cholinergic and dopaminergic neurons on serotonin-type 1 receptors in rat brain

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    Quirion, R.; Richard, J.

    1987-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)-type1 receptor binding sites are discretely distributed in rat brain. High densities of (3H)5-HT1 binding sites are especially located in areas enriched with cholinergic and dopaminergic innervation, such as the substantia innominata/ventral pallidum, striatum, septal nuclei, hippocampus and substantia nigra. The possible association of (3H)5-HT1 binding sites with cholinergic or dopaminergic cell bodies and/or nerve fiber terminals was investigated by selective lesions of the substantia innominata/ventral pallidum-cortical and septohippocampal cholinergic pathways and the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection. (3H)5-HT1 receptor binding sites are possibly located on cholinergic cell bodies in the ventral pallidum-cortical pathway since (3H)5-HT1 binding in the substantia innominata/ventral pallidal area was markedly decreased following kainic acid lesions. Fimbriaectomies markedly decreased (3H)5-HT1 binding in the hippocampus, suggesting the presence of 5-HT1 binding sites on cholinergic nerve fiber terminals in the septohippocampal pathway. Lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection did not modify (3H)5-HT1 binding in the substantia nigra and the striatum, suggesting that 5-HT1 receptors are not closely associated with dopaminergic cell bodies and nerve terminals in this pathway. These results demonstrate differential association between 5-HT1 receptors and cholinergic and dopaminergic innervation in rat brain.

  8. A cholinergic receptor gene (CHRM2) affects event-related oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin A; Porjesz, Bernice; Almasy, Laura; Bierut, Laura; Dick, Danielle; Goate, Alison; Hinrichs, Anthony; Rice, John P; Wang, Jen C; Bauer, Lance O; Crowe, Raymond; Foroud, Tatiana; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kuperman, Samuel; Nurnberger, John; O'Connor, Sean J; Rohrbaugh, John; Schuckit, Marc A; Tischfield, Jay; Edenberg, Howard J; Begleiter, Henri

    2006-09-01

    We report genetic linkage and association findings which implicate the gene encoding the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) in the modulation of a scalp-recorded electrophysiological phenotype. The P3 (P300) response was evoked using a three-stimulus visual oddball paradigm and a phenotype that relates to the energy in the theta band (4-5 Hz) was analyzed. Studies have shown that similar electrophysiological measures represent cognitive correlates of attention, working memory, and response selection; a role has been suggested for the ascending cholinergic pathway in the same functions. The results of our genetic association tests, combined with knowledge regarding the presence of presynaptic cholinergic M2 autoreceptors in the basal forebrain, indicate that the cognitive processes required by the experiment may in part be mediated by inhibitory neural networks. These findings underscore the utility of electrophysiology and neurogenetics in the understanding of cognitive function and the study of brain-related disorders.

  9. Postlesion estradiol treatment increases cortical cholinergic innervations via estrogen receptor-α dependent nonclassical estrogen signaling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszegi, Zsombor; Szego, Éva M; Cheong, Rachel Y; Tolod-Kemp, Emeline; Ábrahám, István M

    2011-09-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) treatment exerts rapid, nonclassical actions via intracellular signal transduction system in basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurons in vivo. Here we examined the effect of E2 treatment on lesioned BFC neurons in ovariectomized mice and the role of E2-induced nonclassical action in this treatment. Mice given an N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) injection into the substantia innominata-nucleus basalis magnocellularis complex (SI-NBM) exhibited cholinergic cell loss in the SI-NBM and ipsilateral cholinergic fiber loss in the cortex. A single injection of E2 after NMDA lesion did not have an effect on cholinergic cell loss in the SI-NBM, but it restored the ipsilateral cholinergic fiber density in the cortex in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The most effective cholinergic fiber restoration was observed with 33 ng/g E2 treatment at 1 h after NMDA lesion. The E2-induced cholinergic fiber restoration was absent in neuron-specific estrogen receptor-α knockout mice in vivo. Selective activation of nonclassical estrogen signaling in vivo by estren induced E2-like restorative actions. Selective blockade of the MAPK or protein kinase A pathway in vivo prevented E2's ability to restore cholinergic fiber loss. Finally, studies in intact female mice revealed an E2-induced restorative effect that was similar to that of E2-treated ovariectomized mice. These observations demonstrate that a single E2 treatment restores the BFC fiber loss in the cortex, regardless of endogenous E2 levels. They also reveal the critical role of nonclassical estrogen signaling via estrogen receptor-α and protein kinase A-MAPK pathways in E2-induced restorative action in the cholinergic system in vivo.

  10. Caffeine elicits c-Fos expression in horizontal diagonal band cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Leah R; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Fadel, Jim R

    2009-12-09

    Caffeine is a widely self-administered psychostimulant with purported neuroprotective and procognitive effects in rodent models of aging. The cholinergic basal forebrain is important for arousal and attention and is implicated in age-related cognitive decline. Accordingly, we determined the effects of caffeine on cholinergic neuron activation in the rat basal forebrain. Young adult (age 2 months) male rats were treated with caffeine (0, 10, or 50 mg/kg) and killed 2 h later. Caffeine significantly increased c-Fos expression in cholinergic neurons of the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca but not other basal forebrain regions such as the medial septum or substantia innominata. The horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca provides cholinergic innervation to the olfactory bulb, suggesting that deficits in this structure may contribute to diminished olfactory function observed in Alzheimer's disease patients. These results suggest that part of the cognitive-enhancing effects of caffeine may be mediated through activation of this part of the cholinergic basal forebrain.

  11. ( sup 3 H)cytisine binding to nicotinic cholinergic receptors in brain

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    Pabreza, L.A.; Dhawan, S.; Kellar, K.J. (Georgetown Univ. School of Medicine, Washington, DC (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Cytisine, a ganglionic agonist, competes with high affinity for brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors labeled by any of several nicotinic {sup 3}H-agonist ligands. Here we have examined the binding of ({sup 3}H)cytisine in rat brain homogenates. ({sup 3}H)Cytisine binds with high affinity (Kd less than 1 nM), and specific binding represented 60-90% of total binding at all concentrations examined up to 15 nM. The nicotinic cholinergic agonists nicotine, acetylcholine, and carbachol compete with high affinity for ({sup 3}H)cytisine binding sites, whereas among nicotinic receptor antagonists only dihydro-beta-erythroidine competes with high affinity (in the nanomolar range). Comparison of binding in several brain regions showed that ({sup 3}H)cytisine binding is higher in the thalamus, striatum, and cortex than in the hippocampus, cerebellum, or hypothalamus. The pharmacology and brain regional distribution of ({sup 3}H)cytisine binding sites are those predicted for neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist recognition sites. The high affinity and low nonspecific binding of ({sup 3}H)cytisine should make it a very useful ligand for studying neuronal nicotinic receptors.

  12. Developmental profile of the aberrant dopamine D2 receptor response in striatal cholinergic interneurons in DYT1 dystonia.

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    Giuseppe Sciamanna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DYT1 dystonia, a severe form of genetically determined human dystonia, exhibits reduced penetrance among carriers and begins usually during adolescence. The reasons for such age dependence and variability remain unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: We characterized the alterations in D2 dopamine receptor (D2R signalling in striatal cholinergic interneurons at different ages in mice overexpressing human mutant torsinA (hMT. An abnormal excitatory response to the D2R agonist quinpirole was recorded at postnatal day 14, consisting of a membrane depolarization coupled to an increase in spiking frequency, and persisted unchanged at 3 and 9 months in hMT mice, compared to mice expressing wild-type human torsinA and non-transgenic mice. This response was blocked by the D2R antagonist sulpiride and depended upon G-proteins, as it was prevented by intrapipette GDP-β-S. Patch-clamp recordings from dissociated interneurons revealed a significant increase in the Cav2.2-mediated current fraction at all ages examined. Consistently, chelation of intracellular calcium abolished the paradoxical response to quinpirole. Finally, no gross morphological changes were observed during development. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that an imbalanced striatal dopaminergic/cholinergic signaling occurs early in DYT1 dystonia and persists along development, representing a susceptibility factor for symptom generation.

  13. In vivo PET imaging of brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottlaender, M.; Valette, H.; Saba, W.; Schollhorn-Peyronneau, M.A.; Dolle, F.; Syrota, A. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system where they modulate a number of CNS functions including neurotransmitter release, cognitive function, anxiety, analgesia and control of cerebral blood flow. In the brain, a major subtype is composed of the {alpha}4{beta}2 subunit combination. Density of this subtype has been shown to be decreased in patients with neuro-degenerative disease such as Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease (AD and PD), and mutated receptors has been described in some familial epilepsy. Thus, in vivo mapping of the nicotinic nAChRs by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are of great interest to monitor the evolution of these pathologies and changes in the neuronal biochemistry induced by therapeutic agents. Recently, a new compound, 3-[2(S)-2-azetidinyl-methoxy]pyridine (A-85380) has been synthesised and labelled with fluorine-18, [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 (Dolle et al., 1999). The [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 has been shown to bind with high affinity t o nAChRs in vitro (Saba et al., 2004), and its toxicity was low and compatible with it s use at tracer dose in human PET studies (Valette, 2002). PET studies in baboons showed that, after in vivo administration of [ {sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 at a tracer dose, the distribution of the radioactivity in the brain reflect the distribution of the < 4R2 nAChRs. Competition and pre-blocking studies, using nicotinic agonists, confirm that the radiotracer binds specifically to the heteromeric nAChRs in the brain (Valette et al., 1999). The in vivo, characteristics of the [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-8538 0 combined with its low toxicity make possible the imaging of the nicotinic receptor s in human by PET (Bottlaender 2003). Studies were performed in healthy non-smoker volunteers to evaluate the brain kinetics of [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 and to assess the quantification of its nAChRs binding in the human brain with PET (Gallezot et a., 2005). The [{sup 18}F

  14. Rabbit forebrain cholinergic system: morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Csaba; Härtig, Wolfgang; Grosche, Jens; Keijser, Jan; Luiten, Paul G M; Seeger, Johannes; Brauer, Kurt; Harkany, Tibor

    2003-06-09

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output pathways are still awaited. Therefore, we performed quantitative choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry to localize major cholinergic nuclei and to determine the number of respective cholinergic neurons in the rabbit forebrain. The density of ChAT-immunoreactive terminals in layer V of distinct neocortical territories and in hippocampal subfields was also measured. Another cholinergic marker, the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), was also employed to identify subsets of cholinergic neurons. Double-immunofluorescence labeling of ChAT and p75(NTR), calbindin D-28k (CB), parvalbumin, calretinin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), tyrosine hydroxylase, or substance P was used to elucidate the neuroanatomical borders of cholinergic nuclei and to analyze the neurochemical complexity of cholinergic cell populations. Cholinergic projection neurons with heterogeneous densities were found in the medial septum, vertical and horizontal diagonal bands of Broca, ventral pallidum, and magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN)/substantia innominata (SI) complex; cholinergic interneurons were observed in the caudate nucleus, putamen, accumbens nucleus, and olfactory tubercule, whereas the globus pallidus was devoid of cholinergic nerve cells. Cholinergic interneurons were frequently present in the hippocampus and to a lesser extent in cerebral cortex. Cholinergic projection neurons, except those localized in SI, abundantly expressed p75(NTR), and a subset of cholinergic neurons in posterior MBN was immunoreactive for CB and nNOS. A strict laminar distribution pattern of cholinergic terminals was recorded both in the cerebral cortex and in CA1-CA3 and dentate gyrus

  15. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons

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    Manfred eOswald

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pauses in the tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs emerge during reward-related learning in response to conditioning of a neutral cue. We have previously reported that augmenting the postsynaptic response to cortical afferents in CINs is coupled to the emergence of a cell-intrinsic afterhyperpolarisation (AHP underlying pauses in tonic activity. Here we investigated in a bihemispheric rat-brain slice preparation the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of excitatory afferents to CINs and the association with changes in the AHP. We found that high frequency stimulation (HFS of commissural corticostriatal afferents from the contralateral hemisphere induced a robust long-term depression (LTD of postsynaptic potentials (PSP in CINs. Depression of the PSP of smaller magnitude and duration was observed in response to HFS of the ipsilateral white matter or cerebral cortex. In Mg2+-free solution HFS induced NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation of the PSP, evident in both the maximal slope and amplitude of the PSP. The increase in maximal slope corroborates previous findings, and was blocked by antagonism of either D1-like dopamine receptors with SCH23390 or D2-like dopamine receptors with sulpiride during HFS in Mg2+-free solution. Potentiation of the slower PSP amplitude component was due to augmentation of the NMDA receptor-mediated potential as this was completely reversed on subsequent application of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5. HFS similarly potentiated NMDA receptor currents isolated by blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors with CNQX. The plasticity-induced increase in the slow PSP component was directly associated with an increase in the subsequent AHP. Thus plasticity of cortical afferent synapses is ideally suited to influence the cue-induced firing dynamics of CINs, particularly through potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission.

  16. Melanocortin 4 receptor activation protects against testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury by triggering the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minutoli, Letteria; Bitto, Alessandra; Squadrito, Francesco; Irrera, Natasha; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Arena, Salvatore; Magno, Carlo; Marini, Herbert; Spaccapelo, Luca; Ottani, Alessandra; Giuliani, Daniela; Romeo, Carmelo; Guarini, Salvatore; Antonuccio, Pietro; Altavilla, Domenica

    2011-10-01

    Melanocortins (MC) trigger a vagus nerve-mediated cholinergic-antiinflammatory pathway projecting to the testis. We tested whether pharmacological activation of brain MC receptors might protect the testis from the damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion. Adult male rats were subjected to 1-h testicular ischemia, followed by 24-h reperfusion [testicular ischemia-reperfusion (TI/R)]. Before TI/R, groups of animals were subjected to bilateral cervical vagotomy, or pretreated with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist chlorisondamine or the selective MC(4) receptor antagonist HS024. Immediately after reperfusion, rats were ip treated with saline or the MC analog [Nle(4),D-Phe(7)]α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (NDP-α-MSH) (340 μg/kg). We evaluated testicular IL-6 and TNF-α by Western blot analysis and organ damage by light microscopy. Some experimental groups were prepared for neural efferent activity recording along the vagus nerve starting 30 min after treatment with NDP-α-MSH or saline, and for a 30-min period. Additional groups of TI/R rats were treated for 30 d with saline, NDP-α-MSH, chlorisondamine plus NDP-α-MSH, or HS024 plus NDP-α-MSH to evaluate spermatogenesis, organ damage, and the apoptosis machinery. After a 24-h reperfusion, in TI/R saline-treated rats, there was an increase in IL-6 and TNF-α expression and a marked damage in both testes. NDP-α-MSH inhibited IL-6 and TNF-α expression, decreased histological damage, and increased neural efferent activity. Furthermore, NDP-α-MSH administration for 30 d greatly improved spermatogenesis, reduced organ damage, and inhibited apoptosis. All positive NDP-α-MSH effects were abrogated by vagotomy, chlorisondamine, or HS024. Our data suggest that selective MC(4) receptor agonists might be therapeutic candidates for the management of testicular torsion.

  17. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H. [and others

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  18. Subcellular redistribution of m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in striatal interneurons in vivo after acute cholinergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, V; Laribi, O; Levey, A I; Bloch, B

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of our work was to investigate how the cholinergic environment influences the targeting and the intracellular trafficking of the muscarinic receptor m2 (m2R) in vivo. To address this question, we have used immunohistochemical approaches at light and electron microscopic levels to detect the m2R in control rats and rats treated with muscarinic receptor agonists. In control animals, m2Rs were located mostly at postsynaptic sites at the plasma membrane of perikarya and dendrites of cholinergic and NPY-somatostatin interneurons as autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, respectively. Presynaptic receptors were also detected in boutons. The m2Rs were usually detected at extrasynaptic sites, but they could be found rarely in association with symmetrical synapses, suggesting that the cholinergic transmission mediated by m2R occurs via synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms. The stimulation of muscarinic receptors with oxotremorine provoked a dramatic alteration of m2R compartmentalization, including endocytosis with a decrease of the density of m2R at the membrane (-63%) and an increase of those associated with endosomes (+86%) in perikarya. The very strong increase of m2R associated with multivesicular bodies (+732%) suggests that oxotremorine activated degradation. The slight increase in the Golgi apparatus (+26%) suggests that the m2R stimulation had an effect on the maturation of m2R. The substance P receptor located at the membrane of the same neurons was unaffected by oxotremorine. Our data demonstrate that cholinergic stimulation dramatically influences the subcellular distribution of m2R in striatal interneurons in vivo. These events may have key roles in controlling abundance and availability of muscarinic receptors via regulation of receptor endocytosis, degradation, and/or neosynthesis. Further, the control of muscarinic receptor trafficking may influence the activity of striatal interneurons, including neurotransmitter release and/or electric activity.

  19. Expression and localization of pChAT as a novel method to study cholinergic innervation of rat adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnasharty, Mohamed A; Sayed-Ahmed, Ahmed

    2014-10-01

    Cholinergic innervation of the rat adrenal gland has been analyzed previously using cholinergic markers including acetylcholinesterase (AChE), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). In the present study, we demonstrate putative cholinergic neurons in the rat adrenal gland using an antibody to pChAT, which is the product of a splice variant of ChAT mRNA that is preferentially localized in peripheral cholinergic nerves. Most of the ganglionic neurons as well as small single sporadic neurons in the adrenal gland were stained intensely for pChAT. The density of pChAT-immunoreactive (IR) fibers was distinct in the adrenal cortex and medulla. AChE-, cChAT- and VAChT-immunoreactivities were also observed in some cells and fibers of the adrenal medulla, while the cortex had few positive nerve fibers. These results indicate that ganglionic neurons of the adrenal medulla and nerve fibers heterogeneously express cholinergic markers, especially pChAT. Furthermore, the innervation of the adrenal gland, cortex and medulla, by some cholinergic fibers provides additional morphological evidence for a significant role of cholinergic mechanisms in adrenal gland functions.

  20. Hook-up of GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α for cholinergic muscarinic receptor-dependent LTD in the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanism underlying muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent LTD (mAChR-LTD in the hippocampus is less studied. In a recent study, a novel mechanism is described. The induction of mAChR-LTD required the activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, and the expression was mediated by AMPA receptor endocytosis via interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α. The hook-up of these proteins may result in the recruitment of leukocyte common antigen-related receptor (LAR, a PTP that is known to be involved in AMPA receptor trafficking. Interestingly, the similar molecular interaction cannot be applied to mGluR-LTD, despite the fact that the same G-protein involved in LTD is activated by both mAChR and mGluR. This discovery provides key molecular insights for cholinergic dependent cognitive function, and mAChR-LTD can serve as a useful cellular model for studying the roles of cholinergic mechanism in learning and memory.

  1. Distinct synaptic properties of perisomatic inhibitory cell types and their different modulation by cholinergic receptor activation in the CA3 region of the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Gergely G; Holderith, Noémi; Gulyás, Attila I; Freund, Tamás F; Hájos, Norbert

    2010-06-01

    Perisomatic inhibition originates from three types of GABAergic interneurons in cortical structures, including parvalbumin-containing fast-spiking basket cells (FSBCs) and axo-axonic cells (AACs), as well as cholecystokinin-expressing regular-spiking basket cells (RSBCs). These interneurons may have significant impact in various cognitive processes, and are subjects of cholinergic modulation. However, it is largely unknown how cholinergic receptor activation modulates the function of perisomatic inhibitory cells. Therefore, we performed paired recordings from anatomically identified perisomatic interneurons and pyramidal cells in the CA3 region of the mouse hippocampus. We determined the basic properties of unitary inhibitory postsynaptic currents (uIPSCs) and found that they differed among cell types, e.g. GABA released from axon endings of AACs evoked uIPSCs with the largest amplitude and with the longest decay measured at room temperature. RSBCs could also release GABA asynchronously, the magnitude of the release increasing with the discharge frequency of the presynaptic interneuron. Cholinergic receptor activation by carbachol significantly decreased the uIPSC amplitude in all three types of cell pairs, but to different extents. M2-type muscarinic receptors were responsible for the reduction in uIPSC amplitudes in FSBC- and AAC-pyramidal cell pairs, while an antagonist of CB(1) cannabinoid receptors recovered the suppression in RSBC-pyramidal cell pairs. In addition, carbachol suppressed or even eliminated the short-term depression of uIPSCs in FSBC- and AAC-pyramidal cell pairs in a frequency-dependent manner. These findings suggest that not only are the basic synaptic properties of perisomatic inhibitory cells distinct, but acetylcholine can differentially control the impact of perisomatic inhibition from different sources.

  2. Involvement of CB1 and CB2 receptors in the modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission in mouse gastric preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Baldassano, Sara; Serio, Rosa

    2007-09-01

    While most of the studies concerning the role of cannabinoids on gastric motility have focused the attention on the gastric emptying in in vivo animal models, there is little information about the cannabinoid peripheral influence in the stomach. In addition, the functional features of CB2 receptors in the gastrointestinal tract have been poorly characterized. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of cannabinoid drugs on the excitatory cholinergic and inhibitory non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmission in mouse isolated gastric preparations. Intraluminal pressure from isolated whole stomach was recorded and mechanical responses induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analyzed in different experimental conditions. EFS (0.5ms duration, supramaximal voltage, in trains of 5s, 2-16Hz) caused a cholinergic contraction, which was abolished by atropine or tetrodotoxin (TTX). The cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55,212-2, the endogenous ligand, anandamide, the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, and the selective CB2 receptor agonists, JWH015 and JWH133, produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the EFS-evoked cholinergic contractions. SR141716A, CB1 receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects induced by WIN 55,212-2, anandamide or ACEA, without affecting those caused by JWH133. AM630, CB2 receptor antagonist, reduced the inhibitory effects induced by WIN 55,212-2, anandamide, JWH015 or JWH133, without affecting those caused by ACEA. The joint application of SR141716A and AM630 was able of fully preventing the WIN 55,212-2 and anandamide actions. The cannabinoid antagonists failed per se to affect the neurally evoked responses. Cannabinoids did not modify the contractions produced by exogenous carbachol. In the presence of atropine and guanethidine (NANC conditions) EFS-induced TTX-sensitive relaxation consisting in an early and rapid component followed by a second slow phase, which were

  3. Low-Affinity Neurotrophin Receptor p75 Promotes the Transduction of Targeted Lentiviral Vectors to Cholinergic Neurons of Rat Basal Forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antyborzec, Inga; O'Leary, Valerie B; Dolly, James O; Ovsepian, Saak V

    2016-10-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) are one of the most affected neuronal types in Alzheimer's disease (AD), with their extensive loss documented at late stages of the pathology. While discriminatory provision of neuroprotective agents and trophic factors to these cells is thought to be of substantial therapeutic potential, the intricate topography and structure of the forebrain cholinergic system imposes a major challenge. To overcome this, we took advantage of the physiological enrichment of BFCNs with a low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) for their targeting by lentiviral vectors within the intact brain of adult rat. Herein, a method is described that affords selective and effective transduction of BFCNs with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter, which combines streptavidin-biotin technology with anti-p75(NTR) antibody-coated lentiviral vectors. Specific GFP expression in cholinergic neurons was attained in the medial septum and nuclei of the diagonal band Broca after a single intraventricular administration of such targeted vectors. Bioelectrical activity of GFP-labeled neurons was proven to be unchanged. Thus, proof of principle is obtained for the utility of the low-affinity p75(NTR) for targeted transduction of vectors to BFCNs in vivo.

  4. Cholinergic neurons of the pelvic autonomic ganglia and uterus of the female rat: distribution of axons and presence of muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papka, R E; Traurig, H H; Schemann, M; Collins, J; Copelin, T; Wilson, K

    1999-05-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) stimulates contraction of the uterus and dilates the uterine arterial supply. Uterine cholinergic nerves arise from the paracervical ganglia and were, in the past, characterized based on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry. However, the histochemical reaction for acetylcholinesterase provides only indirect evidence of acetylcholine location and is a nonspecific marker for cholinergic nerves. The present study: (1) reevaluated cholinergic neurons of the paracervical ganglia, (2) examined the cholinergic innervation of the uterus by using retrograde axonal tracing and antibodies against molecules specific to cholinergic neurons, choline acetyltransferase and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and (3) examined muscarinic receptors in the paracervical ganglia using autoradiography and a radiolabeled agonist. Most ganglionic neurons were choline acetyltransferase- and vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive and were apposed by choline acetyltransferase/vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive terminals. Retrograde tracing showed that some cholinergic neurons projected axons to the uterus. These nerves formed moderately dense plexuses in the myometrium, cervical smooth muscle and microarterial system of the uterine horns and cervix. Finally, the paracervical ganglia contain muscarinic receptors. These results clearly reveal the cholinergic innervation of the uterus and cervix, a source of these nerves, and demonstrate the muscarinic receptor content of the paracervical ganglia. Cholinergic nerves could play significant roles in the control of uterine myometrium and vasculature.

  5. Dorsal raphe nucleus acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission modulates post-ictal antinociception: The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-01-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is a key structure of the endogenous pain inhibitory system. Although the DRN is rich in serotoninergic neurons, cholinergic neurons are also found in that nucleus. Both ictal and inter-ictal states are followed by post-ictal analgesia. The present study investigated the role of cholinergic mechanisms in postictal antinociceptive processes using microinjections of atropine and mecamylamine, muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists, respectively, in the DRN of rats. Intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (at 64mg/kg) caused tonic and tonic-clonic seizures. The convulsive motor reactions were followed by an increase in pain thresholds, a phenomenon known as post-ictal analgesia. Pre-treatment of the DRN with atropine or mecamylamine at 1µg, 3µg and 5µg/0.2µL decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. The present results showed that the post-ictal analgesia was mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the DRN, a structure crucially involved in the neural network that organises post-ictal hypoalgesia.

  6. [Properties of cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on type I vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Kong, Wei-Jia; Xia, Jiao; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Hua-Mao; Guo, Chang-Kai

    2008-06-25

    To confirm the existence of cholinergic receptors on type I vestibular hair cells (VHCs I) of guinea pigs and to study the properties of the cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on VHCs I, electrophysiological responses of isolated VHCs I to external ACh were examined by means of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. The results showed that 7.5% (21/279) VHCs I were found to be sensitive to ACh (10-1000 μmol/L). ACh generated an outward current in a steady, slow, dose-dependent [EC(50) was (63.78±2.31) μmol/L] and voltage-independent manner. In standard extracellular solution, ACh at the concentration of 100 μmol/L triggered a calcium-dependent current of (170±15) pA at holding potential of -50 mV, and the current amplitude could be depressed by extracellularly added calcium-dependent potassium channel antagonist TEA. The time interval for the next complete activation of ACh-sensitive current was no less than 1 min. The ion channels did not shut off even when they were exposed to ACh for an extended period of time (8 min). The results suggest that dose-dependent, calcium-dependent and voltage-independent cholinergic receptors were located on a few of the VHCs I investibular epithelium of guinea pigs. The cholinergic receptors did not show desensitization to ACh. This work reveals the existence of efferent neurotransmitter receptors on VHCs I and helps in understanding the function of vestibular efferent nervous system, and may provide some useful information on guiding the clinical rehabilitative treatment of vertigo.

  7. Research progress of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in tumors%毒蕈碱胆碱受体与肿瘤关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何花; 张淑香

    2015-01-01

    非神经元性胆碱能信号通路与肿瘤关系密切,许多肿瘤细胞表达胆碱能自分泌环。肿瘤细胞自分泌及旁分泌乙酰胆碱,作用于自身或邻近细胞的烟碱胆碱受体及毒蕈碱胆碱受体,调节肿瘤细胞的增殖、血管发生及凋亡。毒蕈碱胆碱受体是 G 蛋白耦联受体,主要有 M1R-M5R 共5个亚型。研究发现毒蕈碱胆碱受体在肺癌、结肠癌、黑色素瘤、乳腺癌、卵巢癌、前列腺癌、胃癌和脑星形细胞瘤等多种恶性肿瘤中均有表达,与肿瘤细胞的增殖、迁移、血管发生、凋亡有密切关系,其中尤以毒蕈碱胆碱受体3最为重要,这为肿瘤的治疗提供了一个新的研究方向。%Non-neuronal cholinergic system is closely related with tumor.Many tumor cells express a cholinergic autocrine loop.Acetylcholine secreted by the tumor or neighboring cells interacts with nicotinic cholinergic receptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors (MRs)expressed on the tumor cells to stimulate tumor cells proliferation,angiogenesis,and apoptosis.MRs are G-protein-coupled receptors and five subtypes have been identified.Researches have found that MRs are expressed in a variety of tumors, such as lung cancer,colon cancer,melanoma,breast cancer,ovarian cancer,prostate cancer,gastric cancer, and brain cancer.M3R is the most important one.This may provide a new direction for the treatment of cancer.

  8. An increase in intracelluar free calcium ions modulated by cholinergic receptors in rat facial nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Da-wei; ZHOU Rui; LI Na; ZHANG Qiu-gui; ZHU Fu-gao

    2009-01-01

    Background Ca2+in the central nervous system plays important roles in brain physiology, including neuronal survival and regeneration in rats with injured facial motoneurons. The present research was to study the modulations of intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations by cholinergic receptors in rat facial nucleus, and the mechanisms of the modulations. Methods The fluorescence intensity of facial nucleus in Fluo-3 AM loaded acute brainstem slices was detected by applying intracellular free Ca2+ measurement technique via confocal laser scanning microscope. The changes of fluorescence intensity of facial nucleus indicate the average changes of intracellular free Ca2+ levels of the neurons. Results Acetylcholine was effective at increasing the fluorescence intensity of facial nucleus. Muscarine chlorlde induced a marked increase of fluorescence intensity in a concentration dependent fashion. The enhancement of fluorescence intensity by muscarine chloride was significantly reduced by thapsigargin (depletor of intracellular Ca2+ store; P0.05). And the increase of fluorescence intensity was also significantly inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 subtype selective antagonist; P0.05).Conclusions The data provide the evidence that muscarinic receptors may induce the increase of intracellular free Ca2+ levels through the Ca2+ release of intracellular Ca2+ stores, in a manner related to M1 and M3 subtypes of muscarinic receptors in rat facial nucleus. Nicotine may increase intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations via the influx of extracellular Ca2+ mainly across L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, in a manner related to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic receptors.

  9. Identification of cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons in the pons expressing phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein as a function of rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S; Siwek, D F; Stack, E C

    2009-09-29

    Recent studies have shown that in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT), increased neuronal activity and kainate receptor-mediated activation of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA) are important physiological and molecular steps for the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In the present study performed on rats, phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) immunostaining was used as a marker for increased intracellular PKA activation and as a reflection of increased neuronal activity. To identify whether activated cells were either cholinergic or noncholinergic, the PPT and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) cells were immunostained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in combination with pCREB or c-Fos. The results demonstrated that during high rapid eye movement sleep (HR, approximately 27%), significantly higher numbers of cells expressed pCREB and c-Fos in the PPT, of which 95% of pCREB-expressing cells were ChAT-positive. With HR, the numbers of pCREB-positive cells were also significantly higher in the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF), pontine reticular nucleus oral (PnO), and dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) but very few in the locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Conversely, with low rapid eye movement sleep (LR, approximately 2%), the numbers of pCREB expressing cells were very few in the PPT, mPRF, PnO, and SubCD but significantly higher in the LC and DRN. The results of regression analyses revealed significant positive relationships between the total percentages of REM sleep and numbers of ChAT+/pCREB+ (Rsqr=0.98) cells in the PPT and pCREB+ cells in the mPRF (Rsqr=0.88), PnO (Rsqr=0.87), and SubCD (Rsqr=0.84); whereas significantly negative relationships were associated with the pCREB+ cells in the LC (Rsqr=0.70) and DRN (Rsqr=0.60). These results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that during REM sleep, the PPT cholinergic neurons are active, whereas the LC and DRN neurons are

  10. Brain region-specific alterations in the gene expression of cytokines, immune cell markers and cholinergic system components during peripheral endotoxin-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Harold A; Dancho, Meghan; Regnier-Golanov, Angelique; Nasim, Mansoor; Ochani, Mahendar; Olofsson, Peder S; Ahmed, Mohamed; Miller, Edmund J; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Golanov, Eugene; Metz, Christine N; Tracey, Kevin J; Pavlov, Valentin A

    2015-03-11

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by excessive peripheral immune responses are associated with diverse alterations in brain function, and brain-derived neural pathways regulate peripheral inflammation. Important aspects of this bidirectional peripheral immune-brain communication, including the impact of peripheral inflammation on brain region-specific cytokine responses, and brain cholinergic signaling (which plays a role in controlling peripheral cytokine levels), remain unclear. To provide insight, we studied gene expression of cytokines, immune cell markers and brain cholinergic system components in the cortex, cerebellum, brainstem, hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum and thalamus in mice after an intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide injection. Endotoxemia was accompanied by elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and other cytokines and brain region-specific increases in Il1b (the highest increase, relative to basal level, was in cortex; the lowest increase was in cerebellum) and Il6 (highest increase in cerebellum; lowest increase in striatum) mRNA expression. Gene expression of brain Gfap (astrocyte marker) was also differentially increased. However, Iba1 (microglia marker) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex, hippocampus and other brain regions in parallel with morphological changes, indicating microglia activation. Brain choline acetyltransferase (Chat ) mRNA expression was decreased in the striatum, acetylcholinesterase (Ache) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex and increased in the hippocampus, and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (Chrm1) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex and the brainstem. These results reveal a previously unrecognized regional specificity in brain immunoregulatory and cholinergic system gene expression in the context of peripheral inflammation and are of interest for designing future antiinflammatory approaches.

  11. Ultrastructural localization of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in rat brain cortical capillaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, PGM; deJong, GI; VanderZee, EA; vanDijken, H; Dijken, H. van

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation of the cerebrovasculature is known to regulate vascular tone, perfusion rate and permeability of the microvascular wall. Notably the cholinergic innervation of cerebral capillaries is of interest since these capillaries form the blood-brain barrier. Although there is a genera

  12. Association of m1 and m2 muscarinic receptor proteins with asymmetric synapses in the primate cerebral cortex: morphological evidence for cholinergic modulation of excitatory neurotransmission.

    OpenAIRE

    Mrzljak, L; Levey, A I; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic m1 receptors traditionally are considered to be postsynaptic to cholinergic fibers, while m2 receptors are largely presynaptic receptors associated with axons. We have examined the distribution of these receptor proteins in the monkey cerebral cortex and obtained results that are at odds with this expectation. Using immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies to recombinant m1 and m2 muscarinic receptor proteins, we have demonstrated that both m1 and m2 receptors are prominently ...

  13. INTRAHIPPOCAMPAL ADMINISTRATION OF IBOTENIC ACID INDUCED CHOLINERGIC DYSFUNCTION via NR2A/NR2B EXPRESSION: IMPLICATIONS OF RESVERATROL AGAINST ALZHEIMER DISEASE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennakesavan eKarthick

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although several drugs revealed moderate amelioration of symptoms, none of them have sufficient potency to prevent or reverse the progression towards Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathology. Resveratrol (RSV, a polyphenolic compound has shown an outstanding therapeutic effect on a broad spectrum of diseases like age-associated neurodegeneration, inflammation etc. The present study was thus conducted to assess the therapeutic efficacy of RSV in ameliorating the deleterious effects of Ibotenic acid (IBO in male Wistar rats. Stereotactic intrahippocampal administration of IBO (5µg/µl lesioned rats impairs cholinergic transmission, learning and memory performance that is rather related to AD and thus chosen as a suitable model to understand the drug efficacy in preventing AD pathophysiology. Since IBO is an agonist of glutamate, it is expected to exhibit an excitotoxic effect by altering glutamatergic receptors like NMDA receptor. The current study displayed significant alterations in the mRNA expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors, and further it is surprising to note that cholinergic receptors decreased in expression particularly α7-nAChR with increased m1AChR. RSV administration (20mg/kg body weight, i.p significantly reduced these changes in IBO induced rats. Glutamatergic and cholinergic receptor alterations were associated with significant changes in the behavioral parameters of rats induced by IBO. While RSV improved spatial learning performance, attenuated immobility and improvised open field activity in IBO induced rats. NR2B activation in the present study might mediate cell death through oxidative stress that form the basis of abnormal behavioral pattern in IBO induced rats. Interestingly, RSV that could efficiently encounter oxidative stress have significantly decreased stress markers viz., nitrite, PCO, and MDA levels by enhancing antioxidant status. Histopathological analysis displayed significant reduction in the

  14. Intrahippocampal Administration of Ibotenic Acid Induced Cholinergic Dysfunction via NR2A/NR2B Expression: Implications of Resveratrol against Alzheimer Disease Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, Chennakesavan; Periyasamy, Sabapathy; Jayachandran, Kesavan S; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy

    2016-01-01

    Although several drugs revealed moderate amelioration of symptoms, none of them have sufficient potency to prevent or reverse the progression toward Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenolic compound has shown an outstanding therapeutic effect on a broad spectrum of diseases like age-associated neurodegeneration, inflammation etc. The present study was thus conducted to assess the therapeutic efficacy of RSV in ameliorating the deleterious effects of Ibotenic acid (IBO) in male Wistar rats. Stereotactic intrahippocampal administration of IBO (5 μg/μl) lesioned rats impairs cholinergic transmission, learning and memory performance that is rather related to AD and thus chosen as a suitable model to understand the drug efficacy in preventing AD pathophysiology. Since IBO is an agonist of glutamate, it is expected to exhibit an excitotoxic effect by altering glutamatergic receptors like NMDA receptor. The current study displayed significant alterations in the mRNA expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors, and further it is surprising to note that cholinergic receptors decreased in expression particularly α7-nAChR with increased m1AChR. RSV administration (20 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) significantly reduced these changes in IBO induced rats. Glutamatergic and cholinergic receptor alterations were associated with significant changes in the behavioral parameters of rats induced by IBO. While RSV improved spatial learning performance, attenuated immobility, and improvised open field activity in IBO induced rats. NR2B activation in the present study might mediate cell death through oxidative stress that form the basis of abnormal behavioral pattern in IBO induced rats. Interestingly, RSV that could efficiently encounter oxidative stress have significantly decreased stress markers viz., nitrite, PCO, and MDA levels by enhancing antioxidant status. Histopathological analysis displayed significant reduction in the hippocampal

  15. Macromolecular Instabilities and Dynamical Coding in Brain Enzymes, Polypeptide Ligands, Polypeptide and Cholinergic Receptors, and Sodium and Cholinergic Channel Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    potency of the analog. That is our theorl as to why the salmon is a stronger calcitonin than man in man. Current Work Involving Cholirnergic Receptor...turned to the problem of designing a calcitonin molecule. The large naturally occuring calcitonin family is examined Yith perhaps the nicest

  16. Immunohistochemical localisation of cholinergic muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1r) in the guinea pig and human enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A M; Hutson, J M; Southwell, B R

    2007-07-01

    Little is known regarding the location of cholinergic muscarinic receptor 1 (M1r) in the ENS, even though physiological data suggest that M1rs are central to cholinergic neurotransmission. This study localised M1rs in the ENS of the guinea pig ileum and human colon using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR in human colon. Double labelling using antibodies against neurochemical markers was used to identify neuron subytpes bearing M1r. M1r immunoreactivity (IR) was present on neurons in the myenteric and submucosal ganglia. The two antibodies gave similar M1r-IR patterns and M1r-IR was abolished upon antibody preabsorption. M1r-IR was present on cholinergic and nNOS-IR nerve cell bodies in both guinea pig and human myenteric neurons. Presynaptic M1r-IR was present on NOS-IR and VAChT-IR nerve fibres in the circular muscle in the human colon. In the submucosal ganglia, M1r-IR was present on a population of neurons that contained cChAT-IR, but did not contain NPY-IR or calretinin-IR. M1r-IR was present on endothelial cells of blood vessels in the submucosal plexus. The localisation of M1r-IR in the guinea pig and human ENS shown in this study agrees with physiological studies. M1r-IR in cholinergic and nitrergic neurons and nerve fibres indicate that M1rs have a role in both cholinergic and nitrergic transmission. M1r-IR present in submucosal neurons suggests a role in mediating acetylcholine's effect on submucosal sensory and secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. M1r-IR present on blood vessel endothelial cells suggests that M1rs may also mediate acetylcholine's direct effect on vasoactivation.

  17. Research on Autoantibodies Against Myocardial β1-adrenergic and M2 Cholinergic Receptors in Patients With Chronic Keshan Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Zhenhua; Niu Xiaolin; Ren Fuxian

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To explore the relationship between serum autoantibodies against myocardial β1-adrenergic, M2-cholinergic receptors and chronic Keshan disease (CKD). Methods The second extracellular loops of β1 and M2 receptors on human cardiomyocytes were used as the antigens.Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to determine serum autoantibodies against myocardial β1 and M2 receptors in 32 CKD patients. 31 healthy subjects from endemic area were selected as the control. Results Positive rate of autoantibodies against myocardial β1 adrenergic (51.3%, 17/32) and M2cholinergic (56.3% , 18/32) receptors weresignificantly higher than those in the control (9.7%, 3/31; 12.9%, 4/31) (both P < 0.01). Both positive rate and titers of above autoantibodies in NYHA Ⅱ~Ⅲ CKD patients were significantly higher than those in NYHA Ⅳ , demonstrating an apparently positive correlation between serum antibodies against myocardial β1 and M2 receptors (r=0.95). Conclusions Autoantibodies against myocardial β1 and M2 receptors were found in sera of CKD patients; distribution of positive rate and titers of the autoantibodies in CKD patients in various NYHA classes of cardiac function are significantly different.

  18. Widespread expression of BDNF but not NT3 by target areas of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, H.S.; Hains, J.M.; Laramee, G.R.; Rosenthal, A.; Winslow, J.W. (Genentech, San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-10-12

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT3) are homologs of the well-known neurotrophic factor nerve growth factor. The three members of this family display distinct patterns of target specificity. To examine the distribution in brain of messenger RNA for these molecules, in situ hybridization was performed. Cells hybridizing intensely to antisense BDNF probe were located throughout the major targets of the rat basal forebrain cholinergic system, that is, the hippocampus, amygdala, and neocortex. Strongly hybridizing cells were also observed in structures associated with the olfactory system. The distribution of NT3 mRNA in forebrain was much more limited. Within the hippocampus, labeled cells were restricted to CA2, the most medial portion of CA1, and the dentate gyrus. In human hippocampus, cells expressing BDNF and mRNA are distributed in a fashion similar to that observed in the rat. These findings point to both basal forebrain cholinergic cells and olfactory pathways as potential central targets for BDNF.

  19. Anti-allergic role of cholinergic neuronal pathway via α7 nicotinic ACh receptors on mucosal mast cells in a murine food allergy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yamamoto

    Full Text Available The prevalence of food allergy (FA has increased in developed countries over the past few decades. However, no effective drug therapies are currently available. Therefore, we investigated cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway as a regulatory system to ameliorate disrupted mucosal immune homeostasis in the gut based on the pathophysiological elucidation of mucosal mast cells (MMCs in a murine FA model. BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin received repeated oral ovalbumin for the development of FA. FA mice developed severe allergic diarrhea and exhibited enhanced type 2 helper T (Th2 cell immune responses in both systemic immunity and mucosal immunity, along with MMCs hyperplasia in the colon. MMCs were localized primarily in the strategic position of the mucosal epithelium. Furthermore, the allergic symptoms did not develop in p85α disrupted phosphoinositide-3 kinase-deficient mice that lacked mast cells in the gut. Vagal stimulation by 2-deoxy-D-glucose and drug treatment with nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR agonists (nicotine and α7 nAChR agonist GTS-21 alleviated the allergic symptoms in the FA mice. Nicotine treatment suppressed MMCs hyperplasia, enhanced MPO and upregulated mRNA expression of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in the FA mice colon. MMCs, which are negatively regulated by α7 nAChRs, were often located in close proximity to cholinergic CGRP-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the FA mice colon. The present results reveal that the cholinergic neuroimmune interaction via α7 nAChRs on MMCs is largely involved in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis and can be a target for a new therapy against mucosal immune diseases with homeostatic disturbances such as FA.

  20. Muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists differentially mediate acquisition of fructose-conditioned flavor preference and quinine-conditioned flavor avoidance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, Francis M; Olsson, Kerstin; Vig, Vishal; Yenko, Ira; Pagirsky, Jeremy; Kohen, Ilanna; Aminov, Alon; Dindyal, Trisha; Bodnar, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Rats display both conditioned flavor preference (CFP) for fructose, and conditioned flavor avoidance (CFA) following sweet adulteration with quinine. Previous pharmacological analyses revealed that fructose-CFP expression was significantly reduced by dopamine (DA) D1 or D2 antagonists, but not NMDA or opioid antagonists. Fructose-CFP acquisition was significantly reduced by DA D1, DA D2 or NMDA antagonists, but not opioid antagonists. Quinine-CFA acquisition was significantly enhanced and prolonged by DA D1, NMDA or opioid, but not DA D2 antagonists. Cholinergic interneurons and projections interact with DA systems in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Further, both muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor signaling have been implicated in sweet intake and development of food-related preferences. Therefore, the present study examined whether systemic administration of muscarinic (scopolamine: SCOP) or nicotinic (mecamylamine: MEC) cholinergic receptor antagonists mediated fructose-CFP expression, fructose-CFP acquisition and quinine-CFA acquisition. For fructose-CFP expression, rats were trained over 10 sessions with a CS+ flavor in 8% fructose and 0.2% saccharin and a CS- flavor in 0.2% saccharin. Two-bottle choice tests with CS+ and CS- flavors mixed in 0.2% saccharin occurred following vehicle, SCOP (0.1-10mg/kg) and MEC (1-8mg/kg). For fructose-CFP acquisition, six groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg), MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) or a limited intake vehicle control 0.5h prior to 10 CS+ and CS- training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS+ and CS- choice tests in 0.2% saccharin. For quinine-CFA acquisition, five groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg) or MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) 0.5h prior to 8 one-bottle CS- (8% fructose+0.2% saccharin: FS) and CS+ (fructose+saccharin+quinine (0.030%: FSQ) training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS- and CS+ choice tests in fructose-saccharin solutions. Fructose-CFP expression was

  1. Effect of cholinergic ligands on the lipids of acetylcholine receptor-rich membrane preparations from Torpedo californica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Carrion, M.; Raftery, M.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Sator, V.

    1976-01-01

    Ion permeation, triggered by ligand-receptor interaction, is associated with the primary events of membrane depolarization at the neuromuscular junction and synaptic connections. To explore the possible sites of ion permeation, the long-lived fluorescent probe pyrene (fluorescence lifetime approximately 400 nsec) has been inserted into the lipid phase of acetylcholine receptor-rich membrane (AcChR-M) preparations from Torpedo californica. The pyrene probe is susceptible to both fluidity and permeability changes in the lipid bilayer. These changes are detected by variations in the rate of decay of the excited singlet state of pyrene after pulsation with a 10-nsec ruby laser flash. Variations of these lifetimes in the membrane preparations alone or in the presence of quenchers show that binding of cholinergic agonists and antagonists, neurotoxins, and local anesthetics to AcChR-M produces varying effects on the properties of the pyrene probe in the lipid phase. It is concluded that binding of cholinergic ligands to the receptor does not significantly alter the fluidity or permeability of the lipids in the bilayer in contact with pyrene. On the other hand, local anesthetics do affect these properties.

  2. Cognitive disorder and changes in cholinergic receptors, N-methyl-D aspartate receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor following brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiliang Zhao; Dezhi Kang; Yuanxiang Lin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Learning and memory damage is one of the most permanent and the severest symptoms of traumatic brain injury; it can seriously influence the normal life and work of patients. Some research has demonstrated that cognitive disorder is closely related to nicotine cholinergic receptors, N-methyl-D aspartate receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. OBJECTIVE: To summarize the cognitive disorder and changes in nicotine cholinergic receptors, N-methyl-D aspartate receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor following brain injury. RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: A computer-based online search was conducted in PUBMED for English language publications containing the key words "brain injured, cognitive handicap, acetylcholine, N-methyl-D aspartate receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule, brain-derived neurotrophic factor" from January 2000 to December 2007. There were 44 papers in total. Inclusion criteria: ① articles about changes in nicotine cholinergic receptors, N-methyl-D aspartate receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor following brain injury; ② articles in the same researching circle published in authoritative journals or recently published. Exclusion criteria: duplicated articles.LITERATURE EVALUATION: References were mainly derived from research on changes in these four factors following brain injury. The 20 included papers were clinical or basic experimental studies. DATA SYNTHESIS: After craniocerebral injury, changes in these four factors in brain were similar to those during recovery from cognitive disorder, to a certain degree. Some data have indicated that activation of nicotine cholinergic receptors, N-methyl-D aspartate receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor could greatly improve cognitive disorder following brain injury. However, there are still a lot of questions remaining; for example, how do these

  3. Nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are recruited by acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission within the locus coeruleus during the organisation of post-ictal antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-10-01

    Post-ictal antinociception is characterised by an increase in the nociceptive threshold that accompanies tonic and tonic-clonic seizures (TCS). The locus coeruleus (LC) receives profuse cholinergic inputs from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. Different concentrations (1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL) of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist atropine and the nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonist mecamylamine were microinjected into the LC of Wistar rats to investigate the role of cholinergic mechanisms in the severity of TCS and the post-ictal antinociceptive response. Five minutes later, TCS were induced by systemic administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (64mg/kg). Seizures were recorded inside the open field apparatus for an average of 10min. Immediately after seizures, the nociceptive threshold was recorded for 130min using the tail-flick test. Pre-treatment of the LC with 1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL concentrations of both atropine and mecamylamine did not cause a significant effect on seizure severity. However, the same treatments decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. In addition, mecamylamine caused an earlier decrease in the post-ictal antinociception compared to atropine. These results suggest that muscarinic and mainly nicotinic cholinergic receptors of the LC are recruited to organise tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception.

  4. The Regulatory Action of Radix Astragali on M-Cholinergic Receptor of the Brain of Senile Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The changes in density of M-cholinergic receptors in different areas of senile rats and the regulatory action of Huang Qi (黄芪Radix Astragali, a drug for warming yang and replenishing qi) were observed by autoradiography. The results showed that the gray scale displayed in brain sections was clear and mainly distributed in the cortex, hippocampus and striate body, while that due to nonspecific combination was negligible. The gray scale in the cortex, hippocampus and striate body of the experimental group was markedly lower than that in the young control rats, decreased respectively by 24.87%, 14.12% and 12.76% (all P<0.05); but it was obviously higher than those in the senile control rats, increased respectively by 24.15%, 14.38% and 13.47% (P<0.05). The data indicate that Huang Qi (黄芪Radix Astragali) may up-regulate the decreased density of M-cholinergic receptors in the brain of senile rats.

  5. Comparative analyses of the cholinergic locus of ChAT and VAChT and its expression in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzai, Kota; Adachi, Takeshi; Izumi, Susumu

    2015-07-01

    The cholinergic locus, which encodes choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), is specifically expressed in cholinergic neurons, maintaining the cholinergic phenotype. The organization of the locus is conserved in Bilateria. Here we examined the structure of cholinergic locus and cDNA coding for ChAT and VAChT in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The B. mori ChAT (BmChAT) cDNA encodes a deduced polypeptide including a putative choline/carnitine O-acyltransferase domain and a conserved His residue required for catalysis. The B. mori VAChT (BmVAChT) cDNA encodes a polypeptide including a putative major facilitator superfamily domain and 10 putative transmembrane domains. BmChAT and BmVAChT cDNAs share the 5'-region corresponding to the first and second exon of cholinergic locus. Polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that BmChAT and BmVAChT mRNAs were specifically expressed in the brain and segmental ganglia. The expression of BmChAT was detected 3 days after oviposition. The expression level was almost constant during the larval stage, decreased in the early pupal stage, and increased toward eclosion. The average ratios of BmChAT mRNA to BmVAChT mRNA in brain-subesophageal ganglion complexes were 0.54±0.10 in the larvae and 1.92±0.11 in adults. In addition, we examined promoter activity of the cholinergic locus and localization of cholinergic neurons, using a baculovirus-mediated gene transfer system. The promoter sequence, located 2kb upstream from the start of transcription, was essential for cholinergic neuron-specific gene õexpression. Cholinergic neurons were found in several regions of the brain and segmental ganglia in the larvae and pharate adults.

  6. Medial-to-lateral gradient of neostriatal NGF receptors: relationship to cholinergic neurons and NGF-like immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altar, C A; Dugich-Djordjevic, M; Armanini, M; Bakhit, C

    1991-03-01

    High-affinity binding sites for recombinant human NGF (rhNGF) were studied in the caudate-putamen of the adult rat and rabbit. Displaceable 125I-rhNGF binding sites were densely distributed throughout the caudate-putamen and were 2-3-fold more prevalant in the ventrolateral and lateral than in the medial caudate-putamen. The amount of nondisplaceable binding did not vary throughout the caudate-putamen. The medial-to-lateral receptor gradient was correlated (r = +0.99) with a 2-3-fold medial-to-lateral increase in ChAT activity. In contrast, NGF-like immunoreactivity (NGF-LI) was prevalent but uniformly distributed in the caudate-putamen. Lesions of intrinsic cholinergic neurons by quinolinic acid produced extensive gliosis in the medial, central, and lateral caudate-putamen, yet 125I-rhNGF binding was decreased in each of these regions. The activity of ChAT and 125I-rhNGF binding throughout the caudate-putamen were each decreased by 40% following quinolinic acid. Binding was not changed after 70-77% dopamine nerve terminal depletions induced by 6-hydroxydopamine, demonstrating a nonglial, nondopaminergic locus for striatal NGF binding sites. The cholinergiclike topography of NGF binding sites throughout the intact caudate-putamen, the parallel decreases of cholinergic neurons and NGF binding sites following intrinsic neuronal loss, and the uniform neostriatal gradient of NGF-LI are consistent with the trophic role of endogenous NGF for cholinergic interneurons of the caudate-putamen.

  7. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion - Relation To D Cell/Somatostatin -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Takeuchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1~M5, and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1~M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT and M1-M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 µg/kg was given s.c. to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analogue was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analogue, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect

  8. Cholinesterases: structure of the active site and mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers on the rate of interaction with ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antokhin, A M; Gainullina, E T; Taranchenko, V F [Federal State Agency ' 27 Scientific Centre of Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation' (Russian Federation); Ryzhikov, S B; Yavaeva, D K [Department of Physics, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-19

    Modern views on the structure of cholinesterase active sites and the mechanism of their interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors are considered. The attention is focused on the mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers, acetylcholine antagonists, on the rate of interaction of acetylcholine esterase with organophosphorus inhibitors.

