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Sample records for cholinergic muscarinic system

  1. Immunohistochemical localisation of cholinergic muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1r) in the guinea pig and human enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A M; Hutson, J M; Southwell, B R

    2007-07-01

    Little is known regarding the location of cholinergic muscarinic receptor 1 (M1r) in the ENS, even though physiological data suggest that M1rs are central to cholinergic neurotransmission. This study localised M1rs in the ENS of the guinea pig ileum and human colon using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR in human colon. Double labelling using antibodies against neurochemical markers was used to identify neuron subytpes bearing M1r. M1r immunoreactivity (IR) was present on neurons in the myenteric and submucosal ganglia. The two antibodies gave similar M1r-IR patterns and M1r-IR was abolished upon antibody preabsorption. M1r-IR was present on cholinergic and nNOS-IR nerve cell bodies in both guinea pig and human myenteric neurons. Presynaptic M1r-IR was present on NOS-IR and VAChT-IR nerve fibres in the circular muscle in the human colon. In the submucosal ganglia, M1r-IR was present on a population of neurons that contained cChAT-IR, but did not contain NPY-IR or calretinin-IR. M1r-IR was present on endothelial cells of blood vessels in the submucosal plexus. The localisation of M1r-IR in the guinea pig and human ENS shown in this study agrees with physiological studies. M1r-IR in cholinergic and nitrergic neurons and nerve fibres indicate that M1rs have a role in both cholinergic and nitrergic transmission. M1r-IR present in submucosal neurons suggests a role in mediating acetylcholine's effect on submucosal sensory and secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. M1r-IR present on blood vessel endothelial cells suggests that M1rs may also mediate acetylcholine's direct effect on vasoactivation.

  2. Muscarinic and dopaminergic receptor subtypes on striatal cholinergic interneurons

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    Dawson, V.L.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K. (Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, ND (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Unilateral stereotaxic injection of small amounts of the cholinotoxin, AF64A, caused minimal nonselective tissue damage and resulted in a significant loss of the presynaptic cholinergic markers (3H)hemicholinium-3 (45% reduction) and choline acetyltransferase (27% reduction). No significant change from control was observed in tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase activity; presynaptic neuronal markers for dopamine- and serotonin-containing neurons, respectively. The AF64A lesion resulted in a significant reduction of dopamine D2 receptors as evidenced by a decrease in (3H)sulpiride binding (42% reduction) and decrease of muscarinic non-M1 receptors as shown by a reduction in (3H)QNB binding in the presence of 100 nM pirenzepine (36% reduction). Saturation studies revealed that the change in (3H)sulpiride and (3H)QNB binding was due to a change in Bmax not Kd. Intrastriatal injection of AF64A failed to alter dopamine D1 or muscarinic M1 receptors labeled with (3H)SCH23390 and (3H)pirenzepine, respectively. In addition, no change in (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase was observed. These results demonstrate that a subpopulation of muscarinic receptors (non-M1) are presynaptic on cholinergic interneurons (hence, autoreceptors), and a subpopulation of dopamine D2 receptors are postsynaptic on cholinergic interneurons. Furthermore, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase are not localized to striatal cholinergic interneurons.

  3. [Cholinergic system of the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučera, Matej; Hrabovská, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The cholinergic system of the heart can be either of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. The neuronal cholinergic system in the heart is represented by preganglionic parasympathetic pathways, intracardiac parasympathetic ganglia and postganglionic parasympathetic neurons projecting to the atria, SA node and AV node. The non-neuronal cholinergic system consists of cardiomyocytes that have complete equipment for synthesis and secretion of acetylcholine. Current knowledge suggests that the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the heart affects the regulation of the heart during sympathetic activation. The non-neuronal cholinergic system of the heart plays also a role in the energy metabolism of cardimyocites. Acetylcholine of both neuronal and non-neuronal origin acts in the heart through muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. The effect of acetylcholine in the heart is terminated by cholinesterases acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Recently, papers suggest that the increased cholinergic tone in the heart by cholinesterase inhibitors has a positive effect on some cardiovascular disorders such as heart failure. For this reason, the cholinesterase inhibitors might be used in the treatment of certain cardiovascular disorders in the future.

  4. The role of muscarinic cholinergic signaling in cost-benefit decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobbs, Wambura

    Animals regularly face decisions that affect both their immediate success and long term survival. Such decisions typically involve some form of cost-benefit analysis and engage a number of high level cognitive processes, including learning, memory and motivational influences. While decision making has been a focus of study for over a century, it's only in the last 20 years that researchers have begun to identify functional neural circuits that subserve different forms of cost-benefit decision making. Even though the cholinergic system is both functionally and anatomically positioned to modulate cost-benefit decision circuits, the contribution of the cholinergic system to decision making has been little studied. In this thesis, I investigated the cognitive and neural contribution of muscarinic cholinergic signaling to cost-benefit decision making. I, first, re-examined the effects of systemic administration of 0.3 mg/kg atropine on delay and probability discounting tasks and found that blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by atropine induced suboptimal choices (impulsive and risky) in both tasks. Since the effect on delay discounting was restricted to the No Cue version of the delay discounting task, I concluded that muscarinic cholinergic signaling mediates both forms of cost-benefit decision making and is selectively engaged when decisions require valuation of reward options whose costs are not externally signified. Second, I assessed the impact of inactivating the nucleus basalis (NBM) on both forms decision making and the effect of injecting atropine locally into the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), or nucleus accumbens (NAc) core during the No Cue version of the delay discounting task. I discovered that although NBM inactivation failed to affect delay discounting, it induced risk aversion in the probability discounting task; and blockade of intra- NAc core, but not intra-OFC or intra-BLA, muscarinic cholinergic signaling lead to

  5. Cholinergic neurons of the pelvic autonomic ganglia and uterus of the female rat: distribution of axons and presence of muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papka, R E; Traurig, H H; Schemann, M; Collins, J; Copelin, T; Wilson, K

    1999-05-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) stimulates contraction of the uterus and dilates the uterine arterial supply. Uterine cholinergic nerves arise from the paracervical ganglia and were, in the past, characterized based on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry. However, the histochemical reaction for acetylcholinesterase provides only indirect evidence of acetylcholine location and is a nonspecific marker for cholinergic nerves. The present study: (1) reevaluated cholinergic neurons of the paracervical ganglia, (2) examined the cholinergic innervation of the uterus by using retrograde axonal tracing and antibodies against molecules specific to cholinergic neurons, choline acetyltransferase and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and (3) examined muscarinic receptors in the paracervical ganglia using autoradiography and a radiolabeled agonist. Most ganglionic neurons were choline acetyltransferase- and vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive and were apposed by choline acetyltransferase/vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive terminals. Retrograde tracing showed that some cholinergic neurons projected axons to the uterus. These nerves formed moderately dense plexuses in the myometrium, cervical smooth muscle and microarterial system of the uterine horns and cervix. Finally, the paracervical ganglia contain muscarinic receptors. These results clearly reveal the cholinergic innervation of the uterus and cervix, a source of these nerves, and demonstrate the muscarinic receptor content of the paracervical ganglia. Cholinergic nerves could play significant roles in the control of uterine myometrium and vasculature.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF MUSCARINIC CHOLINERGIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN RAT PROSTATE

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    Pontari, M.A.; LUTHIN, G. R.; Braverman, A. S.; Ruggieri, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the muscarinic receptor subtypes in the individual lobes of the rat prostate. Immunoprecipitation was performed on homogenates of these 3 lobes using antibodies to the m1-m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays (RT-PCR) were also performed using primers specific for each of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5). The susceptibility of the receptors to degradation by endogenous prostate proteas...

  7. Dorsal raphe nucleus acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission modulates post-ictal antinociception: The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-01-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is a key structure of the endogenous pain inhibitory system. Although the DRN is rich in serotoninergic neurons, cholinergic neurons are also found in that nucleus. Both ictal and inter-ictal states are followed by post-ictal analgesia. The present study investigated the role of cholinergic mechanisms in postictal antinociceptive processes using microinjections of atropine and mecamylamine, muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists, respectively, in the DRN of rats. Intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (at 64mg/kg) caused tonic and tonic-clonic seizures. The convulsive motor reactions were followed by an increase in pain thresholds, a phenomenon known as post-ictal analgesia. Pre-treatment of the DRN with atropine or mecamylamine at 1µg, 3µg and 5µg/0.2µL decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. The present results showed that the post-ictal analgesia was mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the DRN, a structure crucially involved in the neural network that organises post-ictal hypoalgesia.

  8. Cholinergic regulation of the vasopressin neuroendocrine system

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    Michels, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the physical and functional relationship between the cholinergic system, and the neurodocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus, a combination of experiments on receptor binding, localization and function were carried out. The putative nicotinic receptor probe (/sup 125/I)alpha bungarotoxin ((/sup 125/I)alpha BTX) bound with high affinity and specificity to the vasopressin and oxytocin magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus, nucleus circularis, and paraventricular nucleus. Binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha BTX within the neural lobe was very low. In contrast, the muscarinic cholinergic receptor probe (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinylbenzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) did not bind to magnocellular vasopressin and oxytocin cell groups. The median eminence, which contains the neurosecretory axons, and the neural lobe of the pituitary contain low levels of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. The physiological significance of these cholinergic receptors in regulation of vasopressin release was tested using an in vitro preparation of the supraoptic - neural lobe system.

  9. Muscarinic signaling influences the patterning and phenotype of cholinergic amacrine cells in the developing chick retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Andy J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies in the vertebrate retina have characterized the differentiation of amacrine cells as a homogenous class of neurons, but little is known about the genes and factors that regulate the development of distinct types of amacrine cells. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to characterize the development of the cholinergic amacrine cells and identify factors that influence their development. Cholinergic amacrine cells in the embryonic chick retina were identified by using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT. Results We found that as ChAT-immunoreactive cells differentiate they expressed the homeodomain transcription factors Pax6 and Islet1, and the cell-cycle inhibitor p27kip1. As differentiation proceeds, type-II cholinergic cells, displaced to the ganglion cell layer, transiently expressed high levels of cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP and neurofilament, while type-I cells in the inner nuclear layer did not. Although there is a 1:1 ratio of type-I to type-II cells in vivo, in dissociated cell cultures the type-I cells (ChAT-positive and CRABP-negative out-numbered the type-II cells (ChAT and CRABP-positive cells by 2:1. The relative abundance of type-I to type-II cells was not influenced by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh, but was affected by compounds that act at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In addition, the abundance and mosaic patterning of type-II cholinergic amacrine cells is disrupted by interfering with muscarinic signaling. Conclusion We conclude that: (1 during development type-I and type-II cholinergic amacrine cells are not homotypic, (2 the phenotypic differences between these subtypes of cells is controlled by the local microenvironment, and (3 appropriate levels of muscarinic signaling between the cholinergic amacrine cells are required for proper mosaic patterning.

  10. Nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are recruited by acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission within the locus coeruleus during the organisation of post-ictal antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-10-01

    Post-ictal antinociception is characterised by an increase in the nociceptive threshold that accompanies tonic and tonic-clonic seizures (TCS). The locus coeruleus (LC) receives profuse cholinergic inputs from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. Different concentrations (1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL) of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist atropine and the nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonist mecamylamine were microinjected into the LC of Wistar rats to investigate the role of cholinergic mechanisms in the severity of TCS and the post-ictal antinociceptive response. Five minutes later, TCS were induced by systemic administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (64mg/kg). Seizures were recorded inside the open field apparatus for an average of 10min. Immediately after seizures, the nociceptive threshold was recorded for 130min using the tail-flick test. Pre-treatment of the LC with 1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL concentrations of both atropine and mecamylamine did not cause a significant effect on seizure severity. However, the same treatments decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. In addition, mecamylamine caused an earlier decrease in the post-ictal antinociception compared to atropine. These results suggest that muscarinic and mainly nicotinic cholinergic receptors of the LC are recruited to organise tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception.

  11. [Modulation of the cholinergic system during inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhinskaia, G I; Vladykin, A L; Sapronov, N S

    2008-01-01

    This review describes the effects of realization of the central and peripheral "cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway" in a model of endotoxic and anaphylactic shock. Under endotoxic shock conditions, a pharmacological correction by means of the central m-cholinomimetic action (electrical stimulation of the distal ends of nervus vagus after bilateral cervical vagotomy, surgical implantation of the stimulant devise, activation of efferent vagal neurons by means of muscarinic agonist) is directed toward the elimination of LPS-induced hypotension. During the anaphylaxis, peripheral effects of the cholinergic system induced by blocking m-AChR on the target cells (neuronal and non-neuronal lung cells) and acetylcholinesterase inhibition are related to suppression of the bronchoconstrictor response. The role of immune system in the pathogenesis of endotoxic shock is associated with the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages, increase in IgM concentration, and complement activation, while the role in the pathogenesis of anaphylactic shock is associated with IgE, IgG1 augmentation. Effects of B cell stimulation may be important in hypoxia and in the prophylaxis of stress ulcers and other diseases. Plasma proteins can influence the effects of the muscarinic antagonist methacine: IgG enhance its action while albumin and CRP abolish it.

  12. Functional and laminar dissociations between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic neuromodulation in the tree shrew primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Bießmann, Felix; Veit, Julia; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine is an important neuromodulator involved in cognitive function. The impact of cholinergic neuromodulation on computations within the cortical microcircuit is not well understood. Here we investigate the effects of layer-specific cholinergic drug application in the tree shrew primary visual cortex during visual stimulation with drifting grating stimuli of varying contrast and orientation. We describe differences between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic effects in terms of both the layer of cortex and the attribute of visual representation. Nicotinic receptor activation enhanced the contrast response in the granular input layer of the cortex, while tending to reduce neural selectivity for orientation across all cortical layers. Muscarinic activation modestly enhanced the contrast response across cortical layers, and tended to improve orientation tuning. This resulted in highest orientation selectivity in the supra- and infragranular layers, where orientation selectivity was already greatest in the absence of pharmacological stimulation. Our results indicate that laminar position plays a crucial part in functional consequences of cholinergic stimulation, consistent with the differential distribution of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors function to enhance sensory representations arriving in the cortex, whereas muscarinic receptors act to boost the cortical computation of orientation tuning. Our findings suggest close homology between cholinergic mechanisms in tree shrew and primate visual cortices.

  13. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2 plays a crucial role in the development of myopia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veluchamy A. Barathi

    2013-09-01

    Myopia is a huge public health problem worldwide, reaching the highest incidence in Asia. Identification of susceptible genes is crucial for understanding the biological basis of myopia. In this paper, we have identified and characterized a functional myopia-associated gene using a specific mouse-knockout model. Mice lacking the muscarinic cholinergic receptor gene (M2; also known as Chrm2 were less susceptible to lens-induced myopia compared with wild-type mice, which showed significantly increased axial length and vitreous chamber depth when undergoing experimental induction of myopia. The key findings of this present study are that the sclera of M2 mutant mice has higher expression of collagen type I and lower expression of collagen type V than do wild-type mice and mice that are mutant for other muscarinic subtypes, and, therefore, M2 mutant mice were resistant to the development of experimental myopia. Pharmacological blockade of M2 muscarinic receptor proteins retarded myopia progression in the mouse. These results suggest for the first time a role of M2 in growth-related changes in extracellular matrix genes during myopia development in a mammalian model. M2 receptor antagonists might thus provide a targeted therapeutic approach to the management of this refractive error.

  14. Interaction of nerve agent antidotes with cholinergic systems.

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    Soukup, O; Tobin, G; Kumar, U K; Binder, J; Proska, J; Jun, D; Fusek, J; Kuca, K

    2010-01-01

    The poisoning with organophosphorus compounds represents a life threatening danger especially in the time of terroristic menace. No universal antidote has been developed yet and other therapeutic approaches not related to reactivation of acetylcholinesterase are being investigated. This review describes the main features of the cholinergic system, cholinergic receptors, cholinesterases and their inhibitors. It also focuses on the organophosphorus nerve agents, their properties, effects and a large part describes various possibilities in treatments, mainly traditional oxime therapies based on reactivation of AChE. Furthermore, non-cholinesterase coupled antidotal effects of the oximes are thoroughly discussed. These antidotal effects principally include oxime interactions with muscarinic and nicotinic receptors.

  15. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

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    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H. [and others

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  16. Subcellular redistribution of m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in striatal interneurons in vivo after acute cholinergic stimulation.

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    Bernard, V; Laribi, O; Levey, A I; Bloch, B

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of our work was to investigate how the cholinergic environment influences the targeting and the intracellular trafficking of the muscarinic receptor m2 (m2R) in vivo. To address this question, we have used immunohistochemical approaches at light and electron microscopic levels to detect the m2R in control rats and rats treated with muscarinic receptor agonists. In control animals, m2Rs were located mostly at postsynaptic sites at the plasma membrane of perikarya and dendrites of cholinergic and NPY-somatostatin interneurons as autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, respectively. Presynaptic receptors were also detected in boutons. The m2Rs were usually detected at extrasynaptic sites, but they could be found rarely in association with symmetrical synapses, suggesting that the cholinergic transmission mediated by m2R occurs via synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms. The stimulation of muscarinic receptors with oxotremorine provoked a dramatic alteration of m2R compartmentalization, including endocytosis with a decrease of the density of m2R at the membrane (-63%) and an increase of those associated with endosomes (+86%) in perikarya. The very strong increase of m2R associated with multivesicular bodies (+732%) suggests that oxotremorine activated degradation. The slight increase in the Golgi apparatus (+26%) suggests that the m2R stimulation had an effect on the maturation of m2R. The substance P receptor located at the membrane of the same neurons was unaffected by oxotremorine. Our data demonstrate that cholinergic stimulation dramatically influences the subcellular distribution of m2R in striatal interneurons in vivo. These events may have key roles in controlling abundance and availability of muscarinic receptors via regulation of receptor endocytosis, degradation, and/or neosynthesis. Further, the control of muscarinic receptor trafficking may influence the activity of striatal interneurons, including neurotransmitter release and/or electric activity.

  17. Cholinergic systems mediate action from movement to higher consciousness.

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    Woolf, Nancy J; Butcher, Larry L

    2011-08-10

    There is a fundamental link between cholinergic neurotransmitter function and overt and covert actions. Major cholinergic systems include peripheral motor neurons organizing skeletal muscle movements into overt behaviors and cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and mesopontine regions that mediate covert actions realized as states of consciousness, arousal, selective attention, perception, and memory. Cholinergic interneurons in the striatum appear to integrate conscious and unconscious actions. Neural network models involving cholinergic neurons, as well as neurons using other neurotransmitters, emphasize connective circuitry as being responsible for both motor programs and neural correlates of higher consciousness. This, however, is only a partial description. At a more fundamental level lie intracellular mechanisms involving the cytoskeleton, which are common to both muscle contraction and neuroplastic responses in targets of central cholinergic cells attendant with higher cognition. Acetylcholine, acting through nicotinic receptors, triggers interactions between cytoskeletal proteins in skeletal muscle cells, as has been long known. There is also evidence that acetylcholine released at central sites acts through muscarinic and nicotinic receptors to initiate responses in actin and microtubule proteins. These effects and their implications for cholinergic involvement in higher cognition are explored in this review.

  18. Association of m1 and m2 muscarinic receptor proteins with asymmetric synapses in the primate cerebral cortex: morphological evidence for cholinergic modulation of excitatory neurotransmission.

    OpenAIRE

    Mrzljak, L; Levey, A I; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic m1 receptors traditionally are considered to be postsynaptic to cholinergic fibers, while m2 receptors are largely presynaptic receptors associated with axons. We have examined the distribution of these receptor proteins in the monkey cerebral cortex and obtained results that are at odds with this expectation. Using immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies to recombinant m1 and m2 muscarinic receptor proteins, we have demonstrated that both m1 and m2 receptors are prominently ...

  19. Ultrastructural localization of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in rat brain cortical capillaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, PGM; deJong, GI; VanderZee, EA; vanDijken, H; Dijken, H. van

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation of the cerebrovasculature is known to regulate vascular tone, perfusion rate and permeability of the microvascular wall. Notably the cholinergic innervation of cerebral capillaries is of interest since these capillaries form the blood-brain barrier. Although there is a genera

  20. Muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists differentially mediate acquisition of fructose-conditioned flavor preference and quinine-conditioned flavor avoidance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, Francis M; Olsson, Kerstin; Vig, Vishal; Yenko, Ira; Pagirsky, Jeremy; Kohen, Ilanna; Aminov, Alon; Dindyal, Trisha; Bodnar, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Rats display both conditioned flavor preference (CFP) for fructose, and conditioned flavor avoidance (CFA) following sweet adulteration with quinine. Previous pharmacological analyses revealed that fructose-CFP expression was significantly reduced by dopamine (DA) D1 or D2 antagonists, but not NMDA or opioid antagonists. Fructose-CFP acquisition was significantly reduced by DA D1, DA D2 or NMDA antagonists, but not opioid antagonists. Quinine-CFA acquisition was significantly enhanced and prolonged by DA D1, NMDA or opioid, but not DA D2 antagonists. Cholinergic interneurons and projections interact with DA systems in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Further, both muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor signaling have been implicated in sweet intake and development of food-related preferences. Therefore, the present study examined whether systemic administration of muscarinic (scopolamine: SCOP) or nicotinic (mecamylamine: MEC) cholinergic receptor antagonists mediated fructose-CFP expression, fructose-CFP acquisition and quinine-CFA acquisition. For fructose-CFP expression, rats were trained over 10 sessions with a CS+ flavor in 8% fructose and 0.2% saccharin and a CS- flavor in 0.2% saccharin. Two-bottle choice tests with CS+ and CS- flavors mixed in 0.2% saccharin occurred following vehicle, SCOP (0.1-10mg/kg) and MEC (1-8mg/kg). For fructose-CFP acquisition, six groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg), MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) or a limited intake vehicle control 0.5h prior to 10 CS+ and CS- training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS+ and CS- choice tests in 0.2% saccharin. For quinine-CFA acquisition, five groups of rats received vehicle, SCOP (1 or 2.5mg/kg) or MEC (4 or 6mg/kg) 0.5h prior to 8 one-bottle CS- (8% fructose+0.2% saccharin: FS) and CS+ (fructose+saccharin+quinine (0.030%: FSQ) training sessions followed by six 2-bottle CS- and CS+ choice tests in fructose-saccharin solutions. Fructose-CFP expression was

  1. A comparison of β-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in tissues of brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the black river and old woman creek, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevens, Jeffery A.; Baumann, Paul C.; Jones, Susan B.

    1996-01-01

    β-Adrenoceptors (βARs) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors were measured in brain, gill, and heart tissues of brown bullhead catfish exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Black River, Ohio, USA, and were compared to values from Old Woman Creek, Ohio, a reference site. A decreased number of βARs were found in the gill from Black River fish, possibly indicating a compensatory response subsequent to chemical stress.

  2. Research progress of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in tumors%毒蕈碱胆碱受体与肿瘤关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何花; 张淑香

    2015-01-01

    非神经元性胆碱能信号通路与肿瘤关系密切,许多肿瘤细胞表达胆碱能自分泌环。肿瘤细胞自分泌及旁分泌乙酰胆碱,作用于自身或邻近细胞的烟碱胆碱受体及毒蕈碱胆碱受体,调节肿瘤细胞的增殖、血管发生及凋亡。毒蕈碱胆碱受体是 G 蛋白耦联受体,主要有 M1R-M5R 共5个亚型。研究发现毒蕈碱胆碱受体在肺癌、结肠癌、黑色素瘤、乳腺癌、卵巢癌、前列腺癌、胃癌和脑星形细胞瘤等多种恶性肿瘤中均有表达,与肿瘤细胞的增殖、迁移、血管发生、凋亡有密切关系,其中尤以毒蕈碱胆碱受体3最为重要,这为肿瘤的治疗提供了一个新的研究方向。%Non-neuronal cholinergic system is closely related with tumor.Many tumor cells express a cholinergic autocrine loop.Acetylcholine secreted by the tumor or neighboring cells interacts with nicotinic cholinergic receptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors (MRs)expressed on the tumor cells to stimulate tumor cells proliferation,angiogenesis,and apoptosis.MRs are G-protein-coupled receptors and five subtypes have been identified.Researches have found that MRs are expressed in a variety of tumors, such as lung cancer,colon cancer,melanoma,breast cancer,ovarian cancer,prostate cancer,gastric cancer, and brain cancer.M3R is the most important one.This may provide a new direction for the treatment of cancer.

  3. Muscarinic cholinergic neuromodulation reduces proactive interference between stored odor memories during associative learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, E; Hasselmo, M E

    2000-02-01

    Previous electrophysiological studies and computational modeling suggest the hypothesis that cholinergic neuromodulation may reduce olfactory associative interference during learning (M. E. Hasselmo, B. P. Anderson, & J. M. Bower, 1992; M. E. Hasselmo & J. M. Bower, 1993). These results provide behavioral evidence supporting this hypothesis. A simultaneous discrimination task required learning a baseline odor pair (A+B-) and then, under the influence of scopolamine, a novel odor pair (A-C+) with an overlapping component (A) versus a novel odor pair (D+E-) with no overlapping component. As predicted by the model, rats that received scopolamine (0.50 and 0.25 mg/kg) were more impaired at acquiring overlapping than nonoverlapping odor pairs relative to their performance under normal saline or methylscopolamine. These results support the prediction that the physiological effects of acetylcholine can reduce interference between stored odor memories during associative learning.

  4. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate inhibitory synaptic rhythms in hippocampus and neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley E Alger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors (mAChRs powerfully affects many neuronal properties as well as numerous cognitive behaviors. Small neuronal circuits constitute an intermediate level of organization between neurons and behaviors, and mAChRs affect interactions among cells that compose these circuits. Circuit activity is often assessed by extracellular recordings of the local field potentials (LFPs, which are analogous to in vivo EEGs, generated by coordinated neuronal interactions. Coherent forms of physiologically relevant circuit activity manifest themselves as rhythmic oscillations in the LFPs. Frequencies of rhythmic oscillations that are most closely associated with animal behavior are in the range of 4-80 Hz, which is subdivided into theta (4-14 Hz, beta (15-29 Hz and gamma (30-80 Hz bands. Activation of mAChRs triggers rhythmic oscillations in these bands in the hippocampus and neocortex. Inhibitory responses mediated by GABAergic interneurons constitute a prominent feature of these oscillations, and indeed, appear to be their major underlying factor in many cases. An important issue is which interneurons are involved in rhythm generation. Besides affecting cellular and network properties directly, mAChRs can cause the mobilization of endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids, eCBs that, by acting on the principal cannabinoid receptor of the brain, CB1R, regulate the release of certain neurotransmitters, including GABA. CB1Rs are heavily expressed on only a subset of interneurons and, at lower density, on glutamatergic neurons. Exogenous cannabinoids typically disrupt oscillations in the θ and Υ ranges, which probably contributes to the behavioral effects of these drugs. It is important to understand how neuronal circuit activity is affected by mAChR-driven eCBs, as this information will provide deeper insight into circuit behavior as the effects both eCBs and exogenous cannabinoids in intacts behavior. After

  5. The involvement of ventral tegmental area cholinergic muscarinic receptors in classically conditioned fear expression as measured with fear-potentiated startle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greba, Q; Munro, L J; Kokkinidis, L

    2000-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) contribute to the complex amygdala-based neurocircuitry that mediates fear-motivated behaviors. Because of acetylcholine's (ACh) role in DA neuronal activation, the involvement of VTA cholinergic muscarinic receptors in Pavlovian conditioned fear responding was evaluated in the present study. Fear-potentiated startle was used to assess the effects of intraVTA infused methylscopolamine on conditioned fear performance in laboratory rats. Application of this nonspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist to VTA neurons was observed to inhibit the ability of a conditioned stimulus (CS) previously paired with footshock to enhance the amplitude of the acoustic startle reflex. Doses of methylscopolamine that blocked conditioned fear expression did not alter baseline sensorimotor responding. These results identify ACh neurotransmission in the VTA as a potential excitatory mechanism underlying the fear-arousing properties of threatening environmental stimuli.

  6. The cholinergic system, circadian rhythmicity, and time memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, R. A.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the interaction between the mammalian cholinergic system and circadian system, and its possible role in time memory. Several studies made clear that circadian (daily) fluctuations in acetylcholine (ACh) release, cholinergic enzyme activity and cholinergic receptor

  7. Pharmacological characteristics of catalepsy induced by intracerebroventricular administration of histamine in mice: the importance of muscarinic step in central cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, K; Shinoda, H

    1991-05-01

    Histamine-induced catalepsy was antagonized potently by scopolamine, an antimuscarinic drug, and partially blocked by sparteine. Neither methylatropine nor antinicotinic drugs could reverse histamine-induced catalepsy. These results indicate the greater importance of muscarinic receptors rather than their nicotinic counterparts in histamine-induced catalepsy. Various antiparkinson drugs, i.e. biperiden and trihexyphenidyl, which have antimuscarinic activity or dopamine agonists, i.e. L-dopa, amantadine and bromocriptine, could antagonize the histamine-induced catalepsy to various degrees. Thus, catalepsy induced by icv histamine can be evoked not only by an activation of the histamine receptor, but also indirectly due to cholinergic and dopaminergic imbalance.

  8. ROLE OF CHOLINERGIC SYSTEM ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF MEMORY AND ITS INTERACTION WITH DOPAMINERGIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Z. Zangeneh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The central cholinergic system has been associated with cognitive function and memory and acetylcholine plays an important role during the early stages of memory consolidation. In this study, after training mice were tested with one way active avoidance procedure and retention were tested at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 24 hours of training and compared with non-shocked mice, in which it took 24 hours, a suitable time for retention test. Low dose administration of arecoline and physostigmine pre-training, immediate post-training and before retrieval showed that muscarinic agonist arecoline can potentiated memory in post trained and retrieval phases and reversible cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine potentiated memory only in retrieval phase. Scopolamine disrupted acetylcholine potentiation only in retrieval phase. In the second part of this study, the effect of dopaminergic system was investigated. Low dose of apomorphine and D2 agonist bromocriptine potentiated memory when administered immediately post-training, and D2 antagonist sulpiride impaired memory. When the cholinergic system was blocked by scopolamine immediately post-training, apomorphine and bromocriptine potentiated memory and sulpiride impaired it. In conclusion, these results suggest that, cholinergic system in retrieval phase is very critical and there was no interaction between the two systems in the post-training phase.

  9. Rabbit Forebrain cholinergic system : Morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, C; Hartig, W; Grosche, J; Luiten, PGM; Seeger, J; Brauer, K; Harkany, T; Härtig, Wolfgang; Keijser, Jan N.

    2003-01-01

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output p

  10. Evidence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the retinal centrifugal system of the chick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calaza K.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we characterize the presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR in the isthmo-optic nucleus (ION of chicks by immunohistochemistry with the M35 antibody. Some M35-immunoreactive fibers were observed emerging from the retinal optic nerve insertion, suggesting that they could be centrifugal fibers. Indeed, intraocular injections of cholera toxin B (CTb, a retrograde tracer, and double-labeling with M35 and CTb in the ION confirmed this hypothesis. The presence of M35-immunoreactive cells and the possible mAChR expression in ION and ectopic neuron cells in the chick brain strongly suggest the existence of such a cholinergic system in this nucleus and that acetylcholine release from amacrine cells may mediate interactions between retinal cells and ION terminals.

  11. Axonal transport of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat vagus nerve: high and low affinity agonist receptors move in opposite directions and differ in nucleotide sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarbin, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    The presence and transport of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites have been detected in the rat vagus nerve. These binding sites accumulate both proximal and distal to ligatures in a time-dependent manner. The results of double ligature and colchicine experiments are compatible with the notion that the anterogradely transported binding sites move by fast transport. Most of the sites accumulating proximal to ligatures bind the agonist carbachol with high affinity, while most of the sites accumulating distally bind carbachol with a low affinity. Also, the receptors transported in the anterograde direction are affected by a guanine nucleotide analogue (GppNHp), while those transported in the retrograde direction are less, or not, affected. The bulk of the sites along the unligated nerve trunk bind carbachol with a low affinity and are less sensitive to GppNHp modulation than the anterogradely transported sites. These results suggest that some receptors in the vagus may undergo axonal transport in association with regulatory proteins and that receptor molecules undergo changes in their binding and regulatory properties during their life cycle. These data also support the notion that the high and low affinity agonist form of the muscarinic receptor represent different modulated forms of a single receptor molecule.

  12. Hook-up of GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α for cholinergic muscarinic receptor-dependent LTD in the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanism underlying muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent LTD (mAChR-LTD in the hippocampus is less studied. In a recent study, a novel mechanism is described. The induction of mAChR-LTD required the activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, and the expression was mediated by AMPA receptor endocytosis via interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α. The hook-up of these proteins may result in the recruitment of leukocyte common antigen-related receptor (LAR, a PTP that is known to be involved in AMPA receptor trafficking. Interestingly, the similar molecular interaction cannot be applied to mGluR-LTD, despite the fact that the same G-protein involved in LTD is activated by both mAChR and mGluR. This discovery provides key molecular insights for cholinergic dependent cognitive function, and mAChR-LTD can serve as a useful cellular model for studying the roles of cholinergic mechanism in learning and memory.

  13. The effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine, and antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan, on the spinal cholinergic receptor system in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists produce spinal antinociception via mechanisms involving an increased release of intraspinal acetylcholine. The cholinergic receptor system interacts with several other receptor types, such as alpha2-adrenergic receptors. To fully understand these interactions, the effects...... of various receptor ligands on the cholinergic system must be investigated in detail. This study was initiated to investigate the effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine and the alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan on spinal cholinergic receptors...... in the rat. Spinal microdialysis was used to measure in vivo changes of acetylcholine after administration of the ligands, with or without nicotinic receptor blockade. In addition, in vitro binding properties of the ligands on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors were investigated. It was found that clonidine...

  14. Rabbit forebrain cholinergic system: morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Csaba; Härtig, Wolfgang; Grosche, Jens; Keijser, Jan; Luiten, Paul G M; Seeger, Johannes; Brauer, Kurt; Harkany, Tibor

    2003-06-09

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output pathways are still awaited. Therefore, we performed quantitative choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry to localize major cholinergic nuclei and to determine the number of respective cholinergic neurons in the rabbit forebrain. The density of ChAT-immunoreactive terminals in layer V of distinct neocortical territories and in hippocampal subfields was also measured. Another cholinergic marker, the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), was also employed to identify subsets of cholinergic neurons. Double-immunofluorescence labeling of ChAT and p75(NTR), calbindin D-28k (CB), parvalbumin, calretinin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), tyrosine hydroxylase, or substance P was used to elucidate the neuroanatomical borders of cholinergic nuclei and to analyze the neurochemical complexity of cholinergic cell populations. Cholinergic projection neurons with heterogeneous densities were found in the medial septum, vertical and horizontal diagonal bands of Broca, ventral pallidum, and magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN)/substantia innominata (SI) complex; cholinergic interneurons were observed in the caudate nucleus, putamen, accumbens nucleus, and olfactory tubercule, whereas the globus pallidus was devoid of cholinergic nerve cells. Cholinergic interneurons were frequently present in the hippocampus and to a lesser extent in cerebral cortex. Cholinergic projection neurons, except those localized in SI, abundantly expressed p75(NTR), and a subset of cholinergic neurons in posterior MBN was immunoreactive for CB and nNOS. A strict laminar distribution pattern of cholinergic terminals was recorded both in the cerebral cortex and in CA1-CA3 and dentate gyrus

  15. Effects of diazinon on the lymphocytic cholinergic system of Nile tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Ibarra, G A; Díaz-Resendiz, K J G; Pavón-Romero, L; Rojas-García, A E; Medina-Díaz, I M; Girón-Pérez, M I

    2016-08-01

    Fish rearing under intensive farming conditions can be easily disturbed by pesticides, substances that have immunotoxic properties and may predispose to infections. Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are widely used in agricultural activities; however, the mechanism of immunotoxicity of these substances is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diazinon pesticides (OPs) on the cholinergic system of immune cells as a possible target of OP immunotoxicity. We evaluated ACh levels and cholinergic (nicotinic and muscarinic) receptor concentration. Additionally, AChE activity was evaluated in mononuclear cells of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a freshwater fish mostly cultivated in tropical regions around the world. The obtained results indicate that acute exposure to diazinon induces an increase in ACh concentration and a decrease in nAChR and mAChR concentrations and AChE activity in fish immune cells, This suggests that the non-neuronal lymphocytic cholinergic system may be the main target in the mechanism of OP immunotoxicity. This study contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of immunotoxicity of pollutants and may help to take actions for animal health improvement.

  16. The Role of Muscarinic and Nicotinic Cholinergic Neurotransmission in Aversive Conditioning: Comparing Pavlovian Fear Conditioning and Inhibitory Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Matthew R.; Quinn, Jennifer J.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    Aversive conditioning is an ideal model for studying cholinergic effects on the processes of learning and memory for several reasons. First, deficits produced by selective lesions of the anatomical structures shown to be critical for Pavlovian fear conditioning and inhibitory avoidance (such as the amygdala and hippocampus) resemble those deficits…

  17. Rabbit Forebrain cholinergic system: Morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    C. Varga; Hartig, W.; Grosche, J.; Luiten, PGM; Seeger, J.; K. Brauer; Harkany, T.; Härtig, Wolfgang; Keijser, Jan N.

    2003-01-01

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output pathways are still awaited. Therefore, we performed quantitative choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry to localize major cholinergic nuclei and to determine the number of respective c...

  18. Central activation of the sympathetic nervous system including the adrenals in anaesthetized guinea pigs by the muscarinic agonist talsaclidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walland, A; Pieper, M P

    1998-04-01

    Talsaclidine, a novel M1-receptor selective muscarinic agonist for cholinergic substitution therapy of Alzheimer's disease, activates the sympathetic nervous system in guinea pigs and dogs at the orthosympathic ganglia and the paraganglionic adrenals. Results from guinea pigs provide indirect evidence for an additional central site of action. The present investigation in anaesthetized and vagotomized guinea pigs intended to demonstrate central activation of the sympathetic nervous system directly by comparing the blood pressure effects of intracerebroventricular and intravenous injections of small doses of talsaclidine. Increasing doses of 0.2 and 0.6 mg/kg talsaclidine were injected alternately into the third cerebral ventricle and intravenously in 6 guinea pigs before and after blockade of peripheral muscarinic receptors with 1 mg/kg ipratropium bromide i.v. In another group of 6 animals the injections were given into the cisterna cerebellomedullaris using the same protocol. In both groups central administration of talsaclidine caused dose-related hypertension while intravenous injections were hypotensive. Ipratropium bromide, a peripheral antimuscarinic drug, reversed this hypotensive action of intravenous talsaclidine into hypertension, but did not inhibit the effects of central administration. In contrast, atropine, an antimuscarinic drug which passes the blood-brain barrier, abolished the effect of 0.6 mg/kg talsaclidine injected into the cisterna cerebellomedullaris of 8 guinea pigs. The hypertensive effect of a first injection of 0.6 mg/kg talsaclidine into the cisterna cerebellomedullaris of 6 guinea pigs was approximately twice as large as that of a second given 90 min after bilateral adrenalectomy. Sham operation in another 6 animals was not inhibitory. The results demonstrate that talsaclidine, a selective muscarinic M1-receptor agonist, activates central parts of the sympathetic nervous system, including central projections of the adrenals by an action

  19. Individual and combined manipulation of muscarinic, NMDA, and benzodiazepine receptor activity in the water maze task: implications for a rat model of Alzheimer dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, D P; Ighanian, K; Boon, F

    2000-06-15

    Recent evidence indicates that Alzheimer disease typically involves different degrees of impairment in a variety of neurotransmitter systems, behaviors, and cognitive abilities in different patients. To investigate the relations between neurotransmitter system, behavioral, and cognitive impairments in an animal model of Alzheimer disease we studied spatial learning in a Morris water maze in male Long-Evans rats given neurochemical agents that targeted muscarinic cholinergic, NMDA, or benzodiazepine systems. Naive rats given a single agent or a combination of agents were severely impaired in place responding and had behavioral strategy impairments. Rats made familiar with the required water maze behavioral strategies by non-spatial pretraining performed as well as controls if given a single agent. Non-spatially pretrained rats with manipulation of both muscarinic cholinergic and NMDA or muscarinic cholinergic and benzodiazepine systems had a specific place response impairment but no behavioral strategy impairments. The results suggest that impairment of both muscarinic cholinergic and NMDA, or muscarinic cholinergic and benzodiazepine systems may model some aspects of human Alzheimer disease (impairments in navigation in familiar environments), but not other aspects of this disorder (global dementia leading to general loss of adaptive behavior). Previous research suggests that impairment of both muscarinic cholinergic and serotonergic systems may provide a better model of global dementia. The water maze testing and detailed behavioral analysis techniques used here appear to provide a means of investigating the contributions of various combinations of neurotransmitter system impairments to an animal model of Alzheimer disease.

  20. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-min LIANG; Su-yun LI; Ling-ling LAI; Juergen HESCHELER; Ming TANG; Chang-jin LIU; Hong-yan LUO; Yuan-long SONG; Xin-wu HU; Jiao-ya XI; Lin-lin GAO; Bin NIE

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Ica- L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of Ica-L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action.IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-Lcurrent by 71.2 %±9.2 % (n=8) and 11.3 %±2.5 % (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5 %±3.5 % (n=5) and 82.7 %±10.4 % (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on ICa-L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  1. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-minLIANG; MingTANG; Chang-jinLIU; Hong-yanLUO; Yuan-longSONG; Xin-wuHU; Jiao-yaXI; Lin-linGAO; BinNIE; Su-yunLI; Ling-lingLAI; JuergenHESCHELER

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record ICa-L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of lCa.L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action. IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L current by 71.2 %±9.2% (n=8) and 11.3%±2.5% (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5%±3.5% (n=5) and 82.7%± 10.4% (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on lca.L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on lCa.L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  2. Catalpol Induces Neuroprotection and Prevents Memory Dysfunction through the Cholinergic System and BDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role and mechanism of catalpol on neuroprotective effects and memory enhancing effects simultaneously, neuroprotective effects of catalpol were assessed by neurological deficits score, TTC staining, and cerebral blood flow detecting. Morris water maze was employed to investigate its effects on learning and memory and then clarify its possible mechanisms relating the central cholinergic system and BDNF. Edaravone and oxiracetam were used for positive control drugs based on its different action. Results showed that catalpol and edaravone significantly facilitated neurological function recovery, reduced infarction volume, and increased cerebral blood flow in stroke mice. Catalpol and oxiracetam decreased the escape latency significantly and increased the numbers of crossing platform obviously. The levels of ACh, ChAT, and BDNF in catalpol group were increased in a dose-dependent manner, and AChE declined with a U-shaped dose-response curve. Moreover, the levels of muscarinic AChR subtypes M1 and M2 in hippocampus were considerably raised by catalpol. These results demonstrated that catalpol may be useful for neuroprotection and memory enhancement, and the mechanism may be related to the central cholinergic system.

  3. Central cholinergic control of vasopressin release in conscious rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iitake, K.; Share, L.; Ouchi, Y.; Crofton, J.T.; Brooks, D.P.

    1986-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of carbachol into conscious rats evoked a substantial increase in vasopressin secretion and blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with the muscarinic blocker, atropine (10 g icv), but not by the nicotinic blocker, hexamethonium (10 g icv). Hexamethonium did, however, block the increase in blood pressure, the decrease in heart rate, and they very small elevation in the plasma vasopressin concentration induced by nicotine (10 g icv). These results indicate that stimulation of either central nicotinic or muscarinic receptors can affect the cardiovascular system and suggest that the cholinergic stimulation of vasopressin secretion may involve primarily muscarinic receptors in the conscious rat.

  4. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Orexin Neurons: Effects on Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Esposito, Teresa; Monda, Vincenzo; Esposito, Maria; Precenzano, Francesco; Carotenuto, Marco; Viggiano, Andrea; Chieffi, Sergio; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system has an important role in attentive functions. The cholinergic system can be activated by different inputs, and in particular, by orexin neurons, whose cell bodies are located within the postero-lateral hypothalamus. Recently the orexin-producing neurons have been proved to promote arousal and attention through their projections to the BF. The aim of this review article is to summarize the evidence showing that the orexin system contributes to attentional processing by an increase in cortical acetylcholine release and in cortical neurons activity. PMID:28197081

  5. The cholinergic system, sigma-1 receptors and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K.; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of present knowledge regarding the relationship between the cholinergic system and sigma-1 receptors, and discusses potential applications of sigma-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of memory deficits and cognitive disorders. Sigma-1 receptors, initially consider

  6. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion - Relation To D Cell/Somatostatin -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Takeuchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1~M5, and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1~M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT and M1-M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 µg/kg was given s.c. to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analogue was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analogue, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect

  7. Role of muscarinic-3 receptor antibody in systemic sclerosis: correlation with disease duration and effects of IVIG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumit; Singh, Jagmohan; Kedika, Ramalinga; Mendoza, Fabian; Jimenez, Sergio A; Blomain, Erik S; DiMarino, Anthony J; Cohen, Sidney; Rattan, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with autoantibodies against muscarinic-3 receptor (M3-R). We investigated the temporal course of the site of action of these autoantibodies at the myenteric neurons (MN) vs. the smooth muscle (SM) M3-R in relation to disease duration, and determined the role of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in reversing these changes. Immunoglobulins purified from SSc patients (SScIgG) were used to assess their differential binding to MN and SM (from rat colon) employing immunohistochemistry (IHC). Effect of SScIgG on neural and direct muscle contraction was determined by cholinergic nerve stimulation and bethanechol-induced SM contraction. Effects of IVIG and its antigen-binding fragment F(ab')2 on SScIgG binding were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of rat colonic longitudinal SM myenteric plexus (LSMMP) lysate and to second extracellular loop peptide of M3-R (M3-RL2). SScIgG from all patients demonstrated significantly higher binding to MN than to SM. With progression of SSc duration, binding at MN and SM increased in a linear fashion with a correlation coefficient of 0.696 and 0.726, respectively (P < 0.05). SScIgG-mediated attenuation of neural and direct SM contraction also increased with disease duration. ELISA analysis revealed that IVIG and F(ab')2 significantly reduced SScIgG binding to LSMMP lysate and M3-RL2. Dysmotility in SSc occurs sequentially, beginning with SScIgG-induced blockage of cholinergic neurotransmission (neuropathy), which progresses to inhibition of acetylcholine action at the SM cell (myopathy). IVIG reverses this cholinergic dysfunction at the neural and myogenic receptors by anti-idiotypic neutralization of SScIgG.

  8. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  9. Contribution of the Cholinergic System to Verbal Memory Performance in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Jessica; Lahr, Jacob; Minkova, Lora; Lauer, Eliza; Grothe, Michel J; Teipel, Stefan; Köstering, Lena; Kaller, Christoph P; Heimbach, Bernhard; Hüll, Michael; Normann, Claus; Nissen, Christoph; Reis, Janine; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-06-18

    Acetylcholine is critically involved in modulating learning and memory function, which both decline in neurodegeneration. It remains unclear to what extent structural and functional changes in the cholinergic system contribute to episodic memory dysfunction in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), in addition to hippocampal degeneration. A better understanding is critical, given that the cholinergic system is the main target of current symptomatic treatment in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. We simultaneously assessed the structural and functional integrity of the cholinergic system in 20 patients with MCI and 20 matched healthy controls and examined their effect on verbal episodic memory via multivariate regression analyses. Mediating effects of either cholinergic function or hippocampal volume on the relationship between cholinergic structure and episodic memory were computed. In MCI, a less intact structure and function of the cholinergic system was found. A smaller cholinergic structure was significantly correlated with a functionally more active cholinergic system in patients, but not in controls. This association was not modulated by age or disease severity, arguing against compensational processes. Further analyses indicated that neither functional nor structural changes in the cholinergic system influence verbal episodic memory at the MCI stage. In fact, those associations were fully mediated by hippocampal volume. Although the cholinergic system is structurally and functionally altered in MCI, episodic memory dysfunction results primarily from hippocampal neurodegeneration, which may explain the inefficiency of cholinergic treatment at this disease stage.

  10. Cholinergic Mechanisms in Spinal Locomotion - Potential Target for Rehabilitation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L M Jordan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a hyper-cholinergic state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in supressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed

  11. Postnatal lead exposure and the cholinergic system: effects on cholinergically mediated behaviors and cholinergic development and plasticity in the hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    A review of previous evidence suggested the possibility of a functional association between the behavioral effect of early lead (Pb) exposure, hippocampal damage and cholinergic deficiency. To further assess this possibility, Long-Evans hooded rat pups were exposed to Pb for the first 25 postnatal days via the maternal milk. Beginning at 65 days of age, animals were tested on behavioral tasks sensitive to both Pb exposure and cholinergic deficiency. Exposure to both levels of Pb impaired passive avoidance acquisition and produced lower rates of spontaneous alternation. The anticholinergic scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg) impaired passive avoidance acquisition, lowered the rate of spontaneous alternation and decreased open field activity scores in control animals. At 30 days of age, the brains of High Pb and control animals were processed for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry. Morphometric evaluation of the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus indicated no effects of Pb on the development of the cholinergic innervation of this brain region. The results provide strong evidence for the involvement of deficient cholinergic functioning in the behavioral changes observed following postnatal Pb exposure. Further, these findings indicate that a decrease in neuroanatomical plasticity may be a critical brain mechanism underlying the learning deficits observed following exposure to Pb.

  12. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 2; Quantitative Autoradiographic Analysis of Gaba (Benzodiazepine) and Muscarinic (Cholinergic) Receptors in the Forebrain of Rats Flown on Cosmos 2044

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Daunton, N. G.; Krasnov, I. B.; DAmelio, F.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of receptors for GABA and acetylcholine in the forebrain of rats flown on COSMOS 2044 was undertaken as part of a joint US-Soviet study to determine the effects of microgravity on the central nervous system, and in particular on the sensory and motor portions of the forebrain. Changes in binding of these receptors in tissue from animals exposed to microgravity would provide evidence for possible changes in neural processing as a result of exposure to microgravity. Tritium-labelled diazepam and Quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB) were used to visualize GABA (benzodiazepine) and muscarinic (cholinergic) receptors, respectively. The density of tritium-labelled radioligands bound to various regions in the forebrain of both flight and control animals were measured from autoradiograms. Data from rats flown in space and from ground-based control animals that were not exposed to microgravity were compared.

  13. Effects of beta-amyloid protein on M1 and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band complex of the rat: relationship with cholinergic, GABAergic, and calcium-binding protein perikarya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Iván; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia

    2007-06-01

    Cortical cholinergic dysfunction has been correlated with the expression and processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein. However, it remains unclear as to how cholinergic dysfunction and beta-amyloid (Abeta) formation and deposition might be related to one another. Since the M1- and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are considered key molecules that transduce the cholinergic message, the purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of the injected Abeta peptide on the number of M1mAchR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum-diagonal band (MS-nDBB) complex of the rat. Injections of Abeta protein into the retrosplenial cortex resulted in a decrease in M1mAChR and M2mAChR immunoreactivity in the MS-nDBB complex. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum nucleus (MS) and in the horizontal nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) as compared to the corresponding hemisphere in control animals and with that seen in the contralateral hemisphere, which corresponds to the PBS-injected side. Co-localization studies showed that the M1mAChR protein is localized in GABA-immunoreactive cells of the MS-nDBB complex, in particular those of the MS nucleus, while M2mAChR protein is localized in both the cholinergic and GABAergic cells. Moreover, GABAergic cells containing M2mAChR are mainly localized in the MS nucleus, while cholinergic cells containing M2mAChR are localized in the MS and the HDB nuclei. Our findings suggest that Abeta induces a reduction in M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-containing cells, which may contribute to impairments of cholinergic and GABAergic transmission in the MS-nDBB complex.

  14. The involvement of the central cholinergic system in the pressor and bradycardic effects of centrally administrated melittin in normotensive conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Murat; Erturk, Melih

    2007-04-01

    Recently we demonstrated that centrally administrated melittin, a phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activator, caused pressor and bradycardic effect in the normotensive conscious rats. In the current study we aimed to determine the mediation of central cholinergic system in the pressor and bradycardic effect of centrally administrated melittin. Studies were performed in normotensive male Sprague-Dawley rats. 1.5, 3.0 or 6.0microg/5.0microl doses of melittin were injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). Melittin caused dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and decrease in heart rate (HR). In order to test the mediation of central cholinergic system on the pressor and bradycardic effect of melittin, the rats were pretreated with mecamylamine (50microg; i.c.v.), cholinergic nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist, atropine sulfate (10microg; i.c.v.), a cholinergic nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist, hemicholinium-3 (20microg; i.c.v.), a high affinity neuronal choline uptake inhibitor, methyllycaconitine (10 and 25microg; i.c.v.) or alpha-bungarotoxin (10 and 25microg; i.c.v.), selective antagonists of alpha-7 subtype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7nAChRs), 15min prior to melittin (3.0microg) injection. Pretreatment with mecamylamine, hemicholinium-3, methyllycaconitine or alpha-bungarotoxin partially attenuated the pressor and bradicardia effect of elicited by melittin in the normotensive conscious rats whereas pretreatment with atropine had no effect. In conclusion, i.c.v. administration of melittin increases MAP and decreases HR in conscious rats. The activation of central nicotinic cholinergic receptors, predominantly alpha7nAChRs, partially acts as a mediator in the pressor responses to i.c.v. injection of melittin in the normotensive conscious rats. Moreover, decreased uptake of choline to the cholinergic terminals may consider that melittin activates central choline and acetylcholine release, as well.

  15. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cam-Etoz, B.; Isbil-Buyukcoskun, N.; Ozluk, K. [Department of Physiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle/Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-03-02

    Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g) female rats (N = 7 in each group) the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv) injected adrenomedullin (ADM) on blood pressure and heart rate (HR), and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors, peripheral V{sub 1} receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1) icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL) caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (ΔMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm). 2) Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP{sub 8-37}) and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM{sub 22-52}) blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3) The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv) and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv) prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv). 4) The V{sub 1} receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl{sup 1}, O-me-Tyr{sup 2},Arg{sup 8}]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg), that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V{sub 1} receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR.

  16. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Cam-Etoz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g female rats (N = 7 in each group the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv injected adrenomedullin (ADM on blood pressure and heart rate (HR, and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP receptors, peripheral V1 receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1 icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (DMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm. 2 Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM22-52 blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3 The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv. 4 The V1 receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl¹, O-me-Tyr²,Arg8]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg, that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V1 receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR.

  17. Nicotinic and muscarinic agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors stimulate a common pathway to enhance GluN2B-NMDAR responses

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Miledi, Ricardo; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2014-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms by which nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic systems facilitate learning and memory largely remain to be elucidated. This study identified a common signaling pathway stimulated by cognitive-enhancing drugs targeted to nicotinic and m1 muscarinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. Stimulation of this signaling pathway induces significant increases in glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl D-aspartate 2B (GluN2B)-containing NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated responses at...

  18. A cellular and regulatory map of the cholinergic nervous system of C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Laura; Kratsios, Paschalis; Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Sheftel, Hila; Mayo, Avi E; Hall, David H; White, John G; LeBoeuf, Brigitte; Garcia, L Rene; Alon, Uri; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-12-25

    Nervous system maps are of critical importance for understanding how nervous systems develop and function. We systematically map here all cholinergic neuron types in the male and hermaphrodite C. elegans nervous system. We find that acetylcholine (ACh) is the most broadly used neurotransmitter and we analyze its usage relative to other neurotransmitters within the context of the entire connectome and within specific network motifs embedded in the connectome. We reveal several dynamic aspects of cholinergic neurotransmitter identity, including a sexually dimorphic glutamatergic to cholinergic neurotransmitter switch in a sex-shared interneuron. An expression pattern analysis of ACh-gated anion channels furthermore suggests that ACh may also operate very broadly as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. As a first application of this comprehensive neurotransmitter map, we identify transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control cholinergic neurotransmitter identity and cholinergic circuit assembly.

  19. Regulation of TRP-like muscarinic cation current in gastrointestinal smooth muscle with special reference to PLC/InsP3/Ca2+ system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander V ZHOLOS

    2006-01-01

    Acetylcholine,the main enteric excitatory neuromuscular transmitter,evokes membrane depolarization and contraction of gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells by activating G protein-coupled muscarinic receptors.Although the cholinergic excitation is generally underlined by the multiplicity of ion channel effects,the primary event appears to be the opening of cation-selective channels;among them the 60 pS channel has been recently identified as the main target for the acetylcholine action in gastrointestinal myocytes.The evoked cation current,termed mICAT,causes either an oscillatory or a more sustained membrane depolarization response,which in turn leads to increases of the open probability of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels.thus providing Ca2+ entry in parallel with Ca2+ release for intracellular Ca2+ concentration rise and contraction.In recent years there have been several significant developments in our understanding of the signaling processes underlying mIcAT generation.They have revealed important synergistic interactions between M2 and M3 receptor subtypes,single channel mechanisms,and the involvement of TRPC-encoded proteins as essential components of native muscarinic cation channels.This review summarizes these recent findings and in particular discusses the roles of the phospholipase C/InsP3/intracellular Ca2+ release system in the mICAT physiological regulation.

  20. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based...... site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands to assess...... the roles of M(1), M(4), and M(5) receptors in various central processes that are under strong dopaminergic control. The outcome of these studies opens new perspectives for the use of novel muscarinic drugs for several severe disorders of the CNS....

  1. Cholinergic systems are essential for late-stage maturation and refinement of motor cortical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Dhakshin S; Conner, James M; Anilkumar, Arjun A; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies reported that early postnatal cholinergic lesions severely perturb early cortical development, impairing neuronal cortical migration and the formation of cortical dendrites and synapses. These severe effects of early postnatal cholinergic lesions preclude our ability to understand the contribution of cholinergic systems to the later-stage maturation of topographic cortical representations. To study cholinergic mechanisms contributing to the later maturation of motor cortical circuits, we first characterized the temporal course of cortical motor map development and maturation in rats. In this study, we focused our attention on the maturation of cortical motor representations after postnatal day 25 (PND 25), a time after neuronal migration has been accomplished and cortical volume has reached adult size. We found significant maturation of cortical motor representations after this time, including both an expansion of forelimb representations in motor cortex and a shift from proximal to distal forelimb representations to an extent unexplainable by simple volume enlargement of the neocortex. Specific cholinergic lesions placed at PND 24 impaired enlargement of distal forelimb representations in particular and markedly reduced the ability to learn skilled motor tasks as adults. These results identify a novel and essential role for cholinergic systems in the late refinement and maturation of cortical circuits. Dysfunctions in this system may constitute a mechanism of late-onset neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome and schizophrenia.

  2. Lesions of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in mice disrupt idiothetic navigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam S Hamlin

    Full Text Available Loss of integrity of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is a consistent feature of Alzheimer's disease, and measurement of basal forebrain degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging is emerging as a sensitive diagnostic marker for prodromal disease. It is also known that Alzheimer's disease patients perform poorly on both real space and computerized cued (allothetic or uncued (idiothetic recall navigation tasks. Although the hippocampus is required for allothetic navigation, lesions of this region only mildly affect idiothetic navigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that the cholinergic medial septo-hippocampal circuit is important for idiothetic navigation. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons were selectively lesioned in mice using the toxin saporin conjugated to a basal forebrain cholinergic neuronal marker, the p75 neurotrophin receptor. Control animals were able to learn and remember spatial information when tested on a modified version of the passive place avoidance test where all extramaze cues were removed, and animals had to rely on idiothetic signals. However, the exploratory behaviour of mice with cholinergic basal forebrain lesions was highly disorganized during this test. By contrast, the lesioned animals performed no differently from controls in tasks involving contextual fear conditioning and spatial working memory (Y maze, and displayed no deficits in potentially confounding behaviours such as motor performance, anxiety, or disturbed sleep/wake cycles. These data suggest that the basal forebrain cholinergic system plays a specific role in idiothetic navigation, a modality that is impaired early in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. The basal forebrain cholinergic system in aging and dementia : Rescuing cholinergic neurons from neurotoxic amyloid-beta 42 with memantine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakas, Csaba; Granic, Ivica; Halmy, Laszlo G.; Banerjee, Pradeep; Luiten, Paul G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The dysfunction and loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and their cortical projections are among the earliest pathological events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The evidence pointing to cholinergic impairments come from studies that report a decline in the activity of choli

  4. Enhanced muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression in the corpus striatum of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Jobin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acetylcholine (ACh, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, regulate the activities of central and peripheral functions through interactions with muscarinic receptors. Changes in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. Previous reports from our laboratory on streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats showed down regulation of muscarinic M1 receptors in the brainstem, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex and pancreatic islets. In this study, we have investigated the changes of acetylcholine esterase (AChE enzyme activity, total muscarinic and muscarinic M1 receptor binding and gene expression in the corpus striatum of STZ – diabetic rats and the insulin treated diabetic rats. The striatum, a neuronal nucleus intimately involved in motor behaviour, is one of the brain regions with the highest acetylcholine content. ACh has complex and clinically important actions in the striatum that are mediated predominantly by muscarinic receptors. We observed that insulin treatment brought back the decreased maximal velocity (Vmax of acetylcholine esterase in the corpus striatum during diabetes to near control state. In diabetic rats there was a decrease in maximal number (Bmax and affinity (Kd of total muscarinic receptors whereas muscarinic M1 receptors were increased with decrease in affinity in diabetic rats. We observed that, in all cases, the binding parameters were reversed to near control by the treatment of diabetic rats with insulin. Real-time PCR experiment confirmed the increase in muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression and a similar reversal with insulin treatment. These results suggest the diabetes-induced changes of the cholinergic activity in the corpus striatum and the regulatory role of insulin on binding parameters and gene expression of total and muscarinic M1 receptors.