  9. α2-containing GABAA receptors expressed in hippocampal region CA3 control fast network oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heistek, Tim S; Ruiperez-Alonso, Marta; Timmerman, A Jaap; Brussaard, Arjen B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2013-02-15

    GABA(A) receptors are critically involved in hippocampal oscillations. GABA(A) receptor α1 and α2 subunits are differentially expressed throughout the hippocampal circuitry and thereby may have distinct contributions to oscillations. It is unknown which GABA(A) receptor α subunit controls hippocampal oscillations and where these receptors are expressed. To address these questions we used transgenic mice expressing GABA(A) receptor α1 and/or α2 subunits with point mutations (H101R) that render these receptors insensitive to allosteric modulation at the benzodiazepine binding site, and tested how increased or decreased function of α subunits affects hippocampal oscillations. Positive allosteric modulation by zolpidem prolonged decay kinetics of hippocampal GABAergic synaptic transmission and reduced the frequency of cholinergically induced oscillations. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors in CA3 altered oscillation frequency in CA1, while modulation of GABA receptors in CA1 did not affect oscillations. In mice having a point mutation (H101R) at the GABA(A) receptor α2 subunit, zolpidem effects on cholinergically induced oscillations were strongly reduced compared to wild-type animals, while zolpidem modulation was still present in mice with the H101R mutation at the α1 subunit. Furthermore, genetic knockout of α2 subunits strongly reduced oscillations, whereas knockout of α1 subunits had no effect. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors was strongly reduced in unitary connections between fast spiking interneurons and pyramidal neurons in CA3 of α2H101R mice, but not of α1H101R mice, suggesting that fast spiking interneuron to pyramidal neuron synapses in CA3 contain α2 subunits. These findings suggest that α2-containing GABA(A) receptors expressed in the CA3 region provide the inhibition that controls hippocampal rhythm during cholinergically induced oscillations.

  10. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. (Universite de Bordeaux II (France))

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  11. Cholinergic dermographism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayou, S C; Kobza Black, A; Eady, R A; Greaves, M W

    1986-09-01

    We report a patient with cholinergic urticaria in whom stroking the skin produced a band of erythema studded with the small weals characteristics of cholinergic urticaria. This response was suppressed by pre-treatment with topical scopolamine. Light and electron microscopy of the weal showed mast cell degranulation and a moderate mononuclear cell infiltrate.

  12. Cholinergic nicotinic receptor genes implicated in a nicotine dependence association study targeting 348 candidate genes with 3713 SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, Scott F; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Saccone, Nancy L; Chase, Gary A; Konvicka, Karel; Madden, Pamela A F; Breslau, Naomi; Johnson, Eric O; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Pomerleau, Ovide; Swan, Gary E; Goate, Alison M; Rutter, Joni; Bertelsen, Sarah; Fox, Louis; Fugman, Douglas; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Wang, Jen C; Ballinger, Dennis G; Rice, John P; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2007-01-01

    Nicotine dependence is one of the world's leading causes of preventable death. To discover genetic variants that influence risk for nicotine dependence, we targeted over 300 candidate genes and analyzed 3713 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1050 cases and 879 controls. The Fagerström test for nicotine dependence (FTND) was used to assess dependence, in which cases were required to have an FTND of 4 or more. The control criterion was strict: control subjects must have smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetimes and had an FTND of 0 during the heaviest period of smoking. After correcting for multiple testing by controlling the false discovery rate, several cholinergic nicotinic receptor genes dominated the top signals. The strongest association was from an SNP representing CHRNB3, the beta3 nicotinic receptor subunit gene (P = 9.4 x 10(-5)). Biologically, the most compelling evidence for a risk variant came from a non-synonymous SNP in the alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunit gene CHRNA5 (P = 6.4 x 10(-4)). This SNP exhibited evidence of a recessive mode of inheritance, resulting in individuals having a 2-fold increase in risk of developing nicotine dependence once exposed to cigarette smoking. Other genes among the top signals were KCNJ6 and GABRA4. This study represents one of the most powerful and extensive studies of nicotine dependence to date and has found novel risk loci that require confirmation by replication studies.

  13. Hippocampal α7-nicotinic cholinergic receptors modulate memory reconsolidation: a potential strategy for recovery from amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, M G; Boccia, M M; Krawczyk, M C; Baratti, C M

    2013-11-01

    When subjects are exposed to new learning experiences, the novel information could be acquired and eventually stored through memory consolidation process. The exposure of mice to a novel experience (a hole-board) after being trained in an inhibitory avoidance apparatus is followed by impaired performance of the avoidance memory in subsequent tests. The same impairing effect is produced when mice are exposed to the novel environment after the reactivation of the avoidance memory. This interfering effect is due to impaired consolidation or reconsolidation of the avoidance memory. The administration of the α7-nicotinic receptor agonist choline (Ch) in the dorsal hippocampus (0.8 μg/hippocampus) immediately after the inhibitory avoidance memory reactivation, allowed memory recovery. This effect of Ch was time-dependent, and retention performance was not affected in drug-treated mice that were not subjected to memory reactivation, suggesting that the effects on performance are not due to non-specific effects of the drug. The effects of Ch also depended on the age of the reactivated memory. Altogether, our results suggest that Ch exerts its effects by modulating memory reconsolidation, and that the memory impairment induced by new learning is a memory expression failure and not a storage deficit. Therefore, reconsolidation, among other functions, might serve to change whether a memory will be expressed in later tests. Summarizing, our results open new avenues about the behavioral significance and the physiological functions of memory reconsolidation, providing new strategies for recovering memories from some types of amnesia.

  14. Fundamental study on nuclear medicine imaging of cholinergic innervation in the brain; Changes of neurotransmitter and receptor in animal model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kinuya, Keiko; Sumiya, Hisashi; Hisada, Kinichi (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Tsuji, Shiro; Terada, Hitoshi; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hirofumi

    1990-10-01

    A fundamental study was performed on the nuclear medicine imaging of cholinergic innervation in the brain. In a cholinergic denervation model prepared by producing an unilateral basal forebrain lesion in the rat, which is reported to be one of animal models of Alzheimer' disease, quantitative determination of acetylcholine in parietal cortices revealed statistically significant 31% decrease on an average in the ipsilateral side relative to the contralateral side to the lesion. In vitro receptor autoradiography showed no significant differences in total, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2} muscarinic acetylcholine receptors between the ipsilateral and contralateral cortices to the lesion. Simultaneous mapping of presynaptic cholinergic innervation using {sup 3}H-2-(4-phenylpiperidino) cyclohexanol (AH5183) demonstrated significant 14% decrease of AH5183 binding on an average in the ipsilateral relative to the contralateral fronto-parieto-temporal cortices to the lesion. These results suggest that AH5183 is a promising ligand for mapping cholinergic innervation in nuclear medicine imaging. (author).

  15. Effects of beta-amyloid protein on M1 and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band complex of the rat: relationship with cholinergic, GABAergic, and calcium-binding protein perikarya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Iván; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia

    2007-06-01

    Cortical cholinergic dysfunction has been correlated with the expression and processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein. However, it remains unclear as to how cholinergic dysfunction and beta-amyloid (Abeta) formation and deposition might be related to one another. Since the M1- and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are considered key molecules that transduce the cholinergic message, the purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of the injected Abeta peptide on the number of M1mAchR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum-diagonal band (MS-nDBB) complex of the rat. Injections of Abeta protein into the retrosplenial cortex resulted in a decrease in M1mAChR and M2mAChR immunoreactivity in the MS-nDBB complex. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum nucleus (MS) and in the horizontal nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) as compared to the corresponding hemisphere in control animals and with that seen in the contralateral hemisphere, which corresponds to the PBS-injected side. Co-localization studies showed that the M1mAChR protein is localized in GABA-immunoreactive cells of the MS-nDBB complex, in particular those of the MS nucleus, while M2mAChR protein is localized in both the cholinergic and GABAergic cells. Moreover, GABAergic cells containing M2mAChR are mainly localized in the MS nucleus, while cholinergic cells containing M2mAChR are localized in the MS and the HDB nuclei. Our findings suggest that Abeta induces a reduction in M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-containing cells, which may contribute to impairments of cholinergic and GABAergic transmission in the MS-nDBB complex.

  16. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate inhibitory synaptic rhythms in hippocampus and neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley E Alger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors (mAChRs powerfully affects many neuronal properties as well as numerous cognitive behaviors. Small neuronal circuits constitute an intermediate level of organization between neurons and behaviors, and mAChRs affect interactions among cells that compose these circuits. Circuit activity is often assessed by extracellular recordings of the local field potentials (LFPs, which are analogous to in vivo EEGs, generated by coordinated neuronal interactions. Coherent forms of physiologically relevant circuit activity manifest themselves as rhythmic oscillations in the LFPs. Frequencies of rhythmic oscillations that are most closely associated with animal behavior are in the range of 4-80 Hz, which is subdivided into theta (4-14 Hz, beta (15-29 Hz and gamma (30-80 Hz bands. Activation of mAChRs triggers rhythmic oscillations in these bands in the hippocampus and neocortex. Inhibitory responses mediated by GABAergic interneurons constitute a prominent feature of these oscillations, and indeed, appear to be their major underlying factor in many cases. An important issue is which interneurons are involved in rhythm generation. Besides affecting cellular and network properties directly, mAChRs can cause the mobilization of endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids, eCBs that, by acting on the principal cannabinoid receptor of the brain, CB1R, regulate the release of certain neurotransmitters, including GABA. CB1Rs are heavily expressed on only a subset of interneurons and, at lower density, on glutamatergic neurons. Exogenous cannabinoids typically disrupt oscillations in the θ and Υ ranges, which probably contributes to the behavioral effects of these drugs. It is important to understand how neuronal circuit activity is affected by mAChR-driven eCBs, as this information will provide deeper insight into circuit behavior as the effects both eCBs and exogenous cannabinoids in intacts behavior. After

  17. Amyloid-β depresses excitatory cholinergic synaptic transmission in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqun Fang; Jingjing Duan; Dongzhi Ran; Zihao Fan; Ying Yan; Naya Huang; Huaiyu Gu; Yulan Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Objective Decline,disruption,or alterations of nicotinic cholinergic mechanisms contribute to cognitive dysfunctions like Alzheimer's disease (AD).Although amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation is a pathological hallmark of AD,the mechanisms by which Aβ peptides modulate cholinergic synaptic transmission and memory loss remain obscure.This study was aimed to investigate the potential synaptic modulation by Aβ of the cholinergic synapses between olfactory receptor neurons and projection neurons (PNs) in the olfactory lobe of the fruit fly.Methods Cholinergic spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) were recorded with whole-cell patch clamp from PNs in Drosophila AD models expressing Aβ40,Aβ42,or Aβ42Arc peptides in neural tissue.Results In fly pupae (2 days before eclosion),overexpression of Aβ42 or Aβ42Arc,but not Aβ40,led to a significant decrease of mEPSC frequency,while overexpression of Aβ40,Aβ42,or Aβ42Arc had no significant effect on mEPSC amplitude.In contrast,Pavlovian olfactory associative learning and lifespan assays showed that both short-term memory and lifespan were decreased in the Drosophila models expressing Aβ40,Aβ42,or Aβ42Arc.Conclusion Both electrophysiological and behavioral results showed an effect of Aβ peptide on cholinergic synaptic transmission and suggest a possible mechanism by which Aβ peptides cause cholinergic neuron degeneration and the consequent memory loss.

  18. Axonal transport of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat vagus nerve: high and low affinity agonist receptors move in opposite directions and differ in nucleotide sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarbin, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    The presence and transport of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites have been detected in the rat vagus nerve. These binding sites accumulate both proximal and distal to ligatures in a time-dependent manner. The results of double ligature and colchicine experiments are compatible with the notion that the anterogradely transported binding sites move by fast transport. Most of the sites accumulating proximal to ligatures bind the agonist carbachol with high affinity, while most of the sites accumulating distally bind carbachol with a low affinity. Also, the receptors transported in the anterograde direction are affected by a guanine nucleotide analogue (GppNHp), while those transported in the retrograde direction are less, or not, affected. The bulk of the sites along the unligated nerve trunk bind carbachol with a low affinity and are less sensitive to GppNHp modulation than the anterogradely transported sites. These results suggest that some receptors in the vagus may undergo axonal transport in association with regulatory proteins and that receptor molecules undergo changes in their binding and regulatory properties during their life cycle. These data also support the notion that the high and low affinity agonist form of the muscarinic receptor represent different modulated forms of a single receptor molecule.

  19. A comparison of β-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in tissues of brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the black river and old woman creek, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevens, Jeffery A.; Baumann, Paul C.; Jones, Susan B.

    1996-01-01

    β-Adrenoceptors (βARs) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors were measured in brain, gill, and heart tissues of brown bullhead catfish exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Black River, Ohio, USA, and were compared to values from Old Woman Creek, Ohio, a reference site. A decreased number of βARs were found in the gill from Black River fish, possibly indicating a compensatory response subsequent to chemical stress.

  20. Endogenous cholinergic neurotransmission contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica Bajic

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system is critical for behavioral adaptations associated with opioid reward and addiction. These processes may be influenced by cholinergic transmission arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg, a main source of acetylcholine to mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To examine this possibility we asked if chronic systemic morphine administration affects expression of genes in ventral and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray at the level of the LDTg using rtPCR. Specifically, we examined gene expression changes in the area of interest using Neurotransmitters and Receptors PCR array between chronic morphine and saline control groups. Analysis suggested that chronic morphine administration led to changes in expression of genes associated, in part, with cholinergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, using a quantitative immunofluorescent technique, we found that chronic morphine treatment produced a significant increase in immunolabeling of the cholinergic marker (vesicular acetylcholine transporter in neurons of the LDTg. Finally, systemic administration of the nonselective and noncompetitive neuronal nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.5 or 2 mg/kg dose-dependently blocked the expression, and to a lesser extent the development, of locomotor sensitization. The same treatment had no effect on acute morphine antinociception, antinociceptive tolerance or dependence to chronic morphine. Taken together, the results suggest that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission selectively contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine and this process may, in part, involve cholinergic neurons within the LDTg.

  1. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  2. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Armando Sawada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Libidibia ferrea (LF is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF, partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg, naloxone (5 mg/kg in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  3. TITERS OF ANTIBODIES TO Β1-ADRENOCEPTOR AND M2 CHOLINERGIC RECEPTORS IN PATIENTS WITH VENTRICULAR ARRHYTHMIAS WITHOUT AN ORGANIC CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND THEIR POSSIBLE CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rogova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify the most promising epitopes that simulate various sites β1-adrenergic and M2-cholinergic receptors, and to evaluate their possible contribution to the development and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias, particularly idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia. Material and methods. Patients with ventricular arrhythmias without organic cardiovascular disease (the study group; n=70 were included in the study. The control group consisted of 20 healthy volunteers. Evaluation of levels of antibodies to antigenic determinants, modeling various sites β1-adrenergic and M2-cholinergic performed in all patients. Causal treatment with clarithromycin and valacyclovir performed in part of patients. Results. Antibodies to different peptide sequences of β1-adrenergic and M2-cholinergic receptors have been identified in 25% of main group patients. A direct correlation between the frequency of episodes of ventricular tachycardia and IgG levels to MRI-MRIV (p=0.02 revealed. Increase in titre of antibodies to β1-adrenoceptors, to a peptide sequence β8 (p=0.02, and lower titers of antibodies to the M2 acetylcholine receptor — chimera MRI-MRIV IgM (p=0.06 and ARI-MRIV IgM (p=0.07 were observed when assessing the efficacy of the therapy in the causal dynamics in the group of "untreated" patients. IgG titer reduction of ARI-MRIV (p=0.02, which is 4 times out of 10 with reduction of ventricular ectopic activity , recorded after valacyclovir therapy. Clarithromycin therapy on the level of antibodies exerted no significant effect. Conclusion. Possible involvement of antibodies to β1-adrenoceptor and M2-cholinergic receptors in the development of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias demonstrated. The relationship between the frequency of episodes of ventricular tachycardia and levels of antibody titers to M2-cholinergic receptors found. Attempt of causal treatment, depending on the possible mechanisms of the autoimmune process is executed. Further studies to

  4. Involvement of Cholinergic and Adrenergic Receptors in Pathogenesis and Inflammatory Response Induced by Alpha-Neurotoxin Bot III of Scorpion Venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakib, Imene; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2016-10-01

    Bot III neurotoxin is the most lethal α neurotoxin purified from Buthus occitanus tunetanus scorpion venom. This toxin binds to the voltage-gated sodium channel of excitable cells and blocks its inactivation, inducing an increased release of neurotransmitters (acetylcholine and catecholamines). This study aims to elucidate the involvement of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in pathogenesis and inflammatory response triggered by this toxin. Injection of Bot III to animals induces an increase of peroxidase activities, an imbalance of oxidative status, tissue damages in lung parenchyma, and myocardium correlated with metabolic disorders. The pretreatment with nicotine (nicotinic receptor agonist) or atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist) protected the animals from almost all disorders caused by Bot III toxin, especially the immunological alterations. Bisoprolol administration (selective β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist) was also efficient in the protection of animals, mainly on tissue damage. Propranolol (non-selective adrenergic receptor antagonist) showed less effect. These results suggest that both cholinergic and adrenergic receptors are activated in the cardiopulmonary manifestations induced by Bot III. Indeed, the muscarinic receptor appears to be more involved than the nicotinic one, and the β1 adrenergic receptor seems to dominate the β2 receptor. These results showed also that the activation of nicotinic receptor leads to a significant protection of animals against Bot III toxin effect. These findings supply a supplementary data leading to better understanding of the mechanism triggered by scorpionic neurotoxins and suggest the use of drugs targeting these receptors, especially the nicotinic one in order to counteract the inflammatory response observed in scorpion envenomation.

  5. Morphine dependence and withdrawal induced changes in cholinergic signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Nichole M.; Einstein, Emily B.; Lopez, Maria B.; McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Mineur, Yann S.; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling is thought to be involved in morphine dependence and withdrawal, but the specific mechanisms involved remain unclear. The current study aimed to identify alterations in the cholinergic system that may contribute to the development of morphine dependence and withdrawal. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and [3H]-epibatidine binding were evaluated in order to determine if morphine dependence and withdrawal induces alterations in cholinergic signaling or expression of high affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the midbrain (MB), medial habenula (MHb) and interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). The effect of cholinergic signaling through nAChRs on morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior was then determined. Lastly, the contribution of β4-containing nAChRs receptors in the MHb to morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior and neuronal activity as indicated by c-fos expression was assessed. Chronic morphine administration decreased AChE activity in MB and MHb, an effect that was no longer present following precipitated withdrawal. Morphine dependent mice showed increased nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) levels in MB. Further, nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) and lobeline (3 mg/kg) decreased jumping behavior while mecamylamine (1 mg/kg) had no effect. Knock-down of β4 subunit-containing nAChRs in the MHb attenuated c-fos activation, but did not decrease morphine withdrawal-induced jumping. Thus, morphine withdrawal induces cholinergic signaling in the MHb, but this does not appear to be responsible for the effects of cholinergic drugs on somatic signs of opiate withdrawal, as measured by jumping behavior. PMID:23651795

  6. Effects of chronic alcohol consumption, withdrawal and nerve growth factor on neuropeptide Y expression and cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Pedro A; Rocha, João P; Cardoso, Armando; Vilela, Manuel; Sousa, Sérgio; Madeira, M Dulce

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the vulnerability of the hippocampal formation (HF) to chronic alcohol consumption and withdrawal. Among the brain systems that appear to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of these conditions are the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-ergic and the cholinergic systems. Because these two systems seem to closely interact in the HF, we sought to study the effects of chronic alcohol consumption (6months) and subsequent withdrawal (2months) on the expression of NPY and on the cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus. As such, we have estimated the areal density and the somatic volume of NPY-immunoreactive neurons, and the density of the cholinergic varicosities. In addition, because alcohol consumption and withdrawal are associated with impaired nerve growth factor (NGF) trophic support and the administration of exogenous NGF alters the effects of those conditions on various cholinergic markers, we have also estimated the same morphological parameters in withdrawn rats infused intracerebroventricularly with NGF. NPY expression increased after withdrawal and returned to control values after NGF treatment. Conversely, the somatic volume of these neurons did not differ among all groups. On other hand, the expression of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was reduced by 24% in ethanol-treated rats and by 46% in withdrawn rats. The administration of NGF to withdrawn rats increased the VAChT expression to values above control levels. These results show that the effects of prolonged alcohol intake and protracted withdrawal on the hilar NPY expression differ from those induced by shorter exposures to ethanol and by abrupt withdrawal. They also suggest that the normalizing effect of NGF on NPY expression might rely on the NGF-induced improvement of cholinergic neurotransmission in the dentate hilus.

  7. 良性前列腺增生合并膀胱过度活动症患者膀胱黏膜毒蕈碱型胆碱能受体 M2、M3亚型的表达及临床意义%Expression and Clinical Significance of Muscarinic Cholinergic Receptor M2 and M3 Subtypes in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Overactive Bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张进生; 刘春林; 刘良颖; 李玮; 刘宁; 渠渊; 王立茹; 冯超; 吴宗山; 柴军; 张前

    2014-01-01

    Objective-To-investigate-the-changes-and-significance-of-the-expression-of-the-M-2-and-M3-receptors-of-the-urinary-bladder-mucosa-in-patients-with-benign-prostatic-hyperplasia-(-BPH)-and-overactive-bladder-(-OAB)-.-Methods-From-May-2012-to-February-2013,-20-cases-of-BPH-were-studied-on-the-International-Prostate-Syndrome-Scoring-(IPSS),-Quality-Of-Life-(QOL),-OAB-syndrome-scoring-(OABSS),-and-urodynamics.According-to-OABSS-results,-the-patients-were-divided-into-either-BPH-group-(n=9)-or-BPH-and-OAB-group-(n=11).Mucosa-biopsies-under-the-cystoscopy-were-performed-in-all-the-cases-.The-expression-of-M2&M3-receptors-was-assayed-by-reverse-transcription-polymerase-chain-reaction-(-RT-PCR-)-.The-mRNA-expression-levels-of-M-2-&-M3-receptors-were-indicated-by-the--Ct-values.-Results-The-levels-of--Ct-of-M2-&-M3-receptors-were-significantly-lower-in-the-BPH-group-than-those-in-the-BPH-+OAB-group,-respectively-[M2:(-0.154-±0.641)-vs.(0.562-±0.762),-t=-2.241,-P=0.038;M3:(2.534-±0.816)-vs.(3.639-±1.019),-t=-2.630,-P=0.017],-which-implied-that-the-expression-of-M-2-and-M3-receptors-was-higher-in-the-BPH-group-than-that-in-the-BPH-+OAB-group.The-median-ratios-of-M2∶M3-in-both-groups-were-respectively-6.5206-(2.35-17.33)-and-7.9447-(2.10-23.83)-(Z=-1.102,-P=0.271).In-the-same-group,-the-expression-of-M2-was-higher-than-M3-in-both-groups-(t=-7.776,-P=0.000;t=-8.018,-P=0.000).The-expression-of-M3-receptors-was-negatively-correlated-to-OABSS-(r=-0.466,-P=0.039)-and-QOL-(r=-0.496,-P=0.026).-Conclusions-The-expression-of-M2-and-M3-receptors-is-decreased-and-the-ratio-of-M-2∶M3-is-increased-in-patients-with-BPH-and-OAB-,-which-may-play-an-important-role-in-the-development-of-OAB.The-decreasing-of-expression-of-M-3-receptor-exacerbates-the-OAB-degree-and-reduces-the-quality-of-patients-’-life.%目的:探讨良性前列腺增生( benign prostatic hyperplasia ,BPH)合并膀胱过度活动症( overactive bladder ,OAB)患者膀胱黏膜

  8. Protection against ventricular fibrillation via cholinergic receptor stimulation and the generation of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalla, Manish; Chotalia, Minesh; Coughlan, Charles; Hao, Guoliang; Crabtree, Mark J.; Tomek, Jakub; Bub, Gil; Paterson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Animal studies suggest an anti‐fibrillatory action of the vagus nerve on the ventricle, although the exact mechanism is controversial.Using a Langendorff perfused rat heart, we show that the acetylcholine analogue carbamylcholine raises ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) and flattens the electrical restitution curve.The anti‐fibrillatory action of carbamylcholine was prevented by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine, inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and can be mimicked by the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside.Carbamylcholine increased NO metabolite content in the coronary effluent and this was prevented by mecamylamine.The anti‐fibrillatory action of both carbamylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was ultimately dependent on muscarinic receptor stimulation as all effects were blocked by atropine.These data demonstrate a protective effect of carbamylcholine on VFT that depends upon both muscarinic and nicotinic receptor stimulation, where the generation of NO is likely to be via a neuronal nNOS–sGC dependent pathway. Abstract Implantable cardiac vagal nerve stimulators are a promising treatment for ventricular arrhythmia in patients with heart failure. Animal studies suggest the anti‐fibrillatory effect may be nitric oxide (NO) dependent, although the exact site of action is controversial. We investigated whether a stable analogue of acetylcholine could raise ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT), and whether this was dependent on NO generation and/or muscarinic/nicotinic receptor stimulation. VFT was determined in Langendorff perfused rat hearts by burst pacing until sustained VF was induced. Carbamylcholine (CCh, 200 nmol l–1, n = 9) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced heart rate from 292 ± 8 to 224 ± 6 b.p.m. Independent of this heart rate change, CCh caused a significant increase in VFT (control 1.5 ± 0.3 mA, CCh 2.4 ± 0.4 mA, wash 1.1

  9. Lesions of cholinergic pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus neurons fail to affect cocaine or heroin self-administration or conditioned place preference in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Steidl

    Full Text Available Cholinergic input to the ventral tegmental area (VTA is known to contribute to reward. Although it is known that the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg provides an important source of excitatory input to the dopamine system, the specific role of PPTg cholinergic input to the VTA in cocaine reward has not been previously determined. We used a diphtheria toxin conjugated to urotensin-II (Dtx::UII, the endogenous ligand for urotensin-II receptors expressed by PPTg cholinergic but not glutamatergic or GABAergic cells, to lesion cholinergic PPTg neurons. Dtx::UII toxin infusion resulted in the loss of 95.78 (±0.65% of PPTg cholinergic cells but did not significantly alter either cocaine or heroin self-administration or the development of cocaine or heroin conditioned place preferences. Thus, cholinergic cells originating in PPTg do not appear to be critical for the rewarding effects of cocaine or of heroin.

  10. Cerebellar Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptors are Intrinsic to the Cerebellum: Implications for Diverse Functional Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jill R.; Ortinski, Pavel I.; Sherrard, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies have delineated the specific nicotinic subtypes present in the mammalian cerebellum, very little is known about their location or function within the cerebellum. This is of increased interest since nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the cerebellum have recently been implicated in the pathology of autism spectrum disorders. To begin to better understand the roles of these heteromeric nAChRs in the cerebellar circuitry and their therapeutic potential as targets for drug development, we used various chemical and stereotaxic lesion models in conjunction with slice electrophysiology to examine how specific heteromeric nAChR subtypes may influence the surrounding cerebellar circuitry. Using subunit-specific immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled nAChRs in the cerebella following N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride, p-chloroamphetamine, and pendunculotomy lesions, we show that most, if not all, cerebellar nicotinic receptors are present in cells within the cerebellum itself and not in extracerebellar afferents. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the β4-containing, but not the β2-containing, nAChRs intrinsic to the cerebellum can regulate inhibitory synaptic efficacy at two major classes of cerebellar neurons. These tandem findings suggest that nAChRs may present a potential drug target for disorders involving the cerebellum. PMID:21562921

  11. Huperzine A protects sepsis associated encephalopathy by promoting the deficient cholinergic nervous function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sen-Zhi; Huang, Wei-Ping; Huang, Lin-Qiang; Han, Yong-Li; Han, Qian-Peng; Zhu, Gao-Feng; Wen, Miao-Yun; Deng, Yi-Yu; Zeng, Hong-Ke

    2016-09-19

    Neuroinflammatory deregulation in the brain plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE). Given the mounting evidence of anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of the cholinergic nervous system, it is surprising that there is little information about its changes in the brain during sepsis. To elucidate the role of the cholinergic nervous system in SAE, hippocampal choline acetyltransferase, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1, acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine were evaluated in LPS-induced sepsis rats. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, neuronal apoptosis, and animal cognitive performance were also assessed. Furthermore, therapeutic effects of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor Huperzine A (HupA) on the hippocampal cholinergic nervous function and neuroinflammation were evaluated. A deficiency of the cholinergic nervous function was revealed in SAE, accompanied with over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines, increase in neuronal apoptosis and brain cognitive impairment. HupA remarkably promoted the deficient cholinergic nervous function and attenuated the abnormal neuroinflammation in SAE, paralleled with the recovery of brain function. We suggest that the deficiency of the cholinergic nervous function and the abnormal neuroinflammation are synergistically implicated in the pathogenesis of SAE. Thus, HupA is a potential therapeutic candidate for SAE, as it improves the deficient cholinergic nervous function and exerts anti-inflammatory action.

  12. Activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors prevents ventilator-induced lung injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Brégeon

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome is responsible for 40 to 60 percent mortality. An over mortality of about 10 percent could result from additional lung injury and inflammation due to the life-support mechanical ventilation, which stretches the lung. It has been recently demonstrated, in vitro, that pharmacological activation of the alpha 7 nicotinic receptors (α7-nAChR could down regulate intracellular mediators involved in lung cell inflammatory response to stretch. Our aim was to test in vivo the protective effect of the pharmacological activation of the α7-nAChR against ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Anesthetized rats were ventilated for two hours with a high stretch ventilation mode delivering a stroke volume large enough to generate 25-cmH(2O airway pressure, and randomly assigned to four groups: pretreated with parenteral injection of saline or specific agonist of the α7-nAChR (PNU-282987, or submitted to bilateral vagus nerve electrostimulation while pre-treated or not with the α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA. Controls ventilated with a conventional stroke volume of 10 mL/kg gave reference data. Physiological indices (compliance of the respiratory system, lung weight, blood oxygenation, arterial blood pressure and lung contents of inflammatory mediators (IL-6 measured by ELISA, substance P assessed using HPLC were severely impaired after two hours of high stretch ventilation (sham group. Vagal stimulation was able to maintain the respiratory parameters close to those obtained in Controls and reduced lung inflammation except when associated to nicotinic receptor blockade (MLA, suggesting the involvement of α7-nAChR in vagally-mediated protection against VILI. Pharmacological pre-treatment with PNU-282987 strongly decreased lung injury and lung IL-6 and substance P contents, and nearly abolished the increase in plasmatic IL-6 levels. Pathological examination of the lungs confirmed the physiological differences observed

  13. Blockade of GABA, type A, receptors in the rat pontine reticular formation induces rapid eye movement sleep that is dependent upon the cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, G A; Sachs, O W; Birabil, C G

    2008-09-22

    The brainstem reticular formation is an area important to the control of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The antagonist of GABA-type A (GABA(A)) receptors, bicuculline methiodide (BMI), injected into the rat nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of the reticular formation resulted in a long-lasting increase in REM sleep. Thus, one factor controlling REM sleep appears to be the number of functional GABA(A) receptors in the PnO. The long-lasting effect produced by BMI may result from secondary influences on other neurotransmitter systems known to have long-lasting effects. To study this question, rats were surgically prepared for chronic sleep recording and additionally implanted with guide cannulas aimed at sites in the PnO. Multiple, 60 nl, unilateral injections were made either singly or in combination. GABA(A) receptor antagonists, BMI and gabazine (GBZ), produced dose-dependent increases in REM sleep with GBZ being approximately 35 times more potent than BMI. GBZ and the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, produced very similar results, both increasing REM sleep for about 8 h, mainly through increased period frequency, with little reduction in REM latency. Pre-injection of the muscarinic antagonist, atropine, completely blocked the REM sleep-increase by GBZ. GABAergic control of REM sleep in the PnO requires the cholinergic system and may be acting through presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release.

  14. Cholinergic receptor blockade by scopolamine and mecamylamine exacerbates global cerebral ischemia induced memory dysfunction in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R S; Rai, S; Katyal, A

    2014-12-01

    Global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (GCI/R) injury encompasses complex pathophysiological sequalae, inducing loss of hippocampal neurons and behavioural deficits. Progressive neuronal death and memory dysfunctions culminate from several different mechanisms like oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation and cholinergic hypofunction. Experimental evidences point to the beneficial effects of cholinomimetic agents such as rivastigmine and galantamine in improving memory outcomes following GCI/R injury. However, the direct implications of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor blockade during global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury have not been investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the relative involvement of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in spatial/associative memory functions and neuronal damage during global cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. The outcomes of present study support the idea that preservation of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptor functions is essential to alleviate hippocampal neuronal death in CA1 region following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  15. The cholinergic system, circadian rhythmicity, and time memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, R. A.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the interaction between the mammalian cholinergic system and circadian system, and its possible role in time memory. Several studies made clear that circadian (daily) fluctuations in acetylcholine (ACh) release, cholinergic enzyme activity and cholinergic receptor

  16. [Cholinergic system of the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučera, Matej; Hrabovská, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The cholinergic system of the heart can be either of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. The neuronal cholinergic system in the heart is represented by preganglionic parasympathetic pathways, intracardiac parasympathetic ganglia and postganglionic parasympathetic neurons projecting to the atria, SA node and AV node. The non-neuronal cholinergic system consists of cardiomyocytes that have complete equipment for synthesis and secretion of acetylcholine. Current knowledge suggests that the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the heart affects the regulation of the heart during sympathetic activation. The non-neuronal cholinergic system of the heart plays also a role in the energy metabolism of cardimyocites. Acetylcholine of both neuronal and non-neuronal origin acts in the heart through muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. The effect of acetylcholine in the heart is terminated by cholinesterases acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Recently, papers suggest that the increased cholinergic tone in the heart by cholinesterase inhibitors has a positive effect on some cardiovascular disorders such as heart failure. For this reason, the cholinesterase inhibitors might be used in the treatment of certain cardiovascular disorders in the future.

  17. The selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist Ro4368554 restores memory performance in cholinergic and serotonergic models of memory deficiency in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieben, Cindy K J; Blokland, Arjan; Sik, Ayhan; Sung, Eric; van Nieuwenhuizen, Petra; Schreiber, Rudy

    2005-12-01

    Antagonists at serotonin type 6 (5-HT(6)) receptors show activity in models of learning and memory. Although the underlying mechanism(s) are not well understood, these effects may involve an increase in acetylcholine (ACh) levels. The present study sought to characterize the cognitive-enhancing effects of the 5-HT(6) antagonist Ro4368554 (3-benzenesulfonyl-7-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)1H-indole) in a rat object recognition task employing a cholinergic (scopolamine pretreatment) and a serotonergic- (tryptophan (TRP) depletion) deficient model, and compared its pattern of action with that of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor metrifonate. Initial testing in a time-dependent forgetting task employing a 24-h delay between training and testing showed that metrifonate improved object recognition (at 10 and 30 mg/kg, p.o.), whereas Ro4368554 was inactive. Both, Ro4368554 (3 and 10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) and metrifonate (10 mg/kg, p.o., respectively) reversed memory deficits induced by scopolamine and TRP depletion (10 mg/kg, i.p., and 3 mg/kg, p.o., respectively). In conclusion, although Ro4368554 did not improve a time-related retention deficit, it reversed a cholinergic and a serotonergic memory deficit, suggesting that both mechanisms may be involved in the facilitation of object memory by Ro4368554 and, possibly, other 5-HT(6) receptor antagonists.

  18. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on Isc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport – up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors – is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  19. The catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis of bipolar disorder revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Janowsky, David S; Olivier, Berend; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2015-04-15

    Bipolar disorder is a unique illness characterized by fluctuations between mood states of depression and mania. Originally, an adrenergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis was postulated to underlie these different affective states. In this review, we update this hypothesis with recent findings from human and animal studies, suggesting that a catecholaminergic-cholinergic hypothesis may be more relevant. Evidence from neuroimaging studies, neuropharmacological interventions, and genetic associations support the notion that increased cholinergic functioning underlies depression, whereas increased activations of the catecholamines (dopamine and norepinephrine) underlie mania. Elevated functional acetylcholine during depression may affect both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a compensatory fashion. Increased functional dopamine and norepinephrine during mania on the other hand may affect receptor expression and functioning of dopamine reuptake transporters. Despite increasing evidence supporting this hypothesis, a relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems that could explain cycling between states of depression and mania is missing. Future studies should focus on the influence of environmental stimuli and genetic susceptibilities that may affect the catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance underlying cycling between the affective states. Overall, observations from recent studies add important data to this revised balance theory of bipolar disorder, renewing interest in this field of research.

  20. Differential expression of canonical (classical) transient receptor potential channels in guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sumei; Qu, Mei-Hua; Ren, Wei; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Gao, Na; Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Fei, Guijun; Zuo, Fei; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2008-12-20

    The canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) family of ion channels is implicated in many neuronal processes including calcium homeostasis, membrane excitability, synaptic transmission, and axon guidance. TRPC channels are postulated to be important in the functional neurobiology of the enteric nervous system (ENS); nevertheless, details for expression in the ENS are lacking. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to study the expression and localization of TRPC channels. We found mRNA transcripts, protein on Western blots, and immunoreactivity (IR) for TRPC1/3/4/6 expressed in the small intestinal ENS of adult guinea pigs. TRPC1/3/4/6-IR was localized to distinct subpopulations of enteric neurons and was differentially distributed between the myenteric and submucosal divisions of the ENS. TRPC1-IR was widely distributed and localized to neurons with cholinergic, calretinin, and nitrergic neuronal immunochemical codes in the myenteric plexus. It was localized to both cholinergic and noncholinergic secretomotor neurons in the submucosal plexus. TRPC3-IR was found only in the submucosal plexus and was expressed exclusively by neuropeptide Y-IR neurons. TRPC4/6-IR was expressed in only a small population of myenteric neurons, but was abundantly expressed in the submucosal plexus. TRPC4/6-IR was coexpressed with both cholinergic and nitrergic neurochemical codes in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, TRPC4/6-IR was expressed exclusively in noncholinergic secretomotor neurons. No TRPC1/3/4/6-IR was found in calbindin-IR neurons. TRPC3/4/6-IR was widely expressed along varicose nerve fibers and colocalized with synaptophysin-IR at putative neurotransmitter release sites. Our results suggest important roles for TRPC channels in ENS physiology and neuronal regulation of gut function.

  1. Identification and functional expression of a family of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the central nervous system of the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nierop, Pim; Bertrand, Sonia; Munno, David W; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; van Minnen, Jan; Spafford, J David; Syed, Naweed I; Bertrand, Daniel; Smit, August B

    2006-01-20

    We described a family of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits underlying cholinergic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS) of the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis. By using degenerate PCR cloning, we identified 12 subunits that display a high sequence similarity to nAChR subunits, of which 10 are of the alpha-type, 1 is of the beta-type, and 1 was not classified because of insufficient sequence information. Heterologous expression of identified subunits confirms their capacity to form functional receptors responding to acetylcholine. The alpha-type subunits can be divided into groups that appear to underlie cation-conducting (excitatory) and anion-conducting (inhibitory) channels involved in synaptic cholinergic transmission. The expression of the Lymnaea nAChR subunits, assessed by real time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization, indicates that it is localized to neurons and widespread in the CNS, with the number and localization of expressing neurons differing considerably between subunit types. At least 10% of the CNS neurons showed detectable nAChR subunit expression. In addition, cholinergic neurons, as indicated by the expression of the vesicular ACh transporter, comprise approximately 10% of the neurons in all ganglia. Together, our data suggested a prominent role for fast cholinergic transmission in the Lymnaea CNS by using a number of neuronal nAChR subtypes comparable with vertebrate species but with a functional complexity that may be much higher.

  2. Human Neuroepithelial Cells Express NMDA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappell B

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1 cerebral endothelial barrier and 2 cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1 were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease.

  3. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  4. Antidepressant-like effects of the cannabinoid receptor ligands in the forced swimming test in mice: mechanism of action and possible interactions with cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Michalak, Agnieszka; Biala, Grazyna

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to explore the role of the endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB) receptor ligands, nicotine and scopolamine, in the depression-related responses using the forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Our results revealed that acute injection of oleamide (10 and 20 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor agonist, caused antidepressant-like effect in the FST, while AM 251 (0.25-3 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor antagonist, did not provoke any effect in this test. Moreover, acute administration of both CB2 receptor agonist, JWH 133 (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) and CB2 receptor antagonist, AM 630 (0.5 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant action. Antidepressant effects of oleamide and JWH 133 were attenuated by acute injection of both non-effective dose of AM 251, as well as AM 630. Among the all CB compounds used, only the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg) with non-effective dose of nicotine (0.5 mg/kg) caused an antidepressant effect. However, none of the CB receptor ligands, had influence on the antidepressant effects provoked by nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) injection. In turn, the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg); JWH (2 mg/kg) or AM 630 (2 mg/kg), but not of AM 251 (0.25 mg/kg), with non-effective dose of scopolamine (0.1 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant properties. Indeed, all of the CB compounds used, intensified the antidepressant-like effects induced by an acute injection of scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg). Our results provide clear evidence that the endocannabinoid system participates in the depression-related behavior and through interactions with cholinergic system modulate these kind of responses.

  5. GABA B receptor subunit expression in glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, K J; Deuchars, J; Davies, C H; Pangalos, M N

    2003-09-01

    GABA(B) receptor subunits are widely expressed on neurons throughout the CNS, at both pre- and postsynaptic sites, where they mediate the late, slow component of the inhibitory response to the major inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. The existence of functional GABA(B) receptors on nonneuronal cells has been reported previously, although the molecular composition of these receptors has not yet been described. Here we demonstrate for the first time, using immunohistochemistry the expression of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) on nonneuronal cells of the rat CNS. All three principle GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on these cells irrespective of whether they had been cultured or found within brain tissue sections. At the ultrastructural level GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on astrocytic processes surrounding both symmetrical and assymetrical synapses in the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus. In addition, GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) receptor subunits were expressed on activated microglia in culture but were not found on myelin forming oligodendrocytes in the white matter of rat spinal cord. Together these data demonstrate that the obligate subunits of functional GABA(B) receptors are expressed in astrocytes and microglia in the rat CNS.

  6. Involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptors and cholinergic neurotransmission in the endomorphins-induced impairment of passive avoidance learning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, Makoto; Lin, Hui Ping

    2002-02-01

    The effects of naloxonazine, a mu(1)-opioid receptor antagonist, and physostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, on the endomorphins-induced impairment of passive avoidance learning were investigated in mice. Endomorphin-1 (10 microg) and endomorphin-2 (10 microg) significantly impaired passive avoidance learning, while naloxonazine (35 mg/kg, s.c.), a mu(1)-opioid receptor antagonist, which alone failed to influence passive avoidance learning significantly inhibited the endomorphin-1 (10 microg)- but not endomorphin-2 (10 microg)-induced disturbance of such learning. A rather nonselective higher dose (50 mg/kg, s.c.) of naloxonazine almost completely antagonized the endomorphin-1 (10 microg)- and endomorphin-2 (10 microg)-induced impairment of passive avoidance learning. In contrast, physostigmine (0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reversed the endomorphin-1 (10 microg)- and endomorphin-2 (10 microg)-induced disturbance of passive avoidance learning, whereas physostigmine (0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) alone did not influence such learning. These results suggest that endomorphin-1 but not endomorphin-2 impairs learning and memory resulting from cholinergic dysfunction, and from activation of mu(1)-opioid receptors.

  7. Effects of melatonin on learning abilities, cholinergic fibers and nitric oxide synthase expression in rat cerebral cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Xu; Junpao Chen; Hailing Zhao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Melatonin is a kind of hormones derived from pineal gland. Recent researches demonstrate that melatonin is characterized by anti-oxidation, anti-senility and destroying free radicals. While, effect and pathogenesis of pineal gland on learning ability should be further studied.OBJ ECTIVE: To investigate the effects of pinealectomy on learning abiliy, distribution of cholinesterase and expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in cerebral cortex of rats and probe into the effect of melatonin on learning ability, central cholinergic system and nNOS expression.DESIGN: Randomized grouping design and animal study.SETTING: Department of Neurology, the 187 Hospital of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: A total of 12 male SD rats, of normal learning ability testing with Y-tape maze, of clean grade,weighing 190-210 g, aged 6 weeks, were selected in this study.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Department of Neurology, Zhujiang Hospital from July 1997to June 2000. All SD rats were divided into experimental group (n =6,pinealectomy) and control group (n =6, sham operation). Seven days later, rats in both two groups were continuously fed for 33 days. ①Learning ability test: The learning ability of rats was tested by trisection Y-type maze and figured as attempting times. ②Expression of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) was detected by enzyme histochemistry and nNOS was measured by SABC method. ③ Quantitative analysis of AchE fibers: AchE fibers density in unit area (surface density)was surveyed with Leica Diaplan microscope and Leica Quantimet 500+ image analytic apparatus and quantitative parameter was set up for AchE fibers covering density (μm2) per 374 693.656 μm2, moreover, the AchE fibers density was measured in Ⅱ -Ⅳ layers of motor and somatosensory cortex (showing three layers per field of vision at one time), in radiative, lacunaria and molecular layers of CA1, CA2 and CA3 areas, and in lamina multiforms of dentate gyrus. Three tissue slices

  8. [Olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma: scintigraphic expression of somatostatin receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Vicente, A; García Del Castillo, E; Soriano Castrejón, A; Alonso Farto, J

    1999-10-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon tumor originating in the upper nasal cavity and constitutes 3% of all intranasal neoplasms. Few references exist about the expression of somatostatin receptors in these tumors. Our case demonstrates a good correlation between the somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Upregulating Nonneuronal Cholinergic Activity Decreases TNF Release from Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonneuronal cholinergic system plays a primary role in maintaining homeostasis. It has been proved that endogenous neuronal acetylcholine (ACh could play an anti-inflammatory role, and exogenous cholinergic agonists could weaken macrophages inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation through activation of α7 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR. We assumed that nonneuronal cholinergic system existing in macrophages could modulate inflammation through autocrine ACh and expressed α7nAChR on the cells. Therefore, we explored whether LPS continuous stimulation could upregulate the nonneuronal cholinergic activity in macrophages and whether increasing autocrine ACh could decrease TNF release from the macrophages. The results showed that, in RAW264.7 cells incubated with LPS for 20 hours, the secretion of ACh was significantly decreased at 4 h and then gradually increased, accompanied with the enhancement of α7nAChR expression level. The release of TNF was greatly increased from RAW264.7 cells at 4 h and 8 h exposure to LPS; however, it was suppressed at 20 h. Upregulating choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression through ChAT gene transfection could enhance ACh secretion and reduce TNF release from the infected RAW264. 7cells. The results indicated that LPS stimulation could modulate the activity of nonneuronal cholinergic system of RAW264.7 cells. Enhancing autocrine ACh production could attenuate TNF release from RAW264.7 cells.

  10. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun eYang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic & PV neurons with the size (>20 µm and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min bath application of adenosine (100 μM decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM. Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1-receptor mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically-projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required for

  11. Whole-brain mapping of inputs to projection neurons and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingchun; Wang, Daqing; He, Xiaobin; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Xu, Fuqiang; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal striatum integrates inputs from multiple brain areas to coordinate voluntary movements, associative plasticity, and reinforcement learning. Its projection neurons consist of the GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine receptor type 1 (D1) or dopamine receptor type 2 (D2). Cholinergic interneurons account for a small portion of striatal neuron populations, but they play important roles in striatal functions by synapsing onto the MSNs and other local interneurons. By combining the modified rabies virus with specific Cre- mouse lines, a recent study mapped the monosynaptic input patterns to MSNs. Because only a small number of extrastriatal neurons were labeled in the prior study, it is important to reexamine the input patterns of MSNs with higher labeling efficiency. Additionally, the whole-brain innervation pattern of cholinergic interneurons remains unknown. Using the rabies virus-based transsynaptic tracing method in this study, we comprehensively charted the brain areas that provide direct inputs to D1-MSNs, D2-MSNs, and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum. We found that both types of projection neurons and the cholinergic interneurons receive extensive inputs from discrete brain areas in the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other subcortical areas, several of which were not reported in the previous study. The MSNs and cholinergic interneurons share largely common inputs from areas outside the striatum. However, innervations within the dorsal striatum represent a significantly larger proportion of total inputs for cholinergic interneurons than for the MSNs. The comprehensive maps of direct inputs to striatal MSNs and cholinergic interneurons shall assist future functional dissection of the striatal circuits.

  12. Cholinergic regulation of the vasopressin neuroendocrine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michels, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the physical and functional relationship between the cholinergic system, and the neurodocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus, a combination of experiments on receptor binding, localization and function were carried out. The putative nicotinic receptor probe (/sup 125/I)alpha bungarotoxin ((/sup 125/I)alpha BTX) bound with high affinity and specificity to the vasopressin and oxytocin magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus, nucleus circularis, and paraventricular nucleus. Binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha BTX within the neural lobe was very low. In contrast, the muscarinic cholinergic receptor probe (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinylbenzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) did not bind to magnocellular vasopressin and oxytocin cell groups. The median eminence, which contains the neurosecretory axons, and the neural lobe of the pituitary contain low levels of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. The physiological significance of these cholinergic receptors in regulation of vasopressin release was tested using an in vitro preparation of the supraoptic - neural lobe system.

  13. Modulatory compartments in cortex and local regulation of cholinergic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Jennifer J; Ward, Nicholas J; Jadi, Monika P; Disney, Anita A

    2016-09-01

    Neuromodulatory signaling is generally considered broad in its impact across cortex. However, variations in the characteristics of cortical circuits may introduce regionally-specific responses to diffuse modulatory signals. Features such as patterns of axonal innervation, tissue tortuosity and molecular diffusion, effectiveness of degradation pathways, subcellular receptor localization, and patterns of receptor expression can lead to local modification of modulatory inputs. We propose that modulatory compartments exist in cortex and can be defined by variation in structural features of local circuits. Further, we argue that these compartments are responsible for local regulation of neuromodulatory tone. For the cholinergic system, these modulatory compartments are regions of cortical tissue within which signaling conditions for acetylcholine are relatively uniform, but between which signaling can vary profoundly. In the visual system, evidence for the existence of compartments indicates that cholinergic modulation likely differs across the visual pathway. We argue that the existence of these compartments calls for thinking about cholinergic modulation in terms of finer-grained control of local cortical circuits than is implied by the traditional view of this system as a diffuse modulator. Further, an understanding of modulatory compartments provides an opportunity to better understand and perhaps correct signal modifications that lead to pathological states.

  14. N-palmitoyl serotonin alleviates scopolamine-induced memory impairment via regulation of cholinergic and antioxidant systems, and expression of BDNF and p-CREB in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, A Young; Doo, Choon Nan; Son, Eun Jung; Sung, Nak Yun; Lee, Kun Jong; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2015-12-05

    N-Palmitoyl-5-hydroxytryptamines (Pal-5HT), a cannabinoid, has recently been reported to express anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory actions in RBL-2H3 cells, and ameliorate glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in HT-22 cells. In this study, we examined the effect of Pal-5HT on deficits of learning and memory induced by scopolamine in mice. Memory performance was evaluated using Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), level of oxidative stress markers, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) were determined. Loss of neuronal cells in hippocampus was evaluated by histological examinations. Pal-5HT significantly improved the amnesia in the behavioral assessment. Pal-5HT regulated cholinergic function by inhibiting scopolamine-induced elevation of AChE activity and decline of ChAT activity. Pal-5HT suppressed oxidative stress by increasing activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) or NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and lowering MDA level. Additionally, it prevented against scopolamine-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2. Moreover, Pal-5HT suppressed the death of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 regions, while it restored expression of p-CREB and BDNF in hippocampus. Taken together, Pal-5HT is suggested to ameliorate deficits of memory and learning through regulation of cholinergic function, activation of antioxidant systems as well as restoration of BDNF and p-CREB expression. From these, Pal-5HT may be a potential candidate to prevent against neurodegeneration related to the memory deficit.

  15. Adenosine Receptors: Expression, Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sheth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (ARs comprise a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR which mediate the physiological actions of adenosine. To date, four AR subtypes have been cloned and identified in different tissues. These receptors have distinct localization, signal transduction pathways and different means of regulation upon exposure to agonists. This review will describe the biochemical characteristics and signaling cascade associated with each receptor and provide insight into how these receptors are regulated in response to agonists. A key property of some of these receptors is their ability to serve as sensors of cellular oxidative stress, which is transmitted by transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF-κB, to regulate the expression of ARs. Recent observations of oligomerization of these receptors into homo- and heterodimers will be discussed. In addition, the importance of these receptors in the regulation of normal and pathological processes such as sleep, the development of cancers and in protection against hearing loss will be examined.

  16. Expression of the 5-HT1A Serotonin Receptor in the Hippocampus Is Required for Social Stress Resilience and the Antidepressant-Like Effects Induced by the Nicotinic Partial Agonist Cytisine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineur, Yann S; Einstein, Emily B; Bentham, Matthew P; Wigestrand, Mattis B; Blakeman, Sam; Newbold, Sylvia A; Picciotto, Marina R

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) blockers potentiate the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in some treatment-resistant patients; however, it is not known whether these effects are independent, or whether the two neurotransmitter systems act synergistically. We first determined that the SSRI fluoxetine and the nicotinic partial agonist cytisine have synergistic effects in a mouse model of antidepressant efficacy, whereas serotonin depletion blocked the effects of cytisine. Using a pharmacological approach, we found that the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT also potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of cytisine, suggesting that this subtype might mediate the interaction between the serotonergic and cholinergic systems. The 5-HT1A receptors are located both presynaptically and postsynaptically. We therefore knocked down 5-HT1A receptors in either the dorsal raphe (presynaptic autoreceptors) or the hippocampus (a brain area with high expression of 5-HT1A heteroreceptors sensitive to cholinergic effects on affective behaviors). Knockdown of 5-HT1A receptors in hippocampus, but not dorsal raphe, significantly decreased the antidepressant-like effect of cytisine. This study suggests that serotonin signaling through postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in the hippocampus is critical for the antidepressant-like effects of a cholinergic drug and begins to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying interactions between the serotonergic and cholinergic systems related to mood disorders. PMID:25288485

  17. Expression of the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor in the hippocampus is required for social stress resilience and the antidepressant-like effects induced by the nicotinic partial agonist cytisine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineur, Yann S; Einstein, Emily B; Bentham, Matthew P; Wigestrand, Mattis B; Blakeman, Sam; Newbold, Sylvia A; Picciotto, Marina R

    2015-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) blockers potentiate the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in some treatment-resistant patients; however, it is not known whether these effects are independent, or whether the two neurotransmitter systems act synergistically. We first determined that the SSRI fluoxetine and the nicotinic partial agonist cytisine have synergistic effects in a mouse model of antidepressant efficacy, whereas serotonin depletion blocked the effects of cytisine. Using a pharmacological approach, we found that the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT also potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of cytisine, suggesting that this subtype might mediate the interaction between the serotonergic and cholinergic systems. The 5-HT1A receptors are located both presynaptically and postsynaptically. We therefore knocked down 5-HT1A receptors in either the dorsal raphe (presynaptic autoreceptors) or the hippocampus (a brain area with high expression of 5-HT1A heteroreceptors sensitive to cholinergic effects on affective behaviors). Knockdown of 5-HT1A receptors in hippocampus, but not dorsal raphe, significantly decreased the antidepressant-like effect of cytisine. This study suggests that serotonin signaling through postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in the hippocampus is critical for the antidepressant-like effects of a cholinergic drug and begins to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying interactions between the serotonergic and cholinergic systems related to mood disorders.

  18. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore.......05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...... studies of vitamin D's effect on TCC cells in vitro are necessary before the efficacy of treatment with vitamin D analogues in TCC can be evaluated in patients....