  5. Orexin receptor activation generates gamma band input to cholinergic and serotonergic arousal system neurons and drives an intrinsic Ca2+-dependent resonance in LDT and PPT cholinergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eIshibashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculopontine (PPT tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4 - 14 Hz and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep and intracortical

  6. Blockade of GABA, type A, receptors in the rat pontine reticular formation induces rapid eye movement sleep that is dependent upon the cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, G A; Sachs, O W; Birabil, C G

    2008-09-22

    The brainstem reticular formation is an area important to the control of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The antagonist of GABA-type A (GABA(A)) receptors, bicuculline methiodide (BMI), injected into the rat nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of the reticular formation resulted in a long-lasting increase in REM sleep. Thus, one factor controlling REM sleep appears to be the number of functional GABA(A) receptors in the PnO. The long-lasting effect produced by BMI may result from secondary influences on other neurotransmitter systems known to have long-lasting effects. To study this question, rats were surgically prepared for chronic sleep recording and additionally implanted with guide cannulas aimed at sites in the PnO. Multiple, 60 nl, unilateral injections were made either singly or in combination. GABA(A) receptor antagonists, BMI and gabazine (GBZ), produced dose-dependent increases in REM sleep with GBZ being approximately 35 times more potent than BMI. GBZ and the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, produced very similar results, both increasing REM sleep for about 8 h, mainly through increased period frequency, with little reduction in REM latency. Pre-injection of the muscarinic antagonist, atropine, completely blocked the REM sleep-increase by GBZ. GABAergic control of REM sleep in the PnO requires the cholinergic system and may be acting through presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release.

  7. Brain region-specific alterations in the gene expression of cytokines, immune cell markers and cholinergic system components during peripheral endotoxin-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Harold A; Dancho, Meghan; Regnier-Golanov, Angelique; Nasim, Mansoor; Ochani, Mahendar; Olofsson, Peder S; Ahmed, Mohamed; Miller, Edmund J; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Golanov, Eugene; Metz, Christine N; Tracey, Kevin J; Pavlov, Valentin A

    2015-03-11

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by excessive peripheral immune responses are associated with diverse alterations in brain function, and brain-derived neural pathways regulate peripheral inflammation. Important aspects of this bidirectional peripheral immune-brain communication, including the impact of peripheral inflammation on brain region-specific cytokine responses, and brain cholinergic signaling (which plays a role in controlling peripheral cytokine levels), remain unclear. To provide insight, we studied gene expression of cytokines, immune cell markers and brain cholinergic system components in the cortex, cerebellum, brainstem, hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum and thalamus in mice after an intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide injection. Endotoxemia was accompanied by elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and other cytokines and brain region-specific increases in Il1b (the highest increase, relative to basal level, was in cortex; the lowest increase was in cerebellum) and Il6 (highest increase in cerebellum; lowest increase in striatum) mRNA expression. Gene expression of brain Gfap (astrocyte marker) was also differentially increased. However, Iba1 (microglia marker) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex, hippocampus and other brain regions in parallel with morphological changes, indicating microglia activation. Brain choline acetyltransferase (Chat ) mRNA expression was decreased in the striatum, acetylcholinesterase (Ache) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex and increased in the hippocampus, and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (Chrm1) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex and the brainstem. These results reveal a previously unrecognized regional specificity in brain immunoregulatory and cholinergic system gene expression in the context of peripheral inflammation and are of interest for designing future antiinflammatory approaches.

  8. The cholinergic REM induction test with RS 86 after scopolamine pretreatment in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, D; Hohagen, F; Fleckenstein, P; Schredl, M; Berger, M

    1991-09-01

    A shortened latency of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is one of the most stable biological abnormalities described in depressive patients. According to the reciprocal interaction model of non-REM and REM sleep regulation, REM sleep disinhibition at the beginning of the night in depression is a consequence of heightened central nervous system cholinergic transmitter activity in relation to aminergic transmitter activity. A recent study has indicated that muscarinic supersensitivity, rather than quantitatively enhanced cholinergic activity, may be the primary cause of REM sleep abnormalities in depression. The present study tested this hypothesis by treating healthy volunteers for 3 days with a cholinergic antagonist (scopolamine) in the morning, in an effort to induce muscarinic receptor supersensitivity. On the last day of scopolamine administration, RS 86, an orally active cholinergic agonist, was administered before bedtime to test whether this procedure would induce sleep onset REM periods. Whereas scopolamine treatment tended to advance REM sleep and to heighten REM density in healthy controls in comparison to NaCl administration, the additional cholinergic stimulation did not provoke further REM sleep disinhibition. This result underlines the need to take a hypofunction of aminergic transmitter systems into account in attempts to explain the pronounced advance of REM sleep typically seen in depressives.

  9. Huperzine A protects sepsis associated encephalopathy by promoting the deficient cholinergic nervous function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sen-Zhi; Huang, Wei-Ping; Huang, Lin-Qiang; Han, Yong-Li; Han, Qian-Peng; Zhu, Gao-Feng; Wen, Miao-Yun; Deng, Yi-Yu; Zeng, Hong-Ke

    2016-09-19

    Neuroinflammatory deregulation in the brain plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE). Given the mounting evidence of anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of the cholinergic nervous system, it is surprising that there is little information about its changes in the brain during sepsis. To elucidate the role of the cholinergic nervous system in SAE, hippocampal choline acetyltransferase, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1, acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine were evaluated in LPS-induced sepsis rats. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, neuronal apoptosis, and animal cognitive performance were also assessed. Furthermore, therapeutic effects of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor Huperzine A (HupA) on the hippocampal cholinergic nervous function and neuroinflammation were evaluated. A deficiency of the cholinergic nervous function was revealed in SAE, accompanied with over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines, increase in neuronal apoptosis and brain cognitive impairment. HupA remarkably promoted the deficient cholinergic nervous function and attenuated the abnormal neuroinflammation in SAE, paralleled with the recovery of brain function. We suggest that the deficiency of the cholinergic nervous function and the abnormal neuroinflammation are synergistically implicated in the pathogenesis of SAE. Thus, HupA is a potential therapeutic candidate for SAE, as it improves the deficient cholinergic nervous function and exerts anti-inflammatory action.

  10. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Croy, Carrie Hughes; Dencker, Ditte;

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R)-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane...

  11. Immunohistochemical localisation of pre-synaptic muscarinic receptor subtype-2 (M2r) in the enteric nervous system of guinea-pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A M; Hutson, J M; Southwell, B R

    2008-04-01

    The cholinergic muscarinic 2 receptor (M2r) is known to be present on smooth muscle cells in the intestine. Pharmacological studies also suggest that M2rs regulate transmitter release from nerves in the enteric nervous system. This study localised M2rs in the guinea-pig ileum using different antibodies and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Double labelling with antibodies against neurochemical markers was used to identify the type of nerves bearing M2r. Guinea-pig ileum were fixed, prepared for sections and wholemounts and incubated with antisera against the M2r sequence. Tissue was double labelled with antibodies against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), common choline acetyltransferase (cChAT), substance P (SP), synaptophysin and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Immunofluorescence was viewed using confocal microscopy. Abundant M2r-immunoreactivity (IR) was present on the surface of circular and longitudinal smooth muscle cells. M2r-IR was present in many but not all nerve fibres in the circular muscle and ganglia. M2r-IR was present in VAChT-IR and cChAT-IR cholinergic nerve fibres and SP-IR nerve fibres in the myenteric ganglia and submucosal ganglia. M2r-IR was present on a few nNOS-IR nerve fibres and around nNOS-IR neurons in the myenteric ganglia. In the circular muscle and deep muscular plexus, M2r-IR was present in many VAChT-IR and SP-IR nerve fibres and in few nNOS-IR nerves. M2rs are not only present on muscle cells in the intestine, but also on nerve fibres. M2rs may mediate cholinergic reflexes via their location on muscle and also via neural transmission. The pre-synaptic location supports pharmacological studies suggesting M2rs mediate neurotransmitter release from nerve fibres. The presence of M2rs on VAChT-IR, SP-IR and nNOS-IR-containing nerve fibres suggests M2rs may regulate ACh, SP and nitric oxide release.

  12. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  13. The cholinergic system is involved in regulation of the development of the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serobyan, Naira; Jagannathan, Suchitra; Orlovskaya, Irina; Schraufstatter, Ingrid; Skok, Marina; Loring, Jeanne; Khaldoyanidi, Sophia

    2007-05-30

    Gene expression profiling demonstrated that components of the cholinergic system, including choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), are expressed in embryonic stem cells and differentiating embryoid bodies (EBs). Triggering of nAChRs expressed in EBs by nicotine resulted in activation of MAPK and shifts of spontaneous differentiation toward hemangioblast. In vivo, non-neural nAChRs are detected early during development in fetal sites of hematopoiesis. Similarly, in vivo exposure of the developing embryo to nicotine resulted in higher numbers of hematopoietic progenitors in fetal liver. However postpartum, the number of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) was decreased, suggesting an impaired colonization of the fetal bone marrow with HSPCs. This correlated with increased number of circulating HSPC and decreased expression of CXCR4 that mediates migration of circulating cells into the bone marrow regulatory niche. In addition, protein microarrays demonstrated that nicotine changed the profile of cytokines produced in the niche. While the levels of IL1alpha, IL1beta, IL2, IL9 and IL10 were not changed, the production of hematopoiesis-supportive cytokines including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL3, IL6 and IGFBP-3 was decreased. This correlated with the decreased repopulating ability of HSPC in vivo and diminished hematopoietic activity in bone marrow cultures treated with nicotine. Interestingly, nicotine stimulated the production of IL4 and IL5, implying a possible role of the cholinergic system in pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Our data provide evidence that the nicotine-induced imbalance of the cholinergic system during gestation interferes with normal development and provides the basis for negative health outcomes postpartum in active and passive smokers.

  14. The modulatory role of M2 muscarinic receptor on apomorphine-induced yawning and genital grooming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, Maria Thereza; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Nasello, Antonia Gladys

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways in the induction of behavioral responses has been previously established. In the brain, M2 receptors are found predominantly in presynaptic cholinergic neurons as autoreceptors, and in dopaminergic neurons as heteroceptors, suggesting a control role of acetylcholine and dopamine release, respectively. Our aim was to investigate the role of M2 receptors on the yawning and genital grooming of rats induced by apomorphine, a dopaminergic receptor agonist, focusing on the interaction between cholinergic and dopaminergic pathways. Initially, the effect of atropine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist, on yawning and genital grooming induced by apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.) was analyzed. Atropine doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before induction of the behavioral responses by apomorphine. Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were quantified over a 60 min period. Apomorphine-induced yawning was increased by low dose (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) but not by high doses (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) of atropine. Genital grooming was antagonized by 2 mg/kg i.p. of atropine and showed no changes at the other doses tested. Tripitramine, a selective M2 cholinergic antagonist, was used as a tool for distinguishing between M2 and all other muscarinic receptor subtypes in yawning and genital grooming. Tripitramine doses of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.04 μmol/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.). Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were also quantified over a 60 min period. Tripitramine 0.01 μmol/kg increased all parameters. Higher doses, which possibly block all subtypes of muscarinic receptor, did not modify the response of apomorphine, suggesting a non-selective effect of tripitramine at these doses. Given that low doses of tripitramine increased the behavioral responses induced by apomorphine and that the main distribution of the M2

  15. Effects of histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidi, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Eidi, Akram; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem

    2003-03-28

    In the present study, the effects of the histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention in adult male rats were investigated. Post-training intracerebroventricular injections were carried out in all the experiments. Cholinoceptor agonist, acetylcholine (1-10 microg/rat) or nicotine (1-10 microg/rat), increased, while a cholinoceptor antagonist, scopolamine (5-20 microg/rat), decreased memory retention. The response to acetylcholine was attenuated by scopolamine. Administration of histamine (5-20 microg/rat) reduced, but the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, pyrilamine (10-50 microg/rat), and the histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine (1-50 microg/rat), increased memory retention in rats. The histamine receptor antagonists attenuated the response to histamine. Histamine reduced the acetylcholine- or nicotine-induced enhancement. The histamine receptor antagonists enhanced the nicotine- or acetylcholine-induced response. Histamine potentiated the inhibitory effect induced by scopolamine. It is concluded that histaminergic and cholinergic systems have opposing effects on memory retention. Also, the histaminergic system elicits an interaction with the cholinergic system in memory retention.

  16. Involvement of a subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the antipsychotic-like effects of the M1/M4 preferring muscarinic receptor agonist xanomeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia;

    2011-01-01

    studies indicate that the M(4) muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtype (mAChR) modulates the activity of the dopaminergic system and that this specific mAChR subtype is involved in mediating the antipsychotic-like effects of xanomeline. A specific neuronal subpopulation that expresses M(4) mAChRs together...... with D(1) dopamine receptors seems to be especially important in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors. Using mutant mice that lack the M(4) mAChR only in D(1) dopamine receptor-expressing cells (D1-M4-KO), we investigated the role of this neuronal population in the antipsychotic-like effects...

  17. The catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis of bipolar disorder revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Janowsky, David S; Olivier, Berend; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2015-04-15

    Bipolar disorder is a unique illness characterized by fluctuations between mood states of depression and mania. Originally, an adrenergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis was postulated to underlie these different affective states. In this review, we update this hypothesis with recent findings from human and animal studies, suggesting that a catecholaminergic-cholinergic hypothesis may be more relevant. Evidence from neuroimaging studies, neuropharmacological interventions, and genetic associations support the notion that increased cholinergic functioning underlies depression, whereas increased activations of the catecholamines (dopamine and norepinephrine) underlie mania. Elevated functional acetylcholine during depression may affect both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a compensatory fashion. Increased functional dopamine and norepinephrine during mania on the other hand may affect receptor expression and functioning of dopamine reuptake transporters. Despite increasing evidence supporting this hypothesis, a relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems that could explain cycling between states of depression and mania is missing. Future studies should focus on the influence of environmental stimuli and genetic susceptibilities that may affect the catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance underlying cycling between the affective states. Overall, observations from recent studies add important data to this revised balance theory of bipolar disorder, renewing interest in this field of research.

  18. 毒蕈碱乙酰胆碱M2/M4受体亚型在调节脊髓背角神经元谷氨酸能递质释放中的作用%Role of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in regulating glutamatergic synaptic transmission in rat spinal dorsal horn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜威; 郭英; 袁维秀

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR) subtypes in the regulation of glutamatergic input to the spinal dorsal horn neurons and the possible mechanism.Methods Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings on acute spinal slice was utilized to investigate the effect of activation of mAChRs and blockade of M2/M4 subtypes on glutamatergic synaptic transmission in rat spinal dorsal horn neurons.Results The nonselective mAChRs agonist oxotremorine-M concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of monosynaptic and polysynaptic evoked glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in most of the neurons.The M2/M4 antagonist himbacine completely blocked the inhibitory effect of oxotremorine-M in 92.3% of monosynaptic and 75% of polysynaptic neurons in the spinal cord slices.In the remaining 16% neurons,himbacine partially blocked the inhibitory effect of oxotremorine-M.Conclusions Activation of mAChRs in the spinal cord attenuates synaptic glutamate release to the dorsal horn neurons mainly through M2 and M4 receptor subtypes,indicating that a presynaptic inhibition in the spinal cord may be involved in the regulation of nociception by the cholinergic system and mAChRs.%目的 研究毒蕈碱胆碱能受体(mAChRs)亚型对脊髓背角感觉神经元谷氨酸能突触传递的调节机制.方法 在急性切取的腰段脊髓切片上,利用全细胞膜片钳法记录mAChRs非特异性激动剂氢化震颤素M(Oxo-M)对脊髓背角浅层神经元谷氨酸能兴奋性突触后电流(eEPSCs)的影响,给予M2/M4受体特异性拮抗剂喜巴辛,观察mAChRs在脊髓背角浅层神经元谷氨酸能递质释放调节过程中的作用.结果 不同浓度Oxo-M使脊髓背角神经元单突触和多突触eEPSCs的幅度显著降低,其抑制强度呈浓度依赖性,喜巴辛可以拮抗Oxo-M对刺激诱发eEPSCs幅度的抑制作用,在记录的25个细胞中,92.3%的单突触细胞和75%的多突触细胞表现为Oxo-M

  19. No changes in lymphocyte muscarinic receptors and platelet monoamine oxidase-B examined as surrogate central nervous system biomarkers in a Faroese children cohort prenatally exposed to methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coccini, Teresa; Manzo, Luigi; Debes, Frodi;

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) are involved in the pathogenesis of neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Blood samples from 7-year-old exposed children were analyzed for platelet M....../or PCB exposure, whereas these markers are significantly altered in sustained exposure scenarios, as shown by clinical studies in drug addicts or patients treated with psychopharmacological agents....

  20. White Matter Damage in the Cholinergic System Contributes to Cognitive Impairment in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment, No Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Zhu, Zude; Teipel, Stefan J.; Yang, Jianwei; Xing, Yi; Tang, Yi; Jia, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Cholinergic deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), but the extent of involvement and underlying mechanism remain unclear. In this study, targeting the early stage of VCI, we determined regional atrophy within the basal forebrain and deficiency in cholinergic pathways in 25 patients with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (VCIND) compared to 24 healthy elderly subjects. By applying stereotaxic cytoarchitectonic maps of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NbM), no significant atrophy was identified in VCIND. Using probabilistic tractography analysis, our study tracked the two major white matter tracks which map to cholinergic pathways. We identified significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in VCIND. Mediation analysis demonstrated that FA in the tracked pathways could fully account for the executive dysfunction, and partly mediate the memory and global cognition impairment. Our study suggests that the fibers mapped to the cholinergic pathways, but not the NbM, are significantly impaired in VCIND. MRI-based in vivo tracking of cholinergic pathways together with NbM measurement may become a valuable in vivo marker for evaluating the cholinergic system in cognitive disorders. PMID:28289381

  1. Cholinergic dermographism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayou, S C; Kobza Black, A; Eady, R A; Greaves, M W

    1986-09-01

    We report a patient with cholinergic urticaria in whom stroking the skin produced a band of erythema studded with the small weals characteristics of cholinergic urticaria. This response was suppressed by pre-treatment with topical scopolamine. Light and electron microscopy of the weal showed mast cell degranulation and a moderate mononuclear cell infiltrate.

  2. The Mechanism of Interaction of Oximes with the Muscarinic-Cholinergic Complex in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-03

    4NMPB) 0 1 + app’A) 1. + KLapp (A) Where (M - [3H]-4NMPB)i and (M - [3H]-4NMPB)o are the specific bound [3H]- " 4NMPB measured in the presence and in...the absence of the agonist, respec- tively. a is the fraction of high affinity agonist binding sites. KHap and KLapp are the apparent affinity constant...of A to the high and low ai- nity binding sites, where: KHapp KLapp KH3 KL 3 I + K([ H]-4NMPB) 1 + K([ H]-4NMPB) K is the affinity constant of [3H

  3. Pharmacological identification of cholinergic receptor subtypes on Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Cole A; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; English, Connor; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster heart is a popular model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. Progress has been made in understanding the role of endogenous compounds in regulating cardiac function in this model. It is well characterized that common neurotransmitters act on many peripheral and non-neuronal tissues as they flow through the hemolymph of insects. Many of these neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), have been shown to act directly on the D. melanogaster larval heart. ACh is a primary neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates and at the neuromuscular junctions on skeletal and cardiac tissue. In insects, ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of sensory neurons and is also prominent in the CNS. A full understanding regarding the regulation of the Drosophila cardiac physiology by the cholinergic system remains poorly understood. Here we use semi-intact D. melanogaster larvae to study the pharmacological profile of cholinergic receptor subtypes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), in modulating heart rate (HR). Cholinergic receptor agonists, nicotine and muscarine both increase HR, while nAChR agonist clothianidin exhibits no significant effect when exposed to an open preparation at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In addition, both nAChR and mAChR antagonists increase HR as well but also display capabilities of blocking agonist actions. These results provide evidence that both of these receptor subtypes display functional significance in regulating the larval heart's pacemaker activity.

  4. A protein phosphatase is involved in the cholinergic suppression of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current sI(AHP) in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, M; Pedarzani, P

    2000-04-27

    The slow calcium-activated potassium current sI(AHP) underlies spike-frequency adaptation and has a substantial impact on the excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Among other neuromodulatory substances, sI(AHP) is modulated by acetylcholine acting via muscarinic receptors. The second-messenger systems mediating the suppression of sI(AHP) by muscarinic agonists are largely unknown. Both protein kinase C and A do not seem to be involved, whereas calcium calmodulin kinase II has been shown to take part in the muscarinic action on sI(AHP). We re-examined the mechanism of action of muscarinic agonists on sI(AHP) combining whole-cell recordings with the use of specific inhibitors or activators of putative constituents of the muscarinic pathway. Our results suggest that activation of muscarinic receptors reduces sI(AHP) in a G-protein-mediated and phospholipase C-independent manner. Furthermore, we obtained evidence for the involvement of the cGMP-cGK pathway and of a protein phosphatase in the cholinergic suppression of sI(AHP), whereas release of Ca(2+) from IP(3)-sensitive stores seems to be relevant neither for maintenance nor for modulation of sI(AHP).

  5. Altitude acclimatization improves submaximal cognitive performance in mice and involves an imbalance of the cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Narbona, R; Delgado-García, J M; López-Ramos, J C

    2013-06-15

    The aim of this work was to reveal a hypothetical improvement of cognitive abilities in animals acclimatized to altitude and performing under ground level conditions, when looking at submaximal performance, once seen that it was not possible when looking at maximal scores. We modified contrasted cognitive tasks (object recognition, operant conditioning, eight-arm radial maze, and classical conditioning of the eyeblink reflex), increasing their complexity in an attempt to find performance differences in acclimatized animals vs. untrained controls. In addition, we studied, through immunohistochemical quantification, the expression of choline acetyltransferase and acetyl cholinesterase, enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of acetylcholine, in the septal area, piriform and visual cortexes, and the hippocampal CA1 area of animals submitted to acute hypobaric hypoxia, or acclimatized to this simulated altitude, to find a relationship between the cholinergic system and a cognitive improvement due to altitude acclimatization. Results showed subtle improvements of the cognitive capabilities of acclimatized animals in all of the tasks when performed under ground-level conditions (although not before 24 h), in the three tasks used to test explicit memory (object recognition, operant conditioning in the Skinner box, and eight-arm radial maze) and (from the first conditioning session) in the classical conditioning task used to evaluate implicit memory. An imbalance of choline acetyltransferase/acetyl cholinesterase expression was found in acclimatized animals, mainly 24 h after the acclimatization period. In conclusion, altitude acclimatization improves cognitive capabilities, in a process parallel to an imbalance of the cholinergic system.

  6. Illuminating the role of cholinergic signaling in circuits of attention and emotionally salient behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eLuchicchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh signaling underlies specific aspects of cognitive functions and behaviors, including attention, learning, memory and motivation. Alterations in ACh signaling are involved in the pathophysiology of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. In the central nervous system, ACh transmission is mainly guaranteed by dense innervation of select cortical and subcortical regions from disperse groups of cholinergic neurons within the basal forebrain (e.g. diagonal band, medial septal, nucleus basalis and the pontine-mesencephalic nuclei, respectively. Despite the fundamental role of cholinergic signaling in the CNS and the long standing knowledge of the organization of cholinergic circuitry, remarkably little is known about precisely how ACh release modulates cortical and subcortical neural activity and the behaviors these circuits subserve. Growing interest in cholinergic signaling in the CNS focuses on the mechanism(s of action by which endogenously released ACh regulates cognitive functions, acting as a neuromodulator and /or as a direct transmitter via nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. The development of optogenetic techniques has provided a valuable toolbox with which we can address these questions, as it allows the selective manipulation of the excitability of cholinergic inputs to the diverse array of cholinergic target fields within cortical and subcortical domains. Here, we review recent papers that use the light-sensitive opsins in the cholinergic system to elucidate the role of ACh in circuits related to attention and emotionally salient behaviors. In particular, we highlight recent optogenetic studies which have tried to disentangle the precise role of ACh in the modulation of cortical-, hippocampal- and striatal-dependent functions.

  7. The facilitating effect of systemic administration of Kv7/M channel blocker XE991 on LTP induction in the hippocampal CA1 area independent of muscarinic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ming-Ke; Cui, Yong-Yao; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Liang; Lu, Yang; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2009-09-11

    A large amount of in vitro studies demonstrate suppression of M-current in hippocampal neurons by Kv7/M channel blocker results in depolarization of membrane potential and release of neurotransmitters, such as acetylcholine and glutamate, suggesting that Kv7/M channel may play important roles in regulating synaptic plasticity. In the present study, we examined the in vivo effect of Kv7/M channel inhibition on the long-term potentiation (LTP) induction at basal dendrites in hippocampal CA1 area of urethane-anaesthetized rats. The Kv7/M channel was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of XE991 (10mg/kg) and the LTP of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) was induced by supra-threshold high frequency stimulation (S1 HFS). A weak protocol which was just below the threshold for evoking LTP was used as sub-threshold high frequency stimulation (S2 HFS). XE991 did not significantly alter the slope of fEPSP and the magnitude of LTP induced by S1 HFS, suggesting that Kv7/M channel inhibition had little or no effect on glutamatergic transmission under basal conditions. However, XE991 could make S2 HFS evoke LTP even after the application of the muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptor antagonist scopolamine, suggesting that Kv7/M channel inhibition lowered the threshold for LTP induction and the effect was independent of muscarinic activation. Based on the above findings, we concluded that the facilitating effect of XE991 on LTP induction is not mediated by its ability to enhance the release of acetylcholine; therefore, Kv7/M channel blockers may provide a therapeutic benefit to cholinergic deficiency-related cognitive impairment, e.g., Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Interaction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with the glucocorticoid system in stress regulation and cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati ePaul

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of studies on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN have provided compelling evidence for their role in the etiology of stress, cognitive aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and other neurodegenerative diseases. BFCN project to a broad range of cortical sites and limbic structures, including the hippocampus, and are involved in stress and cognition. In particular, the hippocampus, the primary target tissue of the glucocorticoid stress hormones, is associated with cognitive function in tandem with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis modulation. The present review summarizes glucocorticoid and HPA axis research to date in an effort to establish the manner in which stress affects the release of acetylcholine, glucocorticoids, and their receptor in the context of cognitive processes. We attempt to provide the molecular interactive link between the glucocorticoids and cholinergic system that contributes to BFCN degeneration in stress-induced acceleration of cognitive decline in aging and AD. We also discuss the importance of animal models in facilitating such studies for pharmacological use, which could help decipher disease states and propose leads for pharmacological intervention.

  9. Interaction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with the glucocorticoid system in stress regulation and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Saswati; Jeon, Won Kyung; Bizon, Jennifer L; Han, Jung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial number of studies on basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons (BFCN) have provided compelling evidence for their role in the etiology of stress, cognitive aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other neurodegenerative diseases. BFCN project to a broad range of cortical sites and limbic structures, including the hippocampus, and are involved in stress and cognition. In particular, the hippocampus, the primary target tissue of the glucocorticoid stress hormones, is associated with cognitive function in tandem with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation. The present review summarizes glucocorticoid and HPA axis research to date in an effort to establish the manner in which stress affects the release of acetylcholine (ACh), glucocorticoids, and their receptor in the context of cognitive processes. We attempt to provide the molecular interactive link between the glucocorticoids and cholinergic system that contributes to BFCN degeneration in stress-induced acceleration of cognitive decline in aging and AD. We also discuss the importance of animal models in facilitating such studies for pharmacological use, to which could help decipher disease states and propose leads for pharmacological intervention.

  10. The organization of the brainstem and spinal cord of the mouse : Relationships between monoaminergic, cholinergic, and spinal projection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, VGJM; Ulfhake, B

    2006-01-01

    Information regarding the organization of the CNS in terms of neurotransmitter systems and spinal connections in the mouse is sparse, especially at the level of the brainstem. An overview is presented of monoaminergic and cholinergic systems in the brainstem and spinal cord that were visualized immu

  11. A cholinergic hypothesis of the unconscious in affective disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa eVakalopoulos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between distinct pharmacological systems are proposed as a key dynamic in the formation of unconscious memories underlying rumination and mood disorder, but also reflect the plastic capacity of neural networks that can aid recovery. An inverse and reciprocal relationship is postulated between cholinergic and monoaminergic receptor subtypes. M1-type muscarinic receptor transduction facilitates encoding of unconscious, prepotent behavioural repertoires at the core of affective disorders and ADHD. Behavioural adaptation to new contingencies is mediated by the classic prototype receptor: 5-HT1A (Gi/o and its modulation of m1-plasticity. Reversal of learning is dependent on increased phasic activation of midbrain monoaminergic nuclei and is a function of hippocampal theta. Acquired hippocampal dysfunction due to abnormal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis predicts deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory and executive function and further impairments to cognitive inhibition. Encoding of explicit memories is mediated by Gq/11 and Gs signalling of monoamines only. A role is proposed for the phasic activation of the basal forebrain cholinergic nucleus by cortical projections from the complex consisting of the insula and claustrum. Although controversial. recent studies suggest a common ontogenetic origin of the two structures and a functional coupling. Lesions of the region result in loss of motivational behaviour and familiarity based judgements. A major hypothesis of the paper is that these lost faculties result indirectly, from reduced cholinergic tone.

  12. Whole-Brain Monosynaptic Afferent Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rongfeng; Jin, Sen; He, Xiaobin; Xu, Fuqiang; Hu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS) robustly modulates many important behaviors, such as arousal, attention, learning and memory, through heavy projections to cortex and hippocampus. However, the presynaptic partners governing BFCS activity still remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized a recently developed rabies virus-based cell-type-specific retrograde tracing system to map the whole-brain afferent inputs of the BFCS. We found that the BFCS receives inputs from multiple cortical areas, such as orbital frontal cortex, motor cortex, and insular cortex, and that the BFCS also receives dense inputs from several subcortical nuclei related to motivation and stress, including lateral septum, central amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus, dorsal raphe, and parabrachial nucleus. Interestingly, we found that the BFCS receives inputs from the olfactory areas and the entorhinal–hippocampal system. These results greatly expand our knowledge about the connectivity of the mouse BFCS and provided important preliminary indications for future exploration of circuit function. PMID:27777554

  13. Effect of central muscarinic receptors on passive-avoidance learning deficits induced by prenatal pentylenetetrazol kindling in male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmotabbed, A; Mahmoodi, G; Mahmoodi, S; Mohammadi-Farani, A; Nedaei, S E; Pourmotabbed, T; Pourmotabbed, T

    2014-10-24

    Occurrence of the epileptic seizures during gestation might affect the neurodevelopment of the fetus resulting in cognitive problems for the child later in life. We have previously reported that prenatal pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindling induces learning and memory deficits in the children born to kindled mothers, later in life but the mechanisms involved in this processes are unknown. The cholinergic system plays a major role in learning and memory. The present study was performed to investigate the possible involvement of central muscarinic cholinergic receptors on learning and memory deficits induced by prenatal PTZ-kindling in male offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were kindled by repetitive i.p. injection of 25mg/kg of PTZ on day 13 of their pregnancy. The effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) microinjection of scopolamine and pilocarpine, muscarinic cholinergic receptors antagonist and agonist, respectively on passive-avoidance learning of pups were tested at 12weeks of age using shuttle-box apparatus. Our data showed that the retention latencies of pups that received scopolamine (2 or 3μg) were significantly reduced compared to those received normal saline (pkindled dams and suggest a central mechanism for the cognitive and memory dysfunction, associated with seizures during pregnancy.

  14. VTA GABA neurons modulate specific learning behaviours through the control of dopamine and cholinergic systems

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    Meaghan C Creed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic reward system is primarily comprised of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc as well as their afferent and efferent connections. This circuitry is essential for learning about stimuli associated with motivationally-relevant outcomes. Moreover, addictive drugs affect and remodel this system, which may underlie their addictive properties. In addition to DA neurons, the VTA also contains approximately 30% ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons. The task of signalling both rewarding and aversive events from the VTA to the NAc has mostly been ascribed to DA neurons and the role of GABA neurons has been largely neglected until recently. GABA neurons provide local inhibition of DA neurons and also long-range inhibition of projection regions, including the NAc. Here we review studies using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, pharmacogenetic and optogenetic manipulations that have characterized the functional neuroanatomy of inhibitory circuits in the mesolimbic system, and describe how GABA neurons of the VTA regulate reward and aversion-related learning. We also discuss pharmacogenetic manipulation of this system with benzodiazepines (BDZs, a class of addictive drugs, which act directly on GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons of the VTA. The results gathered with each of these approaches suggest that VTA GABA neurons bi-directionally modulate activity of local DA neurons, underlying reward or aversion at the behavioural level. Conversely, long-range GABA projections from the VTA to the NAc selectively target cholinergic interneurons (CINs to pause their firing and temporarily reduce cholinergic tone in the NAc, which modulates associative learning. Further characterization of inhibitory circuit function within and beyond the VTA is needed in order to fully understand the function of the mesolimbic system under normal and pathological conditions.

  15. Effects of superoxide generating systems on muscle tone, cholinergic and NANC responses in cat airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, V; Nakajima, T; Pucovsky, V; Onoue, H; Ito, Y

    2000-02-14

    To study the possible role of reactive oxygen species in airway hyperreactivity, we examined the effects of the superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)) generating systems, pyrogallol and xanthine with xanthine oxidase, on muscle tone, excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the cat airway. Smooth muscle contraction or non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxation evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were measured before or after O(2)(-) generating systems with or without diethydithiocarbamic acid (DEDTCA), an inhibitor of endogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD). Resting membrane potential or excitatory junction potential (EJP) were also measured in vitro. Both pyrogallol and xanthine/xanthine oxidase produced biphasic changes in basal and elevated (by 5-HT) muscle tone. After SOD pretreatment, both systems consistently produced a prolonged contraction, thereby indicating that O(2)(-) was converted to H(2)O(2) by the action of SOD and as a result the actions of O(2)(-) were lost but those of H(2)O(2) introduced. The O(2)(-) showed no significant effect on smooth muscle contraction or EJP evoked by EFS, however after DEDTCA pretreatment, it evoked initial enhancement followed by suppression of the contraction and EJP. DEDTCA pretreatment ameliorated the inhibitory action of pyrogallol and xanthine/xanthine oxidase on the NANC relaxation, probably because O(2)(-) could combine with endogenous NO to form peroxynitrite. These results indicate that the O(2)(-) generating systems have multiple actions, presumably due to the presence and simultaneous action of at least two different reactive oxygen species (O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2)). While H(2)O(2) seems to be responsible for elevation of muscle tone and augmentation of smooth muscle contraction by EFS, O(2)(-) inhibits muscle tone, cholinergic and NANC neurotransmission.

  16. Enhanced self-administration of alcohol in muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Cour, Cecilie; Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is known to alter alcohol-drinking behavior. It is not known if muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes have similar effects. The muscarinic M4 receptor is highly expressed in the brain reinforcement system......% and 10% alcohol in 60min sessions, 6 days/week, after having undergone a standard sucrose fading training procedure on a fixed ratio schedule. The mice were further subjected to an extinction period followed by a 1 day reinstatement trial. M4-/- mice consumed more alcohol at 5% and 8% compared to their M......-established. Moreover, the M4-/- mice displayed a reduced capacity to extinguish their alcohol-seeking behavior. Taken together, alcohol consumption is elevated in M4-/- mice, indicating that the M4 receptor is involved in mediating the reinforcing effects of alcohol. The M4 receptor should be further explored...

  17. The involvement of cholinergic neurons in the spreading of tau pathology

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    Diana eSimon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Long time ago, it was described the selective loss of cholinergic neurons during the development of Alzheimer disease. Recently, it has been suggested that tau protein may play a role in that loss of cholinergic neurons through a mechanism involving the interaction of extracellular tau with M1/M3 muscarinic receptors present in the cholinergic neurons. This interaction between tau and muscarinic receptors may be a way, although not the only one, to explain the spreading of tau pathology occurring in Alzheimer disease.

  18. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bryon; Molina-Fernández, Claudia; Ugalde, María Beatriz; Tognarelli, Eduardo I.; Angel, Cristian; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2015-01-01

    The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS), with an unconditioned stimulus (US). The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB), can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA) systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila. PMID:26380118

  19. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

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    Bryon Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS, with an unconditioned stimulus (US. The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB, can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila.

  20. Non-neuronal cholinergic system in airways and lung cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, Laura; Zorzetto, Michele; Inghilleri, Simona; Pozzi, Ernesto; Stella, Giulia Maria

    2013-08-01

    In the airway tract acetylcholine (ACh) is known to be the mediator of the parasympathetic nervous system. However ACh is also synthesized by a large variety of non-neuronal cells. Strongest expression is documented in neuroendocrine and in epithelial cells (ciliated, basal and secretory elements). Growing evidence suggests that a cell-type specific Ach expression and release do exist and act with local autoparacrine loop in the non-neuronal airway compartment. Here we review the molecular mechanism by which Ach is involved in regulating various aspects of innate mucosal defense, including mucociliary clearance, regulation of macrophage activation as well as in promoting epithelial cells proliferation and conferring susceptibility to lung carcinoma onset. Importantly this non-neuronal cholinergic machinery is differently regulated than the neuronal one and could be specifically therapeutically targeted.

  1. A review study on medicinal plants affecting amnesia through cholinergic system

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    Baradaran Azar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter modification is an important method for the treatment of memory loss or amnesia. Cholinomimetic drugs, particularly, acetylcholine esterase inhibitors are the mainstream in pharmacotherapy of amnesia. Donepezil, tacrine, galantamine, and rivastigmine are cholinesterase inhibitors which are widely used in the treatment of amnesia, however, their therapeutic effects are not significant. Therefore, other possibilities including herbal medicine sources have been considered for memory loss therapy. There are some Medicinal plants with cholinomimetic property which mostly possess antioxidant activity, too. These plants may not only ameliorate amnesia but also can be a good source for drug discovery. In this paper other than introducing the medicinal plants and their components affective on cholinergic system and effective on memory loss, their probable advantages over synthetic drugs are discussed.

  2. The role of the muscarinic system in regulating estradiol secretion varies during the estrous cycle: the hemiovariectomized rat model

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    Rodríguez Jorge O

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is evidence that one gonad has functional predominance. The present study analyzed the acute effects of unilateral ovariectomy (ULO and blocking the cholinergic system, by injecting atropine sulfate (ATR, on estradiol (E2 serum concentrations during the estrous cycle. The results indicate that ULO effects on E2 concentrations are asymmetric, vary during the estrous cycle, and partially depend on the cholinergic innervation. Perforation of the left peritoneum resulted in lower E2 serum concentrations in the three stages of the estrous cycle. At proestrus, unilateral or bilateral perforation of the peritoneum resulted in lower E2 serum concentrations. ULO of the right ovary (left ovary in situ resulted in significantly higher E2 concentrations than animals with ULO of the left ovary (right ovary in situ. ATR treatment to ULO rats on D1 resulted in a significant drop of E2 serum concentrations. ULO rats treated with ATR on D2 or P, resulted in an asymmetrical E2 secretion response; when the right ovary remained in situ an increase in E2 was observed, and a decrease when the left ovary remained in situ. The results obtained in the present study suggest that each ovary's ability to compensate the secretion of E2 from the missing ovary is different and varies during the estrous cycle. The results also suggest that the cholinergic system participates in regulating ovarian E2 secretion. Such participation varies according to the ovary remaining in situ and the stage of the estrous cycle of the animal. The results agree with previously stated hypothesis of a neural pathway arising from the peritoneum that participates in regulating E2 secretion, and also supports the idea of cross-talk between the ovaries, via a neural communication, that modulates E2 secretion.

  3. A cholinergic contribution to the circulatory responses evoked at the onset of handgrip exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianna, Lauro C; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    A cholinergic (muscarinic) contribution to the initial circulatory response to exercise in humans remains controversial. Herein, we posit that this may be due to exercise mode with a cholinergic contribution being important during isometric handgrip exercise, where the hyperemic response...... of the muscle is relatively small compared with the onset of leg cycling, where a marked increase in muscle blood flow rapidly occurs as a consequence of multiple redundant mechanisms. We recorded blood pressure (BP; brachial artery), stroke volume (pulse contour analysis), cardiac output, and systemic vascular...... resistance (SVR) in young healthy males, while performing either 20 s of isometric handgrip contraction at 40% maximum voluntary contraction (protocol 1; n = 9) or 20 s of low-intensity leg cycling exercise (protocol 2; n = 8, 42 ± 8 W). Exercise trials were conducted under control (no drug) conditions...

  4. Ethanol impairs muscarinic receptor-induced neuritogenesis in rat hippocampal slices: Role of astrocytes and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Gennaro; Guizzetti, Marina; Dao, Khoi; Mattison, Hayley A; Costa, Lucio G

    2011-12-01

    In an in vitro co-culture system of astrocytes and neurons, stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in astrocytes had been shown to cause neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons, and this effect was inhibited by ethanol. The present study sought to confirm these earlier findings in a more complex system, in vitro rat hippocampal slices in culture. Exposure of hippocampal slices to the cholinergic agonist carbachol (1mM for 24h) induced neurite outgrowth in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which was mediated by activation of muscarinic M3 receptors. Specifically, carbachol induced a >4-fold increase in the length of the longest neurite, and a 4-fold increase in the length of minor neurites and in the number of branches. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol (50mM) resulted in significant inhibition of the effects induced by carbachol on all parameters measured. Neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons is dependent on various permissive factors that are produced and released by glial cells. In hippocampal slices carbachol increased the levels of two extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin and laminin-1, by 1.6-fold, as measured by Western blot. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol significantly inhibited these increases. Carbachol-induced increases in levels of extracellular matrix proteins were antagonized by a M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist. Furthermore, function-blocking fibronectin or laminin-1 antibodies antagonized the effect of carbachol on neurite outgrowth. These results indicate that in hippocampal slices stimulation of muscarinic M3 receptors induces neurite outgrowth, which is mediated by fibronectin and laminin-1, two extracellular matrix proteins released by astrocytes. By decreasing fibronectin and laminin levels ethanol prevents carbachol-induced neuritogenesis. These findings highlight the importance of glial-neuronal interactions as important targets in the developmental neurotoxicity of alcohol.

  5. Ventral tegmental area cholinergic mechanisms mediate behavioral responses in the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, N A; Nunes, E J; Wickham, R J

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies revealed a causal link between ventral tegmental area (VTA) phasic dopamine (DA) activity and pro-depressive and antidepressant-like behavioral responses in rodent models of depression. Cholinergic activity in the VTA has been demonstrated to regulate phasic DA activity, but the role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in depression-related behavior is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether pharmacological manipulation of VTA cholinergic activity altered behavioral responding in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats received systemic or VTA-specific administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine (systemic; 0.06 or 0.125mg/kg, intra-cranial; 1 or 2μg/side), the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist scopolamine (2.4 or 24μg/side), or the nicotinic AChR antagonist mecamylamine (3 or 30μg/side), prior to the FST test session. In control experiments, locomotor activity was also examined following systemic and intra-cranial administration of cholinergic drugs. Physostigmine administration, either systemically or directly into the VTA, significantly increased immobility time in FST, whereas physostigmine infusion into a dorsal control site did not alter immobility time. In contrast, VTA infusion of either scopolamine or mecamylamine decreased immobility time, consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. Finally, the VTA physostigmine-induced increase in immobility was blocked by co-administration with scopolamine, but unaltered by co-administration with mecamylamine. These data show that enhancing VTA cholinergic tone and blocking VTA AChRs has opposing effects in FST. Together, the findings provide evidence for a role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in behavioral responses in FST.

  6. GABAA receptors are located in cholinergic terminals in the nucleus pontis oralis of the rat: implications for REM sleep control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2014-01-16

    The oral pontine reticular formation (PnO) of rat is one region identified in the brainstem as a rapid eye movement (REM) sleep induction zone. Microinjection of GABA(A) receptor antagonists into PnO induces a long lasting increase in REM sleep, which is similar to that produced by cholinergic agonists. We previously showed that this REM sleep-induction can be completely blocked by a muscarinic antagonist, indicating that the REM sleep-inducing effect of GABA(A) receptor antagonism is dependent upon the local cholinergic system. Consistent with these findings, it has been reported that GABA(A) receptor antagonists microdialyzed into PnO resulted in increased levels of acetylcholine. We hypothesize that GABA(A) receptors located on cholinergic boutons in the PnO are responsible for the REM sleep induction by GABA(A) receptor antagonists through blocking GABA inhibition of acetylcholine release. Cholinergic, varicose axon fibers were studied in the PnO by immunofluorescence and confocal, laser scanning microscopy. Immunoreactive cholinergic boutons were found to be colocalized with GABA(A) receptor subunit protein γ2. This finding implicates a specific subtype and location of GABA(A) receptors in PnO of rat in the control of REM sleep.

  7. Cholinergic involvement in vascular and glucoregulatory actions of insulin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Martin; Santuré, Marta; Pitre, Maryse; Nadeau, André; Bachelard, Hélène

    2006-02-01

    This study was designed to test the glucose metabolic and vasodilator actions of insulin in rats and its relation to cholinergic system-dependent mechanisms. The first group of rats had pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters implanted to determine blood pressure, heart rate, and regional blood flows. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique carried out in the absence or presence of atropine. The second group of rats was used to determine the cholinergic contribution to in vivo insulin-mediated glucose utilization in individual muscles. Glucose uptake was examined by using [(3)H]2-deoxy-D-glucose. Muscarinic cholinergic blockade was found to significantly (P = 0.002) reduce insulin sensitivity and to completely abrogate the renal (P = 0.008) and hindquarter (P = 0.02) vasodilator responses to euglycemic infusion of insulin. A significant reduction in insulin-stimulated in vivo glucose uptake was also noted in soleus (P = 0.006), quadriceps (P = 0.03), gastrocnemius (P = 0.02), and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) (P = 0.001) muscles, when insulin was infused at a rate of 4 mU . kg(-1) . min(-1), whereas at the rate of 16 mU . kg(-1) . min(-1), a significant reduction in glucose uptake was only observed in EDL (P = 0.03) and quadriceps (P = 0.01) muscles. Together, these results demonstrate a potential role for cholinergic involvement with physiological insulin actions in glucose clearance and blood flow regulation in rats.

  8. Reduction in choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity but not muscarinic-m2 receptor immunoreactivity in the brainstem of SIDS infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallard, C; Tolcos, M; Leditschke, J; Campbell, P; Rees, S

    1999-03-01

    The cholinergic neurotransmitter system is vital for several brainstem functions including cardiorespiratory control and central chemosensitivity. This study has examined aspects of the cholinergic neurotransmitter system in the brainstem of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and control infants. The cellular localisation and the optical density of the immunoreactivity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CHAT-IR) and the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 (m2-IR) in the medulla was described in 14 SIDS and 9 control cases. There was a reduction in the number of CHAT-IR neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (control: 71.2+/-8.3% vs SIDS: 46.1+/-5.3%) and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) (control: 77.2+/-5.0% vs SIDS: 52.5+/-7.4%) and reduced optical density of CHAT-IR in the hypoglossal nucleus (control: 0.20+/-0.01 vs SIDS; 0.14+/-0.02) in SIDS infants. In contrast there were no changes in the optical density of m2-IR in the hypoglossal nucleus, the DMV, or the arcuate nucleus. Hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus was observed in one SIDS infant. These results suggest that there is a specific defect in some cholinergic motor neurons in the medulla of SIDS infants. This could lead to abnormal control of cardiovascular and respiratory function and airway patency and may be one of the contributing factors in the etiology of SIDS.

  9. Targeting the non-neuronal cholinergic system in macrophages for the management of infectious diseases and cancer: challenge and promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Sandra; Reichrath, Jörg; Moussa, Amira-Talaat; Meier, Carola; Tschernig, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent key players of the immune system exerting highly effective defense mechanisms against microbial infections and cancer that include phagocytosis and programmed cell removal. Recent findings highlight the relevance of the non-neuronal cholinergic system for the regulation of macrophage function that opens promising new concepts for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. This mini review summarizes our present knowledge on this topic and gives an outlook on future developments.

  10. Ameliorative Effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cognitive Impairment: Role of Cholinergic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yang; Peng, Jian; Wang, Xiaona; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Tianyin

    2017-01-11

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce systemic inflammation, and therefore disrupt learning and memory processes. Ginsenoside Rg1, a major bioactive component of ginseng, is shown to greatly improve cognitive function. The present study was designed to further investigate whether administration of ginsenoside Rg1 can ameliorate LPS-induced cognitive impairment in the Y-maze and Morris water maze (MWM) task, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Results showed that exposure to LPS (500 μg/kg) significantly impaired working and spatial memory and that repeated treatment with ginsenoside Rg1 (200 mg/kg/day, for 30 days) could effectively alleviate the LPS-induced cognitive decline as indicated by increased working and spatial memory in the Y-maze and MWM tests. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rg1 treatment prevented LPS-induced decrease of acetylcholine (ACh) levels and increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Ginsenoside Rg1 treatment also reverted the decrease of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) protein expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of LPS-treated rats. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 has protective effect against LPS-induced cognitive deficit and that prevention of LPS-induced changes in cholinergic system is crucial to this ameliorating effect.

  11. Muscarinic receptors stimulate cell proliferation in the human urothelium-derived cell line UROtsa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Nicola; Bodei, Serena; Lucente, Alessandra; Michel, Martin C; Zani, Danilo; Simeone, Claudio; Cunico, Sergio Cosciani; Spano, PierFranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2011-10-01

    The widespread non-neuronal synthesis of acetylcholine (ACh) has changed the paradigm of ACh acting solely as a neurotransmitter. Indeed, the presence of ACh in many types of proliferating cells suggests a role for this neurotransmitter in the control of cell division. The parasympathetic system is a major pathway regulating micturition, but ACh-mediated control plays a more complex role than previously described, acting not only in the detrusor muscle, but also influencing detrusor function through the activity of urothelial muscarinic receptors. Here we investigated the role of muscarinic receptors in mediating cell proliferation in the human UROtsa cell line, which is a widely used experimental model to study urothelium physiology and pathophysiology. Our results demonstrate that UROtsa cells express the machinery for ACh synthesis and that muscarinic receptors, with the rank order of M3>M2>M5>M1=M4, are present and functionally linked to their known second messengers. Indeed, the cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (CCh) (1-100 μM) concentration-dependently raised IP(3) levels, reaching 66±5% over basal. The forskolin-mediated adenylyl cyclase activation was reduced by CCh exposure (forskolin: 1.4±0.14 pmol/ml; forskolin+100 μM CCh: 0.84±0.12 pmol/ml). CCh (1-100 μM) concentration-dependently increased UROtsa cell proliferation and this effect was inhibited by the non-selective antagonist atropine and the M(3)-selective antagonists darifenacin and J104129. Finally, CCh-induced cell proliferation was blocked by selective PI-3 kinase and ERK activation inhibitors, strongly suggesting that these intracellular pathways mediate, at least in part, the muscarinic receptor-mediated cell proliferation.

  12. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained...... to discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M(1)/M(4)-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M(1)-selective agonist...

  13. Muscarinic M3 receptor subtype gene expression in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, I; Mustafa, A; Riazi, M; Suliman, I; Sylvén, C; Adem, A

    2000-01-20

    The heart is an important target organ for cholinergic function. In this study, muscarinic receptor subtype(s) in the human heart were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our results demonstrated muscarinic receptor M2 and M3 subtype RNA in left/right atria/ventricles of donor hearts. Receptor autoradiography analysis using selective muscarinic ligands indicated an absence of M1 receptor subtype in the human heart. The level of muscarinic receptor binding in atria was two to three times greater than in ventricles. Our results suggest that muscarinic receptors in the human heart are of the M2 and M3 subtypes. This is the first report of M3 receptors in the human myocardium.

  14. Involvement of Cholinergic and Opioid System in γ-Terpinene-Mediated Antinociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Franceli de Brito Passos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature shows that the monoterpenes are great candidates for the development of new drugs for the treatment of various pathological processes, including painful conditions. The gamma terpinene (γ-TPN is a monoterpene present in plant species that have multiple pharmacological properties and has structural similarity to antinociceptive monoterpenes, such as limonene and alpha-phellandrene. The γ-TPN molecular mass was evaluated by mass spectrometry and showed a pseudomolecular ion with m/z 137.0 Da. The animals did not present any signs of acute toxicity at 2 g/kg, p.o. γ-TPN (1.562 to 50 mg/kg, p.o. showed an antinociceptive effect in the formalin, capsaicin, and glutamate tests. γ-TPN has antinociceptive action when administered by others routes in glutamate test. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of γ-TPN, the open field and rota-rod test were conducted and the γ-TPN did not show muscle relaxant activity or central depressant effect. To investigate the mechanisms of action, the animals were pretreated with naloxone, glibenclamide, atropine, mecamylamine, or L-arginine in the glutamate test. γ-TPN antinociception was inhibited in the presence of naloxone, glibenclamide, atropine, and mecamylamine. The results suggest that the γ-TPN (p.o. produced antinociceptive effect in models of chemical nociception through the cholinergic and opioid systems involvement.

  15. The Role of Gut Microflora and the Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Neuroendocrine System in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J; Nayi, Vipul R; Johnson, David A; Vinik, Aaron I

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic has drastically impacted the state of health care in the United States. Paralleling this epidemic is the incidence of diabetes mellitus, with a notable shift toward a much younger age of onset. While central to the pathogenesis of diabetes associated with obesity is the role of inflammation attributed to "adiposopathy." Emerging data suggest that changes in sympathetic/parasympathetic balance regulated by the brain precede changes in the inflammatory cascade. It has now been established that the gut microflora contributes significantly to the activation and inhibition of autonomic control and impact the set of the neuroinflammatory inhibitory reflex mediated by the cholinergic nervous system. There has been a paradigm shift toward further investigating commensal bacteria in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes mellitus and its complications, as dysbiosis is thought to play a pivotal role in diabetic-associated disorders. This paper is intended to evaluate the role of intestinal dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and examine the potential for restoration of balance via use of probiotics.

  16. The Role of Gut Microflora and the Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Neuroendocrine System in Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J.; Nayi, Vipul R.; Johnson, David A.; Vinik, Aaron I.

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic has drastically impacted the state of health care in the United States. Paralleling this epidemic is the incidence of diabetes mellitus, with a notable shift toward a much younger age of onset. While central to the pathogenesis of diabetes associated with obesity is the role of inflammation attributed to “adiposopathy.” Emerging data suggest that changes in sympathetic/parasympathetic balance regulated by the brain precede changes in the inflammatory cascade. It has now been established that the gut microflora contributes significantly to the activation and inhibition of autonomic control and impact the set of the neuroinflammatory inhibitory reflex mediated by the cholinergic nervous system. There has been a paradigm shift toward further investigating commensal bacteria in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes mellitus and its complications, as dysbiosis is thought to play a pivotal role in diabetic-associated disorders. This paper is intended to evaluate the role of intestinal dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and examine the potential for restoration of balance via use of probiotics. PMID:27375553

  17. Modulation of muscarinic system with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant attenuates depression in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramdeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies suggest that muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine is a rapidly acting antidepressant for the treatment-resistant depression. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the possibility of synergistic potential of scopolamine with antidepressants for the treatment of depression without memory impairment in mice. Materials and Methods: Antidepressants such as citalopram, duloxetine, fluvoxamine, and venlafaxine at their median effective dose that is 12.5, 42.8, 17.5, 15.7 mg/kg p.o., respectively, were evaluated in combination with scopolamine 0.2 mg/kg intraperitoneally for the synergistic potential for ameliorating depression in Swiss albino mice. A battery of tests including forced swim test (FST and tail suspension test (TST were performed in all the groups comprising vehicle control, scopolamine, antidepressants per se, and the combinations of antidepressants with scopolamine. This was followed by the locomotor activity and memory tests. Results: Behavioral studies indicated that only antidepressant venlafaxine with scopolamine resulted in 95.5% and 93.6% reduction in immobility time compared to the vehicle control in FST and TST, respectively. This is significant (P < 0.0001 synergistic hyper-additive antidepressive-like effect compared to scopolamine per se and venlafaxine per se treatment effects in antidepressant paradigms. All the data were evaluated using the one-way analysis of variance followed by individual comparisons using Tukey′s post-hoc test. Control open field studies demonstrated no significant increase in general locomotion after co-administration of the compounds. Step down avoidance paradigm confirmed that scopolamine at the selected dose has no cognition deficit in any mice. Conclusions: The dose of scopolamine selected for synergistic potential has no detrimental effect on memory. The present results suggest the concoction of scopolamine with venlafaxine for enhanced synergistic

  18. Hyperfunction of muscarinic receptor maintains long-term memory in 5-HT4 receptor knock-out mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Segu

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from dementia of Alzheimer's type express less serotonin 4 receptors (5-HTR(4, but whether an absence of these receptors modifies learning and memory is unexplored. In the spatial version of the Morris water maze, we show that 5-HTR(4 knock-out (KO and wild-type (WT mice performed similarly for spatial learning, short- and long-term retention. Since 5-HTR(4 control mnesic abilities, we tested whether cholinergic system had circumvented the absence of 5-HTR(4. Inactivating muscarinic receptor with scopolamine, at an ineffective dose (0.8 mg/kg to alter memory in WT mice, decreased long-term but not short-term memory of 5-HTR(4 KO mice. Other changes included decreases in the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, the required enzyme for acetylcholine synthesis, in the septum and the dorsal hippocampus in 5-HTR(4 KO under baseline conditions. Training- and scopolamine-induced increase and decrease, respectively in ChAT activity in the septum in WT mice were not detected in the 5-HTR(4 KO animals. Findings suggest that adaptive changes in cholinergic systems may circumvent the absence of 5-HTR(4 to maintain long-term memory under baseline conditions. In contrast, despite adaptive mechanisms, the absence of 5-HTR(4 aggravates scopolamine-induced memory impairments. The mechanisms whereby 5-HTR(4 mediate a tonic influence on ChAT activity and muscarinic receptors remain to be determined.

  19. Depression Case Control (DeCC) Study fails to support involvement of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) gene in recurrent major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Gaysina, Daria; Craddock, Nick; Farmer, Anne; Gray, Joanna; Gunasinghe, Cerisse; Hoda, Farzana; Jones, Lisa; Knight, Jo; Korszun, Ania; Owen, Michael J; Sterne, Abram; Craig, Ian W; McGuffin, Peter

    2009-04-15

    It has been suggested that alteration in the muscarinic-cholinergic system is involved in modulation of mood. Three studies have reported linkage on chromosome 7 with major depressive disorder (MDD) in or close to a region containing the muscarinic receptor CHRM2 gene. A haplotype of SNPs located in CHRM2 (rs1824024-rs2061174-rs324650) has been significantly associated with MDD in a previous study. We report the first study investigating this gene in a large, adequately powered, clinical depression case-control sample (n = 1420 cases, 1624 controls). Our data fail to support association with the CHRM2 polymorphisms previously implicated in the genetic aetiology of depression. It is possible our failure to replicate may be a consequence of differences in definition of the MDD phenotype and/or ethnic differences.

  20. Acupuncture effects on the hippocampal cholinergic system in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junying Wang; Junling Liu; Shuping Chen; Yonghui Gao; Fanying Meng; Lina Qiao

    2012-01-01

    The present study observed the effects of repeated electroacupuncture of Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34) on expression of hippocampal acetylcholinesterase, vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and muscarinic M1 receptor mRNA in chronic constrictive injury (neuropathic pain) and/or ovariotomy rats. Results demonstrated increased expression of hippocampal acetylcholinesterase, vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and muscarinic M1 receptor mRNA, as well as decreased pain threshold, in a rat model of chronic neuropathic pain after electroacupuncture. The effects of electroacupuncture increased with prolonged time, but the above-mentioned effects decreased in memory-deficient animals. Results indicated that repeated electroacupuncture has a cumulative analgesic effect, which is closely associated with upregulation of acetylcholinesterase and vesicular acetylcholine transporter activity, as well as M1 receptor mRNA expression and memory.

  1. Effects of Chemical Agents on the Cholinergic Neurotransmitter System: Mechanisms of Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-20

    changes in cholinergic neurochemistry (31). The former was observed in such symptoms as salivation, lacrimation and tremor and in measures of hypothermia...to the belladonna drugs occurs in man to a limited extent, e.g., patients with Parkinsonism may eventually receive daily doses of atropine or

  2. Dexmedetomidine controls systemic cytokine levels through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Hui; Hu, Bo; Li, Zhifeng; Li, Jianguo

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that dexmedetomidine exerted anti-inflammatory effect on several animal models with inflammation, but the mechanism is not clear. This study intends to elucidate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of dexmedetomidine through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To investigate this therapeutic potential of dexmedetomidine, a murine model of endotoxemia was established induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Animals were assigned to one of four protocols. Protocol one: animals were randomly assigned to control group, dexmedetomidine group, and sterile saline group (n=20 each), and these animals were used for survival analysis. The survival rate was assessed up to 120 h after endotoxin injection. Protocol two: animals were randomly assigned to one of four groups (n=16 each): group 1 (group Saline), treated with sterile saline 15 min prior to endotoxin treatment (10 mg kg(-1) over 2 min); group 2 (group Dex), treated with dexmedetomidine 15 min prior to endotoxin treatment; group 3 (group αBGT+Dex), treated with alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChR) antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin (αBGT, 1 μg/kg) 15 min prior to dexmedetomidine treatment; group 4 (group saline+Dex), treated with equivalent sterile saline 15 min prior to dexmedetomidine treatment. Protocol three: animals were randomly assigned to one of two groups (n=16 each): vagotomy group (group VNX+Dex), right cervical vagus nerve was exposed and transected; sham-operated group (group SHAM+Dex), the cervical vagus nerve was visualized, but was neither isolated from the surrounding tissues nor transected. Protocol four: animals were treated with dexmedetomidine (40 μg/kg) and sterile saline to observe the discharge activity of cervical vagus nerves by using BL-420F data acquisition and analysis system (n=16 each). In the survival analysis groups, the survival rate of dexmedetomidine group was significantly higher than that of the endotoxemia group (65 versus 25

  3. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. (Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine (USA))

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  4. Increased cocaine self-administration in M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene Sørensen; Thomsen, Morgane; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The reinforcing effects of cocaine are mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. Behavioral and neurochemical studies have shown that the cholinergic muscarinic M4 receptor subtype plays an important role in regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Objectives Here we investigated...... for the first time the involvement of M4 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine using chronic intravenous cocaine self-administration in extensively backcrossed M4 receptor knockout (M4 -/-) mice. Methods We evaluated acquisition of cocaine self-administration in experimentally naïve mice. Both cocaine...... self-administration and food-maintained operant behavior were evaluated under fixed ratio 1 (FR 1) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In addition, cocaine-induced dopamine release and cocaine-induced hyperactivity were evaluated. Results M4 -/- mice earned significantly more cocaine...

  5. A bio-behavioural investigation into the role of the cholinergic system in stress / Ilse Groenewald

    OpenAIRE

    Groenewald, Ilse

    2006-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that may follow exposure to severe emotional trauma and presents with various symptoms of anxiety, hyperarousal and cognitive anomalies. Interestingly, only 10-30% of an exposed population will go on to develop full-blown PTSD. Cholinergic neurotransmission is implicated in anxiety as well as other typical manifestations of PTSD, particularly cognitive changes. The frontal cortex and hippocampus regulate and in turn ar...

  6. Developmental Neurotoxicity of Tobacco Smoke Directed Toward Cholinergic and Serotonergic Systems: More Than Just Nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Card, Jennifer; Stadler, Ashley; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-09-01

    Tobacco smoke contains thousands of compounds in addition to nicotine, a known neuroteratogen. We evaluated the developmental neurotoxicity of tobacco smoke extract (TSE) administered to pregnant rats starting preconception and continued through the second postnatal week. We simulated nicotine concentrations encountered with second-hand smoke, an order of magnitude below those seen in active smokers, and compared TSE with an equivalent dose of nicotine alone, and to a 10-fold higher nicotine dose. We conducted longitudinal evaluations in multiple brain regions, starting in adolescence (postnatal day 30) and continued to full adulthood (day 150). TSE exposure impaired presynaptic cholinergic activity, exacerbated by a decrement in nicotinic cholinergic receptor concentrations. Although both nicotine doses produced presynaptic cholinergic deficits, these were partially compensated by hyperinnervation and receptor upregulation, effects that were absent with TSE. TSE also produced deficits in serotonin receptors in females that were not seen with nicotine. Regression analysis showed a profound sex difference in the degree to which nicotine could account for overall TSE effects: whereas the 2 nicotine doses accounted for 36%-46% of TSE effects in males, it accounted for only 7%-13% in females. Our results show that the adverse effects of TSE on neurodevelopment exceed those that can be attributed to just the nicotine present in the mixture, and further, that the sensitivity extends down to levels commensurate with second-hand smoke exposure. Because nicotine itself evoked deficits at low exposures, "harm reduction" nicotine products do not eliminate the potential for neurodevelopmental damage.

  7. A cholinergic contribution to the circulatory responses evoked at the onset of handgrip exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Lauro C; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H; Fisher, James P

    2015-04-01

    A cholinergic (muscarinic) contribution to the initial circulatory response to exercise in humans remains controversial. Herein, we posit that this may be due to exercise mode with a cholinergic contribution being important during isometric handgrip exercise, where the hyperemic response of the muscle is relatively small compared with the onset of leg cycling, where a marked increase in muscle blood flow rapidly occurs as a consequence of multiple redundant mechanisms. We recorded blood pressure (BP; brachial artery), stroke volume (pulse contour analysis), cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) in young healthy males, while performing either 20 s of isometric handgrip contraction at 40% maximum voluntary contraction (protocol 1; n = 9) or 20 s of low-intensity leg cycling exercise (protocol 2; n = 8, 42 ± 8 W). Exercise trials were conducted under control (no drug) conditions and following cholinergic blockade (glycopyrrolate). Under control conditions, isometric handgrip elicited an initial increase in BP (+5 ± 2 mmHg at 3 s and +3 ± 1 mmHg at 10 s, P mechanism is important for the BP and SVR responses at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise in humans.

  8. An increase in intracelluar free calcium ions modulated by cholinergic receptors in rat facial nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Da-wei; ZHOU Rui; LI Na; ZHANG Qiu-gui; ZHU Fu-gao

    2009-01-01

    Background Ca2+in the central nervous system plays important roles in brain physiology, including neuronal survival and regeneration in rats with injured facial motoneurons. The present research was to study the modulations of intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations by cholinergic receptors in rat facial nucleus, and the mechanisms of the modulations. Methods The fluorescence intensity of facial nucleus in Fluo-3 AM loaded acute brainstem slices was detected by applying intracellular free Ca2+ measurement technique via confocal laser scanning microscope. The changes of fluorescence intensity of facial nucleus indicate the average changes of intracellular free Ca2+ levels of the neurons. Results Acetylcholine was effective at increasing the fluorescence intensity of facial nucleus. Muscarine chlorlde induced a marked increase of fluorescence intensity in a concentration dependent fashion. The enhancement of fluorescence intensity by muscarine chloride was significantly reduced by thapsigargin (depletor of intracellular Ca2+ store; P0.05). And the increase of fluorescence intensity was also significantly inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 subtype selective antagonist; P0.05).Conclusions The data provide the evidence that muscarinic receptors may induce the increase of intracellular free Ca2+ levels through the Ca2+ release of intracellular Ca2+ stores, in a manner related to M1 and M3 subtypes of muscarinic receptors in rat facial nucleus. Nicotine may increase intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations via the influx of extracellular Ca2+ mainly across L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, in a manner related to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic receptors.

  9. Expression of the M3 Muscarinic Receptor on Orexin Neurons that Project to the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu-Wen E; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Chen, Jennifer Y S; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Hwang, Ling-Ling

    2016-05-01

    Activation of central cholinergic receptors causes a pressor response in rats, and the hypothalamus is important for this response. Projections from hypothalamic orexin neurons to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are involved in sympatho-excitation of the cardiovascular system. A small population of orexin neurons is regulated by cholinergic inputs through M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3 R). To elucidate whether the M3 R on orexin neurons is involved in cardiosympathetic regulation through the RVLM, we examined the presence of the M3 R on retrograde-labeled RVLM-projecting orexin neurons. The retrograde tracer was unilaterally injected into the RVLM. Within the hypothalamus, retrograde-labeled neurons were located predominantly ipsilateral to the injection side. In the anterior hypothalamus (-1.5 to -2.3 mm to the bregma), retrograde-labeled neurons were densely distributed in the paraventricular nuclei and scattered in the retrochiasmatic area. At -2.3 to -3.5 mm from the bregma, labeled neurons were located in the regions where orexin neurons were situated, that is, the tuberal lateral hypothalamic area, perifornical area, and dorsomedial nuclei. Very few retrograde-labeled neurons were observed in the hypothalamus at -3.5 to -4.5 mm from the bregma. About 19.5% ± 1.6% of RVLM-projecting neurons in the tuberal hypothalamus were orexinergic. The M3 R was present on 18.7% ± 3.0% of RVLM-projecting orexin neurons. Injection of a muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine, in the perifornical area resulted in a pressor response, which was attenuated by a pretreatment of atropine. We conclude that cholinergic inputs to orexin neurons may be involved in cardiosympathetic regulation through the M3 R on the orexin neurons that directly project to the RVLM.

  10. Mice Lacking M1 and M3 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Have Impaired Odor Discrimination and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wilson; Singh, Sanmeet; Keshav, Taj; Dewan, Ramita; Eberly, Christian; Maurer, Robert; Nunez-Parra, Alexia; Araneda, Ricardo C.

    2017-01-01

    The cholinergic system has extensive projections to the olfactory bulb (OB) where it produces a state-dependent regulation of sensory gating. Previous work has shown a prominent role of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs) in regulating the excitability of OB neurons, in particular the M1 receptor. Here, we examined the contribution of M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes to olfactory processing using mice with a genetic deletion of these receptors, the M1−/− and the M1/M3−/− knockout (KO) mice. Genetic ablation of the M1 and M3 mAChRs resulted in a significant deficit in odor discrimination of closely related molecules, including stereoisomers. However, the discrimination of dissimilar molecules, social odors (e.g., urine) and novel object recognition was not affected. In addition the KO mice showed impaired learning in an associative odor-learning task, learning to discriminate odors at a slower rate, indicating that both short and long-term memory is disrupted by mAChR dysfunction. Interestingly, the KO mice exhibited decreased olfactory neurogenesis at younger ages, a deficit that was not maintained in older animals. In older animals, the olfactory deficit could be restored by increasing the number of new born neurons integrated into the OB after exposing them to an olfactory enriched environment, suggesting that muscarinic modulation and adult neurogenesis could be two different mechanism used by the olfactory system to improve olfactory processing. PMID:28210219

  11. Decreased binding capacity (Bmax) of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in fibroblasts from boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jessica; Landgren, Magnus; Fernell, Elisabeth; Lewander, Tommy; Venizelos, Nikolaos

    2013-09-01

    Monoaminergic dysregulation is implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and methylphenidate and amphetamines are the most frequently prescribed pharmacological agents for treating ADHD. However, it has recently been proposed that the core symptoms of the disorder might be due to an imbalance between monoaminergic and cholinergic systems. In this study, we used fibroblast cell homogenates from boys with and without ADHD as an extraneural cell model to examine the cholinergic receptor density, that is, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). We found that the binding capacity (Bmax) of [³H] Quinuclidinyl benzilate (³H-QNB) to mAChRs was decreased by almost 50 % in the children with ADHD (mean = 30.6 fmol/mg protein, SD = 25.6) in comparison with controls [mean = 63.1 fmol/mg protein, SD = 20.5, p ≤ 0.01 (Student's unpaired t test)]. The decreased Bmax indicates a reduced cholinergic receptor density, which might constitute a biomarker for ADHD. However, these preliminary findings need to be replicated in larger ADHD and comparison cohorts.

  12. Acetylcholinesterase loosens the brain's cholinergic anti-inflammatory response and promotes epileptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehudit eGnatek

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show a key role of brain inflammation in epilepsy. However, the mechanisms controlling brain immune response are only partly understood. In the periphery, acetylcholine (ACh release by the vagus nerve restrains inflammation by inhibiting the activation of leukocytes. Recent reports suggested a similar anti-inflammatory effect for ACh in the brain. Since brain cholinergic dysfunction are documented in epileptic animals, we explored changes in brain cholinergic gene expression and associated immune response during pilocarpine-induced epileptogenesis. Levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE and inflammatory markers were measured using real-time RT-PCR, in-situ hybridization and immunostaining in wild type (WT and transgenic mice over-expressing the "synaptic" splice variant AChE-S (TgS. One month following pilocarpine, mice were video-monitored for spontaneous seizures. To test directly the effect of ACh on the brain's innate immune response, cytokines expression levels were measured in acute brain slices treated with cholinergic agents. We report a robust upregulation of AChE as early as 48 hrs following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE. AChE was expressed in hippocampal neurons, microglia and endothelial cells but rarely in astrocytes. TgS mice overexpressing AChE showed constitutive increased microglial activation, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines 48 hrs after SE and accelerated epileptogenesis compared to their WT counterparts. Finally we show a direct, muscarine-receptor dependant, nicotine-receptor independent anti-inflammatory effect of ACh in brain slices maintained ex vivo. Our work demonstrates for the first time, that ACh directly suppresses brain innate immune response and that AChE up-regulation after SE is associated with enhanced immune response, facilitating the epileptogenic process. Our results highlight the cholinergic system as a potential new target for the prevention of seizures and epilepsy.

  13. 可视法脑片膜片钳技术观察大鼠前庭内侧核神经元毒蕈碱样胆碱能受体的电生理特性%Electrophysiological characteristics of muscarinic cholinergic receptor in rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons by visual patch clamp technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宇; 孔维佳; 刘邦华; 郭长凯; 孙大为; 夏交; 朱云; 张建

    2007-01-01

    目的 建立大鼠前庭内侧核脑片可视法膜片钳实验技术,探讨前庭内侧核神经元毒蕈碱样胆碱能受体(muscarinic cholinergic receptor,M受体)介导电流的生物学特性.方法 选用15只Wistar大鼠用于制备前庭内侧核脑片,应用红外微分干涉相差(infrared differential interference contrast,IR-DIC)技术结合电荷耦合式感光成像(charge coupled device-camera,CCD-camera)系统,在可视法膜片钳全细胞记录模式下对20个正常功能状态的前庭内侧核神经元M受体的通道电流性质进行观察和分析.结果 可视法脑片膜片钳技术可对神经元直接进行准确定位和功能状态的筛选.前庭内侧核神经元给予毒蕈碱后电流-电压(I-V)曲线斜率增加,毒蕈碱引发效应电流的反转电位为(-88.4±4.9)mV((-x)±s,下同),表明M受体去极化效应是由钾电导的减少所介导;M受体介导电流的电压敏感性测试显示:毒蕈碱引发的效应曲线呈线性关系,反转电位为(-86.7±3.5)mV,提示毒蕈碱所阻断的钾电流为非电压敏感性的漏钾电流.结论 可视法脑片膜片钳实验技术克服了盲法脑片膜片钳技术的缺陷,提高了神经元封接的成功率.通过对前庭内侧核神经元M受体通道电流性质的分析,进一步揭示毒蕈碱样胆碱能机制的兴奋性调节作用,为临床抗胆碱药物的应用提供新思路.

  14. Mechanisms mediating cholinergic antral circular smooth muscle contraction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena F Wrzos; Tarun Tandon; Ann Ouyang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathway (s) mediating rat antral circular smooth muscle contractile responses to the cholinomimetic agent, bethanechol and the subtypes of muscarinic receptors mediating the cholinergic contraction.METHODS: Circular smooth muscle strips from the antrum of Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted in muscle baths in Krebs buffer. Isometric tension was recorded. Cumulative concentration-response curves were obtained for (+)-cisdioxolane (cD), a nonspecific muscarinic agonist, at 10-8-10-4 mol/L, in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-7 mol/L).Results were normalized to cross sectional area. A repeat concentration-response curve was obtained after incubation of the muscle for 90 min with antagonists for M1 (pirenzepine),M2 (methoctramine) and M3 (darifenacin) muscarinic receptor subtypes. The sensitivity to PTX was tested by the ip injection of 100 mg/kg of PTX 5 d before the experiment. The antral circular smooth muscles were removed from PTX-treated and non-treated rats as strips and dispersed smooth muscle cells to identify whether PTX-linked pathway mediated the contractility to bethanechol.RESULTS: A dose-dependent contractile response observed with bethanechol, was not affected by TTX. The pretreatment of rats with pertussis toxin decreased the contraction induced by bethanechol. Lack of calcium as Well as the presence of the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, also inhibited the cholinergic contraction, with a reduction in response from 2.5±0.4 g/mm2 to 1.2±0.4 g/mm2 (P<0.05). The doseresponse curves were shifted to the right by muscarinic antagonists in the following order of affinity: darifenacin(M3)>methocramine (M2)>pirenzepine (M1).CONCLUSION: The muscarinic receptors-dependent contraction of rat antral circular smooth muscles was linked to the signal transduction pathway(s) involving pertussis-toxin sensitive GTP-binding proteins and to extracellular calcium via L-type voltage gated calcium channels. The presence of the

  15. Gestational alterations in phospholipase c coupled muscarinic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varol, F.G.; Hadjiconstantinou, M.; Zuspan, F.P.; Neff, N.H. (Ohio State Univ. college of Medicine, Columbus (USA))

    1989-01-01

    In the pregnant rat, carbachol-induced phosphoinositol hydrolysis by myometrium at the placental attachment region progressively decreased toward term, whereas hydrolysis was relatively stable in the myometrium of the non-attachment region. Tritium-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding increased in the myometrium of non-attachment regions as pregnancy progressed. At placental attachment sites binding remained relatively stable until parturition when it increased. Apparently the myometrium associated with the placental attachment site is less sensitive to cholinergic influence during pregnancy compared with the non-attachment site when evaluated by muscarinic activation of phospholipase C or ligand binding.

  16. Perioral Dermatitis after Dental Filling in a 12-Year-Old Girl: Involvement of Cholinergic System in Skin Neuroinflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Guarneri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiopathogenesis of perioral dermatitis (PD is still unknown and, consequently, medical treatment is difficult, not precisely defined, and often unsatisfactory. On the basis of a peculiar case that appeared soon after multiple dental fillings with a mercury-containing amalgam, we proposed that neurogenic inflammation could play a role in the pathogenesis of PD. According to the new findings provided by clinical and basic research, neurogenic inflammation has a relevant part in the pathogenesis of many cutaneous diseases. We report a similar case of PD, taking into account, more specifically, the possible involvement of the cholinergic system. Also in this case, PD seems to be mainly related to the mercury contained in dental fillings and/or its organic compounds formed by oral/gut bacteria. We examined the possible role of these substances as causes of PD, providing new information on the possible cross-talk between neuroimmunodermatology and potential triggers of PD.

  17. Dose-dependent effect of donepezil administration on long-term enhancement of visually evoked potentials and cholinergic receptor overexpression in rat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Mira; Groleau, Marianne; Bhat, Menakshi; Vaucher, Elvire

    2016-09-01

    Stimulation of the cholinergic system tightly coupled with periods of visual stimulation boosts the processing of specific visual stimuli via muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in terms of intensity, priority and long-term effect. However, it is not known whether more diffuse pharmacological stimulation with donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is an efficient tool for enhancing visual processing and perception. The goal of the present study was to potentiate cholinergic transmission with donepezil treatment (0.5 and 1mg/kg) during a 2-week visual training to examine the effect on visually evoked potentials and to profile the expression of cholinergic receptor subtypes. The visual training was performed daily, 10min a day, for 2weeks. One week after the last training session, visual evoked potentials were recorded, or the mRNA expression level of muscarinic (M1-5) and nicotinic (α/β) receptors subunits was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The visual stimulation coupled with any of the two doses of donepezil produced significant amplitude enhancement of cortical evoked potentials compared to pre-training values. The enhancement induced by the 1mg/kg dose of donepezil was spread to neighboring spatial frequencies, suggesting a better sensitivity near the visual detection threshold. The M3, M4, M5 and α7 receptors mRNA were upregulated in the visual cortex for the higher dose of donepezil but not the lower one, and the receptors expression was stable in the somatosensory (non-visual control) cortex. Therefore, higher levels of acetylcholine within the cortex sustain the increased intensity of the cortical response and trigger the upregulation of cholinergic receptors.

  18. Muscarinic responses of gastric parietal cells

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    Wilkes, J.M.; Kajimura, M.; Scott, D.R.; Hersey, S.J.; Sachs, G. (Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Isolated rabbit gastric glands were used to study the nature of the muscarinic cholinergic responses of parietal cells. Carbachol stimulation of acid secretion, as measured by the accumulation of aminopyrine, was inhibited by the M1 antagonist, pirenzepine, with an IC50 of 13 microM; by the M2 antagonist, 11,2-(diethylamino)methyl-1 piperidinyl acetyl-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido 2,3-b 1,4 benzodiazepin-6-one (AF-DX 116), with an IC50 of 110 microM; and by the M1/M3 antagonist, diphenyl-acetoxy-4-methylpiperidinemethiodide, with an IC50 of 35 nM. The three antagonists displayed equivalent IC50 values for the inhibition of carbachol-stimulated production of 14CO2 from radiolabeled glucose, which is a measure of the turnover of the H,K-ATPase, the final step of acid secretion. Intracellular calcium levels were measured in gastric glands loaded with FURA 2. Carbachol was shown to both release calcium from an intracellular pool and to promote calcium entry across the plasma membrane. The calcium entry was inhibitable by 20 microM La3+. The relative potency of the three muscarinic antagonists for inhibition of calcium entry was essentially the same as for inhibition of acid secretion or pump related glucose oxidation. Image analysis of the glands showed the effects of carbachol, and of the antagonists, on intracellular calcium were occurring largely in the parietal cell. The rise in cell calcium due to release of calcium from intracellular stores was inhibited by 4-DAMP with an IC50 of 1.7 nM, suggesting that the release pathway was regulated by a low affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state; Ca entry and acid secretion are regulated by a high affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state, inhibited by higher 4-DAMP concentrations, suggesting that it is the steady-state elevation of Ca that is related to parietal cell function rather than the (Ca)i transient.

  19. Monitoring cholinergic activity during attentional performance in mice heterozygous for the choline transporter: a model of cholinergic capacity limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolone, Giovanna; Mallory, Caitlin S; Koshy Cherian, Ajeesh; Miller, Thomas R; Blakely, Randy D; Sarter, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in the capacity of the human choline transporter (SLC5A7, CHT) have been hypothesized to diminish cortical cholinergic neurotransmission, leading to risk for cognitive and mood disorders. To determine the acetylcholine (ACh) release capacity of cortical cholinergic projections in a mouse model of cholinergic hypofunction, the CHT+/- mouse, we assessed extracellular ACh levels while mice performed an operant sustained attention task (SAT). We found that whereas SAT-performance-associated increases in extracellular ACh levels of CHT+/- mice were significantly attenuated relative to wildtype littermates, performance on the SAT was normal. Tetrodotoxin-induced blockade of neuronal excitability reduced both dialysate ACh levels and SAT performance similarly in both genotypes. Likewise, lesions of cholinergic neurons abolished SAT performance in both genotypes. However, cholinergic activation remained more vulnerable to the reverse-dialyzed muscarinic antagonist atropine in CHT+/- mice. Additionally, CHT+/- mice displayed greater SAT-disrupting effects of reverse dialysis of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine. Receptor binding assays revealed a higher density of α4β2* nAChRs in the cortex of CHT+/- mice compared to controls. These findings reveal compensatory mechanisms that, in the context of moderate cognitive challenges, can overcome the performance deficits expected from the significantly reduced ACh capacity of CHT+/- cholinergic terminals. Further analyses of molecular and functional compensations in the CHT+/- model may provide insights into both risk and resiliency factors involved in cognitive and mood disorders.

  20. Muscarinic and nicotinic modulation of thalamo-prefrontal cortex synaptic plasticity [corrected] in vivo.

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    Lezio Soares Bueno-Junior

    Full Text Available The mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD is a rich source of afferents to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. Dysfunctions in the thalamo-prefrontal connections can impair networks implicated in working memory, some of which are affected in Alzheimer disease and schizophrenia. Considering the importance of the cholinergic system to cortical functioning, our study aimed to investigate the effects of global cholinergic activation of the brain on MD-mPFC synaptic plasticity by measuring the dynamics of long-term potentiation (LTP and depression (LTD in vivo. Therefore, rats received intraventricular injections either of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (PILO; 40 nmol/µL, the nicotinic agonist nicotine (NIC; 320 nmol/µL, or vehicle. The injections were administered prior to either thalamic high-frequency (HFS or low-frequency stimulation (LFS. Test pulses were applied to MD for 30 min during baseline and 240 min after HFS or LFS, while field postsynaptic potentials were recorded in the mPFC. The transient oscillatory effects of PILO and NIC were monitored through recording of thalamic and cortical local field potentials. Our results show that HFS did not affect mPFC responses in vehicle-injected rats, but induced a delayed-onset LTP with distinct effects when applied following PILO or NIC. Conversely, LFS induced a stable LTD in control subjects, but was unable to induce LTD when applied after PILO or NIC. Taken together, our findings show distinct modulatory effects of each cholinergic brain activation on MD-mPFC plasticity following HFS and LFS. The LTP-inducing action and long-lasting suppression of cortical LTD induced by PILO and NIC might implicate differential modulation of thalamo-prefrontal functions under low and high input drive.

  1. Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rat brain.

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    Nukina,Itaru

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors were studied in the rat central nervous system (CNS using 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB, an antagonist of muscarinic ACh receptors. Scatchard analysis indicated that the rat CNS had a single 3H-QNB binding site with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd of 5.0 X 10(-10 M. Li+, Zn++ and Cu++ had strong effects on 3H-QNB binding which indicates that these metal ions might play important roles at muscarinic ACh receptor sites in the brain. Since antidepressants and antischizophrenic drugs displaced the binding of 3H-QNB, the anticholinergic effects of these drugs need to be taken into account when they are applied clinically. The muscarinic ACh receptor was successfully solubilized with lysophosphatidylcholine. By gel chromatography, with a Sepharose 6B column, the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor molecule eluted at the fraction corresponding to a Stokes' radius of 6.1 nm. With the use of sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, the molecular weight of the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor was determined to be about 90,000 daltons. The regional distribution of 3H-QNB binding in rat brain was examined, and the highest level of 3H-QNB binding was found to be in the striatum followed by cerebral cortex and hippocampus, indicating that muscarinic ACh mechanisms affect CNS function mainly through these areas.

  2. Behavioral and biochemical effects of neonicotinoid thiamethoxam on the cholinergic system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, K J A; Santana, M B; Do Nascimento, J L M; Picanço-Diniz, D L W; Maués, L A L; Santos, S N; Ferreira, V M M; Alfonso, M; Durán, R; Faro, L R F

    2010-01-01

    Thiamethoxam is a neonicotinoid insecticide, a group of pesticides that acts selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), with only a little action on mammalian nAChRs. Nevertheless, the selectivity of neonicotinoids for the insect nAChRs may change when these substances are metabolized. Therefore, we aimed to determine the potential effects of thiamethoxam on mammalian brain, testing the performance in the open field and elevated plus-maze of rats exposed to this insecticide and, in order to establish the neurochemical endpoints, we measured the acetylcholinesterase activity in different brain regions (hippocampus, striatum and cortex) and the high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) in synaptosomes from rat hippocampus. Treated animals received thiamethoxam (25, 50 or 100mg/kg) for 7 consecutive days. The results showed that treatment with thiamethoxam induced an increase in the anxiety behavior at two doses (50 or 100mg/kg). Moreover, there was a significant decrease in both HACU and acetylcholinesterase activity. Our hypothesis is that thiamethoxam (or its metabolites) could be acting on the central rats nAChRs. This would produce an alteration on the cholinergic transmission, modulating the anxiety behavior, acetylcholinesterase levels and HACU.

  3. Astrocytes mediate in vivo cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity.

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    Marta Navarrete

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission represents the cellular basis of learning and memory. Astrocytes have been shown to regulate synaptic transmission and plasticity. However, their involvement in specific physiological processes that induce LTP in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that in vivo cholinergic activity evoked by sensory stimulation or electrical stimulation of the septal nucleus increases Ca²⁺ in hippocampal astrocytes and induces LTP of CA3-CA1 synapses, which requires cholinergic muscarinic (mAChR and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR activation. Stimulation of cholinergic pathways in hippocampal slices evokes astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, postsynaptic depolarizations of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and LTP of transmitter release at single CA3-CA1 synapses. Like in vivo, these effects are mediated by mAChRs, and this cholinergic-induced LTP (c-LTP also involves mGluR activation. Astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations and LTP are absent in IP₃R2 knock-out mice. Downregulating astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal by loading astrocytes with BAPTA or GDPβS also prevents LTP, which is restored by simultaneous astrocyte Ca²⁺ uncaging and postsynaptic depolarization. Therefore, cholinergic-induced LTP requires astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, which stimulate astrocyte glutamate release that activates mGluRs. The cholinergic-induced LTP results from the temporal coincidence of the postsynaptic activity and the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal simultaneously evoked by cholinergic activity. Therefore, the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal is necessary for cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity, indicating that astrocytes are directly involved in brain storage information.

  4. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  5. Cholinergic pairing with visual activation results in long-term enhancement of visual evoked potentials.

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    Jun Il Kang

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh contributes to learning processes by modulating cortical plasticity in terms of intensity of neuronal activity and selectivity properties of cortical neurons. However, it is not known if ACh induces long term effects within the primary visual cortex (V1 that could sustain visual learning mechanisms. In the present study we analyzed visual evoked potentials (VEPs in V1 of rats during a 4-8 h period after coupling visual stimulation to an intracortical injection of ACh analog carbachol or stimulation of basal forebrain. To clarify the action of ACh on VEP activity in V1, we individually pre-injected muscarinic (scopolamine, nicotinic (mecamylamine, alpha7 (methyllycaconitine, and NMDA (CPP receptor antagonists before carbachol infusion. Stimulation of the cholinergic system paired with visual stimulation significantly increased VEP amplitude (56% during a 6 h period. Pre-treatment with scopolamine, mecamylamine and CPP completely abolished this long-term enhancement, while alpha7 inhibition induced an instant increase of VEP amplitude. This suggests a role of ACh in facilitating visual stimuli responsiveness through mechanisms comparable to LTP which involve nicotinic and muscarinic receptors with an interaction of NMDA transmission in the visual cortex.

  6. Influence of the Cholinergic System on the Immune Response of Teleost Fishes: Potential Model in Biomedical Research

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    G. A. Toledo-Ibarra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishes are the phylogenetically oldest vertebrate group, which includes more than one-half of the vertebrates on the planet; additionally, many species have ecological and economic importance. Fish are the first evolved group of organisms with adaptive immune mechanisms; consequently, they are an important link in the evolution of the immune system, thus a potential model for understanding the mechanisms of immunoregulation. Currently, the influence of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh on the cells of the immune system is widely studied in mammalian models, which have provided evidence on ACh production by immune cells (the noncholinergic neuronal system; however, these neuroimmunomodulation mechanisms in fish and lower vertebrates are poorly studied. Therefore, the objective of this review paper was to analyze the influence of the cholinergic system on the immune response of teleost fish, which could provide information concerning the possibility of bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems in these organisms and provide data for a better understanding of basic issues in neuroimmunology in lower vertebrates, such as bony fishes. Thus, the use of fish as a model in biomedical research may contribute to a better understanding of human diseases and diseases in other animals.

  7. Muscarinic receptor heterogeneity in follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Rogelio O; Garay, Edith; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Ionic current responses elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) in follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes (follicles) were studied using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. ACh generated a fast chloride current (Fin) and inhibited K+ currents gated by cAMP (IK,cAMP) following receptor activation by adenosine, follicle-stimulating hormone or noradrenaline. These previously described cholinergic responses were confirmed to be of the muscarinic type, and were independently generated among follicles from different frogs.Inhibition of IK,cAMP was about 100 times more sensitive to ACh than Fin activation; the half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50) were 6.6 ± 0.4 and 784 ± 4 nm, respectively.Both responses were blocked by several muscarinic receptor antagonists. Using the respective EC50 concentrations of ACh as standard, the antagonist 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide blocked the two effects with very different potencies. Fin was blocked with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.4 ± 0.07 nm, whilst the IC50 for IK,cAMP inhibition was 5.9 ± 0.2 μm.Oxotremorine, a muscarinic agonist, preferentially stimulated IK,cAMP inhibition (EC50= 15.8 ± 1.4 μm), whilst Fin was only weakly activated. In contrast, oxotremorine inhibited Fin generated by ACh with an IC50 of 2.3 ± 0.7 μm.Fin elicited via purinergic receptor stimulation was not affected by oxotremorine, indicating that the inhibition produced was specific to the muscarinic receptor, and suggesting that muscarinic actions do not exert a strong effect on follicular cell-oocyte coupling.Using reverse transcription-PCR, transcripts of a previously cloned muscarinic receptor from Xenopus (XlmR) were amplified from the RNA of both the isolated follicular cells and the oocyte. The pharmacological and molecular characteristics suggest that XlmR is involved in IK,cAMP inhibition.In conclusion, follicular cells possess two different muscarinic receptors, one resembling the M2 (or M4) subtype

  8. Differential role of muscarinic transmission within the entorhinal cortex and basolateral amygdala in the processing of irrelevant stimuli.

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    Barak, Segev; Weiner, Ina

    2010-04-01

    Cholinergic projections to the entorhinal cortex (EC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) mediate distinct cognitive processes through muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). In this study, we sought to further differentiate the role of muscarinic transmission in these regions in cognition, using the latent inhibition (LI) phenomenon. LI is a cross-species phenomenon manifested as poorer conditioning to a stimulus experienced as irrelevant during an earlier stage of repeated non-reinforced pre-exposure to that stimulus, and is considered to index the ability to ignore, or to in-attend to, irrelevant stimuli. Given our recent findings that systemic administration of the mAChR antagonist scopolamine can produce two contrasting LI abnormalities in rats, ie, abolish LI under conditions yielding LI in non-treated controls, or produce abnormally persistent LI under conditions preventing its expression in non-treated controls, we tested whether mAChR blockade in the EC and BLA would induce LI abolition and persistence, respectively. We found that intra-EC scopolamine infusion (1, 10 mug per hemisphere) abolished LI when infused in pre-exposure or both pre-exposure and conditioning, but not in conditioning alone, whereas intra-BLA scopolamine infusion led to persistent LI when infused in conditioning or both stages, but not in pre-exposure alone. Although cholinergic innervation of the EC and BLA has long been implicated in attention to novel stimuli and in processing of motivationally significant stimuli, respectively, our results provide evidence that EC mAChRs also have a role in the development of inattention to stimuli, whereas BLA mAChRs have a role in re-attending to previously irrelevant stimuli that became motivationally relevant.

  9. Muscarinic receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction is coupled to caveolae in murine airways

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenz, Heike; Kummer, Wolfgang; Jositsch, Gitte; Wess, Jürgen; Krasteva, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    Cholinergic bronchoconstriction is mediated by M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors (MR). In heart and urinary bladder, MR are linked to caveolin-1 or -3, the structural proteins of caveolae. Caveolae are cholesterol-rich, omega-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. They provide a scaffold for multiple G protein receptors and membrane-bound enzymes, thereby orchestrating signaling into the cell interior. Hence, we hypothesized that airway MR signaling pathways are coupled to caveolae as well...

  10. Muscarinic modulation of sodium current by activation of protein kinase C in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, A R; Ma, J Y; Scheuer, T; Catterall, W A

    1996-05-01

    Phosphorylation of brain Na+ channels by protein kinase C (PKC) decreases peak Na+ current and slows macroscopic inactivation, but receptor-activated modulation of Na+ currents via the PKC pathway has not been demonstrated. We have examined modulation of Na+ channels by activation of muscarinic receptors in acutely-isolated hippocampal neurons using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording. Application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol reduced peak Na+ current and slowed macroscopic inactivation at all potentials, without changing the voltage-dependent properties of the channel. These effects were mediated by PKC, since they were eliminated when the specific PKC inhibitor (PKCI19-36) was included in the pipette solution and mimicked by the extracellular application of the PKC activator, OAG. Thus, activation of endogenous muscarinic receptors on hippocampal neurons strongly modulates Na+ channel activity by activation of PKC. Cholinergic input from basal forebrain neurons may have this effect in the hippocampus in vivo.

  11. Alpha-lipoic acid-mediated activation of muscarinic receptors improves hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent memory.

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    Mahboob, Aamra; Farhat, Syeda Mehpara; Iqbal, Ghazala; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Ahmed, Touqeer

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxic agent which readily crosses the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and accumulates in the brain leading to neurodegenerative disorders, characterised by cognitive impairment. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant and has a potential to improve cognitive functions. This study aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of ALA in AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity mouse model. Effect of ALA (25mg/kg/day) was evaluated in the AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity (AlCl3 150 mg/kg/day) mouse model on learning and memory using behaviour tests and on the expression of muscarinic receptor genes (using RT-PCR), in hippocampus and amygdala. Following ALA treatment, the expression of muscarinic receptor genes M1, M2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChaT) were significantly improved (pnovelty preference (p<0.001) comparative to the AlCl3-treated group. Fear extinction memory was remarkably restored (p<0.001) in ALA-treated group demonstrated by reduced freezing response as compared to the AlCl3-treated group which showed higher freezing. In-silico analysis showed that racemic mixture of ALA has higher binding affinity for M1 and M2 compared to acetylcholine. These novel findings highlight the potential role of ALA in cognitive functions and cholinergic system enhancement thus presenting it an enviable therapeutic candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. The brain of the archerfish Toxotes chatareus: A Nissl-based neuroanatomical atlas and catecholaminergic/cholinergic systems

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    Naomi Karoubi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, the seven-spot archerfish (Toxotes chatareus has emerged as a new model for studies in visual and behavioral neuroscience thanks to its unique hunting strategy. Its natural ability to spit at insects outside of water can be used in the lab for well controlled behavioral experiments where the fish is trained to aim at targets on a screen. The need for a documentation of the neuroanatomy of this animal became critical as more research groups use it as a model. Here we present an atlas of adult T. chatareus specimens caught in the wild in South East Asia. The atlas shows representative sections of the brain and specific structures revealed by a classic Nissl staining as well as corresponding schematic drawings. Additional immunostainings for catecholaminergic and cholinergic systems were conducted to corroborate the identification of certain nuclei and the data of a whole brain scanner is available online. We describe the general features of the archerfish brain as well as its specificities, especially for the visual system and compare the neuroanatomy of the archerfish with other teleosts. This atlas of the archerfish brain shows all levels of the neuraxis and intends to provide a solid basis for further neuroscientific research on T. chatareus, in particular electrophysiological studies.

  13. Excitatory and inhibitory cholinergic effects of yohimbine on isolated guinea-pig small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Tacca, M; Tadini, P; Blandizzi, C; Bernardini, M C

    1988-08-01

    The interaction of yohimbine with the cholinergic intestinal system was investigated in the isolated guinea-pig ileum using a wide range of drug concentrations from 3 x 10(-13) to 2 x 10(-4) g/ml. Low concentrations of yohimbine (3 x 10(-13) to 3 x 10(-11) g/ml) caused dose-dependent contractions of the ileal longitudinal muscle, which were potentiated by eserine 1 x 10(-8) g/ml and prevented by tetrodotoxin 1 x 10(-6) g/ml or by atropine 1 x 10(-12) g/ml; methysergide and diphenydramine were ineffective up to 3 x 10(-7) g/ml dose. Submaximal stimulatory responses evoked by twitch stimulation or by acetylcholine were significantly potentiated by the same concentrations of yohimbine (3 x 10(-13) to 3 x 10(-11) g/ml) and blocked by atropine 1 x 10(-12) g/ml. By contrast, high concentrations of yohimbine (1 x 10(-6) to 2 x 10(-4) g/ml) displayed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on cholinergic responses. The stimulant effect of yohimbine seems to be indirect and mediated by the increase in the release of acetylcholine, while the inhibitory action may be due to a molecular interaction with the muscarinic receptors allowing non-specific receptor blockade.

  14. GABAergic actions on cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, K A; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    (IRK) mediated this effect. Further, outward currents were never additive with those induced by application of carbachol, suggesting that they were mediated by activation of GABA(B) receptors linked to the same G(IRK) activated in these cells by muscarinic receptor stimulation. Activation of GABA(B) receptors....... Therefore, we studied the actions of GABA agonists and antagonists on cholinergic LDT cells by performing patch clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. Under conditions where detection of Cl(-) -mediated events was optimized, GABA induced gabazine (GZ)-sensitive inward currents in the majority of LDT...... neurons. Post-synaptic location of GABA(A) receptors was demonstrated by persistence of muscimol-induced inward currents in TTX and low Ca(2+) solutions. THIP, a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist with a preference for d-subunit containing GABA(A) receptors, induced inward currents, suggesting...

  15. Organophosphorus pesticides decrease M2 muscarinic receptor function in guinea pig airway nerves via indirect mechanisms.

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    Becky J Proskocil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies link organophosphorus pesticide (OP exposures to asthma, and we have shown that the OPs chlorpyrifos, diazinon and parathion cause airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs 24 hr after a single subcutaneous injection. OP-induced airway hyperreactivity involves M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction on airway nerves independent of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition, but how OPs inhibit neuronal M2 receptors in airways is not known. In the central nervous system, OPs interact directly with neurons to alter muscarinic receptor function or expression; therefore, in this study we tested whether the OP parathion or its oxon metabolite, paraoxon, might decrease M2 receptor function on peripheral neurons via similar direct mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intravenous administration of paraoxon, but not parathion, caused acute frequency-dependent potentiation of vagally-induced bronchoconstriction and increased electrical field stimulation (EFS-induced contractions in isolated trachea independent of AChE inhibition. However, paraoxon had no effect on vagally-induced bradycardia in intact guinea pigs or EFS-induced contractions in isolated ileum, suggesting mechanisms other than pharmacologic antagonism of M2 receptors. Paraoxon did not alter M2 receptor expression in cultured cells at the mRNA or protein level as determined by quantitative RT-PCR and radio-ligand binding assays, respectively. Additionally, a biotin-labeled fluorophosphonate, which was used as a probe to identify molecular targets phosphorylated by OPs, did not phosphorylate proteins in guinea pig cardiac membranes that were recognized by M2 receptor antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that neither direct pharmacologic antagonism nor downregulated expression of M2 receptors contributes to OP inhibition of M2 function in airway nerves, adding to the growing evidence of non-cholinergic mechanisms of OP neurotoxicity.

  16. Evolution of the toxins muscarine and psilocybin in a family of mushroom-forming fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosentka, Pawel; Sprague, Sarah L; Ryberg, Martin; Gartz, Jochen; May, Amanda L; Campagna, Shawn R; Matheny, P Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Mushroom-forming fungi produce a wide array of toxic alkaloids. However, evolutionary analyses aimed at exploring the evolution of muscarine, a toxin that stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, and psilocybin, a hallucinogen, have never been performed. The known taxonomic distribution of muscarine within the Inocybaceae is limited, based only on assays of species from temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Here, we present a review of muscarine and psilocybin assays performed on species of Inocybaceae during the last fifty years. To supplement these results, we used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to determine whether muscarine was present in 30 new samples of Inocybaceae, the majority of which have not been previously assayed or that originated from either the tropics or temperate regions of the southern hemisphere. Our main objective is to test the hypothesis that the presence of muscarine is a shared ancestral feature of the Inocybaceae. In addition, we also test whether species of Inocyabceae that produce psilocybin are monophyletic. Our findings suggest otherwise. Muscarine has evolved independently on several occasions, together with several losses. We also detect at least two independent transitions of muscarine-free lineages to psilocybin-producing states. Although not ancestral for the family as a whole, muscarine is a shared derived trait for an inclusive clade containing three of the seven major lineages of Inocybaceae (the Inocybe, Nothocybe, and Pseudosperma clades), the common ancestor of which may have evolved ca. 60 million years ago. Thus, muscarine represents a conserved trait followed by several recent losses. Transitions to psilocybin from muscarine-producing ancestors occurred more recently between 10-20 million years ago after muscarine loss in two separate lineages. Statistical analyses firmly reject a single origin of muscarine-producing taxa.

  17. Evolution of the toxins muscarine and psilocybin in a family of mushroom-forming fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Kosentka

    Full Text Available Mushroom-forming fungi produce a wide array of toxic alkaloids. However, evolutionary analyses aimed at exploring the evolution of muscarine, a toxin that stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, and psilocybin, a hallucinogen, have never been performed. The known taxonomic distribution of muscarine within the Inocybaceae is limited, based only on assays of species from temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Here, we present a review of muscarine and psilocybin assays performed on species of Inocybaceae during the last fifty years. To supplement these results, we used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS to determine whether muscarine was present in 30 new samples of Inocybaceae, the majority of which have not been previously assayed or that originated from either the tropics or temperate regions of the southern hemisphere. Our main objective is to test the hypothesis that the presence of muscarine is a shared ancestral feature of the Inocybaceae. In addition, we also test whether species of Inocyabceae that produce psilocybin are monophyletic. Our findings suggest otherwise. Muscarine has evolved independently on several occasions, together with several losses. We also detect at least two independent transitions of muscarine-free lineages to psilocybin-producing states. Although not ancestral for the family as a whole, muscarine is a shared derived trait for an inclusive clade containing three of the seven major lineages of Inocybaceae (the Inocybe, Nothocybe, and Pseudosperma clades, the common ancestor of which may have evolved ca. 60 million years ago. Thus, muscarine represents a conserved trait followed by several recent losses. Transitions to psilocybin from muscarine-producing ancestors occurred more recently between 10-20 million years ago after muscarine loss in two separate lineages. Statistical analyses firmly reject a single origin of muscarine-producing taxa.

  18. Blockade of muscarinic receptors impairs the retrieval of well-trained memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo eSoma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is known to play an important role in memory functions, and its deficit has been proposed to cause the cognitive decline associated with advanced age and Alzheimer’s disease (the cholinergic hypothesis. Although many studies have tested the cholinergic hypothesis for recently acquired memory, only a few have investigated the role of ACh in the retrieval process of well-trained cognitive memory, which describes the memory established from repetition and daily routine. To examine this point, we trained rats to perform a two-alternative forced-choice visual detection task. Each trial was started by having the rats pull upward a central-lever, which triggered the presentation of a visual stimulus to the right or left side of the display monitor, and then pulling upward a stimulus-relevant choice-lever located on both sides. Rats learned the task within 10 days, and the task training was continued for a month. Task performance was measured with or without systemic administration of a muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR antagonist, scopolamine (SCOP, prior to the test. After 30 min of SCOP administration, rats stopped manipulating any lever even though they explored the lever and surrounding environment, suggesting a loss of the task-related associative memory. Three hours later, rats were recovered to complete the trial, but the rats selected the levers irrespective of the visual stimulus, suggesting they remembered a series of lever-manipulations in association with a reward, but not association between the reward and visual stimulation. Furthermore, an m1-AChR, but not nicotinic AChR antagonist caused a similar deficit in the task execution. SCOP neither interfered with locomotor activity nor drinking behavior, while it influenced anxiety. These results suggest that the activation of mAChRs at basal ACh levels is essential for the recall of well-trained cognitive memory.

  19. In vitro studies on the effect of beta-carbolines on the activities of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase and on the muscarinic receptor binding of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skup, M; Oderfeld-Nowak, B; Rommelspacher, H

    1983-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) activity and muscarinic receptor binding of homogenates from several brain structures were inhibited by beta-carbolines. The inhibition was of the noncompetitive type in the case of the enzyme and of the mixed type in the case of the receptor binding. This effect was most strongly manifested by pyridoindoles(harmane, norharmane), i.e., carbolines containing an aromatic C ring than by the corresponding piperidoindoles (tetrahydroharmane, tetrahydronorharmane), i.e., those with a reduced C ring. The activity of choline acetyltransferase (acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6) was not altered. These data are further evidence of the interactions between indoleamine derivatives and the cholinergic system. The results are discussed in terms of their possible biological significance.

  20. Alterations in the cholinergic system of brain stem neurons in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginsky, Max F; Cui, Ningren; Zhong, Weiwei; Johnson, Christopher M; Jiang, Chun

    2014-09-15

    Rett syndrome is an autism-spectrum disorder resulting from mutations to the X-linked gene, methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), which causes abnormalities in many systems. It is possible that the body may develop certain compensatory mechanisms to alleviate the abnormalities. The norepinephrine system originating mainly in the locus coeruleus (LC) is defective in Rett syndrome and Mecp2-null mice. LC neurons are subject to modulation by GABA, glutamate, and acetylcholine (ACh), providing an ideal system to test the compensatory hypothesis. Here we show evidence for potential compensatory modulation of LC neurons by post- and presynaptic ACh inputs. We found that the postsynaptic currents of nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChR) were smaller in amplitude and longer in decay time in the Mecp2-null mice than in the wild type. Single-cell PCR analysis showed a decrease in the expression of α3-, α4-, α7-, and β3-subunits and an increase in the α5- and α6-subunits in the mutant mice. The α5-subunit was present in many of the LC neurons with slow-decay nAChR currents. The nicotinic modulation of spontaneous GABAA-ergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents in LC neurons was enhanced in Mecp2-null mice. In contrast, the nAChR manipulation of glutamatergic input to LC neurons was unaffected in both groups of mice. Our current-clamp studies showed that the modulation of LC neurons by ACh input was reduced moderately in Mecp2-null mice, despite the major decrease in nAChR currents, suggesting possible compensatory processes may take place, thus reducing the defects to a lesser extent in LC neurons.

  1. Catecholaminergic and cholinergic systems of mouse brain are modulated by LMN diet, rich in theobromine, polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fernández, Laura; Esteban, Gerard; Giralt, Mercedes; Valente, Tony; Bolea, Irene; Solé, Montse; Sun, Ping; Benítez, Susana; Morelló, José Ramón; Reguant, Jordi; Ramírez, Bartolomé; Hidalgo, Juan; Unzeta, Mercedes

    2015-04-01

    The possible modulatory effect of the functional LMN diet, rich in theobromine, polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids, on the catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmission, affecting cognition decline during aging has been studied. 129S1/SvlmJ mice were fed for 10, 20, 30 and 40 days with either LMN or control diets. The enzymes involved in catecholaminergic and cholinergic metabolism were determined by both immunohistological and western blot analyses. Noradrenalin, dopamine and other metabolites were quantified by HPLC analysis. Theobromine, present in cocoa, the main LMN diet component, was analysed in parallel using SH-SY5Y and PC12 cell lines. An enhanced modulatory effect on both cholinergic and catecholaminergic transmissions was observed on 20 day fed mice. Similar effect was observed with theobromine, besides its antioxidant capacity inducing SOD-1 and GPx expression. The enhancing effect of the LMN diet and theobromine on the levels of acetylcholine-related enzymes, dopamine and specially noradrenalin confirms the beneficial role of this diet on the "cognitive reserve" and hence a possible reducing effect on cognitive decline underlying aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangfeng Jiang; Dawei Sun; Rui Zhou; Fugao Zhu; Yanqing Wang; Xiuming Wan; Banghua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors and nicotine receptors can increase free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus via different channels following facial nerve injury. In addition, γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors have been shown to negatively regulate free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus by inhibiting nicotine receptors. The present study investigated the influence of GABAA, γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) and C (GABAC) receptors on muscarinic receptors in rats with facial nerve injury by confocal laser microscopy. GABAA and GABAB receptors exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibitory effects on increased muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury. Results showed that GABAA and GABAB receptors negatively regulate muscarinic receptor effects and interplay with cholinergic receptors to regulate free calcium ion levels for facial neural regeneration.

  3. Muscarinic Receptor Occupancy and Cognitive Impairment: A PET Study with [11C](+)3-MPB and Scopolamine in Conscious Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Nishiyama, Shingo; Kawamata, Masahiro; Ohba, Hiroyuki; Wakuda, Tomoyasu; Takei, Nori; Tsukada, Hideo; Domino, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR) antagonist scopolamine was used to induce transient cognitive impairment in monkeys trained in a delayed matching to sample task. The temporal relationship between the occupancy level of central mAChRs and cognitive impairment was determined. Three conscious monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were subjected to positron emission tomography (PET) scans with the mAChR radioligand N-[11C]methyl-3-piperidyl benzilate ([11C](+)3-MPB). The scan sequence was pre-, 2,...

  4. Layer-specific processing of excitatory signals in CA1 interneurons depends on postsynaptic M₂ muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fang; Seeger, Thomas; Nixdorf-Bergweiler, Barbara E; Alzheimer, Christian

    2011-05-02

    The hippocampus receives a diffuse cholinergic innervation which acts on pre- and postsynaptic sites to modulate neurotransmission and excitability of pyramidal cells and interneurons in an intricate fashion. As one missing piece in this puzzle, we explored how muscarinic receptor activation modulates the somatodendritic processing of glutamatergic input in CA1 interneurons. We performed whole-cell recordings from visually identified interneurons of stratum radiatum (SR) and stratum oriens (SO) and examined the effects of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh) on EPSP-like waveforms evoked by brief glutamate pulses onto their proximal dendrites. In SO interneurons, CCh consistently reduced glutamate-induced postsynaptic potentials (GPSPs) in control rat and mice, but not in M₂ muscarinic receptor knockout mice. By contrast, the overwhelming majority of interneurons recorded in SR of control and M₂ receptor-deficient hippocampi exhibited muscarinic enhancement of GPSPs. Interestingly, the non-responding interneurons were strictly confined to the SR subfield closest to the subiculum. Our data suggest that postsynaptic modulation by acetylcholine of excitatory input onto CA1 interneurons occurs in a stratum-specific fashion, which is determined by the absence or presence of M₂ receptors in their (somato-)dendritic compartments. Thus cholinergic projections might be capable of recalibrating synaptic weights in different inhibitory circuits of the CA1 region.

  5. Impact of basal forebrain cholinergic inputs on basolateral amygdala neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Cagri T; Pare, Denis; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2015-01-14

    In addition to innervating the cerebral cortex, basal forebrain cholinergic (BFc) neurons send a dense projection to the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA). In this study, we investigated the effect of near physiological acetylcholine release on BLA neurons using optogenetic tools and in vitro patch-clamp recordings. Adult transgenic mice expressing cre-recombinase under the choline acetyltransferase promoter were used to selectively transduce BFc neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 and a reporter through the injection of an adeno-associated virus. Light-induced stimulation of BFc axons produced different effects depending on the BLA cell type. In late-firing interneurons, BFc inputs elicited fast nicotinic EPSPs. In contrast, no response could be detected in fast-spiking interneurons. In principal BLA neurons, two different effects were elicited depending on their activity level. When principal BLA neurons were quiescent or made to fire at low rates by depolarizing current injection, light-induced activation of BFc axons elicited muscarinic IPSPs. In contrast, with stronger depolarizing currents, eliciting firing above ∼ 6-8 Hz, these muscarinic IPSPs lost their efficacy because stimulation of BFc inputs prolonged current-evoked afterdepolarizations. All the effects observed in principal neurons were dependent on muscarinic receptors type 1, engaging different intracellular mechanisms in a state-dependent manner. Overall, our results suggest that acetylcholine enhances the signal-to-noise ratio in principal BLA neurons. Moreover, the cholinergic engagement of afterdepolarizations may contribute to the formation of stimulus associations during fear-conditioning tasks where the timing of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli is not optimal for the induction of synaptic plasticity.

  6. Interaction between muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin C. Michel

    2012-01-01

    In many tissues the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system regulate smooth musc tone via their transmitters aeetylcholine and noradrenaline, respectively. Direct smooth musc e e effects of acetylcholine via muscarinic receptors always promote contraction, but non-neuronal sources can importantly contribute to such stimulation. Direct smooth muscle effects of noradren- aline can promote contraction via al- and sometimes also α2-adrenoceptors but can promote re- laxation and inhibit contraction via β-adrenoceptors. I will focus on the interaction between sub- types of muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors, largely using the urinary bladder as an exam- ple.

  7. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on Isc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport – up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors – is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  8. Laser Acupuncture at HT7 Acupoint Improves Cognitive Deficit, Neuronal Loss, Oxidative Stress, and Functions of Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Systems in Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Sutalangka, Chatchada

    2014-01-01

    To date, the therapeutic strategy against cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still not in satisfaction level and requires novel effective intervention. Based the oxidative stress reduction and cognitive enhancement induced by laser acupuncture at HT7, the beneficial effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 against cognitive impairment in PD has been focused. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 on memory impairment, oxidative stress status, and the functions of both cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in hippocampus of animal model of PD. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were induced unilateral lesion at right substantianigra by 6-OHDA and were treated with laser acupuncture continuously at a period of 14 days. The results showed that laser acupuncture at HT7 enhanced memory and neuron density in CA3 and dentate gyrus. The decreased AChE, MAO-B, and MDA together with increased GSH-Px in hippocampus of a 6-OHDA lesion rats were also observed. In conclusion, laser acupuncture at HT7 can improve neuron degeneration and memory impairment in animal model of PD partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the improved cholinergic and dopaminergic functions. More researches concerning effect of treatment duration are still required.

  9. Muscarinic depolarization of layer II neurons of the parasubiculum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Glasgow

    Full Text Available The parasubiculum (PaS is a component of the hippocampal formation that sends its major output to layer II of the entorhinal cortex. The PaS receives strong cholinergic innervation from the basal forebrain that is likely to modulate neuronal excitability and contribute to theta-frequency network activity. The present study used whole cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings to determine the effects of cholinergic receptor activation on layer II PaS neurons. Bath application of carbachol (CCh; 10-50 µM resulted in a dose-dependent depolarization of morphologically-identified layer II stellate and pyramidal cells that was not prevented by blockade of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Bath application of the M1 receptor antagonist pirenzepine (1 µM, but not the M2-preferring antagonist methoctramine (1 µM, blocked the depolarization, suggesting that it is dependent on M1 receptors. Voltage-clamp experiments using ramped voltage commands showed that CCh resulted in the gradual development of an inward current that was partially blocked by concurrent application of the selective Kv7.2/3 channel antagonist XE-991, which inhibits the muscarine-dependent K(+ current I M. The remaining inward current also reversed near EK and was inhibited by the K(+ channel blocker Ba(2+, suggesting that M1 receptor activation attenuates both I M as well as an additional K(+ current. The additional K(+ current showed rectification at depolarized voltages, similar to K(+ conductances mediated by Kir 2.3 channels. The cholinergic depolarization of layer II PaS neurons therefore appears to occur through M1-mediated effects on I M as well as an additional K(+ conductance.

  10. Cholinergic modulation of primary afferent glutamatergic transmission in rat medullary dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seok-Gwon; Choi, In-Sun; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Jang, Il-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Although muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptors are expressed in trigeminal ganglia, it is still unknown whether mACh receptors modulate glutamatergic transmission from primary afferents onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. In this study, we have addressed the cholinergic modulation of primary afferent glutamatergic transmission using a conventional whole cell patch clamp technique. Glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were evoked from primary afferents by electrical stimulation of trigeminal tract and monosynaptic EPSCs were recorded from medullary dorsal horn neurons of rat horizontal brain stem slices. Muscarine and ACh reversibly and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio. In addition, muscarine reduced the frequency of miniature EPSCs without affecting the current amplitude, suggesting that muscarine acts presynaptically to decrease the probability of glutamate release onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. The muscarine-induced decrease of glutamatergic EPSCs was significantly occluded by methoctramine or AF-DX116, M2 receptor antagonists, but not pirenzepine, J104129 and MT-3, selective M1, M3 and M4 receptor antagonists. The muscarine-induced decrease of glutamatergic EPSCs was highly dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration. Physostigmine and clinically available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as rivastigmine and donepezil, significantly shifted the concentration-inhibition relationship of ACh for glutamatergic EPSCs. These results suggest that muscarine acts on presynaptic M2 receptors to inhibit glutamatergic transmission by reducing the Ca2+ influx into primary afferent terminals, and that M2 receptor agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors could be, at least, potential targets to reduce nociceptive transmission from orofacial tissues.