  19. Tryptophan and cystein residues of the acetylcholine receptors of Torpedo species. Relationship to binding of cholinergic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldefrawi, M E; Eldefrawi, A T; Wilson, D B

    1975-09-23

    Several methods were used to analyze for tryptophan in the acetylcholine (ACh) receptors purified from the electric organs of the electric rays, Torpedo californica and Torpedo marmorata. The best value of tryptophan was 2.4 mol %. When excited at 290 nm, both receptors fluoresced with a maximum at 336, but there was no change in the fluorescence emission spectra upon binding of carbamylcholine, d-tubocurarine, ACh, or decamethonium. The free SH content of the Torpedo receptors varied in different preparations, and was highest in that purified from fresh T. californica using deaerated solutions and dialysis under nitrogen, and lowest in that prepared from the aged lyophilized membranes of T. marmorata. The maximum free SH content was 20 nmol/mg of protein or 0.22 mol %, equal to at most 18% of the total cysteic acid residues. Reaction of either 33% or of all the SH residues with p-chloromercuribenzoate reduced maximum ACh binding to the pure receptor prepared from fresh T. californica by only 23%.

  20. Cholinergic Mechanisms in Spinal Locomotion - Potential Target for Rehabilitation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L M Jordan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a hyper-cholinergic state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in supressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed

  1. Melanocortin-4 receptor expression in a vago-vagal circuitry involved in postprandial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautron, Laurent; Lee, Charlotte; Funahashi, Hisayuki; Friedman, Jeffrey; Lee, Syann; Elmquist, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Vagal afferents regulate energy balance by providing a link between the brain and postprandial signals originating from the gut. In the current study, we investigated melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) expression in the nodose ganglion, where the cell bodies of vagal sensory afferents reside. By using a line of mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the MC4R promoter, we found GFP expression in approximately one-third of nodose ganglion neurons. By using immunohistochemistry combined with in situ hybridization, we also demonstrated that approximately 20% of GFP-positive neurons coexpressed cholecystokinin receptor A. In addition, we found that the GFP is transported to peripheral tissues by both vagal sensory afferents and motor efferents, which allowed us to assess the sites innervated by MC4R-GFP neurons. GFP-positive efferents that co-expressed choline acetyltransferase specifically terminated in the hepatic artery and the myenteric plexus of the stomach and duodenum. In contrast, GFP-positive afferents that did not express cholinergic or sympathetic markers terminated in the submucosal plexus and mucosa of the duodenum. Retrograde tracing experiments confirmed the innervation of the duodenum by GFP-positive neurons located in the nodose ganglion. Our findings support the hypothesis that MC4R signaling in vagal afferents may modulate the activity of fibers sensitive to satiety signals such as cholecystokinin, and that MC4R signaling in vagal efferents may contribute to the control of the liver and gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Muscarinic signaling influences the patterning and phenotype of cholinergic amacrine cells in the developing chick retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Andy J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies in the vertebrate retina have characterized the differentiation of amacrine cells as a homogenous class of neurons, but little is known about the genes and factors that regulate the development of distinct types of amacrine cells. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to characterize the development of the cholinergic amacrine cells and identify factors that influence their development. Cholinergic amacrine cells in the embryonic chick retina were identified by using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT. Results We found that as ChAT-immunoreactive cells differentiate they expressed the homeodomain transcription factors Pax6 and Islet1, and the cell-cycle inhibitor p27kip1. As differentiation proceeds, type-II cholinergic cells, displaced to the ganglion cell layer, transiently expressed high levels of cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP and neurofilament, while type-I cells in the inner nuclear layer did not. Although there is a 1:1 ratio of type-I to type-II cells in vivo, in dissociated cell cultures the type-I cells (ChAT-positive and CRABP-negative out-numbered the type-II cells (ChAT and CRABP-positive cells by 2:1. The relative abundance of type-I to type-II cells was not influenced by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh, but was affected by compounds that act at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In addition, the abundance and mosaic patterning of type-II cholinergic amacrine cells is disrupted by interfering with muscarinic signaling. Conclusion We conclude that: (1 during development type-I and type-II cholinergic amacrine cells are not homotypic, (2 the phenotypic differences between these subtypes of cells is controlled by the local microenvironment, and (3 appropriate levels of muscarinic signaling between the cholinergic amacrine cells are required for proper mosaic patterning.

  3. Effects of bone morphogenetic protein-4 on spatial memory and cholinergic expression in the dentate gyrus after fornix-fimbria transection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Liu; Yilong Xue; Jingkun Pan; Yazhuo Hu; Yuhong Gao; Yun Luo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous experiments have confirmed bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) upregulate cholinergic expression in neurons isolated from the embryonic rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Therefore, BMPs could be useful for treating Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. OBJECTIVE: BMP-4 was infused into the hippocampal dentate gyrus of fornix-fimbria transected rats to test the effects of BMP-4 on cholinergic expression in dentate gyrus neurons, and to observe changes in spatial memory behavior. DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment. SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery and Laboratory for Cell Biology, Institute of Geriatrics, General Hospital of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-seven healthy adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 250-300 g, were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center of the General Hospital of Chinese PLA. Reagents: BMP-4 (B-2680, Sigma Company) and choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) antibody (AB5042, Chemicon Company) were used in this study. Equipments: a rat stereotaxic instrument (type: SN-2N, Narushige Group, Japan) and Image-prog-plus image analysis software (Media Cybernetics company, USA) were used in this study. The protocol was carried out in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals.METHODS: This experiment was performed in the Institute of Geriatrics, General Hospital of Chinese PLA between July 2004 and March 2005. Rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Alzheimer's disease group (n = 7), normal control group (n = 5), BMP-4-Alzheimer's disease group (n = 8), and model group (n = 7). In the Alzheimer's disease group, the left hippocampal fornix-fimbria of rats was transected to mimic Alzheimer's disease symptoms. In the BMP-4-Alzheimer's disease group, 1 μL BMP-4 (10 mg/L) was perfused into the left dentate gyrus with a microinjector at 1 μL/min. In the model group, 1 μL saline was perfused into the same position by the same method. Twenty-eight days after injection

  4. Cholinergic interneurons control local circuit activity and cocaine conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Ilana B; Lin, Shih-Chun; Brodsky, Matthew; Prakash, Rohit; Diester, Ilka; Anikeeva, Polina; Gradinaru, Viviana; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-12-17

    Cholinergic neurons are widespread, and pharmacological modulation of acetylcholine receptors affects numerous brain processes, but such modulation entails side effects due to limitations in specificity for receptor type and target cell. As a result, causal roles of cholinergic neurons in circuits have been unclear. We integrated optogenetics, freely moving mammalian behavior, in vivo electrophysiology, and slice physiology to probe the cholinergic interneurons of the nucleus accumbens by direct excitation or inhibition. Despite representing less than 1% of local neurons, these cholinergic cells have dominant control roles, exerting powerful modulation of circuit activity. Furthermore, these neurons could be activated by cocaine, and silencing this drug-induced activity during cocaine exposure (despite the fact that the manipulation of the cholinergic interneurons was not aversive by itself) blocked cocaine conditioning in freely moving mammals.

  5. Intracerebroventricular injection of mu- and delta-opiate receptor antagonists block 60 Hz magnetic field-induced decreases in cholinergic activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H; Carino, M

    1998-01-01

    In previous research, we have found that acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field decreased cholinergic activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat as measured by sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake activity. We concluded that the effect was mediated by endogenous opioids inside the brain because it could be blocked by pretreatment of rats before magnetic field exposure with the opiate antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral antagonist naloxone methiodide. In the present study, the involvement of opiate receptor subtypes was investigated. Rats were pretreated by intracerebroventricular injection of the mu-opiate receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine, or the delta-opiate receptor antagonist, naltrindole, before exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field (2 mT, 1 hour). It was found that the effects of magnetic field on high-affinity choline uptake in the frontal cortex and hippocampus were blocked by the drug treatments. These data indicate that both mu- and delta-opiate receptors in the brain are involved in the magnetic field-induced decreases in cholinergic activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

  6. Increased expression of 5-HT(1B) receptors by Herpes simplex virus gene transfer in septal neurons: New in vitro and in vivo models to study 5-HT(1B) receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegert, Céline; Rothmaier, Anna Katharina; Leemhuis, Jost; Sexton, Timothy J; Neumaier, John F; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Jackisch, Rolf

    2008-07-01

    Serotonergic modulation of acetylcholine (ACh) release after neuron-specific increase of the expression of 5-HT(1B) receptors by gene transfer was studied in vitro and in vivo. The increased expression of the 5-HT(1B) receptor in vitro was induced by treating rat primary fetal septal cell cultures for 3 days with a viral vector inducing the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) vector alone, or, in addition, of 5-HT(1B) receptors (HA1B/GFP vector). The transfection resulted in a high number of GFP-positive cells, part of which being immunopositive for choline acetyltransferase. In HA1B/GFP-cultures (vs. GFP-cultures), electrically evoked ACh release was significantly more sensitive to the inhibitory action of the 5-HT(1B) agonist CP-93,129. Increased expression of the 5-HT(1B) receptor in vivo was induced by stereotaxic injections of the vectors into the rat septal region. Three days later, electrically evoked release of ACh in hippocampal slices of HA1B/GFP-treated rats was lower than in their GFP-treated counterparts, showing a higher inhibitory efficacy of endogenous 5-HT on cholinergic terminals after transfection. Moreover, CP-93,129 had a higher inhibitory potency. In conclusion, the HA1B/GFP vector reveals a useful tool to induce a targeted increase of 5-HT(1B) heteroreceptors on cholinergic neurons in selected CNS regions, which provides interesting perspectives for functional approaches at more integrated levels.

  7. The expression of the ACTH receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L.K. Elias

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal glucocorticoid secretion is regulated by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH acting through a specific cell membrane receptor (ACTH-R. The ACTH-R is a member of the G protein superfamily-coupled receptors and belongs to the subfamily of melanocortin receptors. The ACTH-R is mainly expressed in the adrenocortical cells showing a restricted tissue specificity, although ACTH is recognized by the other four melanocortin receptors. The cloning of the ACTH-R was followed by the study of this gene in human diseases such as familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD and adrenocortical tumors. FGD is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by glucocorticoid deficiency, elevated plasma ACTH levels and preserved renin/aldosterone secretion. This disorder has been ascribed to an impaired adrenal responsiveness to ACTH due to a defective ACTH-R, a defect in intracellular signal transduction or an abnormality in adrenal cortical development. Mutations of the ACTH-R have been described in patients with FGD in segregation with the disease. The functional characterization of these mutations has been prevented by difficulties in expressing human ACTH-R in cells that lack endogenous melanocortin receptor activity. To overcome these difficulties we used Y6 cells, a mutant variant of the Y1 cell line, which possesses a non-expressed ACTH-R gene allowing the functional study without any background activity. Our results demonstrated that the several mutations of the ACTH-R found in FGD result in an impaired cAMP response or loss of sensitivity to ACTH stimulation. An ACTH-binding study showed an impairment of ligand binding with loss of the high affinity site in most of the mutations studied.

  8. Expression of orexin receptors in the pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Tadeusz; Smolinska, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Orexin receptors type 1 (OX1R) and type 2 (OX2R) are G protein-coupled receptors whose structure is highly conserved in mammals. OX1R is selective for orexin A, and OX2R binds orexin A and orexin B with similar affinity. Orexin receptor expression was observed in human, rat, porcine, sheep as well as Xenopus laevis pituitaries, both in the adenohypophysis and in the neurohypophysis. The expression level is regulated by gonadal steroid hormones and GnRH. The majority of orexins reaching the pituitary originate from the lateral hypothalamus, but due to the presence of the receptors and the local production of orexins in the pituitary, orexins could deliver an auto/paracrine effect within the gland. Cumulative data indicate that orexins are involved in the regulation of LH, GH, PRL, ACTH, and TSH secretion by pituitary cells, pointing to orexins' effect on the functioning of the endocrine axes. Those hormones may also serve as a signal linking metabolic status with endocrine control of sleep, arousal, and reproduction processes.

  9. The long-term effects of neonatal morphine administration on the pentylenetetrazol seizure model in rats: the role of hippocampal cholinergic receptors in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboory, Ehsan; Gholami, Morteza; Zare, Samad; Roshan-Milani, Shiva

    2014-04-01

    Early life exposure to opiates may affect neuropathological conditions, such as epilepsy, during adulthood. We investigated whether neonatal morphine exposure affects pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in adulthood. Male rats were subcutaneously injected with morphine or saline on postnatal days 8-14. During adulthood, each rat was assigned to 1 of the following 10 sub-groups: saline, nicotine (0.1, 0.5, or 1 μg), atropine (0.25 or 1 μg), oxotremorine M (0.1 or 1 μg), or mecamylamine (2 or 8 μg). An intrahippocampal infusion of the indicated compound was administered 30 min before seizure induction (80 mg/kg PTZ). Compared with the saline/oxotremorine (1 μg), saline/saline, and morphine/saline groups, the morphine/oxotremorine (1 μg) group showed a significantly increased latency to the first epileptic behavior. The duration of tonic-clonic seizures was significantly lower in the morphine/oxotremorine (1 μg) group compared to the saline/saline and morphine/saline groups. The severity of seizure was significantly decreased in the morphine/atropine (1 μg) group than in the saline/atropine (1 μg). Seizure severity was also decreased in the morphine/mecamylamine (2 μg) group than in the saline/mecamylamine (2 μg) group. Latency for death was significantly lower in the morphine/mecamylamine (2 μg) group compared with the saline/mecamylamine (2 μg) group. Mortality rates in the morphine/atropine (1 μg) and morphine/mecamylamine (2 μg) groups were significantly lower than those in the saline/atropine (1 μg) and saline/mecamylamine (2 μg) groups, respectively. Chronic neonatal morphine administration attenuated PTZ-induced seizures, reduced the mortality rate, and decreased the impact of the hippocampal cholinergic system on seizures and mortality rate in adult rats. Neonatal morphine exposure induces changes to μ-receptors that may lead to activation of GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus. This pathway may explain the anti-convulsant effects of

  10. Hormone-receptor expression and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieh, Weiva; Köbel, Martin; Longacre, Teri A;

    2013-01-01

    Few biomarkers of ovarian cancer prognosis have been established, partly because subtype-specific associations might be obscured in studies combining all histopathological subtypes. We examined whether tumour expression of the progesterone receptor (PR) and oestrogen receptor (ER) was associated...

  11. Acetylcholinesterase loosens the brain's cholinergic anti-inflammatory response and promotes epileptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehudit eGnatek

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show a key role of brain inflammation in epilepsy. However, the mechanisms controlling brain immune response are only partly understood. In the periphery, acetylcholine (ACh release by the vagus nerve restrains inflammation by inhibiting the activation of leukocytes. Recent reports suggested a similar anti-inflammatory effect for ACh in the brain. Since brain cholinergic dysfunction are documented in epileptic animals, we explored changes in brain cholinergic gene expression and associated immune response during pilocarpine-induced epileptogenesis. Levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE and inflammatory markers were measured using real-time RT-PCR, in-situ hybridization and immunostaining in wild type (WT and transgenic mice over-expressing the "synaptic" splice variant AChE-S (TgS. One month following pilocarpine, mice were video-monitored for spontaneous seizures. To test directly the effect of ACh on the brain's innate immune response, cytokines expression levels were measured in acute brain slices treated with cholinergic agents. We report a robust upregulation of AChE as early as 48 hrs following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE. AChE was expressed in hippocampal neurons, microglia and endothelial cells but rarely in astrocytes. TgS mice overexpressing AChE showed constitutive increased microglial activation, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines 48 hrs after SE and accelerated epileptogenesis compared to their WT counterparts. Finally we show a direct, muscarine-receptor dependant, nicotine-receptor independent anti-inflammatory effect of ACh in brain slices maintained ex vivo. Our work demonstrates for the first time, that ACh directly suppresses brain innate immune response and that AChE up-regulation after SE is associated with enhanced immune response, facilitating the epileptogenic process. Our results highlight the cholinergic system as a potential new target for the prevention of seizures and epilepsy.

  12. 胆碱能受体激动剂逆转天疱疮棘层松解的机制研究%Mechanisms underlying the reversal of acantholysis in pemphigus by a cholinergic receptor agonist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志量; 张洁尘; 徐浩翔; 杨永红; 冯素英; 王宝玺

    2015-01-01

    pemphigus vulgaris immunoglobulin G (PV-IgG) to establish a cell model of pemphigus,then classified into two groups to be incubated with the cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol for 12 hours (test group) or remain untreated (control group).Cell dissociation assay was performed to quantitatively estimate the reversal effect of carbachol on acantholysis,and immunofluorescence assay to qualitatively assess the changes of desmosomal proteins.Radio-immunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) lysis buffer and Triton X-100 were used to lyse HaCaT cells to obtain total proteins and cytoplasmic proteins,and Western blot was conducted to determine the expression levels of adhesion-related proteins desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) and plakoglobin (PG) on the surface of HaCaT cells,as well as the phosphorylation levels of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at different time points.Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to detect the mRNA expressions of the above surface proteins,and coimmunoprecipitation assay to qualitatively evaluate the interaction between Dsg3 and PG.Results The number of cell debris was significantly lower in the test group than in the control group (18.67 ± 2.52 vs.46.67 ± 2.03,t =11.22,P<0.01).Immunofluorescence assay showed that carbachol could reverse the internalization of desmosomal molecules induced by PV-IgG.In the pemphigus cell model,the levels of total Dsg3 and PG as well as non-desmosomal Dsg3 were decreased,while the level of non-desmosomal PG increased,and the interaction between Dsg3 and PG was attenuated.When the pemphigus cell model was co-cultured with carbachol,these above changes were reversed.Carbachol also increased the mRNA levels (expressed as 2-△△Ct) of Dsg3 and PG from 1.428 ± 0.215 and 1.563 ± 0.247 in the control group to 4.974 ± 0.948 (t =3.65,P =0.01) and 13.420 ± 1.715 (t =6.85,P < 0.01) in the test group respectively.In phosphorylation assay,carbachol inhibited

  13. Expression of Androgen Receptor in Meningiomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the expression of androgen receptor (AR) in meningiomas and its relation to tumor proliferative potential, we examined the expression of AR and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) by avidine-biotin complex immunohistochemistry in 39 cases of meningiomas. Of the 39 cases of meningiomas, 20(51 %) showed positive AR immunoreactivity. The AR expression positivity rates were 31 % (6/19) in benign meningiomas, 58 % (7/12) in atypical meningiomas, 87.5 % (7/8) in malignant meningiomas, respectively. In addition to the tumor cells, cells of microvascular endothelial proliferation were frequently AR positive. Malignant meningiomas had a significantly higher percentage of AR positive cells compared with atypical and benign meningiomas (P<0.05). The mean proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index (PCNA LI) was significantly higher in the malignant meningiomas when compared with atypical meningiomas (P<0.05) and benign meningiomas (P<0.05). AR positive meningiomas had higher PCNA LI than AR negative meningiomas (P<0.05). The expression of AR in tumor tissues was significantly related with PCNA LI. These data indicated that AR in the meningiomas was correlated with histological grade and AR might participate in the growth of these tumors and tumor angiogenesis. The measurement of AR in these tumors may indirectly represent tumor growth potential.

  14. Enhanced muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression in the corpus striatum of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Jobin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acetylcholine (ACh, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, regulate the activities of central and peripheral functions through interactions with muscarinic receptors. Changes in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. Previous reports from our laboratory on streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats showed down regulation of muscarinic M1 receptors in the brainstem, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex and pancreatic islets. In this study, we have investigated the changes of acetylcholine esterase (AChE enzyme activity, total muscarinic and muscarinic M1 receptor binding and gene expression in the corpus striatum of STZ – diabetic rats and the insulin treated diabetic rats. The striatum, a neuronal nucleus intimately involved in motor behaviour, is one of the brain regions with the highest acetylcholine content. ACh has complex and clinically important actions in the striatum that are mediated predominantly by muscarinic receptors. We observed that insulin treatment brought back the decreased maximal velocity (Vmax of acetylcholine esterase in the corpus striatum during diabetes to near control state. In diabetic rats there was a decrease in maximal number (Bmax and affinity (Kd of total muscarinic receptors whereas muscarinic M1 receptors were increased with decrease in affinity in diabetic rats. We observed that, in all cases, the binding parameters were reversed to near control by the treatment of diabetic rats with insulin. Real-time PCR experiment confirmed the increase in muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression and a similar reversal with insulin treatment. These results suggest the diabetes-induced changes of the cholinergic activity in the corpus striatum and the regulatory role of insulin on binding parameters and gene expression of total and muscarinic M1 receptors.

  15. Cholinergic systems mediate action from movement to higher consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Nancy J; Butcher, Larry L

    2011-08-10

    There is a fundamental link between cholinergic neurotransmitter function and overt and covert actions. Major cholinergic systems include peripheral motor neurons organizing skeletal muscle movements into overt behaviors and cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and mesopontine regions that mediate covert actions realized as states of consciousness, arousal, selective attention, perception, and memory. Cholinergic interneurons in the striatum appear to integrate conscious and unconscious actions. Neural network models involving cholinergic neurons, as well as neurons using other neurotransmitters, emphasize connective circuitry as being responsible for both motor programs and neural correlates of higher consciousness. This, however, is only a partial description. At a more fundamental level lie intracellular mechanisms involving the cytoskeleton, which are common to both muscle contraction and neuroplastic responses in targets of central cholinergic cells attendant with higher cognition. Acetylcholine, acting through nicotinic receptors, triggers interactions between cytoskeletal proteins in skeletal muscle cells, as has been long known. There is also evidence that acetylcholine released at central sites acts through muscarinic and nicotinic receptors to initiate responses in actin and microtubule proteins. These effects and their implications for cholinergic involvement in higher cognition are explored in this review.

  16. Human basophils express interleukin-4 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valent, P.; Besemer, J.; Kishi, K.; Di Padova, F.; Geissler, K.; Lechner, K.; Bettelheim, P. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1990-11-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4), a multipotential lymphokine reputed to play an important role in the regulation of immune responses, interacts with a variety of hemopoietic target cells through specific cell surface membrane receptors. The present study was designed to investigate whether human basophils express IL-4 binding sites. For this purpose, basophils were enriched to homogeneity (93% and 98% purity, respectively) from the peripheral blood of two chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL) donors using a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and complement. Purified basophils bound 125I-radiolabeled recombinant human (rh) IL-4 in a specific manner. Quantitative binding studies and Scatchard plot analysis revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity IL-4 binding sites (280 +/- 40 sites per cell in donor 1 and 640 +/- 45 sites per cell in donor 2) with an apparent dissociation constant, kd, of 7.12 x 10(-11) +/- 2.29 x 10(-11) and 9.55 +/- 3.5 x 10(-11) mol/L, respectively. KU812-F, a human basophil precursor cell line, was found to express a single class of 810 to 1,500 high affinity IL-4 binding sites with a kd of 2.63 to 5.54 x 10(-10) mol/L. No change in the numbers or binding constants of IL-4 receptors was found after exposure of KU812-F cells to rhIL-3 (a potent activator of basophils) for 60 minutes. No effect of rhIL-4 on 3H-thymidine uptake, release or synthesis of histamine, or expression of basophil differentiation antigens (Bsp-1, CD11b, CD25, CD40, CD54) on primary human CGL basophils or KU812-F cells was observed.

  17. Expressing exogenous functional odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomina Alla F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory discrimination depends on the large numbers of odorant receptor genes and differential ligand-receptor signaling among neurons expressing different receptors. In this study, we describe an in vitro system that enables the expression of exogenous odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons. Olfactory sensory neurons in the culture express characteristic signaling molecules and, therefore, provide a system to study receptor function within its intrinsic cellular environment. Results We demonstrate that cultured olfactory sensory neurons express endogenous odorant receptors. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer enables successful ectopic expression of odorant receptors. We show that the ectopically expressed mouse I7 is functional in the cultured olfactory sensory neurons. When two different odorant receptors are ectopically expressed simultaneously, both receptor proteins co-localized in the same olfactory sensory neurons up to 10 days in vitro. Conclusion This culture technique provided an efficient method to culture olfactory sensory neurons whose morphology, molecular characteristics and maturation progression resembled those observed in vivo. Using this system, regulation of odorant receptor expression and its ligand specificity can be studied in its intrinsic cellular environment.

  18. GABAA Receptors Implicated in REM Sleep Control Express a Benzodiazepine Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Tin Quang; Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that non-subtype-selective GABAA receptor antagonists injected into the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of rats induced long-lasting increases in REM sleep. Characteristics of these REM sleep increases were identical to those resulting from injection of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. Both actions were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, atropine. Microdialysis of GABAA receptor antagonists into the PnO resulted in increased acetylcholine levels. These findings were consis...

  19. Chronic Morphine Reduces Surface Expression of δ-Opioid Receptors in Subregions of Rostral Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah, Paul M; Heath, Emily M L; Balleine, Bernard W; Christie, Macdonald J

    2016-03-01

    The delta opioid receptor (DOPr), whilst not the primary target of clinically used opioids, is involved in development of opioid tolerance and addiction. There is growing evidence that DOPr trafficking is involved in drug addiction, e.g., a range of studies have shown increased plasma membrane DOPr insertion during chronic treatment with opioids. The present study used a transgenic mouse model in which the C-terminal of the DOPr is tagged with enhanced-green fluorescence protein to examine the effects of chronic morphine treatment on surface membrane expression in striatal cholinergic interneurons that are implicated in motivated learning following both chronic morphine and morphine sensitization treatment schedules in male mice. A sex difference was noted throughout the anterior striatum, which was most prominent in the nucleus accumbens core region. Incontrast with previous studies in other neurons, chronic exposure to a high dose of morphine for 6 days had no effect, or slightly decreased (anterior dorsolateral striatum) surface DOPr expression. A morphine sensitization schedule produced similar results with a significant decrease in surface DOPr expression in nucleus accumbens shell. These results suggest that chronic morphine and morphine sensitisation treatment may have effects on instrumental reward-seeking behaviours and learning processes related to drug addiction, via effects on striatal DOPr function.

  20. Estrogen receptor expression in adrenocortical carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-cao SHEN; Cai-xiao GU; Yi-qing QIU; Chuan-jun DU; Yan-biao FU; Jian-jun WU

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but highly malignant tumor, and its diagnosis is mostly delayed and prognosis is poor. We report estrogen receptor (ER) expression in this tumor and our clinical experiences with 17 ACC cases. Methods: The data of the 17 patients (9 females and 8 males, age range from 16 to 69 years, mean age of 42.6 years) with ACC were reviewed, and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, treatment, and results of follow-up were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect ER expression in tumor samples from the 17 patients. Results: At the time of diagnosis, 4 tumors were classified as Stage Ⅰ, 4 as Stage Ⅱ, 3 as Stage Ⅲ, and 6 as Stage Ⅳ. Eight patients demonstrated positive nuclear immunostaining of ER. The prognosis of patients with ER positive was significantly better (P<0.05) than that of patients with ER negative, with 1- and 5-year survival rates at 86% and 60% for ER-positive patients, and 38% and 0% for ER-negative patients, respectively. Conclusion: ER-positivity may be one of the factors associated with a worse prognosis of ACC.

  1. Functional expression of rat VPAC1 receptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.K.; Tams, J.W.; Fahrenkrug, Jan;

    1999-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide......G protein-coupled receptor; heterologous expression; membrane protein; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; yeast mating factor-pre-pro *Ga-leader peptide...

  2. Cholinergic interneurons mediate fast VGluT3-dependent glutamatergic transmission in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Michael J; Gittis, Aryn H; Oldenburg, Ian A; Balthasar, Nina; Seal, Rebecca P; Edwards, Robert H; Lowell, Bradford B; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2011-04-22

    The neurotransmitter glutamate is released by excitatory projection neurons throughout the brain. However, non-glutamatergic cells, including cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons, express markers that suggest that they are also capable of vesicular glutamate release. Striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) express the Type-3 vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT3), although whether they form functional glutamatergic synapses is unclear. To examine this possibility, we utilized mice expressing Cre-recombinase under control of the endogenous choline acetyltransferase locus and conditionally expressed light-activated Channelrhodopsin2 in CINs. Optical stimulation evoked action potentials in CINs and produced postsynaptic responses in medium spiny neurons that were blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists. CIN-mediated glutamatergic responses exhibited a large contribution of NMDA-type glutamate receptors, distinguishing them from corticostriatal inputs. CIN-mediated glutamatergic responses were insensitive to antagonists of acetylcholine receptors and were not seen in mice lacking VGluT3. Our results indicate that CINs are capable of mediating fast glutamatergic transmission, suggesting a new role for these cells in regulating striatal activity.

  3. Cholinergic interneurons mediate fast VGluT3-dependent glutamatergic transmission in the striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Higley

    Full Text Available The neurotransmitter glutamate is released by excitatory projection neurons throughout the brain. However, non-glutamatergic cells, including cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons, express markers that suggest that they are also capable of vesicular glutamate release. Striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs express the Type-3 vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT3, although whether they form functional glutamatergic synapses is unclear. To examine this possibility, we utilized mice expressing Cre-recombinase under control of the endogenous choline acetyltransferase locus and conditionally expressed light-activated Channelrhodopsin2 in CINs. Optical stimulation evoked action potentials in CINs and produced postsynaptic responses in medium spiny neurons that were blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists. CIN-mediated glutamatergic responses exhibited a large contribution of NMDA-type glutamate receptors, distinguishing them from corticostriatal inputs. CIN-mediated glutamatergic responses were insensitive to antagonists of acetylcholine receptors and were not seen in mice lacking VGluT3. Our results indicate that CINs are capable of mediating fast glutamatergic transmission, suggesting a new role for these cells in regulating striatal activity.

  4. Expression of histamine receptors in the human endolymphatic sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M Nue; Kirkeby, S; Vikeså, J.

    2016-01-01

    in 2012. This leaves betahistine (Betaserc) as the only drug for potential prevention of the incapacitating attacks of dizziness, tinnitus and hearing loss. However, the histamine receptors targeted by betahistine have never been demonstrated in the human ES. Accordingly, this study aims to investigate...... the expression of histamine receptors of the human ES epithelium and sub-epithelial stroma. Following sampling of human endolymphatic sac tissue during translabyrinthine surgery, the expression of histamine receptor genes was determined by cDNA microarray analysis. Results were subsequently verified by immuno......-histochemistry. The combined results of microarrays and immuno-histochemistry showed expression of the histamine receptor HRH1 in the epithelial lining of the ES, whereas HRH3 was expressed exclusively in the sub-epithelial capillary network. Receptors HRH2 and -4 were not expressed. The present data provide the first direct...

  5. Distribution of cellular HSV-1 receptor expression in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathe, Richard; Haas, Juergen G

    2016-12-15

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus linked to a range of acute and chronic neurological disorders affecting distinct regions of the brain. Unusually, HSV-1 entry into cells requires the interaction of viral proteins glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) with distinct cellular receptor proteins. Several different gD and gB receptors have been identified, including TNFRSF14/HVEM and PVRL1/nectin 1 as gD receptors and PILRA, MAG, and MYH9 as gB receptors. We investigated the expression of these receptor molecules in different areas of the adult and developing human brain using online transcriptome databases. Whereas all HSV-1 receptors showed distinct expression patterns in different brain areas, the Allan Brain Atlas (ABA) reported increased expression of both gD and gB receptors in the hippocampus. Specifically, for PVRL1, TNFRFS14, and MYH9, the differential z scores for hippocampal expression, a measure of relative levels of increased expression, rose to 2.9, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, comparable to the z score for the archetypical hippocampus-enriched mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2, z = 3.1). These data were confirmed at the Human Brain Transcriptome (HBT) database, but HBT data indicate that MAG expression is also enriched in hippocampus. The HBT database allowed the developmental pattern of expression to be investigated; we report that all HSV1 receptors markedly increase in expression levels between gestation and the postnatal/adult periods. These results suggest that differential receptor expression levels of several HSV-1 gD and gB receptors in the adult hippocampus are likely to underlie the susceptibility of this brain region to HSV-1 infection.

  6. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Pranay [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Yadav, Rajesh S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Department of Crimnology and Forensic Science, Harisingh Gour University, Sagar 470 003 (India); Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Dwivedi, Hari N. [Babu Banarasi Das University, BBD City, Faizabad Road, Lucknow 227 015 (India); Pant, Aditiya B. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Khanna, Vinay K., E-mail: vkkhanna1@gmail.com [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  7. Different neuropeptides are expressed in different functional subsets of cholinergic excitatory motorneurons in the nematode Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konop, Christopher J; Knickelbine, Jennifer J; Sygulla, Molly S; Vestling, Martha M; Stretton, Antony O W

    2015-06-17

    Neuropeptides are known to have dramatic effects on neurons and synapses; however, despite extensive studies of the motorneurons in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum, their peptide content had not yet been described. We determined the peptide content of single excitatory motorneurons by mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. There are two subsets of ventral cord excitatory motorneurons, each with neuromuscular output either anterior or posterior to their cell body, mediating forward or backward locomotion, respectively. Strikingly, the two sets of neurons contain different neuropeptides, with AF9 and six novel peptides (As-NLP-21.1-6) in anterior projectors, and the six afp-1 peptides in addition to AF2 in posterior projectors. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression of these peptides, validating the integrity of the dissection technique. This work identifies new components of the functional behavioral circuit, as well as potential targets for antiparasitic drug development.

  8. GABAergic actions on cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, K A; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    (IRK) mediated this effect. Further, outward currents were never additive with those induced by application of carbachol, suggesting that they were mediated by activation of GABA(B) receptors linked to the same G(IRK) activated in these cells by muscarinic receptor stimulation. Activation of GABA(B) receptors....... Therefore, we studied the actions of GABA agonists and antagonists on cholinergic LDT cells by performing patch clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. Under conditions where detection of Cl(-) -mediated events was optimized, GABA induced gabazine (GZ)-sensitive inward currents in the majority of LDT...... neurons. Post-synaptic location of GABA(A) receptors was demonstrated by persistence of muscimol-induced inward currents in TTX and low Ca(2+) solutions. THIP, a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist with a preference for d-subunit containing GABA(A) receptors, induced inward currents, suggesting...

  9. Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fede

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2 in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation.

  10. Striatal cholinergic interneurons Drive GABA release from dopamine terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alexandra B; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F; Shah, Nirao M; Seal, Rebecca P; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2014-04-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons.

  11. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios [Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King' s College London, Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [{sup 11}C]MP4A and [{sup 11}C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [{sup 123}I]5IA SPECT for the α{sub 4}β{sub 2} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [{sup 123}I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  12. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshula eSamarajeewa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin (5-HT type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including cortical neurons. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins towards the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

  13. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  14. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G; Beazely, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

  15. Convergent effects on cell signaling mechanisms mediate the actions of different neurobehavioral teratogens: alterations in cholinergic regulation of protein kinase C in chick and avian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Joseph; Beer, Avital; Huleihel, Rabab; Izrael, Michal; Katz, Sofia; Levi, Yaarit; Rozenboim, Israel; Yaniv, Shiri P; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2004-10-01

    Although the actions of heroin on central nervous system (CNS) development are mediated through opioid receptors, the net effects converge on dysfunction of cholinergic systems. We explored the mechanisms underlying neurobehavioral deficits in mouse and avian (chick, Cayuga duck) models. In mice, prenatal heroin exposure (10 mg/kg on gestation days 9-18) elicited deficits in behaviors related to hippocampal cholinergic innervation, characterized by concomitant pre- and postsynaptic hyperactivity, but ending in a reduction of basal levels of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms betaII and gamma and their desensitization to cholinergic receptor-induced activation. PKCalpha, which is not involved in the behaviors studied, was unaffected. Because mammalian models possess inherent confounding factors from maternal effects, we conducted parallel studies using avian embryos, evaluating hyperstriatal nucleus (intermedial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale, IMHV)-related, filial imprinting behavior. Heroin injection to the eggs (20 mg/kg) on incubation days 0 and 5 diminished the post-hatch imprinting ability and reduced PKCg and bII content in the IMHV membrane fraction. Two otherwise unrelated agents that converge on cholinergic systems, chlorpyrifos and nicotine, elicited the same spectrum of effects on PKC isoforms and imprinting but had more robust actions. Pharmacological characterization also excluded direct effects of opioid receptors on the expression of imprinting; instead, it indicated participation of serotonergic innervation. The avian models can provide rapid screening of neuroteratogens, exploration of common mechanisms of behavioral disruption, and the potential design of therapies to reverse neurobehavioral deficits.

  16. Regulation of gonadotropin receptor gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); R. Kraaij (Robert); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe receptors for the gonadotropins differ from the other G protein-coupled receptors by having a large extracellular hormone-binding domain, encoded by nine or ten exons. Alternative splicing of the large pre-mRNA of approximately 100 kb can result in mRNA species that encode truncated

  17. Muscarinic M3 receptor subtype gene expression in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, I; Mustafa, A; Riazi, M; Suliman, I; Sylvén, C; Adem, A

    2000-01-20

    The heart is an important target organ for cholinergic function. In this study, muscarinic receptor subtype(s) in the human heart were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our results demonstrated muscarinic receptor M2 and M3 subtype RNA in left/right atria/ventricles of donor hearts. Receptor autoradiography analysis using selective muscarinic ligands indicated an absence of M1 receptor subtype in the human heart. The level of muscarinic receptor binding in atria was two to three times greater than in ventricles. Our results suggest that muscarinic receptors in the human heart are of the M2 and M3 subtypes. This is the first report of M3 receptors in the human myocardium.

  18. Interaction of nerve agent antidotes with cholinergic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, O; Tobin, G; Kumar, U K; Binder, J; Proska, J; Jun, D; Fusek, J; Kuca, K

    2010-01-01

    The poisoning with organophosphorus compounds represents a life threatening danger especially in the time of terroristic menace. No universal antidote has been developed yet and other therapeutic approaches not related to reactivation of acetylcholinesterase are being investigated. This review describes the main features of the cholinergic system, cholinergic receptors, cholinesterases and their inhibitors. It also focuses on the organophosphorus nerve agents, their properties, effects and a large part describes various possibilities in treatments, mainly traditional oxime therapies based on reactivation of AChE. Furthermore, non-cholinesterase coupled antidotal effects of the oximes are thoroughly discussed. These antidotal effects principally include oxime interactions with muscarinic and nicotinic receptors.

  19. Dcc haploinsufficiency regulates dopamine receptor expression across postnatal lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokinko, Matthew; Grant, Alanna; Shahabi, Florence; Dumont, Yvan; Manitt, Colleen; Flores, Cecilia

    2017-03-27

    Adolescence is a period during which the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) undergoes significant remodeling. The netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), controls the extent and organization of mPFC dopamine connectivity during adolescence and in turn directs mPFC functional and structural maturation. Dcc haploinsufficiency leads to increased mPFC dopamine input, which causes improved cognitive processing and resilience to behavioral effects of stimulant drugs of abuse. Here we examine the effects of Dcc haploinsufficiency on the dynamic expression of dopamine receptors in forebrain targets of C57BL6 mice. We conducted quantitative receptor autoradiography experiments with [(3)H]SCH-23390 or [(3)H]raclopride to characterize D1 and D2 receptor expression in mPFC and striatal regions in male Dcc haploinsufficient and wild-type mice. We generated autoradiograms at early adolescence (PND21±1), mid-adolescence (PND35±2), and adulthood (PND75±15). C57BL6 mice exhibit overexpression and pruning of D1, but not D2, receptors in striatal regions, and a lack of dopamine receptor pruning in the mPFC. We observed age- and region-specific differences in D1 and D2 receptor density between Dcc haploinsufficient and wild-type mice. Notably, neither group shows the typical pattern of mPFC dopamine receptor pruning in adolescence, but adult haploinsufficient mice show increased D2 receptor density in the mPFC. These results show that DCC receptors contribute to the dynamic refinement of D1 and D2 receptor expression in striatal regions across adolescence. The age-dependent expression of dopamine receptor in C57BL6 mice shows marked differences from previous characterizations in rats.

  20. Gene expression and protein distribution of orexins and orexin receptors in rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Xu, G Z; Wang, L; Jiang, S X; Yang, X L; Zhong, Y M

    2011-08-25

    Orexins, composed of orexin A and orexin B, are identified as endogenous ligands of two orphan G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). Orexins are implicated in regulating wake/sleep states, feeding behaviors, etc. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactive (RT-PCR) analysis and immunofluorescence double labeling, we investigated the distributions of orexin A, orexin B, OX1R and OX2R in rat retina. RT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of mRNAs of prepro-orexin, OX1R and OX2R in rat retina. Immunostaining for orexin A and orexin B was observed in many cells in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. In the outer retina, horizontal cells, labeled by calbindin, and bipolar cells, labeled by homeobox protein Chx10, were orexin A- and orexin B-positive. In the inner retina, two orexins were both found in GABAergic amacrine cells (ACs), including dopaminergic and cholinergic ones, stained by tyrosine hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase respectively. Glycinergic ACs, including AII ACs, also expressed orexins. Weak to moderate labeling for orexin A and orexin B was diffusely distributed in the inner plexiform layer. Additionally, orexins were expressed in almost all ganglion cells (GCs) retrogradely labeled by cholera toxin B subunit. Specifically, double-labeling experiments demonstrated that melanopsin-positive GCs (intrinsically photosensitive retinal GCs, ipRGCs) were labeled by two orexins. Morever, OX1R immunoreactivity was observed in most of GCs and all dopaminergic ACs, as well as in both outer and inner plexiform layers. In contrast, no obvious OX2R immunostaining was detectable in the rat retina. These results suggest that orexins may modulate the function of neurons, especially in the inner retina. We further hypothesize that the orexin signaling via ipRGCs may be involved in setting the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian clock.

  1. High expression of NPY receptors in the human testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Meike; Waser, Beatriche; Thalmann, George N; Reubii, Jean Claude

    2011-04-30

    NPY receptors represent novel molecular therapeutic targets in cancer and obesity. However, the extent of NPY receptor expression in normal human tissues is poorly investigated. Based on the role of NPY in reproductive functions, the NPY receptor expression was studied in 25 normal human testes and, additionally, 24 testicular tumors using NPY receptor autoradiography. In the normal testis, Leydig cells strongly expressed NPY receptor subtype Y2, and small arterial blood vessels Y1. Y2 receptors were found to be functional with agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding autoradiography. Full functional integrity of the NPY system was further suggested by the immunohistochemical detection of NPY peptide in nerve fibers directly adjacent to Leydig cells and arteries. Germ cell tumors expressed Y1 and Y2 on tumor cells in 33% and Y1 on intratumoral blood vessels in 50%. Based on its strong NPY receptor expression in Leydig cells and blood vessels, the normal human testis represents a potentially important physiological and pharmalogical NPY target.

  2. Expression of luteinizing hormone receptors in the mouse penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokk, Kersti; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Keisala, Tiina; Purmonen, Sami; Kaipia, Antti; Tammela, Teuvo; Orro, Helen; Simovart, Helle-Evi; Pöllänen, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    The role of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the regulation of normal reproductive functions in males and females is quite well established. Besides the expression of LH receptors in the target cells in gonads, it has been found in several extragonadal organs. There is no information about the expression of LH receptors in the penis up to now. The aim of the present study is to investigate the expression of the LH receptor in the mouse penis to see if LH effects are possible in the penis. BALB/c mice were used as donors of normal penis and testis tissue. Immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) were used for the detection of the LH receptor. Positive immunoreaction for LH receptors was present in the nuclei of urethral epithelium and endothelial cells of cavernous spaces in the corpus cavernosum and corpus spongiosum penis. Western blotting experiments demonstrated the presence of LH antigen at M(r) = 97.4 and 78 kd. Quantitative RT-PCRs confirmed the expression of LH receptor in the penis. Our results show that LH receptor is expressed in the body of the mouse penis; thus, it may directly regulate functions of penile tissue.

  3. Expression of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit mRNAs in rat hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jong-Hyun; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H

    2008-11-10

    Hippocampal inhibitory interneurons are a diverse population of cells widely scattered in the hippocampus, where they regulate hippocampal circuit activity. The hippocampus receives cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain, and functional studies have suggested the presence of different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons. Single-cell polymerase chain reaction analysis had confirmed that several nAChR subunit mRNAs are co-expressed with glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), the marker for GABAergic interneurons. In this anatomical study, we systematically investigated the co-expression of GAD67 with different nAChR subunits by using double in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled GAD67 probe and (35)S-labeled probes for nAChR subunits (alpha2, alpha3, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, alpha7, beta2, beta3, and beta4). The results revealed that most GAD67-positive interneurons expressed beta2, and 67 % also expressed alpha7 mRNA. In contrast, mRNA expression of other subunits was limited; only 13 % of GAD67-positive neurons co-expressed alpha4, and less than 10% expressed transcripts for alpha2, alpha3, alpha5, or beta4. Most GAD67/alpha2 co-expression was located in CA1/CA3 stratum oriens, and GAD67/alpha5 co-expression was predominantly detected in CA1/CA3 stratum radiatum/lacunosum moleculare and the dentate gyrus. Expression of alpha6 and beta3 mRNAs was rarely detected in the hippocampus, and mRNAs were not co-expressed with GAD67. These findings suggest that the majority of nicotinic responses in GABAergic interneurons should be mediated by a homomeric alpha7 or heteromeric alpha7*-containing nAChRs. Other possible combinations such as alpha2beta2*, alpha4beta2*, or alpha5beta2* heteromeric nAChRs could contribute to functional nicotinic response in subsets of GABAergic interneurons but overall would have a minor role.

  4. Intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus: fact or artefact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Krzysztof Blusztajn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed that hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh is synthesized and released exclusively from the terminals of the long-axon afferents whose cell bodies reside in the medial septum and diagonal band. The search for intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus has a long history; however evidence for the existence of these neurons has been inconsistent, with most investigators failing to detect them using in situ hybridization or immunohistochemical staining of the cholinergic markers, choline acetyltransferase (CHAT or vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VACHT. Advances in the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice expressing a reporter protein under the control of the genomic elements of the Chat gene (Chat-BAC mice have facilitated studies of cholinergic neurons. Such mice show robust and faithful expression of the reporter proteins in all known cholinergic cell populations. The availability of the Chat-BAC mice re-ignited interest in hippocampal cholinergic interneurons, because a small number of such reporter-expressing cells is frequently observed in the hippocampus of these mice. However, to date, attempts to confirm that these neurons co-express the endogenous cholinergic markers CHAT or VACHT, or release ACh, have been unsuccessful. Without such confirmatory evidence it is best to conclude that there are no cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus. Similar considerations apply to other BAC transgenic lines, whose utility as a discovery tool for cell populations heretofore not known to express the genes of interest encoded by the BACs, must be validated by methods that detect expression of the endogenous genes.

  5. Astrocytes mediate in vivo cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Navarrete

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission represents the cellular basis of learning and memory. Astrocytes have been shown to regulate synaptic transmission and plasticity. However, their involvement in specific physiological processes that induce LTP in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that in vivo cholinergic activity evoked by sensory stimulation or electrical stimulation of the septal nucleus increases Ca²⁺ in hippocampal astrocytes and induces LTP of CA3-CA1 synapses, which requires cholinergic muscarinic (mAChR and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR activation. Stimulation of cholinergic pathways in hippocampal slices evokes astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, postsynaptic depolarizations of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and LTP of transmitter release at single CA3-CA1 synapses. Like in vivo, these effects are mediated by mAChRs, and this cholinergic-induced LTP (c-LTP also involves mGluR activation. Astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations and LTP are absent in IP₃R2 knock-out mice. Downregulating astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal by loading astrocytes with BAPTA or GDPβS also prevents LTP, which is restored by simultaneous astrocyte Ca²⁺ uncaging and postsynaptic depolarization. Therefore, cholinergic-induced LTP requires astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, which stimulate astrocyte glutamate release that activates mGluRs. The cholinergic-induced LTP results from the temporal coincidence of the postsynaptic activity and the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal simultaneously evoked by cholinergic activity. Therefore, the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal is necessary for cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity, indicating that astrocytes are directly involved in brain storage information.

  6. Cloning and expression of the rabbit prostaglandin EP2 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Youfei; Stillman, Brett A.; Zhang, Yahua; Schneider, André; Saito, Osamu; Davis, Linda S.; Redha, Reyadh; Breyer, Richard M.; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2002-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has multiple physiologic roles mediated by G protein coupled receptors designated E-prostanoid, or "EP" receptors. Evidence supports an important role for the EP2 receptor in regulating fertility, vascular tone and renal function. Results The full-length rabbit EP2 receptor cDNA was cloned. The encoded polypeptide contains 361 amino acid residues with seven hydrophobic domains. COS-1 cells expressing the cloned rabbit EP2 exhibited specific [3H]PGE2 binding ...

  7. Purinergic receptors expressed in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, A; Ploug, Thorkil; Bune, L T;

    2012-01-01

    Purinergic receptors are present in most tissues and thought to be involved in various signalling pathways, including neural signalling, cell metabolism and local regulation of the microcirculation in skeletal muscles. The present study aims to determine the distribution and intracellular content...... and sarcolemma. P2Y(4) receptors were present in sarcolemma. P2Y(11) receptors were abundantly and diffusely expressed intracellularly and were more explicitly expressed in type I than in type II fibres, whereas P2X(1) and P2Y(4) showed no fibre-type specificity. Both diabetic patients and healthy controls...... distribution of purinergic receptors in skeletal muscle fibres. We speculate that the intracellular localization of purinergic receptors may reflect a role in regulation of muscle metabolism; further studies are nevertheless needed to determine the function of the purinergic system in skeletal muscle cells....

  8. Monitoring cholinergic activity during attentional performance in mice heterozygous for the choline transporter: a model of cholinergic capacity limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolone, Giovanna; Mallory, Caitlin S; Koshy Cherian, Ajeesh; Miller, Thomas R; Blakely, Randy D; Sarter, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in the capacity of the human choline transporter (SLC5A7, CHT) have been hypothesized to diminish cortical cholinergic neurotransmission, leading to risk for cognitive and mood disorders. To determine the acetylcholine (ACh) release capacity of cortical cholinergic projections in a mouse model of cholinergic hypofunction, the CHT+/- mouse, we assessed extracellular ACh levels while mice performed an operant sustained attention task (SAT). We found that whereas SAT-performance-associated increases in extracellular ACh levels of CHT+/- mice were significantly attenuated relative to wildtype littermates, performance on the SAT was normal. Tetrodotoxin-induced blockade of neuronal excitability reduced both dialysate ACh levels and SAT performance similarly in both genotypes. Likewise, lesions of cholinergic neurons abolished SAT performance in both genotypes. However, cholinergic activation remained more vulnerable to the reverse-dialyzed muscarinic antagonist atropine in CHT+/- mice. Additionally, CHT+/- mice displayed greater SAT-disrupting effects of reverse dialysis of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine. Receptor binding assays revealed a higher density of α4β2* nAChRs in the cortex of CHT+/- mice compared to controls. These findings reveal compensatory mechanisms that, in the context of moderate cognitive challenges, can overcome the performance deficits expected from the significantly reduced ACh capacity of CHT+/- cholinergic terminals. Further analyses of molecular and functional compensations in the CHT+/- model may provide insights into both risk and resiliency factors involved in cognitive and mood disorders.

  9. Prostaglandin F receptor expression in intrauterine tissues of pregnant rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanca, Halit; Yar, Atiye Seda; Helvacioğlu, Fatma; Menevşe, Sevda; Çalgüner, Engin; Erdoğan, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we studied the expression and localization of rat prostaglandin F (FP) receptor in uterine tissues of rats on gestational Days 10, 15, 18, 20, 21, 21.5 and postpartal Days 1 and 3 using Western blotting analysis, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. A high level of immunoreactivity was observed on gestational Days 20, 21, and 21.5 with the most significant signals found on Day 20. FP receptor protein was expressed starting on gestational Day 15, and a fluctuating unsteady increase was observed until delivery. Uterine FP receptor mRNA levels were low between Days 10 and 18 of gestation (p < 0.05). The transcript level increased significantly on Day 20 and peaked on Day 21.5 just before labor (p < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between FP receptor mRNA expression and serum estradiol levels (rs = 0.78; p < 0.01) along with serum estradiol/progesterone ratios (rs = 0.79; p < 0.01). In summary, we observed an increase FP receptor expression in rat uterus with advancing gestation, a marked elevation of expression at term, and a concominant decrease during the postpartum period. These findings indicate a role for uterine FP receptors in the mediation of uterine contractility at term. PMID:24136214

  10. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman S. Cheung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 expression in mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ida Holst; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Vetter-Kauczok, Claudia;

    2012-01-01

    Here, we have studied vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) expression in mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Immunohistochemistry revealed that in two-thirds of 34 patients, VEGFR-3 was expressed in situ by both tumor and stromal...

  12. Impairment of cognitive function and reduced hippocampal cholinergic activity in a rat model of chronic intermittent hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Zhao; Yan Chen; Chunlai Zhang; Linya Lü; Qian Xu

    2011-01-01

    The present study established a rat model of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) to simulate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. CIH rats were evaluated for cognitive function using the Morris water maze, and neuronal pathology in the hippocampus was observed using hematoxylin-eosin staining. In addition, hippocampal choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Our results revealed necrotic hippocampal neurons, decreased ChAT and nAChR expression, as well as cognitive impairment in CIH rats. These results suggest that hippocampal neuronal necrosis and decreased cholinergic activity may be involved in CIH-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

  13. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration.

  14. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago.