  11. [Involvement of cross interaction between central cholinergic and histaminergic systems in the nucleus tractus solitarius in regulating carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Xun; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Hong-Fen; Yu, Kang-Ying; Wang, Guo-Qing

    2013-12-25

    The carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) is an important approach for regulating arterial blood pressure homeostasis instantaneously and physiologically. Activation of the central histaminergic or cholinergic systems results in CSR functional inhibitory resetting. However, it is unclear whether two systems at the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) level display cross interaction to regulate the CSR or not. In the present study, the left or right carotid sinus region was isolated from the systemic circulation in Sprague-Dawley rats (sinus nerve was reserved) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Respective intubation was conducted into one side isolated carotid sinus and into the femoral artery for recording the intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) simultaneously with pressure transducers connection in vivo. ISP was set at the level of 0 mmHg to eliminate the effect of initial internal pressure of the carotid sinus on the CSR function. To trigger CSR, the ISP was quickly elevated from 0 mmHg to 280 mmHg in a stepwise manner (40 mmHg) which was added at every step for over 4 s, and then ISP returned to 0 mmHg in similar steps. The original data of ISP and corresponding MAP were fitted to a modified logistic equation with five parameters to obtain the ISP-MAP, ISP-Gain relationship curves and the CSR characteristic parameters, which were statistically compared and analyzed separately. Under the precondition of no influence on the basic levels of the artery blood pressure, the effects and potential regulatory mechanism of preceding microinjection with different cholinoceptor antagonists, the selective cholinergic M1 receptor antagonist, i.e., pirenzepine (PRZ), the M2 receptor antagonist, i.e., methoctramine (MTR) or the N1 receptor antagonist, i.e., hexamethonium (HEX) into the NTS on the changes in function of CSR induced by intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) of histamine (HA) in rats were observed. Meanwhile, the actions and

  12. Noradrenergic and cholinergic modulation of late ERP responses to deviant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen B R E; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Noorden, Martijn S; Giltay, Erik J; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-12-01

    Researchers have proposed several hypotheses about the neuromodulator systems involved in generating P3 components of the ERP. To test some of these hypotheses, we conducted a randomized placebo-controlled crossover study in which we investigated how the late positive ERP response to deviant stimuli is modulated by (a) clonidine, an α2 agonist that attenuates baseline noradrenergic activity; and (b) scopolamine, a muscarinic antagonist of acetylcholine receptors. We collected EEG data from 18 healthy volunteers during the performance of an auditory oddball task with several active and passive task conditions. We then used temporospatial principal component analysis (PCA) to decompose the ERP waveforms. The PCA revealed two distinct late positive ERP components: the classic parietal P300 and the frontal novelty P3. Statistical analysis of the temporospatial factor scores indicated that in most conditions the amplitude of the classic P300 was increased by clonidine and scopolamine. In contrast, the amplitude of the novelty P3 was decreased by both drugs. The similar pattern of results for clonidine and scopolamine probably reflects the strong interactions between the noradrenergic and cholinergic systems. The results, in combination with previous pharmacological studies, suggest a critical role for both neuromodulator systems in the generation of the P300 and the novelty P3.

  13. Cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [(3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled B(max value in SIDS (n = 9 SIDS versus 8 controls. On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n = 9 SIDS versus 11 controls. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism.

  14. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Hua

    Full Text Available Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs. In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC.

  15. Distribution of secretagogin-containing neurons in the basal forebrain of mice, with special reference to the cholinergic corticopetal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyengesi, Erika; Andrews, Zane B; Paxinos, George; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2013-05-01

    Cholinergic and GABAergic corticopetal neurons in the basal forebrain play important roles in cortical activation, sensory processing, and attention. Cholinergic neurons are intermingled with peptidergic, and various calcium binding protein-containing cells, however, the functional role of these neurons is not well understood. In this study we examined the expression pattern of secretagogin (Scgn), a newly described calcium-binding protein, in neurons of the basal forebrain. We also assessed some of the corticopetal projections of Scgn neurons and their co-localization with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), neuropeptide-Y, and other calcium-binding proteins (i.e., calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin). Scgn is expressed in cell bodies of the medial and lateral septum, vertical and horizontal diagonal band nuclei, and of the extension of the amygdala but it is almost absent in the ventral pallidum. Scgn is co-localized with ChAT in neurons of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, extension of the amygdala, and interstitial nucleus of the posterior limb of the anterior commissure. Scgn was co-localized with calretinin in the accumbens nucleus, medial division of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis, the extension of the amygdala, and interstitial nucleus of the posterior limb of the anterior commissure. We have not found co-expression of Scgn with parvalbumin, calbindin, or neuropeptide-Y. Retrograde tracing studies using Fluoro Gold in combination with Scgn-specific immunohistochemistry revealed that Scgn neurons situated in the nucleus of the horizontal limb of the diagonal band project to retrosplenial and cingulate cortical areas.

  16. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Austin Lim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh. Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI, which comprises only about 1-2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction.

  17. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios [Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King' s College London, Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [{sup 11}C]MP4A and [{sup 11}C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [{sup 123}I]5IA SPECT for the α{sub 4}β{sub 2} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [{sup 123}I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  18. Cholinergic drugs as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M; Riemann, D; Krieg, C

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis of a significant involvement of the cholinergic system in the pathogenesis of affective disorders still lacks strong experimental support. This is mainly because of missing specific peripheral markers of the central nervous activity of the cholinergic system and the lack of specific cholinergic agonists and antagonists without severe peripheral side effects. As the direct cholinergic agonist RS 86 seems to be more suitable because of its minor side effects, long half-life and oral applicability, it was tested for its antimanic property and its effect on the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal system and the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep-generating system. RS 86 exhibited antimanic and REM sleep-inducing properties, but failed to stimulate the cortisol system.

  19. Reduced cholinergic olfactory centrifugal inputs in patients with neurodegenerative disorders and MPTP-treated monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundiñano, Iñaki-Carril; Hernandez, Maria; Dicaudo, Carla; Ordoñez, Cristina; Marcilla, Irene; Tuñon, Maria-Teresa; Luquin, Maria-Rosario

    2013-09-01

    Olfactory impairment is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Olfactory bulb (OB) pathology in these diseases shows an increased number of olfactory dopaminergic cells, protein aggregates and dysfunction of neurotransmitter systems. Since cholinergic denervation might be a common underlying pathophysiological feature, the objective of this study was to determine cholinergic innervation of the OB in 27 patients with histological diagnosis of PD (n = 5), AD (n = 14), DLB (n = 8) and 8 healthy control subjects. Cholinergic centrifugal inputs to the OB were clearly reduced in all patients, the most significant decrease being in the DLB group. We also studied cholinergic innervation of the OB in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys (n = 7) and 7 intact animals. In MPTP-monkeys, we found that cholinergic innervation of the OB was reduced compared to control animals (n = 7). Interestingly, in MPTP-monkeys, we also detected a loss of cholinergic neurons and decreased dopaminergic innervation in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, which is the origin of the centrifugal cholinergic input to the OB. All these data suggest that cholinergic damage in the OB might contribute, at least in part, to the olfactory dysfunction usually exhibited by these patients. Moreover, decreased cholinergic input to the OB found in MPTP-monkeys suggests that dopamine depletion in itself might reduce the cholinergic tone of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons.

  20. N-palmitoyl serotonin alleviates scopolamine-induced memory impairment via regulation of cholinergic and antioxidant systems, and expression of BDNF and p-CREB in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, A Young; Doo, Choon Nan; Son, Eun Jung; Sung, Nak Yun; Lee, Kun Jong; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2015-12-05

    N-Palmitoyl-5-hydroxytryptamines (Pal-5HT), a cannabinoid, has recently been reported to express anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory actions in RBL-2H3 cells, and ameliorate glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in HT-22 cells. In this study, we examined the effect of Pal-5HT on deficits of learning and memory induced by scopolamine in mice. Memory performance was evaluated using Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), level of oxidative stress markers, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) were determined. Loss of neuronal cells in hippocampus was evaluated by histological examinations. Pal-5HT significantly improved the amnesia in the behavioral assessment. Pal-5HT regulated cholinergic function by inhibiting scopolamine-induced elevation of AChE activity and decline of ChAT activity. Pal-5HT suppressed oxidative stress by increasing activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) or NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and lowering MDA level. Additionally, it prevented against scopolamine-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2. Moreover, Pal-5HT suppressed the death of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 regions, while it restored expression of p-CREB and BDNF in hippocampus. Taken together, Pal-5HT is suggested to ameliorate deficits of memory and learning through regulation of cholinergic function, activation of antioxidant systems as well as restoration of BDNF and p-CREB expression. From these, Pal-5HT may be a potential candidate to prevent against neurodegeneration related to the memory deficit.

  1. Hormonal and cholinergic influences on pancreatic lysosomal and digestive enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evander, A; Ihse, I; Lundquist, I

    1983-01-01

    Hormonal and cholinergic influences on lysosomal and digestive enzyme activities in pancreatic tissue were studied in normal adult rats. Hormonal stimulation by the cholecystokinin analogue, caerulein, induced a marked enhancement of the activities of cathepsin D and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in pancreatic tissue, whereas the activities of amylase and lipase tended to decrease. Acid phosphatase activity was not affected. Further, caerulein was found to induce a significant increase of cathepsin D output in bile-pancreatic juice. This output largely parallelled that of amylase. Cholinergic stimulation by the muscarinic agonist carbachol, at a dose level giving the same output of amylase as caerulein, did not affect pancreatic activities of cathepsin D and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Further, cholinergic stimulation induced an increase of amylase activity and a slight decrease of acid phosphatase activity in pancreatic tissue. Lipase activity was not affected. No apparent effect on cathepsin D output in bile-pancreatic juice was encountered after cholinergic stimulation. The activities of neither the digestive nor the lysosomal enzymes were influenced by the administration of secretin. The results suggest a possible lysosomal involvement in caerulein-induced secretion and/or inactivation of pancreatic digestive enzymes, whereas cholinergic stimulation seems to act through different mechanisms.

  2. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Kelly

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of pharmacological and medical aspects of the muscarinic class of acetylcholine agonists and antagonists is presented. The therapeutic benefits of achieving receptor subtype selectivity are outlined and applications in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are discussed. A selection of chemical routes are described, which illustrate contemporary methodology for the synthesis of chiral medicinal compounds (asymmetric synthesis, chiral pool, enzymes. Routes to bicyclic intrannular amines and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions are highlighted.

  3. A role for muscarinic receptors in neutrophil extracellular trap formation and levamisole-induced autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Purmalek, Monica M.; Moore, Erica; Waldman, Meryl; Walter, Peter J.; Garraffo, H. Martin; Phillips, Karran A.; Preston, Kenzie L.; Graf, Jonathan; Grayson, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Levamisole, an anthelmintic drug with cholinergic properties, has been implicated in cases of drug-induced vasculitis when added to cocaine for profit purposes. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a cell death mechanism characterized by extrusion of chromatin decorated with granule proteins. Aberrant NET formation and degradation have been implicated in idiopathic autoimmune diseases that share features with levamisole-induced autoimmunity as well as in drug-induced autoimmunity. This study’s objective was to determine how levamisole modulates neutrophil biology and its putative effects on the vasculature. Murine and human neutrophils exposed to levamisole demonstrated enhanced NET formation through engagement of muscarinic subtype 3 receptor. Levamisole-induced NETosis required activation of Akt and the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, ROS induction through the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and peptidylarginine deiminase activation. Sera from two cohorts of patients actively using levamisole-adulterated cocaine displayed autoantibodies against NET components. Cutaneous biopsy material obtained from individuals exposed to levamisole suggests that neutrophils produce NETs in areas of vasculitic inflammation and thrombosis. NETs generated by levamisole were toxic to endothelial cells and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors on neutrophils by cholinergic agonists may contribute to the pathophysiology observed in drug-induced autoimmunity through the induction of inflammatory responses and neutrophil-induced vascular damage. PMID:28194438

  4. A role for muscarinic receptors in neutrophil extracellular trap formation and levamisole-induced autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Purmalek, Monica M; Moore, Erica; Waldman, Meryl; Walter, Peter J; Garraffo, H Martin; Phillips, Karran A; Preston, Kenzie L; Graf, Jonathan; Kaplan, Mariana J; Grayson, Peter C

    2017-02-09

    Levamisole, an anthelmintic drug with cholinergic properties, has been implicated in cases of drug-induced vasculitis when added to cocaine for profit purposes. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a cell death mechanism characterized by extrusion of chromatin decorated with granule proteins. Aberrant NET formation and degradation have been implicated in idiopathic autoimmune diseases that share features with levamisole-induced autoimmunity as well as in drug-induced autoimmunity. This study's objective was to determine how levamisole modulates neutrophil biology and its putative effects on the vasculature. Murine and human neutrophils exposed to levamisole demonstrated enhanced NET formation through engagement of muscarinic subtype 3 receptor. Levamisole-induced NETosis required activation of Akt and the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, ROS induction through the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and peptidylarginine deiminase activation. Sera from two cohorts of patients actively using levamisole-adulterated cocaine displayed autoantibodies against NET components. Cutaneous biopsy material obtained from individuals exposed to levamisole suggests that neutrophils produce NETs in areas of vasculitic inflammation and thrombosis. NETs generated by levamisole were toxic to endothelial cells and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors on neutrophils by cholinergic agonists may contribute to the pathophysiology observed in drug-induced autoimmunity through the induction of inflammatory responses and neutrophil-induced vascular damage.

  5. Suppression of glucocorticoid secretion enhances cholinergic transmission in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Shoji, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Ryuji; Tanaka, Yayoi; Maruyama, Wakako; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-08-15

    We previously demonstrated that suppression of glucocorticoid secretion by adrenalectomy (ADX) impaired prefrontal cortex-sensitive working memory, but not reference memory. Since the cholinergic system in the hippocampus is also involved in these memories, we examined the effects of glucocorticoid suppression on cholinergic transmission in the rat hippocampus. A microdialysis study revealed that ADX did not affect the basal acetylcholine release, but enhanced the KCl-evoked response. This enhanced response was reversed by the corticosterone replacement treatment. The extracellular choline concentrations increased under both basal and KCl-stimulated conditions in the ADX rats, and these increases were also reversed by the corticosterone replacement. These results indicate that suppression of glucocorticoid secretion enhances cholinergic transmission in the hippocampus in response to stimuli. It is possible that this enhanced cholinergic transmission may not contribute to the ADX-induced working memory impairment, but it may be involved in maintenance of reference memory.

  6. Disruption of cardiac cholinergic neurons enhances susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungen, Christiane; Scherschel, Katharina; Eickholt, Christian; Kuklik, Pawel; Klatt, Niklas; Bork, Nadja; Salzbrunn, Tim; Alken, Fares; Angendohr, Stephan; Klene, Christiane; Mester, Janos; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Veldkamp, Marieke W.; Schumacher, Udo; Willems, Stephan; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Meyer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation, a minimally invasive procedure deactivating abnormal firing cardiac tissue, is increasingly becoming the therapy of choice for atrial fibrillation. This is inevitably associated with the obliteration of cardiac cholinergic neurons. However, the impact on ventricular electrophysiology is unclear. Here we show that cardiac cholinergic neurons modulate ventricular electrophysiology. Mechanical disruption or pharmacological blockade of parasympathetic innervation shortens ventricular refractory periods, increases the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia and decreases ventricular cAMP levels in murine hearts. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ventricular cholinergic innervation, revealing parasympathetic fibres running from the atria to the ventricles parallel to sympathetic fibres. In humans, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation, which is accompanied by accidental parasympathetic and concomitant sympathetic denervation, raises the burden of premature ventricular complexes. In summary, our results demonstrate an influence of cardiac cholinergic neurons on the regulation of ventricular function and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:28128201

  7. Muscarinic regulation of Kenyon cell dendritic arborizations in adult worker honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrin, Scott E; Herlihy, J Daniel; Robinson, Gene E; Fahrbach, Susan E

    2011-09-01

    The experience of foraging under natural conditions increases the volume of mushroom body neuropil in worker honey bees. A comparable increase in neuropil volume results from treatment of worker honey bees with pilocarpine, an agonist for muscarinic-type cholinergic receptors. A component of the neuropil growth induced by foraging experience is growth of dendrites in the collar region of the calyces. We show here, via analysis of Golgi-impregnated collar Kenyon cells with wedge arborizations, that significant increases in standard measures of dendritic complexity were also found in worker honey bees treated with pilocarpine. This result suggests that signaling via muscarinic-type receptors promotes the increase in Kenyon cell dendritic complexity associated with foraging. Treatment of worker honey bees with scopolamine, a muscarinic inhibitor, inhibited some aspects of dendritic growth. Spine density on the Kenyon cell dendrites varied with sampling location, with the distal portion of the dendritic field having greater total spine density than either the proximal or medial section. This observation may be functionally significant because of the stratified organization of projections from visual centers to the dendritic arborizations of the collar Kenyon cells. Pilocarpine treatment had no effect on the distribution of spines on dendrites of the collar Kenyon cells.

  8. Long-term changes in brain cholinergic system and behavior in rats following gestational exposure to lead: protective effect of calcium supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basha Chand D.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our earlier studies showed that lactational exposure to lead (Pb caused irreversible neurochemical alterations in rats. The present study was carried out to examine whether gestational exposure to Pb can cause long-term changes in the brain cholinergic system and behavior of rats. The protective effect of calcium (Ca supplementation against Pb toxicity was also examined. Pregnant rats were exposed to 0.2% Pb (Pb acetate in drinking water from gestational day (GD 6 to GD 21. The results showed decrease in body weight gain (GD 6–21 of dams, whereas no changes were observed in offspring body weight at different postnatal days following Pb exposure. Male offspring treated with Pb showed marginal alterations in developmental landmarks such as unfolding of pinnae, lower and upper incisor eruption, fur development, eye slit formation and eye opening on postnatal day (PND 1, whereas significant alterations were found in the righting reflex (PNDs 4–7, slant board behavior (PNDs 8–10 and forelimb hang performance (PNDs 12–16. Biochemical analysis showed decrease in synaptosomal acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity and an increase in acetylcholine (ACh levels in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus on PND 14, PND 21, PND 28 and in the four-month age group of rats following Pb exposure. Significant deficits were also observed in total locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and open field behavior in selected age groups of Pb-exposed rats. These alterations were found to be maximal on PND 28, corresponding with the greater blood lead levels observed on PND 28. Addition of 0.02% Ca to Pb reversed the Pb-induced impairments in the cholinergic system as well as in behavioral parameters of rats. In conclusion, these data suggest that gestational exposure to Pb is able to induce long-term changes in neurological functions of offspring. Maternal Ca administration reversed these neurological effects of Pb later in life, suggesting a protective effect of

  9. Synergism between insecticides permethrin and propoxur occurs through activation of presynaptic muscarinic negative feedback of acetylcholine release in the insect central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbel, Vincent; Stankiewicz, Maria; Bonnet, Julien; Grolleau, Françoise; Hougard, Jean Marc; Lapied, Bruno

    2006-07-01

    Although synergism between pesticides has been widely documented, the physiological mechanisms by which an insecticide synergizes another remains unclear. Toxicological and electrophysiological studies were carried out on two susceptible pest species (the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus and the cockroach Periplaneta americana) to understand better the physiological process involved in pyrethroid and carbamate interactions. Larval bioassays were conducted with the susceptible reference strain SLAB of C. quinquefasciatus to assess the implication of multi-function oxidases and non-specific esterases in insecticide detoxification and synergism. Results showed that the general theory of synergism (competition between pesticides for a common detoxification enzyme) was unlikely to occur in the SLAB strain since the level of synergy recorded between permethrin and propoxur was unchanged in the presence of piperonyl butoxide and tribufos, two inhibitors of oxidases and esterases, respectively (synergism ratios were similar with and without synergists). We also showed that addition of a sub-lethal concentration of nicotine significantly increased the toxicity of permethrin and propoxur at the lower range of the dose-mortality regression lines, suggesting the manifestation of important physiological disruptions at synaptic level. The effects of both permethrin and propoxur were studied on the cercal-afferent giant-interneuron synapses in the terminal abdominal ganglion of the cockroach P. americana using the single-fibre oil-gap method. We demonstrated that permethrin and propoxur increased drastically the ACh concentration within the synaptic cleft, which thereby stimulated a negative feedback of ACh release. Atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, reversed the effect of permethrin and propoxur mixtures. This demonstrates the implication of the presynaptic muscarinic receptors in the negative feedback regulation process and in synergism. Based on these findings, we

  10. Personalized genetics of the cholinergic blockade of neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simchovitz, Alon; Heneka, Michael T; Soreq, Hermona

    2017-03-21

    Acetylcholine signaling is essential for cognitive functioning and blocks inflammation. To maintain homeostasis, cholinergic signaling is subjected to multi-leveled and bidirectional regulation by both proteins and non-coding microRNAs ('CholinomiRs'). CholinomiRs coordinate the cognitive and inflammatory aspects of cholinergic signaling by targeting major cholinergic transcripts including the acetylcholine hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Notably, AChE inhibitors are the only currently approved line of treatment for Alzheimer's disease patients. Since cholinergic signaling blocks neuroinflammation which is inherent to Alzheimer's disease, genomic changes modifying AChE's properties and its susceptibility to inhibitors and/or to CholinomiRs regulation may affect the levels and properties of inflammasome components such as NLRP3. This calls for genomic-based medicine approaches based on genotyping of both coding and non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in cholinergic signaling. An example is a SNP in a recognition element for the primate-specific microRNA-608 within the 3' untranslated region of the AChE transcript. Carriers of the minor allele of that SNP present massively elevated brain AChE levels, increased trait anxiety and inflammation, accompanied by perturbed CholinomiR-608 regulatory networks and elevated prefrontal activity under exposure to stressful insults. Several additional SNPs in the AChE and other cholinergic genes await further studies, and might likewise involve different CholinomiRs and pathways including those modulating the initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. CholinomiRs regulation of the cholinergic system thus merits in-depth interrogation and is likely to lead to personalized medicine approaches for achieving better homeostasis in health and disease. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms.

  11. Down-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 adversely affects the expression of Alzheimer's disease-relevant genes and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchner, Thole; Schliebs, Reinhard; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2005-10-01

    Beta-amyloid peptides play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, preventing beta-amyloid formation by inhibition of the beta site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 is considered as a potential strategy to treat AD. Cholinergic mechanisms have been shown to control amyloid precursor protein processing and the number of muscarinic M2-acetylcholine receptors is decreased in brain regions of patients with AD enriched with senile plaques. Therefore, the present study investigates the effect of this M2 muscarinic receptor down-regulation by siRNA on total gene expression and on regulation of BACE1 in particular in SK-SH-SY5Y cells. This model system was used for microarray analysis after carbachol stimulation of siRNA-treated cells compared with carbachol stimulated, non-siRNA-treated cells. The same model system was used to elucidate changes at the protein level by using two-dimensional gels followed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis. Taken together, the results indicate that the M2 acetylcholine receptor down-regulation in brains of patients with AD has important effects on the expression of several genes and proteins with major functions in the pathology of AD. This includes beta-secretase BACE1 as well as several modulators of the tau protein and other AD-relevant genes and proteins. Moreover, most of these genes and proteins are adversely affected against the background of AD.

  12. Calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release and muscarinic autoreceptors in rat cortical synaptosomes during development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchi, M.; Caviglia, A.; Paudice, P.; Raiteri, M.

    1983-05-01

    A number of presynaptic cholinergic parameters (high affinity (/sup 3/H)choline uptake, (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine synthesis, (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release, and autoinhibition of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release mediated by muscarinic autoreceptors) were comparatively analyzed in rat brain cortex synaptosomes during postnatal development. These various functions showed a differential time course during development. At 10 days of age the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine evoked by 15 mM KCl from superfused synaptosomes was Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent but insensitive to the inhibitory action of extrasynaptosomal acetylcholine. The muscarinic autoreceptors regulating acetylcholine release were clearly detectable only at 14 days, indicating that their appearance may represent a criterion of synaptic maturation more valuable than the onset of a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent release.

  13. The role of efferent cholinergic transmission for the insulinotropic and glucagonostatic effects of GLP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plamboeck, Astrid; Veedfald, Simon; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2015-01-01

    The importance of vagal efferent signaling for the insulinotropic and glucagonostatic effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) was investigated in a randomized single-blinded study. Healthy male participants (n = 10) received atropine to block vagal cholinergic transmission or saline infusions...... on separate occasions. At t = 15 min, plasma glucose was clamped at 6 mmol/l. GLP-1 was infused at a low dose (0.3 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) from t = 45-95 min and at a higher dose (1 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) from t = 95-145 min. Atropine blocked muscarinic, cholinergic transmission, as evidenced by an increase...... in heart rate [peak: 70 ± 2 (saline) vs. 90 ± 2 (atropine) beats/min, P atropine) pmol/l × min, P

  14. A cholinergic receptor gene (CHRM2) affects event-related oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin A; Porjesz, Bernice; Almasy, Laura; Bierut, Laura; Dick, Danielle; Goate, Alison; Hinrichs, Anthony; Rice, John P; Wang, Jen C; Bauer, Lance O; Crowe, Raymond; Foroud, Tatiana; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kuperman, Samuel; Nurnberger, John; O'Connor, Sean J; Rohrbaugh, John; Schuckit, Marc A; Tischfield, Jay; Edenberg, Howard J; Begleiter, Henri

    2006-09-01

    We report genetic linkage and association findings which implicate the gene encoding the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) in the modulation of a scalp-recorded electrophysiological phenotype. The P3 (P300) response was evoked using a three-stimulus visual oddball paradigm and a phenotype that relates to the energy in the theta band (4-5 Hz) was analyzed. Studies have shown that similar electrophysiological measures represent cognitive correlates of attention, working memory, and response selection; a role has been suggested for the ascending cholinergic pathway in the same functions. The results of our genetic association tests, combined with knowledge regarding the presence of presynaptic cholinergic M2 autoreceptors in the basal forebrain, indicate that the cognitive processes required by the experiment may in part be mediated by inhibitory neural networks. These findings underscore the utility of electrophysiology and neurogenetics in the understanding of cognitive function and the study of brain-related disorders.

  15. Basal forebrain cholinergic input is not essential for lesion-induced plasticity in mature auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Marc R; Brown, Mel; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2005-11-23

    The putative role of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in mediating lesion-induced plasticity in topographic cortical representations was investigated. Cholinergic immunolesions were combined with unilateral restricted cochlear lesions in adult cats, demonstrating the consequence of cholinergic depletion on lesion-induced plasticity in primary auditory cortex (AI). Immunolesions almost eliminated the cholinergic input to AI, while cochlear lesions produced broad high-frequency hearing losses. The results demonstrate that the near elimination of cholinergic input does not disrupt reorganization of the tonotopic representation of the lesioned (contralateral) cochlea in AI and does not affect the normal representation of the unlesioned (ipsilateral) cochlea. It is concluded that cholinergic basal forebrain input to AI is not essential for the occurrence of lesion-induced plasticity in AI.

  16. Reducing cholinergic constriction: the major reversible mechanism in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Brusasco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The airway narrowing in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has often been misunderstood as being irreversible. However, a large proportion of patients with COPD do respond to bronchodilator agents with significant changes in lung function. Unlike in asthma, abnormalities in airway smooth muscle structure or function are not believed to play a key role in COPD airway narrowing. Although there are only limited data suggesting that cholinergic tone may be increased in COPD, the well-documented efficacy of antimuscarinic agents in increasing airway calibre suggests that cholinergic tone represents the major reversible component of airflow obstruction in these patients. Airway wall thickening and loss of airway-to-parenchyma interdependence are nonreversible components of airflow obstruction in COPD that may amplify the effect of changes in airway smooth muscle tone. Thus, keeping airway smooth muscle tone to a minimum might offer patients long-lasting airway patency and protection against breathlessness, which is the major complaint of patients with COPD. Receptor antagonism by anticholinergic agents can achieve effective relaxation of airway smooth muscle in COPD. According to a classical view of cholinergic receptor function and distribution, the ideal anticholinergic bronchodilator would be one that blocks both M1 and M3 receptors, which mediate airway smooth muscle contraction, but not the M2 receptor, stimulation of which reduces acetylcholine release from vagus nerve endings and prevents the airway smooth muscle from contracting by excessive increments. Agents with such pharmacodynamic selectivity are not available, but effective and prolonged inhibition of airway smooth muscle tone has been obtained with tiotropium, which binds to all three major muscarinic receptor subtypes, but for much longer to M3 than to M2 receptors. Recent data show that long-term treatment with tiotropium for 1 yr helps sustain 24-h airway patency. This

  17. Role for M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Fedorova, Irina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P D; Rasmussen, Thøger; Thomsen, Morgane; Bolwig, Tom G; Knitowski, Karen M; McKinzie, David L; Yamada, Masahisa; Wess, Jürgen; Basile, Anthony

    2003-10-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors of the M5 subtype are expressed by dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmentum. These M5 receptors modulate the activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, which play an important role in mediating reinforcing properties of abused psychostimulants like cocaine. The potential role of M5 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine was investigated using M5 receptor-deficient mice in a model of acute cocaine self-administration. The M5-deficient mice self-administered cocaine at a significantly lower rate than wild-type controls. In the conditioned place preference procedure, a classic test for evaluating the rewarding properties of drugs, M5-deficient mice spent significantly less time in the cocaine-paired compartment than control mice. Moreover, the severity of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome (withdrawal-associated anxiety measured in the elevated plus-maze) was significantly attenuated in mice lacking the M5 receptor. These results demonstrate that M5 receptors play an important role in mediating both cocaine-associated reinforcement and withdrawal.

  18. 良性前列腺增生合并膀胱过度活动症患者膀胱黏膜毒蕈碱型胆碱能受体 M2、M3亚型的表达及临床意义%Expression and Clinical Significance of Muscarinic Cholinergic Receptor M2 and M3 Subtypes in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Overactive Bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张进生; 刘春林; 刘良颖; 李玮; 刘宁; 渠渊; 王立茹; 冯超; 吴宗山; 柴军; 张前

    2014-01-01

    蕈碱型胆碱能受体( muscarinic cholinergic receptor ,M受体) M2、M3亚型表达水平的变化及临床意义。方法分析2012年5月~2013年3月20例BPH患者的国际前列腺症状评分( international prostate syndrome scoring ,IPSS)、生活质量评分(quality of life,QOL)、膀胱过度活动症症状评分(OAB syndrome scoring,OABSS)和尿动力学检查。根据OABSS评分结果将其分为BPH组(9例)及BPH并OAB组(11例)。2组均在膀胱镜下钳取膀胱黏膜,经逆转录聚合酶链式反应( reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction ,RT-PCR)检测M受体M2、M3亚型mRNA的表达水平。 M2、M3受体mRNA表达水平采用相对于内参基因mRNA表达的相对值ΔCt值表示。比较2组M2、M3受体表达水平及相关性。结果 M2、M3受体表达的ΔCt值BPH组明显低于BPH并OAB组(M2的ΔCt值:-0.154±0.641 vs.0.562±0.762, t=-2.241, P=0.038;M3的ΔCt值:2.534±0.816 vs.3.639±1.019, t=-2.630, P=0.017),说明BPH组M2、M3表达水平均高于BPH并OAB组。2组M2∶M3分别为中位数6.5206(2.35~17.33)和7.9447(2.10~23.83)(Z=-1.102,P=0.271)。同组比较,2组M2表达水平均高于M3(t=-7.776,P=0.000;t=-8.018, P=0.000)。 M3表达水平与OABSS和QOL评分呈负相关(r=-0.466,P=0.039;r=-0.496,P=0.026)。结论 BPH合并OAB症状的患者,其膀胱黏膜M2、M3表达水平下降,且M2∶M3比例在合并OAB后有升高的趋势,在OAB发病中起一定作用。 M3表达的下降,加重了OAB的程度,降低了患者的生活质量。

  19. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  20. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  1. Central cholinergic regulation of respiration: nicotinic receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuesi M SHAO; Jack L FELDMAN

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in brainstem and spinal cord regions involved in the control of breathing. These receptors mediate central cholinergic regulation of respiration and effects of the exogenous ligand nicotine on respiratory pattern. Activation of a4* nAChRs in the preBotzinger Complex (preBotC), an essential site for normal respiratory rhythm generation in mammals, modulates excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission and depolarizes preBotC inspiratory neurons, leading to increases in respiratory frequency. nAChRs are also present in motor nuclei innervating respiratory muscles. Activation of post- and/or extra-synaptic a4* nAChRs on hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons depolarizes these neurons, potentiating tonic and respiratory-related rhythmic activity. As perinatal nicotine exposure may contribute to the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), we discuss the effects of perinatal nicotine exposure on development of the cholinergic and other neurotransmitter systems involved in control of breathing. Advances in understanding of the mechanisms underlying central cholinergic/nicotinic modulation of respiration provide a pharmacological basis for exploiting nAChRs as therapeutic targets for neurological disorders related to neural control of breathing such as sleep apnea and SIDS.

  2. Cholinergic excitation in mouse primary vs. associative cortex: region-specific magnitude and receptor balance.

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    Tian, Michael K; Bailey, Craig D C; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2014-08-01

    Cholinergic stimulation of the cerebral cortex is essential for tasks requiring attention; however, there is still some debate over which cortical regions are required for such tasks. There is extensive cholinergic innervation of both primary and associative cortices, and transient release of acetylcholine (ACh) is detected in deep layers of the relevant primary and/or associative cortex, depending on the nature of the attention task. Here, we investigated the electrophysiological effects of ACh in layer VI, the deepest layer, of the primary somatosensory cortex, the primary motor cortex, and the associative medial prefrontal cortex. Layer VI pyramidal neurons are a major source of top-down modulation of attention, and we found that the strength and homogeneity of their direct cholinergic excitation was region-specific. On average, neurons in the primary cortical regions showed weaker responses to ACh, mediated by a balance of contributions from both nicotinic and muscarinic ACh receptors. Conversely, neurons in the associative medial prefrontal cortex showed significantly stronger excitation by ACh, mediated predominantly by nicotinic receptors. The greatest diversity of responses to ACh was found in the primary somatosensory cortex, with only a subset of neurons showing nicotinic excitation. In a mouse model with attention deficits only under demanding conditions, cholinergic excitation was preserved in primary cortical regions but not in the associative medial prefrontal cortex. These findings demonstrate that the effect of ACh is not uniform throughout the cortex, and suggest that its ability to enhance attention performance may involve different cellular mechanisms across cortical regions.

  3. Central cholinergic activation of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit alleviates experimental colitis.

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    Ji, H; Rabbi, M F; Labis, B; Pavlov, V A; Tracey, K J; Ghia, J E

    2014-03-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is an efferent vagus nerve-based mechanism that regulates immune responses and cytokine production through α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) signaling. Decreased efferent vagus nerve activity is observed in inflammatory bowel disease. We determined whether central activation of this pathway alters inflammation in mice with colitis and the mediating role of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit and α7nAChR signaling. Two experimental models of colitis were used in C57BL/6 mice. Central cholinergic activation induced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine or a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist treatments resulted in reduced mucosal inflammation associated with decreased major histocompatibility complex II level and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by splenic CD11c⁺ cells mediated by α7nAChR signaling. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory efficacy was abolished in mice with vagotomy, splenic neurectomy, or splenectomy. In conclusion, central cholinergic activation of a vagus nerve-to-spleen circuit controls intestinal inflammation and this regulation can be explored to develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  4. Antidepressant-like effects of the cannabinoid receptor ligands in the forced swimming test in mice: mechanism of action and possible interactions with cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Michalak, Agnieszka; Biala, Grazyna

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to explore the role of the endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB) receptor ligands, nicotine and scopolamine, in the depression-related responses using the forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Our results revealed that acute injection of oleamide (10 and 20 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor agonist, caused antidepressant-like effect in the FST, while AM 251 (0.25-3 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor antagonist, did not provoke any effect in this test. Moreover, acute administration of both CB2 receptor agonist, JWH 133 (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) and CB2 receptor antagonist, AM 630 (0.5 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant action. Antidepressant effects of oleamide and JWH 133 were attenuated by acute injection of both non-effective dose of AM 251, as well as AM 630. Among the all CB compounds used, only the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg) with non-effective dose of nicotine (0.5 mg/kg) caused an antidepressant effect. However, none of the CB receptor ligands, had influence on the antidepressant effects provoked by nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) injection. In turn, the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg); JWH (2 mg/kg) or AM 630 (2 mg/kg), but not of AM 251 (0.25 mg/kg), with non-effective dose of scopolamine (0.1 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant properties. Indeed, all of the CB compounds used, intensified the antidepressant-like effects induced by an acute injection of scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg). Our results provide clear evidence that the endocannabinoid system participates in the depression-related behavior and through interactions with cholinergic system modulate these kind of responses.

  5. Heart failure causes cholinergic transdifferentiation of cardiac sympathetic nerves via gp130-signaling cytokines in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kimura, Kensuke; Arai, Takahide; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Jin; Sano, Motoaki; Kawakami, Takashi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Iwanami, Akio; Okano, Hideyuki; Okada, Yasunori; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ogawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-02-01

    Although several cytokines and neurotrophic factors induce sympathetic neurons to transdifferentiate into cholinergic neurons in vitro, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this remain unknown. During congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic neural tone is upregulated, but there is a paradoxical reduction in norepinephrine synthesis and reuptake in the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Here we examined whether cholinergic transdifferentiation can occur in the cardiac SNS in rodent models of CHF and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism(s) using genetically modified mice. We used Dahl salt-sensitive rats to model CHF and found that, upon CHF induction, the cardiac SNS clearly acquired cholinergic characteristics. Of the various cholinergic differentiation factors, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and cardiotrophin-1 were strongly upregulated in the ventricles of rats with CHF. Further, LIF and cardiotrophin-1 secreted from cultured failing rat cardiomyocytes induced cholinergic transdifferentiation in cultured sympathetic neurons, and this process was reversed by siRNAs targeting Lif and cardiotrophin-1. Consistent with the data in rats, heart-specific overexpression of LIF in mice caused cholinergic transdifferentiation in the cardiac SNS. Further, SNS-specific targeting of the gene encoding the gp130 subunit of the receptor for LIF and cardiotrophin-1 in mice prevented CHF-induced cholinergic transdifferentiation. Cholinergic transdifferentiation was also observed in the cardiac SNS of autopsied patients with CHF. Thus, CHF causes target-dependent cholinergic transdifferentiation of the cardiac SNS via gp130-signaling cytokines secreted from the failing myocardium.

  6. Cholinergic receptor blockade by scopolamine and mecamylamine exacerbates global cerebral ischemia induced memory dysfunction in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R S; Rai, S; Katyal, A

    2014-12-01

    Global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (GCI/R) injury encompasses complex pathophysiological sequalae, inducing loss of hippocampal neurons and behavioural deficits. Progressive neuronal death and memory dysfunctions culminate from several different mechanisms like oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation and cholinergic hypofunction. Experimental evidences point to the beneficial effects of cholinomimetic agents such as rivastigmine and galantamine in improving memory outcomes following GCI/R injury. However, the direct implications of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor blockade during global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury have not been investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the relative involvement of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in spatial/associative memory functions and neuronal damage during global cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. The outcomes of present study support the idea that preservation of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptor functions is essential to alleviate hippocampal neuronal death in CA1 region following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  7. Endogenous cholinergic neurotransmission contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica Bajic

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system is critical for behavioral adaptations associated with opioid reward and addiction. These processes may be influenced by cholinergic transmission arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg, a main source of acetylcholine to mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To examine this possibility we asked if chronic systemic morphine administration affects expression of genes in ventral and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray at the level of the LDTg using rtPCR. Specifically, we examined gene expression changes in the area of interest using Neurotransmitters and Receptors PCR array between chronic morphine and saline control groups. Analysis suggested that chronic morphine administration led to changes in expression of genes associated, in part, with cholinergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, using a quantitative immunofluorescent technique, we found that chronic morphine treatment produced a significant increase in immunolabeling of the cholinergic marker (vesicular acetylcholine transporter in neurons of the LDTg. Finally, systemic administration of the nonselective and noncompetitive neuronal nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.5 or 2 mg/kg dose-dependently blocked the expression, and to a lesser extent the development, of locomotor sensitization. The same treatment had no effect on acute morphine antinociception, antinociceptive tolerance or dependence to chronic morphine. Taken together, the results suggest that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission selectively contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine and this process may, in part, involve cholinergic neurons within the LDTg.

  8. Physical urticarias and cholinergic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abajian, Marina; Schoepke, Nicole; Altrichter, Sabine; Zuberbier, Torsten; Zuberbier, H C Torsten; Maurer, Marcus

    2014-02-01

    Physical urticarias are a unique subgroup of chronic urticaria in which urticarial responses can be reproducibly induced by different specific physical stimuli acting on the skin. These conditions include urticaria factitia/symptomatic dermographism, delayed pressure urticaria, cold contact urticaria, heat contact urticaria, solar urticaria, and vibratory urticaria/angioedema. Physical urticarias and cholinergic urticarias are diagnosed based on the patients' history and provocation tests including trigger threshold testing where possible. Treatment is mainly symptomatic. Many patients benefit from avoiding eliciting triggers, and desensitization to these triggers can be helpful in some physical urticarias and in cholinergic urticaria.

  9. Cholinergic modulation of non-N-methyl-D-aspartic acid glutamatergic transmission in the chick ventral lateral geniculate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J-Z; Sorenson, E M; Chiappinelli, V A

    2010-03-17

    effects. Thus while activation of nicotinic receptors potentiates retinogeniculate transmission, activation of muscarinic receptors mediates depression of transmission, demonstrating a complex cholinergic modulation of sensory information in LGNv.

  10. Regional and muscle layer variations in cholinergic nerve control of the rat myometrium during the oestrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdeau, Eric; Rossano, Bernadette; Prud'homme, Marie-Jeanne

    2003-02-28

    To determine regional and muscle layer differences in the cholinergic nerve control of uterine activity, functional and immunohistochemical experiments were carried out on the cervix, and circular and longitudinal muscle from the caudal and rostral uterine horn in cyclic rats. During oestrus, in vitro electrical field stimulation evoked contractions in the cervix and myometrium of the caudal horn, predominantly in circular muscle layer. All evoked responses were tetrodotoxin-sensitive and completely abolished by atropine, thus were cholinergic nerve-mediated. In contrast, no electrical field stimulation-induced contraction occurred in either the circular or longitudinal muscle from the rostral uterus. Concentration-response curves for carbachol showed that muscarinic receptor-mediated contractions occurred in all uterine regions and muscle layers during oestrus. Immunohistochemistry for the cholinergic nerve marker, vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that the predominance of the acetylcholine-dependent contractions in circular muscle preparations were related to a layer-specific distribution of cholinergic nerve fibres, abundant in the circular muscle but scarce in the longitudinal muscle layer. In addition, the absence of electrical field stimulation-evoked acetylcholine-dependent contractions in the rostral uterus was correlated to a marked decrease in the density of cholinergic fibres along the caudo-rostral axis of the organ. In the uterus from diestrus rats, contractions were not elicited in response to electrical field stimulation in the cervix and circular or longitudinal muscle from the caudal as well as rostral uterine horn. Addition of cumulative doses of carbachol failed to increase in a concentration-dependent manner the frequency and amplitude of contractions in the cervix and myometrial layers from either the caudal and rostral uterine horn. The distribution and density of cholinergic nerve fibres along the uterus and between the muscle layers

  11. M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonism alters sleep without affecting memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Christoph; Power, Ann E; Nofzinger, Eric A; Feige, Bernd; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Kloepfer, Corinna; Waldheim, Bernhard; Radosa, Marc-Philipp; Berger, Mathias; Riemann, Dieter

    2006-11-01

    Preclinical studies have implicated cholinergic neurotransmission, specifically M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activation, in sleep-associated memory consolidation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of administering the direct M1 mAChR agonist RS-86 on pre-post sleep memory consolidation. Twenty healthy human participants were tested in a declarative word-list task and a procedural mirror-tracing task. RS-86 significantly reduced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency and slow wave sleep (SWS) duration in comparison with placebo. Presleep acquisition and postsleep recall rates were within the expected ranges. However, recall rates in both tasks were almost identical for the RS-86 and placebo conditions. These results indicate that selective M1 mAChR activation in healthy humans has no clinically relevant effect on pre-post sleep consolidation of declarative or procedural memories at a dose that reduces REM sleep latency and SWS duration.

  12. Nicotinic and muscarinic agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors stimulate a common pathway to enhance GluN2B-NMDAR responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Miledi, Ricardo; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic and muscarinic ACh receptor agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) can enhance cognitive function. However, it is unknown whether a common signaling pathway is involved in the effect. Here, we show that in vivo administration of nicotine, AChEIs, and an m1 muscarinic (m1) agonist increase glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl D-aspartate 2B (GluN2B)-containing NMDA receptor (NR2B-NMDAR) responses, a necessary component in memory formation, in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, and that coadministration of the m1 antagonist pirenzepine prevents the effect of cholinergic drugs. These observations suggest that the effect of nicotine is secondary to increased release of ACh via the activation of nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) and involves m1 receptor activation through ACh. In vitro activation of m1 receptors causes the selective enhancement of NR2B-NMDAR responses in CA1 pyramidal cells, and in vivo exposure to cholinergic drugs occludes the in vitro effect. Furthermore, in vivo exposure to cholinergic drugs suppresses the potentiating effect of Src on NMDAR responses in vitro. These results suggest that exposure to cholinergic drugs maximally stimulates the m1/guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit alpha q/PKC/proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2/Src signaling pathway for the potentiation of NMDAR responses in vivo, occluding the in vitro effects of m1 activation and Src. Thus, our results indicate not only that nAChRs, ACh, and m1 receptors are on the same pathway involving Src signaling but also that NR2B-NMDARs are a point of convergence of cholinergic and glutamatergic pathways involved in learning and memory. PMID:25114227

  13. Local cholinergic and non-cholinergic neural pathways to the rat supraoptic nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeker, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    An estimated two thirds of the input to the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus (SON) including a functionally significant cholinergic innervation, arise from local sources of unknown origin. The sources of these inputs were identified utilizing Golgi-Cox, retrograde tracing, choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and anterograde tracing methodologies. Multipolar Golgi impregnated neurons located dorsal and lateral to the SON extend spiney processes into the nucleus. Injections of the retrograde tracers, wheat germ agglutinin or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase, into the SON labeled cells bilaterally in the arcuate nucleus, and ipsilaterally in the lateral hypothalamus, anterior hypothalamus, nucleus of the diagonal band, subfornical organ, medial preoptic area, lateral preoptic area and in the region dorsolateral to the nucleus. Immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase revealed cells within the ventro-caudal portion of cholinergic cell group, Ch4, which cluster dorsolateral to the SON, and extend axon- and dendrite-like processes into the SON. Cells double-labeled by choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and retrograde tracer injections into the SON are localized within the same cholinergic cell group dorsolateral to the SON. Injections of the anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, deposited dorsolateral to the SON results in labeled pre-and post-synaptic processes within the SON. The identification and characterization of endogenous immunoglobulin within the SON and other neurons innervating areas lacking a blood-brain barrier established a novel and potentially important system for direct communication of the supraoptic cells with blood-borne constitutents.

  14. Different muscarinic receptor subtypes modulate proliferation of primary human detrusor smooth muscle cells via Akt/PI3K and map kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Nicola; Bodei, Serena; Zani, Danilo; Michel, Martin C; Simeone, Claudio; Cosciani Cunico, Sergio; Spano, Pierfranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    While acetylcholine (ACh) and muscarinic receptors in the bladder are mainly known for their role in the regulation of smooth muscle contractility, in other tissues they are involved in tissue remodelling and promote cell growth and proliferation. In the present study we have used primary cultures of human detrusor smooth muscle cells (HDSMCs), in order to investigate the role of muscarinic receptors in HDSMC proliferation. Samples were obtained as discarded tissue from men >65 years undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer and cut in pieces that were either immediately frozen or placed in culture medium for the cell culture establishment. HDSMCs were isolated from samples, propagated and maintained in culture. [(3)H]-QNB radioligand binding on biopsies revealed the presence of muscarinic receptors, with a Kd of 0.10±0.02nM and a Bmax of 72.8±0.1fmol/mg protein. The relative expression of muscarinic receptor subtypes, based on Q-RT-PCR, was similar in biopsies and HDSMC with a rank order of M2≥M3>M1>M4>M5. The cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh, 1-100μM) concentration-dependently increased [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation (up to 46±4%). This was concentration-dependently inhibited by the general muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and by subtype-preferring antagonists with an order of potency of darifenacin >4-DAMP>AF-DX 116. The CCh-induced cell proliferation was blocked by selective PI-3 kinase and ERK activation inhibitors, strongly suggesting that these intracellular pathways mediate, at least in part, the muscarinic receptor-mediated cell proliferation. This work shows that M2 and M3 receptors can mediate not only HDSM contraction but also proliferation; they may also contribute bladder remodelling including detrusor hypertrophy.

  15. Cholinergic Signaling Exerts Protective Effects in Models of Sympathetic Hyperactivity-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavioli, Mariana; Lara, Aline; Almeida, Pedro W. M.; Lima, Augusto Martins; Damasceno, Denis D.; Rocha-Resende, Cibele; Ladeira, Marina; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Martinelli, Patricia M.; Melo, Marcos Barrouin; Brum, Patricia C.; Fontes, Marco Antonio Peliky; Souza Santos, Robson A.; Prado, Marco A. M.; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic control of the heart is exerted by two distinct branches; the autonomic component represented by the parasympathetic nervous system, and the recently described non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery. Previous evidence has shown that reduced cholinergic function leads to deleterious effects on the myocardium. Yet, whether conditions of increased cholinergic signaling can offset the pathological remodeling induced by sympathetic hyperactivity, and its consequences for these two cholinergic axes are unknown. Here, we investigated two models of sympathetic hyperactivity: i) the chronic beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation evoked by isoproterenol (ISO), and ii) the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptor knockout (KO) mice that lack pre-synaptic adrenergic receptors. In both models, cholinergic signaling was increased by administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine. First, we observed that isoproterenol produces an autonomic imbalance characterized by increased sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic tone. Under this condition transcripts for cholinergic proteins were upregulated in ventricular myocytes, indicating that non-neuronal cholinergic machinery is activated during adrenergic overdrive. Pyridostigmine treatment prevented the effects of ISO on autonomic function and on the ventricular cholinergic machinery, and inhibited cardiac remodeling. α2A/α2C-KO mice presented reduced ventricular contraction when compared to wild-type mice, and this dysfunction was also reversed by cholinesterase inhibition. Thus, the cardiac parasympathetic system and non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery are modulated in opposite directions under conditions of increased sympathetic drive or ACh availability. Moreover, our data support the idea that pyridostigmine by restoring ACh availability is beneficial in heart disease. PMID:24992197

  16. Cholinergic signaling exerts protective effects in models of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gavioli

    Full Text Available Cholinergic control of the heart is exerted by two distinct branches; the autonomic component represented by the parasympathetic nervous system, and the recently described non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery. Previous evidence has shown that reduced cholinergic function leads to deleterious effects on the myocardium. Yet, whether conditions of increased cholinergic signaling can offset the pathological remodeling induced by sympathetic hyperactivity, and its consequences for these two cholinergic axes are unknown. Here, we investigated two models of sympathetic hyperactivity: i the chronic beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation evoked by isoproterenol (ISO, and ii the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptor knockout (KO mice that lack pre-synaptic adrenergic receptors. In both models, cholinergic signaling was increased by administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine. First, we observed that isoproterenol produces an autonomic imbalance characterized by increased sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic tone. Under this condition transcripts for cholinergic proteins were upregulated in ventricular myocytes, indicating that non-neuronal cholinergic machinery is activated during adrenergic overdrive. Pyridostigmine treatment prevented the effects of ISO on autonomic function and on the ventricular cholinergic machinery, and inhibited cardiac remodeling. α2A/α2C-KO mice presented reduced ventricular contraction when compared to wild-type mice, and this dysfunction was also reversed by cholinesterase inhibition. Thus, the cardiac parasympathetic system and non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery are modulated in opposite directions under conditions of increased sympathetic drive or ACh availability. Moreover, our data support the idea that pyridostigmine by restoring ACh availability is beneficial in heart disease.

  17. Plasticity-related binding of GABA and muscarinic receptor sites in piriform cortex of rat: An autoradiographic study

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    Thomas, A.P.; Westrum, L.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1989-09-01

    This study has used the recently developed in vitro quantitative autoradiographic technique to examine the effects of olfactory bulb (OB) removal on receptor-binding sites in the deafferented piriform cortex (PC) of the rat. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-benzodiazepine receptor (GABA-BZR)- and muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MChR)-binding sites in layer I of PC were localized using (3H)flunitrazepam and (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate as ligands, respectively. From the resultant autoradiograms the optical densities were measured using a Drexel-DUMAS image analysis system. The densities of BZR and MChR-binding sites were markedly increased in the PC ipsilateral to the lesion as compared to the contralateral side in those subjects that were operated in adulthood (Postnatal Day 100, PN 100). Comparisons between the unoperated and PN 100 operated animals also showed significant increases in the deafferented PC. In the animals operated on the day of birth (PN 0) no significant differences were seen between the operated and the contralateral PC. The difference between the PN 0 deafferented PC and the unoperated controls shows a slight decrease in BZR density in the former group; however, in case of the MChR there is a slight increase on the side of the lesion. These results demonstrate that deafferentation of PC by OB removal appears to modulate both the BZR-binding sites that are coupled with the GABA-A receptor complex and the MChR-binding sites. The results also suggest that possibility of a role for these neurotransmitter receptor-binding sites in plasticity following deafferentation.

  18. Taurolithocholic acid promotes intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonyingcharoen, Sumet; Suriyo, Tawit; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignant cancer of the biliary tract and its occurrence is associated with chronic cholestasis which causes an elevation of bile acids in the liver and bile duct. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanistic effect of bile acids on the CCA cell growth. Intrahepatic CCA cell lines, RMCCA-1 and HuCCA-1, were treated with bile acids and their metabolites to determine the growth promoting effect. Cell viability, cell cycle analysis, EdU incorporation assays were conducted. Intracellular signaling proteins were detected by western immunoblotting. Among eleven forms of bile acids and their metabolites, only taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) concentration dependently (1-40 µM) increased the cell viability of RMCCA-1, but not HuCCA-1 cells. The cell cycle analysis showed induction of cells in the S phase and the EdU incorporation assay revealed induction of DNA synthesis in the TLCA-treated RMCCA-1 cells. Moreover, TLCA increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK 1/2 and also increased the expression of cyclin D1 in RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, TLCA-induced RMCCA-1 cell growth could be inhibited by atropine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, AG 1478, a specific EGFR inhibitor, or U 0126, a specific MEK 1/2 inhibitor. These results suggest that TLCA induces CCA cell growth via mAChR and EGFR/EKR1/2 signaling pathway. Moreover, the functional presence of cholinergic system plays a certain role in TLCA-induced CCA cell growth.

  19. Morphine dependence and withdrawal induced changes in cholinergic signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Nichole M.; Einstein, Emily B.; Lopez, Maria B.; McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Mineur, Yann S.; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling is thought to be involved in morphine dependence and withdrawal, but the specific mechanisms involved remain unclear. The current study aimed to identify alterations in the cholinergic system that may contribute to the development of morphine dependence and withdrawal. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and [3H]-epibatidine binding were evaluated in order to determine if morphine dependence and withdrawal induces alterations in cholinergic signaling or expression of high affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the midbrain (MB), medial habenula (MHb) and interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). The effect of cholinergic signaling through nAChRs on morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior was then determined. Lastly, the contribution of β4-containing nAChRs receptors in the MHb to morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior and neuronal activity as indicated by c-fos expression was assessed. Chronic morphine administration decreased AChE activity in MB and MHb, an effect that was no longer present following precipitated withdrawal. Morphine dependent mice showed increased nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) levels in MB. Further, nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) and lobeline (3 mg/kg) decreased jumping behavior while mecamylamine (1 mg/kg) had no effect. Knock-down of β4 subunit-containing nAChRs in the MHb attenuated c-fos activation, but did not decrease morphine withdrawal-induced jumping. Thus, morphine withdrawal induces cholinergic signaling in the MHb, but this does not appear to be responsible for the effects of cholinergic drugs on somatic signs of opiate withdrawal, as measured by jumping behavior. PMID:23651795

  20. Cholinergic control of visual categorisation in macaques

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    Nikolaos C. Aggelopoulos

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is a neurotransmitter acting via muscarinic and nicotinic receptors that is implicated in several cognitive functions and impairments, such as Alzheimer’s disease. It is believed to especially affect the acquisition of new information, which is particularly important when behaviour needs to be adapted to new situations and to novel sensory events. Categorisation, the process of assigning stimuli to a category, is a cognitive function that also involves information acquisition. The role of ACh on categorisation has not been previously studied. We have examined the effects of scopolamine, an antagonist of muscarinic ACh receptors, on visual categorisation in macaque monkeys using familiar and novel stimuli. When the peripheral effects of scopolamine on the parasympathetic nervous system were controlled for, categorisation performance was disrupted following systemic injections of scopolamine. This impairment was observed only when the stimuli that needed to be categorised had not been seen before. In other words, the monkeys were not impaired by the central action of scopolamine in categorising a set of familiar stimuli (stimuli which they had categorised successfully in previous sessions. Categorisation performance also deteriorated as the stimulus became less salient by an increase in the level of visual noise. However, scopolamine did not cause additional performance disruptions for difficult categorisation judgements at lower coherence levels. Scopolamine, therefore, specifically affects the assignment of new exemplars to established cognitive categories, presumably by impairing the processing of novel information. Since we did not find an effect of scopolamine in the categorisation of familiar stimuli, scopolamine had no significant central action on other cognitive functions such as perception, attention, memory or executive control within the context of our categorisation task.

  1. The effect of indomethacin on the muscarinic induced contractions in the isolated normal guinea pig urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahnama’i Mohammad S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effect of prostaglandin depletion by means of COX-inhibition on cholinergic enhanced spontaneous contractions. Methods The urethra and bladder of 9 male guinea pigs (weight 270–300 g were removed and placed in an organ bath with Krebs’ solution. A catheter was passed through the urethra through which the intravesical pressure was measured. The muscarinic agonist arecaidine, the non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin, and PGE2 were subsequently added to the organ bath. The initial average frequency and amplitude of spontaneous contractions in the first 2 minutes after arecaidine application were labelled Fini and Pini, respectively. The steady state frequency (Fsteady and amplitude (Psteady were defined as the average frequency and amplitude during the 5 minutes before the next wash out. Results Application of 1 μM PGE2 increased the amplitude of spontaneous contractions without affecting frequency. 10 μM of indomethacin reduced amplitude but not frequency. The addition of indomethacin did not alter Fini after the first application (p = 0.7665. However, after the second wash, Fini was decreased (p = 0.0005. Fsteady, Psteady and Pini were not significantly different in any of the conditions. These effects of indomethacin were reversible by PGE2 addition.. Conclusions Blocking PG synthesis decreased the cholinergically stimulated autonomous contractions in the isolated bladder. This suggests that PG could modify normal cholinergically evoked response. A combination of drugs inhibiting muscarinic receptors and PG function or production can then become an interesting focus of research on a treatment for overactive bladder syndrome.

  2. Quantitation of the Contractile Response Mediated by Two Receptors: M2 and M3 Muscarinic Receptor-Mediated Contractions of Human Gastroesophageal Smooth MuscleS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S.; Miller, Larry S.; Vegesna, Anil K.; Tiwana, Mansoor I.; Tallarida, Ronald J.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M2 receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M3 density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M2 and M3 receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M2 and M3 receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M2 muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M3 receptor predominantly mediates contraction. PMID:19126780

  3. Quantitation of the contractile response mediated by two receptors: M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor-mediated contractions of human gastroesophageal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Miller, Larry S; Vegesna, Anil K; Tiwana, Mansoor I; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2009-04-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M(2) and M(3) muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M(2) receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M(3) density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M(2) and M(3) receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M(2) and M(3) receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M(2) muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M(3) receptor predominantly mediates contraction.

  4. Interaction between muscarinic receptor subtype signal transduction pathways mediating bladder contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2002-09-01

    M(3) muscarinic receptors mediate cholinergic-induced contraction in most smooth muscles. However, in the denervated rat bladder, M(2) receptors participate in contraction because M(3)-selective antagonists [para-fluoro-hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (p-F-HHSiD) and 4-DAMP] have low affinities. However, the affinity of the M(2)-selective antagonist methoctramine in the denervated bladder is consistent with M(3) receptor mediating contraction. It is possible that two pathways interact to mediate contraction: one mediated by the M(2) receptor and one by the M(3) receptor. To determine whether an interaction exists, the inhibitory potencies of combinations of methoctramine and p-F-HHSiD for reversing cholinergic contractions were measured. In normal bladders, all combinations gave additive effects. In denervated bladders, synergistic effects were seen with the 10:1 and 1:1 (methoctramine:p-F-HHSiD wt/wt) combinations. After application of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin to normal tissue, the 10:1 and 1:1 ratios became synergistic, mimicking denervated tissue. Thus in normal bladders both M(2) and M(3) receptors can induce contraction. In the denervated bladder, the M(2) and the M(3) receptors interact in a facilitatory manner to mediate contraction.