  15. Structural Characterization of the Putative Cholinergic Binding Region alpha(179-201) of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor. Part 1. Review and Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    ct-bungarotoxin. Most studies indicate there are two binding sites per AchR rnonomer(Maelicke 1984; Popot and Changeux 1984), this is consistent with...Acetylcholine Receptor a-subunit by epitope mapping," J. Biol. Chem, vol. 265(0), pp. 569-581, 1990. Popot , J.L and Changeux, J-P, Nicotinic receptor of

  16. Right Cervical Vagotomy Aggravates Viral Myocarditis in Mice Via the Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Sha, Ge; Xing-Xing, Chen; Lian-Pin, Wu; De-Pu, Zhou; Xiao-Wei, Li; Jia-Feng, Lin; Yue-Chun, Li

    2017-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system dysfunction with increased sympathetic activity and withdrawal of vagal activity may play an important role in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis. The vagus nerve can modulate the immune response and control inflammation through a ‘cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway’ dependent on the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Although the role of β-adrenergic stimulation on viral myocarditis has been investigated in our pervious studies, the direct effect of vagal tone in this setting has not been yet studied. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of cervical vagotomy in a murine model of viral myocarditis. In a coxsackievirus B3 murine myocarditis model (Balb/c), effects of right cervical vagotomy and nAChR agonist nicotine on echocardiography, myocardial histopathology, viral RNA, and proinflammatory cytokine levels were studied. We found that right cervical vagotomy inhibited the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, aggravated myocardial lesions, up-regulated the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and worsened the impaired left ventricular function in murine viral myocarditis, and these changes were reversed by co-treatment with nicotine by activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. These results indicate that vagal nerve plays an important role in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect in viral myocarditis, and that cholinergic stimulation with nicotine also plays its peripheral anti-inflammatory role relying on α7nAChR, without requirement for the integrity of vagal nerve in the model. The findings suggest that vagus nerve stimulation mediated inhibition of the inflammatory processes likely provide important benefits in myocarditis treatment. PMID:28197102

  17. Heart failure causes cholinergic transdifferentiation of cardiac sympathetic nerves via gp130-signaling cytokines in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kimura, Kensuke; Arai, Takahide; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Jin; Sano, Motoaki; Kawakami, Takashi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Iwanami, Akio; Okano, Hideyuki; Okada, Yasunori; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ogawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-02-01

    Although several cytokines and neurotrophic factors induce sympathetic neurons to transdifferentiate into cholinergic neurons in vitro, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this remain unknown. During congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic neural tone is upregulated, but there is a paradoxical reduction in norepinephrine synthesis and reuptake in the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Here we examined whether cholinergic transdifferentiation can occur in the cardiac SNS in rodent models of CHF and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism(s) using genetically modified mice. We used Dahl salt-sensitive rats to model CHF and found that, upon CHF induction, the cardiac SNS clearly acquired cholinergic characteristics. Of the various cholinergic differentiation factors, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and cardiotrophin-1 were strongly upregulated in the ventricles of rats with CHF. Further, LIF and cardiotrophin-1 secreted from cultured failing rat cardiomyocytes induced cholinergic transdifferentiation in cultured sympathetic neurons, and this process was reversed by siRNAs targeting Lif and cardiotrophin-1. Consistent with the data in rats, heart-specific overexpression of LIF in mice caused cholinergic transdifferentiation in the cardiac SNS. Further, SNS-specific targeting of the gene encoding the gp130 subunit of the receptor for LIF and cardiotrophin-1 in mice prevented CHF-induced cholinergic transdifferentiation. Cholinergic transdifferentiation was also observed in the cardiac SNS of autopsied patients with CHF. Thus, CHF causes target-dependent cholinergic transdifferentiation of the cardiac SNS via gp130-signaling cytokines secreted from the failing myocardium.

  18. Regulation of fibrinogen receptor expression on human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shattil, S.J.; Motulsky, H.J.; Insel, P.A.; Brass, L.F.

    1986-03-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to specific receptors on the plasma membrane glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. Although the IIb-IIIa complex is identifiable on the surface of resting platelets, the fibrinogen receptor is expressed only after platelet activation. The authors have developed a monoclonal anti-IIb-IIIa antibody (PAC-1) that binds only to stimulated platelets and only in the presence of Ca. In order to better understand the steps leading to platelet aggregation, the authors used radiolabeled PAC-1 and fibrinogen to examine the effect of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist, epinephrine, on the expression and function of the fibrinogen receptor. The addition of epinephrine to unstirred platelets caused and immediate increase in PAC-1 and fibrinogen binding that was associated with platelet aggregation once the platelets were stirred. Even after prolonged incubation of the platelets with epinephrine, fibrinogen receptor expression could be reversed by adding EGTA, PGl/sub 2/, or the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, phentolamine. When unstirred platelets were exposed to epinephrine for more than 10 min, the extent of aggregation caused by subsequent stirring was decreased by 70%. Surprisingly, these desensitized platelets bound PAC-1 and fibrinogen normally, indicating that the loss of aggregation was not due to a decrease in fibrinogen receptor expression or function. These studies demonstrate that: (1) fibrinogen receptor expression is dependent on extracellular CA; (2) induction of the fibrinogen receptor by epinephrine requires the continued presence of the agonist; and (3) prolonged stimulation of the platelet by epinephrine can lead to a reduced aggregation response by a mechanism that does not involve a loss of either fibrinogen recepor expression or fibrinogen binding.

  19. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegner, Thorsten; Teriete, Peter; Hoefert, Sebastian; Krimmel, Michael; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Material and Methods Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. Results ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. Conclusions ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, hormone receptor. PMID:27475696

  20. Cloning and expression of a widely expressed receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; D'Eustachio, P; Givol, D;

    1990-01-01

    antigen yielded cDNA clones coding for a 794-amino acid transmembrane protein [hereafter referred to as receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (R-PTP-alpha)] with an intracellular domain displaying clear homology to the catalytic domains of CD45 and LAR (45% and 53%, respectively). The 142-amino acid...

  1. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors increases neuronal platelet-derived growth factor β receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Several antipsychotics have a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors yet despite intense interest in the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential drug target to treat psychosis, the function and signaling properties of 5-HT7 receptors in neurons remain largely uncharacterized. In primary mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as in the SH-SY5Y cell line, incubation with 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), or 5-HT7 receptor-selective agonists increases the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)β receptors. The increased PDGFβ receptor expression is cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptors couple to Gα(s) in primary neurons. Interestingly, up-regulated PDGFβ receptors display an increased basal phosphorylation state at the phospholipase Cγ-activating tyrosine 1021. This novel linkage between the 5-HT7 receptor and the PDGF system may be an important GPCR-neurotrophic factor signaling pathway in neurons.

  2. The involvement of cholinergic neurons in the spreading of tau pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eSimon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Long time ago, it was described the selective loss of cholinergic neurons during the development of Alzheimer disease. Recently, it has been suggested that tau protein may play a role in that loss of cholinergic neurons through a mechanism involving the interaction of extracellular tau with M1/M3 muscarinic receptors present in the cholinergic neurons. This interaction between tau and muscarinic receptors may be a way, although not the only one, to explain the spreading of tau pathology occurring in Alzheimer disease.

  3. Expression of AT2 receptors in the developing rat fetus.

    OpenAIRE

    Grady, E F; Sechi, L. A.; Griffin, C A; Schambelan, M.; Kalinyak, J E

    1991-01-01

    Angiotensin II is known primarily for its effects on blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis, but recent studies suggest that angiotensin II may play a role in the regulation of cellular growth. This study was undertaken to identify the angiotensin II receptor subtypes expressed during fetal and neonatal development and to characterize their cellular localization. Using an in situ receptor binding assay on sagittal frozen sections of fetal and neonatal rats, bound 125I-[Sar1,Ile8]-angioten...

  4. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20...... receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed...... whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays...

  5. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival...... in epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: Immunohistochemical stainings for ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR were assessed in relation to survival in 118 serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers. Expression of the genes encoding the four receptors was studied in relation to prognosis in the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer...... in ovarian cancer and support that tumors should be stratified based on molecular as well as histological subtypes in future studies investigating the role of endocrine treatment in ovarian cancer....

  6. Cholinergic Signaling Exerts Protective Effects in Models of Sympathetic Hyperactivity-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavioli, Mariana; Lara, Aline; Almeida, Pedro W. M.; Lima, Augusto Martins; Damasceno, Denis D.; Rocha-Resende, Cibele; Ladeira, Marina; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Martinelli, Patricia M.; Melo, Marcos Barrouin; Brum, Patricia C.; Fontes, Marco Antonio Peliky; Souza Santos, Robson A.; Prado, Marco A. M.; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic control of the heart is exerted by two distinct branches; the autonomic component represented by the parasympathetic nervous system, and the recently described non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery. Previous evidence has shown that reduced cholinergic function leads to deleterious effects on the myocardium. Yet, whether conditions of increased cholinergic signaling can offset the pathological remodeling induced by sympathetic hyperactivity, and its consequences for these two cholinergic axes are unknown. Here, we investigated two models of sympathetic hyperactivity: i) the chronic beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation evoked by isoproterenol (ISO), and ii) the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptor knockout (KO) mice that lack pre-synaptic adrenergic receptors. In both models, cholinergic signaling was increased by administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine. First, we observed that isoproterenol produces an autonomic imbalance characterized by increased sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic tone. Under this condition transcripts for cholinergic proteins were upregulated in ventricular myocytes, indicating that non-neuronal cholinergic machinery is activated during adrenergic overdrive. Pyridostigmine treatment prevented the effects of ISO on autonomic function and on the ventricular cholinergic machinery, and inhibited cardiac remodeling. α2A/α2C-KO mice presented reduced ventricular contraction when compared to wild-type mice, and this dysfunction was also reversed by cholinesterase inhibition. Thus, the cardiac parasympathetic system and non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery are modulated in opposite directions under conditions of increased sympathetic drive or ACh availability. Moreover, our data support the idea that pyridostigmine by restoring ACh availability is beneficial in heart disease. PMID:24992197

  7. Cholinergic signaling exerts protective effects in models of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gavioli

    Full Text Available Cholinergic control of the heart is exerted by two distinct branches; the autonomic component represented by the parasympathetic nervous system, and the recently described non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery. Previous evidence has shown that reduced cholinergic function leads to deleterious effects on the myocardium. Yet, whether conditions of increased cholinergic signaling can offset the pathological remodeling induced by sympathetic hyperactivity, and its consequences for these two cholinergic axes are unknown. Here, we investigated two models of sympathetic hyperactivity: i the chronic beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation evoked by isoproterenol (ISO, and ii the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptor knockout (KO mice that lack pre-synaptic adrenergic receptors. In both models, cholinergic signaling was increased by administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine. First, we observed that isoproterenol produces an autonomic imbalance characterized by increased sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic tone. Under this condition transcripts for cholinergic proteins were upregulated in ventricular myocytes, indicating that non-neuronal cholinergic machinery is activated during adrenergic overdrive. Pyridostigmine treatment prevented the effects of ISO on autonomic function and on the ventricular cholinergic machinery, and inhibited cardiac remodeling. α2A/α2C-KO mice presented reduced ventricular contraction when compared to wild-type mice, and this dysfunction was also reversed by cholinesterase inhibition. Thus, the cardiac parasympathetic system and non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery are modulated in opposite directions under conditions of increased sympathetic drive or ACh availability. Moreover, our data support the idea that pyridostigmine by restoring ACh availability is beneficial in heart disease.

  8. The cholinergic system is involved in regulation of the development of the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serobyan, Naira; Jagannathan, Suchitra; Orlovskaya, Irina; Schraufstatter, Ingrid; Skok, Marina; Loring, Jeanne; Khaldoyanidi, Sophia

    2007-05-30

    Gene expression profiling demonstrated that components of the cholinergic system, including choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), are expressed in embryonic stem cells and differentiating embryoid bodies (EBs). Triggering of nAChRs expressed in EBs by nicotine resulted in activation of MAPK and shifts of spontaneous differentiation toward hemangioblast. In vivo, non-neural nAChRs are detected early during development in fetal sites of hematopoiesis. Similarly, in vivo exposure of the developing embryo to nicotine resulted in higher numbers of hematopoietic progenitors in fetal liver. However postpartum, the number of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) was decreased, suggesting an impaired colonization of the fetal bone marrow with HSPCs. This correlated with increased number of circulating HSPC and decreased expression of CXCR4 that mediates migration of circulating cells into the bone marrow regulatory niche. In addition, protein microarrays demonstrated that nicotine changed the profile of cytokines produced in the niche. While the levels of IL1alpha, IL1beta, IL2, IL9 and IL10 were not changed, the production of hematopoiesis-supportive cytokines including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL3, IL6 and IGFBP-3 was decreased. This correlated with the decreased repopulating ability of HSPC in vivo and diminished hematopoietic activity in bone marrow cultures treated with nicotine. Interestingly, nicotine stimulated the production of IL4 and IL5, implying a possible role of the cholinergic system in pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Our data provide evidence that the nicotine-induced imbalance of the cholinergic system during gestation interferes with normal development and provides the basis for negative health outcomes postpartum in active and passive smokers.

  9. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  10. Impact of basal forebrain cholinergic inputs on basolateral amygdala neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Cagri T; Pare, Denis; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2015-01-14

    In addition to innervating the cerebral cortex, basal forebrain cholinergic (BFc) neurons send a dense projection to the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA). In this study, we investigated the effect of near physiological acetylcholine release on BLA neurons using optogenetic tools and in vitro patch-clamp recordings. Adult transgenic mice expressing cre-recombinase under the choline acetyltransferase promoter were used to selectively transduce BFc neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 and a reporter through the injection of an adeno-associated virus. Light-induced stimulation of BFc axons produced different effects depending on the BLA cell type. In late-firing interneurons, BFc inputs elicited fast nicotinic EPSPs. In contrast, no response could be detected in fast-spiking interneurons. In principal BLA neurons, two different effects were elicited depending on their activity level. When principal BLA neurons were quiescent or made to fire at low rates by depolarizing current injection, light-induced activation of BFc axons elicited muscarinic IPSPs. In contrast, with stronger depolarizing currents, eliciting firing above ∼ 6-8 Hz, these muscarinic IPSPs lost their efficacy because stimulation of BFc inputs prolonged current-evoked afterdepolarizations. All the effects observed in principal neurons were dependent on muscarinic receptors type 1, engaging different intracellular mechanisms in a state-dependent manner. Overall, our results suggest that acetylcholine enhances the signal-to-noise ratio in principal BLA neurons. Moreover, the cholinergic engagement of afterdepolarizations may contribute to the formation of stimulus associations during fear-conditioning tasks where the timing of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli is not optimal for the induction of synaptic plasticity.

  11. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist MK-801 and Radical Scavengers Protect Cholinergic Nucleus Basalis Neurons against β-Amyloid Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T.; Mulder, J.; Sasvári, M.; Ábrahám, I.; Kónya, C.; Zarándi, M.; Penke, B.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Nyakas, C.

    1999-01-01

    Previous experimental data indicate the involvement of Ca2+-related excitotoxic processes, possibly mediated by N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors, in β-amyloid (βA) neurotoxicity. On the other hand, other lines of evidence support the view that free radical generation is a critical step in the β

  12. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 and radical scavengers protect cholinergic nucleus basalis neurons against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; Mulder, J; Sasvari, M; Abraham, [No Value; Konya, C; Zarandi, M; Penke, B; Luiten, PGM; Nyakas, C

    1999-01-01

    Previous experimental data indicate the involvement of Ca2+-related excitotoxic processes, possibly mediated by N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors, in beta-amyloid (beta A) neurotoxicity. On the other hand, other lines of evidence support the view that free radical generation is a critical step i

  13. Genes involved in Drosophila glutamate receptor expression and localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Featherstone David E

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A clear picture of the mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor expression, localization, and stability remains elusive, possibly due to an incomplete understanding of the proteins involved. We screened transposon mutants generated by the ongoing Drosophila Gene Disruption Project in an effort to identify the different types of genes required for glutamate receptor cluster development. Results To enrich for non-silent insertions with severe disruptions in glutamate receptor clustering, we identified and focused on homozygous lethal mutants in a collection of 2185 BG and KG transposon mutants generated by the BDGP Gene Disruption Project. 202 lethal mutant lines were individually dissected to expose glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions, stained using antibodies that recognize neuronal membrane and the glutamate receptor subunit GluRIIA, and viewed using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. We identified 57 mutants with qualitative differences in GluRIIA expression and/or localization. 84% of mutants showed loss of receptors and/or clusters; 16% of mutants showed an increase in receptors. Insertion loci encode a variety of protein types, including cytoskeleton proteins and regulators, kinases, phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases, mucins, cell adhesion proteins, transporters, proteins controlling gene expression and protein translation, and proteins of unknown/novel function. Expression pattern analyses and complementation tests, however, suggest that any single mutant – even if a mutant gene is uniquely tagged – must be interpreted with caution until the mutation is validated genetically and phenotypically. Conclusion Our study identified 57 transposon mutants with qualitative differences in glutamate receptor expression and localization. Despite transposon tagging of every insertion locus, extensive validation is needed before one can have confidence in the role of any individual gene. Alternatively, one can focus on the

  14. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  15. Problem-Solving Test: Expression Cloning of the Erythropoietin Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cytokines, cytokine receptors, cDNA library, cDNA synthesis, poly(A)[superscript +] RNA, primer, template, reverse transcriptase, restriction endonucleases, cohesive ends, expression vector, promoter, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, poly(A) signal, DNA helicase, DNA ligase, topoisomerases,…

  16. Megakaryocytes and platelets express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors but nicotine does not affect megakaryopoiesis or platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedel, Angelika; Kaiser, Kerstin; Uhlig, Stefanie; Lorenz, Florian; Sarin, Anip; Starigk, Julian; Hassmann, Dennis; Bieback, Karen; Bugert, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In our previous investigations we have shown that platelets and their precursors express nicotinic α7 acetylcholine receptors (nAChRα7) that are involved in platelet function and in vitro differentiation of the megakaryoblastic cell line MEG-01. In this study, we were interested in the expression analysis of additional nAChR and the effects of nicotine in an ex vivo model using megakaryocytic cells differentiated from cord blood derived CD34(+) cells (CBMK) and an in vivo model using blood samples from smokers. CBMK were differentiated with thrombopoietin (TPO) for up to 17 days. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), Western blot analysis and flow cytometry were used to investigate nAChR expression (nAChRα7, nAChRα4, nAChRβ2) and nicotine effects. In blood samples of 15 nonsmokers and 16 smokers platelet parameters (count, mean platelet volume--MPV and platelet distribution width--PDW) were determined as indicators for changes of in vivo megakaryopoiesis. Platelet function was determined by the use of whole blood aggregometry and flow cytometry. The functional role of nAChR was evaluated using specific antagonists in aggregometry. CHRNA7, CHRNA4 and CHRNB2 gene transcripts and the corresponding proteins could be identified in CBMK during all stages of differentiation. Platelets contain nAChRα7 and nAChRβ2 but not nAChRα4. Nicotine had no effect on TPO-induced differentiation of CBMK. There was no significant difference in all platelet parameters of the smokers compared to the nonsmokers. In line with this, cholinergic gene transcripts as well as the encoded proteins were equally expressed in both the study groups. Despite our observation of nAChR expression in megakaryopoiesis and platelets, we were not able to detect effects of nicotine in our ex vivo and in vivo models. Thus, the functional role of the nAChR in these cells remains open.

  17. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali-Nadoushan, Mohammad-Reza; Amirtouri, Reza; Davati, Ali; Askari, Samaneh; Siadati, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), occurs mostly in women and sex hormones may play a role in the pathogenesis and clinical course. The objective of this study was to determine the status and prevalence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in PTC with regard to age, gender, tumor size and lymph node involvement. Methods: Immunohistochemical stains were performed on 92 tissue blocks of PTC for estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression in tumor cells. Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to determine statistical difference using statistical software SPSS. Results: The mean age of patients was 39.32±1.7 years (range 13-80) with 79(85.9%) women and 13 (14.1%) men. Lymph node involvement was seen in 76.1% of patients. The average tumor size was 3.6±2.21 cm. The rate of ER and PR expression were 46.75% and 5.6%, respectively. ER expression for females was higher than males (P=0.014), but no relation was found between males and females in PR expression (P=0.7). Also there was no statistical difference between ER and PR expression with respect to age, lymph node involvement and tumor size. Conclusion: Our study showed higher ER expression in females than males with PTC. No relation was found between the expression of these receptors and age of presentation, lymph node involvement and tumor size. Further investigation is required to determine the prognostic importance of ER and PR in PTC.

  18. Functional bitter taste receptors are expressed in brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nisha; Vrontakis, Maria; Parkinson, Fiona; Chelikani, Prashen

    2011-03-04

    Humans are capable of sensing five basic tastes which are sweet, sour, salt, umami and bitter. Of these, bitter taste perception provides protection against ingestion of potentially toxic substances. Bitter taste is sensed by bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) that belong to the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily. Humans have 25 T2Rs that are expressed in the oral cavity, gastrointestinal (GI) neuroendocrine cells and airway cells. Electrophysiological studies of the brain neurons show that the neurons are able to respond to different tastants. However, the presence of bitter taste receptors in brain cells has not been elucidated. In this report using RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry analysis we show that T2Rs are expressed in multiple regions of the rat brain. RT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of T2R4, T2R107 and T2R38 transcripts in the brain stem, cerebellum, cortex and nucleus accumbens. The bitter receptor T2R4 was selected for further analysis at the transcript level by quantitative real time PCR and at the protein level by immunohistochemistry. To elucidate if the T2R4 expressed in these cells is functional, assays involving G-protein mediated calcium signaling were carried out. The functional assays showed an increase in intracellular calcium levels after the application of exogenous ligands for T2R4, denatonium benzoate and quinine to these cultured cells, suggesting that endogenous T2R4 expressed in these cells is functional. We discuss our results in terms of the physiological relevance of bitter receptor expression in the brain.

  19. Immunological role of neuronal receptor vanilloid receptor 1 expressed on dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Sreyashi; Srivastava, Pramod

    2005-01-01

    Capsaicin (CP), the pungent component of chili pepper, acts on sensory neurons to convey the sensation of pain. The CP receptor, vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1), has been shown to be highly expressed by nociceptive neurons in dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. We demonstrate here that the dendritic cell (DC), a key cell type of the vertebrate immune system, expresses VR1. Engagement of VR1 on immature DCs such as by treatment with CP leads to maturation of DCs as measured by up-regulation of anti...

  20. Novel G Protein-Coupled Oestrogen Receptor GPR30 Shows Changes in mRNA Expression in the Rat Brain over the Oestrous Cycle

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    Emma J. Spary

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oestrogen influences autonomic function via actions at classical nuclear oestrogen receptors α and β in the brain, and recent evidence suggests the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 may also function as a cytoplasmic oestrogen receptor. We investigated the expression of GPR30 in female rat brains throughout the oestrous cycle and after ovariectomy to determine whether GPR30 expression in central autonomic nuclei is correlated with circulating oestrogen levels. In the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, ventrolateral medulla (VLM and periaqueductal gray (PAG GPR30 mRNA, quantified by real-time PCR, was increased in proestrus and oestrus. In ovariectomised (OVX rats, expression in NTS and VLM appeared increased compared to metoestrus, but in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and PAG lower mRNA levels were seen in OVX. GPR30-like immunoreactivity (GPR30-LI colocalised with Golgi in neurones in many brain areas associated with autonomic pathways, and analysis of numbers of immunoreactive neurones showed differences consistent with the PCR data. GPR30-LI was found in a variety of transmitter phenotypes, including cholinergic, serotonergic, catecholaminergic and nitrergic neurones in different neuronal groups. These observations support the view that GPR30 could act as a rapid transducer responding to oestrogen levels and thus modulate the activity of central autonomic pathways.

  1. Expression of serotonin receptors in human lower esophageal sphincter

    OpenAIRE

    Li, He-Fei; Liu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Ke; Feng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter and vasoactive amine that is involved in the regulation of a large number of physiological functions. The wide variety of 5-HT-mediated functions is due to the existence of different classes of serotonergic receptors in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract and nervous system. The aim of this study was to explore the expression of multiple types of 5-HT receptor (5-HT1AR, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT3AR, 5-HT4R, 5-HT5AR, 5-HT6R and 5-HT7R) in sling and clasp fibers from...

  2. Dual nitrergic/cholinergic control of short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs to striatal projection neurons

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    Craig Peter Blomeley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of nitric oxide and acetylcholine to modulate the short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs was investigated using current-clamp recordings in BAC mouse brain slices. Glutamatergic responses were evoked by stimulation of corpus callosum in D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs and D2-MSN, respectively. Paired-pulse stimulation (50 ms intervals evoked depressing or facilitating responses in subgroups of both D1-MSNs and D2 MSNs. In both neuronal types, glutamatergic responses of cells that displayed paired-pulse depression were not significantly affected by the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 100 µM. Conversely, in D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs that displayed paired-pulse facilitation, SNAP did not affect the first evoked response, but significantly reduced the amplitude of the second evoked EPSP, converting paired-pulse facilitation into paired-pulse depression. SNAP also strongly excited cholinergic interneurons and increased their cortical glutamatergic responses acting through a presynaptic mechanism. The effects of SNAP on glutamatergic response of D1-MSNs and D2-MSN were mediated by acetylcholine. The broad-spectrum muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (25 µM did not affect paired-pulse ratios and did not prevent the effects of SNAP. Conversely, the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist tubocurarine (10 µM fully mimicked and occluded the effects of SNAP. We concluded that phasic acetylcholine release mediates feedforward facilitation in MSNs through activation of nicotinic receptors on glutamatergic terminals and that nitric oxide, while increasing cholinergic interneurons’ firing, functionally impairs their ability to modulate glutamatergic inputs of MSNs. These results show that nitrergic and cholinergic transmission control the short-term plasticity of glutamatergic inputs in the striatum and reveal a novel cellular mechanism underlying paired

  3. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  4. GABA(A) receptors implicated in REM sleep control express a benzodiazepine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tin Quang; Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2013-08-21

    It has been reported that non-subtype-selective GABAA receptor antagonists injected into the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of rats induced long-lasting increases in REM sleep. Characteristics of these REM sleep increases were identical to those resulting from injection of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. Both actions were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, atropine. Microdialysis of GABAA receptor antagonists into the PnO resulted in increased acetylcholine levels. These findings were consistent with GABAA receptor antagonists disinhibiting acetylcholine release in the PnO to result in an acetylcholine-mediated REM sleep induction. Direct evidence has been lacking for localization in the PnO of the specific GABAA receptor-subtypes mediating the REM sleep effects. Here, we demonstrated a dose-related, long-lasting increase in REM sleep following injection (60 nl) in the PnO of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline (DMCM, 10(-2)M). REM sleep increases were greater and more consistently produced than with the non-selective antagonist gabazine, and both were blocked by atropine. Fluorescence immunohistochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy, colocalized in PnO vesicular acetylcholine transporter, a presynaptic marker of cholinergic boutons, with the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor. These data provide support for the direct action of GABA on mechanisms of acetylcholine release in the PnO. The presence of the γ2 subunit at this locus and the REM sleep induction by DMCM are consistent with binding of benzodiazepines by a GABAA receptor-subtype in control of REM sleep.

  5. Characterisation of the expression of NMDA receptors in human astrocytes.

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    Ming-Chak Lee

    Full Text Available Astrocytes have long been perceived only as structural and supporting cells within the central nervous system (CNS. However, the discovery that these glial cells may potentially express receptors capable of responding to endogenous neurotransmitters has resulted in the need to reassess astrocytic physiology. The aim of the current study was to characterise the expression of NMDA receptors (NMDARs in primary human astrocytes, and investigate their response to physiological and excitotoxic concentrations of the known endogenous NMDAR agonists, glutamate and quinolinic acid (QUIN. Primary cultures of human astrocytes were used to examine expression of these receptors at the mRNA level using RT-PCR and qPCR, and at the protein level using immunocytochemistry. The functionality role of the receptors was assessed using intracellular calcium influx experiments and measuring extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity in primary cultures of human astrocytes treated with glutamate and QUIN. We found that all seven currently known NMDAR subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B, NR2C, NR2D, NR3A and NR3B are expressed in astrocytes, but at different levels. Calcium influx studies revealed that both glutamate and QUIN could activate astrocytic NMDARs, which stimulates Ca2+ influx into the cell and can result in dysfunction and death of astrocytes. Our data also show that the NMDAR ion channel blockers, MK801, and memantine can attenuate glutamate and QUIN mediated cell excitotoxicity. This suggests that the mechanism of glutamate and QUIN gliotoxicity is at least partially mediated by excessive stimulation of NMDARs. The present study is the first to provide definitive evidence for the existence of functional NMDAR expression in human primary astrocytes. This discovery has significant implications for redefining the cellular interaction between glia and neurons in both physiological processes and pathological conditions.

  6. Molecular characterization and expression profiles of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wu, Shun-Fan; Teng, Zi-Wen; Yao, Hong-Wei; Fang, Qi; Huang, Jia; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-02-05

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel (cysLGIC) superfamily, mediating fast synaptic cholinergic transmission in the central nervous system in insects. Insect nAChRs are the molecular targets of economically important insecticides, such as neonicotinoids and spinosad. Identification and characterization of the nAChR gene family in the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, could provide beneficial information about this important receptor gene family and contribute to the investigation of the molecular modes of insecticide action and resistance for current and future chemical control strategies. We searched our C. suppressalis transcriptome database using B. mori nAChR sequences in local BLAST searches and obtained the putative nAChR subunit cDNAs via RT-PCR and RACE methods. Similar to B. mori, C. suppressalis possesses 12 nAChR subunits, including nine α-type and three β-type subunits. qRT-PCR analysis revealed the expression profiles of the nAChR subunits in various tissues, including the brain, suboesophageal ganglion, thoracic ganglion, abdominal ganglion, hemocytes, fat body, foregut, midgut, hindgut, and Malpighian tubules. Developmental expression analyses showed clear differential expression of nAChR subunits throughout the C. suppressalis life cycle. The identification of nAChR subunits in this study will provide a foundation for investigating the diverse roles played by nAChRs in the C. suppressalis and for exploring specific target sites for chemicals that control agricultural pests while sparing beneficial species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. GABAA receptor-expressing neurons promote consumption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Samantha K.

    2017-01-01

    Feeding decisions are highly plastic and bidirectionally regulated by neurons that either promote or inhibit feeding. In Drosophila melanogaster, recent studies have identified four GABAergic interneurons that act as critical brakes to prevent incessant feeding. These GABAergic neurons may inhibit target neurons that drive consumption. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining GABA receptors and neurons that promote consumption. We find that Resistance to dieldrin (RDL), a GABAA type receptor, is required for proper control of ingestion. Knockdown of Rdl in a subset of neurons causes overconsumption of tastants. Acute activation of these neurons is sufficient to drive consumption of appetitive substances and non-appetitive substances and acute silencing of these neurons decreases consumption. Taken together, these studies identify GABAA receptor-expressing neurons that promote Drosophila ingestive behavior and provide insight into feeding regulation. PMID:28362856

  8. Vitamin D Receptor, Retinoid X Receptor, Ki-67, Survivin, and Ezrin Expression in Canine Osteosarcoma

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    John Davies

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine osteosarcoma (OS is an aggressive malignant bone tumor. Prognosis is primarily determined by clinical parameters. Vitamin D has been postulated as a novel therapeutic option for many malignancies. Upon activation, vitamin D receptors (VDRs combine with retinoid receptor (RXR forming a heterodimer initiating a cascade of events. Vitamin D's antineoplastic activity and its mechanism of action in OS remain to be clearly established. Expression of VDR, RXR, Ki-67, survivin, and ezrin was studied in 33 archived, canine OS specimens. VDR, RXR, survivin, and ezrin were expressed in the majority of cases. There was no statistically significant difference in VDR expression in relationship with tumor grade, type, or locations or animal breed, age, and/or sex. No significant association (p=0.316 between tumor grade and Ki-67 expression was found; in particular, no difference in Ki-67 expression between grades 2 and 3 OSs was found, while a negative correlation was noted between Ki-67 and VDR expression (ρ=−0.466, a positive correlation between survivin and RXR expression was found (p=0.374. A significant relationship exists between VDR and RXR expression in OSs and proliferative/apoptosis markers. These results establish a foundation for elucidating mechanisms by which vitamin D induces antineoplastic activity in OS.

  9. Effects of Repeated Ethanol Exposures on NMDA Receptor Expression and Locomotor Sensitization in Mice Expressing Ethanol Resistant NMDA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Carolina R.; Gilstrap, Meghin; Eaton, Bethany; Lench, Daniel H.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Homanics, Gregg. E.; Woodward, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence from a large number of preclinical studies suggests that chronic exposure to drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants or ethanol induces changes in glutamatergic transmission in key brain areas associated with reward and control of behavior. These changes include alterations in the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) that are important for regulating neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity. NMDA receptors are inhibited by ethanol and reductions in NMDA-mediated signaling are thought to trigger homestatic responses that limit ethanol's effects on glutamatergic transmission. Following repeated exposures to ethanol, these homeostatic responses may become unstable leading to an altered glutamatergic state that contributes to the escalations in drinking and cognitive deficits observed in alcohol-dependent subjects. An important unanswered question is whether ethanol-induced changes in NMDAR expression are modulated by the intrinsic sensitivity of the receptor to ethanol. In this study, we examined the effects of ethanol on NMDAR subunit expression in cortical (orbitofrontal, medial prefrontal), striatal (dorsal and ventral striatum) and limbic (dorsal hippocampus, basolateral amygdala) areas in mice genetically modified to express ethanol-resistant receptors (F639A mice). These mice have been previously shown to drink more ethanol than their wild-type counterparts and have altered behavioral responses to certain actions of ethanol. Following long-term voluntary drinking, F639A mice showed elevations in GluN2A but not GluN1 or GluN2B expression as compared to wild-type mice. Mice treated with repeated injections with ethanol (2–3.5 g/kg; i.p.) showed changes in NMDAR expression that varied in a complex manner with genotype, brain region, subunit type and exposure protocol all contributing to the observed response. F639A mice, but not wild-type mice, showed enhanced motor activity following repeated

  10. Long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, synchronous bursting and synaptic remodeling.

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    Maya Kaufman

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neuromodulation plays key roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability, network activity, arousal, and behavior. On longer time scales, cholinergic systems play essential roles in cortical development, maturation, and plasticity. Presumably, these processes are associated with substantial synaptic remodeling, yet to date, long-term relationships between cholinergic tone and synaptic remodeling remain largely unknown. Here we used automated microscopy combined with multielectrode array recordings to study long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, excitatory synapse remodeling, and network activity characteristics in networks of cortical neurons grown on multielectrode array substrates. Experimental elevations of cholinergic tone led to the abrupt suppression of episodic synchronous bursting activity (but not of general activity, followed by a gradual growth of excitatory synapses over hours. Subsequent blockage of cholinergic receptors led to an immediate restoration of synchronous bursting and the gradual reversal of synaptic growth. Neither synaptic growth nor downsizing was governed by multiplicative scaling rules. Instead, these occurred in a subset of synapses, irrespective of initial synaptic size. Synaptic growth seemed to depend on intrinsic network activity, but not on the degree to which bursting was suppressed. Intriguingly, sustained elevations of cholinergic tone were associated with a gradual recovery of synchronous bursting but not with a reversal of synaptic growth. These findings show that cholinergic tone can strongly affect synaptic remodeling and synchronous bursting activity, but do not support a strict coupling between the two. Finally, the reemergence of synchronous bursting in the presence of elevated cholinergic tone indicates that the capacity of cholinergic neuromodulation to indefinitely suppress synchronous bursting might be inherently limited.

  11. A cellular and regulatory map of the cholinergic nervous system of C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Laura; Kratsios, Paschalis; Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Sheftel, Hila; Mayo, Avi E; Hall, David H; White, John G; LeBoeuf, Brigitte; Garcia, L Rene; Alon, Uri; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-12-25

    Nervous system maps are of critical importance for understanding how nervous systems develop and function. We systematically map here all cholinergic neuron types in the male and hermaphrodite C. elegans nervous system. We find that acetylcholine (ACh) is the most broadly used neurotransmitter and we analyze its usage relative to other neurotransmitters within the context of the entire connectome and within specific network motifs embedded in the connectome. We reveal several dynamic aspects of cholinergic neurotransmitter identity, including a sexually dimorphic glutamatergic to cholinergic neurotransmitter switch in a sex-shared interneuron. An expression pattern analysis of ACh-gated anion channels furthermore suggests that ACh may also operate very broadly as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. As a first application of this comprehensive neurotransmitter map, we identify transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control cholinergic neurotransmitter identity and cholinergic circuit assembly.

  12. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 ) versus w...

  13. Physical urticarias and cholinergic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abajian, Marina; Schoepke, Nicole; Altrichter, Sabine; Zuberbier, Torsten; Zuberbier, H C Torsten; Maurer, Marcus

    2014-02-01

    Physical urticarias are a unique subgroup of chronic urticaria in which urticarial responses can be reproducibly induced by different specific physical stimuli acting on the skin. These conditions include urticaria factitia/symptomatic dermographism, delayed pressure urticaria, cold contact urticaria, heat contact urticaria, solar urticaria, and vibratory urticaria/angioedema. Physical urticarias and cholinergic urticarias are diagnosed based on the patients' history and provocation tests including trigger threshold testing where possible. Treatment is mainly symptomatic. Many patients benefit from avoiding eliciting triggers, and desensitization to these triggers can be helpful in some physical urticarias and in cholinergic urticaria.

  14. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4(+) T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4(+) T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6(+) and CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8(+) T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4(+) T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6(+) cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  15. Spatiotemporal expression of Nogo-66 receptor after focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Cao; Ya-xian Dong; Jie Xu; Guo-liang Chu; Zhi-hua Yang; Yan-ming Liu

    2016-01-01

    NgR, the receptor for the neurite outgrowth inhibitor Nogo-66, plays a critical role in the plasticity and regeneration of the nervous system after injury such as ischemic stroke. In the present study, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the regional expression of NgR in rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). NgR protein expression was not observed in the center of the lesion, but was elevated in the marginal zone compared with control and sham-operated rats. The cerebral cortex and hippocampus (CA1, CA2, and CA3) showed the greatest expression of NgR. Furthermore, NgR expression was higher in the ipsilesional hemisphere than on the control side in the same coronal section. Although time-dependent changes in NgR expression across brain regions had their own characteristics, the overall trend complied with the following rules: NgR expression changes with time showed two peaks and one trough; the ifrst peak in expression appeared between 1 and 3 days after MCAO; expression declined at 5 days; and the second peak occurred at 28 days.

  16. Endogenous cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generator is not required for REM sleep to occur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Kevin P; Vanstone, Lindsay E; Horner, Richard L

    2014-10-22

    Initial theories of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the pontine subceruleus (SubC) by cholinergic inputs. Although the capacity of cholinergic neurotransmission to contribute to REM sleep generation has been established, the role of cholinergic inputs in the generation of REM sleep is ultimately undetermined as the critical test of this hypothesis (local blockade of SubC acetylcholine receptors) has not been rigorously performed. We used bilateral microdialysis in freely behaving rats (n = 32), instrumented for electroencephalographic and electromyographic recording, to locally manipulate neurotransmission in the SubC with select drugs. As predicted, combined microperfusion of D-AP5 (glutamate receptor antagonist) and muscimol (GABAA receptor agonist) in the SubC virtually eliminated REM sleep. However, REM sleep was not reduced by scopolamine microperfusion in this same region, at a concentration capable of blocking the effects of cholinergic receptor stimulation. This result suggests that transmission of REM sleep drive to the SubC is acetylcholine-independent. Although SubC cholinergic inputs are not majorly involved in REM sleep generation, they may perform a minor function in the reinforcement of transitions into REM sleep, as evidenced by increases in non-REM-to-REM sleep transition duration and failure rate during cholinergic receptor blockade. Cholinergic receptor antagonism also attenuated the normal increase in hippocampal θ oscillations that characterize REM sleep. Using computational modeling, we show that our in vivo results are consistent with a mutually excitatory interaction between the SubC and cholinergic neurons where, importantly, cholinergic neuron activation is gated by SubC activity.

  17. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorov, E. [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferrari, M.F.R. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fior-Chadi, D.R. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Camarini, R. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Felício, L.F. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  18. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Teodorov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05 because a lower percentage of kappa group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05 and lactating female rats (P < 0.01, with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in

  19. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 2; Quantitative Autoradiographic Analysis of Gaba (Benzodiazepine) and Muscarinic (Cholinergic) Receptors in the Forebrain of Rats Flown on Cosmos 2044

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Daunton, N. G.; Krasnov, I. B.; DAmelio, F.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of receptors for GABA and acetylcholine in the forebrain of rats flown on COSMOS 2044 was undertaken as part of a joint US-Soviet study to determine the effects of microgravity on the central nervous system, and in particular on the sensory and motor portions of the forebrain. Changes in binding of these receptors in tissue from animals exposed to microgravity would provide evidence for possible changes in neural processing as a result of exposure to microgravity. Tritium-labelled diazepam and Quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB) were used to visualize GABA (benzodiazepine) and muscarinic (cholinergic) receptors, respectively. The density of tritium-labelled radioligands bound to various regions in the forebrain of both flight and control animals were measured from autoradiograms. Data from rats flown in space and from ground-based control animals that were not exposed to microgravity were compared.

  20. Leptin receptor expression during the progression of endometrial carcinoma is correlated with estrogen and progesterone receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-López, Luis Fernando; Zavala-Pompa, Angel; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The hormone leptin, which is produced in the adipose tissue, may influence tumorigenesis directly via its receptor (Ob-R). Thus, a role for Ob-R in endometrial carcinogenesis has been proposed. However, most studies neither included samples of the entire histological progression of endometrial carcinoma nor examined Ob-R jointly with the estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR, respectively). Material and methods To determine the fluctuations of Ob-R, ER, and PR during the histological progression of endometrial carcinoma, we assessed their expression via immunohistochemistry (IHC) in six histological types of endometrium (proliferative, secretory, nonatypical and atypical hyperplasia, and endometrioid and nonendometrioid endometrial carcinoma), in which we performed histopathological and digital scoring for the quantification of receptors. Results We found that Ob-R expression was positively correlated with that of ER and PR (r = 1, p hyperplasias, and carcinomas, according to their relative digitally scored Ob-R expression (p endometrial carcinogenesis in correlation with ER and PR, suggesting that Ob-R expression in vivo is highly dependent on estrogen and progesterone activities in the endometrium and on its ER and PR status, as suggested previously by in vitro studies. PMID:28144276

  1. Expression of oestrogen receptor-α and oestrogen receptor-β in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-sheng; WANG Ying; WANG Ping; CHEN Zhao-dian

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that estrogens are involved in normal and abnormal prostate growth,though their exact role is still controversial. Oestrogens exert inhibitory and stimulatory effects on prostate gland, but the expression of oestrogen receptor-α (ERα) and oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ) in malignant prostate tissue remains unresolved. We determined ERα and ERβ in prostate cancer and investigated the relationship between expression of ER and pathological features of prostate carcinoma.Methods Thirty-two cases of prostate cancer, 12 cases of normal prostate tissue and 32 cases of benign prostate hyperplasia were analyzed for the expression of ERα and ERβ using semiquantitative, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the products sequenced.Results Comparisons of the normal, hyperplastic and tumour prostate tissues indicated an overexpression of ERα in tumour specimens (P<0.01). However, the expression of ERβ significantly reduced in tumour tissues compared with normal and hyperplastic specimens (P<0.01), suggesting that severe pathological features of prostate cancer were associated with lower ERβ expression. Spearman analysis showed negative correlation between ERβ expression and tumour stage, grade (-0.67, -0.43, respectively, both P<0.05), and a positive correlation between ERα expression and tumour stage, grade (0.51, 0.57, respectively, both P<0.01). Our analysis also showed that hormone refractory, prostate cancer, compared with hormone dependent, prostate cancer, displayed a decreased expression of ERβ (P<0.01) and an increased expression of ERα.Conclusions ERa and ERβ may play important roles in the development of prostate cancer. The decrease in ERβ expression is associated with higher Gleason grade tumours and prostate cancer with higher metastatic potential. The loss of ERβ could be one of the key processes leading to uncontrolled growth of prostate epithelial cells.

  2. Expression profile of frizzled receptors in human medulloblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsano, Ettore; Paterra, Rosina; Figus, Miriam; Menghi, Francesca; Maderna, Emanuela; Pollo, Bianca; Solero, Carlo Lazzaro; Massimi, Luca; Finocchiaro, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    Secreted WNT proteins signal through ten receptors of the frizzled (FZD) family. Because of the relevance of the WNT/β-catenin (CTNNB1) signaling pathway in medulloblastomas (MBs), we investigated the expression of all ten members of the FZD gene family (FZD1-10) in 17 human MBs, four MB cell lines and in normal human cerebellum, using real-time PCR. We found that FZD2 transcript was over-expressed in all MBs and MB cell lines. Western blot analysis confirmed the expression of FZD2 at the protein level. Moreover, the levels of FZD2 transcript were found to correlate with those of ASPM transcript, a marker of mitosis essential for mitotic spindle function. Accordingly, ASPM mRNA was expressed at a very low level in the adult, post-mitotic, human cerebellum, at higher levels in fetal cerebellum and at highest levels in MB tissues and cell lines. Unlike FZD2, the other FZDs were overexpressed (e.g., FZD1, FZD3 and FZD8) or underexpressed (e.g., FZD7, FZD9 and FZD10) in a case-restricted manner. Interestingly, we did not find any nuclear immuno-reactivity to CTNNB1 in four MBs over-expressing both FZD2 and other FZD receptors, confirming the lack of nuclear CTNNB1 staining in the presence of increased FZD expression, as in other tumor types. Overall, our results indicate that altered expression of FZD2 might be associated with a proliferative status, thus playing a role in the biology of human MBs, and possibly of cerebellar progenitors from which these malignancies arise.

  3. Modulation of the Cholinergic Mechanisms in the Bronchial Smooth Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Ginsborg and Hirst, 1q72; Sawynok and Jhamandas, 1976), although theopylline has not shown to be a specific adenosine receptor antagonist in all the tissues... theopylline and other cyclic nucletide phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Acta Pharmacol. Toxicol. 45, 336-344. Fredholm, B.B. and P. Hedqvist, 1980...51 mM) evoked release of [3H]-Ach from cholinergic nerves in the bronchial smooth muscle. The effect of theopylline (I mM) on the response to

  4. TEMPORAL EXPRESSION OF NOTCH RECEPTORS DURING LUNG DEVELOPMENT IN RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qian-shen; CHANG Li-wen; LIU Han-chu; RONG Zhi-hu; CHEN Hong-bing

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the temporal expression of Notch receptors in developing lungs of rats and to explore the regulating role of Notch in lung development. Methods We studied the expression of Notch1,2,3 isforms in embryonic days 18,20,21 and postnatal days 1,4,7,14, 21 rat lungs. Six rats of each group were used to assess lung histologic changes by HE staining and expression of Notch in lungs by immunohistochemistry. Total RNA was extracted by Trizol reagent from the frozen lung tissues. mRNA levels of Notch were measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results It is showed that Notch1-3 mainly localized in the airway surface epithelium、alveolar epithelium during the psdueoglandular stage, and reached the peaks at canalicular period. The expression patterns of Notch1-3 were changed with the fetal age. Conclusion These results support multiple roles for Notch1,2,and 3 receptor activation during lung development, probably not only modulating the process of branching morphogenesis but also involved in determining the cell differentiation fate in fetal alveolar epithelium.

  5. Activation of D4 dopamine receptor decreases angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in rat renal proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ken; Deng, Kun; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhen; Zheng, Shuo; Ren, Hongmei; He, Duofen; Han, Yu; Asico, Laureano D; Jose, Pedro A; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    The dopaminergic and renin-angiotensin systems interact to regulate blood pressure. Disruption of the D4 dopamine receptor gene in mice produces hypertension that is associated with increased renal angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor expression. We hypothesize that the D4 receptor can inhibit AT1 receptor expression and function in renal proximal tubule cells from Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, but the D4 receptor regulation of AT1 receptor is aberrant in renal proximal tubule cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The D4 receptor agonist, PD168077, decreased AT1 receptor protein expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in WKY cells. By contrast, in SHR cells, PD168077 increased AT1 receptor protein expression. The inhibitory effect of D4 receptor on AT1 receptor expression in WKY cells was blocked by a calcium channel blocker, nicardipine, or calcium-free medium, indicating that calcium is involved in the D4 receptor-mediated signaling pathway. Angiotensin II increased Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity in WKY cells. Pretreatment with PD168077 decreased the stimulatory effect of angiotensin II on Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity in WKY cells. In SHR cells, the inhibitory effect of D4 receptor on angiotensin II-mediated stimulation of Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity was aberrant; pretreatment with PD168077 augmented the stimulatory effect of AT1 receptor on Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity in SHR cells. This was confirmed in vivo; pretreatment with PD128077 for 1 week augmented the antihypertensive and natriuretic effect of losartan in SHRs but not in WKY rats. We suggest that an aberrant interaction between D4 and AT1 receptors may play a role in the abnormal regulation of sodium excretion in hypertension.

  6. Nuclear receptor complement of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis: phylogenetic relationships and developmental expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarrant Ann M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of metazoan transcription factors that regulate diverse developmental and physiological processes. Sequenced genomes from an increasing number of bilaterians have provided a more complete picture of duplication and loss of nuclear receptors in protostomes and deuterostomes but have left open the question of which nuclear receptors were present in the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor. In addition, nuclear receptor expression and function are largely uncharacterized within cnidarians, preventing determination of conserved and novel nuclear receptor functions in the context of animal evolution. Results Here we report the first complete set of nuclear receptors from a cnidarian, the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. Genomic searches using conserved DNA- and ligand-binding domains revealed seventeen nuclear receptors in N. vectensis. Phylogenetic analyses support N. vectensis orthologs of bilaterian nuclear receptors in four nuclear receptor subfamilies within nuclear receptor family 2 (COUP-TF, TLL, HNF4, TR2/4 and one putative ortholog of GCNF (nuclear receptor family 6. Other N. vectensis genes grouped well with nuclear receptor family 2 but represented lineage-specific duplications somewhere within the cnidarian lineage and were not clear orthologs of bilaterian genes. Three nuclear receptors were not well-supported within any particular nuclear receptor family. The seventeen nuclear receptors exhibited distinct developmental expression patterns, with expression of several nuclear receptors limited to a subset of developmental stages. Conclusion N. vectensis contains a diverse complement of nuclear receptors including orthologs of several bilaterian nuclear receptors. Novel nuclear receptors in N. vectensis may be ancient genes lost from triploblastic lineages or may represent cnidarian-specific radiations. Nuclear receptors exhibited distinct developmental expression patterns, which

  7. Functional α7β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in hippocampal interneurons exhibit high sensitivity to pathological level of amyloid β peptides

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    Liu Qiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-amyloid (Aβ accumulation is described as a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Aβ perturbs a number of synaptic components including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α7 subunits (α7-nAChRs, which are abundantly expressed in the hippocampus and found on GABAergic interneurons. We have previously demonstrated the existence of a novel, heteromeric α7β2-nAChR in basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that exhibits high sensitivity to acute Aβ exposure. To extend our previous work, we evaluated the expression and pharmacology of α7β2-nAChRs in hippocampal interneurons and their sensitivity to Aβ. Results GABAergic interneurons in the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus expressed functional α7β2-nAChRs, which were characterized by relatively slow whole-cell current kinetics, pharmacological sensitivity to dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE, a nAChR β2* subunit selective blocker, and α7 and β2 subunit interaction using immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, α7β2-nAChRs were sensitive to 1 nM oligomeric Aβ. Similar effects were observed in identified hippocampal interneurons prepared from GFP-GAD mice. Conclusion These findings suggest that Aβ modulation of cholinergic signaling in hippocampal GABAergic interneurons via α7β2-nAChRs could be an early and critical event in Aβ-induced functional abnormalities of hippocampal function, which may be relevant to learning and memory deficits in AD.

  8. A cholinergic hypothesis of the unconscious in affective disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa eVakalopoulos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between distinct pharmacological systems are proposed as a key dynamic in the formation of unconscious memories underlying rumination and mood disorder, but also reflect the plastic capacity of neural networks that can aid recovery. An inverse and reciprocal relationship is postulated between cholinergic and monoaminergic receptor subtypes. M1-type muscarinic receptor transduction facilitates encoding of unconscious, prepotent behavioural repertoires at the core of affective disorders and ADHD. Behavioural adaptation to new contingencies is mediated by the classic prototype receptor: 5-HT1A (Gi/o and its modulation of m1-plasticity. Reversal of learning is dependent on increased phasic activation of midbrain monoaminergic nuclei and is a function of hippocampal theta. Acquired hippocampal dysfunction due to abnormal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis predicts deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory and executive function and further impairments to cognitive inhibition. Encoding of explicit memories is mediated by Gq/11 and Gs signalling of monoamines only. A role is proposed for the phasic activation of the basal forebrain cholinergic nucleus by cortical projections from the complex consisting of the insula and claustrum. Although controversial. recent studies suggest a common ontogenetic origin of the two structures and a functional coupling. Lesions of the region result in loss of motivational behaviour and familiarity based judgements. A major hypothesis of the paper is that these lost faculties result indirectly, from reduced cholinergic tone.

  9. Alleviating effects of Bushen-Yizhi formula on ibotenic acid-induced cholinergic impairments in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xue-Qin; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Cong; Rong, Cui-Ping; He, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Chun-Xia; Li, Shi; Su, Ru-Yu; Chang, Xiang; Qin, Ji-Huan; Chen, Yun-Bo; Xian, Shao-Xiang; Wang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    This study explored the curative effect and underlying mechanisms of a traditional Chinese medicine compound prescription, Bushen-Yizhi formula (BSYZ), in ibotenic acid (IBO)-induced rats. Morris water maze and novel object recognition tests showed that BSYZ significantly improved spatial and object memory. Brain immunohistochemistry staining showed that BSYZ significantly up-regulated expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in the hippocampus and cortex. The protein tyrosine kinase high-affinity receptor TrkA was slightly increased in the hippocampus and cortex, and significantly enhanced in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) after BSYZ intervention. The immunoreactivity of the p75 low-affinity receptor in BSYZ-treated rats was significantly strengthened in the cortex. Similar expression trends of nerve growth factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75 mRNA were observed in the hippocampus and cortex. Additionally, BSYZ reversed IBO-induced disorders of acetylcholine (ACh) levels, ChAT, and cholinesterase (ChE) in the cortex, which was consistent with the changes in mRNA levels of ChAT and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Expression of ChAT and AChE proteins and mRNA in the hippocampus was up-regulated, whereas the apoptosis-relative protein cleaved caspase-3 was decreased after administration of BSYZ. Moreover, changes in cell death were confirmed by histological morphology. Thus, the results indicated that the BSYZ formula could ameliorate memory impairments in IBO-induced rats, and it exerted its therapeutic action probably by modulating cholinergic pathways, NGF signaling, and anti-apoptosis. Overall, it is suggested that the BSYZ formula might be a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other cholinergic impairment-related diseases.

  10. GABAERGIC MODULATION OF STRIATAL CHOLINERGIC INTERNEURONS - AN IN-VIVO MICRODIALYSIS STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, P; WESTERINK, BHC

    1994-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons have been shown to receive input from striatal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell elements. GABA is known to act on two different types of receptors, the GABA(A) and the GABA(B) receptor. Using in vivo microdialysis, we have studied the effect of intrast

  11. Regulation of gene expression in ovarian cancer cells by luteinizing hormone receptor expression and activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dam Phuongan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since a substantial percentage of ovarian cancers express gonadotropin receptors and are responsive to the relatively high concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins during the postmenopausal years, it has been suggested that receptor activation may contribute to the etiology and/or progression of the neoplasm. The goal of the present study was to develop a cell model to determine the impact of luteinizing hormone (LH receptor (LHR expression and LH-mediated LHR activation on gene expression and thus obtain insights into the mechanism of gonadotropin action on ovarian surface epithelial (OSE carcinoma cells. Methods The human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV-3, was stably transfected to express functional LHR and incubated with LH for various periods of time (0-20 hours. Transcriptomic profiling was performed on these cells to identify LHR expression/activation-dependent changes in gene expression levels and pathways by microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. Results Through comparative analysis on the LHR-transfected SKOV-3 cells exposed to LH, we observed the differential expression of 1,783 genes in response to LH treatment, among which five significant families were enriched, including those of growth factors, translation regulators, transporters, G-protein coupled receptors, and ligand-dependent nuclear receptors. The most highly induced early and intermediate responses were found to occupy a network impacting transcriptional regulation, cell growth, apoptosis, and multiple signaling transductions, giving indications of LH-induced apoptosis and cell growth inhibition through the significant changes in, for example, tumor necrosis factor, Jun and many others, supportive of the observed cell growth reduction in in vitro assays. However, other observations, e.g. the substantial up-regulation of the genes encoding the endothelin-1 subtype A receptor, stromal cell-derived factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor II, all of which are

  12. Molecular Cooperativity Governs Diverse and Monoallelic Olfactory Receptor Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jianhua; Tian, Xiaojun; Zhang, Hang; Sannerud, Jens

    Multiple-objective optimization is common in biological systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, each sensory neuron stochastically expresses only one out of up to thousands of olfactory receptor (OR) gene alleles; at organism level the types of expressed ORs need to be maximized. The molecular mechanism of this Nobel-Prize winning puzzle remains unresolved after decades of extensive studies. Existing models focus only on monoallele activation, and cannot explain recent observations in mutants, especially the reduced global diversity of expressed ORs in G9a/GLP knockouts. In this work we integrated existing information on OR expression, and proposed an evolutionarily optimized three-layer regulation mechanism, which includes zonal segregation, epigenetic and enhancer competition coupled to a negative feedback loop. This model not only recapitulates monoallelic OR expression, but also elucidates how the olfactory system maximizes and maintains the diversity of OR expression. The model is validated by several experimental results, and particularly underscores cooperativity and synergy as a general design principle of multi-objective optimization in biology. The work is supported by the NIGMS/DMS Mathematical Biology program.

  13. Interleukin-6 impairs chronotropic responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation and decreases heart rate variability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiasgharzadeh, Khalil; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Mani, Ali R

    2011-12-30

    Heart rate variability is reduced in several clinical settings associated with systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism of decreased heart rate variability during systemic inflammation is unknown. It appears that the inflammatory cytokines might play a role, since epidemiologic studies has shown that circulating levels of interleukine-6 (IL-6) correlate significantly with indexes of depressed heart rate variability in various clinical conditions. The present investigation was carried out to study the peripheral and central effects of IL-6 on heart rate dynamic in mice. Adult male BALB/c mice were used in the study. RT-PCR was performed to study the expression of IL-6 receptor in mouse atrial and the results showed that gp130 mRNA was detectable in the atrium. The effect of IL-6 was also studies on chronotropic responsiveness of isolated atria to adrenergic and cholinergic stimulations. Incubation of isolated atria with 10 ng/ml of IL-6 was associated with a significant hypo-responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation (log IC₅₀ of carbacholine changed from -6.26±0.10 in controls to -5.59±0.19 following incubation with IL-6, Pheart rate variability parameters (SDNN, SD1, and SD2). While intracerebroventricular injection of IL-6 (50 ng/mouse) had no significant effect on heart rate variability parameters. These data are in line with a peripheral role for IL-6 in the genesis of decreased heart rate variability during systemic inflammation.

  14. Optogenetic identification of an intrinsic cholinergically driven inhibitory oscillator sensitive to cannabinoids and opioids in hippocampal CA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagode, Daniel A; Tang, Ai-Hui; Yang, Kun; Alger, Bradley E

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal electrical oscillations in the theta (4-14 Hz) and gamma (30-80 Hz) ranges are necessary for the performance of certain animal behaviours and cognitive processes. Perisomatic GABAergic inhibition is prominently involved in cortical oscillations driven by ACh release from septal cholinergic afferents. In neocortex and hippocampal CA3 regions, parvalbumin (PV)-expressing basket cells, activated by ACh and glutamatergic agonists, largely mediate oscillations. However, in CA1 hippocampus in vitro, cholinergic agonists or the optogenetic release of endogenous ACh from septal afferents induces rhythmic, theta-frequency inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in pyramidal cells, even with glutamatergic transmission blocked. The IPSCs are regulated by exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids, suggesting that they arise from type 1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing (CB1R+) interneurons - mainly cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing cells. Nevertheless, an occult contribution of PV-expressing interneurons to these rhythms remained conceivable. Here, we directly test this hypothesis by selectively silencing CA1 PV-expressing cells optogenetically with halorhodopsin or archaerhodopsin. However, this had no effect on theta-frequency IPSC rhythms induced by carbachol (CCh). In contrast, the silencing of glutamic acid decarboxylase 2-positive interneurons, which include the CCK-expressing basket cells, strongly suppressed inhibitory oscillations; PV-expressing interneurons appear to play no role. The low-frequency IPSC oscillations induced by CCh or optogenetically stimulated ACh release were also inhibited by a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, which was unexpected because MORs in CA1 are not usually associated with CCK-expressing cells. Our results reveal novel properties of an inhibitory oscillator circuit within CA1 that is activated by muscarinic agonists. The oscillations could contribute to behaviourally relevant, atropine-sensitive, theta rhythms and link cannabinoid and

  15. Vocal area-related expression of the androgen receptor in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2008-05-01

    The androgen receptor is a steroid hormone receptor widely expressed in the vocal control nuclei in songbirds. Here, we analysed androgen receptor expression in the brains of juvenile and adult budgerigars. With a species-specific probe for budgerigar androgen receptor mRNA, we found that the androgen receptor was expressed in the vocal areas, such as the central nucleus of the lateral nidopallium, the anterior arcopallium, the oval nucleus of the mesopallium, the oval nucleus of the anterior nidopallium and the tracheosyringeal hypoglossal nucleus. With the present data, together with previous reports, it turned out that the androgen receptor expression in telencephalic vocal control areas is similar amongst three groups of vocal learners--songbirds, hummingbirds and parrots, suggesting the possibility that the androgen receptor might play a role in vocal development and that the molecular mechanism regulating the androgen receptor expression in the vocal areas might be important in the evolution of vocal learning.

  16. The collagen receptor DDR2 is expressed during early cardiac development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Edie C; Zhang, Xiadong; Watson, James; Hastings, Josh; Potts, Jay D

    2010-05-01

    Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase which has been shown to regulate cell migration upon binding its ligand, collagen. Expression studies determined that DDR2 mRNA and protein are present in the atrioventricular canal during epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) and the receptor is expressed in both activated endothelial and migrating mesenchymal cells in vivo.

  17. GRK5 Deficiency Leads to Selective Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neuronal Vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Minchao; Singh, Prabhakar; Cheng, Shaowu; Zhang, Qiang; Peng, Wei; Ding, XueFeng; Li, Longxuan; Liu, Jun; Premont, Richard T; Morgan, Dave; Burns, Jeffery M; Swerdlow, Russell H; Suo, William Z

    2016-05-19

    Why certain diseases primarily affect one specific neuronal subtype rather than another is a puzzle whose solution underlies the development of specific therapies. Selective basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurodegeneration participates in cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the first recapitulation of the selective BFC neuronal loss that is typical of human AD in a mouse model termed GAP. We created GAP mice by crossing Tg2576 mice that over-express the Swedish mutant human β-amyloid precursor protein gene with G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 (GRK5) knockout mice. This doubly defective mouse displayed significant BFC neuronal loss at 18 months of age, which was not observed in either of the singly defective parent strains or in the wild type. Along with other supporting evidence, we propose that GRK5 deficiency selectively renders BFC neurons more vulnerable to degeneration.

  18. Reducing cholinergic constriction: the major reversible mechanism in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Brusasco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The airway narrowing in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has often been misunderstood as being irreversible. However, a large proportion of patients with COPD do respond to bronchodilator agents with significant changes in lung function. Unlike in asthma, abnormalities in airway smooth muscle structure or function are not believed to play a key role in COPD airway narrowing. Although there are only limited data suggesting that cholinergic tone may be increased in COPD, the well-documented efficacy of antimuscarinic agents in increasing airway calibre suggests that cholinergic tone represents the major reversible component of airflow obstruction in these patients. Airway wall thickening and loss of airway-to-parenchyma interdependence are nonreversible components of airflow obstruction in COPD that may amplify the effect of changes in airway smooth muscle tone. Thus, keeping airway smooth muscle tone to a minimum might offer patients long-lasting airway patency and protection against breathlessness, which is the major complaint of patients with COPD. Receptor antagonism by anticholinergic agents can achieve effective relaxation of airway smooth muscle in COPD. According to a classical view of cholinergic receptor function and distribution, the ideal anticholinergic bronchodilator would be one that blocks both M1 and M3 receptors, which mediate airway smooth muscle contraction, but not the M2 receptor, stimulation of which reduces acetylcholine release from vagus nerve endings and prevents the airway smooth muscle from contracting by excessive increments. Agents with such pharmacodynamic selectivity are not available, but effective and prolonged inhibition of airway smooth muscle tone has been obtained with tiotropium, which binds to all three major muscarinic receptor subtypes, but for much longer to M3 than to M2 receptors. Recent data show that long-term treatment with tiotropium for 1 yr helps sustain 24-h airway patency. This

  19. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptors in human endometrial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Ottesen, B

    1993-01-01

    Little data exist on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-Rs) in human endometrial cancer. EGF-R status was studied in 65 patients with endometrial carcinomas and in 26 women with nonmalignant postmenopausal endometria, either inactive/atrophic endometrium or adenomatous...... hyperplasia. EGF-R was identified on frozen tissue sections by means of an indirect immunoperoxidase technique with a monoclonal antibody against the external domain of the EGF-R. Seventy-one percent of the carcinomas expressed positive EGF-R immunoreactivity. In general, staining was most prominent....../inactive endometria and seven of 13 (54%) endometria with adenomatous hyperplasia were EGF-R positive, with an immunostaining pattern rather similar to that of the carcinomas....

  20. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1......) in the endothelia of Apoe(-/-) mice (Irs1/Apoe(-/-)) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE(-/-) mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin's enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable...... overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE(-/-) mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway...

  1. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands regulate monocyte Fcγ receptor expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Prexy; Fatehchand, Kavin; Patel, Hemal; Fang, Huiqing; Justiniano, Steven E; Mo, Xiaokui; Jarjoura, David; Tridandapani, Susheela; Butchar, Jonathan P

    2013-04-26

    Fcγ receptor (FcγR) clustering on monocytes/macrophages results in phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokine production, which serve to eliminate antibody-opsonized targets and activate neighboring immune cells. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which recognizes a range of both bacterial and fungal components, elicits strong proinflammatory responses in these cells when stimulated by ligands, either natural or synthetic. Thus, we explored the possibility that TLR2 agonists could strengthen FcγR activity within the context of antibody therapy. Human peripheral blood monocytes treated with the TLR2 agonist Pam2CSK4 showed significantly enhanced FcγR-mediated cytokine production as well as phagocytic ability. An examination of the molecular mechanism behind this enhancement revealed increased expression of both FcγRIIa and the common γ subunit following Pam2CSK4 treatment. Interestingly however, expression of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb was also modestly increased. Further investigation revealed that Pam2CSK4 also dramatically decreased the expression of SHIP, the major mediator of FcγRIIb inhibitory activity. Using a murine Her2/neu solid tumor model of antibody therapy, we found that Pam2CSK4 significantly enhanced the ability of anti-Her2 antibody to reduce the rate of tumor growth. To verify that the FcγR enhancement was not unique to the diacylated Pam2CSK4, we also tested Pam3CSK4, a related triacylated TLR2 agonist. Results showed significant enhancement in FcγR function and expression. Taken together, these findings indicate that TLR2 activation can positively modulate FcγR and suggest that TLR2 agonists should be considered for testing as adjuvants for antitumor antibody therapy.

  2. Toll-like Receptor 2 Ligands Regulate Monocyte Fcγ Receptor Expression and Function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Prexy; Fatehchand, Kavin; Patel, Hemal; Fang, Huiqing; Justiniano, Steven E.; Mo, Xiaokui; Jarjoura, David; Tridandapani, Susheela; Butchar, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Fcγ receptor (FcγR) clustering on monocytes/macrophages results in phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokine production, which serve to eliminate antibody-opsonized targets and activate neighboring immune cells. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which recognizes a range of both bacterial and fungal components, elicits strong proinflammatory responses in these cells when stimulated by ligands, either natural or synthetic. Thus, we explored the possibility that TLR2 agonists could strengthen FcγR activity within the context of antibody therapy. Human peripheral blood monocytes treated with the TLR2 agonist Pam2CSK4 showed significantly enhanced FcγR-mediated cytokine production as well as phagocytic ability. An examination of the molecular mechanism behind this enhancement revealed increased expression of both FcγRIIa and the common γ subunit following Pam2CSK4 treatment. Interestingly however, expression of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb was also modestly increased. Further investigation revealed that Pam2CSK4 also dramatically decreased the expression of SHIP, the major mediator of FcγRIIb inhibitory activity. Using a murine Her2/neu solid tumor model of antibody therapy, we found that Pam2CSK4 significantly enhanced the ability of anti-Her2 antibody to reduce the rate of tumor growth. To verify that the FcγR enhancement was not unique to the diacylated Pam2CSK4, we also tested Pam3CSK4, a related triacylated TLR2 agonist. Results showed significant enhancement in FcγR function and expression. Taken together, these findings indicate that TLR2 activation can positively modulate FcγR and suggest that TLR2 agonists should be considered for testing as adjuvants for antitumor antibody therapy. PMID:23504312

  3. Central cholinergic control of vasopressin release in conscious rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iitake, K.; Share, L.; Ouchi, Y.; Crofton, J.T.; Brooks, D.P.

    1986-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of carbachol into conscious rats evoked a substantial increase in vasopressin secretion and blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with the muscarinic blocker, atropine (10 g icv), but not by the nicotinic blocker, hexamethonium (10 g icv). Hexamethonium did, however, block the increase in blood pressure, the decrease in heart rate, and they very small elevation in the plasma vasopressin concentration induced by nicotine (10 g icv). These results indicate that stimulation of either central nicotinic or muscarinic receptors can affect the cardiovascular system and suggest that the cholinergic stimulation of vasopressin secretion may involve primarily muscarinic receptors in the conscious rat.

  4. Expression of CysLT2 receptors in asthma lung, and their possible role in bronchoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Sekioka

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: CysLT2 receptors were expressed in lung specimens isolated from asthma subjects. Activation of CysLT2 receptors may contribute to antigen-induced bronchoconstriction in certain asthma population.

  5. Decreased expression of serum and microvascular vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in meningococcal sepsis*.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, M. van der; Baerveldt, E.M.; Miedema, A.; Hartwig, N.G.; Hazelzet, J.A.; Emonts, M.; Groot, R. de; Prens, E.P.; Vught, A.J. van; Jansen, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the skin microvessel expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and serum-soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 levels in children with meningococcal sepsis. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Two tertiary academic children hospital PICUs.

  6. Selective optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic axons in neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, Abigail; Hedrick, Tristan; Waters, Jack

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine profoundly affects neocortical function, being involved in arousal, attention, learning, memory, sensory and motor function, and plasticity. The majority of cholinergic afferents to neocortex are from neurons in nucleus basalis. Nucleus basalis also contains projecting neurons that release other transmitters, including GABA and possibly glutamate. Hence, electrical stimulation of nucleus basalis evokes the release of a mixture of neurotransmitters in neocortex, and this lack of selectivity has impeded research on cholinergic signaling in neocortex. We describe a method for the selective stimulation of cholinergic axons in neocortex. We used the Cre-lox system and a viral vector to express the light-activated protein channelrhodopsin-2 in cholinergic neurons in nucleus basalis and their axons in neocortex. Labeled neurons depolarized on illumination with blue light but were otherwise unchanged. In anesthetized mice, illumination of neocortex desynchronized the local field potential, indicating that light evoked release of ACh. This novel technique will enable many new studies of the cellular, network, and behavioral physiology of ACh in neocortex.

  7. Activity-dependent neurotransmitter-receptor matching at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodinsky, Laura N; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2007-01-02

    Signaling in the nervous system requires matching of neurotransmitter receptors with cognate neurotransmitters at synapses. The vertebrate neuromuscular junction is the best studied cholinergic synapse, but the mechanisms by which acetylcholine is matched with acetylcholine receptors are not fully understood. Because alterations in neuronal calcium spike activity alter transmitter specification in embryonic spinal neurons, we hypothesized that receptor expression in postsynaptic cells follows changes in transmitter expression to achieve this specific match. We find that embryonic vertebrate striated muscle cells normally express receptors for glutamate, GABA, and glycine as well as for acetylcholine. As maturation progresses, acetylcholine receptor expression prevails. Receptor selection is altered when early neuronal calcium-dependent activity is perturbed, and remaining receptor populations parallel changes in transmitter phenotype. In these cases, glutamatergic, GABAergic, and glycinergic synaptic currents are recorded from muscle cells, demonstrating that activity regulates matching of transmitters and their receptors in the assembly of functional synapses.

  8. A neuronal acetylcholine receptor regulates the balance of muscle excitation and inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maelle Jospin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cholinergic motor neurons stimulate muscle contraction as well as activate GABAergic motor neurons that inhibit contraction of the contralateral muscles. Here, we describe the composition of an ionotropic acetylcholine receptor that is required to maintain excitation of the cholinergic motor neurons. We identified a gain-of-function mutation that leads to spontaneous muscle convulsions. The mutation is in the pore domain of the ACR-2 acetylcholine receptor subunit and is identical to a hyperactivating mutation in the muscle receptor of patients with myasthenia gravis. Screens for suppressors of the convulsion phenotype led to the identification of other receptor subunits. Cell-specific rescue experiments indicate that these subunits function in the cholinergic motor neurons. Expression of these subunits in Xenopus oocytes demonstrates that the functional receptor is comprised of three alpha-subunits, UNC-38, UNC-63 and ACR-12, and two non-alpha-subunits, ACR-2 and ACR-3. Although this receptor exhibits a partially overlapping subunit composition with the C. elegans muscle acetylcholine receptor, it shows distinct pharmacology. Recordings from intact animals demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in acr-2 reduce the excitability of the cholinergic motor neurons. By contrast, the acr-2(gf mutation leads to a hyperactivation of cholinergic motor neurons and an inactivation of downstream GABAergic motor neurons in a calcium dependent manner. Presumably, this imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory input into muscles leads to convulsions. These data indicate that the ACR-2 receptor is important for the coordinated excitation and inhibition of body muscles underlying sinusoidal movement.

  9. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  10. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kesha Rana; Nicole KL Lee; Jeffrey D Zajac; Helen E MacLean

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor(AR)‑regulated genes ininvitroandinvivomodels. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factormyogenin was signiifcantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity(ARΔZF2) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating thatmyogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligaseFbxo32 was repressed by 12h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, andc‑Myc expression was decreased in testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7, p57Kip2, Igf2 andcalcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all butp57Kip2was also decreased in testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase‑mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  11. The Estrogen ReceptorExpression in De Quervain's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Po-Chuan; Wang, Ping-Hui; Wu, Po-Ting; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-11-04

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist (a.k.a. de Quervain's disease) is common but how estrogen is involved is still unknown. We previously reported that inflammation was involved in the pathogenesis of this ailment. In the present study, we extended our investigation of estrogen receptor (ER)-β expression to determine whether estrogen is involved in the pathogenesis of de Quervain's. Intraoperative retinaculum samples were collected from 16 patients with the ailment. Specimens were histologically graded by collagen structure and immunohistochemically evaluated by quantifying the expression of ER-β, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 (inflammatory cytokines), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (an inflammatory enzyme), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Von Willebrand's factor (vWF). De Quervain's occurs primarily in women. The female:male ratio in our study was 7:1. We found that ER-β expression in the retinaculum was positively correlated with disease grade and patient age. Additionally, disease severity was associated with inflammatory factors--IL-1β and IL-6, COX-2, and VEGF and vWF in tenosynovial tissue. The greater the levels of ER-β expression, tissue inflammation, and angiogenesis are, the more severe de Quervain's disease is. ER-β might be a useful target for novel de Quervain's disease therapy.

  12. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Kesha; Lee, Nicole K L; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (AR(ΔZF2)) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57(Kip2), Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle, and the expression of all but p57(Kip2) was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  13. Expression of estrogen receptor alpha in preimplantation mice embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in preimplantation mice embryos.Methods:Mice zygotes were collected from superovulated Kunming mice and cultured in vitro.Embryos at different developmental stages were collected at 0,24,36,48,72 and 96hours after cultivation.The expression of ERα in early mice embryos was detected by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry.Results:The expression of ERα mRNA was detected in all of the examined embryonic stages.The relative amount of ERα mRNA showed no significant difference between 1-cell stage embryos and 4-cell stage embryos (P>0.05).However,the relative level of ERα mRNA significantly decreased (P<0.05) at 2-cell stage and was the lowest at this stage.Over 2-cell stage,the ERα mRNA relative level would increase and achieve the peak level at blastocyst stage.The location of immunocytochemistry showed that ERα immunopositive cells could be firstly detected at 8-cell stage,after which they are consistently detected until blastocyst stage.In addition,the intensity of ERα positive staining was higher at blastocyst stage compared with that at 8-cell stage and morula stage.Conclusion:ERα is expressed in preimplantation mice embryos in a temporal and spatial pattern and may be involved in regulating the development of early mice embryos,which probably plays crucial roles in early embryonic development.

  14. Overnight fasting regulates inhibitory tone to cholinergic neurons of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Groessl

    Full Text Available The dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH contributes to the regulation of overall energy homeostasis by modulating energy intake as well as energy expenditure. Despite the importance of the DMH in the control of energy balance, DMH-specific genetic markers or neuronal subtypes are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate the presence of cholinergic neurons in the DMH using genetically modified mice that express enhanced green florescent protein (eGFP selectively in choline acetyltransferase (Chat-neurons. Overnight food deprivation increases the activity of DMH cholinergic neurons, as shown by induction of fos protein and a significant shift in the baseline resting membrane potential. DMH cholinergic neurons receive both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic input, but the activation of these neurons by an overnight fast is due entirely to decreased inhibitory tone. The decreased inhibition is associated with decreased frequency and amplitude of GABAergic synaptic currents in the cholinergic DMH neurons, while glutamatergic synaptic transmission is not altered. As neither the frequency nor amplitude of miniature GABAergic or glutamatergic postsynaptic currents is affected by overnight food deprivation, the fasting-induced decrease in inhibitory tone to cholinergic neurons is dependent on superthreshold activity of GABAergic inputs. This study reveals that cholinergic neurons in the DMH readily sense the availability of nutrients and respond to overnight fasting via decreased GABAergic inhibitory tone. As such, altered synaptic as well as neuronal activity of DMH cholinergic neurons may play a critical role in the regulation of overall energy homeostasis.

  15. Prenatal nicotine alters vigilance states and AchR gene expression in the neonatal rat: implications for SIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, M G; Srere, H; Ledezma, C; O'Hara, B; Heller, H C

    2001-04-01

    Maternal smoking is a major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke predisposes infants to SIDS are not known. We examined the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on sleep/wake ontogenesis and central cholinergic receptor gene expression in the neonatal rat. Prenatal nicotine exposure transiently increased sleep continuity and accelerated sleep/wake ontogeny in the neonatal rat. Prenatal nicotine also upregulated nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor mRNAs in brain regions involved in regulating vigilance states. These findings suggest that the nicotine contained in cigarette smoke may predispose human infants to SIDS by interfering with the normal maturation of sleep and wake.

  16. Glomerular Glucocorticoid Receptors Expression and Clinicopathological Types of Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Yasser; Badawy, Ahlam; Swelam, Salwa; Tawfeek, Mostafa S K; Gad, Eman Fathalla

    2017-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are primary therapy of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). However, not all children respond to steroid therapy. We assessed glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression in fifty-one children with INS and its relation to response to steroid therapy and to histopathological type. Clinical, laboratory and glomerular expression of glucocorticoid receptors were compared between groups with different steroid response. Glomerular glucocorticoid expression was slightly higher in controls than in minimal change early responders, which in turn was significantly higher than in minimal change late responders. There was significantly lower glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression in steroid-resistance compared to early responders, late responders and controls. Glomerular glucocorticoid expression was significantly higher in all minimal change disease (MCD) compared to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In INS, response to glucocorticoid is dependent on glomerular expression of receptors and peripheral expression. Evaluation of glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression at time of diagnosis of NS can predict response to steroid therapy.

  17. Expression of retinoic acid receptors in human endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Kojiro; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Tamura, Mitsutoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Takano, Tadao; Yoshinaga, Kohsuke; Nagase, Satoru; Suzuki, Takashi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-02-01

    The retinoids (vitamin A and its biologically active derivatives) are essential for the health and survival of the individual. Several studies have reported a strong rationale for the use of retinoids in cancer treatment and chemoprevention. It has been discovered that expression of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta is frequently silenced in epithelial carcinogenesis, which has led to the hypothesis that RAR beta could act as a tumor suppressor. However, the status of RAR beta in human endometrial carcinoma has not been examined. In the present study, we initially studied the effects of retinoic acid on cell proliferation and the expression of RAR alpha, RAR beta, and RAR gamma using AM580 (a RAR-specific agonist) in the Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line. We also examined the expression of RAR in human eutopic endometrium (30 cases), endometrial hyperplasia (28 cases), and endometrial carcinoma (103 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Finally, we correlated these findings with the clinicopathological parameters. In vitro, cell growth was inhibited and RAR beta and RAR gamma mRNA was significantly induced by AM580, compared with vehicle controls, whereas RAR alpha mRNA was significantly attenuated by AM580, compared with vehicle. RAR beta was detected predominantly in endometrial hyperplasia, compared with endometrial carcinoma. No statistically significant correlation was obtained between the expression of any other RAR subtypes and clinicopathological parameters in human endometrial carcinoma. The results of our study demonstrate that AM580 inhibits cell growth and induces RAR beta mRNA expression in the Ishikawa cell line, and the expression level of RAR beta in endometrial carcinoma is significantly lower than that in endometrial hyperplasia. AM580 might therefore be considered as a potential treatment for endometrial carcinoma.

  18. Expression of estrogen receptor β in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Qun Xie; Jie-Ping Yu; He-Sheng Luo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of estrogen receptor (ER)β in Chinese colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients.METHODS: Erβ expression in CRC was investigated by immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 40 CRCs, 10 colonic adenomas,and 10 normal colon mucosa biopsies. The percentage of positive cells was recorded, mRNA expression of Erα and Erβ in 12 CRC tissues and paired normal colon tissues were detected by RT-PCR.RESULTS: Positive ER immunoreactivity was present in part of normal epithelium of biopsy (2/10), adenomas (3/10),and the sections of CRC tissue, most of them were nuclear positive. In CRCs, nuclear Erβ immunoreactivity was detected in over 10% of the cancer cells in 57.5% of the cases and was always associated with cytoplasmic immunoreactivity.There was no statistical significance between Erβ positive and negative groups in regard to depth of invasion and nodal metastases. Of the 12 CRC tissues and paired normal colon tissues, the expression rate of Erα mRNA in CRC tissue and corresponding normal colon tissue was 25% and 16.6%,respectively. Erβ mRNA was expressed in 83.3% CRC tissue and 91.7% paired normal colon tissue, respectively. Therewas no significant difference in Erβ mRNA level between CRC tissues and paired normal colon tissues.CONCLUSION: A large number of CRCs are positive for Erβ, which can also be detected in normal colonic epithelia.There is a different localization of Erβ immunoreactivity among normal colon mucosae, adenomas and CRCs. Erαand Erβ mRNA can be detected both in CRC tissue and in corresponding normal colon tissue. A post-transcriptional mechanism may account for the decrease of Erβ protein expression in CRC tissues.

  19. Expression of tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand receptor in glioblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongling Gao; Zhongwei Zhao; Hongxin Zhang; Lan Zhang; Kuisheng Chen; Yunhan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Receptors for tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) include death receptor 4, death receptor 5, decoy receptor 1, and decoy receptor 2. Activation of death receptor 4 and 5 selectively kills tumor cells.OBJECTIVE: To detect TRAIL receptor expression in glioblastoma by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR and to compare this expression to that in normal brain tissue.DESIGN: Observational analysis.SETTING: Department of Pathology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University; Henan Tumor Pathology Key Laboratory.PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five patients (17 males and 8 females) who received glioblastoma resection were selected from the Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, between September 2003 to June 2004. All glioblastoma samples were diagnosed pathologically. Twenty patients (12 males and 8 females) with craniocerebral injury who received normal brain tissue resection were selected in the same time period. There were no significant differences in sex and age between glioblastoma patients or between craniocerebral injury patients (P>0.05). All patients and appropriate relatives provided informed consent, and this study was approved by the local research ethics committee.METHODS: Polyclonal antibody against TRAIL receptors and an immunohistochemical kit (batch number: 200502) were purchased from Boster Company, Wuhan. Immunohistochemistry: Expression of death receptor 4, death receptor 5, decoy receptor 1, and decoy receptor 2 were observed in both glioblastoma and normal brain tissue. The experiment was performed according to the kit instructions, and positive staining was brown-yellow. Assessment: There were no positive signals (-); weakly positive signals, positive cells75% (++++). Evaluation: Expression levels of TRAIL receptors were estimated in both normal brain tissue and glioblastoma. Expression of decoy receptor 1 and decoy receptor 2 mRNA in glioblastoma were detected by reverse transcription polymerase

  20. Development of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, glial cells, and regional cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, S P; Hoover, D B

    2012-09-27

    Very little is known about the development of cardiac parasympathetic ganglia and cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the growth of cholinergic neurons and nerve fibers in mouse hearts from embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) through postnatal day 21(P21). Cholinergic perikarya and varicose nerve fibers were identified in paraffin sections immunostained for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Satellite cells and Schwann cells in adjacent sections were identified by immunostaining for S100β calcium binding protein (S100) and brain-fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP). We found that cardiac ganglia had formed in close association to the atria and cholinergic innervation of the atrioventricular junction had already begun by E18.5. However, most cholinergic innervation of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, developed postnatally (P0.5-P21) along with a doubling of the cross-sectional area of cholinergic perikarya. Satellite cells were present throughout neonatal cardiac ganglia and expressed primarily B-FABP. As they became more mature at P21, satellite cells stained strongly for both B-FABP and S100. Satellite cells appeared to surround most cardiac parasympathetic neurons, even in neonatal hearts. Mature Schwann cells, identified by morphology and strong staining for S100, were already present at E18.5 in atrial regions that receive cholinergic innervation at later developmental times. The abundance and distribution of S100-positive Schwann cells increased postnatally along with nerve density. While S100 staining of cardiac Schwann cells was maintained in P21 and older mice, Schwann cells did not show B-FABP staining at these times. Parallel development of satellite cells and cholinergic perikarya in the cardiac ganglia and the increase in abundance of Schwann cells and varicose cholinergic nerve fibers in the atria suggest that neuronal-glial interactions could be important for development of the parasympathetic nervous

  1. Expression pattern of mda-7/IL-24 receptors in liver cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhu; Zhi-Bin Yang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mda-7/IL-24 receptor belongs to the typeⅡ cytokine receptor family, and its two heterodimeric receptors are IL-22R1/IL-20R2 and IL-20R1/IL-20R2. Mda-7/IL-24 receptor expression in liver cancer cell lines has not yet been described. This information may be helpful for further clinical gene therapy. METHODS: With normal skin total RNA as template, the cDNA sequences of IL-20R1, IL-20R2 and IL-22R were ampliifed by RT-PCR. Total RNA was extracted from cultured liver cancer cell lines and a normal liver cell line, then detected by northern blotting, and the expression of mda-7/IL-24 receptors was analyzed. RESULTS: PLC/PRF/5 and SMMC-7721 expressed IL-20R1;BEL-7402, Hep3B, HepG2, and PLC/PRF/5 expressed IL-20R2; and HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 expressed IL-22R. Only HepG2 expressed the IL-22R/IL-20R2 receptor complex. PLC/PRF/5 completely expressed both heterodimeric receptors. Huh-7, QGY-7701 and WRL-68 did not express the IL-24 receptor. CONCLUSION: Complete mda-7/IL-24 receptors are seldom expressed in liver cancer cell lines.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE OLFACTORY RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN HUMAN SPERMATOZOA

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    Caroline eFlegel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicated that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa and demonstrates that ORs are involved in the physiological processes.

  3. Pharmacological Characterization of Human Histamine Receptors and Histamine Receptor Mutantsin the Sf9 Cell Expression System.

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    Schneider, Erich H; Seifert, Roland

    2017-02-24

    A large problem of histamine receptor research is data heterogeneity. Various experimental approaches, the complex signaling pathways of mammalian cells, and the use of different species orthologues render it difficult to compare and interpret the published results. Thus, the four human histamine receptor subtypes were analyzed side-by-side in the Sf9 insect cell expression system, using radioligand binding assays as well as functional readouts proximal to the receptor activation event (steady-state GTPase assays and [(35)S]GTPγS assays). The human H1R was co-expressed with the regulators of G protein signaling RGS4 or GAIP, which unmasked a productive interaction between hH1R and insect cell Gαq. By contrast, functional expression of the hH2R required the generation of an hH2R-Gsα fusion protein to ensure close proximity of G protein and receptor. Fusion of hH2R to the long (GsαL) or short (GsαS) splice variant of Gαs resulted in comparable constitutive hH2R activity, although both G protein variants show different GDP affinities. Medicinal chemistry studies revealed profound species differences between hH1R/hH2R and their guinea pig orthologues gpH1R/gpH2R. The causes for these differences were analyzed by molecular modeling in combination with mutational studies. Co-expression of the hH3R with Gαi1, Gαi2, Gαi3, and Gαi/o in Sf9 cells revealed high constitutive activity and comparable interaction efficiency with all G protein isoforms. A comparison of various cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+)) and anions (Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) revealed that anions with large radii most efficiently stabilize the inactive hH3R state. Potential sodium binding sites in the hH3R protein were analyzed by expressing specific hH3R mutants in Sf9 cells. In contrast to the hH3R, the hH4R preferentially couples to co-expressed Gαi2 in Sf9 cells. Its high constitutive activity is resistant to NaCl or GTPγS. The hH4R shows structural instability and adopts a G protein-independent high

  4. Functional and laminar dissociations between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic neuromodulation in the tree shrew primary visual cortex.

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    Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Bießmann, Felix; Veit, Julia; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine is an important neuromodulator involved in cognitive function. The impact of cholinergic neuromodulation on computations within the cortical microcircuit is not well understood. Here we investigate the effects of layer-specific cholinergic drug application in the tree shrew primary visual cortex during visual stimulation with drifting grating stimuli of varying contrast and orientation. We describe differences between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic effects in terms of both the layer of cortex and the attribute of visual representation. Nicotinic receptor activation enhanced the contrast response in the granular input layer of the cortex, while tending to reduce neural selectivity for orientation across all cortical layers. Muscarinic activation modestly enhanced the contrast response across cortical layers, and tended to improve orientation tuning. This resulted in highest orientation selectivity in the supra- and infragranular layers, where orientation selectivity was already greatest in the absence of pharmacological stimulation. Our results indicate that laminar position plays a crucial part in functional consequences of cholinergic stimulation, consistent with the differential distribution of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors function to enhance sensory representations arriving in the cortex, whereas muscarinic receptors act to boost the cortical computation of orientation tuning. Our findings suggest close homology between cholinergic mechanisms in tree shrew and primate visual cortices.

  5. Analysis of TRAIL receptor expression using anti-TRAIL death receptor-5 monoclonal antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马远方; 杨东亮; 陈有海

    2003-01-01

    ObjectiveTo establish hybridomas that produce anti-death receptor-5 (DR5) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and check the surface expression of DR5 (sDR5) on cell lines.MethodsThe cDNA of human DR5 was cloned into pGAPZα. Recombinant Pichia pastoris clones generated via homologous recombination secreted high levels of sDR5. The sDR5 was purified using a nickel ion column. BALB/c mice were immunized with sDR5 and spleen cells were fused with the SP2/0-Ag 14. Monoclonal antibodies were tested by ELISA for their abilities binding to sDR5 and by flow cytometry for thereactivities to surface DR5 of Jurkat cells. Surface expression of the TRAIL receptor was determined by flow cytometric analysis measuring the binding of anti-DR5 mAb. Resultse to sDR5 as observed through ELISA. It was discovered using flow cytometry that only IgG was able to bind to DR5 on the plasma membrane of Jurkat cells. sDR5was found to completely inhibit anti-DR5 mAb binding to Jurkat cells. Pproximately 95% of Jurkat cells, 98% SW480, 99% U937, 100% U87, 86% HCT116, 64% HL-60, 47% HeLa and 13% K562 cells express membrane DR5. ConclusionsThese results demonstrate that anti-DR5 mAb is able to specifically bind to DR5and that DR5 is expressed at high levels on Jurkat, SW480, U87, U937 and HCT116cell lines, and at medium levels on HL-60 and HeLa cell lines. The expressionof DR5 on K562 cell line is low.

  6. Serotonin 1A receptors alter expression of movement representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, Kathleen; Boychuk, Jeffery A; Yamakawa, Glenn R; Rodych, Justin T G; Nakanishi, Stan T; Seto, Angela; Smith, Victoria M; McCarthy, Ryan W; Whelan, Patrick J; Antle, Michael C; Pittman, Quentin J; Teskey, G Campbell

    2013-03-13

    Serotonin has a myriad of central functions involving mood, appetite, sleep, and memory and while its release within the spinal cord is particularly important for generating movement, the corresponding role on cortical movement representations (motor maps) is unknown. Using adult rats we determined that pharmacological depletion of serotonin (5-HT) via intracerebroventricular administration of 5,7 dihydroxytryptamine resulted in altered movements of the forelimb in a skilled reaching task as well as higher movement thresholds and smaller maps derived using high-resolution intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). We ruled out the possibility that reduced spinal cord excitability could account for the serotonin depletion-induced changes as we observed an enhanced Hoffman reflex (H-reflex), indicating a hyperexcitable spinal cord. Motor maps derived in 5-HT1A receptor knock-out mice also showed higher movement thresholds and smaller maps compared with wild-type controls. Direct cortical application of the 5-HT1A/7 agonist 8-OH-DPAT lowered movement thresholds in vivo and increased map size in 5-HT-depleted rats. In rats, electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe lowered movement thresholds and this effect could be blocked by direct cortical application of the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100135, indicating that serotonin is primarily acting through the 5-HT1A receptor. Next we developed a novel in vitro ICMS preparation that allowed us to track layer V pyramidal cell excitability. Bath application of WAY-100135 raised the ICMS current intensity to induce action potential firing whereas the agonist 8-OH-DPAT had the opposite effect. Together our results demonstrate that serotonin, acting through 5-HT1A receptors, plays an excitatory role in forelimb motor map expression.

  7. Lesions of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in mice disrupt idiothetic navigation.

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    Adam S Hamlin

    Full Text Available Loss of integrity of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is a consistent feature of Alzheimer's disease, and measurement of basal forebrain degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging is emerging as a sensitive diagnostic marker for prodromal disease. It is also known that Alzheimer's disease patients perform poorly on both real space and computerized cued (allothetic or uncued (idiothetic recall navigation tasks. Although the hippocampus is required for allothetic navigation, lesions of this region only mildly affect idiothetic navigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that the cholinergic medial septo-hippocampal circuit is important for idiothetic navigation. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons were selectively lesioned in mice using the toxin saporin conjugated to a basal forebrain cholinergic neuronal marker, the p75 neurotrophin receptor. Control animals were able to learn and remember spatial information when tested on a modified version of the passive place avoidance test where all extramaze cues were removed, and animals had to rely on idiothetic signals. However, the exploratory behaviour of mice with cholinergic basal forebrain lesions was highly disorganized during this test. By contrast, the lesioned animals performed no differently from controls in tasks involving contextual fear conditioning and spatial working memory (Y maze, and displayed no deficits in potentially confounding behaviours such as motor performance, anxiety, or disturbed sleep/wake cycles. These data suggest that the basal forebrain cholinergic system plays a specific role in idiothetic navigation, a modality that is impaired early in Alzheimer's disease.

  8. A novel gene delivery system targeting cells expressing VEGF receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJUNMIN; JINGCHULUO; 等

    1999-01-01

    Two ligand oligopeptides GV1 and GV2 were designed according to the putative binding region of VEGF to its receptors.GV1,GV2 and endosome releasing oligopeptide HA20 were conjugated with poly-L-lysine or protamine and the resulting conjugates could interact with DNA in a noncovalent bond to form a complex.Using pSV2-β-galactosidase as a reporter gene,it has been demonstrated that exogenous gene was transferred into bovine aortic arch-derived endothelial cells (ABAE) and human malignant melanoma cell lines (A375) in vitro.In vivo experiments,exogenous gene was transferred into tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells of subcutaneously transplanted human colon cancer LOVO,human malignant melanoma A375 and human hepatoma graft in nude mice.This system could also target gene to intrahepatically transplanted human hepatoma injected via portal vein in nude mice.These results are correlated with the relevant receptors(flt-1,flk-1/KDR) expression on the targeted cells and tissues.

  9. Dopaminergic and Cholinergic Modulation of Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Xenias, Harry S.; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The recent electrophysiological characterization of TH-expressing GABAergic interneurons (THINs) in the neostriatum revealed an unexpected degree of diversity of interneurons in this brain area (Ibáñez-Sandoval et al., 2010, Unal et al., 2011, 2013). Despite being relatively few in number, THINs may play a significant role in transmitting and distributing extra- and intrastriatal neuromodulatory signals in the striatal circuitry. Here we investigated the dopaminergic and cholinergic regulatio...

  10. Expression of estrogen receptor and estrogen receptor messenger RNA in gastric carcinoma tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Han Zhao; Shan-Zhi Gu; Shan-Xi Liu; Bo-Rong Pan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogen receptor messenger RNA (ERmRNA) expression in gastric carcinoma tissues and to investigate their association with the pathologic types of gastric carcinoma.METHODS: The expression of ER and ERmRNA in gastric carcinoma tissues (15 males and 15 females, 42-70 years old) was detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively.RESULTS: The positive rate of ER (immunohistochemistry)was 33.3% in males and 46.7% in females. In Borrmann Ⅳ gastric carcinoma ER positive rate was greater than that in other pathologic types, and in poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma the positive rates were greater than those in other histological types of both males and females (P<0.05). The ER was more highly expressed in diffused gastric carcinoma than in non-diffused gastric carcinoma (P<0.05). The ER positive rate was also related to regional lymph nodes metastases (P<0.05), and was significantly higher in females above 55 years old, and higher in males under 55 years old (P<0.05). The ERmRNA (in situ hybridization) positive rate was 73.3% in males and 86.7% in females. The ERmRNA positive rates were almost the same in Borrmann Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ gastric carcinoma (P>0.05). ERmRNA was expressed in all tubular adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma (P<0.05). The ERmRNA positive rate was related to both regional lymph nodes metastases and gastric carcinoma growth patterns, and was higher in both sexes above 55 years old but without statistical significance (P>0.05). The positive rate of ERmRNA expression by in situ hybridization was higher than that of ER expression by immunohistochemistry (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: ERmRNA expression is related to the pathological behaviors of gastric carcinoma, which might help to predict the prognosis and predict the effectiveness of endocrine therapy for gastric carcinoma.

  11. A complex pattern of chemokine receptor expression is seen in osteosarcoma

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    Nathrath Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone tumor in childhood and adolescence. Patients with primary metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. It is therefore important to better characterize the biology of this tumor to define new prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for tailored therapy. Chemokines and their receptors have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of malignant tumors. They are thought to be active participants in the biology of osteosarcoma. The function of specific chemokines and their receptors is strongly associated with the biological context and microenvironment of their expression. In this report we characterized the expression of a series of chemokine receptors in the complex environment that defines osteosarcoma. Methods The overall level of chemokine receptor mRNA expression was determined using TaqMan RT-PCR of microdissected archival patient biopsy samples. Expression was then verified at the protein level by immunohistochemistry using a series of receptor specific antibody reagents to elucidate the cellular association of expression. Results Expression at the RNA level was found for most of the tested receptors. CCR1 expression was found on infiltrating mononuclear and polynuclear giant cells in the tumor. Cells associated with the lining of intratumoral vessels were shown to express CCR4. Infiltrating mononuclear cells and tumor cells both showed expression of the receptor CCR5, while CCR7 was predominantly expressed by the mononuclear infiltrate. CCR10 was only very rarely detected in few scattered infiltrating cells. Conclusion Our data elucidate for the first time the cellular context of chemokine receptor expression in osteosarcoma. This is an important issue for better understanding potential chemokine/chemokine receptor function in the complex biologic processes that underlie the development and progression of osteosarcoma. Our data support the suggested involvement of

  12. The subcellular distribution of [3H]-CGS 21680 binding sites in the rat striatum: copurification with cholinergic nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S; Richardson, P J

    1993-08-01

    The subcellular distribution of the adenosine A2a receptor in rat striatum has been investigated using specific binding of the A2a-selective ligand [3H]-CGS 21680. After subcellular fractionation, the distribution of [3H]-CGS 21680 binding was similar to that of the cholinergic nerve terminal marker acetylcholinesterase rather than the more general membrane marker 5'-nucleotidase, with 42% of binding associated with the synaptosomal sub-fraction and 19% with a light membrane fraction. Binding of [3H]-CGS 21680 was also found to co-purify with the cholinergic nerve terminal marker choline acetyltransferase during immunoaffinity purification of striatal cholinergic nerve terminals. These results demonstrate that some adenosine A2a receptors are present on cholinergic nerve terminals in rat striatum.

  13. Electroacupuncture at Zusanli (ST36 Prevents Intestinal Barrier and Remote Organ Dysfunction following Gut Ischemia through Activating the Cholinergic Anti-Inflammatory-Dependent Mechanism

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    Sen Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the protective effect and mechanism of electroacupuncture at ST36 points on the intestinal barrier dysfunction and remote organ injury after intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats. Rats were subjected to gut ischemia for 30 min, and then received electroacupuncture for 30 min with or without abdominal vagotomy or intraperitoneal administration of cholinergic α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR inhibitor. Then we compared its effects with electroacupuncture at nonchannel points, vagal nerve stimulation, or intraperitoneal administration of cholinergic agonist. Cytokine levels in plasma and tissue of intestine, lung, and liver were assessed 60 min after reperfusion. Intestinal barrier injury was detected by histology, gut injury score, the permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran, and changes in tight junction protein ZO-1 using immunofluorescence and Western blot. Electroacupuncture significantly lowered the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 in plasma and organ tissues, decreased intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran, and prevented changes in ZO-1 protein expression and localization. However, abdominal vagotomy or intraperitoneal administration of cholinergic α7nAChR inhibitor reversed these effects of electroacupuncture. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture attenuates the systemic inflammatory response through protection of intestinal barrier integrity after intestinal ischemia injury in the presence of an intact vagus nerve.

  14. The LIM and POU homeobox genes ttx-3 and unc-86 act as terminal selectors in distinct cholinergic and serotonergic neuron types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feifan; Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Nelson, Jessica C; Abe, Namiko; Gordon, Patricia; Lloret-Fernandez, Carla; Maicas, Miren; Flames, Nuria; Mann, Richard S; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Hobert, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive neuron type-specific terminal differentiation programs in the developing nervous system are often expressed in several distinct neuronal cell types, but to what extent they have similar or distinct activities in individual neuronal cell types is generally not well explored. We investigate this problem using, as a starting point, the C. elegans LIM homeodomain transcription factor ttx-3, which acts as a terminal selector to drive the terminal differentiation program of the cholinergic AIY interneuron class. Using a panel of different terminal differentiation markers, including neurotransmitter synthesizing enzymes, neurotransmitter receptors and neuropeptides, we show that ttx-3 also controls the terminal differentiation program of two additional, distinct neuron types, namely the cholinergic AIA interneurons and the serotonergic NSM neurons. We show that the type of differentiation program that is controlled by ttx-3 in different neuron types is specified by a distinct set of collaborating transcription factors. One of the collaborating transcription factors is the POU homeobox gene unc-86, which collaborates with ttx-3 to determine the identity of the serotonergic NSM neurons. unc-86 in turn operates independently of ttx-3 in the anterior ganglion where it collaborates with the ARID-type transcription factor cfi-1 to determine the cholinergic identity of the IL2 sensory and URA motor neurons. In conclusion, transcription factors operate as terminal selectors in distinct combinations in different neuron types, defining neuron type-specific identity features.

  15. Cholinergic Neurons - Keeping Check on Amyloid beta in the Cerebral Cortex

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    Saak V. Ovsepian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological relevance of the uptake of ligands with no apparent trophic functions via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR remains unclear. Herein, we propose a homeostatic role for this in clearance of amyloid β (Aβ in the brain. We hypothesize that uptake of Aβ in conjunction with p75NTR followed by its degradation in lysosomes endows cholinergic basalo-cortical projections enriched in this receptor a facility for maintaining physiological levels of Aβ in target areas. Thus, in addition to the diffuse modulator influence and channeling of extra-thalamic signals, cholinergic innervations could supply the cerebral cortex with an elaborate system for Aβ drainage. Interpreting the emerging relationship of new molecular data with established role of cholinergic modulator system in regulating cortical network dynamics should provide new insights into the brain physiology and mechanisms of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  16. The Characteristics of Gastrin Receptor Expression in Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGGuangjian; ZHANGYanling; LEZhuqin; YUFen; ZHANGGuangming; DENShouzhen; NIQuanxing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics and significance of gastrin receptor (GR) expression in gastric cancer. Methods: The content and affinity of GR were determined in 34 specimens of gastric cancer using radioligand binding assay. The correlation was analyzed between GR expression in tumors and tumor sites, stages, grades, DNA of gastric cancer cells, GR of adjacent normal gastric mucosa, survival time. Results: Among the 34 cases of gastric cancer, 16 patients (47.1%) had positive GR in specimens of gastric cancer, with high-affinity GR in 14 cases (41.2%) and low-affinity GR in 2 cases. Of high-affinity GR, 9 cases had cancers with GR>10 fmol/mg.protein (39.5±14.4 fmol/mg.protein), 5 cases with GR≤10fmol/mg.protein (6.0±2.8 fmol/mg.protein). High-affinity GR was easier to be expressed in cancers ofgastric body (7/9) and cardia (3/6) than in gastric antrum (4/19). The expression of GR in gastric cancer accorded well with that in normal gastric mucosa at the same sites, but with more high-special binding sites than the latter (39.5±14.4 vs 26.1±16.6 fmol/mg.protein). A significantly greater proportion of patients withⅢ+Ⅳ stages (13/24) had high-affinity GR compared with I+II stages (1/10) of gastric cancers. During a follow-up of 23-61 months, 11 of 13 cases with high-affinity GR were dead, whereas 4 of 11 cases with low-affinity or negative GR were dead in Ⅲ+Ⅳ stages of gastric cancer. Conclusion: GR is an important factor in the autocrine growth of gastric cancer cells, and helpful in the prediction of prognosis and guidance of treatment with GR antagonists.

  17. The therapeutic promise of positive allosteric modulation of nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uteshev, Victor V

    2014-03-15

    In the central nervous system, deficits in cholinergic neurotransmission correlate with decreased attention and cognitive impairment, while stimulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves attention, cognitive performance and neuronal resistance to injury as well as produces robust analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. The rational basis for the therapeutic use of orthosteric agonists and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic receptors arises from the finding that functional nicotinic receptors are ubiquitously expressed in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues including brain regions highly vulnerable to traumatic and ischemic types of injury (e.g., cortex and hippocampus). Moreover, functional nicotinic receptors do not vanish in age-, disease- and trauma-related neuropathologies, but their expression and/or activation levels decline in a subunit- and brain region-specific manner. Therefore, augmenting the endogenous cholinergic tone by nicotinic agents is possible and may offset neurological impairments associated with cholinergic hypofunction. Importantly, because neuronal damage elevates extracellular levels of choline (a selective agonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) near the site of injury, α7-PAM-based treatments may augment pathology-activated α7-dependent auto-therapies where and when they are most needed (i.e., in the penumbra, post-injury). Thus, nicotinic-PAM-based treatments are expected to augment the endogenous cholinergic tone in a spatially and temporally restricted manner creating the potential for differential efficacy and improved safety as compared to exogenous orthosteric nicotinic agonists that activate nicotinic receptors indiscriminately. In this review, I will summarize the existing trends in therapeutic applications of nicotinic PAMs.

  18. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  19. Muscle Plasticity and β2-Adrenergic Receptors: Adaptive Responses of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression to Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy

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    Shogo Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the functional roles of β2-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β2-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β2-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β2-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β2-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β2-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  20. Defective expression of scavenger receptors in celiac disease mucosa.

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    Maria Laura Cupi

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a gluten sensitive enteropathy characterized by a marked infiltration of the mucosa with immune cells, over-production of inflammatory cytokines and epithelial cell damage. The factors/mechanisms that sustain and amplify the ongoing mucosal inflammation in CD are not however fully understood. Here, we have examined whether in CD there is a defective clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, a phenomenon that helps promote tolerogenic signals thus liming pathogenic responses. Accumulation of apoptotic cells and bodies was more pronounced in the epithelial and lamina propria compartments of active CD patients as compared to inactive CD patients and normal controls. Expression of scavenger receptors, which are involved in the clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, namely thrombospondin (TSP-1, CD36 and CD61, was significantly reduced in active CD as compared to inactive CD and normal mucosal samples. Consistently, lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC of active CD patients had diminished ability to phagocyte apoptotic cells. Interleukin (IL-15, IL-21 and interferon-γ, cytokines over-produced in active CD, inhibited the expression of TSP-1, CD36, and CD61 in normal intestinal LPMC. These results indicate that CD-related inflammation is marked by diminished clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, thus suggesting a role for such a defect in the ongoing mucosal inflammation in this disorder.

  1. Defective expression of scavenger receptors in celiac disease mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupi, Maria Laura; Sarra, Massimiliano; De Nitto, Daniela; Franzè, Eleonora; Marafini, Irene; Monteleone, Ivan; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Paoluzi, Omero Alessandro; Di Fusco, Davide; Gentileschi, Paolo; Ortenzi, Angela; Colantoni, Alfredo; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a gluten sensitive enteropathy characterized by a marked infiltration of the mucosa with immune cells, over-production of inflammatory cytokines and epithelial cell damage. The factors/mechanisms that sustain and amplify the ongoing mucosal inflammation in CD are not however fully understood. Here, we have examined whether in CD there is a defective clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, a phenomenon that helps promote tolerogenic signals thus liming pathogenic responses. Accumulation of apoptotic cells and bodies was more pronounced in the epithelial and lamina propria compartments of active CD patients as compared to inactive CD patients and normal controls. Expression of scavenger receptors, which are involved in the clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, namely thrombospondin (TSP)-1, CD36 and CD61, was significantly reduced in active CD as compared to inactive CD and normal mucosal samples. Consistently, lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of active CD patients had diminished ability to phagocyte apoptotic cells. Interleukin (IL)-15, IL-21 and interferon-γ, cytokines over-produced in active CD, inhibited the expression of TSP-1, CD36, and CD61 in normal intestinal LPMC. These results indicate that CD-related inflammation is marked by diminished clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, thus suggesting a role for such a defect in the ongoing mucosal inflammation in this disorder.

  2. Expression of leptin and leptin receptor isoforms in the human stomach

    OpenAIRE

    Mix, H.; Widjaja, A; Jandl, O.; Cornberg, M; Kaul, A; Goke, M; Beil, W.; Kuske, M.; Brabant, G; Manns, M; Wagner, S.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Leptin is an important regulator of food intake and energy expenditure. Initially it was thought to be expressed exclusively in and secreted by adipocytes. Recently, leptin expression was also noted in other tissues, including rat gastric mucosa. Information on leptin and leptin receptor expression in the human stomach is lacking.
AIM—To investigate expression of leptin and its corresponding receptors in human gastric epithelial cells.
METHODS—Fundic and antral gastric mucosal biop...