  5. Role of acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors in serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Wolfgang; Wiegand, Silke; Akinci, Sibel; Schinkel, Alfred H; Wess, Jürgen; Koepsell, Hermann; Haberberger, Rainer Viktor; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2006-01-01

    For the murine trachea, it has been reported that constriction evoked by serotonin (5-HT) is largely dependent on acetylcholine (ACh) released from the epithelium, owing to the sensitivity of the 5-HT response to epithelium removal, sensitivity to atropine, and insensitivity to tetrodotoxin (Moffatt et al., 2003). Consistent with this assumption, the respiratory epithelium contains ACh, its synthesizing enzyme, and the high-affinity choline transporter CHT1 (Reinheimer et al., 1996; Pfeil et al., 2003; Proskocil et al., 2004). Recently, we demonstrated that ACh can be released from non-neuronal cells by corticosteroid-sensitive polyspecific organic cation transporters (OCTs), which are also expressed by airway epithelial cells (Lips et al., 2005). Hence, we proposed that 5-HT evokes release of ACh from epithelial cells via OCTs and that this epithelial-derived ACh induces bronchoconstriction. We tested this hypothesis in a well-established model of videomorphometric analysis of bronchial diameter in precision-cut murine lung slices utilizing epithelium removal to assess the role of the epithelium, OCT mouse knockout (KO) strains to assess the role of OCT isoforms, and muscarinic receptor M2/M3 double-KO mice to assess the cholinergic component of 5-HT induced bronchoconstriction, as bronchi of this strain are entirely unresponsive to cholinergic stimulation(Struckmann et al., 2003).

  6. Interaction between muscarinic receptor subtype signal transduction pathways mediating bladder contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRAVERMAN, ALAN S.; TALLARIDA, RONALD J.; RUGGIERI, MICHAEL R.

    2012-01-01

    M3 muscarinic receptors mediate cholinergic-induced contraction in most smooth muscles. However, in the denervated rat bladder, M2 receptors participate in contraction because M3-selective antagonists [para-fluoro-hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (p-F-HHSiD) and 4-DAMP] have low affinities. However, the affinity of the M2-selective antagonist methoctramine in the denervated bladder is consistent with M3 receptor mediating contraction. It is possible that two pathways interact to mediate contraction: one mediated by the M2 receptor and one by the M3 receptor. To determine whether an interaction exists, the inhibitory potencies of combinations of methoctramine and p-F-HHSiD for reversing cholinergic contractions were measured. In normal bladders, all combinations gave additive effects. In denervated bladders, synergistic effects were seen with the 10:1 and 1:1 (methoctramine:p-F-HHSiD wt/wt) combinations. After application of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin to normal tissue, the 10:1 and 1:1 ratios became synergistic, mimicking denervated tissue. Thus in normal bladders both M2 and M3 receptors can induce contraction. In the denervated bladder, the M2 and the M3 receptors interact in a facilitatory manner to mediate contraction. PMID:12185001

  7. Long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, synchronous bursting and synaptic remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Kaufman

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neuromodulation plays key roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability, network activity, arousal, and behavior. On longer time scales, cholinergic systems play essential roles in cortical development, maturation, and plasticity. Presumably, these processes are associated with substantial synaptic remodeling, yet to date, long-term relationships between cholinergic tone and synaptic remodeling remain largely unknown. Here we used automated microscopy combined with multielectrode array recordings to study long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, excitatory synapse remodeling, and network activity characteristics in networks of cortical neurons grown on multielectrode array substrates. Experimental elevations of cholinergic tone led to the abrupt suppression of episodic synchronous bursting activity (but not of general activity, followed by a gradual growth of excitatory synapses over hours. Subsequent blockage of cholinergic receptors led to an immediate restoration of synchronous bursting and the gradual reversal of synaptic growth. Neither synaptic growth nor downsizing was governed by multiplicative scaling rules. Instead, these occurred in a subset of synapses, irrespective of initial synaptic size. Synaptic growth seemed to depend on intrinsic network activity, but not on the degree to which bursting was suppressed. Intriguingly, sustained elevations of cholinergic tone were associated with a gradual recovery of synchronous bursting but not with a reversal of synaptic growth. These findings show that cholinergic tone can strongly affect synaptic remodeling and synchronous bursting activity, but do not support a strict coupling between the two. Finally, the reemergence of synchronous bursting in the presence of elevated cholinergic tone indicates that the capacity of cholinergic neuromodulation to indefinitely suppress synchronous bursting might be inherently limited.

  8. Diabetic plasticity of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic and P2X-mediated rat bladder contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Alvaro; Boone, Timothy B; Smith, Christopher P; Somogyi, George T

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the plasticity effects of diabetes mellitus and diuresis on the non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) and purinergic (P2X-type) contractile responses in longitudinal rat bladder strips. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received streptozotocin to induce diabetes, or sucrose in water to induce diuresis as a control condition for polyuria. Experiments were carried out at four weeks after treatments, using bladders from non-treated rats as control. Urinary bladder strips were electrically stimulated throughout the experiments to generate neurally evoked contractions (NEC). In all cases, P2X-mediated purinergic contractions were evaluated at the beginning and end of the stimulations with α,β-methylene-adenosine triphosphate (α,βMeATP). The NANC responses were assessed by using two independent protocols. First, cholinergic receptors were activated with carbachol (CCh), followed by inhibition of the muscarinic component with atropine. In the second protocol, the application order for CCh and atropine was reversed. The NANC response, unmasked with the application of atropine, and the P2X purinergic contractions were analyzed. NANC contractions in diabetic bladder strips are more resistant to the desensitizing effects caused by activation of cholinergic receptors. In early stages of experimental diabetes, NANC responses in diabetic strips are less sensitive to functional inhibition mediated by the cholinergic activation. However, P2X-mediated purinergic contractions are more sensitive to desensitization in diabetic or diuretic bladders. For instance preventing muscarinic receptor activation with atropine does not counteract the desensitization of purinergic contractions in either diabetic or diuretic strips. We suggest that diabetes may induce a plasticity of the NANC and P2X-mediated bladder contractile responses. The first one may be associated with diabetic neuropathic damage to bladder nerves, while impaired P2X purinergic contractions might be associated

  9. A new perspective on muscarinic receptor antagonism in obstructive airways diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Oenema, Tjitske A.; Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine has traditionally only been regarded as a neurotransmitter of the parasympathetic nervous system, causing bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion in asthma and COPD by muscarinic receptor activation on airway smooth muscle and mucus-producing cells. Recent studies in experimental model

  10. Evidence of a M1-muscarinic GPCR homolog in unicellular eukaryotes: featuring Acanthamoeba spp bioinformatics 3D-modelling and experimentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Abdul Mannan; Ahmad, H R

    2017-06-01

    Acetylcholine affects the target cellular function via muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors that are seen to exist in humans. Both the cholinergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that perform cardinal functions in humans. Anti-muscarinic drugs, particularly the ones that target M1 subtype (mAChR1), have consistently shown to kill unicellular pathogenic eukaryotes like Acanthamoeba spp. As the M1 receptor subtype has not been reported to be expressed in the above protist, the presence of an ancient form of the M1 muscarinic receptor was inferred. Bioinformatic tools and experimental assays were performed to establish the presence of a ligand-binding site. A search for sequence homology of amino acids of human M1 receptor failed to uncover an equivalent ligand-binding site on Acanthamoeba, but structural bioinformatics showed a hypothetical protein L8HIA6 to be a receptor homolog of the human mAChR1. Immunostaining with an anti-mAChR1 antibody showed cellular staining. Growth assays showed proliferation and lethal effects of exposure to mAChR1 agonist and antagonist respectively. With the recent authentication of human mAChR1 structure and its addition to the database, it was possible to discover its structural analog in Acanthamoeba; which could explain the effects of anticholinergics observed in the past on Acanthamoeba spp. The discovery of a receptor homolog of human mAChR1 on Acanthamoeba with future studies planned to show its expression and binding to cholinergic agonist and antagonist would help clarify its role in the biology of this protist pathogen.

  11. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya (Stanford-MED); (Kyoto); (Gakushuin); (Kyushu)

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  12. Selective optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic axons in neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, Abigail; Hedrick, Tristan; Waters, Jack

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine profoundly affects neocortical function, being involved in arousal, attention, learning, memory, sensory and motor function, and plasticity. The majority of cholinergic afferents to neocortex are from neurons in nucleus basalis. Nucleus basalis also contains projecting neurons that release other transmitters, including GABA and possibly glutamate. Hence, electrical stimulation of nucleus basalis evokes the release of a mixture of neurotransmitters in neocortex, and this lack of selectivity has impeded research on cholinergic signaling in neocortex. We describe a method for the selective stimulation of cholinergic axons in neocortex. We used the Cre-lox system and a viral vector to express the light-activated protein channelrhodopsin-2 in cholinergic neurons in nucleus basalis and their axons in neocortex. Labeled neurons depolarized on illumination with blue light but were otherwise unchanged. In anesthetized mice, illumination of neocortex desynchronized the local field potential, indicating that light evoked release of ACh. This novel technique will enable many new studies of the cellular, network, and behavioral physiology of ACh in neocortex.

  13. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in acetylcholine regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In animal cells, action of acetylcholine depends on its binding with its two specific receptors on the plasma membrane: the nicotinic and muscarinic respectively. The present investigation has shown that agonists of muscarinic receptor (muscarine) could induce stomatal opening, while the antagonists (atropine) could block stomatal opening induced by acetylcholine. Their effects can only be realized in medium containing Ca2+, but not in medium containing K+. The results tend to reveal that the muscarinic receptor is involved in acetylcholine-induced stomatal movement.

  14. Cholinergic enhancement of visual attention and neural oscillations in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Markus; Kluge, Christian; Bach, Dominik; Bradbury, David; Heinze, Hans Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J; Driver, Jon

    2012-03-06

    Cognitive processes such as visual perception and selective attention induce specific patterns of brain oscillations. The neurochemical bases of these spectral changes in neural activity are largely unknown, but neuromodulators are thought to regulate processing. The cholinergic system is linked to attentional function in vivo, whereas separate in vitro studies show that cholinergic agonists induce high-frequency oscillations in slice preparations. This has led to theoretical proposals that cholinergic enhancement of visual attention might operate via gamma oscillations in visual cortex, although low-frequency alpha/beta modulation may also play a key role. Here we used MEG to record cortical oscillations in the context of administration of a cholinergic agonist (physostigmine) during a spatial visual attention task in humans. This cholinergic agonist enhanced spatial attention effects on low-frequency alpha/beta oscillations in visual cortex, an effect correlating with a drug-induced speeding of performance. By contrast, the cholinergic agonist did not alter high-frequency gamma oscillations in visual cortex. Thus, our findings show that cholinergic neuromodulation enhances attentional selection via an impact on oscillatory synchrony in visual cortex, for low rather than high frequencies. We discuss this dissociation between high- and low-frequency oscillations in relation to proposals that lower-frequency oscillations are generated by feedback pathways within visual cortex.

  15. Development of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, glial cells, and regional cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, S P; Hoover, D B

    2012-09-27

    Very little is known about the development of cardiac parasympathetic ganglia and cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the growth of cholinergic neurons and nerve fibers in mouse hearts from embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) through postnatal day 21(P21). Cholinergic perikarya and varicose nerve fibers were identified in paraffin sections immunostained for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Satellite cells and Schwann cells in adjacent sections were identified by immunostaining for S100β calcium binding protein (S100) and brain-fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP). We found that cardiac ganglia had formed in close association to the atria and cholinergic innervation of the atrioventricular junction had already begun by E18.5. However, most cholinergic innervation of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, developed postnatally (P0.5-P21) along with a doubling of the cross-sectional area of cholinergic perikarya. Satellite cells were present throughout neonatal cardiac ganglia and expressed primarily B-FABP. As they became more mature at P21, satellite cells stained strongly for both B-FABP and S100. Satellite cells appeared to surround most cardiac parasympathetic neurons, even in neonatal hearts. Mature Schwann cells, identified by morphology and strong staining for S100, were already present at E18.5 in atrial regions that receive cholinergic innervation at later developmental times. The abundance and distribution of S100-positive Schwann cells increased postnatally along with nerve density. While S100 staining of cardiac Schwann cells was maintained in P21 and older mice, Schwann cells did not show B-FABP staining at these times. Parallel development of satellite cells and cholinergic perikarya in the cardiac ganglia and the increase in abundance of Schwann cells and varicose cholinergic nerve fibers in the atria suggest that neuronal-glial interactions could be important for development of the parasympathetic nervous

  16. Acetylcholine release in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system during cocaine seeking: conditioned and unconditioned contributions to reward and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhi-Bing; Wang, Bin; Zitzman, Dawnya; Wise, Roy A

    2008-09-03

    Microdialysis was used to assess the contribution to cocaine seeking of cholinergic input to the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system in ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA acetylcholine (ACh) was elevated in animals lever pressing for intravenous cocaine and in cocaine-experienced and cocaine-naive animals passively receiving similar "yoked" injections. In cocaine-trained animals, the elevations comprised an initial (first hour) peak to approximately 160% of baseline and a subsequent plateau of 140% of baseline for the rest of the cocaine intake period. In cocaine-naive animals, yoked cocaine injections raised ACh levels to the 140% plateau but did not cause the initial 160% peak. In cocaine-trained animals that received unexpected saline (extinction conditions) rather than the expected cocaine, the initial peak was seen but the subsequent plateau was absent. VTA ACh levels played a causal role and were not just a correlate of cocaine seeking. Blocking muscarinic input to the VTA increased cocaine intake; the increase in intake offset the decrease in cholinergic input, resulting in the same VTA dopamine levels as were seen in the absence of the ACh antagonists. Increased VTA ACh levels (resulting from 10 microM VTA neostigmine infusion) increased VTA dopamine levels and reinstated cocaine seeking in cocaine-trained animals that had undergone extinction; these effects were strongly attenuated by local infusion of a muscarinic antagonist and weakly attenuated by a nicotinic antagonist. These findings identify two cholinergic responses to cocaine self-administration, an unconditioned response to cocaine itself and a conditioned response triggered by cocaine-predictive cues, and confirm that these cholinergic responses contribute to the control of cocaine seeking.

  17. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  18. Cholinergic cells in the nucleus basalis of mice express the N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor subunit NR2C and its replacement by the NR2B subunit enhances frontal and amygdaloid acetylcholine levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Souza Silva, M. A.; Dolga, Amalia; Pieri, I.; Marchetti, L.; Eisel, U. L. M.; Huston, J. P.; Dere, E.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that glutamatergic and cholinergic systems interact functionally at the level of the cholinergic basal forebrain. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) is a multiprotein complex composed of NR1, NR2 and/or NR3 subunits. The subunit composition of NMDA-R of cholinergic cells in the n

  19. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-05

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems.

  20. Binding of quinolizidine alkaloids to nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeller, T; Sauerwein, M; Sporer, F; Wink, M; Müller, W E

    1994-09-01

    Fourteen quinolizidine alkaloids, isolated from Lupinus albus, L. mutabilis, and Anagyris foetida, were analyzed for their affinity for nicotinic and/or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Of the compounds tested, the alpha-pyridones, N-methylcytisine and cytisine, showed the highest affinities at the nicotinic receptor, while several quinolizidine alkaloid types were especially active at the muscarinic receptor.

  1. Effects of cholinergic and noradrenergic agents on locomotion in the mudpuppy (Necturus maculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, M; Stein, R B

    2002-08-01

    Some neurotransmitters act consistently on the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion in a wide range of vertebrates. In contrast, acetylcholine (ACh) and noradrenaline (NA) have various effects on locomotion in different preparations. The roles of ACh and NA have not been studied in amphibian walking, so we examined their effects in an isolated spinal cord preparation of the mudpuppy ( Necturus maculatus). This preparation contains a CPG that produces locomotor activity when N-methyl- D-aspartic acid (NMDA), an excitatory amino acid agonist, is added to the bath. The addition of carbachol, a long acting ACh agonist, to the bath disrupted the walking rhythm induced by NMDA, while not changing the level of activity in flexor and extensor motoneurons. Adding clonidine, an alpha(2)-noradrenergic agonist, had no effect on the NMDA-induced walking rhythm. Physostigmine, an ACh-esterase inhibitor, disrupted the walking rhythm, presumably by potentiating the effects of endogenously released ACh. Atropine, an ACh antagonist that binds to muscarinic ACh receptors, blocked the effects of carbachol, indicating that the action is mediated, at least in part, by muscarinic receptors. In the absence of carbachol, atropine had no effect. Locomotion was not induced by carbachol, atropine or clonidine in a resting spinal cord preparation. Cholinergic actions do not seem to be essential to the CPG for walking in the mudpuppy, but ACh may convert a rhythmic walking state to a more tonic state with occasional bursts of EMG activity for postural adjustments.

  2. Muscarinic receptor signaling and colon cancer progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofeng Xie; Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of effective treatments, advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Emerging evidence supports the observation that muscarinic receptor (MR) signaling plays a critical role in growth and progression of CRC. MR activation by acetylcholine and bile acids results in transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and post-EGFR signal transduction that enhances cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, the authors review recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MR-mediated CRC progression and its therapeutic implications.

  3. Evaluation of cholinergic markers in Alzheimer's disease and in a model of cholinergic deficit

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), have been closely related to cholinergic deficits. We have compared different markers of cholinergic function to assess the best biomarker of cognitive deficits associated to cholinergic hypoactivity. In post-mortem frontal cortex from AD patients, acetylcholine (ACh) levels, cholinacetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were all reduced compared to controls. Both ChAT and AChE activi...

  4. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  5. Contribution of the cholinergic basal forebrain to proactive interference from stored odor memories during associative learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, E; Hasselmo, M E; Baxter, M G

    2001-04-01

    E. De Rosa and M. E. Hasselmo (2000) demonstrated that 0.25 mg/kg scopolamine (SCOP) selectively increased proactive interference (PI) from stored odor memories during learning. In the present study, rats with bilateral cholinergic lesions limited to the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca, made with 192 IgG-saporin, were not impaired in acquiring the same olfactory discrimination task relative to control rats. Rats with bilateral 192 IgG-saporin lesions to all basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei (BF) also showed no impairment in acquisition of this task. However, the BF-saporin rats were hypersensitive to oxotremorine-induced hypothermia and demonstrated an increased sensitivity to PI following a low dose of SCOP (0.125 mg/kg) relative to control rats. The results suggest that weaker cholinergic modulation after cholinergic BF lesions makes the system more sensitive to PI during blockade of the remaining cholinergic elements.

  6. Modulatory compartments in cortex and local regulation of cholinergic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Jennifer J; Ward, Nicholas J; Jadi, Monika P; Disney, Anita A

    2016-09-01

    Neuromodulatory signaling is generally considered broad in its impact across cortex. However, variations in the characteristics of cortical circuits may introduce regionally-specific responses to diffuse modulatory signals. Features such as patterns of axonal innervation, tissue tortuosity and molecular diffusion, effectiveness of degradation pathways, subcellular receptor localization, and patterns of receptor expression can lead to local modification of modulatory inputs. We propose that modulatory compartments exist in cortex and can be defined by variation in structural features of local circuits. Further, we argue that these compartments are responsible for local regulation of neuromodulatory tone. For the cholinergic system, these modulatory compartments are regions of cortical tissue within which signaling conditions for acetylcholine are relatively uniform, but between which signaling can vary profoundly. In the visual system, evidence for the existence of compartments indicates that cholinergic modulation likely differs across the visual pathway. We argue that the existence of these compartments calls for thinking about cholinergic modulation in terms of finer-grained control of local cortical circuits than is implied by the traditional view of this system as a diffuse modulator. Further, an understanding of modulatory compartments provides an opportunity to better understand and perhaps correct signal modifications that lead to pathological states.

  7. The cholinergic agonist carbachol increases the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic currents in dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C; Brown, R E

    2014-01-31

    Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons play an important role in feeding, mood control and stress responses. One important feature of their activity across the sleep-wake cycle is their reduced firing during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep which stands in stark contrast to the wake/REM-on discharge pattern of brainstem cholinergic neurons. A prominent model of REM sleep control posits a reciprocal interaction between these cell groups. 5-HT inhibits cholinergic neurons, and activation of nicotinic receptors can excite DRN 5-HT neurons but the cholinergic effect on inhibitory inputs is incompletely understood. Here, in vitro, in DRN brain slices prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, a brief (3 min) bath application of carbachol (50 μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in GFP-negative, putative 5-HT neurons but did not affect miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) IPSCs. Carbachol had no direct postsynaptic effect. Thus, carbachol likely increases the activity of local GABAergic neurons which synapse on 5-HT neurons. Removal of dorsal regions of the slice including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) region where GABAergic neurons projecting to the DRN have been identified, abolished the effect of carbachol on sIPSCs whereas the removal of ventral regions containing the oral region of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) did not. In addition, carbachol directly excited GFP-positive, GABAergic vlPAG neurons. Antagonism of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors completely abolished the effects of carbachol. We suggest cholinergic neurons inhibit DRN 5-HT neurons when acetylcholine levels are lower i.e. during quiet wakefulness and the beginning of REM sleep periods, in part via excitation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors located on local vlPAG and DRN GABAergic neurons. Higher firing rates or burst firing of cholinergic neurons associated with attentive wakefulness or phasic REM sleep periods

  8. Mechanism for Muscarinic Inhibitory Regulation of the L-type Ca2 + Current in Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋彬; 杨向军; 惠杰; 蒋廷波; 宋建平; 刘志华

    2004-01-01

    @@ Objective The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in regulating cardiac function by modifying heart rate, contractility and impulse. The parasympathetic neurotransmitter acetyl-choline and muscarinic agonist carbachol (Cch) inhibit excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac ventricular myocytes. Muscarinic agonists suppress adenylyl cyclase (AC) acitivity and,by reducing activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)cascade, inhibit the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa(L) ). They also increase the content of cGMP by stimulating guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity. The role of nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP in muscarinic inhibition has undergone considerable scrutiny. The role of the NO/cGMP pathway in the inhibition of ICa(L) by Cch was examined in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

  9. Evaluating the evidence surrounding pontine cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Grace

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of rapid eye movement (REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the ‘pontine REM sleep generator’ by cholinergic inputs. Here we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PFT is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv Cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  10. Basal forebrain neurons suppress amygdala kindling via cortical but not hippocampal cholinergic projections in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, I; Leanza, G; Nanobashvili, A; Kokaia, M; Lindvall, O

    2000-06-01

    Intraventricular administration of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin in rats has been shown to cause a selective loss of cholinergic afferents to the hippocampus and cortical areas, and to facilitate seizure development in hippocampal kindling. Here we demonstrate that this lesion also accelerates seizure progression when kindling is induced by electrical stimulations in the amygdala. However, whereas intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin facilitated the development of the initial stages of hippocampal kindling, the same lesion promoted the late stages of amygdala kindling. To explore the role of various parts of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in amygdala kindling, selective lesions of the cholinergic projections to either hippocampus or cortex were produced by intraparenchymal injections of 192 IgG-saporin into medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band or nucleus basalis, respectively. Cholinergic denervation of the cortical regions caused acceleration of amygdala kindling closely resembling that observed after the more widespread lesion induced by intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin. In contrast, removal of the cholinergic input to the hippocampus had no effect on the development of amygdala kindling. These data indicate that basal forebrain cholinergic neurons suppress kindling elicited from amygdala, and that this dampening effect is mediated via cortical but not hippocampal projections.

  11. Evaluating the Evidence Surrounding Pontine Cholinergic Involvement in REM Sleep Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Kevin P; Horner, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the "pontine REM sleep generator" by cholinergic inputs. Here, we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i) the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii) the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii) loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PTF is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv) cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  12. Activation of muscarinic receptors in porcine airway smooth muscle elicits a transient increase in phospholipase D activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoon, A M; Smith, J; Baker, R C; Farley, J M

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphodiesterase that catalyses hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid and choline. In the presence of ethanol, PLD also catalyses the formation of phosphatidylethanol, which is a unique characteristic of this enzyme. Muscarinic receptor-induced changes in the activity of PLD were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring the formation of [3H]phosphatidic acid ([3H]PA) and [3H]phosphatidylethanol ([3H]PEth) after labeling the muscle strips with [3H]palmitic acid. The cholinergic receptor agonist acetylcholine (Ach) significantly but transiently increased formation of both [3H]PA and [3H]PEth in a concentration-dependent manner (>105-400% vs. controls in the presence of 10(-6) to 10(-4) M Ach) when pretreated with 100 mM ethanol. The Ach receptor-mediated increase in PLD activity was inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M), indicating that activation of PLD occurred via muscarinic receptors. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) increased PLD activity that was effectively blocked by the PKC inhibitors calphostin C (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) and GFX (10(-8) to 10(-6) M). Ach-induced increases in PLD activity were also significantly, but incompletely, inhibited by both GFX and calphostin C. From the present data, we conclude that in tracheal smooth muscle, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-induced PLD activation is transient in nature and coupled to these receptors via PKC. However, PKC activation is not solely responsible for Ach-induced activation of PLD in porcine tracheal smooth muscle.

  13. Lesions of cholinergic pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus neurons fail to affect cocaine or heroin self-administration or conditioned place preference in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Steidl

    Full Text Available Cholinergic input to the ventral tegmental area (VTA is known to contribute to reward. Although it is known that the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg provides an important source of excitatory input to the dopamine system, the specific role of PPTg cholinergic input to the VTA in cocaine reward has not been previously determined. We used a diphtheria toxin conjugated to urotensin-II (Dtx::UII, the endogenous ligand for urotensin-II receptors expressed by PPTg cholinergic but not glutamatergic or GABAergic cells, to lesion cholinergic PPTg neurons. Dtx::UII toxin infusion resulted in the loss of 95.78 (±0.65% of PPTg cholinergic cells but did not significantly alter either cocaine or heroin self-administration or the development of cocaine or heroin conditioned place preferences. Thus, cholinergic cells originating in PPTg do not appear to be critical for the rewarding effects of cocaine or of heroin.

  14. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues....... The distributions of these subtypes and their potential physiological roles are discussed. By use of molecular genetic manipulation of cloned muscarinic receptor cDNAs, the regions of muscarinic receptors that specify G-protein coupling and ligand binding have been defined in several recent studies. Overall...

  15. Increased cholinergic contractions of jejunal smooth muscle caused by a high cholesterol diet are prevented by the 5-HT4 agonist – tegaserod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Eldon

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excess cholesterol in bile and in blood is a major risk factor for the respective development of gallbladder disease and atherosclerosis. This lipid in excess negatively impacts the functioning of other smooth muscles, including the intestine. Serotonin is an important mediator of the contractile responses of the small intestine. Drugs targeting the serotonin receptor are used as prokinetic agents to manage intestinal motor disorders, in particular irritable bowel syndrome. Thus, tegaserod, acting on 5-HT4 receptor, ideally should obviate detrimental effects of excessive cholesterol on gastrointestinal smooth muscle. In this study we examined the effect of tegaserod on cholesterol-induced changes in the contractile responses of intestinal smooth muscle. Methods The effects of a high cholesterol (1% diet on the in vitro contractile responses of jejunal longitudinal smooth muscle from Richardson ground squirrels to the cholinergic agonist carbachol were examined in the presence or absence of tetrodrodotoxin (TTX. Two groups of animals, fed either low (0.03% or high cholesterol rat chow diet, were further divided into two subgroups and treated for 28 days with either vehicle or tegaserod. Results The high cholesterol diet increased, by nearly 2-fold, contractions of the jejunal longitudinal smooth muscle elicited by carbachol. These cholinergic contractions were mediated by muscarinic receptors since they were blocked by scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, but not by the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium. Tegaserod treatment, which did not affect cholinergic contractions of tissues from low cholesterol fed animals, abrogated the increase caused by the high cholesterol diet. With low cholesterol diet TTX enhanced carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas this action potential blocker did not affect the augmented cholinergic contractions seen with tissues from animals on the high cholesterol diet. Tegaserod

  16. Muscarinic 2 Receptors Modulate Cardiac Proteasome Function in a Protein Kinase G-dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Ranek, Mark J.; Kost, Curtis K.; Hu, Chengjun; Martin, Douglas S.; Wang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome function insufficiency and inadequate protein quality control are strongly implicated in a large subset of cardiovascular disease and may play an important role in their pathogenesis. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system can be physiologically regulated. Cardiac muscarinic 2 (M2) receptors were pharmacologically interrogated in intact mice and cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). Proteasome-mediated proteolysis was measured with a surrogate misfolde...

  17. Posttranslational modifications of human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor: zooming in its functional implications

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Fernández, Wilber

    2011-01-01

    The human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) regulates many important physiological roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, and it is involved in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases, representing attractive potential pharmacological target for intervention. However, the lack of structural information on this receptor hampered the development of new potent antagonist with increased selectivity and lower side effects. Such structural inf...

  18. The effect of interference with muscarinic receptor on drug addiction and its relationship with dopamine%干预胆碱M受体对药物成瘾的影响及其与多巴胺的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘昕鹤; 田琳; 刘佳琳; 李新旺

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a disease with central nervous system dysfunction.Muscarinic receptor belong to cholinergic system,has five subtypes,M1-M5 receptors.Behavioral research show that interference with M receptor could affect drug addiction behavior.Both opioids and psychoactive drugs could active central DA system.And M receptor regulating dopamine system in various brain areas,implicate there is a potential way that M receptor affect addiction behavior through interaction with DA system.Activing M2 and M4 receptor could inhibit DA system activating,and active M5 receptor could facilitate DA system activating,in corresponding to the effect of intervened with M2、M4、M5 receptor in drug addiction behavioral research.These evidences prove that M receptor regulating DA system in drug addiction behavior,and M receptor could be new neural target for treatment of drug addiction.%药物成瘾是一类精神及行为障碍,涉及到中枢神经系统的病变.毒蕈碱受体(Muscarinic receptor,M受体)属于胆碱能受体,分5种亚型.行为学研究表明,干预M受体能有效影响药物成瘾行为,但其神经机制还亟待探索.阿片类药物与精神活性药物均能激活中枢多巴胺系统,而M受体与多巴胺系统在多个脑区产生了交互作用.其中激动M2及M4受体抑制了多巴胺系统功能,而激动M5受体增强了多巴胺系统功能,与干预M2、M4、M5受体对药物成瘾行为的影响相对应.以上证据提示,干预M受体可能通过影响多巴胺系统对药物成瘾起作用.

  19. SPET imaging of central muscarinic receptors with (R,R)[{sup 123}I]-I-QNB: methodological considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbury, R. E-mail: r.norbury@iop.kcl.ac.uk; Travis, M.J.; Erlandsson, K.; Waddington, W.; Owens, J.; Ell, P.J.; Murphy, D.G

    2004-07-01

    Investigations on the effect of normal healthy ageing on the muscarinic system have shown conflicting results. Also, in vivo determination of muscarinic receptor binding has been hampered by a lack of subtype selective ligands and differences in methods used for quantification of receptor densities. Recent in vitro and in vivo work with the muscarinic antagonist (R,R)-I-QNB indicates this ligand has selectivity for m{sub 1} and m{sub 4} muscarinic receptor subtypes. Therefore, we used (R,R)[{sup 123}I]-I-QNB and single photon emission tomography to study brain m{sub 1} and m{sub 4} muscarinic receptors in 25 healthy female subjects (11 younger subjects, age range 26-32 years and 14 older subjects, age range 57-82 years). Our aims were to ascertain the viability of tracer administration and imaging within the same day, and to evaluate whether normalization to whole brain, compared to normalization to cerebellum, could alter the clinical interpretation of results. Images were analyzed using the simplified reference tissue model and by two ratio methods: normalization to whole brain and normalization to cerebellum. Significant correlations were observed between kinetic analysis and normalization to cerebellum, but not to whole brain. Both the kinetic analysis and normalization to cerebellum showed age-related reductions in muscarinic binding in frontal, orbitofrontal, and parietal regions. Normalization to whole brain, however, failed to detect age-related changes in any region. Here we show that, for this radiotracer, normalizing to a region of negligible specific binding (cerebellum) significantly improves sensitivity when compared to global normalization.

  20. Animal model of vascular dementia and its cholinergic mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wen-hui; LI Lu-si; LIU Zhi-rong; ZHU Hong-yan; CHEN Kang-ning

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To establish a model of vascular dementia (VD) in aging rats and study primarily the cholinergic mechanism of hypomnesia. Methods: Chronic hypoperfusion of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the forebrain was performed in aging rats with permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (PBCCAO). Then the rats were tested with a computerized shuttle-training case. The changes of cerebrovascular system were observed with digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The brain tissues were studied with immunohistochemical method with cholinergic acetyltransferase (ChAT) as a marker. Results: The cognitive function of rats was obviously reduced in 2 months after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and became worse 2 months later, showing a more marked decrease of ChAT positive neurons and fibers in CA1 of the hippocampus as compared with the rats of the control, which had a significant positive correlation with memory ability. Conclusion: This rat model is successfully established to imitate human VD induced with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The mechanism of the hypomnesia of VD might be the impairment of cholinergic neurons in frontal cortex and hippocampus.

  1. Nicotinic and muscarinic reduction of unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials in sensory cortex; dual intracellular recording in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Robert B; Reyes, Alex D; Aoki, Chiye

    2006-04-01

    We studied the cholinergic modulation of glutamatergic transmission between neighboring layer 5 regular-spiking pyramidal neurons in somatosensory cortical slices from young rats (P10-P26). Brief bath application of 5-10 microM carbachol, a nonspecific cholinergic agonist, decreased the amplitude of evoked unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). This effect was blocked by 1 microM atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. Nicotine (10 microM), in contrast to carbachol, reduced EPSPs in nominally magnesium-free solution but not in the presence of 1 mM Mg+2, indicating the involvement of NMDA receptors. Likewise, when the postsynaptic cell was depolarized under voltage clamp to allow NMDA receptor activation in the presence of 1 mM Mg+2, synaptic currents were reduced by nicotine. Nicotinic EPSP reduction was prevented by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 (50 microM) and by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (10 microM). Both carbachol and nicotine reduced short-term depression of EPSPs evoked by 10 Hz stimulation, indicating that EPSP reduction happens via reduction of presynaptic glutamate release. In the case of nicotine, several possible mechanisms for NMDAR-dependent EPSP reduction are discussed. As a result of NMDA receptor dependence, nicotinic EPSP reduction may serve to reduce the local spread of cortical excitation during heightened sensory activity.

  2. Site-specific dephosphorylation of tau of apolipoprotein E-deficient and control mice by M1 muscarinic agonist treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, I; Fisher, A; Michaelson, D M

    1999-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice have memory deficits that are associated with synaptic loss of basal forebrain cholinergic projections and with hyperphosphorylation of distinct epitopes of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Furthermore, treatment of apoE-deficient mice with the M1 selective agonist 1-methylpiperidine-4-spiro-(2'-methylthiazoline) [AF150(S)] abolishes their memory deficits and results in recovery of their brain cholinergic markers. In the present study, we used a panel of anti-tau monoclonal antibodies to further map the tau epitopes that are hyperphosphorylated in apoE-deficient mice and examined the effects of prolonged treatment with AF150(S). This revealed that tau of apoE-deficient mice contains a distinct, hyperphosphorylated "hot spot" domain which is localized N-terminally to the microtubule binding domain of tau, and that AF150(S) has an epitope-specific tau dephosphorylating effect whose magnitude is affected by apoE deficiency. Accordingly, epitopes which reside in the hyperphosphorylated "hot spot" are dephosphorylated by AF150(S) in apoE-deficient mice but are almost unaffected in the controls, whereas epitopes which flank this tau domain are dephosphorylated by AF150(S) in both mice groups. In contrast, epitopes located at the N and C terminals of tau are unaffected by AF150(S) in both groups of mice. These findings suggest that apoE deficiency results in hyperphosphorylation of a distinct tau domain whose excess phosphorylation can be reduced by muscarinic treatment.

  3. Fundamental study on nuclear medicine imaging of cholinergic innervation in the brain; Changes of neurotransmitter and receptor in animal model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kinuya, Keiko; Sumiya, Hisashi; Hisada, Kinichi (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Tsuji, Shiro; Terada, Hitoshi; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hirofumi

    1990-10-01

    A fundamental study was performed on the nuclear medicine imaging of cholinergic innervation in the brain. In a cholinergic denervation model prepared by producing an unilateral basal forebrain lesion in the rat, which is reported to be one of animal models of Alzheimer' disease, quantitative determination of acetylcholine in parietal cortices revealed statistically significant 31% decrease on an average in the ipsilateral side relative to the contralateral side to the lesion. In vitro receptor autoradiography showed no significant differences in total, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2} muscarinic acetylcholine receptors between the ipsilateral and contralateral cortices to the lesion. Simultaneous mapping of presynaptic cholinergic innervation using {sup 3}H-2-(4-phenylpiperidino) cyclohexanol (AH5183) demonstrated significant 14% decrease of AH5183 binding on an average in the ipsilateral relative to the contralateral fronto-parieto-temporal cortices to the lesion. These results suggest that AH5183 is a promising ligand for mapping cholinergic innervation in nuclear medicine imaging. (author).

  4. Long-Acting Muscarinic Antagonists for Difficult-to-Treat Asthma: Emerging Evidence and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkhi, Adeeb; Tabatabaian, Farnaz; Casale, Thomas B

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a complex disease where many patients remain symptomatic despite guideline-directed therapy. This suggests an unmet need for alternative treatment approaches. Understanding the physiological role of muscarinic receptors and the parasympathetic nervous system in the respiratory tract will provide a foundation of alternative therapeutics in asthma. Currently, several long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are on the market for the treatment of respiratory diseases. Many studies have shown the effectiveness of tiotropium, a LAMA, as add-on therapy in uncontrolled asthma. These studies led to FDA approval for tiotropium use in asthma. In this review, we discuss how the neurotransmitter acetylcholine itself contributes to inflammation, bronchoconstriction, and remodeling in asthma. We further describe the current clinical studies evaluating LAMAs in adult and adolescent patients with asthma, providing a comprehensive review of the current known physiological benefits of LAMAs in respiratory disease.

  5. Effects of Suanzaoren Decoction on cognitive function and cholinergic system in sleep deprived rats%酸枣仁汤对睡眠剥夺大鼠认知功能和胆碱能系统的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 张晓双; 白黎明

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Suanzaoren Decoction (SZRT ) on cognitive function and cholinergic system in sleep deprived rats .Methods Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups ,big platform control group ,sleep deprived group ,high ,medium and low dose group of SZRT .The rat model of sleep deprived was established with modified multiple platform method .Learning and memory of rats were tested by Y‐type maze .The histomorphology in hippocampal was observed by HE staining .The contents of acetylcholine ,activity of choline acetyltransferase and cholinesterase of rat hippocampal were determined by colorimetry .Results Compared with sleep deprived group ,high‐dose group can significantly decrease the error number and increase the active avoid‐ance .SZRT can reduce the hippocampal pyramidal cells injury .High and medium‐dose group can obviously increase the content of acetylcholine ,increase cholinesterase and decrease choline acetyltransferase activity in hippocampal .Conclusion SZRT can im‐prove the learning and memory in rats after sleep deprivation ,which probably was related to the protection of cholinergic system .%目的:考察酸枣仁汤(SZRT )对睡眠剥夺大鼠认知功能和胆碱能系统的影响。方法雄性大鼠随机分为5组即大平台对照组、睡眠剥夺组及SZRT高、中、低剂量组,釆用改良多平台法建立大鼠睡眠剥夺模型、Y型电迷宫测定学习记忆、HE染色观察大鼠海马组织形态学、比色法测定海马Ach含量及AChE与ChA T的活性。结果与睡眠剥夺组相比,Y‐迷宫,SZRT 高剂量组错误次数减少,主动回避率增多。SZRT可减轻睡眠剥夺大鼠海马锥体细胞损伤,酸枣仁汤高、中剂量组可提高海马Ach含量,降低AChE活性,提高ChAT活性。结论 SZRT能改善睡眠剥夺大鼠所致的学习记忆下降,可能与保护胆碱能系统有关。

  6. An allosteric enhancer of M(4) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M(4) acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M(4) receptors could...... be a novel target for modulating psychostimulant effects of cocaine....

  7. Internal cholinergic regulation of learning and recall in a model of olfactory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licurgo Benemann Almeida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the olfactory system, cholinergic modulation has been associated with contrast modulation and changes in receptive fields in the olfactory bulb, as well the learning of odor associations in olfactory cortex. Computational modeling and behavioral studies suggest that cholinergic modulation could improve sensory processing and learning while preventing pro-active interference when task demands are high. However, how sensory inputs and/or learning regulate incoming modulation has not yet been elucidated. We here use a computational model of the olfactory bulb, piriform cortex (PC and horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB to explore how olfactory learning could regulate cholinergic inputs to the system in a closed feedback loop. In our model, the novelty of an odor is reflected in firing rates and sparseness of cortical neurons in response to that odor and these firing rates can directly regulate learning in the system by modifying cholinergic inputs to the system. In the model, cholinergic neurons reduce their firing in response to familiar odors – reducing plasticity in the PC, but increase their firing in response to novel odor – increasing PC plasticity. Recordings from HDB neurons in awake behaving rats reflect predictions from the model by showing that a subset of neurons decrease their firing as an odor becomes familiar.

  8. Cholinergic neuromuscular junctions in Brachionus calyciflorus and Lecane quadridentata (Rotifera:Monogononta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignacio Alejandro Prez-Legaspi; Alma Lilin Guerrero-Barrera; Ivn Jos Galvn-Mendoza; Jos Luis Quintanar; Roberto Rico-Martnez

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To identify the presence of joint muscular and cholinergic systems in two freshwater rotifer species, Brachionus calyciflorus and Lecane quadridentata. Methods: The muscle actin fibers were stained with phalloidin-linked fluorescent dye, and acetylcholine was detected with Amplex Red Acetylcholine/Acetylcholinesterase Assay Kit, and then confocal scanning laser microscopy was used. Results:The musculature of Brachionus calyciflorus showed a pattern similar to other species of the same genus, while that of Lecane quadridentata was different from other rotifer genera described previously. The cholinergic system was determined by co-localization of both muscles and acetylcholine labels in the whole rotifer, suggesting the presence of neuromuscular junctions. Conclusions: The distribution pattern of muscular and acetylcholine systems showed considerable differences between the two species that might be related to different adaptations to particular ecological niches. The confirmation of a cholinergic system in rotifers contributes to the development of potential neuro-pharmacological and toxicological studies using rotifers as model organism.

  9. Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate drives glutamatergic and cholinergic inhibition selectively in spiny projection neurons in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Michael A; Swapna, Immani; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2013-02-06

    The striatum is critically involved in the selection of appropriate actions in a constantly changing environment. The spiking activity of striatal spiny projection neurons (SPNs), driven by extrinsic glutamatergic inputs, is shaped by local GABAergic and cholinergic networks. For example, it is well established that different types of GABAergic interneurons, activated by extrinsic glutamatergic and local cholinergic inputs, mediate powerful feedforward inhibition of SPN activity. In this study, using mouse striatal slices, we show that glutamatergic and cholinergic inputs exert direct inhibitory regulation of SPN activity via activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. While pressure ejection of the group I mGluR (mGluR1/5) agonist DHPG [(S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine] equally engages both mGluR1 and mGluR5 subtypes, the mGluR-dependent component of IPSCs elicited by intrastriatal electrical stimulation is almost exclusively mediated by the mGluR1 subtype. Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores specifically through inositol 1,4,5-triphospahte receptors (IP(3)Rs) and not ryanodine receptors (RyRs) mediates this form of inhibition by gating two types of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (i.e., small-conductance SK channels and large-conductance BK channels). Conversely, spike-evoked Ca(2+) influx triggers Ca(2+) release solely through RyRs to generate SK-dependent slow afterhyperpolarizations, demonstrating functional segregation of IP(3)Rs and RyRs. Finally, IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release is uniquely observed in SPNs and not in different types of interneurons in the striatum. These results demonstrate that IP(3)-mediated activation of SK and BK channels provides a robust mechanism for glutamatergic and cholinergic inputs to selectively suppress striatal output neuron activity.

  10. Postlesion estradiol treatment increases cortical cholinergic innervations via estrogen receptor-α dependent nonclassical estrogen signaling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszegi, Zsombor; Szego, Éva M; Cheong, Rachel Y; Tolod-Kemp, Emeline; Ábrahám, István M

    2011-09-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) treatment exerts rapid, nonclassical actions via intracellular signal transduction system in basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurons in vivo. Here we examined the effect of E2 treatment on lesioned BFC neurons in ovariectomized mice and the role of E2-induced nonclassical action in this treatment. Mice given an N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) injection into the substantia innominata-nucleus basalis magnocellularis complex (SI-NBM) exhibited cholinergic cell loss in the SI-NBM and ipsilateral cholinergic fiber loss in the cortex. A single injection of E2 after NMDA lesion did not have an effect on cholinergic cell loss in the SI-NBM, but it restored the ipsilateral cholinergic fiber density in the cortex in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The most effective cholinergic fiber restoration was observed with 33 ng/g E2 treatment at 1 h after NMDA lesion. The E2-induced cholinergic fiber restoration was absent in neuron-specific estrogen receptor-α knockout mice in vivo. Selective activation of nonclassical estrogen signaling in vivo by estren induced E2-like restorative actions. Selective blockade of the MAPK or protein kinase A pathway in vivo prevented E2's ability to restore cholinergic fiber loss. Finally, studies in intact female mice revealed an E2-induced restorative effect that was similar to that of E2-treated ovariectomized mice. These observations demonstrate that a single E2 treatment restores the BFC fiber loss in the cortex, regardless of endogenous E2 levels. They also reveal the critical role of nonclassical estrogen signaling via estrogen receptor-α and protein kinase A-MAPK pathways in E2-induced restorative action in the cholinergic system in vivo.

  11. Upregulating Nonneuronal Cholinergic Activity Decreases TNF Release from Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells

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    Yi Lv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonneuronal cholinergic system plays a primary role in maintaining homeostasis. It has been proved that endogenous neuronal acetylcholine (ACh could play an anti-inflammatory role, and exogenous cholinergic agonists could weaken macrophages inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation through activation of α7 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR. We assumed that nonneuronal cholinergic system existing in macrophages could modulate inflammation through autocrine ACh and expressed α7nAChR on the cells. Therefore, we explored whether LPS continuous stimulation could upregulate the nonneuronal cholinergic activity in macrophages and whether increasing autocrine ACh could decrease TNF release from the macrophages. The results showed that, in RAW264.7 cells incubated with LPS for 20 hours, the secretion of ACh was significantly decreased at 4 h and then gradually increased, accompanied with the enhancement of α7nAChR expression level. The release of TNF was greatly increased from RAW264.7 cells at 4 h and 8 h exposure to LPS; however, it was suppressed at 20 h. Upregulating choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression through ChAT gene transfection could enhance ACh secretion and reduce TNF release from the infected RAW264. 7cells. The results indicated that LPS stimulation could modulate the activity of nonneuronal cholinergic system of RAW264.7 cells. Enhancing autocrine ACh production could attenuate TNF release from RAW264.7 cells.

  12. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  13. Neuroligin 2 is expressed in synapses established by cholinergic cells in the mouse brain.

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    Virág T Takács

    Full Text Available Neuroligin 2 is a postsynaptic protein that plays a critical role in the maturation and proper function of GABAergic synapses. Previous studies demonstrated that deletion of neuroligin 2 impaired GABAergic synaptic transmission, whereas its overexpression caused increased inhibition, which suggest that its presence strongly influences synaptic function. Interestingly, the overexpressing transgenic mouse line showed increased anxiety-like behavior and other behavioral phenotypes, not easily explained by an otherwise strengthened GABAergic transmission. This suggested that other, non-GABAergic synapses may also express neuroligin 2. Here, we tested the presence of neuroligin 2 at synapses established by cholinergic neurons in the mouse brain using serial electron microscopic sections double labeled for neuroligin 2 and choline acetyltransferase. We found that besides GABAergic synapses, neuroligin 2 is also present in the postsynaptic membrane of cholinergic synapses in all investigated brain areas (including dorsal hippocampus, somatosensory and medial prefrontal cortices, caudate putamen, basolateral amygdala, centrolateral thalamic nucleus, medial septum, vertical- and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca, substantia innominata and ventral pallidum. In the hippocampus, the density of neuroligin 2 labeling was similar in GABAergic and cholinergic synapses. Moreover, several cholinergic contact sites that were strongly labeled with neuroligin 2 did not resemble typical synapses, suggesting that cholinergic axons form more synaptic connections than it was recognized previously. We showed that cholinergic cells themselves also express neuroligin 2 in a subset of their input synapses. These data indicate that mutations in human neuroligin 2 gene and genetic manipulations of neuroligin 2 levels in rodents will potentially cause alterations in the cholinergic system as well, which may also have a profound effect on the functional properties

  14. Chronic Cerebral Ischaemia Forms New Cholinergic Mechanisms of Learning and Memory

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    E. I. Zakharova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was a comparative analysis of cholinergic synaptic organization following learning and memory in normal and chronic cerebral ischaemic rats in the Morris water maze model. Choline acetyltransferase and protein content were determined in subpopulations of presynapses of “light” and “heavy” synaptosomal fractions of the cortex and the hippocampus, and the cholinergic projective and intrinsic systems of the brain structures were taken into consideration. We found a strong involvement of cholinergic systems, both projective and intrinsic, in all forms of cognition. Each form of cognition had an individual cholinergic molecular profile and the cholinergic synaptic compositions in the ischaemic rat brains differed significantly from normal ones. Our data demonstrated that under ischaemic conditions, instead of damaged connections new key synaptic relationships, which were stable against pathological influences and able to restore damaged cognitive functions, arose. The plasticity of neurochemical links in the individual organization of certain types of cognition gave a new input into brain pathology and can be used in the future for alternative corrections of vascular and other degenerative dementias.

  15. Cholinergic Neurons - Keeping Check on Amyloid beta in the Cerebral Cortex

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    Saak V. Ovsepian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological relevance of the uptake of ligands with no apparent trophic functions via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR remains unclear. Herein, we propose a homeostatic role for this in clearance of amyloid β (Aβ in the brain. We hypothesize that uptake of Aβ in conjunction with p75NTR followed by its degradation in lysosomes endows cholinergic basalo-cortical projections enriched in this receptor a facility for maintaining physiological levels of Aβ in target areas. Thus, in addition to the diffuse modulator influence and channeling of extra-thalamic signals, cholinergic innervations could supply the cerebral cortex with an elaborate system for Aβ drainage. Interpreting the emerging relationship of new molecular data with established role of cholinergic modulator system in regulating cortical network dynamics should provide new insights into the brain physiology and mechanisms of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  16. Ethanol affects striatal interneurons directly and projection neurons through a reduction in cholinergic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomeley, Craig P; Cains, Sarah; Smith, Richard; Bracci, Enrico

    2011-04-01

    The acute effects of ethanol on the neurons of the striatum, a basal ganglia nucleus crucially involved in motor control and action selection, were investigated using whole-cell recordings. An intoxicating concentration of ethanol (50 mM) produced inhibitory effects on striatal large aspiny cholinergic interneurons (LAIs) and low-threshold spike interneurons (LTSIs). These effects persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin and were because of an increase in potassium currents, including those responsible for medium and slow afterhyperpolarizations. In contrast, fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) were directly excited by ethanol, which depolarized these neurons through the suppression of potassium currents. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) became hyperpolarized in the presence of ethanol, but this effect did not persist in the presence of tetrodotoxin and was mimicked and occluded by application of the M1 muscarinic receptor antagonist telenzepine. Ethanol effects on MSNs were also abolished by 100 μM barium. This showed that the hyperpolarizations observed in MSNs were because of decreased tonic activation of M1 muscarinic receptors, resulting in an increase in Kir2 conductances. Evoked GABAergic responses of MSNs were reversibly decreased by ethanol with no change in paired-pulse ratio. Furthermore, ethanol impaired the ability of thalamostriatal inputs to inhibit a subsequent corticostriatal glutamatergic response in MSNs. These results offer the first comprehensive description of the highly cell type-specific effects of ethanol on striatal neurons and provide a cellular basis for the interpretation of ethanol influence on a brain area crucially involved in the motor and decisional impairment caused by this drug.

  17. A Cell Line Producing Recombinant Nerve Growth Factor Evokes Growth Responses in Intrinsic and Grafted Central Cholinergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernfors, Patrik; Ebendal, Ted; Olson, Lars; Mouton, Peter; Stromberg, Ingrid; Persson, Hakan

    1989-06-01

    The rat β nerve growth factor (NGF) gene was inserted into a mammalian expression vector and cotransfected with a plasmid conferring resistance to neomycin into mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. From this transfection a stable cell line was selected that contains several hundred copies of the rat NGF gene and produces excess levels of recombinant NGF. Such genetically modified cells were implanted into the rat brain as a probe for in vivo effects of NGF on central nervous system neurons. In a model of the cortical cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer disease, we demonstrate a marked increase in the survival of, and fiber outgrowth from, grafts of fetal basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as well as stimulation of fiber formation by intact adult intrinsic cholinergic circuits in the cerebral cortex. Adult cholinergic interneurons in intact striatum also sprout vigorously toward implanted fibroblasts. Our results suggest that this model has implications for future treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Selective Activation of Cholinergic Interneurons Enhances Accumbal Phasic Dopamine Release: Setting the Tone for Reward Processing

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    Roger Cachope

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays a critical role in motor control, addiction, and reward-seeking behaviors, and its release dynamics have traditionally been linked to changes in midbrain dopamine neuron activity. Here, we report that selective endogenous cholinergic activation achieved via in vitro optogenetic stimulation of nucleus accumbens, a terminal field of dopaminergic neurons, elicits real-time dopamine release. This mechanism occurs via direct actions on dopamine terminals, does not require changes in neuron firing within the midbrain, and is dependent on glutamatergic receptor activity. More importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo selective activation of cholinergic interneurons is sufficient to elicit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Therefore, the control of accumbal extracellular dopamine levels by endogenous cholinergic activity results from a complex convergence of neurotransmitter/neuromodulator systems that may ultimately synergize to drive motivated behavior.

  19. Cholinergic dysfunction and amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Bergmann, Jürgen; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Kronbichler, Martin; Kraus, Jörg; Caleri, Francesca; Tezzon, Frediano; Ladurner, Gunther; Golaszewski, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    The specific neurochemical substrate underlying the amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is still poorly defined. Memory impairment has been linked to dysfunction of neurons in the cholinergic system. A transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI), may give direct information about the function of some cholinergic pathways in the human motor cortex. In the present study, we measured SAI in eight alcoholics with WKS and compared the data with those from a group of age-matched healthy individuals; furthermore, we correlated the individual SAI values of the WKS patients with memory and other cognitive functions. Mean SAI was significantly reduced in WKS patients when compared with the controls. SAI was increased after administration of a single dose of donezepil in a subgroup of four patients. The low score obtained in the Rey Complex Figure delayed recall test, the Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and the Corsi's Block Span subtest of the WAIS-R documented a severe impairment in the anterograde memory and short-term memory. None of the correlations between SAI values and these neuropsychological tests reached significance. We provide physiological evidence of cholinergic involvement in WKS. However, this putative marker of central cholinergic activity did not significantly correlate with the memory deficit in our patients. These findings suggest that the cholinergic dysfunction does not account for the memory disorder and that damage to the cholinergic system is not sufficient to cause a persisting amnesic syndrome in WKS.

  20. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Wymke Ockenga; Ritva Tikkanen

    2015-01-01

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimul...

  1. Cholinergic modulation of local pyramid-interneuron synapses exhibiting divergent short-term dynamics in rat sensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Robert B; Reyes, Alex D; Aoki, Chiye

    2008-06-18

    Acetylcholine (ACh) influences attention, short-term memory, and sleep/waking transitions, through its modulatory influence on cortical neurons. It has been proposed that behavioral state changes mediated by ACh result from its selective effects on the intrinsic membrane properties of diverse cortical inhibitory interneuron classes. ACh has been widely shown to reduce the strength of excitatory (glutamatergic) synapses. But past studies using extracellular stimulation have not been able to examine the effects of ACh on local cortical connections important for shaping sensory processing. Here, using dual intracellular recording in slices of rat somatosensory cortex, we show that reduction of local excitatory input to inhibitory neurons by ACh is coupled to differences in the underlying short-term synaptic plasticity (STP). In synapses with short-term depression, where successive evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs; >5 Hz) usually diminish in strength (short-term depression), cholinergic agonist (5-10 microM carbachol (CCh)) reduced the amplitude of the first EPSP in an evoked train, but CCh's net effect on subsequent EPSPs rapidly diminished. In synapses where successive EPSPs increased in strength (facilitation), the effect of CCh on later EPSPs in an evoked train became progressively greater. The effect of CCh on both depressing and facilitating synapses was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, 1-5 microM atropine. It is suggested that selective influence on STP contributes fundamentally to cholinergic "switching" between cortical rhythms that underlie different behavioral states.

  2. Characterization of the novel positive allosteric modulator, LY2119620, at the muscarinic M(2) and M(4) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Carrie H; Schober, Douglas A; Xiao, Hongling; Quets, Anne; Christopoulos, Arthur; Felder, Christian C

    2014-07-01

    The M(4) receptor is a compelling therapeutic target, as this receptor modulates neural circuits dysregulated in schizophrenia, and there is clinical evidence that muscarinic agonists possess both antipsychotic and procognitive efficacy. Recent efforts have shifted toward allosteric ligands to maximize receptor selectivity and manipulate endogenous cholinergic and dopaminergic signaling. In this study, we present the pharmacological characterization of LY2119620 (3-amino-5-chloro-N-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-6-[2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-oxoethoxy] thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide), a M(2)/M(4) receptor-selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM), chemically evolved from hits identified through a M4 allosteric functional screen. Although unsuitable as a therapeutic due to M(2) receptor cross-reactivity and, thus, potential cardiovascular liability, LY2119620 surpassed previous congeners in potency and PAM activity and broadens research capabilities through its development into a radiotracer. Characterization of LY2119620 revealed evidence of probe dependence in both binding and functional assays. Guanosine 5'-[γ-(35)S]-triphosphate assays displayed differential potentiation depending on the orthosteric-allosteric pairing, with the largest cooperativity observed for oxotremorine M (Oxo-M) LY2119620. Further [(3)H]Oxo-M saturation binding, including studies with guanosine-5'-[(β,γ)-imido]triphosphate, suggests that both the orthosteric and allosteric ligands can alter the population of receptors in the active G protein-coupled state. Additionally, this work expands the characterization of the orthosteric agonist, iperoxo, at the M(4) receptor, and demonstrates that an allosteric ligand can positively modulate the binding and functional efficacy of this high efficacy ligand. Ultimately, it was the M(2) receptor pharmacology and PAM activity with iperoxo that made LY2119620 the most suitable allosteric partner for the M(2) active-state structure recently solved

  3. Direct excitation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons by M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: roles in cellular excitability, inhibitory transmission and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng; Ball, Jackson; Stoll, Kurt E; Satpute, Vaishali C; Mitchell, Samantha M; Pauli, Jordan L; Holloway, Benjamin B; Johnston, April D; Nathanson, Neil M; Deisseroth, Karl; Gerber, David J; Tonegawa, Susumu; Lawrence, J Josh

    2014-08-15

    Parvalbumin-containing (PV) neurons, a major class of GABAergic interneurons, are essential circuit elements of learning networks. As levels of acetylcholine rise during active learning tasks, PV neurons become increasingly engaged in network dynamics. Conversely, impairment of either cholinergic or PV interneuron function induces learning deficits. Here, we examined PV interneurons in hippocampus (HC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and their modulation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). HC PV cells, visualized by crossing PV-CRE mice with Rosa26YFP mice, were anatomically identified as basket cells and PV bistratified cells in the stratum pyramidale; in stratum oriens, HC PV cells were electrophysiologically distinct from somatostatin-containing cells. With glutamatergic transmission pharmacologically blocked, mAChR activation enhanced PV cell excitability in both CA1 HC and PFC; however, CA1 HC PV cells exhibited a stronger postsynaptic depolarization than PFC PV cells. To delete M1 mAChRs genetically from PV interneurons, we created PV-M1 knockout mice by crossing PV-CRE and floxed M1 mice. The elimination of M1 mAChRs from PV cells diminished M1 mAChR immunoreactivity and muscarinic excitation of HC PV cells. Selective cholinergic activation of HC PV interneurons using Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs technology enhanced the frequency and amplitude of inhibitory synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal cells. Finally, relative to wild-type controls, PV-M1 knockout mice exhibited impaired novel object recognition and, to a lesser extent, impaired spatial working memory, but reference memory remained intact. Therefore, the direct activation of M1 mAChRs on PV cells contributes to some forms of learning and memory.