  3. Cytokine receptor expression in human lymphoid tissue: analysis by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zola, H; Ridings, J; Weedon, H; Fusco, M; Byard, R W; Macardle, P J

    1995-08-01

    A highly-sensitive flourescence method, capable of detecting cytokine receptors present at low concentrations (around 100 molecules per cell) by flow cytometry, was adapted for use on tissue sections. This method was used to examine the expression of several cytokine receptors in lymphoid tissues. IL-2 receptors were distributed broadly, with higher concentrations in T cell areas. IL-1 receptor Type 1 was detected in T cell areas and in the follicular mantle, and was strongly expressed on vascular endothelium. IL-6 receptor was found at very low concentration, both within and outside germinal centres. The gp 130 molecule, which is involved in the functional receptor complex for IL-6 and several other cytokines, was present at higher concentrations, particularly in the germinal centre. Analysis of receptor expression in secondary lymphoid tissue provides evidence bearing on the physiological roles of cytokines, as these tissues contain cells at various stages of physiological activation located in well-defined functional zones.

  4. Neural stem cells express melatonin receptors and neurotrophic factors: colocalization of the MT1 receptor with neuronal and glial markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Catherine R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to optimize the potential benefits of neural stem cell (NSC transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, it is necessary to understand their biological characteristics. Although neurotrophin transduction strategies are promising, alternative approaches such as the modulation of intrinsic neurotrophin expression by NSCs, could also be beneficial. Therefore, utilizing the C17.2 neural stem cell line, we have examined the expression of selected neurotrophic factors under different in vitro conditions. In view of recent evidence suggesting a role for the pineal hormone melatonin in vertebrate development, it was also of interest to determine whether its G protein-coupled MT1 and MT2 receptors are expressed in NSCs. Results RT-PCR analysis revealed robust expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF in undifferentiated cells maintained for two days in culture. After one week, differentiating cells continued to exhibit high expression of BDNF and NGF, but GDNF expression was lower or absent, depending on the culture conditions utilized. Melatonin MT1 receptor mRNA was detected in NSCs maintained for two days in culture, but the MT2 receptor was not seen. An immature MT1 receptor of about 30 kDa was detected by western blotting in NSCs cultured for two days, whereas a mature receptor of about 40 – 45 kDa was present in cells maintained for longer periods. Immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that the MT1 receptor is expressed in both neural (β-tubulin III positive and glial (GFAP positive progenitor cells. An examination of the effects of melatonin on neurotrophin expression revealed that low physiological concentrations of this hormone caused a significant induction of GDNF mRNA expression in NSCs following treatment for 24 hours. Conclusions The phenotypic characteristics of C17.2 cells suggest that they are

  5. Expression of a novel D4 dopamine receptor in the lamprey brain. Evolutionary considerations about dopamine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan ePérez-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous data reported in lampreys, which belong to the phylogenetically oldest branch of vertebrates, show that the dopaminergic system was already well developed at the dawn of vertebrate evolution. The expression of dopamine in the lamprey brain is well conserved when compared to other vertebrates, and this is also true for the D2 receptor. Additionally, the key role of dopamine in the striatum, modulating the excitability in the direct and indirect pathways through the D1 and D2 receptors, has also been recently reported in these animals. The moment of divergence regarding the two whole genome duplications occurred in vertebrates suggests that additional receptors, apart from the D1 and D2 previously reported, could be present in lampreys. We used in situ hybridization to characterize the expression of a novel dopamine receptor, which we have identified as a D4 receptor according to the phylogenetic analysis. The D4 receptor shows in the sea lamprey a more restricted expression pattern than the D2 subtype, as reported in mammals. Its main expression areas are the striatum, lateral and ventral pallial sectors, several hypothalamic regions, habenula, and mesencephalic and rhombencephalic motoneurons. Some expression areas are well conserved through vertebrate evolution, as is the case of the striatum or the habenula, but the controversies regarding the D4 receptor expression in other vertebrates hampers for a complete comparison, especially in rhombencephalic regions. Our results further support that the dopaminergic system in vertebrates is well conserved and suggest that at least some functions of the D4 receptor were already present before the divergence of lampreys.

  6. Regulation of TRAIL receptor expression by β-catenin in colorectal tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalving, M.; Heijink, D. M.; Koornstra, J. J.; Boersma-van Ek, W.; Zwart, N.; Wesseling, Johannes; Sluiter, W. J.; de Vries, E.G.E.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; de Jong, S.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the pro-apoptotic TRAIL receptors is regulated, at least in part, by beta-catenin. We show that beta-catenin co-localizes with DR4/5 in human and mouse colorectal tumours and that downregulation of beta-catenin in cell line models reduces TRAIL receptor expression and TRAIL sensitivity

  7. TRAIL Death Receptor-4, Decoy Receptor-1 and Decoy Receptor-2 Expression on CD8+ T Cells Correlate with the Disease Severity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisgin Atil

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorder. Although the pathogenesis of disease is unclear, it is well known that T cells play a major role in both development and perpetuation of RA through activating macrophages and B cells. Since the lack of TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL expression resulted in defective thymocyte apoptosis leading to an autoimmune disease, we explored evidence for alterations in TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression on peripheral T lymphocytes in the molecular mechanism of RA development. Methods The expression of TRAIL/TRAIL receptors on T cells in 20 RA patients and 12 control individuals were analyzed using flow cytometry. The correlation of TRAIL and its receptor expression profile was compared with clinical RA parameters (RA activity scored as per DAS28 using Spearman Rho Analysis. Results While no change was detected in the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells between controls and RA patient groups, upregulation of TRAIL and its receptors (both death and decoy was detected on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in RA patients compared to control individuals. Death Receptor-4 (DR4 and the decoy receptors DcR1 and DcR2 on CD8+ T cells, but not on CD4+ T cells, were positively correlated with patients' DAS scores. Conclusions Our data suggest that TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression profiles on T cells might be important in revelation of RA pathogenesis.

  8. Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Breast Cancer by Tumor Receptor Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xuehong; Beck, Andrew H.; Collins, Laura C.; Chen, Wendy Y.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Hazra, Aditi; Brown, Myles; Rosner, Bernard; Hankinson, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    In epidemiologic studies, alcohol consumption appears more strongly associated with risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. However, this association has not been assessed by other potentially relevant tumor markers, such as androgen receptor (AR) or insulin receptor (IR). In the prospective Nurses’ Health Study cohort, we evaluated alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk by individual tumor marker expression (i.e. ER, Progesterone Receptor [PR], AR and IR) ...

  9. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    -induced excitotoxicity and KA-glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression after long-term exposure to low, non-toxic doses of KA and NBQX. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures, combined with standardized procedures for quantitation of cell damage and receptor subunit changes is of great potential use...... for studies of excitotoxic, glutamate receptor-induced neuronal cell death, receptor modulation and related neuroprotection....

  10. Activation profiles of opioid ligands in HEK cells expressing δ opioid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Clark J; Demirci Hasan; Gharagozlou Parham; Lameh Jelveh

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to characterize the activation profiles of 15 opioid ligands in transfected human embryonic kidney cells expressing only δ opioid receptors. Activation profiles of most of these ligands at δ opioid receptors had not been previously characterized in vitro. Receptor activation was assessed by measuring the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production. Results Naltrexone and nalorphine were classified as antagonists at δ opioid receptor....

  11. Involvement of a subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the antipsychotic-like effects of the M1/M4 preferring muscarinic receptor agonist xanomeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia;

    2011-01-01

    studies indicate that the M(4) muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtype (mAChR) modulates the activity of the dopaminergic system and that this specific mAChR subtype is involved in mediating the antipsychotic-like effects of xanomeline. A specific neuronal subpopulation that expresses M(4) mAChRs together...... with D(1) dopamine receptors seems to be especially important in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors. Using mutant mice that lack the M(4) mAChR only in D(1) dopamine receptor-expressing cells (D1-M4-KO), we investigated the role of this neuronal population in the antipsychotic-like effects...

  12. Expression of soluble Toll-like receptors in pleural effusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hai-bo; XIE Kai-qing; DENG Jing-min; QIN Shou-ming

    2010-01-01

    Background The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) represent a group of single-pass transmembrane receptors expressed on sentinel cells that are central to innate immune responses.The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of soluble TLRs in pleural effusions, and the diagnostic values of TLRs for pleural effusion with various etiologies.Methods Pleural effusion and serum samples were collected from 102 patients (36 with malignant pleural effusion, 36with tuberculous pleural effusion, 18 with bacterial pleural effusion, and 12 with transudative pleural effusion).The concentrations of TLR1 to TLR10 were determined in effusion and serum samples by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.Four classical parameters (protein, lactate dehydrogenase, glucose and C-reactive protein (CRP)) in the pleural fluid were also assessed.Receiver-operating characteristic curves were used to assess the sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid TLRs and biochemical parameters for differentiating bacterial pleural effusion.Results The concentrations of TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in bacterial pleural effusion were significantly higher than those in malignant, tuberculous, and transudative groups, respectively.Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves revealed that the area under the curves of TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 were 0.831, 0.843,0.842, 0.883 and 0.786, respectively, suggesting that these TLRs play a role in the diagnosis of bacterial pleural effusion.Also, the diagnostic value of TLRs for bacterial pleural effusions was much better than that of biochemical parameters (protein, lactate dehydrogenase, glucose and CRP).Conclusions The concentrations of TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 appeared to be increased in bacterial pleural effusion compared to non-bacterial pleural effusions.Determination of these pleural TLRs may improve the ability of clinicians to differentiate pleural effusion patients of bacterial origin from those with other etiologies.

  13. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Ceredig, R A; Matifas, A; Vonesch, J-L; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2016-01-28

    Delta opioid (DOP) receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor-positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased DOP receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline-treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces DOP receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits.

  14. Differential expression of functional Fc-receptors and additional immune complex receptors on mouse kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E

    2013-12-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Ig binding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury.

  15. Cholinergic modulation of primary afferent glutamatergic transmission in rat medullary dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seok-Gwon; Choi, In-Sun; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Jang, Il-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Although muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptors are expressed in trigeminal ganglia, it is still unknown whether mACh receptors modulate glutamatergic transmission from primary afferents onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. In this study, we have addressed the cholinergic modulation of primary afferent glutamatergic transmission using a conventional whole cell patch clamp technique. Glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were evoked from primary afferents by electrical stimulation of trigeminal tract and monosynaptic EPSCs were recorded from medullary dorsal horn neurons of rat horizontal brain stem slices. Muscarine and ACh reversibly and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio. In addition, muscarine reduced the frequency of miniature EPSCs without affecting the current amplitude, suggesting that muscarine acts presynaptically to decrease the probability of glutamate release onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. The muscarine-induced decrease of glutamatergic EPSCs was significantly occluded by methoctramine or AF-DX116, M2 receptor antagonists, but not pirenzepine, J104129 and MT-3, selective M1, M3 and M4 receptor antagonists. The muscarine-induced decrease of glutamatergic EPSCs was highly dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration. Physostigmine and clinically available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as rivastigmine and donepezil, significantly shifted the concentration-inhibition relationship of ACh for glutamatergic EPSCs. These results suggest that muscarine acts on presynaptic M2 receptors to inhibit glutamatergic transmission by reducing the Ca2+ influx into primary afferent terminals, and that M2 receptor agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors could be, at least, potential targets to reduce nociceptive transmission from orofacial tissues.

  16. Down-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 adversely affects the expression of Alzheimer's disease-relevant genes and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchner, Thole; Schliebs, Reinhard; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2005-10-01

    Beta-amyloid peptides play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, preventing beta-amyloid formation by inhibition of the beta site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 is considered as a potential strategy to treat AD. Cholinergic mechanisms have been shown to control amyloid precursor protein processing and the number of muscarinic M2-acetylcholine receptors is decreased in brain regions of patients with AD enriched with senile plaques. Therefore, the present study investigates the effect of this M2 muscarinic receptor down-regulation by siRNA on total gene expression and on regulation of BACE1 in particular in SK-SH-SY5Y cells. This model system was used for microarray analysis after carbachol stimulation of siRNA-treated cells compared with carbachol stimulated, non-siRNA-treated cells. The same model system was used to elucidate changes at the protein level by using two-dimensional gels followed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis. Taken together, the results indicate that the M2 acetylcholine receptor down-regulation in brains of patients with AD has important effects on the expression of several genes and proteins with major functions in the pathology of AD. This includes beta-secretase BACE1 as well as several modulators of the tau protein and other AD-relevant genes and proteins. Moreover, most of these genes and proteins are adversely affected against the background of AD.

  17. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum: formation of two distinct drug targets by varying the relative expression levels of two subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally M Williamson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic nematodes are of medical and veterinary importance, adversely affecting human health and animal welfare. Ascaris suum is a gastrointestinal parasite of pigs; in addition to its veterinary significance it is a good model of the human parasite Ascaris lumbricoides, estimated to infect approximately 1.4 billion people globally. Anthelmintic drugs are essential to control nematode parasites, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs on nerve and muscle are the targets of cholinergic anthelmintics such as levamisole and pyrantel. Previous genetic analyses of nematode nAChRs have been confined to Caenorhabditis elegans, which is phylogenetically distinct from Ascaris spp. and many other important parasites. Here we report the cloning and expression of two nAChR subunit cDNAs from A. suum. The subunits are very similar in sequence to C. elegans UNC-29 and UNC-38, are expressed on muscle cells and can be expressed robustly in Xenopus oocytes to form acetylcholine-, nicotine-, levamisole- and pyrantel-sensitive channels. We also demonstrate that changing the stoichiometry of the receptor by injecting different ratios of the subunit cRNAs can reproduce two of the three pharmacological subtypes of nAChR present in A. suum muscle cells. When the ratio was 5:1 (Asu-unc-38ratioAsu-unc-29, nicotine was a full agonist and levamisole was a partial agonist, and oocytes responded to oxantel, but not pyrantel. At the reverse ratio (1:5 Asu-unc-38ratioAsu-unc-29, levamisole was a full agonist and nicotine was a partial agonist, and the oocytes responded to pyrantel, but not oxantel. These results represent the first in vitro expression of any parasitic nicotinic receptor and show that their properties are substantially different from those of C. elegans. The results also show that changing the expression level of a single receptor subunit dramatically altered the efficacy of some anthelmintic drugs. In vitro expression of these subunits may permit the

  18. Mechanisms mediating cholinergic antral circular smooth muscle contraction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena F Wrzos; Tarun Tandon; Ann Ouyang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathway (s) mediating rat antral circular smooth muscle contractile responses to the cholinomimetic agent, bethanechol and the subtypes of muscarinic receptors mediating the cholinergic contraction.METHODS: Circular smooth muscle strips from the antrum of Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted in muscle baths in Krebs buffer. Isometric tension was recorded. Cumulative concentration-response curves were obtained for (+)-cisdioxolane (cD), a nonspecific muscarinic agonist, at 10-8-10-4 mol/L, in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-7 mol/L).Results were normalized to cross sectional area. A repeat concentration-response curve was obtained after incubation of the muscle for 90 min with antagonists for M1 (pirenzepine),M2 (methoctramine) and M3 (darifenacin) muscarinic receptor subtypes. The sensitivity to PTX was tested by the ip injection of 100 mg/kg of PTX 5 d before the experiment. The antral circular smooth muscles were removed from PTX-treated and non-treated rats as strips and dispersed smooth muscle cells to identify whether PTX-linked pathway mediated the contractility to bethanechol.RESULTS: A dose-dependent contractile response observed with bethanechol, was not affected by TTX. The pretreatment of rats with pertussis toxin decreased the contraction induced by bethanechol. Lack of calcium as Well as the presence of the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, also inhibited the cholinergic contraction, with a reduction in response from 2.5±0.4 g/mm2 to 1.2±0.4 g/mm2 (P<0.05). The doseresponse curves were shifted to the right by muscarinic antagonists in the following order of affinity: darifenacin(M3)>methocramine (M2)>pirenzepine (M1).CONCLUSION: The muscarinic receptors-dependent contraction of rat antral circular smooth muscles was linked to the signal transduction pathway(s) involving pertussis-toxin sensitive GTP-binding proteins and to extracellular calcium via L-type voltage gated calcium channels. The presence of the

  19. Puerarin partly counteracts the inflammatory response after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion via activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojie Liu; Zhigang Mei; Jingping Qian; Yongbao Zeng; Mingzhi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Puerarin, a major isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medical herb radix puerariae (Gegen), has been reported to inhibit neuronal apoptosis and play an anti-inflammatory role in focal cerebral ischemia model rats. Recent findings regarding stroke pathophysiology have recognized that an-ti-inflammation is an important target for the treatment of ischemic stroke. The cholinergic an-ti-inflammatory pathway is a highly robust neural-immune mechanism for inflammation control. This study was to investigate whether activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be in-volved in the mechanism of inhibiting the inflammatory response during puerarin-induced cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Results showed that puerarin pretreatment (intravenous injection) re-duced the ischemic infarct volume, improved neurological deficit after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and decreased the levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-αin brain tissue. Pretreatment with puerarin (intravenous injection) attenuated the inflammatory response in rats, which was accompanied by janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibition. These observa-tions were inhibited by the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) antagonistα-bungarotoxin (α-BGT). In addition, puerarin pretreatment increased the expression of α7nAchR mRNA in ischemic cerebral tissue. These data demonstrate that puerarin pretreatment strongly protects the brain against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and inhibits the inflammatory re-sponse. Our results also indicated that the anti-inflammatory effect of puerarin may partly be me-diated through the activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  20. Lymphocyte Cc Chemokine Receptor 9 and Epithelial Thymus-Expressed Chemokine (Teck) Expression Distinguish the Small Intestinal Immune Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The immune system has evolved specialized cellular and molecular mechanisms for targeting and regulating immune responses at epithelial surfaces. Here we show that small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphocytes migrate to thymus-expressed chemokine (TECK). This attraction is mediated by CC chemokine receptor (CCR)9, a chemoattractant receptor expressed at high levels by essentially all CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the small intestine. Only a small subset of lymp...

  1. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Austin Lim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh. Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI, which comprises only about 1-2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction.

  2. Role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor expression in eosinophils of patients with allergic rhinitis, and effect of topical nasal steroid treatment on this receptor expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mackle, T

    2008-12-01

    Recent research has indicated that sphingosine 1-phosphate plays a role in allergy. This study examined the effect of allergen challenge on the expression of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors on the eosinophils of allergic rhinitis patients, and the effect of steroid treatment on this expression.

  3. Oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK induces expression of the growth-promoting receptor ICOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, HongYi; Kantekure, Kanchan;

    2011-01-01

    Here we report that T-cell lymphoma cells carrying the NPM-ALK fusion protein (ALK(+) TCL) frequently express the cell-stimulatory receptor ICOS. ICOS expression in ALK(+) TCL is moderate and strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM-ALK. NPM-ALK induces ICOS expression via......RNA and protein. Stimulation of the ICOS receptor with anti-ICOS antibody or ICOS ligand-expressing B cells markedly enhanced proliferation of the ALK(+) TCL cells. These results demonstrate that NPM-ALK, acting through STAT3 as the gene transcriptional activator, induces the expression of ICOS, a cell growth...

  4. Differential regulation of alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) expression in schizophrenic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexal, Sharon; Berger, Ralph; Logel, Judy; Ross, Randal G; Freedman, Robert; Leonard, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    The alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia by genetic and pharmacological studies. Expression of the alpha7* receptor, as measured by [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin autoradiography, is decreased in postmortem brain of schizophrenic subjects compared to non-mentally ill controls. Most schizophrenic patients are heavy smokers, with high levels of serum cotinine. Smoking changes the expression of multiple genes and differentially regulates gene expression in schizophrenic hippocampus. We examined the effects of smoking on CHRNA7 expression in the same tissue and find that smoking differentially regulates expression of both mRNA and protein for this gene. CHRNA7 mRNA and protein levels are significantly lower in schizophrenic nonsmokers compared to control nonsmokers and are brought to control levels in schizophrenic smokers. Sufficient protein but low surface expression of the alpha7* receptor, seen in the autoradiographic studies, suggests aberrant assembly or trafficking of the receptor.

  5. [Research Progress on Expression and Function of P2 Purinergic Receptor in Blood Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wen-Li; Wang, Li-Na; Zheng, Guo-Guang

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotides have unambiguously emerged as a family of mediators of intercellular communication, which bind a class of plasma membrane receptors, P2 purinergic receptors, to trigger intercellular signaling. P2 receptors can be further divided into two structurally and functionally different sub-famlies, the P2X and P2Y receptors. Different blood cells express diverse spectrum of P2 receptors at different levels. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) exerts different effects on blood cells, regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, chemotaxis, release of cytokines or lysosomal constituents, and generation of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The relationship between abnormal P2 receptors and human diseases attracts more and more attention. This review briefly discusses the expression and function of P2 receptors in hematopoietic system.

  6. Urotensin II is a new chemotactic factor for UT receptor-expressing monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segain, Jean-Pierre; Rolli-Derkinderen, Malvyne; Gervois, Nadine; Raingeard de la Blétière, Diane; Loirand, Gervaise; Pacaud, Pierre

    2007-07-15

    Urotensin II (U-II), a vasoactive cyclic neuropeptide which activates the G protein-coupled receptor UT receptor, exerts various cardiovascular effects and may play a role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. In this study, we report that the UT receptor is expressed and functional on human PBMC and rat splenocytes. PBMC surface expression of the UT receptor was mainly found in monocytes and NK cells, also in a minority of B cells, but not in T cells. Stimulation of monocytes with LPS increased UT receptor mRNA and protein expression. Cloning and functional characterization of the human UT receptor gene promoter revealed the presence of NF-kappaB-binding sites involved in the stimulation of UT receptor gene expression by LPS. Activation of the UT receptor by U-II induced chemotaxis with maximal activity at 10 and 100 nM. This U-II effect was restricted to monocytes. Analysis of the signaling pathway involved indicated that U-II-mediated chemotaxis was related to RhoA and Rho kinase activation and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. The present results thus identify U-II as a chemoattractant for UT receptor-expressing monocytes and indicate a pivotal role of the RhoA-Rho kinase signaling cascade in the chemotaxis induced by U-II.

  7. Cloning and expression of the mouse histamine H3 receptor: evidence for multiple isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Agnès; Héron, Anne; Cochois, Véronique; Pillot, Catherine; Schwartz, Jean-Charles; Arrang, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-01

    The existence of mouse H3-receptor isoforms was investigated by PCR analysis and cDNA cloning. Splicing mechanisms previously reported in various species are conserved in the mouse. The retention/deletion of a fragment in the third intracellular loop of the mouse receptor leads to the existence of three isoforms designated mH(3(445)), mH(3(413)) and mH(3(397)) according to the length of their deduced amino acid sequence. PCR analysis showed that mouse H3-receptor isoforms display different expression patterns in the brain. Following expression in Cos-1 cells, [125I]iodoproxyfan binding indicated similar pharmacological profiles of the mH(3(445)), mH(3(413)) and mH(3(397)) isoforms. The pharmacological profile of the mouse H3 receptor is more similar to the rat receptor than to the human receptor, although some differences were also observed between the mouse and rat receptors. For example, the potency of thioperamide and ciproxifan is slightly higher at the mouse receptor than at the rat receptor but 40-100-fold higher than at the human receptor. In situ hybridization histochemistry showed that the distribution of H3-receptor mRNAs in the mouse brain is rather similar to that previously reported in the rat brain. However, the autoradiographic and cellular expression patterns observed in several brain areas such as the thalamus or hippocampus reveal important differences between the two species.

  8. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  9. Modifications of 5-HT4 receptor expression in rat brain during memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel-Apolinar, L; Rocha, L; Pascoe, D; Castillo, E; Castillo, C; Meneses, A

    2005-04-25

    Pharmacological evidence indicates a specific role of 5-HT(4) receptors on memory function. These receptors are members of G-protein-coupled 7-transmembrane domain receptor superfamily, are positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, and are heterogeneously located in some structures important for memory, such as the hippocampus and cortical regions. To further clarify 5-HT(4) receptors' role in memory, the expression of these receptors in passive (P3) untrained and autoshaping (A3) trained (3 sessions) adult (3 months) and old (P9 or A9; 9 months) male rats was determined by autoradiography. Adult trained (A3) rats showed a better memory respect to old trained (A9). Using [(3)H] GR113808 as ligand (0.2 nM specific activity 81 Ci/mmol) for 5-HT(4) receptor expression, 29 brain areas were analyzed, 16 areas of A3 and 17 of A9 animals displayed significant changes. The medial mammillary nucleus of A3 group showed diminished 5-HT(4) receptor expression, and in other 15 brain areas of A3 or 10 of A9 animals, 5-HT(4) receptors were increased. Thus, for A3 rats, 5-HT(4) receptors were augmented in olfactory lobule, caudate putamen, fundus striatum, CA2, retrosplenial, frontal, temporal, occipital, and cingulate cortex. Also, 5-HT(4) receptors were increased in olfactory tubercule, hippocampal CA1, parietal, piriform, and cingulate cortex of A9. However, hippocampal CA2 and CA3 areas, and frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex of A9 rats, expressed less 5-HT(4) receptors. These findings suggest that serotonergic activity, via 5-HT(4) receptors in hippocampal, striatum, and cortical areas, mediates memory function and provides further evidence for a complex and regionally specific regulation over 5-HT receptor expression during memory formation.

  10. Expression of serotonin receptors in the colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the difference among the expression of serotonin receptors (5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors in colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats. Materials and Methods: A rat model of chronic diarrhea was established by lactose diet. The expression of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blotting techniques. Results: There is no significant difference on the protein expression of 5-HT3receptor between the normal group and the chronic diarrhea model group. The mRNA expression of 5-HT3 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group was significantly lower than that in the normal group (n = 10; P< 0.01. The protein and mRNA expression of 5-HT4 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group were significantly higher than those in the normal group (n = 10; P< 0.05, P< 0.01. On the contrary, the protein and mRNA expressions of 5-HT7 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group were significantly decreased compared with the normal group (n = 10; P< 0.01, P< 0.01. Conclusions: The results suggested the receptors of 5-HT4and 5-HT7 may be involved in inducing diarrhea by lactose diet.

  11. Sulindac metabolites inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor activation and expression

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    Pangburn Heather A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with a decreased mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC. NSAIDs induce apoptotic cell death in colon cancer cells in vitro and inhibit growth of neoplastic colonic mucosa in vivo however, the biochemical mechanisms required for these growth inhibitory effects are not well defined. We previously reported that metabolites of the NSAID sulindac downregulate extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 signaling and that this effect is both necessary and sufficient for the apoptotic effects of these drugs. The goal of this project was to specifically test the hypothesis that sulindac metabolites block activation and/or expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor (EGFR. Methods HT29 human colon cancer cells were treated with EGF, alone, or in the presence of sulindac sulfide or sulindac sulfone. Cells lysates were assayed by immunoblotting for phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR, pY1068, total EGFR, phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK1/2, total ERK1/2, activated caspase-3, and α-tubulin. Results EGF treatment rapidly induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 in HT29 colon cancer cells. Pretreatment with sulindac metabolites for 24 h blocked EGF-induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 and decreased total EGFR protein expression. Under basal conditions, downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 12 h following sulindac sulfide treatment and persisted through at least 48 h. Sulindac sulfone induced downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 1 h and 24 h, respectively, following drug treatment, and persisted through at least 72 h. EGFR downregulation by sulindac metabolites was observed in three different CRC cell lines, occurred prior to the observed downregulation of pERK1/2 and induction of apoptosis by these drugs, and was not dependent of caspase activation. Conclusion These results suggest that

  12. Fluoxetine alters mu opioid receptor expression in obese Zucker rat extrahypothalamic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, Itziar; Portillo, María P; Zumalabe, José María; Macarulla, María T; Sáenz Del Burgo, Laura; Zarate, Jon; Echevarría, Enrique

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the effects of chronic fluoxetine on mu opioid receptor expression in obese Zucker rat extrahypothalamic regions. Male obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats were administered with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg; i.p.) daily for two weeks. Brain regional immunostaining for mu opioid receptor was carried out. An increase in the numbers of neural cells immunostained for mu opioid receptor in caudatus-putamen, dentate gyrus, lateral septum, amygdala, and frontal, parietal, and piriform cortices was observed. Increased mu opioid receptor expression in the central amygdaloid nuclei suggests a decreased opioidergic tone at this level that could be involved in fluoxetine anorectic action.

  13. Expression of functional growth hormone receptor in a mouse L cell line infected with recombinant vaccinia virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strous, G J; van Kerkhof, P; Verheijen, C; Rossen, J W; Liou, W; Slot, J W; Roelen, C A; Schwartz, A L

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone receptor is a member of a large family of receptors including the receptors for prolactin and interleukins. Upon binding to one molecule of growth hormone two growth hormone receptor polypeptides dimerize. We have expressed the rabbit growth hormone receptor DNA in transfected mou

  14. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-Il; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y L; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ-binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism.

  15. Illuminating the role of cholinergic signaling in circuits of attention and emotionally salient behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eLuchicchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh signaling underlies specific aspects of cognitive functions and behaviors, including attention, learning, memory and motivation. Alterations in ACh signaling are involved in the pathophysiology of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. In the central nervous system, ACh transmission is mainly guaranteed by dense innervation of select cortical and subcortical regions from disperse groups of cholinergic neurons within the basal forebrain (e.g. diagonal band, medial septal, nucleus basalis and the pontine-mesencephalic nuclei, respectively. Despite the fundamental role of cholinergic signaling in the CNS and the long standing knowledge of the organization of cholinergic circuitry, remarkably little is known about precisely how ACh release modulates cortical and subcortical neural activity and the behaviors these circuits subserve. Growing interest in cholinergic signaling in the CNS focuses on the mechanism(s of action by which endogenously released ACh regulates cognitive functions, acting as a neuromodulator and /or as a direct transmitter via nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. The development of optogenetic techniques has provided a valuable toolbox with which we can address these questions, as it allows the selective manipulation of the excitability of cholinergic inputs to the diverse array of cholinergic target fields within cortical and subcortical domains. Here, we review recent papers that use the light-sensitive opsins in the cholinergic system to elucidate the role of ACh in circuits related to attention and emotionally salient behaviors. In particular, we highlight recent optogenetic studies which have tried to disentangle the precise role of ACh in the modulation of cortical-, hippocampal- and striatal-dependent functions.

  16. Evaluation of cholinergic markers in Alzheimer's disease and in a model of cholinergic deficit

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), have been closely related to cholinergic deficits. We have compared different markers of cholinergic function to assess the best biomarker of cognitive deficits associated to cholinergic hypoactivity. In post-mortem frontal cortex from AD patients, acetylcholine (ACh) levels, cholinacetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were all reduced compared to controls. Both ChAT and AChE activi...

  17. Relationship between expression of somatostatin receptors subtype 2 mRNA and estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾希志; 姚榛祥

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To observe the expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) mRNA, and investigate the relationship between the expression of SSTR2 mRNA and the expressions of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ERs and PRs) in benign and malignant breast tissues.Methods Samples from a total of 23 breast carcinomas, 16 mammary hyperplasias, and 9 mammary fibroadenomas were analyzed. SSTR2 mRNA expression was examined by in situ hybridization using multiphase oligoprobes. ER and PR expressions were detected by immunohistochemical staining. A computerized image analysis system was utilized to estimate the relative content of SSTR2 mRNA.Results The rate of expression (87.0%) and relative content (0.47) of SSTR2 mRNA in breast cancer were higher than those in benign breast tissue (64%,0.26) (P<0.05). SSTR2 mRNA expression was closely correlated with ER and PR expressions in breast cancer (P<0.05). SSTR2 mRNA was also positively correlated with ER expression in benign breast tissues.Conclusions SSTR2 mRNA expression is higher or in benign breast tissues than in malignant ones. There is a significant positive correlation between SSTR2 mRNA and ER and PR expressions. Combined antiestrogen and somatostatin analogue in treatment of ER-positive breast cancers should be further investigated.

  18. Cardiovascular risk factors regulate the expression of vascular endothelin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Cang-Bao; Sun, Yang; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    , cigarette smoking and hypertension (both strongly related to arterial wall injury), inflammation and atherosclerosis. The vascular endothelin receptors are a protein family that belongs to the larger family of G-protein coupled receptors. They mediate vascular smooth muscle contraction, proliferation......-activated protein kinase pathways and downstream transcription factors such as nuclear factor-kappaB. Understanding the mechanisms involved in vascular endothelin receptor upregulation during cardiovascular disease may provide novel therapeutic approaches....

  19. Expression of the M3 Muscarinic Receptor on Orexin Neurons that Project to the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu-Wen E; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Chen, Jennifer Y S; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Hwang, Ling-Ling

    2016-05-01

    Activation of central cholinergic receptors causes a pressor response in rats, and the hypothalamus is important for this response. Projections from hypothalamic orexin neurons to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are involved in sympatho-excitation of the cardiovascular system. A small population of orexin neurons is regulated by cholinergic inputs through M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3 R). To elucidate whether the M3 R on orexin neurons is involved in cardiosympathetic regulation through the RVLM, we examined the presence of the M3 R on retrograde-labeled RVLM-projecting orexin neurons. The retrograde tracer was unilaterally injected into the RVLM. Within the hypothalamus, retrograde-labeled neurons were located predominantly ipsilateral to the injection side. In the anterior hypothalamus (-1.5 to -2.3 mm to the bregma), retrograde-labeled neurons were densely distributed in the paraventricular nuclei and scattered in the retrochiasmatic area. At -2.3 to -3.5 mm from the bregma, labeled neurons were located in the regions where orexin neurons were situated, that is, the tuberal lateral hypothalamic area, perifornical area, and dorsomedial nuclei. Very few retrograde-labeled neurons were observed in the hypothalamus at -3.5 to -4.5 mm from the bregma. About 19.5% ± 1.6% of RVLM-projecting neurons in the tuberal hypothalamus were orexinergic. The M3 R was present on 18.7% ± 3.0% of RVLM-projecting orexin neurons. Injection of a muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine, in the perifornical area resulted in a pressor response, which was attenuated by a pretreatment of atropine. We conclude that cholinergic inputs to orexin neurons may be involved in cardiosympathetic regulation through the M3 R on the orexin neurons that directly project to the RVLM.

  20. CB1 cannabinoid receptor expression in the striatum: Association with corticostriatal circuits and developmental regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent eVan Waes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Corticostriatal circuits mediate various aspects of goal-directed behavior and are critically important for basal ganglia-related disorders. Activity in these circuits is regulated by the endocannabinoid system via stimulation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors. CB1 receptors are highly expressed in projection neurons and select interneurons of the striatum, but expression levels vary considerably between different striatal regions (functional domains. We investigated CB1 receptor expression within specific corticostriatal circuits by mapping CB1 mRNA levels in striatal sectors defined by their cortical inputs in rats. We also assessed changes in CB1 expression in the striatum during development. Our results show that CB1 expression is highest in juveniles (P25 and then progressively decreases towards adolescent (P40 and adult (P70 levels. At every age, CB1 receptors are predominantly expressed in sensorimotor striatal sectors, with considerably lower expression in associative and limbic sectors. Moreover, for most corticostriatal circuits there is an inverse relationship between cortical and striatal expression levels. Thus, striatal sectors with high CB1 expression (sensorimotor sectors tend to receive inputs from cortical areas with low expression, while striatal sectors with low expression (associative/limbic sectors receive inputs from cortical regions with higher expression (medial prefrontal cortex. In so far as CB1 mRNA levels reflect receptor function, our findings suggest differential CB1 signaling between different developmental stages and between sensorimotor and associative/limbic circuits. The regional distribution of CB1 receptor expression in the striatum further suggests that, in sensorimotor sectors, CB1 receptors mostly regulate GABA inputs from local axon collaterals of projection neurons, whereas in associative/limbic sectors, CB1 regulation of GABA inputs from interneurons and glutamate inputs may be more important.

  1. Neural Stem Cell Transplant-Induced Effect on Neurogenesis and Cognition in Alzheimer Tg2576 Mice Is Inhibited by Concomitant Treatment with Amyloid-Lowering or Cholinergic α7 Nicotinic Receptor Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Anna M; Malmsten, Linn; Röjdner, Jennie; Voytenko, Larysa; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Ögren, Sven Ove; Nordberg, Agneta; Marutle, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating regeneration in the brain has the potential to rescue neuronal networks and counteract progressive pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated whether drugs with different mechanisms of action could enhance neurogenesis and improve cognition in mice receiving human neural stem cell (hNSC) transplants. Six- to nine-month-old AD Tg2576 mice were treated for five weeks with the amyloid-modulatory and neurotrophic drug (+)-phenserine or with the partial α7 nicotinic receptor (nAChR) agonist JN403, combined with bilateral intrahippocampal hNSC transplantation. We observed improved spatial memory in hNSC-transplanted non-drug-treated Tg2576 mice but not in those receiving drugs, and this was accompanied by an increased number of Doublecortin- (DCX-) positive cells in the dentate gyrus, a surrogate marker for newly generated neurons. Treatment with (+)-phenserine did however improve graft survival in the hippocampus. An accumulation of α7 nAChR-expressing astrocytes was observed around the injection site, suggesting their involvement in repair and scarring processes. Interestingly, JN403 treatment decreased the number of α7 nAChR-expressing astrocytes, correlating with a reduction in the number of DCX-positive cells in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that transplanting hNSCs enhances endogenous neurogenesis and prevents further cognitive deterioration in Tg2576 mice, while simultaneous treatments with (+)-phenserine or JN403 result in countertherapeutic effects.

  2. Neural Stem Cell Transplant-Induced Effect on Neurogenesis and Cognition in Alzheimer Tg2576 Mice Is Inhibited by Concomitant Treatment with Amyloid-Lowering or Cholinergic α7 Nicotinic Receptor Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Lilja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stimulating regeneration in the brain has the potential to rescue neuronal networks and counteract progressive pathological changes in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. This study investigated whether drugs with different mechanisms of action could enhance neurogenesis and improve cognition in mice receiving human neural stem cell (hNSC transplants. Six- to nine-month-old AD Tg2576 mice were treated for five weeks with the amyloid-modulatory and neurotrophic drug (+-phenserine or with the partial α7 nicotinic receptor (nAChR agonist JN403, combined with bilateral intrahippocampal hNSC transplantation. We observed improved spatial memory in hNSC-transplanted non-drug-treated Tg2576 mice but not in those receiving drugs, and this was accompanied by an increased number of Doublecortin- (DCX- positive cells in the dentate gyrus, a surrogate marker for newly generated neurons. Treatment with (+-phenserine did however improve graft survival in the hippocampus. An accumulation of α7 nAChR-expressing astrocytes was observed around the injection site, suggesting their involvement in repair and scarring processes. Interestingly, JN403 treatment decreased the number of α7 nAChR-expressing astrocytes, correlating with a reduction in the number of DCX-positive cells in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that transplanting hNSCs enhances endogenous neurogenesis and prevents further cognitive deterioration in Tg2576 mice, while simultaneous treatments with (+-phenserine or JN403 result in countertherapeutic effects.

  3. Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels in Xenopus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Injection of Caenorhabditis elegans polyA RNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the expression of neurotransmitter receptors that generated some unique responses, including ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors as well as receptors that coupled to G proteins, such as those to octopamine, norepinephrine, and angiotensin, which activated the oocyte’s own phosphatidylinositol system and calcium-gated chloride channels. The oocytes also expressed chloride-conducting glutamate receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and voltage-operated calcium channels. Unexpectedly, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), dopamine, GABA, and kainate did not generate ionic currents, suggesting that the corresponding receptors were not expressed or were not functional in the oocytes. The use of X. laevis oocytes for expressing worm RNA demonstrates that there are many molecular components whose role remains to be clarified in the nematode. Among them are the nature of the endogenous agonists for the octopamine and angiotensin receptors and the subunits that compose the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors and the norepinephrine receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide cascade. PMID:16549772

  4. Selective Activation of Cholinergic Interneurons Enhances Accumbal Phasic Dopamine Release: Setting the Tone for Reward Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Cachope

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays a critical role in motor control, addiction, and reward-seeking behaviors, and its release dynamics have traditionally been linked to changes in midbrain dopamine neuron activity. Here, we report that selective endogenous cholinergic activation achieved via in vitro optogenetic stimulation of nucleus accumbens, a terminal field of dopaminergic neurons, elicits real-time dopamine release. This mechanism occurs via direct actions on dopamine terminals, does not require changes in neuron firing within the midbrain, and is dependent on glutamatergic receptor activity. More importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo selective activation of cholinergic interneurons is sufficient to elicit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Therefore, the control of accumbal extracellular dopamine levels by endogenous cholinergic activity results from a complex convergence of neurotransmitter/neuromodulator systems that may ultimately synergize to drive motivated behavior.

  5. DMPD: G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17456803 G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macropha...2007 Apr 24. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signali...ng in macrophages. PubmedID 17456803 Title G-protein-coupled receptor expression,

  6. Histaminergic modulation of cholinergic release from the nucleus basalis magnocellularis into insular cortex during taste aversive memory formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Purón-Sierra

    Full Text Available The ability of acetylcholine (ACh to alter specific functional properties of the cortex endows the cholinergic system with an important modulatory role in memory formation. For example, an increase in ACh release occurs during novel stimulus processing, indicating that ACh activity is critical during early stages of memory processing. During novel taste presentation, there is an increase in ACh release in the insular cortex (IC, a major structure for taste memory recognition. There is extensive evidence implicating the cholinergic efferents of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM in cortical activity changes during learning processes, and new evidence suggests that the histaminergic system may interact with the cholinergic system in important ways. However, there is little information as to whether changes in cholinergic activity in the IC are modulated during taste memory formation. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the influence of two histamine receptor subtypes, H1 in the NBM and H3 in the IC, on ACh release in the IC during conditioned taste aversion (CTA. Injection of the H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine (RAMH into the IC or of the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine into the NBM during CTA training impaired subsequent CTA memory, and simultaneously resulted in a reduction of ACh release in the IC. This study demonstrated that basal and cortical cholinergic pathways are finely tuned by histaminergic activity during CTA, since dual actions of histamine receptor subtypes on ACh modulation release each have a significant impact during taste memory formation.

  7. Expression of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor in differentiated thyroid carcinoma and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李清怀

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor in differentiated thyroid carcinoma and its clinical significance.Methods Seventy-four patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated in our department from January 2009 to January 2011were selected as the observation group,and 28 patients with nodular goiter were selected as the control group.Expression of TSH receptor in the two groups were detected by immunohistochemistry.Results The positive rate of TSH receptor expression in the observation group was55.4 (41/74) ,significantly lower than that of the control

  8. Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury via endogenous cholinergic pathway in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available Inflammation and apoptosis play critical roles in the acute progression of ischemic injury pathology. Emerging evidence indicates that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS following focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R may be neuroprotective by limiting infarct size. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether the protective effects of VNS in acute cerebral I/R injury were associated with anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic processes. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats underwent VNS at 30 min after focal cerebral I/R surgery. Twenty-four h after reperfusion, neurological deficit scores, infarct volume, and neuronal apoptosis were evaluated. In addition, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected using enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA, and immunofluorescence staining for the endogenous "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" was also performed. The protein expression of a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAchR, phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt, and cleaved caspase 3 in ischemic penumbra were determined with Western blot analysis. I/R rats treated with VNS (I/R+VNS had significantly better neurological deficit scores, reduced cerebral infarct volume, and decreased number of TdT mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL positive cells. Furthermore, in the ischemic penumbra of the I/R+VNS group, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cleaved caspase 3 protein were significantly decreased, and the levels of a7nAchR and phosphorylated Akt were significantly increased relative to the I/R alone group. These results indicate that VNS is neuroprotective in acute cerebral I/R injury by suppressing inflammation and apoptosis via activation of cholinergic and a7nAchR/Akt pathways.

  9. Expression of heregulin and ErbB receptors in mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI Chun; WANG Jian-an; HE Ai-na; CHEN Tie-long; LIU Xian-bao; LUO Rong-hua; JIANG Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells are a promising cell type for cell transplantation in myocardial infarction.Type Ⅰ neuregulins-1,also known as heregulin,can promote the survival of cardiomyocytes and stimulate angiogenesis.The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of heregulin and ErbB receptors in mesenchymaI stem cells,then further detect the secretion of heregulin and the changes in expression of heregulin and ErbB receptors under conditions of serum deprivation and hypoxia.Methods Mesenchymal stem cells lsolated frOm bone marrow of 180 g male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured.Passage 3 cells were detected experimentally by regular reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR),quantitative real time PCR and Western blotting.Results Heregulin and ErbB receptors were expressed in mesenchymal stem cells,and all three ErbB receptors mRNA expressions were significantly down-regulated by serum deprivation and hypoxia,but serum deprivation and hypoxia significantly increased the protein expression of heregulin.Serum deprivation and hypoxia more than 12 hours could induce the secretion of heregulin.Conclusions Mesenchymal stem cells can express all three ErbB receptors and heregulin.Serum deprivation and hypoxia decrease the mRNA expression of ErbB receptors,increase the expression of heregulin,and activate the secretion of heregulin.

  10. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  11. The cholinergic REM induction test with RS 86 after scopolamine pretreatment in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, D; Hohagen, F; Fleckenstein, P; Schredl, M; Berger, M

    1991-09-01

    A shortened latency of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is one of the most stable biological abnormalities described in depressive patients. According to the reciprocal interaction model of non-REM and REM sleep regulation, REM sleep disinhibition at the beginning of the night in depression is a consequence of heightened central nervous system cholinergic transmitter activity in relation to aminergic transmitter activity. A recent study has indicated that muscarinic supersensitivity, rather than quantitatively enhanced cholinergic activity, may be the primary cause of REM sleep abnormalities in depression. The present study tested this hypothesis by treating healthy volunteers for 3 days with a cholinergic antagonist (scopolamine) in the morning, in an effort to induce muscarinic receptor supersensitivity. On the last day of scopolamine administration, RS 86, an orally active cholinergic agonist, was administered before bedtime to test whether this procedure would induce sleep onset REM periods. Whereas scopolamine treatment tended to advance REM sleep and to heighten REM density in healthy controls in comparison to NaCl administration, the additional cholinergic stimulation did not provoke further REM sleep disinhibition. This result underlines the need to take a hypofunction of aminergic transmitter systems into account in attempts to explain the pronounced advance of REM sleep typically seen in depressives.

  12. Profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Verbeurgt

    Full Text Available Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems, containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men. Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were

  13. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delays TLR-induced skin allograft rejection in mice: cholinergic pathway modulates alloreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Sadis

    Full Text Available Activation of innate immunity through Toll-like receptors (TLR can abrogate transplantation tolerance by revealing hidden T cell alloreactivity. Separately, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has the capacity to dampen macrophage activation and cytokine release during endotoxemia and ischemia reperfusion injury. However, the relevance of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR-dependent anti-inflammatory pathway in the process of allograft rejection or maintenance of tolerance remains unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate whether the cholinergic pathway could impact T cell alloreactivity and transplant outcome in mice. For this purpose, we performed minor-mismatched skin allografts using donor/recipient combinations genetically deficient for the α7nAChR. Minor-mismatched skin grafts were not rejected unless the mice were housed in an environment with endogenous pathogen exposure or the graft was treated with direct application of imiquimod (a TLR7 ligand. The α7nAChR-deficient recipient mice showed accelerated rejection compared to wild type recipient mice under these conditions of TLR activation. The accelerated rejection was associated with enhanced IL-17 and IFN-γ production by alloreactive T cells. An α7nAChR-deficiency in the donor tissue facilitated allograft rejection but not in recipient mice. In addition, adoptive T cell transfer experiments in skin-grafted lymphopenic animals revealed a direct regulatory role for the α7nAChR on T cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the cholinergic pathway regulates alloreactivity and transplantation tolerance at multiple levels. One implication suggested by our work is that, in an organ transplant setting, deliberate α7nAChR stimulation of brain dead donors might be a valuable approach for preventing donor tissue inflammation prior to transplant.

  14. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delays TLR-induced skin allograft rejection in mice: cholinergic pathway modulates alloreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadis, Claude; Detienne, Sophie; Vokaer, Benoît; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Lemaître, Philippe; Spilleboudt, Chloé; Delbauve, Sandrine; Kubjak, Carole; Flamand, Véronique; Field, Kenneth A; Goldman, Michel; Benghiat, Fleur S; Le Moine, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Activation of innate immunity through Toll-like receptors (TLR) can abrogate transplantation tolerance by revealing hidden T cell alloreactivity. Separately, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has the capacity to dampen macrophage activation and cytokine release during endotoxemia and ischemia reperfusion injury. However, the relevance of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-dependent anti-inflammatory pathway in the process of allograft rejection or maintenance of tolerance remains unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate whether the cholinergic pathway could impact T cell alloreactivity and transplant outcome in mice. For this purpose, we performed minor-mismatched skin allografts using donor/recipient combinations genetically deficient for the α7nAChR. Minor-mismatched skin grafts were not rejected unless the mice were housed in an environment with endogenous pathogen exposure or the graft was treated with direct application of imiquimod (a TLR7 ligand). The α7nAChR-deficient recipient mice showed accelerated rejection compared to wild type recipient mice under these conditions of TLR activation. The accelerated rejection was associated with enhanced IL-17 and IFN-γ production by alloreactive T cells. An α7nAChR-deficiency in the donor tissue facilitated allograft rejection but not in recipient mice. In addition, adoptive T cell transfer experiments in skin-grafted lymphopenic animals revealed a direct regulatory role for the α7nAChR on T cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the cholinergic pathway regulates alloreactivity and transplantation tolerance at multiple levels. One implication suggested by our work is that, in an organ transplant setting, deliberate α7nAChR stimulation of brain dead donors might be a valuable approach for preventing donor tissue inflammation prior to transplant.

  15. High-level expression of a full-length Eph receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavilainen, Sari; Grandy, David; Karelehto, Eveliina; Chang, Elizabeth; Susi, Petri; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Nikolov, Dimitar; Himanen, Juha

    2013-11-01

    Eph receptors are the largest family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases containing a single membrane-spanning segment. They are involved in a various developmental and cell-cell communication events. Although there is extensive structural information available on both the extra- and intracellular regions of Eph's in isolation, no structures are available for the entire receptor. To facilitate structural studies on functionally relevant Eph/ephrin complexes, we have developed an expression system for producing the full-length human EphA2 receptor. We successfully expressed milligram amounts of the receptor using baculovirus-based vector and insect cells. We were also able to extract the protein from the cell membranes and purify it to near homogeneity in two simple steps. The purified receptor was shown to retain its biological activity in terms of both binding to its functional ligands and being able to auto-phosphorylate the key tyrosine residues of the cytoplasmic kinase domain.

  16. THE EXPRESSION OF RECEPTORS FOR VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL PEPTIDE AND SECRETIN IN COLON NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the expression of the receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and secretin in colon cancer. Methods: This study visualized and characterized the receptors for VIP and secretin in the sequence of human tumor-free colon, adenoma, carcinoma, liver metastasis using storage phosphor autoradiography. Results: Receptors for VIP and secretin were demonstrated in tumor-free colon and colon tumors. A decrease in affinity of VIP receptors was shown in the colonic liver metastasis (Kd = 3.30 nmol) when compared with tumor-free colon (Kd = 0.82 nmol). An up-regulation of receptors for secretin was found in colonic liver metastases. Conclusions: VIP and secretin were both expressed on normal colon tissues. Binding of VIP decreased while secretin increased in colonic liver metastasis. A down-regulation of receptors for VIP in colonic liver metastases may helpful to understand the migration of colon cancer.

  17. Expression and function of P2 receptors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenli; Wang, Lina; Zheng, Guoguang

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotides have unambiguously emerged as a family of mediators of intercellular communication, which bind to a class of plasma membrane receptors, P2 receptors, to trigger intercellular signaling. P2 receptors can be further divided into P2X and P2Y subfamilies based on structure and function. Different hematopoietic cells express diverse spectrums of P2 receptors at different levels, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) exerts different effects on HSPCs, regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and chemotaxis, release of cytokines or lysosomal constituents, and generation of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The relationship between abnormal P2 receptor function and human diseases attracts more and more attention. This review summarizes the expression and function of P2 receptors in HSPCs and the relationship to hematopoietic diseases.

  18. Expression of oestrogen receptor α and oestrogen receptor β in the uterus of the pregnant swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapczyk-Stwora, K; Durlej, M; Duda, M; Czernichowska-Ferreira, K; Tabecka-Lonczynska, A; Slomczynska, M

    2011-02-01

    The uterus is a well-known target of endocrine, paracrine and autocrine acting molecules among which steroid hormones are of special importance. The objective of our work was to localize oestrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) mRNA and protein in the pig uterus throughout pregnancy (10, 18, 32, 50, 71, 90 days post coitum) using RT-PCR, Western-blot and immunohistochemistry. The present study is the first one to demonstrate the presence of ERs protein in the porcine uterus not only at the beginning but also at mid- and late pregnancy. In the pregnant swine, ERα was immunolocalized in the luminal epithelium (LE) and glandular epithelium (GE) and the myometrium of the uterus with differences in the intensity of staining at different stages of pregnancy studied. The LE and GE of pregnant swine stained for ERβ regardless of the day of pregnancy examined, whereas only a few cells within the myometrium showed a weak immunoreactivity. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of ERα and ERβ proteins on all investigated days of gestation. The expression of ERα and ERβ mRNA was detected by RT-PCR in all examined samples corresponding to each of the consecutive stages of pregnancy. The obtained results show that ERα is more abundant in comparison to ERβ within the porcine pregnant uterus. The presence of ERα and ERβ in all compartments of the pig uterus during pregnancy may indicate direct action of oestrogens on proliferation and differentiation of these cells.

  19. In adult female hamsters hypothyroidism stimulates D1 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D1 receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroidism affects cardiopulmonary regulation and function of dopaminergic receptors. Here we evaluated effects of 5 months of hypothyroidism on dopamine D1 receptor modulation of breathing in female hamsters using a D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Euthyroid hamsters (EH) served as controls. Results indicated that hypothyroid female hamsters (HH) exhibited decreased body weights and minute ventilation (VE) following hypoxia due to decreased frequency of breathing (F). Moreover, SCH 23390 administration in HH increased VE by increasing tidal volume during exposure to air, hypoxia and following hypoxia. Relative to vehicle, SCH 23390 treatment decreased body temperature and hypoxic VE responsiveness in both groups. In EH, SCH 23390 decreased F in air, hypoxia and post hypoxia, and VE during hypoxia trended to decrease (P=0.053). Finally, expression of D1 receptor protein was not different between the two groups in any region evaluated. Thus, hypothyroidism in older female hamsters affected D1 receptor modulation of ventilation differently relative to euthyroid animals, but not expression of D1 receptors.

  20. Expression of soluble triggering receptor expression on myeloid cells-1 in pleural effusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lu-ying; SHI Huan-zhong; LIANG Qiu-li; WU Yan-bin; QIN Xue-jun; CHEN Yi-qiang

    2008-01-01

    Background Tdggedng receptors expressed on myeloid cells(TREM)proteins are a family of cell surface receptors expressed broadly by cells of the myeloid lineage.The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of soluble TREM-1(sTREM-1)in pleural effusions,and to determine the effects of pneumonia on pleural sTREM-1 concentrations.Methods PleuraI fluid was collected from 109 patients who presented to the respiratory institute (35 with malignant pleural effusion,31 with tuberculous pleural effusion,21 with bacteriaI pleural effusion,and 22 with transudate).The concentrations of sTREM-1,tumor necrosis factor-o(TNF-α)and interleukin-1β(IL-1β)were determined jn effusion and serum samples by enzyme Iinked immunosorbent assay(ELISA).Results The concentrations of sTREM-1 in bacterial pleural effusion were significantly higher than those in malignant.tuberculous,and transudative groups(all P<0.001).An sTREM-1 cutoff value of 768.1 ng/L had a sensitivity of 86%and a specificity of 93%.Pleural sTREM-1 Ievels were positively correlated with Ievels of TNF-α and IL-1β.Patients with complicating bacterial pneumonia did not have elevated concentration of STREM-1 jn pleural effusion when compared with patients without pneumonia.Conclusions Determination of pleural sTREM-1 may improve the ability of clinicians to differentiate pleural effusion patients of bacterial origin from those with other etiologies.The occurrence of bacterial pneumonia did not affect pleural sTREM-1 concentrations.

  1. The histaminergic system in human thalamus: correlation of innervation to receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, C Y; Kalimo, H; Panula, Pertti

    2002-04-01

    The mRNA expression of three histamine receptors (H1, H2 and H3) and H1 and H3 receptor binding were mapped and quantified in normal human thalamus by in situ hybridization and receptor binding autoradiography, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was applied to study the distribution of histaminergic fibres and terminals in the normal human thalamus. mRNAs for all three histamine receptors were detected mainly in the dorsal thalamus, but the expression intensities were different. Briefly, H1 and H3 receptor mRNAs were relatively enriched in the anterior, medial, and part of the lateral nuclei regions; whereas the expression level was much lower in the ventral and posterior parts of the thalamus, and the reticular nucleus. H2 receptor mRNA displayed in general very low expression intensity with slightly higher expression level in the anterior and lateropolar regions. H1 receptor binding was mainly detected in the mediodorsal, ventroposterolateral nuclei, and the pulvinar. H3 receptor binding was detected mainly in the dorsal thalamus, predominantly the periventricular, mediodorsal, and posterior regions. Very high or high histaminergic fibre densities were observed in the midline nuclear region and other nuclei next to the third ventricle, ventroposterior lateral nucleus and medial geniculate nucleus. In most of the core structures of the thalamus, the fibre density was very low or absent. The results suggest that histamine in human brain regulates tactile and proprioceptory thalamocortical functions through multiple receptors. Also, other, e.g. visual areas and those not making cortical connections expressed histamine receptors and contained histaminergic nerve fibres.

  2. Expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in fibroadenomas of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenicek, Tanja; Kasumović, Dino; Stajduhar, Emil; Dzombeta, Tihana; Jukić, Zoran; Kruslin, Bozo

    2013-06-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most prevalent benign breast tumor. It consists of epithelial and stromal components. In general, breast tumors are highly hormonally dependent and growth hormone by its physiology may have a possible oncogenic potential. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in epithelial and stromal components of fibroadenomas. Study group included 30 randomly chosen fibroadenomas from female patients aged between 18 and 69 years. The expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor was defined in both histologic components of fibroadenomas. Growth hormone was expressed in 96.7% of both epithelial and stromal components of fibroadenomas, with stronger expression in the stromal component. The same percentage of positive reaction (96.7%) was obtained in the epithelial component of fibroadenomas for growth hormone receptor expression. Only 6.7% of stromal components tested for growth hormone receptor were positive. The high expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in fibroadenoma tissue indicates their possible role in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Follow up of patients with high expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor may be suggested.

  3. Interleukin-1 receptors are differentially expressed in normal and psoriatic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebes, Attila; Kovács-Sólyom, Ferenc; Prihoda, Judit; Kui, Róbert; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4(+)CD25(-) effector and CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2) upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  4. Regulation of bradykinin receptor gene expression in human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phagoo, S B; Yaqoob, M; Herrera-Martinez, E; McIntyre, P; Jones, C; Burgess, G M

    2000-06-01

    In WI-38 human fibroblasts, interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) increased bradykinin B(1) receptor mRNA, which peaked between 2 and 4 h, remaining elevated for 20 h. Binding of the bradykinin B(1) receptor selective ligand [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin, also increased, peaking at 4 h and remaining elevated for 20 h. The B(max) value for [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin rose from 280+/-102 fmol/mg (n=3) to 701+/-147 fmol/mg (n=3), but the K(D) value remained unaltered (control, 1.04+/-0.33 nM (n=3); interleukin-1 beta, 0.88+/-0.41 nM (n=3)). The interleukin-1 beta-induced [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin binding sites were functional receptors, as bradykinin B(1) receptor agonist-induced responses increased in treated cells. Bradykinin B(2) receptor mRNA and [3H]bradykinin binding were upregulated by interleukin-1 beta, but not TNF-alpha. The effect of interleukin-1 beta on bradykinin B(2) receptors was smaller than for bradykinin B(1) receptors. Cycloheximide prevented interleukin-1 beta-mediated increases in B(1) and B(2) binding, but not mRNA suggesting that de novo synthesis of a transcriptional activator was unnecessary.

  5. Altered Sigma-1 Receptor Expression in Two Animal Models of Cognitive Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzhuppilly Ramakrishnan, Nisha; Marosi, Krisztina; Nyakas, Csaba J.; Kwizera, Chantal; Elsinga, Philip H.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Luiten, Paul G M; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; van Waarde, Aren

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Sigma-1 receptors are involved in learning and memory processes. We assessed sigma-1 receptor expression and memory function in two animal models of cognitive impairment. PROCEDURES: Male Wistar-Hannover rats were either lesioned by unilateral injection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid in the nu

  6. Histamine H1 Receptor Gene Expression and Drug Action of Antihistamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Hisao; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2016-11-25

    The upregulation mechanism of histamine H1 receptor through the activation of protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) and the receptor gene expression was discovered. Levels of histamine H1 receptor mRNA and IL-4 mRNA in nasal mucosa were elevated by the provocation of nasal hypersensitivity model rats. Pretreatment with antihistamines suppressed the elevation of mRNA levels. Scores of nasal symptoms were correlatively alleviated to the suppression level of mRNAs above. A correlation between scores of nasal symptoms and levels of histamine H1 receptor mRNA in the nasal mucosa was observed in patients with pollinosis. Both scores of nasal symptoms and the level of histamine H1 receptor mRNA were improved by prophylactic treatment of antihistamines. Similar to the antihistamines, pretreatment with antiallergic natural medicines showed alleviation of nasal symptoms with correlative suppression of gene expression in nasal hypersensitivity model rats through the suppression of PKCδ. Similar effects of antihistamines and antiallergic natural medicines support that histamine H1 receptor-mediated activation of histamine H1 receptor gene expression is an important signaling pathway for the symptoms of allergic diseases. Antihistamines with inverse agonist activity showed the suppression of constitutive histamine H1 receptor gene expression, suggesting the advantage of therapeutic effect.

  7. Larvae of small white butterfly, Pieris rapae, express a novel serotonin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biogenic amine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter in vertebrates and invertebrates. It acts in regulation and modulation of many physiological and behavioral processes through G protein-coupled receptors. Insects express five 5-HT receptor subtypes that share high simila...

  8. Comparative genomics reveals tissue-specific regulation of prolactin receptor gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolactin (PRL), acting via the prolactin receptor, fulfills a diversity of biological functions including the maintenance of solute balance and mineral homeostasis via tissues such as the heart, kidneys and intestine. Expression and activity of the prolactin receptor (PRLR) is regulated by various ...

  9. Low density lipoprotein induces upregulation of vasoconstrictive endothelin type B receptor expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Cang-Bao; Zheng, Jian-Pu; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Vasoconstrictive endothelin type B (ET(B)) receptors promote vasospasm and ischemic cerebro- and cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to examine if low density lipoprotein (LDL) induces upregulation of vasoconstrictive ET(B) receptor expression and if extracellular signal...

  10. Heterologous expression of rat testis GABAA receptor βt variant in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-FengLi; Yu-GuangChen; Yuan-ChangYan; Yi-PingLi

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To study the characteristics and possible retention functionof specific sequence in the 5'-end of rat testis GABAA receptor β 3t variant, Methods: Rat testis GABAA receptor β 3t variant cDNA was cloned and inserted into two eukaryotic expression vectors of pEGFP-N1 and pEGFP-C1 respectively, which have EGFP reporter gene.

  11. Class A scavenger receptor promotes osteoclast differentiation via the enhanced expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, Kenichi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sakashita, Naomi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Lei, XiaoFeng; Ohnishi, Koji [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Kodama, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Biology and Medicine, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, Hiroshi [Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Takeya, Motohiro, E-mail: takeya@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2010-01-22

    Osteoclasts originate from bone marrow monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, and their differentiation depends on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand. Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is one of the principal functional molecules of macrophages, and its level of expression declines during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of SR-A in osteoclastogenesis, we examined pathological changes in femoral bone and the expression levels of osteoclastogenesis-related molecules in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. The femoral osseous density of SR-A{sup -/-} mice was higher than that of SR-A{sup +/+} mice, and the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly decreased. An in vitro differentiation assay revealed that the differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is impaired in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. Elimination of SR-A did not alter the expression level of the M-CSF receptor, c-fms; however, the expression levels of RANK and RANK-related osteoclast-differentiation molecules such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) significantly decreased. Furthermore, acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL), an SR-A ligand, significantly increased the expression level of RANK and MITF during osteoclast differentiation. These data indicate that SR-A promotes osteoclastogenesis via augmentation of the expression level of RANK and its related molecules.

  12. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its two receptors in normal human endometrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海燕; 陈贵安

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: We try to demonstrate the expression of vascular endothelial growthfactor (VEGF) and its receptors, flt-1 and KDR, in normal human emdometrium duringthe menstrual cycle.Methods: Immunohistochemical method was used to observe the expression ofVEGF and its two receptors in emdometrium throughout the normal menstrual cyclemeanwhile the isoforms of VEGF were also detected by Western blot analysis. The en-dothelial cells of micro-vessels were marked with Ⅷ factor antibody.Results: VEGF and its receptors existed in endometrial glandular, stromal and vas-cular endothelial cells of human endometrium. Their expressions were higher in the mid-secretory phase of menstrual cycle and highest at menstruation. VEGF121 and VEGF165were the predominant isoforms in normal human endometrium.Conclusion: The expression of VEGF and its two receptors showed cycle-dependentin human endometrium, probably involved in embryonic implantation and endometrialproliferation and differentiation.

  13. Effect of Curcumin on the Gene Expression of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular mechanisms and effective target ponits of lipid-lowering drug, Rhizoma Curcumae Longae, and study the effect of curcumin on the expression of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in macrophages in mice. Methods: Macrophages in mice were treated with curcumin, which was purified from the ethanolly extraction of Rhizoma Curcumae Longae for 24 h. The LDL receptors expressed in the macrophages were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and assay of Dil labeled LDL uptake by flow cytometer. Results: It was found for the first time that 10 μmol/L-50μmol/L curcumin could obviously up-regulate the expression of LDL receptor in macrophages in mice, and a dose-effect relationship was demonstrated. Conclusion: One of the lipid-lowering mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine, Rhizoma Curcumae Longae, was completed by the effect of curcumin through the up-regulation of the expression of LDL receptor.

  14. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali;

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  15. Expression of urokinase receptors by human trophoblast. A histochemical and ultrastructural analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Mazar, A; Cines, D B

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Through their ability to invade endometrium, remodel the uterine spiral arteries, and sustain placental blood fluidity, trophoblast cells play a central role in establishing and maintaining the integrity of the uteroplacental vasculature. The expression of urokinase receptors by troph...

  16. CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor expression during development and in epileptogenic developmental pathologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurolo, E.; Iyer, A.M.; Spliet, W.G.M.; van Rijen, P.C.; Troost, D.; Gorter, J.A.; Aronica, E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent data support the involvement of the endocannabinoid signaling in early brain development, as well as a key role of cannabinoid receptors (CBR) in pathological conditions associated with unbalanced neuronal excitability and inflammation. Using immunocytochemistry, we explored the expression an

  17. Expression of folate receptors in nasopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinoma and folate receptor-mediated endocytosis by molecular targeted nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available M Xie, H Zhang, Y Xu, T Liu, S Chen, J Wang, T ZhangDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Immunohistochemistry and an immunofluorescence technique was used to detect folate receptor expression in tissue samples and cell lines of head and neck squamous carcinoma, including 20 tissue samples of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 16 tissue samples of laryngeal carcinoma, and HNE-1, HNE-2, CNE-1, CNE-2, SUNE-1, 5-8F, and Hep-2 cell lines. Iron staining, electron microscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging were used to observe endocytosis of folate-conjugated cisplatin-loaded magnetic nanoparticles (CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP in cultured cells and transplanted tumors. As shown by immunohistochemistry, 83.3% (30/36 of the head and neck squamous carcinomas expressed the folate receptor versus none in the control group (0/24. Only the HNE-1 and Hep-2 cell lines expressed the folate receptor, and the other five cell lines did not. Endocytosis of CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP was seen in HNE-1 and Hep-2 cells by iron staining and electron microscopy. A similar result was seen in transplanted tumors in nude mice. Magnetic resonance imaging showed low signal intensity of HNE-1 cells and HNE-1 transplanted tumors on T2-weighted images after uptake of CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP, and this was not seen in CNE-2 transplanted tumors. In conclusion, head and neck squamous carcinoma cell strongly expressed the folate receptor, while normal tissue did not. The folate receptor can mediate endocytosis of folate-conjugated anticancer nanomedicines, and lays the foundation for molecular targeted treatment of cancer.Keywords: nasopharyngeal carcinoma, laryngeal carcinoma, folate receptor, molecular targeting, cisplatin, nanomedicine

  18. Upregulation of neurokinin-1 receptor expression in the lungs of patients with sarcoidosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Terence M

    2012-02-03

    Substance P (SP) is a proinflammatory neuropeptide that is secreted by sensory nerves and inflammatory cells. Increased levels of SP are found in sarcoid bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. SP acts by binding to the neurokinin-1 receptor and increases secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in many cell types. We sought to determine neurokinin-1 receptor expression in patients with sarcoidosis compared with normal controls. Neurokinin-1 receptor messenger RNA and protein expression were below the limits of detection by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers (n = 9) or patients with stage 1 or 2 pulmonary sarcoidosis (n = 10), but were detected in 1\\/9 bronchoalveolar lavage cells of controls compared with 8\\/10 patients with sarcoidosis (p = 0.012) and 2\\/9 biopsies of controls compared with 9\\/10 patients with sarcoidosis (p = 0.013). Immunohistochemistry localized upregulated neurokinin-1 receptor expression to bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, and sarcoid granulomas. The patient in whom neurokinin-1 receptor was not detected was taking corticosteroids. Incubation of the type II alveolar and bronchial epithelial cell lines A549 and SK-LU 1 with dexamethasone downregulated neurokinin-1 receptor expression. Upregulated neurokinin-1 receptor expression in patients with sarcoidosis may potentiate substance P-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in patients with sarcoidosis.

  19. Expression of steroid receptors in ameloblasts during amelogenesis in rat incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Houari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs play a part in the modern burst of diseases and interfere with the steroid hormone axis. Bisphenol A (BPA, one of the most active and widely used EDCs, affects ameloblast functions, leading to an enamel hypomineralization pattern similar to that of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH. In order to explore the molecular pathways stimulated by BPA during amelogenesis, we thoroughly investigated the receptors known to directly or indirectly mediate the effects of BPA. The expression patterns of high affinity BPA receptors (ERRγ, GPR30, of ketosteroid receptors (ERs, AR, PGR, GR, MR, of the retinoid receptor RXRα and PPARγ were established using RT-qPCR analysis of RNAs extracted from microdissected enamel organ of adult rats. Their expression was dependent on the stage of ameloblast differentiation, except that of ERβ and PPARγ which remained undetectable. An additional large scale microarray analysis revealed three main groups of receptors according to their level of expression in maturation stage ameloblasts. The expression level of RXRα was the highest, similar to the vitamin D receptor (VDR, whereas the others were 13 to 612 fold lower, with AR and GR being intermediate. Immunofluorescent analysis of VDR, ERα and AR confirmed their presence mainly in maturation- stage ameloblasts. These data provide further evidence that ameloblasts express a specific combination of hormonal receptors depending on their developmental stage. This study represents the first step towards understanding dental endocrinology as well as some of the effects of EDCs on the pathophysiology of amelogenesis.

  20. Expression of Steroid Receptors in Ameloblasts during Amelogenesis in Rat Incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houari, Sophia; Loiodice, Sophia; Jedeon, Katia; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) play a part in the modern burst of diseases and interfere with the steroid hormone axis. Bisphenol A (BPA), one of the most active and widely used EDCs, affects ameloblast functions, leading to an enamel hypomineralization pattern similar to that of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH). In order to explore the molecular pathways stimulated by BPA during amelogenesis, we thoroughly investigated the receptors known to directly or indirectly mediate the effects of BPA. The expression patterns of high affinity BPA receptors (ERRγ, GPR30), of ketosteroid receptors (ERs, AR, PGR, GR, MR), of the retinoid receptor RXRα, and PPARγ were established using RT-qPCR analysis of RNAs extracted from microdissected enamel organ of adult rats. Their expression was dependent on the stage of ameloblast differentiation, except that of ERβ and PPARγ which remained undetectable. An additional large scale microarray analysis revealed three main groups of receptors according to their level of expression in maturation-stage ameloblasts. The expression level of RXRα was the highest, similar to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), whereas the others were 13 to 612-fold lower, with AR and GR being intermediate. Immunofluorescent analysis of VDR, ERα and AR confirmed their presence mainly in maturation- stage ameloblasts. These data provide further evidence that ameloblasts express a specific combination of hormonal receptors depending on their developmental stage. This study represents the first step toward understanding dental endocrinology as well as some of the effects of EDCs on the pathophysiology of amelogenesis.

  1. Expression of Steroid Receptors in Ameloblasts during Amelogenesis in Rat Incisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houari, Sophia; Loiodice, Sophia; Jedeon, Katia; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) play a part in the modern burst of diseases and interfere with the steroid hormone axis. Bisphenol A (BPA), one of the most active and widely used EDCs, affects ameloblast functions, leading to an enamel hypomineralization pattern similar to that of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH). In order to explore the molecular pathways stimulated by BPA during amelogenesis, we thoroughly investigated the receptors known to directly or indirectly mediate the effects of BPA. The expression patterns of high affinity BPA receptors (ERRγ, GPR30), of ketosteroid receptors (ERs, AR, PGR, GR, MR), of the retinoid receptor RXRα, and PPARγ were established using RT-qPCR analysis of RNAs extracted from microdissected enamel organ of adult rats. Their expression was dependent on the stage of ameloblast differentiation, except that of ERβ and PPARγ which remained undetectable. An additional large scale microarray analysis revealed three main groups of receptors according to their level of expression in maturation-stage ameloblasts. The expression level of RXRα was the highest, similar to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), whereas the others were 13 to 612-fold lower, with AR and GR being intermediate. Immunofluorescent analysis of VDR, ERα and AR confirmed their presence mainly in maturation- stage ameloblasts. These data provide further evidence that ameloblasts express a specific combination of hormonal receptors depending on their developmental stage. This study represents the first step toward understanding dental endocrinology as well as some of the effects of EDCs on the pathophysiology of amelogenesis. PMID:27853434

  2. Mouse Leydig cells express multiple P2X receptor subunits

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    ATP acts on cellular membranes by interacting with P2X (ionotropic) and P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. Seven homomeric P2X receptors (P2X1–P2X7) and seven heteromeric receptors (P2X1/2, P2X1/4, P2X1/5, P2X2/3, P2X2/6, P2X4/6, P2X4/7) have been described. ATP treatment of Leydig cells leads to an increase in [Ca2+]i and testosterone secretion, supporting the hypothesis that Ca2+ signaling through purinergic receptors contributes to the process of testosterone secretion in these cells. Mouse Ley...

  3. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit α9 in type Ⅱ vestibular hair cells of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-jia KONG; Hua-mao CHENG; Paul van CAUWENBERGE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore the cell specific existence of α9 AChR in the vestibular type Ⅱ hair cells (VHC Ⅱ) of rats. Methods: To detect the expression of α9 AChR messenger RNA (mRNA) in the vestibular endorgans and single VHC Ⅱ of rats by using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique and the single cell RT-PCR technique, respectively. Results: It was shown that α9 AChR mRNA was detected in the vestibular endorgans. By using single-cell RT-PCR, mRNA encoding α9 AChR was also detected in the VHC Ⅱ of the rats. Sequence analysis of the PCR products confirmed identity to corresponding cDNA sequence in the predicted region. Conclusion: We established a method which could effectively detect the cell specific expression of mRNA in an individual VHC. Present data confirm that α9 AChR mRNA is expressed in the VHC Ⅱ of rats and indicates that α9 AChR may function as a mediator of efferent cholinergic signaling in mammalian VHC.

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 upregulates surface NMDA receptor expression in striatal neurons via CaMKII

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Dao-Zhong; Xue, Bing; Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors are closely clustered in postsynaptic membranes and are believed to interact actively with each other to control excitatory synaptic transmission. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), for example, has been well documented to potentiate ionotropic NMDA receptor activity, although underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of mGluR5 in regulating trafficking and subcellular distribution of NMDA rece...

  5. Differential Regulation of α7 Nicotinic Receptor Gene (CHRNA7) Expression in Schizophrenic Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Mexal, Sharon; Berger, Ralph; Logel, Judy; Ross, Randal G.; Freedman, Robert; Leonard, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    The α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia by genetic and pharmacological studies. Expression of the α7* receptor, as measured by [125I]α-bungarotoxin autoradiography, is decreased in postmortem brain of schizophrenic subjects compared to non-mentally ill controls. Most schizophrenic patients are heavy smokers, with high levels of serum cotinine. Smoking changes the expression of multiple genes and differentially regulates gene...

  6. Developmental expression analysis and immunolocalization of a biogenic amine receptor in Schistosoma mansoni

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shehabi, Fouad; Vermeire, Jon J.; Yoshino, Timothy P.; Ribeiro, Paula

    2009-01-01

    A Schistosoma mansoni G-protein coupled receptor (SmGPCR) was previously cloned and shown to be activated by the biogenic amine, histamine. Here we report a first investigation of the receptor’s subunit organization, tissue distribution and expression levels in different stages of the parasite. A polyclonal antibody was produced in rabbits against the recombinant third intracellular loop (il3) of SmGPCR. Western blot studies of the native receptor and recombinant protein expressed in HEK293 c...

  7. Dichotomous Distribution of Putative Cholinergic Interneurons in Mouse Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marking, Sarah; Krosnowski, Kurt; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Sensory information processing in the olfactory bulb (OB) relies on diverse populations of bulbar interneurons. In rodents, the accessory OB (AOB) is divided into two bulbar regions, the anterior (aAOB) and posterior (pAOB), which differ substantially in their circuitry connections and associated behaviors. We previously identified and characterized a large number of morphologically diverse cholinergic interneurons in the main OB (MOB) using transgenic mice to visualize the cell bodies of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-expressing neurons and immunolabeling (Krosnowski et al., 2012)). However, whether there are cholinergic neurons in the AOB is controversial and there is no detailed characterization of such neurons. Using the same line of ChAT(bacterial artificial chromosome, BAC)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice, we investigated cholinergic neurons in the AOB. We found significant differences in the number and location of GFP-expressing (GFP+), putative cholinergic interneurons between the aAOB and pAOB. The highest numbers of GFP+ interneurons were found in the aAOB glomerular layer (aGL) and pAOB mitral/tufted cell layer (pMCL). We also noted a high density of GFP+ interneurons encircling the border region of the pMCL. Interestingly, a small subset of glomeruli in the middle of the GL receives strong MCL GFP+ nerve processes. These local putative cholinergic-innervated glomeruli are situated just outside the aGL, setting the boundary between the pGL and aGL. Many but not all GFP+ neurons in the AOB were weakly labeled with antibodies against ChAT and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). We further determined if these GFP+ interneurons differ from other previously characterized interneuron populations in the AOB and found that AOB GFP+ interneurons express neither GABAergic nor dopaminergic markers and most also do not express the glutamatergic marker. Similar to the cholinergic interneurons of the MOB, some AOB GFP+ interneurons

  8. BMPR2 expression is suppressed by signaling through the estrogen receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Eric D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in multiple organ systems have shown cross-talk between signaling through the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2 and estrogen pathways. In humans, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH has a female predominance, and is associated with decreased BMPR2 expression. The goal of this study was to determine if estrogens suppress BMPR2 expression. Methods A variety of techniques were utilized across several model platforms to evaluate the relationship between estrogens and BMPR2 gene expression. We used quantitative RT-PCR, gel mobility shift, and luciferase activity assays in human samples, live mice, and cell culture. Results BMPR2 expression is reduced in lymphocytes from female patients compared with male patients, and in whole lungs from female mice compared with male mice. There is an evolutionarily conserved estrogen receptor binding site in the BMPR2 promoter, which binds estrogen receptor by gel-shift assay. Increased exogenous estrogen decreases BMPR2 expression in cell culture, particularly when induced to proliferate. Transfection of increasing quantities of estrogen receptor alpha correlates strongly with decreasing expression of BMPR2. Conclusions BMPR2 gene expression is reduced in females compared to males in live humans and in mice, likely through direct estrogen receptor alpha binding to the BMPR2 promoter. This reduced BMPR2 expression may contribute to the increased prevalence of PAH in females.

  9. Chemokine receptor expression on B cells and effect of interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Roed, Hanne; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the B-cell expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR5 and CCR5 in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients in relapse of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in neurological controls. Chemokine receptor expression was also studied in interferon-beta-treated patients...... with relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive MS. We observed significantly higher expression of CXCR3 on B cells in the CSF in active MS than in controls. Patients with active MS also had higher B-cell expression of CCR5 in blood. No major differences between RRMS and SPMS patients were detected...

  10. Selective Expression of Progesterone Receptor in Malignant Melanoma Was Inversely Correlated with PCNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiawen LI; Xianfeng FANG; Xu'e CHEN; Jing CHEN

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the role of progesterone receptor (PR) expression in malignant melanoma (MM), PR and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression were immunohistochemistri- tally evaluated in a series of 35 specimens of MM, and the correlation between the immunohisto- chemistrical findings and clinicopathological data was also analyzed. PR expression was detected in 25.7% (9/35) of the patients with MM. No PR expression was observed in nevi. PR expression was inversely correlated with PCNA expression (r=-0.353, P=0.026). PR expression was slightly in- creased in females, subjects aged under 55 y, those with ulceration, non-acral subtype and diagnosis delay longer than 1 y, but the difference was not statistically significant. Selective expression of pro- gesterone receptor in malignant melanoma might be correlated with inhibited tumor growth.

  11. CB1 and CB2 receptor expression and promoter methylation in patients with cannabis dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Andrea; Bayerlein, Kristina; Hansbauer, Max; Weiland, Judith; Sperling, Wolfgang; Kornhuber, Johannes; Biermann, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    CB1 and CB2 receptors are influenced via exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids. To date, little is known regarding changes in receptor expression and methylation in THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) dependence. Therefore, the CB1 and CB2 receptor mRNA expression levels and promoter methylation status in the peripheral blood cells of 77 subjects (36 with THC dependence, 21 cigarette smokers and 20 nonsmokers) were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and methylation-specific PCR. There was a significant difference in CB1 receptor expression levels between the three groups (ANOVA, p CB1 receptor mRNA expression levels (Spearman's rho: r = -0.37; p = 0.002). Using a mixed general linear model, it was demonstrated that the CB1 mRNA expression (as the dependent variable) was associated with the satisfaction with life scale (SWLS) (r = 0.101; T = 2.8; p = 0.007), craving (as measured with the VAS; r = -0.023; T = -2.3; p = 0.023) and the WHO-Assist Subscale for Cannabis consumption (r = -0.068; T = -2.4; p = 0.02). CB1 receptor expression levels and methylation status appear to be altered in subjects with THC dependence.

  12. Cholinergic Degeneration and Alterations in the TrkA and p75NTR Balance as a Result of Pro-NGF Injection into Aged Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M. Fortress

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning and memory impairments occurring with Alzheimer's disease (AD are associated with degeneration of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs. BFCNs extend their axons to the hippocampus where they bind nerve growth factor (NGF which is retrogradely transported to the cell body. While NGF is necessary for BFCN survival and function via binding to the high-affinity receptor TrkA, its uncleaved precursor, pro-NGF has been proposed to induce neurodegeneration via binding to the p75NTR and its coreceptor sortilin. Basal forebrain TrkA and NGF are downregulated with aging while pro-NGF is increased. Given these data, the focus of this paper was to determine a mechanism for how pro-NGF accumulation may induce BFCN degeneration. Twenty-four hours after a single injection of pro-NGF into hippocampus, we found increased hippocampal p75NTR levels, decreased hippocampal TrkA levels, and cholinergic degeneration. The data suggest that the increase in p75NTR with AD may be mediated by elevated pro-NGF levels as a result of decreased cleavage, and that pro-NGF may be partially responsible for age-related degenerative changes observed in the basal forebrain. This paper is the first in vivo evidence that pro-NGF can affect BFCNs and may do so by regulating expression of p75NTR neurotrophin receptors.

  13. Eight genes are required for functional reconstitution of the Caenorhabditis elegans levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulin, Thomas; Gielen, Marc; Richmond, Janet E.; Williams, Daniel C.; Paoletti, Pierre; Bessereau, Jean-Louis

    2008-01-01

    Levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptors (L-AChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junctions of nematodes. They constitute a major drug target for anthelminthic treatments because they can be activated by nematode-specific cholinergic agonists such as levamisole. Genetic screens conducted in Caenorhabditis elegans for resistance to levamisole toxicity identified genes that are indispensable for the biosynthesis of L-AChRs. These include 5 genes encoding distinct AChR subunits and 3 genes coding for ancillary proteins involved in assembly and trafficking of the receptors. Despite extensive analysis of L-AChRs in vivo, pharmacological and biophysical characterization of these receptors has been greatly hampered by the absence of a heterologous expression system. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to reconstitute functional L-AChRs by coexpressing the 5 distinct receptor subunits and the 3 ancillary proteins. Strikingly, this system recapitulates the genetic requirements for receptor expression in vivo because omission of any of these 8 genes dramatically impairs L-AChR expression. We demonstrate that 3 α- and 2 non-α-subunits assemble into the same receptor. Pharmacological analysis reveals that the prototypical cholinergic agonist nicotine is unable to activate L-AChRs but rather acts as a potent allosteric inhibitor. These results emphasize the role of ancillary proteins for efficient expression of recombinant neurotransmitter receptors and open the way for in vitro screening of novel anthelminthic agents. PMID:19020092

  14. Estrogen receptor-alpha gene expression in the cortex: sex differences during development and in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Melinda E; Westberry, Jenne M; Trout, Amanda L

    2011-03-01

    17β-estradiol is a hormone with far-reaching organizational, activational and protective actions in both male and female brains. The organizational effects of early estrogen exposure are essential for long-lasting behavioral and cognitive functions. Estradiol mediates many of its effects through the intracellular receptors, estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor-beta (ERβ). In the rodent cerebral cortex, estrogen receptor expression is high early in postnatal life and declines dramatically as the animal approaches puberty. This decline is accompanied by decreased expression of ERα mRNA. This change in expression is the same in both males and females in the developing isocortex and hippocampus. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene expression is critical for understanding the developmental, as well as changes in postpubertal expression of the estrogen receptor. One mechanism of suppressing gene expression is by the epigenetic modification of the promoter regions by DNA methylation that results in gene silencing. The decrease in ERα mRNA expression during development is accompanied by an increase in promoter methylation. Another example of regulation of ERα gene expression in the adult cortex is the changes that occur following neuronal injury. Many animal studies have demonstrated that the endogenous estrogen, 17β-estradiol, is neuroprotective. Specifically, low levels of estradiol protect the cortex from neuronal death following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). In females, this protection is mediated through an ERα-dependent mechanism. ERα expression is rapidly increased following MCAO in females, but not in males. This increase is accompanied by a decrease in methylation of the promoter suggesting a return to the developmental program of gene expression within neurons. Taken together, during development and in adulthood, regulation of ERα gene expression in the

  15. Cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal and ventral striatum: anatomical and functional considerations in normal and diseased conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Kalynda K; Smith, Yoland

    2015-09-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) are central for the processing and reinforcement of reward-related behaviors that are negatively affected in states of altered dopamine transmission, such as in Parkinson's disease or drug addiction. Nevertheless, the development of therapeutic interventions directed at ChIs has been hampered by our limited knowledge of the diverse anatomical and functional characteristics of these neurons in the dorsal and ventral striatum, combined with the lack of pharmacological tools to modulate specific cholinergic receptor subtypes. This review highlights some of the key morphological, synaptic, and functional differences between ChIs of different striatal regions and across species. It also provides an overview of our current knowledge of the cellular localization and function of cholinergic receptor subtypes. The future use of high-resolution anatomical and functional tools to study the synaptic microcircuitry of brain networks, along with the development of specific cholinergic receptor drugs, should help further elucidate the role of striatal ChIs and permit efficient targeting of cholinergic systems in various brain disorders, including Parkinson's disease and addiction.

  16. Ionotropic glutamate receptor expression in preganglionic neurons of the rat inferior salivatory nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M; Chiego, D J; Bradley, R M

    2008-02-29

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) subunit composition of inferior salivatory nucleus (ISN) neurons was studied by immunohistochemical staining of retrogradely labeled neurons. Preganglionic ISN neurons innervating the von Ebner or parotid salivary glands were labeled by application of a fluorescent tracer to the lingual-tonsilar branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve or the otic ganglion respectively. We used polyclonal antibodies to glutamate receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, NR2B, (NMDA receptor subunits) GluR1, GluR2, GluR3, GluR4 (AMPA receptor subunits), and GluR5-7, KA2 (kainate receptor subunits) to determine their expression in ISN neurons. The distribution of the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptor subunits in retrogradely labeled ISN neurons innervating the von Ebner and parotid glands was qualitatively similar. The percentage of retrogradley labeled ISN neurons innervating the parotid gland expressing the GluR subunits was always greater than those innervating the von Ebner gland. For both von Ebner and parotid ISN neurons, NR2A subunit staining had the highest expression and the lowest expression of GluR subunit staining was NR2B for von Ebner ISN neurons and GluR1 for parotid ISN neurons. The percentage of NR2B and GluR4 expressing ISN neurons was significantly different between the two glands. The percentage of ISN neurons that expressed GluR receptor subunits ranged widely indicating that the distribution of GluR subunit expression differs amongst the ISN neurons. While ISN preganglionic neurons express all the GluR subunits, differences in the percentage of ISN neurons expression between neurons innervating the von Ebner and parotid glands may relate to the different functional roles of these glands.

  17. Toll-like receptor 3 signalling up-regulates expression of the HIV co-receptor G-protein coupled receptor 15 on human CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Kiene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many HIV-2 and SIV isolates, as well as some HIV-1 strains, can use the orphan 7-transmembrane receptor GPR15 as co-receptor for efficient entry into host cells. GPR15 is expressed on central memory and effector memory CD4(+ T cells in healthy individuals and a subset of these cells is susceptible to HIV-1 and SIV infection. However, it has not been determined whether GPR15 expression is altered in the context of HIV-1 infection. RESULTS: Here, we show that GPR15 expression in CD4(+ T cells is markedly up-regulated in some HIV-1 infected individuals compared to the rest of the infected patients and to healthy controls. Infection of the PM1 T cell line with primary HIV-1 isolates was found to up-regulate GPR15 expression on the infected cells, indicating that viral components can induce GPR15 expression. Up-regulation of GPR15 expression on CD4(+ T cells was induced by activation of Toll-like receptor 3 signalling via TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF and was more prominent on gut-homing compared to lymph node-homing CD4(+ T cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that infection-induced up-regulation of GPR15 expression could increase susceptibility of CD4(+ T cells to HIV infection and target cell availability in the gut in some infected individuals.

  18. Allosteric modulation by benzodiazepine receptor ligands of the GABAA receptor channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigel, E; Baur, R

    1988-01-01

    Chick brain mRNA was isolated and injected into Xenopus oocytes. This led to the expression in the surface membrane of functional GABA-activated channels with properties reminiscent of vertebrate GABAA channels. The GABA-induced current was analyzed quantitatively under voltage-clamp conditions. Picrotoxin inhibited this current in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 = 0.6 microM. The allosteric modulation of GABA currents by a number of drugs acting at the benzodiazepine binding site was characterized quantitatively. In the presence of the benzodiazepine receptor ligands diazepam and clorazepate, GABA responses were enhanced, and in the presence of the convulsant beta-carboline compound methyl 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM), they were depressed. Maximal stimulation of the response elicited by 10 microM GABA was 160% with diazepam and 90% with clorazepate, and maximal inhibition was 42% with DMCM, 30% with methyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCM), 15% with ethyl-8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1,5a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate (Ro 15-1788), and 12% with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE). Half-maximal stimulation was observed with 20 nM diazepam and 390 nM clorazepate, respectively, and half-maximal inhibition with 6 nM DMCM. beta-CCM had a similar effect to DMCM, whereas beta-CCE and Ro 15-1788 showed only small inhibition at low concentrations (less than 1 microM). All the tested carboline compounds and Ro 15-1788 showed a biphasic action and stimulated GABA current at concentrations higher than 1 microM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor specific transcriptome: effect of receptor expression level and an activating mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel W; Pedersen, Nina; Damstrup, Lars;

    2005-01-01

    moderately expressed or overexpressed at an in-itself transforming level. These changes were compared to those induced by the naturally occurring constitutively active variant EGFRvIII. This study provides novel insight on the activities and mechanisms of EGFRvIII and EGFR mediated transformation, as genes...... by interferons. Expression of this module was absent in the EGFRvIII-expressing cell line and the parental cell line. Treatment with the specific EGFR inhibitor AG1478 indicated that the regulations were primary, receptor-mediated events. Furthermore, activation of this module correlated with activation of STAT1...

  20. Recovery of network-driven glutamatergic activity in rat hippocampal neurons during chronic glutamate receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Eric; Belousov, Andrei B

    2009-01-28

    Previous studies indicated that a long-term decrease in the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces cholinergic activity in rat and mouse hypothalamic neuronal cultures. Here we studied whether a prolonged inactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors also induces cholinergic activity in hippocampal neurons. Receptor activity was chronically suppressed in rat hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with two proportionally increasing sets of concentrations of NMDA plus non-NMDA receptor antagonists: 100 microM/10 microM AP5/CNQX (1X cultures) and 200 microM/20 microM AP5/CNQX (2X cultures). Using calcium imaging we demonstrate that cholinergic activity does not develop in these cultures. Instead, network-driven glutamate-dependent activity, that normally is detected in hyper-excitable conditions, reappears in each culture group in the presence of these antagonists and can be reversibly suppressed by higher concentrations of AP5/CNQX. This activity is mediated by non-NMDA receptors and is modulated by NMDA receptors. Further, non-NMDA receptors, the general level of glutamate receptor activity and CaMK-dependent signaling are critical for development of this network-driven glutamatergic activity in the presence of receptor antagonists. Using electrophysiology, western blotting and calcium imaging we show that some neuronal parameters are either reduced or not affected by chronic glutamate receptor blockade. However, other parameters (including neuronal excitability, mEPSC frequency, and expression of GluR1, NR1 and betaCaMKII) become up-regulated and, in some cases, proportionally between the non-treated, 1X and 2X cultures. Our data suggest recovery of the network-driven glutamatergic activity after chronic glutamate receptor blockade. This recovery may represent a form of neuronal plasticity that compensates for the prolonged suppression of the activity of glutamate receptors.

  1. Memory consolidation and amnesia modify 5-HT6 receptors expression in rat brain: an autoradiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A; Manuel-Apolinar, L; Castillo, C; Castillo, E

    2007-03-12

    Traditionally, the search for memory circuits has been centered on examinations of amnesic and AD patients, cerebral lesions and, neuroimaging. A complementary alternative might be the use of autoradiography with radioligands. Indeed, ex vivo autoradiographic studies offer the advantage to detect functionally active receptors altered by pharmacological tools and memory formation. Hence, herein the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-399885 and the amnesic drugs scopolamine or dizocilpine were used to manipulate memory consolidation and 5-HT(6) receptors expression was determined by using [(3)H]-SB-258585. Thus, memory consolidation was impaired in scopolamine and dizocilpine treated groups relative to control vehicle but improved it in SB-399885-treated animals. SB-399885 improved memory consolidation seems to be associated with decreased 5-HT(6) receptors expression in 15 out 17 brain areas. Scopolamine or dizocilpine decreased 5-HT(6) receptors expression in nine different brain areas and increased it in CA3 hippocampus or other eight areas, respectively. In brain areas thought to be in charge of procedural memory such basal ganglia (i.e., nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, and fundus striate) data showed that relative to control animals amnesic groups showed diminished (scopolamine) or augmented (dizocilpine) 5-HT(6) receptor expression. SB-399885 showing improved memory displayed an intermediate expression in these same brain regions. A similar intermediate expression occurs with regard to amygdala, septum, and some cortical areas in charge of explicit memory storage. However, relative to control group amnesic and SB-399885 rats in the hippocampus, region where explicit memory is formed, showed a complex 5-HT(6) receptors expression. In conclusion, these results indicate neural circuits underlying the effects of 5-HT(6) receptor antagonists in autoshaping task and offer some general clues about cognitive processes in general.

  2. Developmental and neurochemical features of cholinergic neurons in the murine cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becchetti Andrea

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence and role of intrinsic cholinergic cells in the cerebral cortex is controversial, because of their variable localization and morphology in different mammalian species. We have applied choline acetyltransferase (ChAT immunocytochemistry to study the distribution of cholinergic neurons in the murine cerebral cortex, in the adult and during postnatal development. For more precise neurochemical identification of these neurons, the possible colocalization of ChAT with different markers of cortical neuronal populations has been analyzed by confocal microscopy. This method was also used to verify the relationship between cholinergic cells and cortical microvessels. Results ChAT positive cells appeared at the end of the first postnatal week. Their density dramatically increased at the beginning of the second postnatal week, during which it remained higher than in perinatal and adult stages. In the adult neocortex, cholinergic neurons were particularly expressed in the somatosensory area, although their density was also significant in visual and auditory areas. ChAT positive cells tended to be scarce in other regions. They were mainly localized in the supragranular layers and displayed a fusiform/bipolar morphology. The colocalization of ChAT with pyramidal neuron markers was negligible. On the other hand, more than half of the cholinergic neurons contained calretinin, but none of them expressed parvalbumin or calbindin. However, only a fraction of the ChAT positive cells during development and very few in adulthood turned out to be GABAergic, as judged from expression of GABA and its biosynthetic enzymes GAD67/65. Consistently, ChAT showed no localization with interneurons expressing green fluorescent protein under control of the GAD67 promoter in the adult neocortex. Finally, the cortical cholinergic cells often showed close association with the microvessel walls, as identified with the gliovascular marker aquaporin 4

  3. Reexposure to nicotine during withdrawal increases the pacemaking activity of cholinergic habenular neurons

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    Görlich, Andreas; Antolin-Fontes, Beatriz; Ables, Jessica L.; Frahm, Silke; Ślimak, Marta A.; Dougherty, Joseph D.; Ibañez-Tallon, Inés

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of genetic variants in the cholinergic receptor nicotinic CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster associated with heavy smoking and higher relapse risk has led to the identification of the midbrain habenula–interpeduncular axis as a critical relay circuit in the control of nicotine dependence. Although clear roles for α3, β4, and α5 receptors in nicotine aversion and withdrawal have been established, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that participate in signaling nicotine use and contribute to relapse have not been identified. Here, using translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) profiling, electrophysiology, and behavior, we demonstrate that cholinergic neurons, but not peptidergic neurons, of the medial habenula (MHb) display spontaneous tonic firing of 2–10 Hz generated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) pacemaker channels and that infusion of the HCN pacemaker antagonist ZD7288 in the habenula precipitates somatic and affective signs of withdrawal. Further, we show that a strong, α3β4-dependent increase in firing frequency is observed in these pacemaker neurons upon acute exposure to nicotine. No change in the basal or nicotine-induced firing was observed in cholinergic MHb neurons from mice chronically treated with nicotine. We observe, however, that, during withdrawal, reexposure to nicotine doubles the frequency of pacemaking activity in these neurons. These findings demonstrate that the pacemaking mechanism of cholinergic MHb neurons controls withdrawal, suggesting that the heightened nicotine sensitivity of these neurons during withdrawal may contribute to smoking relapse. PMID:24082085

  4. Central cholinergic activation of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit alleviates experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, H; Rabbi, M F; Labis, B; Pavlov, V A; Tracey, K J; Ghia, J E

    2014-03-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is an efferent vagus nerve-based mechanism that regulates immune responses and cytokine production through α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) signaling. Decreased efferent vagus nerve activity is observed in inflammatory bowel disease. We determined whether central activation of this pathway alters inflammation in mice with colitis and the mediating role of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit and α7nAChR signaling. Two experimental models of colitis were used in C57BL/6 mice. Central cholinergic activation induced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine or a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist treatments resulted in reduced mucosal inflammation associated with decreased major histocompatibility complex II level and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by splenic CD11c⁺ cells mediated by α7nAChR signaling. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory efficacy was abolished in mice with vagotomy, splenic neurectomy, or splenectomy. In conclusion, central cholinergic activation of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit controls intestinal inflammation and this regulation can be explored to develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  5. Striatal dopamine receptors modulate the expression of insulin receptor, IGF-1 and GLUT-3 in diabetic rats: effect of pyridoxine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, M; Abraham, Pretty Mary; Paulose, C S

    2012-12-05

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is rising at alarming proportions. Central nervous system plays an important part in orchestrating glucose metabolism, with accumulating evidence linking dysregulated central nervous system circuits to the failure of normal glucoregulatory mechanisms. Pyridoxine is a water soluble vitamin and it has important role in brain function. This study aims to evaluate the role of pyridoxine in striatal glucose regulation through dopaminergic receptor expressions in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Radio receptor binding assays for dopamine D(1), D(2) receptors were done using [(3)H] 7-chloro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepin-8-ol and [(3)H] 5-chloro-2-methoxy-4-methylamino-N-[-2-methyl-1-(phenylmethyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl]benzamide. Gene expressions were done using fluorescently labeled Taqman probes of dopamine D(1), D(2) receptor, Insulin receptor, Insulin like growth factor-1(IGF-1) and Glucose transporter-3 (GLUT-3). Bmax of dopamine D(1) receptor is decreased and B(max) of dopamine D(2) was increased in diabetic rats compared to control. Gene expression of dopamine D(1) receptor was down regulated and dopamine D(2) receptor was up regulated in diabetic rats. Our results showed decreased gene expression of Insulin receptor, IGF-1 and increased gene expression of GLUT-3 in diabetic rats compared to control. Pyridoxine treatment restored diabetes induced alterations in dopamine D(1), D(2) receptors, Insulin receptor, IGF-1, GLUT-3 gene expressions in striatum compared to diabetic rats. Insulin treatment reversed dopamine D(1), D(2) receptor, GLUT-3 mRNA expression, D(2) receptor binding parameters in the striatum compared to diabetic group. Our results suggest the potential role of pyridoxine supplementation in ameliorating diabetes mediated dysfunctions in striatal dopaminergic receptor expressions and insulin signaling. Thus pyridoxine has therapeutic significance in diabetes management.

  6. Functional expression in frog oocytes of human ρ1 receptors produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, Alejandro; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to express the ρ1 subunit of the human γ-aminobutyric acid ρ1 (GABAρ1) receptor. RNA that was isolated from several transformed yeast strains produced fully functional GABA receptors in Xenopus oocytes. The GABA currents elicited in the oocytes were fast, nondesensitizing chloride currents; and the order of agonist potency was GABA > β-alanine > glycine. Moreover, the receptors were resistant to bicuculline, strongly antagonized by (1,2,5,6 tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid, and modulated by zinc and lanthanum. Thus, the GABA receptors expressed by the yeast mRNA retained all of the principal characteristics of receptors expressed by cRNA or native retina mRNAs. Western blot assays showed immunoreactivity in yeast plasma membrane preparations, and a ρ1-GFP fusion gene showed mostly intracellular distribution with a faint fluorescence toward the plasma membrane. In situ immunodetection of ρ1 in yeast demonstrated that some receptors reach the plasma membrane. Furthermore, microtransplantation of yeast plasma membranes to frog oocytes resulted in the incorporation of a small number of functional yeast ρ1 receptors into the oocyte plasma membrane. These results show that yeast may be useful to produce complete functional ionotropic receptors suitable for structural analysis. PMID:14704273

  7. Functional coupling between heterologously expressed dopamine D(2) receptors and KCNQ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungstrom, Trine; Grunnet, Morten; Jensen, Bo Skaaning

    2003-01-01

    Activation of KCNQ potassium channels by stimulation of co-expressed dopamine D(2) receptors was studied electrophysiologically in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in mammalian cells. To address the specificity of the interaction between D(2)-like receptors and KCNQ channels, combinations of KCNQ1...... activation of the KCNQ channels was confirmed by co-expression of other neuronal K(+) channels (BK, K(V)1.1, and K(V)4.3) with the D(2L) receptor in Xenopus oocytes. None of these K(+) channels responded to stimulation of the D(2L) receptor. In the mammalian brain, dopamine D(2) receptors and KCNQ channels...... co-localise postsynaptically in several brain regions, so modulation of neuronal excitability by dopamine release could in part be mediated via an effect on KCNQ channels....

  8. Expression of Serotonin Receptors in the Colonic Tissue of Chronic Diarrhea Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Qiu, Juanjuan; Wan, Jiajia; Wang, Fengyun; Tang, Xudong; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the difference among the expression of serotonin receptors (5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors) in colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats. Materials and Methods: A rat model of chronic diarrhea was established by lactose diet. The expression of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blotting techniques. Results: There is no significant difference on the protein expression of 5-HT3 receptor between the normal group and the chronic diarrhea model group. The mRNA expression of 5-HT3 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group was significantly lower than that in the normal group (n = 10; P 5-HT7 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group were significantly decreased compared with the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.01, P < 0.01). Conclusions: The results suggested the receptors of 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 may be involved in inducing diarrhea by lactose diet. PMID:27184643

  9. mRNA expression of dopamine receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes of computer game addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Eghbali, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Excessive playing of computer games like some other behaviors could lead to addiction. Addictive behaviors may induce their reinforcing effects through stimulation of the brain dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway. The status of dopamine receptors in the brain may be parallel to their homologous receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Here, we have investigated the mRNA expression of dopamine D3, D4 and D5 receptors in PBLs of computer game addicts (n = 20) in comparison to normal subjects (n = 20), using a real-time PCR method. The results showed that the expression level of D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts were not statistically different from the control group. However, the expression of the mRNA of D5 dopamine receptor was significantly down-regulated in PBLs of computer game addicts and reached 0.42 the amount of the control group. It is concluded that unlike with drug addiction, the expression levels of the D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts are not altered compared to the control group. However, reduced level of the D5 dopamine receptor in computer game addicts may serve as a peripheral marker in studies where the confounding effects of abused drugs are unwanted.

  10. Expression of the 5-HT receptors in rat brain during memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A; Manuel-Apolinar, L; Rocha, L; Castillo, E; Castillo, C

    2004-07-09

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system displays more than 14 receptors subtypes on brain areas involved in learning and memory processes, and pharmacological manipulation of specific receptors selectively affects memory formation. In order to begin the search of 5-HT receptors expression during memory formation, in this work, we aimed to determine, by autoradiography (using 3H 5-HT as ligand, 2 nM, specific activity 123 Ci/mmol), 5-HT receptors (5-HTR) expression in passive (untrained) and autoshaping trained (3 sessions) adult (3 months) and old (9 months) male rats. Thus, trained adult rats had better retention than old animals. Raphe nuclei of adult and old trained rats expressed less receptors on medial and dorsal, respectively. Hippocampal CA1 area and dentate gyrus of adult trained rats expressed less 5-HTR, while dentate gyrus of old increased them. Basomedial amygdaloid nucleus in old trained rats expressed more 5-HTR; while in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus they were augmented in both groups. Training decreased or did not change 5-HTR in caudate-putamen of adult or old animals. The above profile of 5-HTR expression is consistent with previous reports, and suggests that memory formation and aging modulates 5-HTR expression in brain areas relevant to memory systems.

  11. Coordinated regulation of NK receptor expression in the maturing human immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Horowitz, Amir; Parham, Peter; Blish, Catherine A

    2014-11-15

    NK cells are responsible for recognizing and killing transformed, stressed, and infected cells. They recognize a set of non-Ag-specific features termed "altered self" through combinatorial signals from activating and inhibitory receptors. These NKRs are also expressed on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, B cells, and monocytes, although a comprehensive inventory of NKR expression patterns across leukocyte lineages has never been performed. Using mass cytometry, we found that NKR expression patterns distinguish cell lineages in human peripheral blood. In individuals with high levels of CD57, indicative of a mature immune repertoire, NKRs are more likely to be expressed on non-NK cells, especially CD8(+) T cells. Mature NK and CD8(+) T cell populations show increased diversity of NKR surface expression patterns, but with distinct determinants: mature NK cells acquire primarily inhibitory receptors, whereas CD8(+) T cells attain a specific subset of both activating and inhibitory receptors, potentially imbuing them with a distinct functional role. Concurrently, monocytes show decreased expression of the generalized inhibitory receptor leukocyte Ig-like receptor subfamily b member 1, consistent with an increased activation threshold. Therefore, NKR expression is coordinately regulated as the immune system matures, resulting in the transfer of "altered self" recognition potential among leukocyte lineages. This likely reduces Ag specificity in the mature human immune system, and implies that vaccines and therapeutics that engage both its innate and adaptive branches may be more effective in the settings of aging and chronic infection.

  12. Chromatin Modulatory Proteins and Olfactory Receptor Signaling in the Refinement and Maintenance of Fruitless Expression in Olfactory Receptor Neurons.

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    Catherine E Hueston

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During development, sensory neurons must choose identities that allow them to detect specific signals and connect with appropriate target neurons. Ultimately, these sensory neurons will successfully integrate into appropriate neural circuits to generate defined motor outputs, or behavior. This integration requires a developmental coordination between the identity of the neuron and the identity of the circuit. The mechanisms that underlie this coordination are currently unknown. Here, we describe two modes of regulation that coordinate the sensory identities of Drosophila melanogaster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs involved in sex-specific behaviors with the sex-specific behavioral circuit identity marker fruitless (fru. The first mode involves a developmental program that coordinately restricts to appropriate ORNs the expression of fru and two olfactory receptors (Or47b and Ir84a involved in sex-specific behaviors. This regulation requires the chromatin modulatory protein Alhambra (Alh. The second mode relies on the signaling from the olfactory receptors through CamK and histone acetyl transferase p300/CBP to maintain ORN-specific fru expression. Our results highlight two feed-forward regulatory mechanisms with both developmentally hardwired and olfactory receptor activity-dependent components that establish and maintain fru expression in ORNs. Such a dual mechanism of fru regulation in ORNs might be a trait of neurons driving plastic aspects of sex-specific behaviors.