  4. Cholinergic and glutamatergic transmission at synapses between pedunculopotine tegmental nucleus axonal terminals and A7 catecholamine cell group noradrenergic neurons in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Jiyuan; Chang, Tien-Wei; Hung, Wei-Chen; Wu, Chieh-Yi; Luo, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Ting-Hsuan; Lin, Chingju; Yang, Chi-Sheng; Yang, Hsiu-Wen; Min, Ming-Yuan

    2016-11-01

    We characterized transmission from the pedunculopotine tegmental nucleus (PPTg), which contains cholinergic and glutamatergic neurons, at synapses with noradrenergic (NAergic) A7 neurons. Injection of an anterograde neuronal tracer, biotinylated-dextran amine, into the PPTg resulted in labeling of axonal terminals making synaptic connection with NAergic A7 neurons. Consistent with this, extracellular stimulation using a train of 10 pulses at 100 Hz evoked both fast and slow excitatory synaptic currents (EPSCs) that were blocked, respectively, by DNQX, a non-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor blocker, or atropine, a cholinergic muscarinic receptor (mAChR) blocker. Interestingly, many spontaneous-like, but stimulation-dependent, EPSCs, were seen for up to one second after the end of stimulation and were blocked by DNQX and decreased by EGTA-AM, a membrane permeable form of EGTA, showing they are glutamatergic EPSCs causing by asynchronous release of vesicular quanta. Moreover, application of atropine or carbachol, an mAChR agonist, caused, respectively, an increase in the number of asynchronous EPSCs or a decrease in the frequency of miniature EPSCs, showing that mAChRs mediated presynaptic inhibition of glutamatergic transmission of the PPTg onto NAergic A7 neurons. In conclusion, our data show direct synaptic transmission of PPTg afferents onto pontine NAergic neurons that involves cooperation of cholinergic and glutamatergic transmission. This dual-transmitter transmission drives the firing rate of NAergic neurons, which may correlate with axonal and somatic/dendritic release of NA.

  5. Distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes mediate pre- and postsynaptic effects in rat neocortex

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    Gigout Sylvain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic transmission has been implicated in learning, memory and cognition. However, the cellular effects induced by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs activation are poorly understood in the neocortex. We investigated the effects of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh and various agonists and antagonists on neuronal activity in rat neocortical slices using intracellular (sharp microelectrode and field potential recordings. Results CCh increased neuronal firing but reduced synaptic transmission. The increase of neuronal firing was antagonized by pirenzepine (M1/M4 mAChRs antagonist but not by AF-DX 116 (M2/M4 mAChRs antagonist. Pirenzepine reversed the depressant effect of CCh on excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP but had marginal effects when applied before CCh. AF-DX 116 antagonized the depression of EPSP when applied before or during CCh. CCh also decreased the paired-pulse inhibition of field potentials and the inhibitory conductances mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors. The depression of paired-pulse inhibition was antagonized or prevented by AF-DX 116 or atropine but only marginally by pirenzepine. The inhibitory conductances were unaltered by xanomeline (M1/M4 mAChRs agonist, yet the CCh-induced depression was antagonized by AF-DX 116. Linopirdine, a selective M-current blocker, mimicked the effect of CCh on neuronal firing. However, linopirdine had no effect on the amplitude of EPSP or on the paired-pulse inhibition, indicating that M-current is involved in the increase of neuronal excitability but neither in the depression of EPSP nor paired-pulse inhibition. Conclusions These data indicate that the three effects are mediated by different mAChRs, the increase in firing being mediated by M1 mAChR, decrease of inhibition by M2 mAChR and depression of excitatory transmission by M4 mAChR. The depression of EPSP and increase of neuronal firing might enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, whereas the

  6. Cognitive impairment as a central cholinergic deficit in patients with Myasthenia Gravis

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    Antonia Kaltsatou

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: VCmax and ACmax are governed mainly by the action of the Parasympathetic Nervous System, through acetylcholine. The results of this study demonstrate that the CNS may be affected in MG and support the hypothesis that MG has central cholinergic effects manifested by cognitive dysfunction.

  7. Red Dermographism in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Clinical Sign of Cholinergic Dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonnier, E.; Grandgeorge, M.; Jacobzone-Leveque, C.; Bessaguet, C.; Peudenier, S.; Misery, L.

    2013-01-01

    The authors hypothesised that red dermographism--a skin reaction involving the cholinergic system--is more frequent in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in children exhibiting typical development. We used a dermatological examination to study red dermographism in this transverse study, which compared forty six children with ASDs…

  8. Developmental and neurochemical features of cholinergic neurons in the murine cerebral cortex

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    Becchetti Andrea

    2009-03-01

    , supporting previous hypotheses on the role of cholinergic cells in modulating the cortical microcirculation. Conclusion Our results show that the development of the intracortical cholinergic system accompanies the cortical rearrangements during the second postnatal week, a crucial stage for the establishment of cortical cytoarchitecture and for synaptogenesis. Although intrinsic ChAT positive cells usually expressed calretinin, they displayed a variable GABAergic phenotype depending on marker and on cortical developmental stage.

  9. Dual nitrergic/cholinergic control of short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs to striatal projection neurons

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    Craig Peter Blomeley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of nitric oxide and acetylcholine to modulate the short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs was investigated using current-clamp recordings in BAC mouse brain slices. Glutamatergic responses were evoked by stimulation of corpus callosum in D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs and D2-MSN, respectively. Paired-pulse stimulation (50 ms intervals evoked depressing or facilitating responses in subgroups of both D1-MSNs and D2 MSNs. In both neuronal types, glutamatergic responses of cells that displayed paired-pulse depression were not significantly affected by the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 100 µM. Conversely, in D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs that displayed paired-pulse facilitation, SNAP did not affect the first evoked response, but significantly reduced the amplitude of the second evoked EPSP, converting paired-pulse facilitation into paired-pulse depression. SNAP also strongly excited cholinergic interneurons and increased their cortical glutamatergic responses acting through a presynaptic mechanism. The effects of SNAP on glutamatergic response of D1-MSNs and D2-MSN were mediated by acetylcholine. The broad-spectrum muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (25 µM did not affect paired-pulse ratios and did not prevent the effects of SNAP. Conversely, the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist tubocurarine (10 µM fully mimicked and occluded the effects of SNAP. We concluded that phasic acetylcholine release mediates feedforward facilitation in MSNs through activation of nicotinic receptors on glutamatergic terminals and that nitric oxide, while increasing cholinergic interneurons’ firing, functionally impairs their ability to modulate glutamatergic inputs of MSNs. These results show that nitrergic and cholinergic transmission control the short-term plasticity of glutamatergic inputs in the striatum and reveal a novel cellular mechanism underlying paired

  10. Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

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    Juciane Maria de Andrade Castro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway smooth muscle constriction induced by cholinergic agonists such as methacholine (MCh, which is typically increased in asthmatic patients, is regulated mainly by muscle muscarinic M3 receptors and negatively by vagal muscarinic M2 receptors. Here we evaluated basal (intrinsic and allergen-induced (extrinsic airway responses to MCh. We used two mouse lines selected to respond maximally (AIRmax or minimally (AIRmin to innate inflammatory stimuli. We found that in basal condition AIRmin mice responded more vigorously to MCh than AIRmax. Treatment with a specific M2 antagonist increased airway response of AIRmax but not of AIRmin mice. The expression of M2 receptors in the lung was significantly lower in AIRmin compared to AIRmax animals. AIRmax mice developed a more intense allergic inflammation than AIRmin, and both allergic mouse lines increased airway responses to MCh. However, gallamine treatment of allergic groups did not affect the responses to MCh. Our results confirm that low or dysfunctional M2 receptor activity is associated with increased airway responsiveness to MCh and that this trait was inherited during the selective breeding of AIRmin mice and was acquired by AIRmax mice during allergic lung inflammation.

  11. Constitutive overexpression of muscarinic receptors leads to vagal hyperreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations in muscarinic receptor expression and acetylcholinesterase (AchE activity have been observed in tissues from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS. Vagal overactivity has been proposed as a possible cause of SIDS as well as of vasovagal syncopes. The aim of the present study was to seek whether muscarinic receptor overexpression may be the underlying mechanism of vagal hyperreactivity. Rabbits with marked vagal pauses following injection of phenylephrine were selected and crossed to obtain a vagal hyperreactive strain. The density of cardiac muscarinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase (AchE gene expression were assessed. Blood markers of the observed cardiac abnormalities were also sought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cardiac muscarinic M(2 and M(3 receptors were overexpressed in hyperreactive rabbits compared to control animals (2.3-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively and the severity of the phenylephrine-induced bradycardia was correlated with their densities. A similar overexpression of M(2 receptors was observed in peripheral mononuclear white blood cells, suggesting that cardiac M(2 receptor expression can be inferred with high confidence from measurements in blood cells. Sequencing of the coding fragment of the M(2 receptor gene revealed a single nucleotide mutation in 83% of hyperreactive animals, possibly contributing for the transcript overexpression. Significant increases in AchE expression and activity were also assessed (AchE mRNA amplification ratio of 3.6 versus normal rabbits. This phenomenon might represent a compensatory consequence of muscarinic receptors overexpression. Alterations in M(2 receptor and AchE expression occurred between the 5th and the 7th week of age, a critical period also characterized by a higher mortality rate of hyperreactive rabbits (52% in H rabbits versus 13% in normal rabbits and preceeded the appearance of functional disorders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that

  12. Measurement of functional cholinergic innervation in rat heart with a novel vesamicol receptor ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffeen, Paul R.; Efange, S.M.N.; Haidet, George C.; McKnite, Scott; Langason, Rosemary B.; Khare, A.B.; Pennington, Jennifer; Lurie, Keith G

    1996-10-01

    Regional differences in cholinergic activity in the cardiac conduction system have been difficult to study. We tested the utility of (+)-m-[{sup 125}I]iodobenzyl)trozamicol(+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT), a novel radioligand that binds to the vesamicol receptor located on the synaptic vesicle in presynaptic cholinergic neurons, as a functional marker of cholinergic activity in the conduction system. The (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT was injected intravenously into four rats. Three hours later, the rats were killed and their hearts were frozen. Quantitative autoradiography was performed on 20-micron-thick sections that were subsequently stained for acetylcholinesterase to identify specific conduction-system elements. Marked similarities existed between (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT uptake and acetylcholinesterase-positive regions. Optical densitometric analysis of regional (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT uptake revealed significantly greater (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT binding (nCi/mg) in the atrioventricular node (AVN) and His bundle regions compared with other conduction and contractile elements (AVN: 3.43 {+-} 0.37; His bundle: 2.16 {+-} 0.30; right bundle branch: 0.95 {+-} 0.13; right atrium: 0.68 {+-} 0.05; right ventricle: 0.57 {+-} 0.03; and left ventricle: 0.57 {+-} 0.03; p < 0.05 comparing conduction elements with ventricular muscle). This study demonstrates that (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT binds avidly to cholinergic nerve tissue innervating specific conduction-system elements. Thus, (+)-[{sup 125}I]MIBT may be a useful functional marker in studies on cholinergic innervation in the cardiac conduction system.

  13. Cholinergic profiles in the Goettingen miniature pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahady, Laura J; Perez, Sylvia E; Emerich, Dwaine F; Wahlberg, Lars U; Mufson, Elliott J

    2017-02-15

    Central cholinergic structures within the brain of the even-toed hoofed Goettingen miniature domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) were evaluated by immunohistochemical visualization of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor, p75(NTR) . ChAT-immunoreactive (-ir) perikarya were seen in the olfactory tubercle, striatum, medial septal nucleus, vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca, and the nucleus basalis of Meynert, medial habenular nucleus, zona incerta, neurosecretory arcuate nucleus, cranial motor nuclei III and IV, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, parabigeminal nucleus, pedunculopontine nucleus, and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. Cholinergic ChAT-ir neurons were also found within transitional cortical areas (insular, cingulate, and piriform cortices) and hippocampus proper. ChAT-ir fibers were seen throughout the dentate gyrus and hippocampus, in the mediodorsal, laterodorsal, anteroventral, and parateanial thalamic nuclei, the fasciculus retroflexus of Meynert, basolateral and basomedial amygdaloid nuclei, anterior pretectal and interpeduncular nuclei, as well as select laminae of the superior colliculus. Double immunofluorescence demonstrated that virtually all ChAT-ir basal forebrain neurons were also p75(NTR) -positive. The present findings indicate that the central cholinergic system in the miniature pig is similar to other mammalian species. Therefore, the miniature pig may be an appropriate animal model for preclinical studies of neurodegenerative diseases where the cholinergic system is compromised. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:553-573, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Brain choline acetyltransferase and muscarinic receptor sites, brain and liver cholinesterases in precocial Acomys cahirinus and altricial rat during post-natal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, H; Pintor, A; Fortuna, S; Bisso, G M

    1988-01-01

    Brain choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase with its molecular forms, and muscarinic receptor sites, as well as liver total cholinesterases were evaluated during the first postnatal month in pups of a precocial (Acomys cahirinus) and altricial (rat) murid species. At birth the levels of brain cholinergic markers were higher in the Acomys than in the rat, but in adulthood the differences were smaller or even reversed. The postnatal increase up in the markers to weaning was considerably more pronounced in the rat. However, substantial variations in the patterns of development of the three cholinergic markers within and between species were observed. Liver cholinesterases were considerably higher in Acomys than in rats at all ages investigated. These and literature data are discussed in relation to postnatal, post-conception and post-organogenesis age of pups belonging to the two species. The variability of the ontogenetic patterns between the enzymes suggests that there is some biological control of individual rates of maturation and that it is necessary to be careful in broadly interpreting growth patterns across organs within the same species and across species.

  15. Dysautonomia due to reduced cholinergic neurotransmission causes cardiac remodeling and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Aline; Damasceno, Denis D; Pires, Rita; Gros, Robert; Gomes, Enéas R; Gavioli, Mariana; Lima, Ricardo F; Guimarães, Diogo; Lima, Patricia; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Vasconcelos, Anilton; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Menezes, Cristiane A S; Sirvente, Raquel A; Salemi, Vera M; Mady, Charles; Caron, Marc G; Ferreira, Anderson J; Brum, Patricia C; Resende, Rodrigo R; Cruz, Jader S; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Prado, Vania F; de Almeida, Alvair P; Prado, Marco A M; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2010-04-01

    Overwhelming evidence supports the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. In contrast, much less is known about the role of failing cholinergic neurotransmission in cardiac disease. By using a unique genetically modified mouse line with reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and consequently decreased release of acetylcholine, we investigated the consequences of altered cholinergic tone for cardiac function. M-mode echocardiography, hemodynamic experiments, analysis of isolated perfused hearts, and measurements of cardiomyocyte contraction indicated that VAChT mutant mice have decreased left ventricle function associated with altered calcium handling. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting, and the results indicated that VAChT mutant mice have profound cardiac remodeling and reactivation of the fetal gene program. This phenotype was attributable to reduced cholinergic tone, since administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine for 2 weeks reversed the cardiac phenotype in mutant mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that decreased cholinergic neurotransmission and underlying autonomic imbalance cause plastic alterations that contribute to heart dysfunction.

  16. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships for Organophosphate Enzyme Inhibition (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    Cleft Muscarinic/Nicotinic Receptor Cholinergic Nervous System “Normal Mechanism of Action” Citrate Pyruvate Acetyl CoA + + 6 Cholinergic...Choline Carrier Synaptic Cleft Muscarinic/Nicotinic Receptor CoA + + Acetylcholinesterase Hyperstimulation Citrate Pyruvate 7 Physiologically...neurotoxicity FAAH, CB1 Cannabinoid interactions AFMID teratogenesis APH neuropeptide metabolism Carboxylesterases Amidases Toxicity

  17. Histaminergic modulation of cholinergic release from the nucleus basalis magnocellularis into insular cortex during taste aversive memory formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Purón-Sierra

    Full Text Available The ability of acetylcholine (ACh to alter specific functional properties of the cortex endows the cholinergic system with an important modulatory role in memory formation. For example, an increase in ACh release occurs during novel stimulus processing, indicating that ACh activity is critical during early stages of memory processing. During novel taste presentation, there is an increase in ACh release in the insular cortex (IC, a major structure for taste memory recognition. There is extensive evidence implicating the cholinergic efferents of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM in cortical activity changes during learning processes, and new evidence suggests that the histaminergic system may interact with the cholinergic system in important ways. However, there is little information as to whether changes in cholinergic activity in the IC are modulated during taste memory formation. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the influence of two histamine receptor subtypes, H1 in the NBM and H3 in the IC, on ACh release in the IC during conditioned taste aversion (CTA. Injection of the H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine (RAMH into the IC or of the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine into the NBM during CTA training impaired subsequent CTA memory, and simultaneously resulted in a reduction of ACh release in the IC. This study demonstrated that basal and cortical cholinergic pathways are finely tuned by histaminergic activity during CTA, since dual actions of histamine receptor subtypes on ACh modulation release each have a significant impact during taste memory formation.

  18. Activation of muscarinic receptors increases the activity of the granule neurones of the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus--a calcium imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kőszeghy, Áron; Vincze, János; Rusznák, Zoltán; Fu, Yuhong; Paxinos, George; Csernoch, László; Szücs, Géza

    2012-06-01

    Acetylcholine modulates the function of the cochlear nucleus via several pathways. In this study, the effects of cholinergic stimulation were studied on the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration of granule neurones of the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN). Ca(2+) transients were recorded in Oregon-Green-BAPTA 1-loaded brain slices using a calcium imaging technique. For the detection, identification and characterisation of the Ca(2+) transients, a wavelet analysis-based method was developed. Granule cells were identified on the basis of their size and localisation. The action potential-coupled character of the Ca(2+) transients of the granule cells was established by recording fluorescence changes and electrical activity simultaneously. Application of the cholinergic agonist carbamyl-choline (CCh) significantly increased the frequency of the Ca(2+) transients (from 0.37 to 6.31 min(-1), corresponding to a 17.1-fold increase; n = 89). This effect was antagonised by atropine, whereas CCh could still evoke an 8.3-fold increase of the frequency of the Ca(2+) transients when hexamethonium was present. Using immunolabelling, the expression of both type 1 and type 3 muscarinic receptors (M1 and M3 receptors, respectively) was demonstrated in the granule cells. Application of 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (an M3-specific antagonist) prevented the onset of the CCh effect, whereas an M1-specific antagonist (pirenzepine) was less effective. We conclude that cholinergic stimulation increases the activity of granule cells, mainly by acting on their M3 receptors. The modulation of the firing activity of the granule cells, in turn, may modify the firing of projection neurones and may adjust signal processing in the entire DCN.

  19. Acetylcholine-induced neuronal differentiation: muscarinic receptor activation regulates EGR-1 and REST expression in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salani, Monica; Anelli, Tonino; Tocco, Gabriella Augusti; Lucarini, Elena; Mozzetta, Chiara; Poiana, Giancarlo; Tata, Ada Maria; Biagioni, Stefano

    2009-02-01

    Neurotransmitters are considered part of the signaling system active in nervous system development and we have previously reported that acetylcholine (ACh) is capable of enhancing neuronal differentiation in cultures of sensory neurons and N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells. To study the mechanism of ACh action, in this study, we demonstrate the ability of choline acetyltransferase-transfected N18TG2 clones (e.g. 2/4 clone) to release ACh. Analysis of muscarinic receptors showed the presence of M1-M4 subtypes and the activation of both IP(3) and cAMP signal transduction pathways. Muscarinic receptor activation increases early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) levels and treatments with agonists, antagonists, and signal transduction enzyme inhibitors suggest a role for M3 subtype in EGR-1 induction. The role of EGR-1 in the enhancement of differentiation was investigated transfecting in N18TG2 cells a construct for EGR-1. EGR-1 clones show increased neurite extension and a decrease in Repressor Element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) expression: both these features have also been observed for the 2/4 clone. Transfection of this latter with EGR zinc-finger domain, a dominant negative inhibitor of EGR-1 action, increases REST expression, and decreases fiber outgrowth. The data reported suggest that progression of the clone 2/4 in the developmental program is dependent on ACh release and the ensuing activation of muscarinic receptors, which in turn modulate the level of EGR-1 and REST transcription factors.

  20. DC固有胆碱能系统与JIA炎症免疫反应的关系%The relationship between juvenile idiopathic arthritis inflammatory reaction and inherent cholinergic system in dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨杨; 邱宇珍; 尚桂莲; 王宏伟

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of inherent cholinergic system in dendritic cells with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) inflammatory immunoreaction. Methods Bone marrows (BM) -derived DCs from healthy mouse were cultivated by in-ducing and differentiating with cytokine IL-4, GM-CSF, and LPS to maturity in vitro. The DCs were then evaluated by light microscope and flow cytometry. Flow cytometry was used to detect DC nAChRα7 in serum of normal serum group, JIA active stage serum group,and JIA active stage with MEC group. Meanwhile, IL-12 content in culture fluid, splenic lymphocyte proliferation, and CD69 expres-sion were also measured by ELISA, MTT, and flow cytometry method, respectively. Results The nAChRα7 expression was higher in JIA active stage serum group than that in normal blood serum group (P<0.01), however, there was depression tendency with MEC;the IL-12 content in JIA active stage serum group was higher obviously than that in normal blood serum group (P <0.01 ), and was ele-vated after MEC cultivation (P<0.05). CD69 expression and SI of splenic lymphocyte proliferation were the highest in MEC group,while higher in JIA active stage serum group, as compared with normal group. Conclusion JIA active stage serum can promote DC nAChRα7 expression, simultaneously, enhance the IL-12 expression and lymphocyte proliferation, which suggest that recovering cholin-ergic system may bea way for JIA therapy.%目的 探讨树突状细胞(DC)固有胆碱能系统与幼年特发性关节炎(JIA)炎症免疫反应的关系.方法 分离正常小鼠骨髓细胞,体外采用细胞因子诱导、分化,并刺激其成熟.通过细胞形态变化和表面分子对细胞鉴定;流式细胞术检测正常血清、JLA活动期血清和JIA活动期血清+美加明(MEC)3组血清对DC nAChRα7表达的影响;ELISA方法检测三组血清作用DC 18 h前后,培养上清中IL-12含量;MTT法和流式细胞术分别检测正常血清刺激的DC条件培养液组、JIA

  1. Comparative analyses of the cholinergic locus of ChAT and VAChT and its expression in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzai, Kota; Adachi, Takeshi; Izumi, Susumu

    2015-07-01

    The cholinergic locus, which encodes choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), is specifically expressed in cholinergic neurons, maintaining the cholinergic phenotype. The organization of the locus is conserved in Bilateria. Here we examined the structure of cholinergic locus and cDNA coding for ChAT and VAChT in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The B. mori ChAT (BmChAT) cDNA encodes a deduced polypeptide including a putative choline/carnitine O-acyltransferase domain and a conserved His residue required for catalysis. The B. mori VAChT (BmVAChT) cDNA encodes a polypeptide including a putative major facilitator superfamily domain and 10 putative transmembrane domains. BmChAT and BmVAChT cDNAs share the 5'-region corresponding to the first and second exon of cholinergic locus. Polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that BmChAT and BmVAChT mRNAs were specifically expressed in the brain and segmental ganglia. The expression of BmChAT was detected 3 days after oviposition. The expression level was almost constant during the larval stage, decreased in the early pupal stage, and increased toward eclosion. The average ratios of BmChAT mRNA to BmVAChT mRNA in brain-subesophageal ganglion complexes were 0.54±0.10 in the larvae and 1.92±0.11 in adults. In addition, we examined promoter activity of the cholinergic locus and localization of cholinergic neurons, using a baculovirus-mediated gene transfer system. The promoter sequence, located 2kb upstream from the start of transcription, was essential for cholinergic neuron-specific gene õexpression. Cholinergic neurons were found in several regions of the brain and segmental ganglia in the larvae and pharate adults.

  2. Cholinergic interneurons control local circuit activity and cocaine conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Ilana B; Lin, Shih-Chun; Brodsky, Matthew; Prakash, Rohit; Diester, Ilka; Anikeeva, Polina; Gradinaru, Viviana; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-12-17

    Cholinergic neurons are widespread, and pharmacological modulation of acetylcholine receptors affects numerous brain processes, but such modulation entails side effects due to limitations in specificity for receptor type and target cell. As a result, causal roles of cholinergic neurons in circuits have been unclear. We integrated optogenetics, freely moving mammalian behavior, in vivo electrophysiology, and slice physiology to probe the cholinergic interneurons of the nucleus accumbens by direct excitation or inhibition. Despite representing less than 1% of local neurons, these cholinergic cells have dominant control roles, exerting powerful modulation of circuit activity. Furthermore, these neurons could be activated by cocaine, and silencing this drug-induced activity during cocaine exposure (despite the fact that the manipulation of the cholinergic interneurons was not aversive by itself) blocked cocaine conditioning in freely moving mammals.

  3. Activation and dynamic network of the M2 muscarinic receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Yinglong; Nichols, Sara E.; Gasper, Paul M.; Metzger, Vincent T; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate cellular responses to various hormones and neurotransmitters and are important targets for treating a wide spectrum of diseases. Although significant advances have been made in structural studies of GPCRs, details of their activation mechanism remain unclear. The X-ray crystal structure of the M2 muscarinic receptor, a key GPCR that regulates human heart rate and contractile forces of cardiomyocytes, was determined recently in an inactive antagonist...

  4. Cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal and ventral striatum: anatomical and functional considerations in normal and diseased conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Kalynda K; Smith, Yoland

    2015-09-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) are central for the processing and reinforcement of reward-related behaviors that are negatively affected in states of altered dopamine transmission, such as in Parkinson's disease or drug addiction. Nevertheless, the development of therapeutic interventions directed at ChIs has been hampered by our limited knowledge of the diverse anatomical and functional characteristics of these neurons in the dorsal and ventral striatum, combined with the lack of pharmacological tools to modulate specific cholinergic receptor subtypes. This review highlights some of the key morphological, synaptic, and functional differences between ChIs of different striatal regions and across species. It also provides an overview of our current knowledge of the cellular localization and function of cholinergic receptor subtypes. The future use of high-resolution anatomical and functional tools to study the synaptic microcircuitry of brain networks, along with the development of specific cholinergic receptor drugs, should help further elucidate the role of striatal ChIs and permit efficient targeting of cholinergic systems in various brain disorders, including Parkinson's disease and addiction.

  5. Involvement of Cholinergic and Adrenergic Receptors in Pathogenesis and Inflammatory Response Induced by Alpha-Neurotoxin Bot III of Scorpion Venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakib, Imene; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2016-10-01

    Bot III neurotoxin is the most lethal α neurotoxin purified from Buthus occitanus tunetanus scorpion venom. This toxin binds to the voltage-gated sodium channel of excitable cells and blocks its inactivation, inducing an increased release of neurotransmitters (acetylcholine and catecholamines). This study aims to elucidate the involvement of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in pathogenesis and inflammatory response triggered by this toxin. Injection of Bot III to animals induces an increase of peroxidase activities, an imbalance of oxidative status, tissue damages in lung parenchyma, and myocardium correlated with metabolic disorders. The pretreatment with nicotine (nicotinic receptor agonist) or atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist) protected the animals from almost all disorders caused by Bot III toxin, especially the immunological alterations. Bisoprolol administration (selective β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist) was also efficient in the protection of animals, mainly on tissue damage. Propranolol (non-selective adrenergic receptor antagonist) showed less effect. These results suggest that both cholinergic and adrenergic receptors are activated in the cardiopulmonary manifestations induced by Bot III. Indeed, the muscarinic receptor appears to be more involved than the nicotinic one, and the β1 adrenergic receptor seems to dominate the β2 receptor. These results showed also that the activation of nicotinic receptor leads to a significant protection of animals against Bot III toxin effect. These findings supply a supplementary data leading to better understanding of the mechanism triggered by scorpionic neurotoxins and suggest the use of drugs targeting these receptors, especially the nicotinic one in order to counteract the inflammatory response observed in scorpion envenomation.

  6. Mean field model of acetylcholine mediated dynamics in the thalamocortical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearwater, J M; Rennie, C J; Robinson, P A

    2008-12-01

    A recent continuum model of the large scale electrical activity of the thalamocortical system is generalized to include cholinergic modulation. The model is examined analytically and numerically to determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh) on its steady states, linear stability, spectrum, and temporal responses. Changing the ACh concentration moves the system between zones of one, three, and five steady states, showing that neuromodulation of synaptic strength is a possible mechanism by which multiple steady states emerge in the brain. The lowest firing rate steady state is always stable, and subsequent fixed points alternate between stable and unstable. Increasing ACh concentration changes the form of the spectrum. Increasing the tonic level of ACh concentration increases the magnitudes of the N100 and P200 in the evoked response potential (ERP), without changing the timing of these peaks. Driving the system with a pulse of cholinergic activity results in a transient increase in the firing rate of cortical neurons that lasts over 10s. Step-like increases in cortical ACh concentration cause increases in the firing rate of cortical neurons, with rapid responses due to fast acting nicotinic receptors and slower responses due to muscarinic receptor suppression of intracortical connections.

  7. Role of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in regulating host response and its interventional strategy for inflammatory diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Da-wei; ZHOU Rong-bin; YAO Yong-ming

    2009-01-01

    @@ The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) is a neurophysiological mechanism that regulates the immune system. The CAP inhibits inflammation by suppressing cytokine synthesis via release of acetylcholine in organs of the reticuloendothelial system, including the lungs, spleen, liver, kidneys and gastrointestinal tract.

  8. A ganglionic stimulant, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium, caused both cholinergic and adrenergic responses in the isolated mouse atrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Kenta; Teraoka, Hiroki; Unno, Toshihiro; Komori, Sei-Ichi; Yamada, Masahisa; Kitazawa, Takio

    2013-03-15

    An isolated atrial preparation of the mouse is useful for analyzing the actions of drugs on the myocardium, autonomic neurons and endocardial endothelium. The aim of the present study was to examine the functions of intrinsic neurons of the atrium using a ganglionic stimulant, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP). DMPP (1-100 μM) caused a negative chronotropic action followed by a positive chronotropic action in spontaneously beating right atria and also caused biphasic inotropic actions consisting of initial inhibition followed by potentiation of electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contraction in the left atria. Inotropic actions in the left atria induced by DMPP were characterized using some autonomic drugs and M2 and/or M3 muscarinic receptor knockout (M2R-KO, M3R-KO and M2M3R-KO) mice. Atropine and hexamethonium decreased the initial negative inotropic actions of DMPP. In the atria from pertussis toxin-treated, M2R-KO and M2/M3R-KO mice, the negative inotropic actions were abolished. On the other hand, the following positive inotropic actions were decreased by hexamethonium, atropine and atenolol. In the atria from reserpine-treated mice, positive inotropic actions were also decreased. The positive inotropic action induced by DMPP was almost the same in M2R-KO mice but was reduced in both M3R-KO mice and M2/M3R-KO mice. In conclusion, DMPP caused biphasic inotropic/chronotropic actions in the mouse atrium through activation of intrinsic cholinergic and adrenergic neurons. M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors and β1-adrenoceptor are thought to be involved in these actions.

  9. The Protective Effect of Electroacupuncturing Zusanli Points on Hemorrhagic Shock Rats through Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Hui DU; Jian-Guo LI; Yan-Lin WANG; Zhou-Quan PENG; Xiao-Feng YE

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction In conditions of circulatory shock, systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) plays a funda mental pathogenetic role, with activation of transcription nuclear factors(mainly NF- kB) and markedly increased production of cytokines (mainly TNF-a), which trigger the inflammatory cascade active ation. Recent research have identified a basic neural pathway that reflexively monitors and adjusts such response. It is through the rapid activation (in "real-time") of efferent vagus nerve fibres(the recentlyrecognized "brain cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway" ) [1].There are show that the rapid activation cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway can protect against the hemorrhagic shock[2,3].

  10. Cholinergic neuromuscular junctions in Brachionus calyciflorus and Lecane quadridentata (Rotifera: Monogononta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Alejandro Pérez-Legaspi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the presence of joint muscular and cholinergic systems in two freshwater rotifer species, Brachionus calyciflorus and Lecane quadridentata. Methods: The muscle actin fibers were stained with phalloidin-linked fluorescent dye, and acetylcholine was detected with Amplex Red Acetylcholine/Acetylcholinesterase Assay Kit, and then confocal scanning laser microscopy was used. Results: The musculature of Brachionus calyciflorus showed a pattern similar to other species of the same genus, while that of Lecane quadridentata was different from other rotifer genera described previously. The cholinergic system was determined by co-localization of both muscles and acetylcholine labels in the whole rotifer, suggesting the presence of neuromuscular junctions. Conclusions: The distribution pattern of muscular and acetylcholine systems showed considerable differences between the two species that might be related to different adaptations to particular ecological niches. The confirmation of a cholinergic system in rotifers contributes to the development of potential neuro-pharmacological and toxicological studies using rotifers as model organism.

  11. Modulation of Cholinergic Pathways and Inflammatory Mediators in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation including cross-talk between central and peripheral immune systems is considered to be a primary event after blast exposure...cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has been proposed as a link in neuroimmunomodulation, especially during stress con- ditions [8–11]. Neuroinflammation is...BINT) elicits early complement activation and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) release in a rat brain, J. Neurol. Sci. 318 (2012) 146–154. [8

  12. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    of the striatum, suggesting a role for muscarinic M4 receptors in the motor side effects of antipsychotics, and in the alleviation of these side effects by anticholinergics. Here we investigated the potential role of the muscarinic M4 receptor in catalepsy induced by antipsychotics (haloperidol and risperidone...

  13. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in cilia-driven transport and airway epithelial development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Maike K.; Haberberger, Rainer V.; Hartmann, Petra; Faulhammer, Petra; Lips, Katrin S.; Krain, Benjamin; Wess, Jürgen; Kummer, Wolfgang; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells drives the removal of mucus and particles from the airways. Mucociliary transport and possibly airway epithelial development are governed by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but the precise roles of the subtypes involved are unknown. This issue was addressed by determining cilia-driven particle transport, ciliary beat frequency, and the composition and ultrastructural morphology of the tracheal epithelium in M1–M5 muscarinic receptor gene-deficient mice. Knockout of M3 muscarinic receptors prevented an increase in particle transport speed and ciliary beat frequency in response to muscarine. Furthermore, the ATP response after application of muscarine was blunted. Pretreatment with atropine before application of muscarine restored the response to ATP. Additional knockout of the M2 receptor in these mice partially restored the muscarine effect most likely through the M1 receptor and normalized the ATP response. M1, M4, and M5 receptor deficient mice exhibited normal responses to muscarine. None of the investigated mutant mouse strains had any impairment of epithelial cellular structure or composition. In conclusion, M3 receptors stimulate whereas M2 receptors inhibit cilia-driven particle transport. The M1 receptor increases cilia-driven particle transport if the M3 and M2 receptor are missing. None of the receptors is necessary for epithelial development. PMID:19213795

  14. Pharmacological Mechanisms of Cortical Enhancement Induced by the Repetitive Pairing of Visual/Cholinergic Stimulation.

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    Jun-Il Kang

    Full Text Available Repetitive visual training paired with electrical activation of cholinergic projections to the primary visual cortex (V1 induces long-term enhancement of cortical processing in response to the visual training stimulus. To better determine the receptor subtypes mediating this effect the selective pharmacological blockade of V1 nicotinic (nAChR, M1 and M2 muscarinic (mAChR or GABAergic A (GABAAR receptors was performed during the training session and visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded before and after training. The training session consisted of the exposure of awake, adult rats to an orientation-specific 0.12 CPD grating paired with an electrical stimulation of the basal forebrain for a duration of 1 week for 10 minutes per day. Pharmacological agents were infused intracortically during this period. The post-training VEP amplitude was significantly increased compared to the pre-training values for the trained spatial frequency and to adjacent spatial frequencies up to 0.3 CPD, suggesting a long-term increase of V1 sensitivity. This increase was totally blocked by the nAChR antagonist as well as by an M2 mAChR subtype and GABAAR antagonist. Moreover, administration of the M2 mAChR antagonist also significantly decreased the amplitude of the control VEPs, suggesting a suppressive effect on cortical responsiveness. However, the M1 mAChR antagonist blocked the increase of the VEP amplitude only for the high spatial frequency (0.3 CPD, suggesting that M1 role was limited to the spread of the enhancement effect to a higher spatial frequency. More generally, all the drugs used did block the VEP increase at 0.3 CPD. Further, use of each of the aforementioned receptor antagonists blocked training-induced changes in gamma and beta band oscillations. These findings demonstrate that visual training coupled with cholinergic stimulation improved perceptual sensitivity by enhancing cortical responsiveness in V1. This enhancement is mainly mediated by n

  15. Optogenetic identification of an intrinsic cholinergically driven inhibitory oscillator sensitive to cannabinoids and opioids in hippocampal CA1.

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    Nagode, Daniel A; Tang, Ai-Hui; Yang, Kun; Alger, Bradley E

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal electrical oscillations in the theta (4-14 Hz) and gamma (30-80 Hz) ranges are necessary for the performance of certain animal behaviours and cognitive processes. Perisomatic GABAergic inhibition is prominently involved in cortical oscillations driven by ACh release from septal cholinergic afferents. In neocortex and hippocampal CA3 regions, parvalbumin (PV)-expressing basket cells, activated by ACh and glutamatergic agonists, largely mediate oscillations. However, in CA1 hippocampus in vitro, cholinergic agonists or the optogenetic release of endogenous ACh from septal afferents induces rhythmic, theta-frequency inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in pyramidal cells, even with glutamatergic transmission blocked. The IPSCs are regulated by exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids, suggesting that they arise from type 1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing (CB1R+) interneurons - mainly cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing cells. Nevertheless, an occult contribution of PV-expressing interneurons to these rhythms remained conceivable. Here, we directly test this hypothesis by selectively silencing CA1 PV-expressing cells optogenetically with halorhodopsin or archaerhodopsin. However, this had no effect on theta-frequency IPSC rhythms induced by carbachol (CCh). In contrast, the silencing of glutamic acid decarboxylase 2-positive interneurons, which include the CCK-expressing basket cells, strongly suppressed inhibitory oscillations; PV-expressing interneurons appear to play no role. The low-frequency IPSC oscillations induced by CCh or optogenetically stimulated ACh release were also inhibited by a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, which was unexpected because MORs in CA1 are not usually associated with CCK-expressing cells. Our results reveal novel properties of an inhibitory oscillator circuit within CA1 that is activated by muscarinic agonists. The oscillations could contribute to behaviourally relevant, atropine-sensitive, theta rhythms and link cannabinoid and

  16. Rhythmic patterns evoked in locust leg motor neurons by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine.

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    Ryckebusch, S; Laurent, G

    1993-05-01

    1. When an isolated metathoracic ganglion of the locust was superfused with the muscarinic cholinergic agonist pilocarpine, rhythmic activity was induced in leg motor neurons. The frequency of this induced rhythm increased approximately linearly from 0 to 0.2 Hz with concentrations of pilocarpine from 10(-5) to 10(-4) M. Rhythmic activity evoked by pilocarpine could be completely and reversibly blocked by 3 x 10(-5) M atropine, but was unaffected by 10(-4) M d-tubocurarine. 2. For each hemiganglion, the observed rhythm was characterized by two main phases: a levator phase, during which the anterior coxal rotator, levators of the trochanter, flexors of the tibia, and common inhibitory motor neurons were active; and a depressor phase, during which depressors of the trochanter, extensors of the tibia, and depressors of the tarsus were active. Activity in depressors of the trochanter followed the activity of the levators of the trochanter with a short, constant interburst latency. Activity in the levator of the tarsus spanned both phases. 3. The levator phase was short compared with the period (0.5-2 s, or 10-20% of the period) and did not depend on the period. The interval between the end of a levator burst and the beginning of the following one thus increased with cycle period. The depressor phase was more variable, and was usually shorter than the interval between successive levator bursts. 4. Motor neurons in a same pool often received common discrete synaptic potentials (e.g., levators of trochanter or extensors of tibia), suggesting common drive during the rhythm. Coactive motor neurons on opposite sides (such as left trochanteral depressors and right trochanteral levators), however, did not share obvious common postsynaptic potentials. Depolarization of a pool of motor neurons during its phase of activity was generally accompanied by hyperpolarization of its antagonist(s) on the same side. 5. Rhythmic activity was generally evoked in both hemiganglia of the

  17. Changing face of β2-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor therapies in asthma.

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    Wasilewski, Nastasia V; Lougheed, M Diane; Fisher, John T

    2014-06-01

    Despite current available treatment options, a significant proportion of patients with asthma remain uncontrolled and asthma pharmacotherapy continues to evolve. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists play a major role as bronchodilators in asthma therapy, although new perspectives reflect the potential for bias G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathways. Due to the success of muscarinic antagonists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the elucidation that muscarinic receptors play a role in airway remodeling, muscarinic receptors represent an attractive therapeutic target in asthma. Although short-acting muscarinic antagonists are currently limited to their use in acute asthma and as alternative bronchodilators in individuals who experience side effects with β2-agonists, recent clinical trials indicate that the long-acting muscarinic antagonist, tiotropium, deserves consideration as a potential therapeutic agent for select populations. The continued evolution of anticholinergic therapy in asthma will require appropriately designed studies to assess mechanisms, efficacy and safety in asthma.

  18. Striatal cholinergic interneurons Drive GABA release from dopamine terminals.

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    Nelson, Alexandra B; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F; Shah, Nirao M; Seal, Rebecca P; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2014-04-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons.

  19. Cholinergic depletion and basal forebrain volume in primary progressive aphasia

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    Jolien Schaeverbeke

    2017-01-01

    In the PPA group, only LV cases showed decreases in AChE activity levels compared to controls. Surprisingly, a substantial number of SV cases showed significant AChE activity increases compared to controls. BF volume did not correlate with AChE activity levels in PPA. To conclude, in our sample of PPA patients, LV but not SV was associated with cholinergic depletion. BF atrophy in PPA does not imply cholinergic depletion.

  20. Mechanisms determining cholinergic neural responses in airways of young and mature rabbits.

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    Larsen, Gary L; Loader, Joan; Nguyen, Dee Dee; Fratelli, Cori; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Colasurdo, Giuseppe N

    2004-08-01

    Neural pathways help control airway caliber and responsiveness. Yet little is known of how neural control changes as a function of development. In rabbits, we found electrical field stimulation (EFS) of airway nerves led to more marked contractile responses in 2- vs. 13-week-old animals. This enhanced response to EFS may be due to prejunctional, junctional, and/or postjunctional neural mechanisms. We assessed these mechanisms in airways of 2- and 13-week-old rabbits. The contractile responses to methacholine did not differ in the groups, suggesting postjunctional neural events are not primarily responsible for differing responses to EFS. To address junctional events, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was measured (spectrophotometry). AChE was elevated in 2-week-olds. However, this should lead to less and not greater responses. Prejunctionally, EFS-induced acetylcholine (ACh) release was assessed by HPLC. Airways of 2-week-old rabbits released significantly more ACh than airways from mature rabbits. Choline acetyltransferase, a marker of cholinergic nerves, was not different between groups, suggesting that more ACh release in young rabbits was not due to increased nerve density. ACh release in the presence of polyarginine increased significantly in both groups, supporting the presence of functional muscarinic autoreceptors (M2) at both ages. Because substance P (SP) increases release of ACh, SP was measured by ELISA. This neuropeptide was significantly elevated in airways of younger rabbits. Nerve growth factor (NGF) increased SP and was also significantly increased in airways from younger rabbits. This work suggests that increases in EFS-induced responsiveness in young rabbits are likely due to prejunctional events with enhanced release of ACh. Increases in NGF and SP early in life may contribute to this increased responsiveness.

  1. Amyloid-β depresses excitatory cholinergic synaptic transmission in Drosophila

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    Liqun Fang; Jingjing Duan; Dongzhi Ran; Zihao Fan; Ying Yan; Naya Huang; Huaiyu Gu; Yulan Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Objective Decline,disruption,or alterations of nicotinic cholinergic mechanisms contribute to cognitive dysfunctions like Alzheimer's disease (AD).Although amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation is a pathological hallmark of AD,the mechanisms by which Aβ peptides modulate cholinergic synaptic transmission and memory loss remain obscure.This study was aimed to investigate the potential synaptic modulation by Aβ of the cholinergic synapses between olfactory receptor neurons and projection neurons (PNs) in the olfactory lobe of the fruit fly.Methods Cholinergic spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) were recorded with whole-cell patch clamp from PNs in Drosophila AD models expressing Aβ40,Aβ42,or Aβ42Arc peptides in neural tissue.Results In fly pupae (2 days before eclosion),overexpression of Aβ42 or Aβ42Arc,but not Aβ40,led to a significant decrease of mEPSC frequency,while overexpression of Aβ40,Aβ42,or Aβ42Arc had no significant effect on mEPSC amplitude.In contrast,Pavlovian olfactory associative learning and lifespan assays showed that both short-term memory and lifespan were decreased in the Drosophila models expressing Aβ40,Aβ42,or Aβ42Arc.Conclusion Both electrophysiological and behavioral results showed an effect of Aβ peptide on cholinergic synaptic transmission and suggest a possible mechanism by which Aβ peptides cause cholinergic neuron degeneration and the consequent memory loss.

  2. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

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    Yaakov A Levine

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model. METHODS: Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed. RESULTS: Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02, a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02 and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01 with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02, accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  3. Distinct synaptic properties of perisomatic inhibitory cell types and their different modulation by cholinergic receptor activation in the CA3 region of the mouse hippocampus.

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    Szabó, Gergely G; Holderith, Noémi; Gulyás, Attila I; Freund, Tamás F; Hájos, Norbert

    2010-06-01

    Perisomatic inhibition originates from three types of GABAergic interneurons in cortical structures, including parvalbumin-containing fast-spiking basket cells (FSBCs) and axo-axonic cells (AACs), as well as cholecystokinin-expressing regular-spiking basket cells (RSBCs). These interneurons may have significant impact in various cognitive processes, and are subjects of cholinergic modulation. However, it is largely unknown how cholinergic receptor activation modulates the function of perisomatic inhibitory cells. Therefore, we performed paired recordings from anatomically identified perisomatic interneurons and pyramidal cells in the CA3 region of the mouse hippocampus. We determined the basic properties of unitary inhibitory postsynaptic currents (uIPSCs) and found that they differed among cell types, e.g. GABA released from axon endings of AACs evoked uIPSCs with the largest amplitude and with the longest decay measured at room temperature. RSBCs could also release GABA asynchronously, the magnitude of the release increasing with the discharge frequency of the presynaptic interneuron. Cholinergic receptor activation by carbachol significantly decreased the uIPSC amplitude in all three types of cell pairs, but to different extents. M2-type muscarinic receptors were responsible for the reduction in uIPSC amplitudes in FSBC- and AAC-pyramidal cell pairs, while an antagonist of CB(1) cannabinoid receptors recovered the suppression in RSBC-pyramidal cell pairs. In addition, carbachol suppressed or even eliminated the short-term depression of uIPSCs in FSBC- and AAC-pyramidal cell pairs in a frequency-dependent manner. These findings suggest that not only are the basic synaptic properties of perisomatic inhibitory cells distinct, but acetylcholine can differentially control the impact of perisomatic inhibition from different sources.

  4. M4 muscarinic receptor knockout mice display abnormal social behavior and decreased prepulse inhibition

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    Koshimizu Hisatsugu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the central nervous system (CNS, the muscarinic system plays key roles in learning and memory, as well as in the regulation of many sensory, motor, and autonomic processes, and is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of several major diseases of the CNS, such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and schizophrenia. Previous studies reveal that M4 muscarinic receptor knockout (M4R KO mice displayed an increase in basal locomotor activity, an increase in sensitivity to the prepulse inhibition (PPI-disrupting effect of psychotomimetics, and normal basal PPI. However, other behaviorally significant roles of M4R remain unclear. Results In this study, to further investigate precise functional roles of M4R in the CNS, M4R KO mice were subjected to a battery of behavioral tests. M4R KO mice showed no significant impairments in nociception, neuromuscular strength, or motor coordination/learning. In open field, light/dark transition, and social interaction tests, consistent with previous studies, M4R KO mice displayed enhanced locomotor activity compared to their wild-type littermates. In the open field test, M4R KO mice exhibited novelty-induced locomotor hyperactivity. In the social interaction test, contacts between pairs of M4R KO mice lasted shorter than those of wild-type mice. In the sensorimotor gating test, M4R KO mice showed a decrease in PPI, whereas in the startle response test, in contrast to a previous study, M4R KO mice demonstrated normal startle response. M4R KO mice also displayed normal performance in the Morris water maze test. Conclusions These findings indicate that M4R is involved in regulation of locomotor activity, social behavior, and sensorimotor gating in mice. Together with decreased PPI, abnormal social behavior, which was newly identified in the present study, may represent a behavioral abnormality related to psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia.

  5. Revisiting the endocytosis of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

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    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-05-12

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles.

  6. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

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    Wymke Ockenga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles.

  7. Sleep pattern and learning in knockdown mice with reduced cholinergic neurotransmission

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    C.M. Queiroz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cholinergic neurotransmission can affect memory formation and influence sleep-wake cycles (SWC. In the present study, we describe the SWC in mice with a deficient vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT system, previously characterized as presenting reduced acetylcholine release and cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions. Continuous, chronic ECoG and EMG recordings were used to evaluate the SWC pattern during light and dark phases in VAChT knockdown heterozygous (VAChT-KDHET, n=7 and wild-type (WT, n=7 mice. SWC were evaluated for sleep efficiency, total amount and mean duration of slow-wave, intermediate and paradoxical sleep, as well as the number of awakenings from sleep. After recording SWC, contextual fear-conditioning tests were used as an acetylcholine-dependent learning paradigm. The results showed that sleep efficiency in VAChT-KDHET animals was similar to that of WT mice, but that the SWC was more fragmented. Fragmentation was characterized by an increase in the number of awakenings, mainly during intermediate sleep. VAChT-KDHET animals performed poorly in the contextual fear-conditioning paradigm (mean freezing time: 34.4±3.1 and 44.5±3.3 s for WT and VAChT-KDHET animals, respectively, which was followed by a 45% reduction in the number of paradoxical sleep episodes after the training session. Taken together, the results show that reduced cholinergic transmission led to sleep fragmentation and learning impairment. We discuss the results on the basis of cholinergic plasticity and its relevance to sleep homeostasis. We suggest that VAChT-KDHET mice could be a useful model to test cholinergic drugs used to treat sleep dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Right Cervical Vagotomy Aggravates Viral Myocarditis in Mice Via the Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Sha, Ge; Xing-Xing, Chen; Lian-Pin, Wu; De-Pu, Zhou; Xiao-Wei, Li; Jia-Feng, Lin; Yue-Chun, Li

    2017-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system dysfunction with increased sympathetic activity and withdrawal of vagal activity may play an important role in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis. The vagus nerve can modulate the immune response and control inflammation through a ‘cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway’ dependent on the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Although the role of β-adrenergic stimulation on viral myocarditis has been investigated in our pervious studies, the direct effect of vagal tone in this setting has not been yet studied. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of cervical vagotomy in a murine model of viral myocarditis. In a coxsackievirus B3 murine myocarditis model (Balb/c), effects of right cervical vagotomy and nAChR agonist nicotine on echocardiography, myocardial histopathology, viral RNA, and proinflammatory cytokine levels were studied. We found that right cervical vagotomy inhibited the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, aggravated myocardial lesions, up-regulated the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and worsened the impaired left ventricular function in murine viral myocarditis, and these changes were reversed by co-treatment with nicotine by activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. These results indicate that vagal nerve plays an important role in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect in viral myocarditis, and that cholinergic stimulation with nicotine also plays its peripheral anti-inflammatory role relying on α7nAChR, without requirement for the integrity of vagal nerve in the model. The findings suggest that vagus nerve stimulation mediated inhibition of the inflammatory processes likely provide important benefits in myocarditis treatment. PMID:28197102

  9. Cross-talk between oxidative stress and modifications of cholinergic and glutaminergic receptors in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-zhong GUAN

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, and its pathogenesis is likely to be associated with multiple etiologies and mechanisms in which oxidative stress and deficits of neurotransmitter receptors may play impor-tant roles. It has been indicated that a high level of free radicals can influence the expressions of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), muscarinic receptors (mAChRs), and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, exhibiting disturbances of cellular mem-brane by lipid peroxidation, damages of the protein receptors by protein oxidation, and possible modified gene expressions of these receptors by DNA oxidation. nAChRs have shown an antioxidative effect by a direct or an indirect pathway; mAChR stimulation may generate reactive oxygen species, which might be a physi-ological compensative reaction, or improve oxidative stress; and high stimulation to NMDA receptors can increase the sensitivity of oxidative stress of neurons. This review may provide complemental information" for understanding the correla-tion between oxidative stress and changed cholinergic and glutaminergic recep-tors in AD processing, and for revealing the underlying molecular mechanisms of these factors in the multiple etiologies and pathophysiology of the disorder.

  10. Intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus: fact or artefact?

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    Jan Krzysztof Blusztajn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed that hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh is synthesized and released exclusively from the terminals of the long-axon afferents whose cell bodies reside in the medial septum and diagonal band. The search for intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus has a long history; however evidence for the existence of these neurons has been inconsistent, with most investigators failing to detect them using in situ hybridization or immunohistochemical staining of the cholinergic markers, choline acetyltransferase (CHAT or vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VACHT. Advances in the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice expressing a reporter protein under the control of the genomic elements of the Chat gene (Chat-BAC mice have facilitated studies of cholinergic neurons. Such mice show robust and faithful expression of the reporter proteins in all known cholinergic cell populations. The availability of the Chat-BAC mice re-ignited interest in hippocampal cholinergic interneurons, because a small number of such reporter-expressing cells is frequently observed in the hippocampus of these mice. However, to date, attempts to confirm that these neurons co-express the endogenous cholinergic markers CHAT or VACHT, or release ACh, have been unsuccessful. Without such confirmatory evidence it is best to conclude that there are no cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus. Similar considerations apply to other BAC transgenic lines, whose utility as a discovery tool for cell populations heretofore not known to express the genes of interest encoded by the BACs, must be validated by methods that detect expression of the endogenous genes.

  11. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

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    Brown, Derek [Department of Psychiatry, Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Jim; Wyper, David [Department of Clinical Physics, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, G51 4TF (United Kingdom); Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally [Department of Clinical Physics, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-01

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[{sup 123}I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  12. Differential effects of the muscarinic M1 receptor agonist RS-86 and the acetylcholine-esterase inhibitor donepezil on REM sleep regulation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Christoph; Nofzinger, Eric A; Feige, Bernd; Waldheim, Bernhard; Radosa, Marc-Philipp; Riemann, Dieter; Berger, Mathias

    2006-06-01

    Broad evidence from preclinical and clinical research indicates that cholinergic neurotransmission contributes significantly to the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. However, a potential role of different acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subtypes for the regulation of three main aspects of REM sleep, (1) REM onset, (2) REM maintenance, and (3) generation of REMs, are not clear. In the present double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled study, we investigated the differential effects of the M1 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) agonist RS-86 and the ACh-esterase inhibitor donepezil to further specify the AChR subtype function on REM sleep regulation in n = 20 healthy volunteers. We found that RS-86 selectively shortened REM latency (multivariate analysis of variance post hoc contrast p = 0.024 compared to placebo, not significant for donepezil) and that donepezil specifically enhanced the duration of REM sleep (% sleep period time, p = 0.000 compared to placebo; p = 0.003 compared to RS-86) and the number of REMs (p = 0.000 compared to placebo; p = 0.000 compared to RS-86). These results provide evidence that the onset of REM sleep is, in part, mediated by M1 mAChR activity, whereas the maintenance of REM sleep and the number of REMs are mediated by non-M1, but presumably M2 mAChR activity. These findings are of interest for the understanding of sleep regulation and of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Alzheimer's dementia and depressive disorders, whose etiopathology may involve alterations in cholinergic neurotransmission.

  13. Cholinergic and adrenergic influence on the teleost heart in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, M; Ehrenström, F; Nilsson, S

    1987-01-01

    The tonical cholinergic and adrenergic influence on the heart rate was investigated in vivo in seven species of marine teleosts (pollack, Pollachius pollachius; cuckoo wrasse, Labrus mixtus; ballan wrasse, Labrus berggylta; five-bearded rockling, Ciliata mustela; tadpole fish, Raniceps raninus; eel-pout, Zoarces viviparus and short-spined sea scorpion, Myoxocephalus scor pius) during rest and, in two of the species (P. pollachius and L. mixtus), also during moderate swimming exercise in a Blazka-type swim tunnel. Ventral aortic blood pressure and heart rate were recorded via a catheter implanted in an afferent branchial artery, and the influence of the cholinergic and adrenergic tonus on the heart rate was assessed by injection of atropine and sotalol respectively. During rest the adrenergic tonus was higher than the cholinergic tonus in all species except L. berggylta, where the reverse was true. In P. pollachius and L. mixtus, exercise appeared to produce a lowering of the cholinergic tonus on the heart and, possibly, a slight increase of the adrenergic tonus. The nature of the adrenergic tonus (humoral or neural) is not clear, but the low plasma concentrations of catecholamines both during rest and exercise could be interpreted in favour of a mainly neural adrenergic tonus on the teleost heart. These experiments are compatible with the view that both a cholinergic inhibitory tonus and an adrenergic excitatory tonus are general features in the control of the teleost heart in vivo, both at rest and during moderate swimming exercise.

  14. Photocolorimetric Biosensor for Detection of Cholinergic Organophosphorus Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Vymazalová

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To detect nerve agents in practice, the analytical methods such as gas, liquid and thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrometry or capillary electrophoresis are usually used. Apart from these analytical methods, we developed an analytical device (tape photocolorimetric biosensor based on the modified Ellman's cholinesterase biochemical reaction for multidetection of cholinergic organophosphorus compounds. Enzyme butyrylcholinesterase was used as a biorecognizing component and its activity was evaluated by red, blue, green (RGB sensor. This method eliminates errors in the evaluation and provides automatic data collection with their subsequent evaluation. The unique method of dosing allows appropriate dispensing of reagents in microlitres volumes and the whole system is simple to operate. Suitability of the constructed biosensors was evaluated using the six organophosphates (Tabun, sarin, Soman, cyclosin, VX and R33 compound. Biosensor showed the ability to measure substances at concentrations ranging between ~ 1×10-8 mg/l - 1×10-6 mg/l in the air, according to their inhibition effect.Defence Science Journal, 2012, 62(6, pp.399-403, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.62.2589

  15. Binding characteristics of the muscarinic receptor subtype in rabbit pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Zwam, A.J.; Willems, P.H.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J.F.; de Pont, J.J.; van Ginneken, C.A. (Catholic Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    The muscarinic receptor in the rabbit pancreas was characterized with the use of the labeled ligand ({sup 3}H)-(-)-quinuclidinyl-benzylate (({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB). Specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB to pancreatic acini was found to be reversible and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 68 pmol/l and a receptor density (RT) of 170 fmol/mg protein. Agonist binding behaviour was investigated by displacement of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB binding by eight agonists like arecoline, arecadine-propargylester (APE) and carbachol, yielding only low affinity binding sites. The inhibition of ({sup 3}H)-(-)-QNB binding by the selective antagonists pirenzepine, hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD) and (11-(2-(diethyl-amino)-methyl-1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyr ido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepin-6-one (AF-DX 116) confirmed the M3 nature of the rabbit pancreatic receptor.

  16. Localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in plant guard cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), as an important neurotransmitter in animals, also plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. But relatively little is known about its receptors in plants. A green fluorescence BODIPY FL-labeled ABT, which is a high affinity ligand of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), was used to localize mAChR in plant guard cells. In Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L., mAChR was found both on the plasma membrane of guard cells. mAChR may also be distributed on guard cell chloroplast membrane of Vicia faba L. The evidence that mAChR localizes in the guard cells provides a new possible signal transduction pathway in ACh mediated stomata movement.

  17. Distinct Agonist Regulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine M2-M3 Heteromers and Their Corresponding Homomers*

    OpenAIRE

    Aslanoglou, Despoina; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Each subtype of the muscarinic receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors is activated by similar concentrations of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine or closely related synthetic analogs such as carbachol. However, pharmacological selectivity can be generated by the introduction of a pair of mutations to produce Receptor Activated Solely by Synthetic Ligand (RASSL) forms of muscarinic receptors. These display loss of potency for acetylcholine/carbachol alongside a concurrent gain in pote...

  18. Muscarinic receptor antagonists, from folklore to pharmacology; finding drugs that actually work in asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Bart C; Fryer, Allison D

    2011-05-01

    In the lungs, parasympathetic nerves provide the dominant control of airway smooth muscle with release of acetylcholine onto M3 muscarinic receptors. Treatment of airway disease with anticholinergic drugs that block muscarinic receptors began over 2000 years ago. Pharmacologic data all indicated that antimuscarinic drugs should be highly effective in asthma but clinical results were mixed. Thus, with the discovery of effective β-adrenergic receptor agonists the use of muscarinic antagonists declined. Lack of effectiveness of muscarinic antagonists is due to a variety of factors including unwanted side effects (ranging from dry mouth to coma) and the discovery of additional muscarinic receptor subtypes in the lungs with sometimes competing effects. Perhaps the most important problem is ineffective dosing due to poorly understood differences between routes of administration and no effective way of testing whether antagonists block receptors stimulated physiologically by acetylcholine. Newer muscarinic receptor antagonists are being developed that address the problems of side effects and receptor selectivity that appear to be quite promising in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  19. Cypermethrin Poisoning and Anti-cholinergic Medication- A Case Report

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    Dr Sudip Parajuli

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A 30 years old male was brought to emergency department of Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal with alleged history of consumption of pyrethroid compound ‘cypermethrin’. It was found to be newer insecticide poisoning reported in Nepal. We reported this case to show effectiveness of anti-cholinergic like hyosciane and chlorpheniramine maleate in the treatment of cypermethrin poisoning.