  13. Delineation of the GPRC6A Receptor Signaling Pathways Using a Mammalian Cell Line Stably Expressing the Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie;

    2013-01-01

    receptor has been suggested to couple to multiple G protein classes albeit via indirect methods. Thus, the exact ligand preferences and signaling pathways are yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we generated a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line that stably expresses mouse GPRC6A. In an effort...... of the stable CHO cell line with robust receptor responsiveness and optimization of the highly sensitive homogeneous time resolved fluorescence technology allow fast assessment of Gq activation without previous manipulations like cotransfection of mutated G proteins. This cell-based assay system for GPRC6A...

  14. Decreased expression of fibroblast and keratinocyte growth factor isoforms and receptors during scarless repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Catherine M; Beanes, Steven R; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Benhaim, Prosper; Hedrick, Marc H; Lorenz, H Peter

    2003-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of 21 cytokines with a broad spectrum of activities, including regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The various FGFs bind to one or more of four different tyrosine kinase receptor types. FGFs 1, 2, 5, 7, and 10 are up-regulated during adult cutaneous wound healing. However, the expression of FGFs during fetal skin development and scarless wound healing has not been characterized. It was hypothesized that differential expression of FGF isoforms and receptors occurs during fetal skin development and that this differential expression pattern may regulate the transition from scarless repair to healing with scar formation. Excisional wounds (2 mm) were created on fetal rats at gestational days 16.5 (scarless) (one wound per fetus, n = 36 fetuses) and 19.5 (scarring) (one wound per fetus, n = 36 fetuses). Wounds were harvested at 24, 48, and 72 hours. Survival until wound harvest ranged from 66 to 75 percent for the gestational day 16 fetuses, and from 83 to 92 percent for the gestational day 19 fetuses. Nonwounded fetal skin from littermates (n = 12 fetuses per wound harvest time point) was used as the control. Wounds/skins were pooled by harvest time point, and RNA was isolated from pooled wounds/skins. Reduced-cycle, specific-primer reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the expression of FGF isoforms 2, 5, 7, 9, and 10 and FGF receptors 1, 2, and 4 in wounds relative to unwounded skin.In unwounded fetal skin, FGF isoform 5 expression more than doubled at birth. FGF 10 expression doubled during the transition period. FGF 7 expression increased more than sevenfold at birth. Expression of FGF isoforms 2 and 9 did not change during late fetal skin development. The expression of FGF receptors 1, 2, and 4 increased at birth. After wounding, expression of FGF isoforms 7 and 10 was down-regulated in scarless wounds, whereas FGF receptor 2 expression decreased in

  15. Both pre- and post-synaptic alterations contribute to aberrant cholinergic transmission in superior cervical ganglia of APP(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhao-Lin; Zhang, Jia-Jia; Chen, Ming; Wang, Jin-Zhao; Xiao, Peng; Yang, Li; Long, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Though amyloid precursor protein (APP) can potentially be cleaved to generate the pathological amyloid β peptide (Aβ), APP itself plays an important role in regulating neuronal activity. APP deficiency causes functional impairment in cholinergic synaptic transmission and cognitive performance. However, the mechanisms underlying altered cholinergic synaptic transmission in APP knock-out mice (APP(-/-)) are poorly understood. In this study, we conducted in vivo extracellular recording to investigate cholinergic compound action potentials (CAPs) of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) in APP(-/-) and littermate wild-type (WT) mice. Our results demonstrate that APP not only regulates presynaptic activity, but also affects postsynaptic function at cholinergic synapses in SCG. APP deficiency reduces the number of vesicles in presynaptic terminalsand attenuatesthe amplitude of CAPs, likely due to dysfunction of high-affinity choline transporters. Pharmacological and biochemical examination showed that postsynaptic responsesmediated by α4β2 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are reduced in the absence of APP. Our research provides evidences on how APP regulates cholinergic function and therefore may help to identify potential therapeutic targets to treat cholinergic dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

  16. Expression and localization of the omega-3 fatty acid receptor GPR120 in human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, S; Ramirez, V I; Gaccioli, F; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-07-01

    Fatty acids can function as signaling molecules, acting through receptors in the cytosol or on the cell surface. G-Protein Receptor (GPR)120 is a membrane-bound receptor mediating anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects of the omega-3 fatty acid docohexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR120 dysfunction is associated with obesity in humans. Cellular localization of GPR120 and the influence of maternal obesity on GPR120 protein expression in the placenta are unknown. Herein we demonstrate that GPR120 is predominantly expressed in the microvillous membrane (MVM) of human placenta and that the expression level of this receptor in MVM is not altered by maternal body mass index (BMI).

  17. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases control expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Juliane; Lerche Hansen, Jakob; Haunsø, Stig;

    2002-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) phosphorylates G protein-coupled receptors resulting in uncoupling from G proteins. Receptors modulate GRK2 expression, however the mechanistic basis for this effect is largely unknown. Here we report a novel mechanism by which receptors use...

  18. Adrenocorticotropin receptors: Functional expression from rat adrenal mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, L.M.; Catt, K.J. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) receptor, which binds corticotropin and stimulates adenylate cyclase and steroidogenesis in adrenocortical cells, was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with rat adrenal poly(A){sup +} RNA. Expression of the ACTH receptor in individual stage 5 and 6 oocytes was monitored by radioimmunoassay of ligand-stimulated cAMP production. Injection of 5-40 ng of adrenal mRNA caused dose-dependent increases in ACTH-responsive cAMP production. Size fractionation of rat adrenal poly(A){sup +}RNA by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation revealed that mRNA encoding the ACTH receptor was present in the 1.1-to 2.0-kilobase fraction. These data indicate that ACTH receptors can be expressed from adrenal mRNA in Xenopus oocytes and are fully functional in terms of ligand specificity and signal generation. The extracellular cAMP response to ACTH is a sensitive and convenient index of receptor expression. This system should permit more complete characterization and expression cloning of the ACTH receptor.

  19. Expression of growth factor receptors and targeting of EGFR in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellermeier Silvia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CC is a malignant neoplasm of the bile ducts or the gallbladder. Targeting of growth factor receptors showed therapeutic potential in palliative settings for many solid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of seven growth factor receptors in CC cell lines and to assess the effect of blocking the EGFR receptor in vitro. Methods Expression of EGFR (epithelial growth factor receptor, HGFR (hepatocyte growth factor receptor IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, IGF2R (insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor and VEGFR1-3 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3 were examined in four human CC cell lines (EGI-1, HuH28, OZ and TFK-1. The effect of the anti-EGFR-antibody cetuximab on cell growth and apoptosis was studied and cell lines were examined for KRAS mutations. Results EGFR, HGFR and IGFR1 were present in all four cell lines tested. IGFR2 expression was confirmed in EGI-1 and TFK-1. No growth-inhibitory effect was found in EGI-1 cells after incubation with cetuximab. Cetuximab dose-dependently inhibited growth in TFK-1. Increased apoptosis was only seen in TFK-1 cells at the highest cetuximab dose tested (1 mg/ml, with no dose-response-relationship at lower concentrations. In EGI-1 a heterozygous KRAS mutation was found in codon 12 (c.35G>A; p.G12D. HuH28, OZ and TFK-1 lacked KRAS mutation. Conclusion CC cell lines express a pattern of different growth receptors in vitro. Growth factor inhibitor treatment could be affected from the KRAS genotype in CC. The expression of EGFR itself does not allow prognoses on growth inhibition by cetuximab.

  20. Expression of neuropeptide receptor mRNA during osteoblastic differentiation of mouse iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Satomi; Goto, Tetsuya; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Joujima, Takaaki; Egusa, Hiroshi; Yatani, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Maki, Kenshi

    2014-12-01

    Various studies have shown a relationship between nerves and bones. Recent evidence suggests that both sensory and sympathetic nerves affect bone metabolism; however, little is known about how neuropeptides are involved in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into osteoblastic (OB) cells. To evaluate the putative effects of neuropeptides during the differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into calcified tissue-forming OB cells, we investigated the expression patterns of neuropeptide receptors at each differentiation stage. Mouse iPS cells were seeded onto feeder cells and then transferred to low-attachment culture dishes to form embryoid bodies (EBs). EBs were cultured for 4 weeks in osteoblastic differentiation medium. The expression of α1-adrenergic receptor (AR), α2-AR, β2-AR, neuropeptide Y1 receptor (NPY1-R), neuropeptide Y2 receptor (NPY2-R), calcitonin gene-related protein receptor (CGRP-R), and neurokinin 1-R (NK1-R) was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. Among these neuropeptide receptors, CGRP-R and β2-AR were expressed at all stages of cell differentiation, including the iPS cell stage, with peak expression occurring at the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. Another sensory nervous system receptor, NK1-R, was expressed mainly in the late osteoblastic differentiation stage. Furthermore, CGRP-R mRNA showed an additional small peak corresponding to EBs cultured for 3 days, suggesting that EBs may be affected by serum CGRP. These data suggest that the sensory nervous system receptor CGRP-R and the sympathetic nervous system receptor β2-AR may be involved in the differentiation of iPS cells into the osteoblastic lineage. It follows from these findings that CGRP and β2-AR may regulate cell differentiation in the iPS and EB stages, and that each neuropeptide has an optimal period of influence during the differentiation process.

  1. Heterologous Expression in Remodeled C. elegans: A Platform for Monoaminergic Agonist Identification and Anthelmintic Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Law

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Monoamines, such as 5-HT and tyramine (TA, paralyze both free-living and parasitic nematodes when applied exogenously and serotonergic agonists have been used to clear Haemonchus contortus infections in vivo. Since nematode cell lines are not available and animal screening options are limited, we have developed a screening platform to identify monoamine receptor agonists. Key receptors were expressed heterologously in chimeric, genetically-engineered Caenorhabditis elegans, at sites likely to yield robust phenotypes upon agonist stimulation. This approach potentially preserves the unique pharmacologies of the receptors, while including nematode-specific accessory proteins and the nematode cuticle. Importantly, the sensitivity of monoamine-dependent paralysis could be increased dramatically by hypotonic incubation or the use of bus mutants with increased cuticular permeabilities. We have demonstrated that the monoamine-dependent inhibition of key interneurons, cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscle inhibited locomotion and caused paralysis. Specifically, 5-HT paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT receptor null animals expressing either nematode, insect or human orthologues of a key Gαo-coupled 5-HT1-like receptor in the cholinergic motor neurons. Importantly, 8-OH-DPAT and PAPP, 5-HT receptor agonists, differentially paralyzed the transgenic animals, with 8-OH-DPAT paralyzing mutant animals expressing the human receptor at concentrations well below those affecting its C. elegans or insect orthologues. Similarly, 5-HT and TA paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT or TA receptor null animals, respectively, expressing either C. elegans or H. contortus 5-HT or TA-gated Cl- channels in either C. elegans cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscles. Together, these data suggest that this heterologous, ectopic expression screening approach will be useful for the identification of agonists for key monoamine receptors from parasites and could have broad application for

  2. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Wehler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P=.039, tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005, and low hemoglobin (P = .039. In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma.

  3. Oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK induces expression of the growth-promoting receptor ICOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hongyi; Kantekure, Kanchan; Paterson, Jennifer C; Liu, Xiaobin; Schaffer, Andras; Paulos, Chrystal; Milone, Michael C; Odum, Niels; Turner, Suzanne; Marafioti, Teresa; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2011-09-15

    Here we report that T-cell lymphoma cells carrying the NPM-ALK fusion protein (ALK(+) TCL) frequently express the cell-stimulatory receptor ICOS. ICOS expression in ALK(+) TCL is moderate and strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM-ALK. NPM-ALK induces ICOS expression via STAT3, which triggers the transcriptional activity of the ICOS gene promoter. In addition, STAT3 suppresses the expression of miR-219 that, in turn, selectively inhibits ICOS expression. ALK(+) TCL cell lines display extensive DNA methylation of the CpG island located within intron 1, the putative enhancer region, of the ICOS gene, whereas cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell lines, which strongly express ICOS, show no methylation of the island. Treatment of the ALK(+) TCL cell lines with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor reversed the CpG island methylation and augmented the expression of ICOS mRNA and protein. Stimulation of the ICOS receptor with anti-ICOS antibody or ICOS ligand-expressing B cells markedly enhanced proliferation of the ALK(+) TCL cells. These results demonstrate that NPM-ALK, acting through STAT3 as the gene transcriptional activator, induces the expression of ICOS, a cell growth promoting receptor. These data also show that the DNA methylation status of the intronic CpG island affects transcriptional activity of the ICOS gene and, consequently, modulates the concentration of the expressed ICOS protein.

  4. Ventral tegmental area cholinergic mechanisms mediate behavioral responses in the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, N A; Nunes, E J; Wickham, R J

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies revealed a causal link between ventral tegmental area (VTA) phasic dopamine (DA) activity and pro-depressive and antidepressant-like behavioral responses in rodent models of depression. Cholinergic activity in the VTA has been demonstrated to regulate phasic DA activity, but the role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in depression-related behavior is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether pharmacological manipulation of VTA cholinergic activity altered behavioral responding in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats received systemic or VTA-specific administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine (systemic; 0.06 or 0.125mg/kg, intra-cranial; 1 or 2μg/side), the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist scopolamine (2.4 or 24μg/side), or the nicotinic AChR antagonist mecamylamine (3 or 30μg/side), prior to the FST test session. In control experiments, locomotor activity was also examined following systemic and intra-cranial administration of cholinergic drugs. Physostigmine administration, either systemically or directly into the VTA, significantly increased immobility time in FST, whereas physostigmine infusion into a dorsal control site did not alter immobility time. In contrast, VTA infusion of either scopolamine or mecamylamine decreased immobility time, consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. Finally, the VTA physostigmine-induced increase in immobility was blocked by co-administration with scopolamine, but unaltered by co-administration with mecamylamine. These data show that enhancing VTA cholinergic tone and blocking VTA AChRs has opposing effects in FST. Together, the findings provide evidence for a role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in behavioral responses in FST.

  5. A Cell Line Producing Recombinant Nerve Growth Factor Evokes Growth Responses in Intrinsic and Grafted Central Cholinergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernfors, Patrik; Ebendal, Ted; Olson, Lars; Mouton, Peter; Stromberg, Ingrid; Persson, Hakan

    1989-06-01

    The rat β nerve growth factor (NGF) gene was inserted into a mammalian expression vector and cotransfected with a plasmid conferring resistance to neomycin into mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. From this transfection a stable cell line was selected that contains several hundred copies of the rat NGF gene and produces excess levels of recombinant NGF. Such genetically modified cells were implanted into the rat brain as a probe for in vivo effects of NGF on central nervous system neurons. In a model of the cortical cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer disease, we demonstrate a marked increase in the survival of, and fiber outgrowth from, grafts of fetal basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as well as stimulation of fiber formation by intact adult intrinsic cholinergic circuits in the cerebral cortex. Adult cholinergic interneurons in intact striatum also sprout vigorously toward implanted fibroblasts. Our results suggest that this model has implications for future treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Regulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelman, Leo Edwin

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the regulation of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (InsP3R). The mechanisms of InsP3R regulation were investigated after cloning of the promoters of the human and rat InsP3R-1 gene and visualization of subcellular distribution of InsP3R-3 by immunoelectron microscopy (c

  7. THE CORRELATIONS OF RETINOIC ACID RECEPTOR-α AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELL LINES AND TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余黎明; 邵志敏; 蔡三军; 韩企夏; 沈镇宙

    1998-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-α(RAR α) plays a major role in the growth inhibitory effect of retinoic acid on human breast cancer ceils, may be it could serve as an indicator to guide the treatment and prevent of breast cancer with retinoic acid in ciiinc. All previous researchs were based on observing the changes ofRAR a mRAN expression. In this study, the expression of RAR a in human breast cell lines was studied by Northern Blot, Western Blot and Immunohistochemistry in mRNA level and protein level. Results showed that RAR a protein expression was correlated with RAR a mRNA expression. RAR α mRNA expression was higher in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human breast cancer cell lines than in ER-negative ones. So was RAR α protein expression. Both RAR α mRNA amd RAR α protein expression were associated with ER status. The expression of RAR α and the relationship between RAR α and ER status were also determined by immunohistochemistry in 58 human primary breast cancer tumors. 37 (63.8%) tumors were ER-positive and of these 28 (75. 7%) were also RAR α -positive. The coexpression of ER and RAR α was statistleally significant (P<0. 01, by X2 contingency analysis), It was reported that RAR α expression in cultured breast cancer ceils was regulated by estrogen acting via the ER. Our study demonstrated that RAR α expression may be modulated in breast cancer in vivo by estrogen via ER.

  8. Notch receptor expression in neurogenic regions of the adult zebrafish brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Oliveira-Carlos

    Full Text Available The adult zebrash brain has a remarkable constitutive neurogenic capacity. The regulation and maintenance of its adult neurogenic niches are poorly understood. In mammals, Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance both in embryonic and adult CNS. To better understand how Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance during adult neurogenesis in zebrafish we analysed Notch receptor expression in five neurogenic zones of the adult zebrafish brain. Combining proliferation and glial markers we identified several subsets of Notch receptor expressing cells. We found that 90 [Formula: see text] of proliferating radial glia express notch1a, notch1b and notch3. In contrast, the proliferating non-glial populations of the dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus rarely express notch3 and about half express notch1a/1b. In the non-proliferating radial glia notch3 is the predominant receptor throughout the brain. In the ventral telencephalon and in the mitotic area of the optic tectum, where cells have neuroepithelial properties, notch1a/1b/3 are expressed in most proliferating cells. However, in the cerebellar niche, although progenitors also have neuroepithelial properties, only notch1a/1b are expressed in a high number of PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. In this region notch3 expression is mostly in Bergmann glia and at low levels in few PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. Additionally, we found that in the proliferation zone of the ventral telencephalon, Notch receptors display an apical high to basal low gradient of expression. Notch receptors are also expressed in subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells. We suggest that the partial regional heterogeneity observed for Notch expression in progenitor cells might be related to the cellular diversity present in each of these neurogenic niches.

  9. Expression of IL-4 receptor on human T and B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zola, H; Flego, L; Weedon, H

    1993-08-01

    The expression of the interleukin-4 receptor on human blood and tonsil lymphocytes has been studied using a monoclonal antibody and high-sensitivity immunofluorescence flow cytometry. While no receptor expression could be detected on circulating or tonsil T cells, a subset of B cells was shown to express the receptor. The IL-4R-positive B cells in tonsil had a phenotype suggesting that they included both germinal centre B cells and B cells outside the germinal centre. The subset of B cells in the blood that expressed the receptor included CD23-positive B cells. Activation of tonsil B cells using anti-IgM, IL-4, IL-2, or combinations of these reagents led to increases in IL-4R expression, but these changes were small compared to changes in the expression of IL-2R p55 (CD25), a known marker of activation. Similarly, activation of T cells led to low-level expression of IL-4R, with IL-4 itself up-regulating IL-4R, especially in CD4 cells. The majority of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia samples were positive for IL-4R expression, whilst most other leukemic samples were negative.

  10. Requirement for Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 Expression on Vascular Cells To Induce Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Stoelcker, Benjamin; Hehlgans, Thomas; Weigl, Karin; Bluethmann, Horst; Grau, Georges E.; Männel, Daniela N

    2002-01-01

    Using tumor necrosis factor receptor type 2 (TNFR2)-deficient mice and generating bone marrow chimeras which express TNFR2 on either hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic cells, we demonstrated the requirement for TNFR2 expression on tissue cells to induce lethal cerebral malaria. Thus, TNFR2 on the brain vasculature mediates tumor necrosis factor-induced neurovascular lesions in experimental cerebral malaria.

  11. Changes in epidermal growth factor receptor expression during chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), such as cetuximab, may potentially improve outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with high EGFR expression. The EGFR expression may be heterogeneously distributed within tumors, and small biopsies may thus...

  12. Expression of leptin and leptin receptor during the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, C; Otte, J-M; Strodthoff, D; Bornstein, S R; Fölsch, U R; Mönig, H; Kloehn, S

    2004-01-01

    Leptin is involved in the regulation of food intake and is mainly secreted by adipocytes. Major secretagogues are cytokines such as TNF-alpha or IL-1. Leptin in turn upregulates inflammatory immune responses. Elevated leptin serum levels have been detected in patients with liver cirrhosis, a disease frequently associated with elevated levels of circulating cytokines as well as hypermetabolism and altered body weight. Recently, leptin has been detected in activated hepatic stellate cells in vitro and an involvement of leptin in liver fibrogenisis has been suggested. The current study was designed to further clarify the role of leptin in liver disease by characterizing leptin and leptin receptor expression in the development and onset of experimental liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis was induced in rats by use of phenobarbitone and increasing doses of CCl (4). Leptin and leptin receptor mRNA expression was determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR, protein expression by Western blot analysis and localization of leptin and its receptor by immunohistochemistry. Normal liver tissue does not express leptin, but leptin receptor mRNA. Increasing levels of leptin mRNA were detected in fibrotic and cirrhotic livers correlated to the degree of fibrosis. Leptin receptor mRNA expression was not significantly altered in damaged livers. Increasing levels of leptin were detected in fibrotic and cirrhotic livers, whereas protein expression of the receptor remained unchanged. Throughout different stages of liver fibrosis, leptin immunoreactivity was localized in activated hepatic stellate cells only, whereas immunoreactivity for the receptor was mainly seen on hepatocytes. In conclusion, leptin is expressed at increasing levels in activated hepatic stellate cells in vivo, which may therefore be a source of increased leptin tissue and serum levels contributing to the pathophysiology and morphological changes of chronic liver disease.

  13. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... to control conditions. We therefore hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans....

  14. Transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transport of transferrin in cultured brain endothelial monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersom, Maria; Helms, Hans Christian; Pretzer, Natasia;

    2016-01-01

    across the endothelial cells by transcytosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transferrin transport in cultured bovine brain endothelial cell monolayers. Transferrin receptor mRNA and protein levels were investigated...... in endothelial mono-cultures and co-cultures with astrocytes, as well as in freshly isolated brain capillaries using qPCR, immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Transendothelial transport and luminal association of holo-transferrin was investigated using [125I]holo-transferrin or [59Fe......]-transferrin. Transferrin receptor mRNA expression in all cell culture configurations was lower than in freshly isolated capillaries, but the expression slightly increased during six days of culture. The mRNA expression levels were similar in mono-cultures and co-cultures. Immunostaining demonstrated comparable transferrin...

  15. Expression of eicosanoid receptors subtypes and eosinophilic inflammation: implication on chronic rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Cauwenberge Paul

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eicosanoid receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors playing an important immunomodulatory role in airway diseases. However, there is little information on the expression of these receptors and their link with eosinophilic inflammation in paranasal sinus diseases. We aimed with this study to investigate the tissue expression of leukotrienes and prostaglandin E2 receptors in chronic rhinosinusitis patients and the link of this regulation with eosinophilic inflammation. Methods Samples were prepared from nasal tissue of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps (CRS, n = 11, with nasal polyps (CRS-NP, n = 13 and healthy subjects (Controls, n = 6. mRNA expression of CysLT1, CysLT2, BLT1, BLT2, E-prostanoid receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, EP4 and sol-IL-5Rα was determined by real-time PCR. Concentrations of PGE2, LTC4/D4/E4, LTB4 and sol-IL-5Rα were determined by ELISA and of ECP by ImmunoCap. Protein expression and tissue localization of eicosanoid receptors and activated eosinophils were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results CysLT1 mRNA expression was significantly increased in CRS-NP compared to CRS and controls, and CRS compared to controls, whereas CysLT2 mRNA was enhanced in both CRS groups without differences between them. Levels of both receptors correlated to the number of activated eosinophils, sol-IL-5Rα, ECP and LTC4/D4/E4 concentrations in the disease groups. PGE2 protein concentrations and prostanoid receptors EP1 and EP3 were down-regulated in the CRS-NP tissue vs. CRS and controls, whereas EP2 and EP4 expression was enhanced in CRS and CRS-NP patients vs. controls. No differences in BLT receptors were observed between patients and controls. Conclusion CyLTs receptors are up-regulated in nasal polyp tissue and their expression correlate with eosinophilic inflammation supporting previous results. Eicosanoid receptors mRNA pattern observed suggests that down-regulation of EP1 and EP3 in CRS-NP and

  16. Cytokine Receptor Expression in Human Lymphoid Tissue: Analysis by Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heddy Zola

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A highl y-sen sitile tlourescence method, capable of detecting cytokine receptors present at low concentrations (around I DO molecules per cell by flow cytometry, was adapted for use on tissue sections. This method was used to examine the expression of several cytokine receptors in lymphoid ti ss ues. lL-2 receptors were distributed broadly, with higher concentrations in T cell areas. lL-1 receptor Type I was detected in T cell areas and in the follicular mantle, and was strongly expressed on vasc ular endothelium. IL-6 receptor was found at very low concentration, both within and outside germinal centres. The gp 130 molecule, which is involved in the functional receptor complex for IL-6 and several other cytokines, was present at higher concentrations, particularly in the germinal centre. Analysis of receptor expression in secondary lymphoid tissue provides evidence bearing on the physiological roles of cytokines, as these tissues contain cells at various stages of physiological activation located in well-defined functional zones.

  17. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M;

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression was evaluated in a panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell lines with radioreceptor assay, affinity labeling, and Northern blotting. We found high-affinity receptors to be expressed in 10 cell lines. Scatchard analysis of the binding data...... demonstrated that the cells bound between 3 and 52 fmol/mg protein with a KD ranging from 0.5 x 10(-10) to 2.7 x 10(-10) M. EGF binding to the receptor was confirmed by affinity-labeling EGF to the EGF receptor. The cross-linked complex had a M(r) of 170,000-180,000. Northern blotting showed the expression...... of EGF receptor mRNA in all 10 cell lines that were found to be EGF receptor-positive and in one cell line that was found to be EGF receptor-negative in the radioreceptor assay and affinity labeling. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that a large proportion of a broad panel of small cell...

  18. Effects of histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidi, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Eidi, Akram; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem

    2003-03-28

    In the present study, the effects of the histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention in adult male rats were investigated. Post-training intracerebroventricular injections were carried out in all the experiments. Cholinoceptor agonist, acetylcholine (1-10 microg/rat) or nicotine (1-10 microg/rat), increased, while a cholinoceptor antagonist, scopolamine (5-20 microg/rat), decreased memory retention. The response to acetylcholine was attenuated by scopolamine. Administration of histamine (5-20 microg/rat) reduced, but the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, pyrilamine (10-50 microg/rat), and the histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine (1-50 microg/rat), increased memory retention in rats. The histamine receptor antagonists attenuated the response to histamine. Histamine reduced the acetylcholine- or nicotine-induced enhancement. The histamine receptor antagonists enhanced the nicotine- or acetylcholine-induced response. Histamine potentiated the inhibitory effect induced by scopolamine. It is concluded that histaminergic and cholinergic systems have opposing effects on memory retention. Also, the histaminergic system elicits an interaction with the cholinergic system in memory retention.

  19. Activation and modulation of recombinantly expressed serotonin receptor type 3A by terpenes and pungent substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Paul M; Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Flegel, Caroline; Herbrechter, Robin; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-11-27

    Serotonin receptor type 3 (5-HT3 receptor) is a ligand-gated ion channel that is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The receptor plays an important role in regulating peristalsis of the gastrointestinal tract and in functions such as emesis, cognition and anxiety. Therefore, a variety of pharmacologically active substances target the 5-HT3 receptor to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The 5-HT3 receptors are activated, antagonized, or modulated by a wide range of chemically different substances, such as 2-methyl-serotonin, phenylbiguanide, setrones, or cannabinoids. Whereas the action of all of these substances is well described, less is known about the effect of terpenoids or fragrances on 5-HT3A receptors. In this study, we screened a large number of natural odorous and pungent substances for their pharmacological action on recombinantly expressed human 5-HT3A receptors. The receptors were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized by electrophysiological recordings using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. A screening of two odorous mixes containing a total of 200 substances revealed that the monoterpenes, thymol and carvacrol, act as both weak partial agonists and positive modulators on the 5-HT3A receptor. In contrast, the most effective blockers were the terpenes, citronellol and geraniol, as well as the pungent substances gingerol, capsaicin and polygodial. In our study, we identified new modulators of 5-HT3A receptors out of the classes of monoterpenes and vanilloid substances that frequently occur in various plants.

  20. Expression of luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Masanori T; Hosaka, Takeshi; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Ishizuka, Bunpei

    2006-08-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) influences the secretion of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) from the pineal gland. The present study examined the possible presence of LH/chorionic gonadotropin (CG) receptor in the pineal gland of adult female rats. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that LH/CG receptor mRNA is expressed in the pineal gland. Western blotting showed that the pineal gland, like the ovary, contains an 80 kDa receptor protein. Immunohistochemistry revealed that LH/CG receptor, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (a regulatory enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis) and serotonin (a melatonin precursor) are localized primarily to the same cells of the pineal gland. We further found that the levels of pineal LH/CG receptor protein in normal cycling female rats change significantly during the estrous cycle, being lowest at early metestrus. These results demonstrate that LH/CG receptor is expressed in the pineal gland, primarily in melatonin-synthesizing cells, namely pinealocytes. Furthermore, it is suggested that LH influences pineal melatonin secretion through binding to this receptor. In addition, LH/CG receptor levels in the pineal gland are regulated during the estrous cycle under normal physiological conditions.

  1. Molecular cloning, chromosomal mapping, and functional expression of human brain glutamate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, W.; Ferrer-Montiel, A.V.; Schinder, A.F.; Montal, M. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States)); McPherson, J.P. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Evans, G.A. (Salk Inst. for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA (United States))

    1992-02-15

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding a glutamate receptor was isolated from a human brain cDNA library, and the gene product was characterized after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Degenerate PCR primers to conserved regions of published rat brain glutamate receptor sequences amplified a 1-kilobase fragment from a human brain cDNA library. This fragment was used as a probe for subsequent hybridization screening. Two clones were isolated that, based on sequence information, code for different receptors: a 3-kilobase clone, HBGR1, contains a full-length glutamate receptor cDNA highly homologous to the rat brain clone GluR1, and a second clone, HBGR2, contains approximately two-thirds of the coding region of a receptor homologous to rat brain clone GluR2. Southern and PCr analysis of a somatic cell-hybrid panel mapped HBGR1 to human chromosome 5q31.3-33.3 and mapped HBGR2 to chromosome 4q25-34.3. Xenopus oocytes injected with in vitro-synthesized HBGR1 cRNA expressed currents activated by glutamate receptor agonists. These results indicate that clone HBGR1 codes for a glutamate receptor of the kainate subtype cognate to members of the glutamate receptor family from rodent brain.

  2. Antibodies to probe endogenous G protein-coupled receptor heteromer expression, regulation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivone eGomes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade an increasing number of studies have focused on the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to form heteromers and explored how receptor heteromerization modulates the binding, signaling and trafficking properties of individual receptors. Most of these studies were carried out in heterologous cells expressing epitope tagged receptors. Very little information is available about the in vivo physiological role of G protein-coupled receptor heteromers due to a lack of tools to detect their presence in endogenous tissue. Recent advances such as the generation of mouse models expressing fluorescently labeled receptors, of TAT based peptides that can disrupt a given heteromer pair, or of heteromer-selective antibodies that recognize the heteromer in endogenous tissue have begun to elucidate the physiological and pathological roles of receptor heteromers. In this review we have focused on heteromer-selective antibodies and describe how a subtractive immunization strategy can be successfully used to generate antibodies that selectively recognize a desired heteromer pair. We also describe the uses of these antibodies to detect the presence of heteromers, to study their properties in endogenous tissues, and to monitor changes in heteromer levels under pathological conditions. Together, these findings suggest that G protein-coupled receptor heteromers represent unique targets for the development of drugs with reduced side-effects.

  3. Increased Expression of Endothelin Receptors in Human Cirrhosis——Relationship with Spl anchnic Hemodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓小荣; 杨镇

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the correlation that likely exists among increased portal pressure (Pp), portal blood flow quantity (Qp) and ETA and ETB receptor mRNA expression in human cirrhosis. In situ hybridization and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) were performed to determine the expression of ETA and ETB receptor mRNA in liver tissues from traumatic subjects (n= 10) and cirrhotic patients (n= 15) in whom hepatic hemodynamic values were measured. The expression of the two transcripts was significantly higher in liver samples of cirrhotic patients than in those obtained from traumatic subjects. It has shown that ETA receptor mRNA predominantly located in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and vascular smooth muscle cells of intrahepatic arteries and portal veins, ETB receptor mRNA in HSCs, sinusoidal endothelial cells and Kuppfer cells. There was a highly significant direct relationship between ETA and ETB receptor mRNA and Pp and Qp in cirrhotic patients. It suggests that liver paracrine endothelin system may be overactivated in human cirrhosis accompanied with increased expression of ETA and ETB receptor mRNA which may play an important role in the pathogenesis and maintenance of splanchnic hyperdynamics.

  4. Developmentally Regulated Expression of the Nerve Growth Factor Receptor Gene in the Periphery and Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, C. R.; Martinez, Humberto J.; Black, Ira B.; Chao, Moses V.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates development and maintenance of function of peripheral sympathetic and sensory neurons. A potential role for the trophic factor in brain has been detected only recently. The ability of a cell to respond to NGF is due, in part, to expression of specific receptors on the cell surface. To study tissue-specific expression of the NGF receptor gene, we have used sensitive cRNA probes for detection of NGF receptor mRNA. Our studies indicate that the receptor gene is selectively and specifically expressed in sympathetic (superior cervical) and sensory (dorsal root) ganglia in the periphery, and by the septum-basal forebrain centrally, in the neonatal rat in vivo. Moreover, examination of tissues from neonatal and adult rats reveals a marked reduction in steady-state NGF receptor mRNA levels in sensory ganglia. In contrast, a 2- to 4-fold increase was observed in the basal forebrain and in the sympathetic ganglia over the same time period. Our observations suggest that NGF receptor mRNA expression is developmentally regulated in specific areas of the nervous system in a differential fashion.

  5. Montelukast modulates lung CysLT1 receptor expression and eosinophilic inflammation in asthmatic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-jun ZHANG; Lei ZHANG; Shao-bin WANG; Hua-hao SHEN; Er-qing WEI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expressions of cysteinyl leukotriene receptors, CysLT1 and CysLT2, in airway eosinophilic inflammation of OVA-induced asthmatic mice and the modulation by montelukast, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist.METHODS: Asthma model was induced by chronic exposure to ovalbumin (OVA) in C57BL/6 mice. The eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were counted, IL-5 level in BAL fluid was measured,and CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptor mRNA expressions were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS:Montelukast (6 mg/kg, once per day for 20 d) significantly suppressed the increased eosinophils in BAL fluid and lung tissue, and increased IL-5 level in BAL fluid in OVA challenged mice. OVA challenge increased CysLT1 but decreased CysLT2 receptor mRNA expression. Montelukast inhibited the increased CysLT1 but not the reduced CysLT2 expression after OVA challenge. CONCLUSION: CysLT receptors are modulated immunologically, and montelukast inhibits up-regulation of CysLT1 receptor and airway eosinophilic inflammation in asthmatic mice.

  6. Identification of neurons that express ghrelin receptors in autonomic pathways originating from the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, John B; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Hunne, Billie; Hirayama, Haruko; Callaghan, Brid P; Lomax, Alan E; Brock, James A

    2012-06-01

    Functional studies have shown that subsets of autonomic preganglionic neurons respond to ghrelin and ghrelin mimetics and in situ hybridisation has revealed receptor gene expression in the cell bodies of some preganglionic neurons. Our present goal has been to determine which preganglionic neurons express ghrelin receptors by using mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the promoter for the ghrelin receptor (also called growth hormone secretagogue receptor). The retrograde tracer Fast Blue was injected into target organs of reporter mice under anaesthesia to identify specific functional subsets of postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Cryo-sections were immunohistochemically stained by using anti-EGFP and antibodies to neuronal markers. EGFP was detected in nerve terminal varicosities in all sympathetic chain, prevertebral and pelvic ganglia and in the adrenal medulla. Non-varicose fibres associated with the ganglia were also immunoreactive. No postganglionic cell bodies contained EGFP. In sympathetic chain ganglia, most neurons were surrounded by EGFP-positive terminals. In the stellate ganglion, neurons with choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity, some being sudomotor neurons, lacked surrounding ghrelin-receptor-expressing terminals, although these terminals were found around other neurons. In the superior cervical ganglion, the ghrelin receptor terminals innervated subgroups of neurons including neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive neurons that projected to the anterior chamber of the eye. However, large NPY-negative neurons projecting to the acini of the submaxillary gland were not innervated by EGFP-positive varicosities. In the celiaco-superior mesenteric ganglion, almost all neurons were surrounded by positive terminals but the VIP-immunoreactive terminals of intestinofugal neurons were EGFP-negative. The pelvic ganglia contained groups of neurons without ghrelin receptor terminal innervation and other groups with

  7. Heterogeneity of histamine H3 receptor genomic expression in the cerebral cortex of spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J B; Cai, Q; Mtshali, C; Myles, E L; Washington, B

    2007-05-15

    Specific binding of [3H]-N-alpha-methylhistamine to homogenates from cerebral cortex tissue was analyzed in aged Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Spontaneously Hypertensive rats (SHR). Scatchard plot analysis of [3H]-N-alpha-methylhistamine binding of the H3 receptor in the cerebral cortex from aged (6, 9, 12, and 16 week) SHR animals indicated that Bmax increased, respectively, 38.05 +/- 1.58, 59.63 +/- 2.48, 79.17 +/- 5.02, and 84.41 +/- 3.72 fmol/mg of protein. Binding studies using tissue from WKY rats indicated that maximal binding (Bmax) of the ligand to the receptor was not significantly altered. The analyses also yielded Kd values of 5, 7.2, 6.3 and 3.8 nM in SHR tissue respectively. Primers based on the sequence of the third intracellular loop of the H3 receptor were amplified at 35 cycles yielding several amplicons. These amplicons expressed sizes 875, 485, and 280 bp in 6 and 9 week cortical tissue from WKY animals where as in cortical tissue from 6 and 9 week SHR animals only two amplicons were expressed, 485 and 280 bp, respectively. Differences in gene expression for 12 and 16 week WKY and SHR rats were also compared using identical primers. Five amplicons were expressed in cortical tissue from 12 and 16 week WKY rats with 1000, 900, 821, 485, and 430 bp where as in 12 and 16 week SHR animals only one amplicon was expressed at 485 bp. The present results imply (1) that H3 receptor density in cortical tissue of SHR animals increases with age where as the number of the expressed amplicons of the detected H3 receptor decreases; and (2) even though a decrease in number of expressed amplicons of the H3 receptor were observed, an increase in expression of the larger amplicon (~500 bp) is evident.

  8. Expression of prolactin receptors in normal canine mammary tissue, canine mammary adenomas and mammary adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Erika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary tumors represent the most common neoplastic disease in female dogs. Recently, the promoting role of prolactin (PRL in the development of human breast carcinoma has been shown. Possible proliferative, anti-apoptotic, migratory and angiogenic effects of PRL on human mammary cancer cells in vitro and in vivo were suggested. The effects of PRL are mediated by its receptor, and alterations in receptor expression are likely to play a role in tumor development. Currently, not much data is available about prolactin receptor (PRLR expression in canine mammary tumors. To set the basis for investigations on the role of PRL in mammary tumorigenesis in this species, prolactin receptor expression was evaluated by semi-quantitative real time PCR and immunohistochemistry on 10 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples each of canine non-neoplastic mammary tissue, mammary adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Results The highest PRLR expression levels were found in normal mammary tissue, while adenomas, and to an even higher degree adenocarcinomas, showed a significant decrease in prolactin receptor expression. Compared to normal tissue, PRLR mRNA was reduced 2.4 fold (p = 0.0261 in adenomas and 4.8 fold (p = 0.008 in adenocarcinomas. PRLR mRNA expression was significantly lower in malignant than in benign lesions (p = 0.0165. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated PRLR expression in all three tissue types with signals mostly limited to epithelial cells. Conclusions Malignant transformation of mammary tissue was associated with a decline in prolactin receptor expression. Further studies are warranted to address the functional significance of this finding.

  9. Expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-8 isoforms and FGF receptors in human ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valve, E; Martikainen, P; Seppänen, J; Oksjoki, S; Hinkka, S; Anttila, L; Grenman, S; Klemi, P; Härkönen, P

    2000-12-01

    FGF-8 is a mitogenic growth factor, which is widely expressed during embryonic development but only at a very low level in adult tissues. Alternative splicing of the human FGF-8 gene potentially allows coding for 4 protein isoforms (a, b, e, f), which differ in their transforming capacity. The FGF-8 isoforms preferentially activate the receptors FGFR1IIIc, FGFR2IIIc, FGFR3IIIc and FGFR4. FGF-8 is over-expressed in human breast and prostate cancers. Expression has also been found in RT-PCR studies of human ovarian and testicular cancers. The present study was undertaken to examine which FGF-8 isoforms are expressed in ovarian cancer and whether FGF-8 receptors are also expressed. Specimens from 5 normal human ovaries and 51 ovarian tumors (1 benign tumor, 8 borderline malignancies, 42 malignant tumors of different histopathological types) were studied by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. FGF-8 isoform b was expressed in all ovarian tumors and in all 7 ovarian-cancer cell lines studied. Isoform a was co-expressed in 9 malignant ovarian tumors. FGF-8 mRNA was not detected by RT-PCR of 3 normal ovary samples. Immunohistochemical staining localized FGF-8 protein to cancer cells. In general, the increased intensity of FGF-8 staining was associated with loss of differentiation within the tumors (Bowker's test, p = 0.37). FGF-8 staining of surface epithelium observed on 2 normal ovaries was very faint. RT-PCR showed that FGFR1IIIc, FGFR2IIIc and FGFR4 were the FGF-8 receptors expressed in normal ovaries and in ovarian tumors. FGF-8 receptor immunoreactivity was preferentially found in normal ovary surface epithelium and tumor cells but also in some stromal cells. Collectively, our results show that ovarian cancers of a wide variety of histological types expressing receptors for FGF-8 have acquired the capacity of expressing FGF-8. This suggests that FGF-8 has an important role in ovarian tumorigenesis.

  10. Expression of Adiponectin Receptors in Human Placenta and Its Possible Implication in Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa F. Al Husseini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Similar to obese patients and type 2 diabetic patients, adiponectin levels are reduced in former Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM patients and are lower in GDM women during late pregnancy compared with pregnant control subjects matched for BMI. Diabetic insult at later stages in gestation, such as may occur in gestational diabetes, will foremost lead to short-term changes in a variety of molecules for key functions including gene expression in the placenta. Approach: In this study we assessed the expression of adiponectin receptors in human placenta to identify the site (s of expression and to clarify the effect of gestational diabetes in this expression. This study was carried on 10 normoglycemic pregnant women and 20 GDM women. The placental tissue was collected immediately after delivery and tissue biopsies were taken from both fetal and maternal sides of each placenta. One step-RT-PCR for ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2 was done by Real Time PCR using Syber Green technique. Relative quantification of mRNA of the ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2 genes was measured using ABI7900 Real Time machine. Results: Both types of Adiponectin Receptors (ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2 are expressed in human placenta. ADIPOR1 is more highly expressed than ADIPOR2 in both fetal and maternal sides of GDM cases and normal pregnant women. ADIPOR1 mRNA expression was significantly up regulated in GDM women compared to normal pregnant women, whereas no significant difference in the expression of ADIPOR2 was detected between the two groups. There was no evidence of maternal-fetal side difference in the expression of adiponectin receptors in GDM cases but in normal pregnant women there is a statistically significant difference between both sides in the expression of both ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2. Conclusion: We concluded that adiponectin plays an important role in mediation the glucose metabolism in fetal tissues through its receptors, mainly Adiponectin Receptor 1 (ADIPOR1.

  11. Influence of ginsenoside on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and receptor tyrosine kinase B in the medial septum of aged rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Zeng; Haihua Zhao; Yongli Lü; Wenbo Dai

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been shown that ginsenoside, the effective component of ginseng, can enhance expression of choline acetyl transferase, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB), in cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain.OBJECTIVE: To qualitatively and quantitatively verify the influence of ginsenoside on expression of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, in the medial septum of aged rats, and to provide a molecular basis for clinical application.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A contrast study, which was performed in the Department of Anatomy, China Medical University, and the Department of Anatomy, Shenyang Medical College between December 2005 and May 2007.MATERIALS: Thirty-five, healthy, female, Sprague Dawley rats were selected for this study. Ginsenoside (81% purity) was provided by Jilin Ji'an Wantai Chinese Medicine Factory; anti-BDNF antibody, anti-TrkB antibody, and their kits were provided by Wuhan Boster Company.METHODS: A total of 35 rats were divided into three groups: young (four months old), aging (26 months old), and ginsenoside. Rats in the ginsenoside group were administered ginsenoside (25mg/kg/d) between 17 months and 26 months.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to measure expression of BDNF and TrkB in the medial septum of aged rats, and the detected results were expressed as gray values.RESULTS: ①Qualitative detection: using microscopy, degenerative neurons were visible in the medial septum in the aging group. However, neuronal morphology in the ginsenoside group was similar to neurons in the young group.②Quantitative detection: the mean gray value of BDNF-positive and TrkB-positive products in the aging group were significantly higher than in the young group (t=3.346,4.169, P<0.01); however, the mean gray value in the ginsenoside group was significantly lower than in the aging group (t=2.432,2.651, P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Ginsenoside can increase

  12. Expression and regulation of the decoy bone morphogenetic protein receptor BAMBI in the developing avian face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashihori, Norihisa; Song, Yiping; Richman, Joy M

    2008-05-01

    Here, we examine the expression and regulation of the gene BAMBI, a kinase-deficient decoy receptor capable of interacting with type I bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors in avian embryos. Initially, expression was limited to the endoderm during neurula and pharyngula stages. From embryonic day 3.5 (stage 20) and onward, BAMBI expression almost perfectly overlapped with known expression patterns for BMP4, particularly in the face and limbs. We performed bead implant experiments in the face to see which signals could be repressing or promoting expression of BAMBI. Our data point to retinoids and BMPs as being major positive regulators of BAMBI expression; however, fibroblast growth factor 2 acts to repress BAMBI. Furthermore, retinoic acid is likely to act directly on BAMBI as induction occurs in the presence of cycloheximide. The data suggested that BAMBI could be used to regulate Bmp signaling during tissue interactions that are an integral part of facial morphogenesis.

  13. Chemokine receptor expression on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talvani, Andre; Rocha, Manoel O C; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2004-01-15

    We evaluated the expression of chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4) on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) and noninfected individuals. Only CCR5 and CXCR4 expression was different on the surface of the subsets (CD4, CD8, and CD14) evaluated. Patients with mild CCC had elevated leukocyte expression of CCR5, compared with noninfected individuals or those with severe disease. CXCR4 expression was lower on leukocytes from patients with severe CCC. The differential expression of both receptors on leukocytes of patients with CCC was consistent and clearly correlated with the degree of heart function such that the lower the heart function, the lower the expression of either CCR5 or CXCR4. These results highlight the possible participation of the chemokine system in early forms of chagasic cardiomyopathy and the relevance of heart failure-induced remodeling in modifying immune parameters in infected individuals.

  14. Rabbit Forebrain cholinergic system : Morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, C; Hartig, W; Grosche, J; Luiten, PGM; Seeger, J; Brauer, K; Harkany, T; Härtig, Wolfgang; Keijser, Jan N.

    2003-01-01

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output p

  15. EXPRESSION OF VEGF RECEPTOR KDR IN DIFFERENT ORIGINATED CARCINOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Shumei; Wujian; Shou Chengchao

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To detect the expression of KDR in different originated carcinomas and to explore its expressed ways and the relationship with tumor progression. Methods: KDR cDNA (Ⅴ-Ⅶ domains)fragment was cloned from human umbilical vein with RTPCR and was expressed in Ecoli.Jm109. The fusion protein of GST-KDR was used for immunizing Balb/c mice to prepare monoclonal antibodies against KDR.The different tumor tissues and related normal tissues were examined with KDR McAb by S-P immunohistochemistry. Results: the rate and intensification of KDR expression among different originated cancers are very different, bladder cancers from transmigrated epidermis are 100% positive and highest intensification.The expression of KDR in breast cancer and intestinal cancer lie in the second-rate, the weakest expression of KDR is in lung squamous carcinoma. Moreover,expression of KDR in tumor tissues lie both in endothelial cells (EC) of tumor blood vessels and tumor cells.Conclusion: VEGF may be not only the para-secretory factor making EC proliferation but also auto-secretory factor stimulating the proliferation of tumor cells to benefit the growth and metastasis of malignant tumors.The different expression of KDR in different originated carcinomas may relate with malignant degree of tumor.

  16. Increased brain histamine H3 receptor expression during hibernation in golden-mantled ground squirrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anichtchik Oleg V

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibernation is a state of extremely reduced physiological functions and a deep depression of CNS activity. We have previously shown that the histamine levels increase in the brain during hibernation, as does the ratio between histamine and its first metabolite, suggesting increased histamine turnover during this state. The inhibitory histamine H3 receptor has both auto- and heteroreceptor function, rendering it the most likely histamine receptor to be involved in regulating the activity of histamine as well as other neurotransmitters during hibernation. In view of accumulating evidence that there is a global depression of transcription and translation during hibernation, of all but a few proteins that are important for this physiological condition, we reasoned that an increase in histamine H3 receptor expression would clearly indicate an important hibernation-related function for the receptor. Results In this study we show, using in situ hybridization, that histamine H3 receptor mRNA increases in the cortex, caudate nucleus and putamen during hibernation, an increase that is accompanied by elevated receptor binding in the cerebral cortex, globus pallidus and substantia nigra. These results indicate that there is a hibernation-related increase in H3 receptor expression in cortical neurons and in striatopallidal and striatonigral GABAergic neurons. GTP-γ-S binding autoradiography shows that the H3 receptors in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra can be stimulated by histamine throughout the hibernation cycle, suggesting that they are functionally active during hibernation. Conclusions These results show that the histamine H3 receptor gene is one of the few with a transcript that increases during hibernation, indicating an important role for the receptor in regulating this state. Moreover, the receptor is functionally active in the basal ganglia, suggesting a function for it in regulating e.g. dopaminergic transmission

  17. 豚鼠输尿管Cajal间质细胞毒蕈碱受体的表达及功能研究%Expression and function of muscarinic receptors in interstitial cells of Cajal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴康棋; 葛亮; 方强; 蒙明森; 鄢俊安; 李为兵

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究毒蕈碱受体在豚鼠输尿管Cajal间质细胞(ICC)上的表达,初步探讨ICC在胆碱能神经递质传递中的作用.方法 将20只豚鼠随机分成对照组和实验组,进行输尿管肌条实验,观察在卡巴胆碱作用下输尿管肌条的收缩幅度和频率的变化;10只豚鼠,将输尿管进行固定、撕片和荧光染色,检测豚鼠输尿管毒蕈碱受体亚型(M1~M5)在ICC上的表达情况.结果 卡巴胆碱作用后,实验组肌条的收缩幅度为0 g,频率为0次/分,对照组的幅度为(0.106±0.021)g,频率为(4.900±0.875)次/分,两组差异显著(P<0.01).免疫荧光双标显示,输尿管ICC仅表达M2、M3受体亚型.结论 胆碱能神经可能通过ICC来调控输尿管平滑肌.%Objective To study the expression of muscarinic receptors in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and to discuss preliminarily on the role of ICC in the transmission of cholinergic neurotransmitter. Methods Twenty guinea pigs were randomly divided into control and experiment group. The changes of ureteral muscle contraction amplitude and frequency were observed after applying ureteral muscle strip experiment in vitro. Fixation, tear film and fluorescence staining were performed on the ureters of 10 guinea pigs. The expressions of the muscarinic receptors subtypes (M1 ~ Ms) in ICC of guinea-pig ureters were detected. Results Statistical differences were observed between the two group in ureteral muscle contraction amplitude and frequency, which were (0) g and (0) per minute in experiment group and (0. 106 ±0. 021) g and ( 4. 900 ± 0. 875 ) per minute in control group ( P < 0. 01 ) . Immunofluorescence double labeling showed that ureteral ICC only expressed M2 and M3 receptor subtypes. Conclusion Cholinergic nerve may regulate ureteral smooth muscle by ICC.

  18. Erythropoietin and erythropoietin receptor expression in the guinea pig inner ear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Wagner, Niels; Lidegaard Frederiksen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    , this study determines expression of EPO and EPOR in the inner ear of the guinea pig. Normal guinea pig inner ears were processed for immunohistochemistry, using poly-clonal antibodies against EPO and the EPO receptor. EPO expression was exclusively found in most, but not all spiral ganglion neurons...... expressed by several cell types within the guinea pig cochlea. We hypothesize on the existence of a local paracrine system and that EPO treatment may be feasible following inner ear damage....

  19. Prognostic significance of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) expression in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yi; Xu, Zhe; Fan, Jin; Huang, Liu; Ye, Ming; Shi, Kun; Huang, Zheng; Liu, Yaqiong; He, Langchi; Huang, Jiezhen; Wang, Yibin; Li, Qiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) plays an important role in cancer development and metastasis. However, the correlation between DDR2 expression and clinical outcome in ovarian cancer has not been investigated. In this study, DDR2 expression was examined by Real-time PCR in surgically resected ovarian cancer and normal ovary tissues. Besides, DDR2 expression was analyzed immunohistochemically in 103 ovarian cancer patients, and the correlation between D...

  20. Maternal exposure to hexachlorophene targets intermediate-stage progenitor cells in the hippocampal neurogenesis involving myelin vacuolation of cholinergic and glutamatergic inputs in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Mizuho; Abe, Hajime; Itahashi, Megu; Kikuchihara, Yoh; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    Hexachlorophene (HCP) has been shown to induce myelin vacuolation due to intramyelinic edema of the nerve fibers in animal neural tissue. We investigated the maternal exposure effect of HCP on hippocampal neurogenesis in the offspring of pregnant mice supplemented with 0 (control), 33 or 100 ppm HCP in diet from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, offspring as examined in males exhibited decreased granule cell lineage populations expressing paired box 6, sex-determining region Y-box 2 and eomesodermin in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) accompanied by myelin vacuolation involving white matter tracts of the hippocampal fimbria at ≥ 33 ppm. However, SGZ cellular populations expressing brain lipid binding protein and doublecortin were unchanged at any dose. Transcript expression of cholinergic receptor genes, Chrna4 and Chrnb2, and glutamate receptor genes, Grm1 and Grin2d, examined at 100 ppm, decreased in the dentate gyrus. HCP exposure did not alter the number of proliferating or apoptotic cells in the SGZ, or reelin- or calcium-binding protein-expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons in the dentate hilus, on PND 21 and PND 77. All neurogenesis-related changes observed in HCP-exposed offspring on PND 21 disappeared on PND 77, suggesting that maternal HCP exposure at ≥ 33 ppm reversibly decreased type 2 intermediate-stage progenitor cells in the hippocampal neurogenesis. Myelin vacuolation might be responsible for changes in neurogenesis possibly by reducing ne