  20. Selectivity of oxomemazine for the M1 muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S W; Woo, C W; Kim, J G

    1994-12-01

    The binding characteristics of pirenzepine and oxomemazine to muscarinic receptor were studied to evaluate the selectivity of oxomemazine for the muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat cerebral microsomes. Equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of (-)-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate([3H]QNB) determined from saturation isotherms was 64 pM. Analysis of the pirenzepine inhibition curve of [3H]QNB binding to cerebral microsome indicated the presence of two receptor subtypes with high (Ki = 16 nM, M1 receptor) and low (Ki = 400 nM, M3 receptor) affinity for pirenzepine. Oxomemazine also identified two receptor subtypes with about 20-fold difference in the affinity for high (Ki = 84 nM, OH receptor) and low (Ki = 1.65 microM, OL receptor) affinity sites. The percentage populations of M1 and M3 receptors to the total receptors were 61:39, and those of OH and OL receptors 39:61, respectively. Both pirenzepine and oxomemazine increased the KD value for [3H]QNB without affecting the binding site concentrations and Hill coefficient for the [3H]QNB binding. Oxomemazine had a 10-fold higher affinity at M1 receptors than at M3 receptors, and pirenzepine a 8-fold higher affinity at OH receptors than at OL receptors. Analysis of the shallow competition binding curves of oxomemazine for M1 receptors and pirenzepine for OL receptors yielded that 69% of M1 receptors were of OH receptors and the remaining 31% of OL receptors, and that 29% of OL receptors were of M1 receptors and 71% of M3 receptors. However, M3 for oxomemazine and OH for pirenzepine were composed of a uniform population. These results suggest that oxomemazine could be classified as a selective drug for M1 receptors and also demonstrate that rat cerebral microsomes contain three different subtypes of M1, M3 and the other site which is different from M1, M2 and M3 receptors.

  1. Brainstem cholinergic modulation of muscle tone in infant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Andrew J; Poremba, Amy; Blumberg, Mark S

    2007-06-01

    In week-old rats, lesions of the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DLPT) and nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) have opposing effects on nuchal muscle tone. Specifically, pups with DLPT lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of nuchal muscle atonia (indicative of sleep) and pups with PnO lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of high nuchal muscle tone (indicative of wakefulness). Here we test the hypothesis that nuchal muscle tone is modulated, at least in part, by cholinergically mediated interactions between these two regions. First, in unanesthetized pups, we found that chemical infusion of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (22 mm, 0.1 microL) within the DLPT produced high muscle tone. Next, chemical lesions of the PnO were used to produce a chronic state of high nuchal muscle tone, at which time the cholinergic antagonist scopolamine (10 mm, 0.1 microL) was infused into the DLPT. Scopolamine effectively decreased nuchal muscle tone, thus suggesting that lesions of the PnO increase muscle tone via cholinergic activation of the DLPT. Using 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography, metabolic activation throughout the DLPT was observed after PnO lesions. Finally, consistent with the hypothesis that PnO inactivation produces high muscle tone, infusion of the sodium channel blocker lidocaine (2%) into the PnO of unanesthetized pups produced rapid increases in muscle tone. We conclude that, even early in infancy, the DLPT is critically involved in the regulation of muscle tone and behavioral state, and that its activity is modulated by a cholinergic mechanism that is directly or indirectly controlled by the PnO.

  2. Characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Carrie H; Chan, Wai Y; Castetter, Andrea M; Watt, Marla L; Quets, Anne T; Felder, Christian C

    2016-07-05

    Identification of synthetic ligands selective for muscarinic receptor subtypes has been challenging due to the high sequence identity and structural homology among the five muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Here, we report the pharmacological characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist. PCS1055 inhibited radioligand [(3)H]-NMS binding to the M4 receptor with a Ki=6.5nM. Though the potency of PCS1055 is lower than that of pan-muscarinic antagonist atropine, it has better subtype selectivity over previously reported M4-selective reagents such as the muscarinic-peptide toxins (Karlsson et al., 1994; Santiago and Potter, 2001a) at the M1 subtype, and benzoxazine ligand PD102807 at the M3-subtype (Bohme et al., 2002). A detailed head-to-head comparison study using [(3)H]-NMS competitive binding assays characterizes the selectivity profiles of PCS1055 to that of other potent muscarinic-antagonist compounds PD102807, tropicamide, AF-DX-384, pirenzapine, and atropine. In addition to binding studies, the subtype specificity of PCS1055 is also demonstrated by functional receptor activation as readout by GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding. These GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding studies showed that PCS1055 exhibited 255-, 69.1-, 342- and >1000-fold greater inhibition of Oxo-M activity at the M4 versus the M1-, M2(-), M3-or M5 receptor subtypes, respectively. Schild analyses indicates that PCS1055 acts as a competitive antagonist to muscarinic M4 receptor, and confirms the affinity of the ligand to be low nanomolar, Kb=5.72nM. Therefore, PCS1055 represents a new M4-preferring antagonist that may be useful in elucidating the roles of M4 receptor signaling.

  3. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides on phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuyin Li; Liming Zou; Carry Pope

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphorus insecticides may promote the accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses and the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity to cause disturbance of neural signal conduction and induce a toxic reaction. Organophosphorus insecticides may act on M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, whose combination with G proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of organophosphorus insecticides on the phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and to reveal other possible actions of organophosphorus insecticides.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study, which was performed in the Central Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College, and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University from June 2002 to December 2004.METHODS: The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor was extracted and purified from pig brain using affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the purified M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, and [OP32] ATP were incubated with different concentrations of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos oxon together. The mixture then underwent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the gel film was dried and radioactively autographed to detect phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Finally, the radio-labeled phosphorylated M2 receptor protein band was excised for counting with an isotope liquid scintillation counter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion in different concentrations on the phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; effects of chlorpyrifos oxon on the phosphorylation of the adrenergic receptor.CONCLUSION: Different kinds of organophosphorus insecticides have different effects on the phosphorylation of the G protein

  4. Cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the central amygdala induces antinociception in the guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite-Panissi C.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA in the modulation of defensive behavior and in antinociceptive regulation. In a previous study, we demonstrated the existence of a cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the CEA, modulating the defensive response of tonic immobility in guinea pigs. In the present study, we investigated a similar interaction in the CEA, but now involved in the regulation of the nociceptive response. Microinjection of carbachol (2.7 nmol and morphine (2.2 nmol into the CEA promoted antinociception up to 45 min after microinjection in guinea pigs as determined by a decrease in the vocalization index in the vocalization test. This test consists of the application of a peripheral noxious stimulus (electric shock into the subcutaneous region of the thigh that provokes the emission of a vocalization response by the animal. Furthermore, the present results demonstrated that the antinociceptive effect of carbachol (2.7 nmol; N = 10 was blocked by previous administration of atropine (0.7 nmol; N = 7 or naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 7 into the same site. In addition, the decrease in the vocalization index induced by the microinjection of morphine (2.2 nmol; N = 9 into the CEA was prevented by pretreatment with naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 11. All sites of injection were confirmed by histology. These results indicate the involvement of the cholinergic and opioidergic systems of the CEA in the modulation of antinociception in guinea pigs. In addition, the present study suggests that cholinergic transmission may activate the release of endorphins/enkephalins from interneurons of the CEA, resulting in antinociception.

  5. Effects of septal cholinergic lesion on rat exploratory behavior in an open-field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Lamprea

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The medial septum participates in the modulation of exploratory behavior triggered by novelty. Also, selective lesions of the cholinergic component of the septohippocampal system alter the habituation of rats to an elevated plus-maze without modifying anxiety indices. We investigated the effects of the intraseptal injection of the cholinergic immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin (SAP on the behavior of rats in an open-field. Thirty-nine male Wistar rats (weight: 194-230 g were divided into three groups, non-injected controls and rats injected with either saline (0.5 µl or SAP (237.5 ng/0.5 µl. Twelve days after surgery, the animals were placed in a square open-field (120 cm and allowed to freely explore for 5 min. After the test, the rats were killed by decapitation and the septum, hippocampus and frontal cortex were removed and assayed for acetylcholinesterase activity. SAP increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the septum, hippocampus and frontal cortex and decreased the total distance run (9.15 ± 1.51 m in comparison to controls (13.49 ± 0.91 m. The time spent in the center and at the periphery was not altered by SAP but the distance run was reduced during the first and second minutes (2.43 ± 0.36 and 1.75 ± 0.34 m compared to controls (4.18 ± 0.26 and 3.14 ± 0.25 m. SAP-treated rats showed decreased but persistent exploration throughout the session. These results suggest that septohippocampal cholinergic mechanisms contribute to at least two critical processes, one related to the motivation to explore new environments and the other to the acquisition and storage of spatial information (i.e., spatial memory.

  6. Differential anti-ischaemic effects of muscarinic receptor blockade in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease; impaired vs normal left ventricular function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van den Heuvel; D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); G.L. Bartels; M. van der Ent (Martin); W.J. Remme (Willem)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: In patients with coronary artery disease acetylcholine (a muscarinic agonist) causes vasoconstriction. The effect of atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) on coronary vasotone in patients with normal or impaired left ventricular function is unknown. METHO

  7. Short-term plasticity and modulation of synaptic transmission at mammalian inhibitory cholinergic olivocochlear synapses

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    Eleonora eKatz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The organ of Corti, the mammalian sensory epithelium of the inner ear, has two types of mechanoreceptor cells, inner hair cells (IHCs and outer hair cells (OHCs. In this sensory epithelium, vibrations produced by sound waves are transformed into electrical signals. When depolarized by incoming sounds, IHCs release glutamate and activate auditory nerve fibers innervating them and OHCs, by virtue of their electromotile property, increase the amplification and fine tuning of sound signals. The medial olivocochlear (MOC system, an efferent feedback system, inhibits OHC activity and thereby reduces the sensitivity and sharp tuning of cochlear afferent fibers. During neonatal development, IHCs fire Ca2+ action potentials which evoke glutamate release promoting activity in the immature auditory system in the absence of sensory stimuli. During this period, MOC fibers also innervate IHCs and are thought to modulate their firing rate. Both the MOC-OHC and the MOC-IHC synapses are cholinergic, fast and inhibitory and mediated by the alpha9alpha10 nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR coupled to the activation of calcium-activated potassium channels that hyperpolarize the hair cells.In this review we discuss the biophysical, functional and molecular data which demonstrate that at the synapses between MOC efferent fibers and cochlear hair cells, modulation of transmitter release as well as short-term synaptic plasticity mechanisms, operating both at the presynaptic terminal and at the postsynaptic hair-cell, determine the efficacy of these synapses and shape the hair cell response pattern.

  8. Interleukin-6 impairs chronotropic responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation and decreases heart rate variability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiasgharzadeh, Khalil; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Mani, Ali R

    2011-12-30

    Heart rate variability is reduced in several clinical settings associated with systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism of decreased heart rate variability during systemic inflammation is unknown. It appears that the inflammatory cytokines might play a role, since epidemiologic studies has shown that circulating levels of interleukine-6 (IL-6) correlate significantly with indexes of depressed heart rate variability in various clinical conditions. The present investigation was carried out to study the peripheral and central effects of IL-6 on heart rate dynamic in mice. Adult male BALB/c mice were used in the study. RT-PCR was performed to study the expression of IL-6 receptor in mouse atrial and the results showed that gp130 mRNA was detectable in the atrium. The effect of IL-6 was also studies on chronotropic responsiveness of isolated atria to adrenergic and cholinergic stimulations. Incubation of isolated atria with 10 ng/ml of IL-6 was associated with a significant hypo-responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation (log IC₅₀ of carbacholine changed from -6.26±0.10 in controls to -5.59±0.19 following incubation with IL-6, Pheart rate variability parameters (SDNN, SD1, and SD2). While intracerebroventricular injection of IL-6 (50 ng/mouse) had no significant effect on heart rate variability parameters. These data are in line with a peripheral role for IL-6 in the genesis of decreased heart rate variability during systemic inflammation.

  9. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  10. Antidepressant-like properties of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and cholinergic dependency in a genetic rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Harvey, Brian H; Brand, Linda; Brink, Christiaan B

    2010-09-01

    We explored the antidepressant-like properties of two phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors in a genetic animal model of depression, namely Flinders sensitive line rats. We investigated the dose-dependency of the antidepressant-like action of sildenafil, and its interaction with the cholinergic system and behavioural correlates of monoaminergic neurotransmission, in the forced swim test. Antidepressant-like properties of tadalafil (a structurally distinct PDE5 inhibitor) were also evaluated. Flinders sensitive line rats were treated for 14 days with vehicle, fluoxetine, atropine or PDE5 inhibitors+/-atropine. Immobility, swimming and climbing behaviours were assessed in the forced swim test. In combination with atropine (1 mg/kg), both sildenafil (10, 20 mg/kg) and tadalafil (10 mg/kg) decreased immobility while increasing swimming (serotonergic) and climbing (noradrenergic) behaviours. Interestingly, sildenafil (3 mg/kg) decreased immobility while selectively increasing climbing behaviour in the absence of atropine. These results suggest that the antidepressant-like activity of PDE5 inhibitors involve alterations in monoaminergic neurotransmission, but involve a dependence on inherent cholinergic tone so that the final response is determined by the relative extent of activation of these systems. Furthermore, the behavioural profile of sildenafil alone, and its observed antidepressant-like properties, shows strict dose-dependency, with only higher doses showing an interaction with the cholinergic system.

  11. Learning history and cholinergic modulation in the dorsal hippocampus are necessary for rats to infer the status of a hidden event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Cynthia D; Flesher, M Melissa; Nocera, Nathanial A; Fanselow, Michael S; Blaisdell, Aaron P

    2016-06-01

    Identifying statistical patterns between environmental stimuli enables organisms to respond adaptively when cues are later observed. However, stimuli are often obscured from detection, necessitating behavior under conditions of ambiguity. Considerable evidence indicates decisions under ambiguity rely on inference processes that draw on past experiences to generate predictions under novel conditions. Despite the high demand for this process and the observation that it deteriorates disproportionately with age, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We developed a rodent model of decision-making during ambiguity to examine features of experience that contribute to inference. Rats learned either a simple (positive patterning) or complex (negative patterning) instrumental discrimination between the illumination of one or two lights. During test, only one light was lit while the other relevant light was blocked from physical detection (covered by an opaque shield, rendering its status ambiguous). We found experience with the complex negative patterning discrimination was necessary for rats to behave sensitively to the ambiguous test situation. These rats behaved as if they inferred the presence of the hidden light, responding differently than when the light was explicitly absent (uncovered and unlit). Differential expression profiles of the immediate early gene cFos indicated hippocampal involvement in the inference process while localized microinfusions of the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine, into the dorsal hippocampus caused rats to behave as if only one light was present. That is, blocking cholinergic modulation prevented the rat from inferring the presence of the hidden light. Collectively, these results suggest cholinergic modulation mediates recruitment of hippocampal processes related to past experiences and transfer of these processes to make decisions during ambiguous situations. Our results correspond with correlations observed between human brain

  12. Soman- or kainic acid-induced convulsions decrease muscarinic receptors but not benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, L.; Pazdernik, T.L.; Cross, R.S.; Nelson, S.R.; Samson, F.E. (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City (USA))

    (3H)Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding to muscarinic receptors decreased in the rat forebrain after convulsions induced by a single dose of either soman, a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, or kainic acid, an excitotoxin. A Rosenthal plot revealed that the receptors decreased in number rather than affinity. When the soman-induced convulsions were blocked, the decrease in muscarinic receptors at 3 days was less extensive than when convulsions occurred and at 10 days they approached control levels in most of the brain areas. The most prominent decrements in QNB binding were in the piriform cortex where the decline in QNB binding is probably related to the extensive convulsion-associated neuropathology. The decrements in QNB binding after convulsions suggest that the convulsive state leads to a down-regulation of muscarinic receptors in some brain areas. In contrast to the decrease in QNB binding after convulsions, (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors did not change even in the piriform cortex where the loss in muscarinic receptors was most prominent. Thus, it appears that those neuronal processes that bear muscarinic receptors are more vulnerable to convulsion-induced change than those with benzodiazepine receptors.

  13. Muscarinic receptor-mediated calcium changes in a rat model of facial nerve nucleus injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei Sun; Huamin Liu; Fugao Zhu; Yanqing Wang; Junfeng Wen; Rui Zhou; Yanjun Wang; Banghua Liu

    2010-01-01

    The muscarinic receptor modulates intracellular free calcium ion levels in the facial nerve nucleus via different channels.In the present study,muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ions levels were detected by confocal laser microscopy in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury in rats.There was no significant difference in muscarinic receptor expression at the affected facial nerve nucleus compared with expression prior to injury,but muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels increased in the affected side following facial nerve injury(P < 0.01).At day 30after facial nerve injury,50 μmol/L muscarinic-mediated free calcium ion levels were significantly inhibited at the affected facial nerve nucleus in calcium-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid,and the change range was 82% of artificial cerebrospinal fluid(P < 0.05).These results suggest that increased free calcium ion concentrations are achieved by intracellular calcium ion release,and that the transmembrane flow of calcium ions is also involved in this process.

  14. Cholinergic modulation differs between basal and apical dendritic excitation of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, L Stan; Péloquin, Pascal

    2010-08-01

    We hypothesize that endogenous cholinergic modulation of dendritic processing of hippocampal CA1 is layer specific, and it specifically enhances spike output resulting from basal as compared with the apical dendritic excitation. Laminar profiles of evoked field potentials were recorded in the CA1 area of urethane-anesthetized rats using multichannel silicon probes and analyzed as current source density. High-frequency stimulation of the pontis oralis (PnO) attenuated the midapical more than the basal or distal apical dendritic excitatory sink. Population spike (PS) and excitatory sink-PS potentiation resulting from basal dendritic excitation were facilitated, while the PS evoked by apical dendritic stimulation was attenuated by PnO stimulation. Perfusion of cholinergic agonist carbachol onto hippocampal slices in vitro also attenuated the apical more than the basal dendritic excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Excitatory sink attenuation and PS changes after PnO stimulation were blocked by systemic or local scopolamine and by intracerebroventricular (icv) M1 receptor antagonist pirenzepine but not by icv M2 receptor antagonist AFDX-116 or nicotinic antagonists. However, a hippocampal theta rhythm activated by PnO stimulation was blocked by systemic but not by local scopolamine. We conclude that endogenous acetylcholine mediates a stronger presynaptic inhibition of the midapical than basal and distal apical excitation mainly through M1 receptors.

  15. Widespread expression of BDNF but not NT3 by target areas of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, H.S.; Hains, J.M.; Laramee, G.R.; Rosenthal, A.; Winslow, J.W. (Genentech, San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-10-12

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT3) are homologs of the well-known neurotrophic factor nerve growth factor. The three members of this family display distinct patterns of target specificity. To examine the distribution in brain of messenger RNA for these molecules, in situ hybridization was performed. Cells hybridizing intensely to antisense BDNF probe were located throughout the major targets of the rat basal forebrain cholinergic system, that is, the hippocampus, amygdala, and neocortex. Strongly hybridizing cells were also observed in structures associated with the olfactory system. The distribution of NT3 mRNA in forebrain was much more limited. Within the hippocampus, labeled cells were restricted to CA2, the most medial portion of CA1, and the dentate gyrus. In human hippocampus, cells expressing BDNF and mRNA are distributed in a fashion similar to that observed in the rat. These findings point to both basal forebrain cholinergic cells and olfactory pathways as potential central targets for BDNF.

  16. Dysfunctional muscarinic M(2) autoreceptors in vagally induced bronchoconstriction of conscious guinea pigs after the early allergic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TenBerge, REJ; Krikke, M; Teisman, ACH; Roffel, AF; Zaagsma, J

    1996-01-01

    We studied the function of autoinhibitory muscarinic M(2) receptors on vagal nerve endings in the airways of conscious, unrestrained, ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs after the early and late allergic reaction. For this purpose, the effects of the selective muscarinic M(2) receptor antagonist gallam

  17. THE INTERACTION OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE ANTAGONISTS WITH PREJUNCTIONAL AND POSTJUNCTIONAL MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN THE GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBERGE, REJ; ROFFEL, AF; ZAAGSMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists were used to study prejunctional M2 and postjunctional M3 receptors in the isolated guinea pig trachea. The effects of four M2-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists (gallamine, methoctramine, AQ-RA 741 and AF-DX 116) were studied on twitch contractions, elicited b

  18. BETA-AMYLOID((1-42)) AFFECTS CHOLINERGIC BUT NOT PARVALBUMIN-CONTAINING NEURONS IN THE SEPTAL COMPLEX OF THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HARKANY, T; DEJONG, GI; SOOS, K; PENKE, B; LUITEN, PGM; GULYA, K

    1995-01-01

    beta-Amyloid((1-42)) peptide (beta AP((1-42))) was injected into the medial septum of rats. After a 14-day survival time, neuronal alterations in the septal cholinergic and GABAergic systems were visualized by means of histo- and immunocytochemical methods. Neurons insulted by the peptide were prima

  19. β-Amyloid(1-42) affects cholinergic but not parvalbumin-containing neurons in the septal complex of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T.; Jong, G.I. de; Soós, K.; Penke, B.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Gulya, K.

    1995-01-01

    β-Amyloid(1-42) peptide (βAP(1-42)) was injected into the medial septum of rats. After a 14-day survival time, neuronal alterations in the septal cholinergic and GABAergic systems were visualized by means of histo- and immunocytochemical methods. Neurons insulted by the peptide were primarily cholin

  20. Cholinergic signals in mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermann, Emmanuel; Kremer, Yves; Crochet, Sylvain; Petersen, Carl C H

    2014-12-11

    Internal brain states affect sensory perception, cognition, and learning. Many neocortical areas exhibit changes in the pattern and synchrony of neuronal activity during quiet versus active behaviors. Active behaviors are typically associated with desynchronized cortical dynamics. Increased thalamic firing contributes importantly to desynchronize mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing. However, a whisking-related cortical state change persists after thalamic inactivation, which is mediated at least in part by acetylcholine, as we show here by using whole-cell recordings, local pharmacology, axonal calcium imaging, and optogenetic stimulation. During whisking, we find prominent cholinergic signals in the barrel cortex, which suppress spontaneous cortical activity. The desynchronized state of barrel cortex during whisking is therefore driven by at least two distinct signals with opposing functions: increased thalamic activity driving glutamatergic excitation of the cortex and increased cholinergic input suppressing spontaneous cortical activity.

  1. Cholinergic Signals in Mouse Barrel Cortex during Active Whisker Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Eggermann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Internal brain states affect sensory perception, cognition, and learning. Many neocortical areas exhibit changes in the pattern and synchrony of neuronal activity during quiet versus active behaviors. Active behaviors are typically associated with desynchronized cortical dynamics. Increased thalamic firing contributes importantly to desynchronize mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing. However, a whisking-related cortical state change persists after thalamic inactivation, which is mediated at least in part by acetylcholine, as we show here by using whole-cell recordings, local pharmacology, axonal calcium imaging, and optogenetic stimulation. During whisking, we find prominent cholinergic signals in the barrel cortex, which suppress spontaneous cortical activity. The desynchronized state of barrel cortex during whisking is therefore driven by at least two distinct signals with opposing functions: increased thalamic activity driving glutamatergic excitation of the cortex and increased cholinergic input suppressing spontaneous cortical activity.

  2. The effects of nitric oxide on spatial learning-memory and cholinergic system in rats%一氧化氮对大鼠学习记忆和胆碱能系统的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨伟; 未小明; 荆治华; 赵建强; 刘丽霞; 祁文秀

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨一氧化氮(nitric oxide,NO)在大鼠空间学习和记忆过程中的作用及其对胆碱能受体作用机制.方法:大鼠侧脑室分别注射NO前体左旋精氨酸(L-arginine,L-Arg,L-Arg组)、α7烟碱型乙酰胆碱受体(α7nicotinic acetylcholine receptor,α7 nAChR)拮抗剂甲基牛扁亭(methyllycaconitine,MLA,MLA组)、α7 nAChR激动剂氯化胆碱(choline chloride,CC组)、一氧化氮合酶抑制剂Nω-硝基-L-精氨酸甲酯(nω-nitro-L-arginine methylester,L-NAME,L-NAME组)以及先注射MLA再注射L-Arg(ML组)、先注射L-NAME再注射氯化胆碱(NC组),并以等量生理盐水(NS组)作为对照.用Y型迷宫刺激器、硝酸还原酶法、免疫组织化学以及Western-Blot等技术分别检测大鼠空间学习和记忆行为能力、大脑皮质和海马NO含量和α7nAChR的表达.结果:与对照组比较,Y迷宫空间学习能力达标次数和24 h后30次测试记忆行为中错误反应次数在L-Arg组和CC组均减少,而在MLA组和L-NAME组均增多;大脑前额叶皮质和海马NO含量和α7nAChR阳性细胞数以及蛋白含量在L-Arg组和CC组均明显增多,而在MLA组和L-NAME组均明显减少.ML组和NC组分别与L-Arg和CC组相比较,大鼠学习和记忆行为能力均明显减弱,并且大脑前额叶皮质和海马NO含量以及α7nAChR的表达均减少.结论:侧脑室应用MLA或L-NAME可减弱L-Arg或氯化胆碱对大鼠空间学习和记忆行为能力的促进作用;NO通过α7nAChR促进大鼠空间学习和记忆能力.%Objective: To explore the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on spatial learning and memory in rats and its cholinergic receptor mechanisms. Methods: L-arginine (L-Arg, a nitric oxide precursor) , methyllycaconitine (MLA, an antagonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)), choline chloride (CC, an agonist of α7nAChR) , Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) was injected into rat cerebral lateral ventricles, respectively

  3. BRAINSTEM CHOLINERGIC MODULATION OF MUSCLE TONE IN INFANT RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Gall, Andrew J.; Poremba, Amy; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    In week-old rats, lesions of the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DLPT) and nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) have opposing effects on nuchal muscle tone. Specifically, pups with DLPT lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of nuchal muscle atonia (indicative of sleep) and pups with PnO lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of high nuchal muscle tone (indicative of wakefulness). Here we test the hypothesis that nuchal muscle tone is modulated, at least in part, by cholinergically mediated interactions between the...

  4. Modulation of the Cholinergic Mechanisms in the Bronchial Smooth Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Ginsborg and Hirst, 1q72; Sawynok and Jhamandas, 1976), although theopylline has not shown to be a specific adenosine receptor antagonist in all the tissues... theopylline and other cyclic nucletide phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Acta Pharmacol. Toxicol. 45, 336-344. Fredholm, B.B. and P. Hedqvist, 1980...51 mM) evoked release of [3H]-Ach from cholinergic nerves in the bronchial smooth muscle. The effect of theopylline (I mM) on the response to

  5. Dopaminergic and Cholinergic Modulation of Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Xenias, Harry S.; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The recent electrophysiological characterization of TH-expressing GABAergic interneurons (THINs) in the neostriatum revealed an unexpected degree of diversity of interneurons in this brain area (Ibáñez-Sandoval et al., 2010, Unal et al., 2011, 2013). Despite being relatively few in number, THINs may play a significant role in transmitting and distributing extra- and intrastriatal neuromodulatory signals in the striatal circuitry. Here we investigated the dopaminergic and cholinergic regulatio...

  6. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford); (NIH); (D.E. Shaw); (Hanyang); (UTSMC)

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  7. Segregated cholinergic transmission modulates dopamine neurons integrated in distinct functional circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautan, Daniel; Souza, Albert S; Huerta-Ocampo, Icnelia; Valencia, Miguel; Assous, Maxime; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Tepper, James M; Bolam, J Paul; Gerdjikov, Todor V; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) receive cholinergic innervation from brainstem structures that are associated with either movement or reward. Whereas cholinergic neurons of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) carry an associative/motor signal, those of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) convey limbic information. We used optogenetics and in vivo juxtacellular recording and labeling to examine the influence of brainstem cholinergic innervation of distinct neuronal subpopulations in the VTA. We found that LDT cholinergic axons selectively enhanced the bursting activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons that were excited by aversive stimulation. In contrast, PPN cholinergic axons activated and changed the discharge properties of VTA neurons that were integrated in distinct functional circuits and were inhibited by aversive stimulation. Although both structures conveyed a reinforcing signal, they had opposite roles in locomotion. Our results demonstrate that two modes of cholinergic transmission operate in the VTA and segregate the neurons involved in different reward circuits.

  8. Convergent effects on cell signaling mechanisms mediate the actions of different neurobehavioral teratogens: alterations in cholinergic regulation of protein kinase C in chick and avian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Joseph; Beer, Avital; Huleihel, Rabab; Izrael, Michal; Katz, Sofia; Levi, Yaarit; Rozenboim, Israel; Yaniv, Shiri P; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2004-10-01

    Although the actions of heroin on central nervous system (CNS) development are mediated through opioid receptors, the net effects converge on dysfunction of cholinergic systems. We explored the mechanisms underlying neurobehavioral deficits in mouse and avian (chick, Cayuga duck) models. In mice, prenatal heroin exposure (10 mg/kg on gestation days 9-18) elicited deficits in behaviors related to hippocampal cholinergic innervation, characterized by concomitant pre- and postsynaptic hyperactivity, but ending in a reduction of basal levels of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms betaII and gamma and their desensitization to cholinergic receptor-induced activation. PKCalpha, which is not involved in the behaviors studied, was unaffected. Because mammalian models possess inherent confounding factors from maternal effects, we conducted parallel studies using avian embryos, evaluating hyperstriatal nucleus (intermedial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale, IMHV)-related, filial imprinting behavior. Heroin injection to the eggs (20 mg/kg) on incubation days 0 and 5 diminished the post-hatch imprinting ability and reduced PKCg and bII content in the IMHV membrane fraction. Two otherwise unrelated agents that converge on cholinergic systems, chlorpyrifos and nicotine, elicited the same spectrum of effects on PKC isoforms and imprinting but had more robust actions. Pharmacological characterization also excluded direct effects of opioid receptors on the expression of imprinting; instead, it indicated participation of serotonergic innervation. The avian models can provide rapid screening of neuroteratogens, exploration of common mechanisms of behavioral disruption, and the potential design of therapies to reverse neurobehavioral deficits.

  9. Muscarinic agonists and potassium currents in guinea-pig myenteric neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, J J; North, R A; Tokimasa, T

    1989-01-01

    1. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings were obtained from single neurones of the guinea-pig myenteric plexus in vitro. Using single electrode voltage clamp techniques, four distinct potassium currents were described and the effects of muscarinic agonists on these currents were studied. 2. A calcium-dependent potassium current (gKCa) was present in AH neurones at rest, and was much increased following a brief depolarization (50 ms, to 0 mV). Muscarinic agonists reduced both the resting current and the current evoked by depolarization. Pirenzepine competitively antagonized the suppression by muscarine of the calcium-dependent potassium current (or after-hyperpolarization) following an action potential. The dissociation equilibrium constant for pirenzepine was about 10 nM. 3. The conductance of AH neurones increased two to three fold when they were hyperpolarized negative to -90 mV. This inward rectification was blocked by extracellular caesium (2 mM) or rubidium (2 mM), but not by tetraethylammonium (TEA, 40 mM), 4-aminopyridine (100 microM) or cobalt (2 mM). The inward rectification was unaffected by muscarinic agonists. 4. When AH neurones were depolarized from very negative holding potentials (less than -80 mV) a brief outward current was recorded with a duration of about 200 ms. This transient or A current was completely blocked by 4-aminopyridine (100 microM) but was not affected by tetrodotoxin (300 nM), TEA (40 mM) or cobalt (2 mM). Muscarinic agonists did not affect the A current. 5. In S neurones, and in AH neurones in calcium-free solutions, the potassium conductance (in TEA and caesium) behaved according to constant field assumptions. This background conductance was suppressed by muscarinic agonists. 6. It is concluded that the depolarization by muscarinic agonists of myenteric AH neurones is due to a suppression of both a calcium-dependent potassium conductance and a background potassium conductance. Muscarinic depolarization of S neurones

  10. [Properties of cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on type I vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Kong, Wei-Jia; Xia, Jiao; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Hua-Mao; Guo, Chang-Kai

    2008-06-25

    To confirm the existence of cholinergic receptors on type I vestibular hair cells (VHCs I) of guinea pigs and to study the properties of the cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on VHCs I, electrophysiological responses of isolated VHCs I to external ACh were examined by means of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. The results showed that 7.5% (21/279) VHCs I were found to be sensitive to ACh (10-1000 μmol/L). ACh generated an outward current in a steady, slow, dose-dependent [EC(50) was (63.78±2.31) μmol/L] and voltage-independent manner. In standard extracellular solution, ACh at the concentration of 100 μmol/L triggered a calcium-dependent current of (170±15) pA at holding potential of -50 mV, and the current amplitude could be depressed by extracellularly added calcium-dependent potassium channel antagonist TEA. The time interval for the next complete activation of ACh-sensitive current was no less than 1 min. The ion channels did not shut off even when they were exposed to ACh for an extended period of time (8 min). The results suggest that dose-dependent, calcium-dependent and voltage-independent cholinergic receptors were located on a few of the VHCs I investibular epithelium of guinea pigs. The cholinergic receptors did not show desensitization to ACh. This work reveals the existence of efferent neurotransmitter receptors on VHCs I and helps in understanding the function of vestibular efferent nervous system, and may provide some useful information on guiding the clinical rehabilitative treatment of vertigo.

  11. Cholinergic Abnormalities, Endosomal Alterations and Up-Regulation of Nerve Growth Factor Signaling in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabeza Carolina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins and their receptors regulate several aspects of the developing and mature nervous system, including neuronal morphology and survival. Neurotrophin receptors are active in signaling endosomes, which are organelles that propagate neurotrophin signaling along neuronal processes. Defects in the Npc1 gene are associated with the accumulation of cholesterol and lipids in late endosomes and lysosomes, leading to neurodegeneration and Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease. The aim of this work was to assess whether the endosomal and lysosomal alterations observed in NPC disease disrupt neurotrophin signaling. As models, we used i NPC1-deficient mice to evaluate the central cholinergic septo-hippocampal pathway and its response to nerve growth factor (NGF after axotomy and ii PC12 cells treated with U18666A, a pharmacological cellular model of NPC, stimulated with NGF. Results NPC1-deficient cholinergic cells respond to NGF after axotomy and exhibit increased levels of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT, whose gene is under the control of NGF signaling, compared to wild type cholinergic neurons. This finding was correlated with increased ChAT and phosphorylated Akt in basal forebrain homogenates. In addition, we found that cholinergic neurons from NPC1-deficient mice had disrupted neuronal morphology, suggesting early signs of neurodegeneration. Consistently, PC12 cells treated with U18666A presented a clear NPC cellular phenotype with a prominent endocytic dysfunction that includes an increased size of TrkA-containing endosomes and reduced recycling of the receptor. This result correlates with increased sensitivity to NGF, and, in particular, with up-regulation of the Akt and PLC-γ signaling pathways, increased neurite extension, increased phosphorylation of tau protein and cell death when PC12 cells are differentiated and treated with U18666A. Conclusions Our results suggest that the NPC cellular phenotype causes neuronal

  12. Luteolin enhances cholinergic activities in PC12 cells through ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Omri, Abdelfatteh; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Ben Abdrabbah, Manef; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-02-09

    Luteolin, a 3', 4', 5, 7-tetrahydroxyflavone, is an active compound in Rosmarinus officinalis (Lamiacea), and has been reported to exert several benefits in neuronal cells. However cholinergic-induced activities of luteolin still remain unknown. Neuronal differentiation encompasses an elaborate developmental program which plays a key role in the development of the nervous system. The advent of several cell lines, like PC12 cells, able to differentiate in culture proved to be the turning point for gaining and understanding of molecular neuroscience. In this work, we investigated the ability of luteolin to induce PC12 cell differentiation and its effect on cholinergic activities. Our findings showed that luteolin treatment significantly induced neurite outgrowth extension, enhanced acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, known as neuronal differentiation marker, and increased the level of total choline and acetylcholine in PC12 cells. In addition, luteolin persistently, activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt; while the addition of pharmacological MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and PI3k/Akt inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated luteolin-induced AChE activity and neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The above findings suggest that luteolin induces neurite outgrowth and enhanced cholinergic activities, at least in part, through the activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling.

  13. Effects of single or repeated administration of a carbamate, propoxur, and an organophosphate, DDVP, on jejunal cholinergic activities and contractile responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H; Sato, I; Akatsu, Y; Fujii, S; Suzuki, T; Matsusaka, N; Yuyama, A

    1994-01-01

    Wistar rats were injected once or repeatedly for 10 days with dichlorvos (DDVP, 5 mg kg-1), propoxur (10 mg kg-1), oxotremorine (0.1 mg kg-1) or atropine (5 mg kg-1). Animals were killed 20 min or 24 h after single or consecutive injections, respectively, for determinations of cholinergic activities and contractile responses to acetylcholine (ACh) of the jejunum. Single treatments: while DDVP and propoxur decreased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, oxotremorine and atropine did not. Although DDVP, propoxur and oxotremorine increased levels of ACh, atropine decreased them. Contractile responses to ACh were enhanced by DDVP and reduced by oxotremorine and atropine. The Bmax value of binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate (QNB) to muscarinic ACh receptors was decreased by atropine. Consecutive treatments: DDVP and oxotremorine decreased AChE activity markedly and slightly, respectively. Although DDVP and oxotremorine increased levels of ACh, propoxur decreased them. Without affecting the contractile responses, DDVP caused a reduction and propoxur and atropine caused an increase in the Bmax value for binding of [3H]QNB. Both the contractile responses and the value of Bmax for binding of [3H]-QNB were decreased by oxotremorine. In summary, propoxur and DDVP showed similar effects mainly through their anticholinesterase properties in the case of single injection, but DDVP had similar effects to those of oxotremorine and propoxur had similar effects to those of atropine in the case of repeated injection.

  14. Delirium Accompanied by Cholinergic Deficiency and Organ Failure in a 73-Year-Old Critically Ill Patient: Physostigmine as a Therapeutic Option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Zujalovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is a common problem in ICU patients, resulting in prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. A cholinergic deficiency in the central nervous system is supposed to be a relevant pathophysiologic process in delirium. Acetylcholine is a major transmitter of the parasympathetic nervous system influencing several organs (e.g., heart and kidneys and the inflammatory response too. This perception might explain that delirium is not an individual symptom, but rather a part of a symptom complex with various disorders of the whole organism. The cholinergic deficiency could not be quantified up to now. Using the possibility of bedside determination of the acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE activity, we assumed to objectify the cholinergic homeostasis within minutes. As reported here, the postoperative delirium was accompanied by a massive hemodynamic and renal deterioration of unclear genesis. We identified the altered AChE activity as a plausible pathophysiological mechanism. The pharmacological intervention with the indirect parasympathomimetic physostigmine led to a quick and lasting improvement of the patient’s cognitive, hemodynamic, and renal status. In summary, severe delirium is not always an attendant phenomenon of critical illness. It might be causal for multiple organ deterioration if it is based on cholinergic deficiency and has to be treated at his pathophysiological roots whenever possible.

  15. 绞股蓝皂甙对阿尔茨海默病小鼠海马胆碱能系统功能的影响%Effects of gypenosides on the hippocampal cholinergic system in D-galactose induced Alzheimer's disease in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周卫华; 谭莉明; 米长忠; 钟飞

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨绞股蓝皂甙对D-半乳糖(D-gal)所致阿尔茨海默病(AD)模型小鼠海马胆碱能系统功能的影响.方法 昆明小鼠颈背部皮下注射10% D-gal,连续6 w造模.同时,各组分别灌胃生理盐水(正常对照组、模型组)、绞股蓝(高、低剂量组).给药结束后进行水迷宫训练,24h后进行学习记忆功能测试和海马胆碱乙酰基转移酶(ChAT)与乙酰胆碱酯酶(AchE)活性测定以及Western印迹检测ChAT表达.结果 与正常对照组相比,D-gal模型组小鼠学习记忆能力,模型组ChAT活性和ChaT表达明显下降(P <0.05,P<0.01);模型组AchE活性明显升高(P<0.01).给予绞股蓝皂甙可明显改善AD模型小鼠的学习记忆功能(P<0.05,P<0.01),增强海马ChAT活性(P<0.01)和降低AchE活性(P<0.01),上调ChAT的表达(P<0.01).结论 绞股蓝皂甙可明显提高模型小鼠的学习记忆能力,改善海马胆碱能系统功能.%Objective To investigate the effects of gypenosides on the hippocampal cholinergic system in D-galactose induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) in mice. Methods The mice were given subcutaneous injection of 10% D-galactose for 6 weeks (125 ml · kg · d-1 ). Normal saline, gypenosides respectively were given by intragastric administration in different study groups. The mice were trained to find the platform in the water maze on the 43th day. After 24 hours, learning and memory ability was tested, choline acetyltransferase (chAT) activity, acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity, the expression of ChAT in hippocampus was observed by Western blotting after treatment. Results Compared with the normal control group, the learning and memory dysfunction, the decreases of ChAT activity and expression of ChAT were found in model group, AchE activity was increased in model group (P < 0. 05, P < 0. 01). The gypenosides could markedly attenuate cognitive dysfunction, elevate ChAT and expression of ChAT, decrease AchE activity in the hippocampi of mice

  16. The change of the ethology and cholinergic system of the hippocampus formation by intravenous administration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with mannitol among vascular dementia rats%甘露醇对骨髓间充质干细胞治疗血管性痴呆大鼠行为学及海马胆碱能系统的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张泰鹏; 莫雪安; 刘金萍; 杨龙秀; 陈志

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨甘露醇对骨髓间充质干细胞(BMSCs)移植治疗血管性痴呆(VD)大鼠行为学及海马胆碱能系统活性的影响.方法 体外全骨髓培养结合细胞贴壁法培养大鼠BMSCs.采用双侧颈总动脉结扎法制备VD模型.将大鼠随机分为4组:(1)甘露醇预处理BMSCs组:造模4w后,先进行尾静脉注射20%甘露醇,10~30min后,再尾静脉注射BMSCs;(2)BMSCs组:造模4w后,经尾静脉注射等量BMSCs;(3)培养基组:造模4w后,经尾静脉注射等量BMSCs基础培养基;(4)假手术组:不进行任何干预.BMSCs移植4w后进行Morris水迷宫试验和大鼠海马内胆碱乙酰转移酶(ChAT)和乙酰胆碱酯酶(AChE)活性检测.结果 甘露醇预处理BMSCs组的ChAT和AChE活性均比BMSCs组、培养基组有明显提高(P<0.05),同时其行为学亦较BMSCs组、培养基组有明显改善(P<0.05).结论 甘露醇预处理后进行静脉注射移植BMSCs,使VD大鼠模型海马胆碱能系统的活性明显增强,并进一步改善VD大鼠的学习与记忆能力.%Objective To explore the change of the ethology and cholinergic system of the hippocampus formation by intravenous administration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)with mannitol among vascular dementia(VD) rats. Methods The BMSCs of rat were isolated and cultured by whole bone marrow adherence screening method. The models of VD rats were established through permanent ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries at an interval of 3 days for each artery. The healthy matured-male SD rats were divided randomly into four group. ( 1 ) Mannitol with BMSCs group: intravenous injection of mannitol at a dose of 1.5g/kg followed 10 ~ 30minutes later by intravenous injection of 1 million BMSCs in 1 ml PBS at the fourth week after ligation. (2) BMSCs group: intravenous injection of 1 million BMSCs in 1 ml PBS at the same time. (3)PBS control group:intravenous injection of only 1 ml PBS. (4)Sham group:no ligation and no intravenous injection

  17. Effects of BDE-153 Exposure on Rats' Cortex Cholinergic System Key Enzymes and Intracellular Calcium Concentration%BDE-153暴露对大鼠中枢胆碱能系统关键酶活力及细胞内钙离子浓度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红梅; 聂继盛; 吴智文; 刘晓虎; 王亮; 康慧杰; 牛侨

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of lactation BDE-153 exposure on the activity of key enzymes in rat cortex cholinergic system and intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration. Methods Forty newborn clean male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups at postnatal day 4 (PND4) according to their body weights, 10 in each group, 1,5,10 mg/kg of BDE-153 group and olive oil solvent control group. At PNDlO,the rats were administrated BDE -153 olive oil solution by intraperitoneal injection at 0.01 ml/g body weight for one time. Two months later,rats were anesthetized and followed the cortex separation for the intracellular Ca2+ concentration determination by flow cytometry and for the activities of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and true cholinesterase (TchE) detection by colorimetric methods. Results Compared with the control group,cortical intracellular Ca2* concentration were significantly decreased in all the BDE-153 treated groups(P<0.05),while the cortical ChAT and TchE activities were significantly declined in the 10 mg/kg BDE-153 treated group. Conclusion Lactation BDE-153 exposure can inhibit the cholinergic system function of rats' cortex,and reduce the intracellular Ca2* concentration, which may be one of the mechanisms of BDE-153 neurotoxicity.%目的 研究哺乳期BDE-153暴露对大鼠成年后大脑皮质胆碱能系统关键酶的活力及细胞内Ca2+浓度的影响.方法 将40只出生第4天的雄性清洁级SD大鼠按体重随机分成4组,分别为溶剂对照(橄榄油)组和低(1 mg/kg)、中(5 mg/kg)、高剂量(10 mg/kg)BDE-153染毒组,每组10只.在仔鼠出生第10天,采用一次性腹腔注射方式进行染毒,染毒容量为0.01 ml/g.染毒两个月后,采用流式细胞仪测定大脑皮质细胞内Ca2+的浓度,采用比色法测定皮质乙酰胆碱转移酶(ChAT)和乙酰胆碱酯酶(TchE)的活力.结果 与溶剂对照组比较,各剂量BDE-153染毒组大鼠大脑皮质神经细胞内Ca2浓度均降

  18. 豚鼠输尿管Cajal间质细胞毒蕈碱受体的表达及功能研究%Expression and function of muscarinic receptors in interstitial cells of Cajal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴康棋; 葛亮; 方强; 蒙明森; 鄢俊安; 李为兵

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究毒蕈碱受体在豚鼠输尿管Cajal间质细胞(ICC)上的表达,初步探讨ICC在胆碱能神经递质传递中的作用.方法 将20只豚鼠随机分成对照组和实验组,进行输尿管肌条实验,观察在卡巴胆碱作用下输尿管肌条的收缩幅度和频率的变化;10只豚鼠,将输尿管进行固定、撕片和荧光染色,检测豚鼠输尿管毒蕈碱受体亚型(M1~M5)在ICC上的表达情况.结果 卡巴胆碱作用后,实验组肌条的收缩幅度为0 g,频率为0次/分,对照组的幅度为(0.106±0.021)g,频率为(4.900±0.875)次/分,两组差异显著(P<0.01).免疫荧光双标显示,输尿管ICC仅表达M2、M3受体亚型.结论 胆碱能神经可能通过ICC来调控输尿管平滑肌.%Objective To study the expression of muscarinic receptors in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and to discuss preliminarily on the role of ICC in the transmission of cholinergic neurotransmitter. Methods Twenty guinea pigs were randomly divided into control and experiment group. The changes of ureteral muscle contraction amplitude and frequency were observed after applying ureteral muscle strip experiment in vitro. Fixation, tear film and fluorescence staining were performed on the ureters of 10 guinea pigs. The expressions of the muscarinic receptors subtypes (M1 ~ Ms) in ICC of guinea-pig ureters were detected. Results Statistical differences were observed between the two group in ureteral muscle contraction amplitude and frequency, which were (0) g and (0) per minute in experiment group and (0. 106 ±0. 021) g and ( 4. 900 ± 0. 875 ) per minute in control group ( P < 0. 01 ) . Immunofluorescence double labeling showed that ureteral ICC only expressed M2 and M3 receptor subtypes. Conclusion Cholinergic nerve may regulate ureteral smooth muscle by ICC.

  19. Effect of icariin on learning and memory abilities and activity of cholinergic system of senescence-accelerated mice SAMP10%淫羊藿苷对快速老化小鼠SAMP10学习记忆能力以及胆碱能系统活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高琳娜; 唐千淇; 贺晓丽; 毕明刚

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of icariin(ICA) on learning and memory abilities and cholinergic system in se-nescence-accelerated mice SAMP10. Method: The 8-month-old senescence-accelerated mice were randomly divided into the model SAMP10 group and the positive Donepezil group (1 mg · kg-1 ) and ICA groups (50, 100, 200 mg · kg-1 ) , with 12 mice in each group. Another 12 8-month-old mice SAMR1 were selected as the normal control group. After 30 days of oral administration, Morris water maze, SMG-2 water maze and experimental platform were used to test the effects of ICA on learning and memory abilities of SAMP10 groups. By colorimetric determination of AChE activity in the cortex, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection of ACh, ChAT, MCBC of the cerebral cortex, the effect of ICA on the cholinergic system of SAMP10 was observed. Result: ICA could improve the abilities of space exploration and positioning navigation of SAMP10, shorten the latency in SMG-2 water maze, enhance their jumping ability in response to the passive test, and increase levels of ACh, ChAT, MCBC in the cerebral cortex of SAMP10. But its active effect on AChE in SAMP10 cortex was not obvious. Conclusion: Different doses of icariin can improve learning and memory abilities of SAMP10 to varying degrees, which may be related to its effect on the cholinergic system.%目的:探讨淫羊藿苷(ICA)对快速老化小鼠SAMP10的学习记忆能力以及胆碱能系统的影响.方法:采取8月龄快速老化小鼠SAMP10为实验对象,随机分为模型SAMP10组,阳性药多奈哌齐组(1 mg· kg-1),ICA低、中、高剂量(50,100,200 mg·kg-1)组,每组12只,以12只同月龄抗快速老化小鼠SAMR1为正常对照.灌胃给药30 d,通过Morris水迷宫、SMG-2迷宫、小鼠跳台仪检测ICA对SAMP10学习记忆能力的影响,通过比色法测定皮层中乙酰胆碱酯酶(AChE)的活力,采用酶联免疫吸附测定法检测乙酰胆碱(ACh)、乙酰胆碱转移酶(ChAT)以及M-

  20. Effects of chronic alcohol consumption, withdrawal and nerve growth factor on neuropeptide Y expression and cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Pedro A; Rocha, João P; Cardoso, Armando; Vilela, Manuel; Sousa, Sérgio; Madeira, M Dulce

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the vulnerability of the hippocampal formation (HF) to chronic alcohol consumption and withdrawal. Among the brain systems that appear to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of these conditions are the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-ergic and the cholinergic systems. Because these two systems seem to closely interact in the HF, we sought to study the effects of chronic alcohol consumption (6months) and subsequent withdrawal (2months) on the expression of NPY and on the cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus. As such, we have estimated the areal density and the somatic volume of NPY-immunoreactive neurons, and the density of the cholinergic varicosities. In addition, because alcohol consumption and withdrawal are associated with impaired nerve growth factor (NGF) trophic support and the administration of exogenous NGF alters the effects of those conditions on various cholinergic markers, we have also estimated the same morphological parameters in withdrawn rats infused intracerebroventricularly with NGF. NPY expression increased after withdrawal and returned to control values after NGF treatment. Conversely, the somatic volume of these neurons did not differ among all groups. On other hand, the expression of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was reduced by 24% in ethanol-treated rats and by 46% in withdrawn rats. The administration of NGF to withdrawn rats increased the VAChT expression to values above control levels. These results show that the effects of prolonged alcohol intake and protracted withdrawal on the hilar NPY expression differ from those induced by shorter exposures to ethanol and by abrupt withdrawal. They also suggest that the normalizing effect of NGF on NPY expression might rely on the NGF-induced improvement of cholinergic neurotransmission in the dentate hilus.

  1. Expression of recombinant M2 and M5 muscarinic receptors in the Sf9-baculovirus system%在Sf9昆虫细胞-杆状病毒系统中表达毒蕈碱型M2及M5受体重组突变体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟男; 孙洪良; 郑建全; 王丽韫

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the expression of human muscarinic receptors ( M2 and M5 recombinant receptors in the baculovirus expression system.METHODS The mutation of human wild type M2 and M5 receptors was constructed by PCR or/and overlap PCR as follows: ① The putative glyeosylation residues Asp 2, 3, 6, and 9 were replaced with Asn to prevent molecular heterogeneity; ② The central part of the protease-susceptible third intracellular loop was deleted; ③ A hexa-histidine tag and a thrombin cleavage site were added at the C terminus for purification.The recombinant receptor gene was confirmed and amplified by PCR, and subcloned to baculovrius pFastBac 1 vector.Then the recombinant vector was co-transfected with the linearized virus DNA into sf9 cells by Lipofectamine.The recombinant M2 and M5 receptor protein was prepared and purified.The expression level of M2 and M5 receptors was evaluated by Western blotting, and pharmacological characteristics were confirmed by radio-legend binding assay.RESULTS The target DNA fragment of M2(1018 bp) and M5 (1041 bp) recombinant receptors was amplified by overlap PCR.The recombinant plasmid pfastbacl/M2 (M5 ) vector was successfully constructed, and transfected to Sf9.Vacuolus pathological changes were observed within cells compared to non-transfection of Sf9.The baculovirus particle protein was prepared and purified from these infected cells.The expression of M2/M5 was further confirmed by Western blotting.The specific binding character of recombinant M2/M5 receptors was detected by radio-legend binding assay.CONCLUSION The expression of M2 and M5 recombinant receptors in the baculovirus expression system will facilitate studies on new drugs from M receptor or genetic engineering.%目的 为乙酰胆碱毒蕈碱(M)受体亚型特异性的变构调节剂及基因工程的研究提供实验平台.方法 用PCR及搭桥PCR法对乙酰胆碱M2及M5受体作以下突变:①将N-糖基化位点Asp突变为Asn;②删除对蛋白酶敏

  2. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig;

    2010-01-01

    (4-hydroxy-2-butynyl)-1-trimethylammonium-3-chlorocarbanilate chloride (McN-A-343), and the novel M(1)-selective agonist 1-(1-2-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bipiperidin-4-yl)-1H benzo[d]imidazol-2(3H)-one (TBPB) were tested as substitution and/or pretreatment to cocaine. Both muscarinic antagonists partially...

  3. Muscarinic receptor stimulation increases tolerance of rat salivary gland function to radiation damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, RP; Vissink, A; Zeilstra, LJW; Konings, AWT

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate if muscarinic receptor-stimulated activation of the PLC/PIP2 second messenger pathway prior to irradiation increases the radiotolerance of rat salivary gland. Materials and methods: Rats were treated with pilocarpine, methacholine, reserpine, methacholine plus reserpine, or a

  4. Differential activation of nitric oxide synthase through muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rat salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leirós, C P; Rosignoli, F; Genaro, A M; Sales, M E; Sterin-Borda, L; Santiago BordaE

    2000-03-15

    Muscarinic receptors play an important role in secretory and vasodilator responses in rat salivary glands. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) appears to be one of the multiple effectors coupled to muscarinic receptors in both submandibular and sublingual glands although some differences have been found depending on the gland studied. First, submandibular glands had a lower basal activity of nitric oxide synthase than sublingual glands and the concentration-response curve for carbachol was bell-shaped in the former but not in sublingual glands. Second, cGMP levels displayed a similar profile to that observed for NOS activity in both glands. Third, protein kinase C also coupled to muscarinic receptor activation in the glands might have a regulatory effect on nitric oxide production since its activity was higher in basal conditions in submandibular than sublingual glands and it also increased in the presence of the agonist at a concentration that inhibited NOS activity in submandibular glands. The effects appear to be partly related to the expression of a minor population of M(1) receptors in submandibular glands absent in sublingual as determined in binding and signaling experiments with the muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine.

  5. Demonstration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-like immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Matsuyama, T.; Strosberg, A.D.; Traber, J.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein (mAChR) in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem was described by using a monoclonal antibody (M35) raised against mAChR purified from bovine forebrain homogenates. A method is investigated for light microscopic (LM) and electronmicroscop

  6. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I

    2013-01-01

    ). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M...

  7. Muscarinic receptors on airway mesenchymal cells : Novel findings for an ancient target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J.; Zaagsma, Johan; Gosens, Reinoud

    2013-01-01

    Since ancient times, anticholinergics have been used as a bronchodilator therapy for obstructive lung diseases. Targets of these drugs are G-protein-coupled muscarinic M-1, M-2 and M-3 receptors in the airways, which have long been recognized to regulate vagally-induced airway smooth muscle contract

  8. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Rasmussen, Peter; Sørensen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate (HR) response to exercise but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate but not combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exerci...

  9. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  10. Pallial origin of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and horizontal limb of the diagonal band nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombero, Ana; Bueno, Carlos; Saglietti, Laura; Rodenas, Monica; Guimera, Jordi; Bulfone, Alexandro; Martinez, Salvador

    2011-10-01

    The majority of the cortical cholinergic innervation implicated in attention and memory originates in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band nucleus of the basal prosencephalon. Functional alterations in this system give rise to neuropsychiatric disorders as well as to the cognitive alterations described in Parkinson and Alzheimer's diseases. Despite the functional importance of these basal forebrain cholinergic neurons very little is known about their origin and development. Previous studies suggest that they originate in the medial ganglionic eminence of the telencephalic subpallium; however, our results identified Tbr1-expressing, reelin-positive neurons migrating from the ventral pallium to the subpallium that differentiate into cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain nuclei projecting to the cortex. Experiments with Tbr1 knockout mice, which lack ventropallial structures, confirmed the pallial origin of cholinergic neurons in Meynert and horizontal diagonal band nuclei. Also, we demonstrate that Fgf8 signaling in the telencephalic midline attracts these neurons from the pallium to follow a tangential migratory route towards the basal forebrain.

  11. Intracellular localization of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor through clathrin-dependent constitutive internalization is mediated by a C-terminal tryptophan-based motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwada, Junsuke; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Masuoka, Takayoshi; Nishio, Matomo; Muramatsu, Ikunobu

    2014-07-15

    The M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1-mAChR, encoded by CHRM1) is a G-protein-coupled membrane receptor that is activated by extracellular cholinergic stimuli. Recent investigations have revealed the intracellular localization of M1-mAChR. In this study, we observed constitutive internalization of M1-mAChR in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells without agonist stimulation. Constitutive internalization depended on dynamin, clathrin and the adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) complex. A WxxI motif in the M1-mAChR C-terminus is essential for its constitutive internalization, given that replacement of W(442) or I(445) with alanine residues abolished constitutive internalization. This WxxI motif resembles YxxΦ, which is the canonical binding motif for the μ2 subunit of the AP-2 complex. The M1-mAChR C-terminal WxxI motif interacted with AP-2 μ2. W442A and I445A mutants of the M1-mAChR C-terminal sequence lost AP-2-μ2-binding activity, whereas the W442Y mutant bound more effectively than wild type. Consistent with these results, W442A and I445A M1-mAChR mutants selectively localized to the cell surface. By contrast, the W442Y receptor mutant was found only at intracellular sites. Our data indicate that the cellular distribution of M1-mAChR is governed by the C-terminal tryptophan-based motif, which mediates constitutive internalization.

  12. The use of occupation isoboles for analysis of a response mediated by two receptors: M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtype-induced mouse stomach contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2008-06-01

    Smooth muscle contains multiple muscarinic receptor subtypes, including M2 and M3. M2 receptors outnumber M3 receptors. Based on the potency of subtype selective anticholinergics, contraction is mediated by the M3 subtype. However, results from knockout (KO) mice show that the M2 receptor mediates approximately 45% of the contractile response produced by the M3 receptor. The traditional theory of one receptor mediating a response does not allow assessment of interactions between receptors when more than one receptor participates in a response. Our study was performed using a novel analysis method based on dual receptor occupancy to determine how M2 and M3 receptor subtypes interact to mediate contraction in mouse stomach. Cumulative carbachol concentration contractile responses were determined for wild-type, M2-KO, and M3-KO stomach body smooth muscle. Using affinity constants for carbachol at M2 and M3 cholinergic receptors, the concentration values were converted to fractional receptor occupation. The resulting occupation-effect relations showed maximum effects for the M2 and M3 subtypes, respectively. These occupation-effect relations allow determination of the additive (expected) isobole based on this dual occupancy, thereby providing a curve (mathematically derived) for comparison against the experimentally derived value in wild type. The actual values determined experimentally in the wild type were not statistically significantly different from that predicted by the isobole. This confirms that the interaction between these mutually occupied receptors is additive. The new method of analysis also expands the traditional Schild theory that was based on a single receptor type to which the agonist and antagonist bind.

  13. A cholinergic feedback circuit to regulate striatal population uncertainty and optimize reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Nicholas T; Frank, Michael J

    2015-12-25

    Convergent evidence suggests that the basal ganglia support reinforcement learning by adjusting action values according to reward prediction errors. However, adaptive behavior in stochastic environments requires the consideration of uncertainty to dynamically adjust the learning rate. We consider how cholinergic tonically active interneurons (TANs) may endow the striatum with such a mechanism in computational models spanning three Marr's levels of analysis. In the neural model, TANs modulate the excitability of spiny neurons, their population response to reinforcement, and hence the effective learning rate. Long TAN pauses facilitated robustness to spurious outcomes by increasing divergence in synaptic weights between neurons coding for alternative action values, whereas short TAN pauses facilitated stochastic behavior but increased responsiveness to change-points in outcome contingencies. A feedback control system allowed TAN pauses to be dynamically modulated by uncertainty across the spiny neuron population, allowing the system to self-tune and optimize performance across stochastic environments.

  14. Antagonism of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Alters Synaptic ERK Phosphorylation in the Rat Forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Min; Wang, Henry H; Wang, John Q

    2016-12-28

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key transmitter in the mesocorticolimbic circuit. By interacting with muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChR) enriched in the circuit, ACh actively regulates various neuronal and synaptic activities. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is one of members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family and is subject to the regulation by dopamine receptors, although the regulation of ERKs by limbic mAChRs is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of mAChRs in the regulation of ERK phosphorylation (activation) in the mesocorticolimbic system of adult rat brains in vivo. We targeted a sub-pool of ERKs at synaptic sites. We found that a systemic injection of the mAChR antagonist scopolamine increased phosphorylation of synaptic ERKs in the striatum (caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Increases in ERK phosphorylation in both forebrain regions were rapid and transient. Notably, pretreatment with a dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonist SCH23390 blocked the scopolamine-stimulated ERK phosphorylation in these brain regions, while a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride did not. Scopolamine and SCH23390 did not change the amount of total ERK proteins. These results demonstrate that mAChRs inhibit synaptic ERK phosphorylation in striatal and mPFC neurons under normal conditions. Blockade of this inhibitory mAChR tone leads to the upregulation of ERK phosphorylation likely through a mechanism involving the level of D1R activity.

  15. Autoantibodies against Muscarinic Receptors in Breast Cancer: Their Role in Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, María Gabriela; Negroni, María Pía; Pelegrina, Laura Tatiana; Castro, María Ester; Fiszman, Gabriel L.; Azar, María Eugenia; Morgado, Carlos Cresta; Sales, María Elena

    2013-01-01

    The presence of autoantibodies in cancer has become relevant in recent years. We demonstrated that autoantibodies purified from the sera of breast cancer patients activate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in tumor cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from breast cancer patients in T1N0Mx stage (tumor size≤2 cm, without lymph node metastasis) mimics the action of the muscarinic agonist carbachol stimulating MCF-7 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Angiogenesis is a central step in tumor progression because it promotes tumor invasion and metastatic spread. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is the main angiogenic mediator, and its levels have been correlated with poor prognosis in cancer. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of T1N0Mx-IgG on the expression of VEGF-A, and the in vivo neovascular response triggered by MCF-7 cells, via muscarinic receptor activation. We demonstrated that T1N0Mx-IgG (10−8 M) and carbachol (10−9 M) increased the constitutive expression of VEGF-A in tumor cells, effect that was reverted by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. We also observed that T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol enhanced the neovascular response produced by MCF-7 cells in the skin of NUDE mice. The action of IgG or carbachol was reduced in the presence of atropine. In conclusion, T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol may promote VEGF-A production and neovascularization induced by breast tumor cells via muscarinic receptors activation. These effects may be accelerating breast tumor progression. PMID:23460876

  16. Autoantibodies against muscarinic receptors in breast cancer: their role in tumor angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Lombardi

    Full Text Available The presence of autoantibodies in cancer has become relevant in recent years. We demonstrated that autoantibodies purified from the sera of breast cancer patients activate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in tumor cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG from breast cancer patients in T1N0Mx stage (tumor size≤2 cm, without lymph node metastasis mimics the action of the muscarinic agonist carbachol stimulating MCF-7 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Angiogenesis is a central step in tumor progression because it promotes tumor invasion and metastatic spread. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A is the main angiogenic mediator, and its levels have been correlated with poor prognosis in cancer. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of T1N0Mx-IgG on the expression of VEGF-A, and the in vivo neovascular response triggered by MCF-7 cells, via muscarinic receptor activation. We demonstrated that T1N0Mx-IgG (10(-8 M and carbachol (10(-9 M increased the constitutive expression of VEGF-A in tumor cells, effect that was reverted by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. We also observed that T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol enhanced the neovascular response produced by MCF-7 cells in the skin of NUDE mice. The action of IgG or carbachol was reduced in the presence of atropine. In conclusion, T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol may promote VEGF-A production and neovascularization induced by breast tumor cells via muscarinic receptors activation. These effects may be accelerating breast tumor progression.

  17. Autoantibodies against muscarinic receptors in breast cancer: their role in tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, María Gabriela; Negroni, María Pía; Pelegrina, Laura Tatiana; Castro, María Ester; Fiszman, Gabriel L; Azar, María Eugenia; Morgado, Carlos Cresta; Sales, María Elena

    2013-01-01

    The presence of autoantibodies in cancer has become relevant in recent years. We demonstrated that autoantibodies purified from the sera of breast cancer patients activate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in tumor cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from breast cancer patients in T1N0Mx stage (tumor size≤2 cm, without lymph node metastasis) mimics the action of the muscarinic agonist carbachol stimulating MCF-7 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Angiogenesis is a central step in tumor progression because it promotes tumor invasion and metastatic spread. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is the main angiogenic mediator, and its levels have been correlated with poor prognosis in cancer. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of T1N0Mx-IgG on the expression of VEGF-A, and the in vivo neovascular response triggered by MCF-7 cells, via muscarinic receptor activation. We demonstrated that T1N0Mx-IgG (10(-8) M) and carbachol (10(-9) M) increased the constitutive expression of VEGF-A in tumor cells, effect that was reverted by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. We also observed that T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol enhanced the neovascular response produced by MCF-7 cells in the skin of NUDE mice. The action of IgG or carbachol was reduced in the presence of atropine. In conclusion, T1N0Mx-IgG and carbachol may promote VEGF-A production and neovascularization induced by breast tumor cells via muscarinic receptors activation. These effects may be accelerating breast tumor progression.

  18. Deficit in sustained attention following selective cholinergic lesion of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in rat, as measured with both post-mortem immunocytochemistry and in vivo PET imaging with [¹⁸F]fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Marilyn; Parent, Maxime J; Mechawar, Naguib; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Clark, Stewart D; Aghourian, Meghmik; Bedard, Marc-Andre

    2015-02-01

    Cholinergic neurons of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) are thought to be involved in cognitive functions such as sustained attention, and lesions of these cells have been documented in patients showing fluctuations of attention such as in Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy Body. Animal studies have been conducted to support the role of these cells in attention, but the lesions induced in these animals were not specific to the cholinergic PPTg system, and were assessed by post-mortem methods remotely performed from the in vivo behavioral assessments. Moreover, sustained attention have not been directly assessed in these studies, but rather deduced from indirect measurements. In the present study, rats were assessed on the 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT), and a specific measure of variability in response latency was created. Animals were observed both before and after selective lesion of the PPTg cholinergic neurons. Brain cholinergic denervation was assessed both in vivo and ex vivo, using PET imaging with [(18)F]fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol ([(18)F]FEOBV) and immunocytochemistry respectively. Results showed that the number of correct responses and variability in response latency in the 5-CSRTT were the only behavioral measures affected following the lesions. These measures were found to correlate significantly with the number of PPTg cholinergic cells, as measured with both [(18)F]FEOBV and immunocytochemistry. This suggests the primary role of the PPTg cholinergic cells in sustained attention. It also allows to reliably use the PET imaging with [(18)F]FEOBV for the purpose of assessing the relationship between behavior and cholinergic innervation in living animals.

  19. Cholinergic neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate mouse brown adipose tissue metabolism

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    Jae Hoon Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: DMH cholinergic neurons directly send efferent signals to sympathetic premotor neurons in the Rpa. Elevated cholinergic input to this area reduces BAT activity through activation of M2 mAChRs on serotonergic neurons. Therefore, the direct DMHACh–Rpa5-HT pathway may mediate physiological heat-defense responses to elevated environmental temperature.

  20. Predominant Glandular Cholinergic Dysautonomia in Patients with Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imrich, Richard; Alevizos, Ilias; Bebris, Lolita; Goldstein, David S.; Holmes, Courtney S.; Illei, Gabor G.; Nikolov, Nikolay P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulates exocrine gland function. Available data show poor correlation between the degree of exocrine gland function and destruction in primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) suggesting other mechanisms, such as autonomic dysfunction may be important in these patients. We performed a comprehensive analysis of sympathoneural and sympathetic cholinergic function in well-characterized patients with pSS. Methods 21 pSS patients (mean±SE age 44±3 years) and in 13 healthy controls (51±2 years) were assessed during orthostasis and intravenous injection of edrophonium (10 mg). The postganglionic sympathetic cholinergic system was evaluated by assessing sweat production by the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART). Gastric empting testing assessed the gastro-intestinal ANS in pSS patients. Results Velocity index and acceleration index were significantly higher (p<0.05) in pSS compared to controls before and during the orthostatic and edrophonium tests. Other hemodynamic and neurochemical parameters did not differ between pSS patients and controls during the orthostasis and edrophonium test, however, edrophonium-induced saliva increment was lower in pSS (p=0.002). Abnormally low sweat production was found in four (N=4) pSS patients but in none of the controls in the QSART. Gastric empting was delayed in 53 % of pSS patients. Conclusion We observed subtle differences in several ANS domains, including gastrointestinal and sympathocholinergic system suggesting a complex ANS dysfunction in pSS. The impact was the largest on the exocrine glands with subtle differences in the cardiac parasympathetic function independent of glandular inflammation and atrophy, suggesting an alternative pathogenesis mechanism of the disease in pSS. PMID:25622919

  1. Bile acid-induced arrhythmia is mediated by muscarinic M2 receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti H Sheikh Abdul Kadir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a common disease affecting up to 5% of pregnancies and which can cause fetal arrhythmia and sudden intrauterine death. We previously demonstrated that bile acid taurocholate (TC, which is raised in the bloodstream of ICP, can acutely alter the rate and rhythm of contraction and induce abnormal calcium destabilization in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM. Apart from their hepatic functions bile acids are ubiquitous signalling molecules with diverse systemic effects mediated by either the nuclear receptor FXR or by a recently discovered G-protein coupled receptor TGR5. We aim to investigate the mechanism of bile-acid induced arrhythmogenic effects in an in-vitro model of the fetal heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: Levels of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptor FXR were studied by quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunostaining, which showed low levels of expression. We did not observe functional involvement of the canonical receptors FXR and TGR5. Instead, we found that TC binds to the muscarinic M(2 receptor in NRCM and serves as a partial agonist of this receptor in terms of inhibitory effect on intracellular cAMP and negative chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA-knockdown of the M(2 receptor completely abolished the negative effect of TC on contraction, calcium transient amplitude and synchronisation in NRCM clusters. CONCLUSION: We conclude that in NRCM the TC-induced arrhythmia is mediated by the partial agonism at the M(2 receptor. This mechanism might serve as a promising new therapeutic target for fetal arrhythmia.

  2. Cholinergic deficiency involved in vascular dementia:possible mechanism and strategy of treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan WANG; Hai-yan ZHANG; Xi-can TANG

    2009-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence.Several studies have recently reported that VaD patients present cholinergic deficits in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that may be closely related to the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment.Moreover,cholinergic therapies have shown promising effects on cognitive improvement in VaD patients.The precise mechanisms of these cholinergic agents are currently not fully understood;however,accumulating evidence indicates that these drugs may act through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway,in which the efferent vagus nerve signals suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine release and inhibit inflammation,although regulation of oxidative stress and energy metabolism,alleviation of apoptosis may also be involved.In this paper,we provide a brief overview of the cholinergic treatment strategy for VaD and its relevant mechanisms of anti-inflammation.

  3. In vivo functional neurochemistry of human cortical cholinergic function during visuospatial attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Michael; Bell, Tiffany; Iqbal, Somya; Mullins, Paul Gerald

    2017-01-01

    Cortical acetylcholine is involved in key cognitive processes such as visuospatial attention. Dysfunction in the cholinergic system has been described in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Levels of brain acetylcholine can be pharmacologically manipulated, but it is not possible to directly measure it in vivo in humans. However, key parts of its biochemical cascade in neural tissue, such as choline, can be measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). There is evidence that levels of choline may be an indirect but proportional measure of acetylcholine availability in brain tissue. In this study, we measured relative choline levels in the parietal cortex using functional (event-related) MRS (fMRS) during performance of a visuospatial attention task, with a modelling approach verified using simulated data. We describe a task-driven interaction effect on choline concentration, specifically driven by contralateral attention shifts. Our results suggest that choline MRS has the potential to serve as a proxy of brain acetylcholine function in humans. PMID:28192451

  4. Spinal cholinergic involvement after treatment with aspirin and paracetamol in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Kommalage, Mahinda; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    Aspirin and paracetamol have been shown to suppress non-inflammatory pain conditions like thermal, visceral and mechanical pain in mice and rats. The non-inflammatory antinociception appears to be mediated by central receptor mechanisms, such as the cholinergic system. In this study, we tested...... the hypothesis that the non-inflammatory antinociception of aspirin and paracetamol could be mediated by an increase of intraspinal acetylcholine release. Microdialysis probes were placed intraspinally in anesthetized rats for acetylcholine sampling. Subcutaneously administered aspirin 100 and 300 mg....../kg increased, while paracetamol 300 mg/kg decreased intraspinal acetylcholine release. Intraspinal drug administration did not affect acetylcholine release. Our results suggest that an increased intraspinal acetylcholine release could be involved in part of the non-inflammatory pain suppression by aspirin...

  5. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delays TLR-induced skin allograft rejection in mice: cholinergic pathway modulates alloreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Sadis

    Full Text Available Activation of innate immunity through Toll-like receptors (TLR can abrogate transplantation tolerance by revealing hidden T cell alloreactivity. Separately, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has the capacity to dampen macrophage activation and cytokine release during endotoxemia and ischemia reperfusion injury. However, the relevance of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR-dependent anti-inflammatory pathway in the process of allograft rejection or maintenance of tolerance remains unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate whether the cholinergic pathway could impact T cell alloreactivity and transplant outcome in mice. For this purpose, we performed minor-mismatched skin allografts using donor/recipient combinations genetically deficient for the α7nAChR. Minor-mismatched skin grafts were not rejected unless the mice were housed in an environment with endogenous pathogen exposure or the graft was treated with direct application of imiquimod (a TLR7 ligand. The α7nAChR-deficient recipient mice showed accelerated rejection compared to wild type recipient mice under these conditions of TLR activation. The accelerated rejection was associated with enhanced IL-17 and IFN-γ production by alloreactive T cells. An α7nAChR-deficiency in the donor tissue facilitated allograft rejection but not in recipient mice. In addition, adoptive T cell transfer experiments in skin-grafted lymphopenic animals revealed a direct regulatory role for the α7nAChR on T cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the cholinergic pathway regulates alloreactivity and transplantation tolerance at multiple levels. One implication suggested by our work is that, in an organ transplant setting, deliberate α7nAChR stimulation of brain dead donors might be a valuable approach for preventing donor tissue inflammation prior to transplant.

  6. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delays TLR-induced skin allograft rejection in mice: cholinergic pathway modulates alloreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadis, Claude; Detienne, Sophie; Vokaer, Benoît; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Lemaître, Philippe; Spilleboudt, Chloé; Delbauve, Sandrine; Kubjak, Carole; Flamand, Véronique; Field, Kenneth A; Goldman, Michel; Benghiat, Fleur S; Le Moine, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Activation of innate immunity through Toll-like receptors (TLR) can abrogate transplantation tolerance by revealing hidden T cell alloreactivity. Separately, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has the capacity to dampen macrophage activation and cytokine release during endotoxemia and ischemia reperfusion injury. However, the relevance of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-dependent anti-inflammatory pathway in the process of allograft rejection or maintenance of tolerance remains unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate whether the cholinergic pathway could impact T cell alloreactivity and transplant outcome in mice. For this purpose, we performed minor-mismatched skin allografts using donor/recipient combinations genetically deficient for the α7nAChR. Minor-mismatched skin grafts were not rejected unless the mice were housed in an environment with endogenous pathogen exposure or the graft was treated with direct application of imiquimod (a TLR7 ligand). The α7nAChR-deficient recipient mice showed accelerated rejection compared to wild type recipient mice under these conditions of TLR activation. The accelerated rejection was associated with enhanced IL-17 and IFN-γ production by alloreactive T cells. An α7nAChR-deficiency in the donor tissue facilitated allograft rejection but not in recipient mice. In addition, adoptive T cell transfer experiments in skin-grafted lymphopenic animals revealed a direct regulatory role for the α7nAChR on T cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the cholinergic pathway regulates alloreactivity and transplantation tolerance at multiple levels. One implication suggested by our work is that, in an organ transplant setting, deliberate α7nAChR stimulation of brain dead donors might be a valuable approach for preventing donor tissue inflammation prior to transplant.

  7. A novel muscarinic receptor-independent mechanism of KCNQ2/3 potassium channel blockade by Oxotremorine-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Ruud; Reed, Hannah; Clarke, Sophie; Sher, Emanuele

    2016-11-15

    Inhibition of KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels by activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been well established, and the ion currents through these channels have been long known as M-currents. We found that this cross-talk can be reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes by co-transfection of human recombinant muscarinic M1 receptors and KCNQ2/3 potassium channels. Application of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist Oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M) between voltage pulses to activate KCNQ2/3 channels caused inhibition of the subsequent KCNQ2/3 responses. This effect of Oxo-M was blocked by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. We also found that KCNQ2/3 currents were inhibited when Oxo-M was applied during an ongoing KCNQ2/3 response, an effect that was not blocked by atropine, suggesting that Oxo-M inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels directly. Indeed, also in oocytes that were transfected with only KCNQ2/3 channels, but not with muscarinic M1 receptors, Oxo-M inhibited the KCNQ2/3 response. These results show that besides the usual muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated inhibition, Oxo-M also inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels by a direct mechanism. We subsequently tested xanomeline, which is a chemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, and oxotremorine, which is a close analogue of Oxo-M. Both compounds inhibited KCNQ2/3 currents via activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but, in contrast to Oxo-M, they did not directly inhibit KCNQ2/3 channels. Xanomeline and oxotremorine do not contain a positively charged trimethylammonium moiety that is present in Oxo-M, suggesting that such a charged moiety could be a crucial component mediating this newly described direct inhibition of KCNQ2/3 channels.

  8. Mangiferin, a natural xanthone, accelerates gastrointestinal transit in mice involving cholinergic mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Talita Cavalcante Morais; Synara Cavalcante Lopes; Karine Maria Martins Bezerra Carvalho; Bruno Rodrigues Arruda; Francisco Thiago Correia de Souza; Maria Teresa Salles Trevisan; Vietla Satyanarayana Rao; Flávia Almeida Santos

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of mangiferin on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) in normal and constipated mice,together with the possible mechanism.METHODS:Intragastrically-administered charcoal meal was used to measure GIT in overnight starved Swiss mice.In the first experiments,mangiferin (3 mg/kg,10mg/kg,30 mg/kg,and 100 mg/kg,po) or tegaserod (1mg/kg,ip) were administered 30 min before the charcoal meal to study their effects on normal transit.In the second series,mangiferin (30 mg/kg) was tested on delayed GIT induced by several different pharmacological agonists (morphine,clonidine,capsaicin) or antagonists (ondansetron,verapamil,and atropine) whereas in the third series,mangiferin (30 mg/kg,100mg/kg and 300 mg/kg) or tegaserod (1 mg/kg) were tested on 6 h fecal pellets outputted by freely fed mice.The ratio of wet to dry weight was calculated and used as a marker of fecal water content.RESULTS:Mangiferin administered orally significantly (P < 0.05) accelerated GIT at 30 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg (89%and 93%,respectively),similarly to 5-hydroxytryptamine4 (5-HT4) agonist tegaserod (81%) when compared to vehicle-treated control (63%).Co-administered mangiferin (30 mg/kg) totally reversed the inhibitory effect of opioid agonist morphine,5-HT3-receptor antagonist ondansetron and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptor agonist capsaicin on GIT,but only to a partial extent with the GIT-delay induced by α2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine,and calcium antagonist verapamil.However,co-administered atropine completely blocked the stimulant effect of mangiferin on GIT,suggesting the involvement of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation.Although mangiferin significantly enhanced the 6 h fecal output at higher doses (245.5 ± 10.43 mg vs 161.9 ± 10.82 mg and 227.1 ± 20.11 mg vs 161.9 ±10.82 mg of vehicle-treated control,at 30 and 100 mg/kg,P < 0.05,respectively),the effect of tegaserod was more potent (297.4 ± 7.42 mg vs 161.9 ± 10.82 mg of

  9. Mangiferin, a natural xanthone, accelerates gastrointestinal transit in mice involving cholinergic mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Talita Cavalcante; Lopes, Synara Cavalcante; Carvalho, Karine Maria Martins Bezerra; Arruda, Bruno Rodrigues; de Souza, Francisco Thiago Correia; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Rao, Vietla Satyanarayana; Santos, Flávia Almeida

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of mangiferin on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) in normal and constipated mice, together with the possible mechanism. METHODS: Intragastrically-administered charcoal meal was used to measure GIT in overnight starved Swiss mice. In the first experiments, mangiferin (3 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg, and 100 mg/kg, po) or tegaserod (1 mg/kg, ip) were administered 30 min before the charcoal meal to study their effects on normal transit. In the second series, mangiferin (30 mg/kg) was tested on delayed GIT induced by several different pharmacological agonists (morphine, clonidine, capsaicin) or antagonists (ondansetron, verapamil, and atropine) whereas in the third series, mangiferin (30 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg) or tegaserod (1 mg/kg) were tested on 6 h fecal pellets outputted by freely fed mice. The ratio of wet to dry weight was calculated and used as a marker of fecal water content. RESULTS: Mangiferin administered orally significantly (P < 0.05) accelerated GIT at 30 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg (89% and 93%, respectively), similarly to 5-hydroxytryptamine4 (5-HT4) agonist tegaserod (81%) when compared to vehicle-treated control (63%). Co-administered mangiferin (30 mg/kg) totally reversed the inhibitory effect of opioid agonist morphine, 5-HT3-receptor antagonist ondansetron and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptor agonist capsaicin on GIT, but only to a partial extent with the GIT-delay induced by α2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, and calcium antagonist verapamil. However, co-administered atropine completely blocked the stimulant effect of mangiferin on GIT, suggesting the involvement of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation. Although mangiferin significantly enhanced the 6 h fecal output at higher doses (245.5 ± 10.43 mg vs 161.9 ± 10.82 mg and 227.1 ± 20.11 mg vs 161.9 ± 10.82 mg of vehicle-treated control, at 30 and 100 mg/kg, P < 0.05, respectively), the effect of tegaserod was more potent (297.4 ± 7.42 mg

  10. Effect of voluntary running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cholinergic lesioned mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawe Gavin S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic neuronal dysfunction of the basal forebrain is observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and has been linked to decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, a region involved in learning and memory. Running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. This study aims to address the effect of running on hippocampal neurogenesis in lesioned mice, where septohippocampal cholinergic neurones have been selectively eliminated in the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca of the basal forebrain by infusion of mu-p75-saporin immunotoxin. Results Running increased the number of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in cholinergic denervated mice compared to non-lesioned mice 24 hours after injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. Although similar levels of surviving cells were present in cholinergic depleted animals and their respective controls four weeks after injection of BrdU, the majority of progenitors that proliferate in response to the initial period of running were not able to survive beyond one month without cholinergic input. Despite this, the running-induced increase in the number of surviving neurones was not affected by cholinergic depletion. Conclusion The lesion paradigm used here models aspects of the cholinergic deficits associated with Alzheimer's Disease and aging. We showed that running still increased the number of newborn cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus in this model of neurodegenerative disease.

  11. Overnight fasting regulates inhibitory tone to cholinergic neurons of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

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    Florian Groessl

    Full Text Available The dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH contributes to the regulation of overall energy homeostasis by modulating energy intake as well as energy expenditure. Despite the importance of the DMH in the control of energy balance, DMH-specific genetic markers or neuronal subtypes are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate the presence of cholinergic neurons in the DMH using genetically modified mice that express enhanced green florescent protein (eGFP selectively in choline acetyltransferase (Chat-neurons. Overnight food deprivation increases the activity of DMH cholinergic neurons, as shown by induction of fos protein and a significant shift in the baseline resting membrane potential. DMH cholinergic neurons receive both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic input, but the activation of these neurons by an overnight fast is due entirely to decreased inhibitory tone. The decreased inhibition is associated with decreased frequency and amplitude of GABAergic synaptic currents in the cholinergic DMH neurons, while glutamatergic synaptic transmission is not altered. As neither the frequency nor amplitude of miniature GABAergic or glutamatergic postsynaptic currents is affected by overnight food deprivation, the fasting-induced decrease in inhibitory tone to cholinergic neurons is dependent on superthreshold activity of GABAergic inputs. This study reveals that cholinergic neurons in the DMH readily sense the availability of nutrients and respond to overnight fasting via decreased GABAergic inhibitory tone. As such, altered synaptic as well as neuronal activity of DMH cholinergic neurons may play a critical role in the regulation of overall energy homeostasis.

  12. Synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic axons in the olfactory bulb of the cynomolgus monkey

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    Teresa eLiberia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory bulb of mammals receives cholinergic afferents from the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca. At present, the synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic axons on the circuits of the olfactory bulb has only been investigated in the rat. In this report, we analyze the synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic axons in the olfactory bulb of the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis. Our aim is to investigate whether the cholinergic innervation of the bulbar circuits is phylogenetically conserved between macrosmatic and microsmatic mammals. Our results demonstrate that the cholinergic axons form synaptic contacts on interneurons. In the glomerular layer, their main targets are the periglomerular cells, which receive axo-somatic and axo-dendritic synapses. In the inframitral region, their main targets are the granule cells, which receive synaptic contacts on their dendritic shafts and spines. Although the cholinergic boutons were frequently found in close vicinity of the dendrites of principal cells, we have not found synaptic contacts on them. From a comparative perspective, our data indicate that the synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic circuits is highly preserved in the olfactory bulb of macrosmatic and microsmatic mammals.

  13. Conformational and stereoeletronic investigations of muscarinic agonists of acetylcholine by NMR and theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Julio Cesar A.; Ducati, Lucas C.; Rittner, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    NMR solvent effects and theoretical calculations showed muscarinic agonists present a large stability for their near synclinal conformations, indicating the presence of significant stabilization factors. Analysis of the results clearly indicated that this stability is not determined by the dihedral around the substituted C-C ethane bond, as stated by some authors, but a consequence of the geometry adopted in order to maximize N+/O interactions in this type of molecules. It can be assumed that acetylcholine and its muscarinic agonists exhibit their biologic activity when the positively charged nitrogen and the oxygen atoms are in the same side of the molecule within an interatomic distance ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 Å.

  14. Glial response in the rat models of functionally distinct cholinergic neuronal denervations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataveljic, Danijela; Petrovic, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Saponjic, Jasna; Andjus, Pavle

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, particularly in the nucleus basalis (NB). Similarly, Parkinson's disease (PD) might involve the selective loss of pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) cholinergic neurons. Therefore, lesions of these functionally distinct cholinergic centers in rats might serve as models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. Our previous articles described dissimilar sleep/wake-state disorders in rat models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. This study further examines astroglial and microglial responses as underlying pathologies in these distinct sleep disorders. Unilateral lesions of the NB or the PPT were induced with rats under ketamine/diazepam anesthesia (50 mg/kg i.p.) by using stereotaxically guided microinfusion of the excitotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO). Twenty-one days after the lesion, loss of cholinergic neurons was quantified by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase histochemistry, and the astroglial and microglial responses were quantified by glia fibrillary acidic protein/OX42 immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the anatomofunctionally related astroglial response following unilateral excitotoxic PPT cholinergic neuronal lesion. Whereas IBO NB and PPT lesions similarly enhanced local astroglial and microglial responses, astrogliosis in the PPT was followed by a remote astrogliosis within the ipslilateral NB. Conversely, there was no microglial response within the NB after PPT lesions. Our results reveal the rostrorostral PPT-NB astrogliosis after denervation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT. This hierarchically and anatomofunctionally guided PPT-NB astrogliosis emerged following cholinergic neuronal loss greater than 17% throughout the overall rostrocaudal PPT dimension.

  15. Persistent sodium current drives conditional pacemaking in CA1 pyramidal neurons under muscarinic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason; Bean, Bruce P

    2013-09-18

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are normally quiescent but can fire spontaneously when stimulated by muscarinic agonists. In brain slice recordings from mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, we examined the ionic basis of this activity using interleaved current-clamp and voltage-clamp experiments. Both in control and after muscarinic stimulation, the steady-state current-voltage curve was dominated by inward TTX-sensitive persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) that activated near -75 mV and increased steeply with depolarization. In control, total membrane current was net outward (hyperpolarizing) near -70 mV so that cells had a stable resting potential. Muscarinic stimulation activated a small nonselective cation current so that total membrane current near -70 mV shifted to become barely net inward (depolarizing). The small depolarization triggers regenerative activation of I(NaP), which then depolarizes the cell from -70 mV to spike threshold. We quantified the relative contributions of I(NaP), hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I(h)), and calcium current to pacemaking by using the cell's own firing as a voltage command along with specific blockers. TTX-sensitive sodium current was substantial throughout the entire interspike interval, increasing as the membrane potential approached threshold, while both Ih and calcium current were minimal. Thus, spontaneous activity is driven primarily by activation of I(NaP) in a positive feedback loop starting near -70 mV and providing increasing inward current to threshold. These results show that the pacemaking "engine" from I(NaP) is an inherent property of CA1 pyramidal neurons that can be engaged or disengaged by small shifts in net membrane current near -70 mV, as by muscarinic stimulation.

  16. Abundance, distribution, mobility and oligomeric state of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in live cardiac muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Nenasheva, Tatiana A.; Neary, Marianne; Gregory I. Mashanov; Birdsall, Nigel J.M.; Breckenridge, Ross A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cardiac rhythm via regulation of the inward potassium current. To increase our understanding of M2 receptor physiology we used Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy to visualize individual receptors at the plasma membrane of transformed CHOM2 cells, a cardiac cell line (HL-1), primary cardiomyocytes and tissue slices from pre- and post-natal mice. Receptor expression levels between individual cells in dissociated cardiomyocytes and he...

  17. Annulated heterocyclic bioisosteres of norarecoline. Synthesis and molecular pharmacology at five recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R;

    1995-01-01

    A series of O-alkylated analogs of 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-isoxazolo[4,5-c]azepin-3-ol (THAO) were synthesized and characterized as ligands for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). O-Methyl-THAO (4a), O-ethyl-THAO (4b), O-isopropyl-THAO (4c), and O-propargyl-THAO (4d) were shown to be poten...

  18. Tolerance of nestin+ cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain against colchicine-induced cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yu; Kaihua Guo; Dongpei Li; Jinhai Duan; Juntao Zou; Junhua Yang; Zhibin Yao

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we injected colchicine into the lateral ventricle of Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate the effects of colchicine on the number of different-type neurons in the basal forebrain and to search for neurons resistant to injury. After colchicine injection, the number of nestin+ cholinergic neurons was decreased at 1 day, but increased at 3 days and peaked at 14-28 days. The quantity of nestin- cholinergic neurons, parvalbumin-positive neurons and choline acetyl transferase-positive neurons decreased gradually. Our results indicate that nestin+ cholinergic neurons possess better tolerance to colchicine-induced neurotoxicity.

  19. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands.

  20. Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibits glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke MA; Li-min YANG; Hong-zhuan CHEN; Yang LU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the actions of the muscarinic agonist carbachol on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells,and the underlying mechanisms.Methods:PC12 cells were treated with different concentrations of glutamate for 24 or 48 h.The cell viability was measured using MTT assay,and the expression and activation of GSK-3β were detected with Western blot.β-Catenin translocation was detected using immunofluorescence.Luciferase reporter assay and real-time PCR were used to analyze the transcriptional activity of β-catenin.Results:Glutamate (1,3,and 10 mmol/L) induced PC12 cell death in a dose-dependent manner.Moreover,treatment of the cells with glutamate (1 mmol/L) caused significant overactivation of GSK-3β and prevented β-catenin translocation to the nucleus.Pretreatment with carbachol (0.01 μmol/L) blocked glutamate-induced cell death and GSK-3β overactivation,and markedly enhanced β-catenin transcriptional activity.Conclusion:Activation of muscarinic receptors exerts neuroprotection in PC12 cells by attenuating glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation,suggesting potential benefits of muscarinic agonists for Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Reciprocal cholinergic and GABAergic modulation of the small ventrolateral pacemaker neurons of Drosophila's circadian clock neuron network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelito, Katherine R; Shafer, Orie T

    2012-04-01

    The relatively simple clock neuron network of Drosophila is a valuable model system for the neuronal basis of circadian timekeeping. Unfortunately, many key neuronal classes of this network are inaccessible to electrophysiological analysis. We have therefore adopted the use of genetically encoded sensors to address the physiology of the fly's circadian clock network. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) and cAMP sensors, we have investigated the physiological responses of two specific classes of clock neuron, the large and small ventrolateral neurons (l- and s-LN(v)s), to two neurotransmitters implicated in their modulation: acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Live imaging of l-LN(v) cAMP and Ca(2+) dynamics in response to cholinergic agonist and GABA application were well aligned with published electrophysiological data, indicating that our sensors were capable of faithfully reporting acute physiological responses to these transmitters within single adult clock neuron soma. We extended these live imaging methods to s-LN(v)s, critical neuronal pacemakers whose physiological properties in the adult brain are largely unknown. Our s-LN(v) experiments revealed the predicted excitatory responses to bath-applied cholinergic agonists and the predicted inhibitory effects of GABA and established that the antagonism of ACh and GABA extends to their effects on cAMP signaling. These data support recently published but physiologically untested models of s-LN(v) modulation and lead to the prediction that cholinergic and GABAergic inputs to s-LN(v)s will have opposing effects on the phase and/or period of the molecular clock within these critical pacemaker neurons.

  2. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago.

  3. Cholinergic and non-cholinergic projections from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei to the medial geniculate body in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Motts

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The midbrain tegmentum is the source of cholinergic innervation of the thalamus and has been associated with arousal and control of the sleep/wake cycle. In general, the innervation arises bilaterally from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT. While this pattern has been observed for many thalamic nuclei, a projection from the LDT to the medial geniculate body (MG has been questioned in some species. We combined retrograde tracing with immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT to identify cholinergic projections from the brainstem to the MG in guinea pigs. Double-labeled cells (retrograde and immunoreactive for ChAT were found in both the PPT (74% and the LDT (26%. In both nuclei, double-labeled cells were more numerous on the ipsilateral side. About half of the retrogradely labeled cells were immunonegative, suggesting they are non-cholinergic. The distribution of these immunonegative cells was similar to that of the immunopositive ones: more were in the PPT than the LDT and more were on the ipsilateral than the contralateral side. The results indicate that both the PPT and the LDT project to the MG, and suggest that both cholinergic and non-cholinergic cells contribute substantially to these projections.

  4. 肾素-血管紧张素系统在卡巴胆碱调节胎羊心血管功能中的作用%Role of rennin-angiotensin system in cholinergic agonist carbachol-induced cardiovascular responses in ovine fetus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿春松; 万镇; 冯亚红; 樊一笋

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying the cholinergic agonist carbachol-induced cardiovascular responses, changes of renin-angiotensin system were examined in fetal hormonal systems. In the ovine fetal model under stressless condition, the cardiovascular function was recorded. Blood samples were collected before (during baseline period) and after the intravenous administration of carbachol. Simultaneously, the levels of angiotensin I (Ang I), angiotensin II (Ang II) and vasopressin in the fetal plasma were detected by immunoradiological method. Also, blood gas, plasma osmolality and electrolyte concentrations were analyzed in blood samples. Results showed that in chronically prepared ovine fetus, intravenous infusion of carbachol led to a significant decrease of heart rate (P 0.05). Blood levels of Ang I and Ang II in the atropine (M receptor antagonist) + carbachol intravenous administration group was lower than those in the carbachol group without atropine administration (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this study indicates that the near-term changes of cardiovascular system induced by intravenous administration of carbachol in ovine fetus, such as blood pressure and heart rate, are associated with the changes of hormones of circulatory renin-angiotensin system.%本研究通过静脉给予胎羊胆碱能激动剂卡巴胆碱,探讨肾素-血管紧张素系统在卡巴胆碱调节胎羊心血管功能中的作用.胎羊静脉注射胆碱能激动剂卡巴胆碱(5 μg/kg),动态检测和分析心血管功能指标变化.在给药前后收集胎羊血液标本,放射免疫法测定血浆血管紧张素Ⅰ (angiotensin Ⅰ,Ang Ⅰ)、血管紧张素Ⅱ (angiotensin Ⅱ,Ang Ⅱ)、血管升压素(vasopressin,VP)水平,并测定胎羊血气、电解质浓度及血浆渗透压等指标.结果显示:胎羊静脉注射卡巴胆碱后,血压先短暂下降后又升高,在血压短暂下降的同时伴有心率减慢(P<0.05),并于30 min恢复到基础水平;血浆VP

  5. Epidemiology and etiology of cholinergic urticaria%胆碱能性荨麻疹流行病学及病因学的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑞; 晏洪波

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic urticaria (ChU),a rare condition clinically characterized by locally or generally distributed,highly pruritic starlike wheals occurring after an increase in body core temperature,negatively influences patients' quality of life.The pathogenesis of ChU remains unclear.The authors summarize the results of epidemiological studies on ChU in different countries over the years,which suggest that this entity has occurred more and more frequently in young people,and the actual incidence rate of ChU is higher than reported.It is considered that sweat hypersensitivity,sweat duct obstruction,poor perspiration,excessive secretion of sweat,and M3 muscarinic cholinergic receptor are closely associated with the occurrence of ChU.This paper reviews advances in the etiology and pathogenesis of ChU with a focus on the theories of sweat allergy and sweating abnormality.%胆碱能性荨麻疹的典型临床特征为体温升高并有全身或局部出现瘙痒性星状风团.该病影响患者生活质量,发病机制尚不完全明确.首先对历年来不同国家不同地区的流行病学相关调查结果进行分析,发现该病发病率年轻化,实际发病率高于数据统计结果.阐述该病病因及发病机制的研究进展,重点关注汗液过敏学说与排汗异常学说,得出汗液超敏反应、汗管阻塞、排汗不畅、汗液分泌过多、毒蕈碱型乙酰胆碱受体3等与该病的发生密切相关.

  6. Cholinergic modulation of auditory P3 event-related potentials as indexed by CHRNA4 and CHRNA7 genotype variation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Molly; Choueiry, Joëlle; Smith, Dylan; de la Salle, Sara; Nelson, Renee; Impey, Danielle; Baddeley, Ashley; Aidelbaum, Robert; Millar, Anne; Knott, Verner

    2016-06-03

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by cognitive dysfunction within the realm of attentional processing. Reduced P3a and P3b event-related potentials (ERPs), indexing involuntary and voluntary attentional processing respectively, have been consistently observed in SZ patients who also express prominent cholinergic deficiencies. The involvement of the brain's cholinergic system in attention has been examined for several decades; however, further inquiry is required to further comprehend how abnormalities in this system affect neighbouring neurotransmitter systems and contribute to neurocognitive deficits. The objective of this pilot study was to examine the moderating role of the CHRNA4 (rs1044396), CHRNA7 (rs3087454), and SLC5A7 (rs1013940) genes on ERP indices of attentional processing in healthy volunteers (N=99; Caucasians and non-Caucasians) stratified by genotype and assessed using the auditory P300 "oddball" paradigm. Results indicated significantly greater P3a and P3b-indexed attentional processing for CT (vs. CC) CHRNA4 carriers and greater P3b for AA (vs. CC) CHRNA7 carriers. SLC5A7 allelic variants did not show significant differences in P3a and P3b processing. These findings expand our knowledge on the moderating effect of cholinergic genes on attention and could help inform targeted drug developments aimed at restoring attention deficits in SZ patients.

  7. Outcome of Patients with Cholinergic Insecticide Poisoning Treated with Gastric Lavage: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekkattukunnel Andrews

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Number or timing of GL does not show any association with mortality while multiple GL had protective effect against development of late RF and IMS. Hence, GL might be beneficial in cholinergic insecticide poisoning.

  8. Transplantation of cholinergic neural stem cells in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-hua; XU Ru-xiang; Seigo Nagao

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is believed that the degeneration of cholinergic cells in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) and the loss of cortical cholinergic innervation cause dementia of Alzheimer's disease (AD).1 Currently available therapeutic interventions are mainly aimed at alleviating the cholinergic deficits. Unfortunately, these strategies do not prevent the disease, but instead offer limited symptomatic improvement.2 A recent study demonstrated that transplantation of in vitro expanded neural stem cells (NSCs) in an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD) resulted in functional recovery of the animals to some extent,2 suggesting that such neural precursors might offer a useful future therapy for AD. In this study, we tried to find whether mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell derived cholinergic NSCs grafted in the prefrontal and parietal cortex have effects on the disruption of spatial memory following development of lesion in NBM.

  9. Optogenetic activation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT or LDT induces REM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dort, Christa J; Zachs, Daniel P; Kenny, Jonathan D; Zheng, Shu; Goldblum, Rebecca R; Gelwan, Noah A; Ramos, Daniel M; Nolan, Michael A; Wang, Karen; Weng, Feng-Ju; Lin, Yingxi; Wilson, Matthew A; Brown, Emery N

    2015-01-13

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is an important component of the natural sleep/wake cycle, yet the mechanisms that regulate REM sleep remain incompletely understood. Cholinergic neurons in the mesopontine tegmentum have been implicated in REM sleep regulation, but lesions of this area have had varying effects on REM sleep. Therefore, this study aimed to clarify the role of cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) and laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) in REM sleep generation. Selective optogenetic activation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT or LDT during non-REM (NREM) sleep increased the number of REM sleep episodes and did not change REM sleep episode duration. Activation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT or LDT during NREM sleep was sufficient to induce REM sleep.

  10. Cholinergic axon length reduced by 300 meters in the brain of an Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Gitte; Jensen, Morten Skovgaard; West, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Modern stereological techniques have been used to show that the total length of the cholinergic fibers in the cerebral cortex of the APPswe/PS1deltaE9 mouse is reduced by almost 300 meters at 18 months of age and has a nonlinear relationship to the amount of transgenetically-induced amyloidosis. ....... These data provide rigorous quantitative morphological evidence that Alzheimer's-like amyloidosis affects the axons of the cholinergic enervation of the cerebral cortex....

  11. Cholinergic Depletion in Alzheimer’s Disease Shown by [18F]FEOBV Autoradiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime J. Parent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD is a neurodegenerative condition characterized in part by deficits in cholinergic basalocortical and septohippocampal pathways. [18F]Fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol ([18F]FEOBV, a Positron Emission Tomography ligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT, is a potential molecular agent to investigate brain diseases associated with presynaptic cholinergic losses. Purpose. To demonstrate this potential, we carried out an [18F]FEOBV autoradiography study to compare postmortem brain tissues from AD patients to those of age-matched controls. Methods. [18F]FEOBV autoradiography binding, defined as the ratio between regional grey and white matter, was estimated in the hippocampus (13 controls, 8 AD and prefrontal cortex (13 controls, 11 AD. Results. [18F]FEOBV binding was decreased by 33% in prefrontal cortex, 25% in CA3, and 20% in CA1. No changes were detected in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, possibly because of sprouting or upregulation toward the resilient glutamatergic neurons of the dentate gyrus. Conclusion. This is the first demonstration of [18F]FEOBV focal binding changes in cholinergic projections to the cortex and hippocampus in AD. Such cholinergic synaptic (and more specifically VAChT alterations, in line with the selective basalocortical and septohippocampal cholinergic losses documented in AD, indicate that [18F]FEOBV is indeed a promising ligand to explore cholinergic abnormalities in vivo.

  12. Origin and immunolesioning of cholinergic basal forebrain innervation of cat primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Marc R; Brown, Mel; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2005-08-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the cholinergic basal forebrain (cBF) in the modulation of auditory cortical responses. This study aimed to accurately define the sources of cBF input to primary auditory cortex (AI) and to assess the efficacy of a cholinergic immunotoxin in cat. Three anaesthetized cats received multiple injections of horseradish-peroxidase conjugated wheatgerm-agglutin into physiologically identified AI. Following one to two days survival, tetramethylbenzidine histochemistry revealed the greatest number of retrogradely labeled cells in ipsilateral putamen, globus pallidus and internal capsule, and smaller numbers in more medial nuclei of the basal forebrain (BF). Concurrent choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry showed that almost 80% of the retrogradely labeled cells in BF were cholinergic, with the vast majority of these cells arising from the more lateral BF nuclei identified above. In the second part of the study, unilateral intraparenchymal injections of the cholinergic immunotoxin ME20.4-SAP were made into the putamen/globus pallidus nuclei of six cats. Immuno- and histochemistry revealed a massive reduction in the number of cholinergic cells in and around the targeted area, and a corresponding reduction in the density of cholinergic fibers in auditory cortex. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for investigations of the role of the cBF in cortical plasticity.

  13. Hippocampal cholinergic interneurons visualized with the choline acetyltransferase promoter: anatomical distribution, intrinsic membrane properties, neurochemical characteristics, and capacity for cholinergic modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Feng eYi; Elizabeth eCatudio-Garrett; Robert eGabriel; Marta eWilhelm; Ferenc eErdelyi; Gabor eSzabo; Karl eDeisseroth; Josh eLawrence

    2015-01-01

    Release of acetylcholine (ACh) in the hippocampus (HC) occurs during exploration, arousal, and learning. Although the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) is the major extrinsic source of cholinergic input to the HC, cholinergic neurons intrinsic to the HC also exist but remain poorly understood. Here, ChAT-tauGFP and ChAT-CRE/Rosa26YFP (ChAT-Rosa) mice were examined in HC. The HC of ChAT-tauGFP mice was densely innervated with GFP-positive axons, often accompanied by large GFP-posit...

  14. Hippocampal “cholinergic interneurons” visualized with the choline acetyltransferase promoter: anatomical distribution, intrinsic membrane properties, neurochemical characteristics, and capacity for cholinergic modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Feng; Catudio-Garrett, Elizabeth; Gábriel, Robert; Wilhelm, Marta; Erdelyi, Ferenc; Szabo, Gabor; Deisseroth, Karl; Lawrence, Josh

    2015-01-01

    Release of acetylcholine (ACh) in the hippocampus (HC) occurs during exploration, arousal, and learning. Although the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) is the major extrinsic source of cholinergic input to the HC, cholinergic neurons intrinsic to the HC also exist but remain poorly understood. Here, ChAT-tauGFP and ChAT-CRE/Rosa26YFP (ChAT-Rosa) mice were examined in HC. The HC of ChAT-tauGFP mice was densely innervated with GFP-positive axons, often accompanied by large GFP-posit...

  15. Differential anti-ischaemic effects of muscarinic receptor blockade in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease - impaired vs normal left ventricular function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, AFM; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Bartels, GL; van der Ent, M; Remme, WJ

    1999-01-01

    Aims In patients with coronary artery disease acetylcholine (a muscarinic agonist) causes vasoconstriction. The effect of atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) on coronary vasotone in patients with normal or impaired left ventricular function is unknown. Methods and Results Twenty-four patients who req

  16. Presynaptic Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and TrkB Receptor Cooperate in the Elimination of Redundant Motor Nerve Terminals during Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Laura; Garcia, Neus; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria A.; Cilleros, Victor; Tomàs, Josep

    2017-01-01

    The development of the nervous system involves the overproduction of synapses but connectivity is refined by Hebbian activity-dependent axonal competition. The newborn skeletal muscle fibers are polyinnervated but, at the end of the competition process, some days later, become innervated by a single axon. We used quantitative confocal imaging of the autofluorescent axons from transgenic B6.Cg-Tg (Thy1-YFP)16 Jrs/J mice to investigate the possible cooperation of the muscarinic autoreceptors (mAChR, M1-, M2- and M4-subtypes) and the tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) receptor in the control of axonal elimination after the mice Levator auris longus (LAL) muscle had been exposed to several selective antagonist of the corresponding receptor pathways in vivo. Our previous results show that M1, M2 and TrkB signaling individually increase axonal loss rate around P9. Here we show that although the M1 and TrkB receptors cooperate and add their respective individual effects to increase axonal elimination rate even more, the effect of the M2 receptor is largely independent of both M1 and TrkB receptors. Thus both, cooperative and non-cooperative signaling mechanisms contribute to developmental synapse elimination. PMID:28228723

  17. Potentiation of M1 Muscarinic Receptor Reverses Plasticity Deficits and Negative and Cognitive Symptoms in a Schizophrenia Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, A; Rook, J M; Dickerson, J W; Roop, G N; Morrison, R D; Jalan-Sakrikar, N; Lamsal, A; Noetzel, M J; Poslusney, M S; Wood, M R; Melancon, B J; Stauffer, S R; Xiang, Z; Daniels, J S; Niswender, C M; Jones, C K; Lindsley, C W; Conn, P J

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients exhibit deficits in signaling of the M1 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and also display impaired cortical long-term depression (LTD). We report that selective activation of the M1 mAChR subtype induces LTD in PFC and that this response is completely lost after repeated administration of phencyclidine (PCP), a mouse model of schizophrenia. Furthermore, discovery of a novel, systemically active M1 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), VU0453595, allowed us to evaluate the impact of selective potentiation of M1 on induction of LTD and behavioral deficits in PCP-treated mice. Interestingly, VU0453595 fully restored impaired LTD as well as deficits in cognitive function and social interaction in these mice. These results provide critical new insights into synaptic changes that may contribute to behavioral deficits in this mouse model and support a role for selective M1 PAMs as a novel approach for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  18. EEG sleep in depression and in remission and the REM sleep response to the cholinergic agonist RS 86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, D; Berger, M

    1989-06-01

    A comparison of the sleep EEG patterns of patients with a major depressive disorder intraindividually between remitted and depressed state revealed an improvement of parameters of sleep continuity and a tendency for normalization of rapid eye movement (REM) latency and REM density in the former. Additional application of the cholinergic agonist RS 86 prior to sleep did not reveal a heightened sensitivity of the REM sleep system in the remitted sample. Whereas a group of presently ill depressives displayed a drastic reduction of REM latency, results of the remitted patients were comparable to healthy controls. Furthermore, RS 86 significantly reduced slow-wave sleep in all groups investigated and had a differential impact on the density of the first REM period and early morning awakening in actively ill patients as compared to remitted patients. The results do not favor the hypothesis of a trait specificity of REM sleep abnormalities for depressive disorders. Furthermore they support the model of a cholinergic supersensitivity, as measured by REM induction after RS 86, as a state but not a trait marker of affective illness. Generalization of the present study may, however, be limited by the fact that the remitted patients were free of symptomatology and psychoactive medication for a long period (mean 3 years), therefore constituting an untypical group of formerly depressed patients with a seemingly low risk of relapse.

  19. Electroacupuncture at Zusanli (ST36 Prevents Intestinal Barrier and Remote Organ Dysfunction following Gut Ischemia through Activating the Cholinergic Anti-Inflammatory-Dependent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the protective effect and mechanism of electroacupuncture at ST36 points on the intestinal barrier dysfunction and remote organ injury after intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats. Rats were subjected to gut ischemia for 30 min, and then received electroacupuncture for 30 min with or without abdominal vagotomy or intraperitoneal administration of cholinergic α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR inhibitor. Then we compared its effects with electroacupuncture at nonchannel points, vagal nerve stimulation, or intraperitoneal administration of cholinergic agonist. Cytokine levels in plasma and tissue of intestine, lung, and liver were assessed 60 min after reperfusion. Intestinal barrier injury was detected by histology, gut injury score, the permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran, and changes in tight junction protein ZO-1 using immunofluorescence and Western blot. Electroacupuncture significantly lowered the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 in plasma and organ tissues, decreased intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran, and prevented changes in ZO-1 protein expression and localization. However, abdominal vagotomy or intraperitoneal administration of cholinergic α7nAChR inhibitor reversed these effects of electroacupuncture. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture attenuates the systemic inflammatory response through protection of intestinal barrier integrity after intestinal ischemia injury in the presence of an intact vagus nerve.

  20. Oxidative stress and altered steroidogenesis in the ovary by cholinergic stimulation of coeliac ganglion in the first proestrous in rats. Implication of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsouc, María B; Della Vedova, María C; Ramírez, Darío; Anzulovich, Ana C; Delgado, Silvia M; Casais, Marilina

    2016-02-29

    An ex-vivo Coeliac Ganglion-Superior Ovarian Nerve-Ovary (CG-SON-O) system from virgin rats in the first proestrous was used to test whether cholinergic stimulation of CG affects oxidative status and steroidogenesis in the ovary. The CG and the O were placed in separate buffered-compartments, connected by the SON, and the CG was stimulated by acetylcholine (Ach). To test a possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in the ovarian response to cholinergic stimulation of CG, aminoguanidine (AG) - an inhibitor of inducible-NO synthase was added to the O compartment. After 180 min incubation, the oxidative status was assessed in O whereas nitrite and steroidogenesis were assessed at 30, 120 and 180 min. Ach in CG decreased the total antioxidant capacity, but increased NO production and protein carbonization in O. Ach stimulation of CG increased estradiol, but decreased progesterone release in O by reducing the mRNAs related to their synthesis and degradation. The addition of AG to the O compartment caused an opposite effect, which was more pronounced in the presence of Ach in the CG compartment than in its absence. These results show that the stimulation of the extrinsic-cholinergic innervation of the O increases the concentration of NO, causes oxidative stress and modulates steroidogenesis in the first rat proestrous.

  1. The LIM and POU homeobox genes ttx-3 and unc-86 act as terminal selectors in distinct cholinergic and serotonergic neuron types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feifan; Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Nelson, Jessica C; Abe, Namiko; Gordon, Patricia; Lloret-Fernandez, Carla; Maicas, Miren; Flames, Nuria; Mann, Richard S; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Hobert, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive neuron type-specific terminal differentiation programs in the developing nervous system are often expressed in several distinct neuronal cell types, but to what extent they have similar or distinct activities in individual neuronal cell types is generally not well explored. We investigate this problem using, as a starting point, the C. elegans LIM homeodomain transcription factor ttx-3, which acts as a terminal selector to drive the terminal differentiation program of the cholinergic AIY interneuron class. Using a panel of different terminal differentiation markers, including neurotransmitter synthesizing enzymes, neurotransmitter receptors and neuropeptides, we show that ttx-3 also controls the terminal differentiation program of two additional, distinct neuron types, namely the cholinergic AIA interneurons and the serotonergic NSM neurons. We show that the type of differentiation program that is controlled by ttx-3 in different neuron types is specified by a distinct set of collaborating transcription factors. One of the collaborating transcription factors is the POU homeobox gene unc-86, which collaborates with ttx-3 to determine the identity of the serotonergic NSM neurons. unc-86 in turn operates independently of ttx-3 in the anterior ganglion where it collaborates with the ARID-type transcription factor cfi-1 to determine the cholinergic identity of the IL2 sensory and URA motor neurons. In conclusion, transcription factors operate as terminal selectors in distinct combinations in different neuron types, defining neuron type-specific identity features.

  2. Low-Affinity Neurotrophin Receptor p75 Promotes the Transduction of Targeted Lentiviral Vectors to Cholinergic Neurons of Rat Basal Forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antyborzec, Inga; O'Leary, Valerie B; Dolly, James O; Ovsepian, Saak V

    2016-10-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) are one of the most affected neuronal types in Alzheimer's disease (AD), with their extensive loss documented at late stages of the pathology. While discriminatory provision of neuroprotective agents and trophic factors to these cells is thought to be of substantial therapeutic potential, the intricate topography and structure of the forebrain cholinergic system imposes a major challenge. To overcome this, we took advantage of the physiological enrichment of BFCNs with a low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) for their targeting by lentiviral vectors within the intact brain of adult rat. Herein, a method is described that affords selective and effective transduction of BFCNs with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter, which combines streptavidin-biotin technology with anti-p75(NTR) antibody-coated lentiviral vectors. Specific GFP expression in cholinergic neurons was attained in the medial septum and nuclei of the diagonal band Broca after a single intraventricular administration of such targeted vectors. Bioelectrical activity of GFP-labeled neurons was proven to be unchanged. Thus, proof of principle is obtained for the utility of the low-affinity p75(NTR) for targeted transduction of vectors to BFCNs in vivo.

  3. Dual-pharmacology muscarinic antagonist and β₂ agonist molecules for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adam D; Jones, Lyn H

    2011-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of death in the world today. Bronchodilators, particularly muscarinic antagonists and β(2) agonists, are recommended for patients with moderate to severe COPD. Dual-pharmacology muscarinic antagonist- β(2) agonist (MABA) molecules present an exciting new approach to the treatment of COPD by combining muscarinic antagonism and β(2) agonism in a single entity. They have the potential to demonstrate additive or synergistic bronchodilation over either pharmacology alone. Due to this enticing prospect, several companies have now reported MABA discovery efforts through a conjugated/linked strategy with one candidate (GSK-961081) demonstrating clinical proof of concept. Several MABA crystal forms have been identified, satisfying the requirements for inhaled dosing devices. There are significant challenges in designing MABAs, but the potential to achieve enhanced bronchoprotection in patients and facilitate 'triple therapy' makes this an extremely important and exciting area of pharmaceutical research.

  4. ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONSE AFFECTED BY AGING AND CHOLINERGIC NEUROTRANSMITTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Hansen; SUN Wei

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic startle response has been used to evaluate tinnitus and hyperacusis in animal models. Gap induced prepulse in-hibition of the acoustic startle reflex (gap-PPI) is affected by tinnitus and loudness changes. Since tinnitus and reduced sound tolerance are commonly seen in elderly, we measured gap-PPI in Fischer 344 rats, an aging related hearing loss model, at dif-ferent ages: 3-5 months, 9-12 months, and 15-17 months. The startle response was induced by three different intensity of sound:105, 95 and 85 dB SPL. Gap-PPI was induced by different duration of silent gaps from 1 to 100 ms. When the startle was induced by 105 dB SPL sound intensity, the gap-PPI induced by 50 ms silent gap was significantly lower than those in-duced by 25 or 100 ms duration, showing a“notch”in the gap-PPI function. The“notch”disappeared with the reduction of startle sound, suggesting the“notch”may be related with hyper-sensitivity to loud sound. As the intensity of the stimulus de-creased, the appearance of the hyperacusis-like effect decreased more quickly for the youngest group of rats. We also tested scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, and mecamylamine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antago-nist, on the effect of gap-PPI. When scopolamine was administered, the results indicated no addition effect on the hyperacu-sis-like phenomenon in the two older groups. Mecamylamine, the nicotinic antagonist also showed effects on the appearance of hyperacusis on rats in different ages. The information derived from the study will be fundamental for the further research in determining the cause and treatment for hyperacusis.

  5. The role of muscarinic receptors in the beneficial effects of adenosine against myocardial reperfusion injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sun

    Full Text Available Adenosine, a catabolite of ATP, displays a wide variety of effects in the heart including regulation of cardiac response to myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, the precise mechanism of adenosine-induced cardioprotection is still elusive. Isolated Sprague-Dawley rat hearts underwent 30 min global ischemia and 120 min reperfusion using a Langendorff apparatus. Both adenosine and acetylcholine treatment recovered the post-reperfusion cardiac function associated with adenosine and muscarinic receptors activation. Simultaneous administration of adenosine and acetylcholine failed to exert any additive protective effect, suggesting a shared mechanism between the two. Our data further revealed a cross-talk between the adenosine and acetylcholine receptor signaling in reperfused rat hearts. Interestingly, the selective M(2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist methoctramine significantly attenuated the cardioprotective effect of adenosine. In addition, treatment with adenosine upregulated the expression and the maximal binding capacity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which were inhibited by the selective A(1 adenosine receptor antagonist 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. These data suggested a possible functional coupling between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors behind the observed cardioprotection. Furthermore, nitric oxide was found involved in triggering the response to each of the two receptor agonist. In summary, there may be a cross-talk between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors in ischemic/reperfused myocardium with nitric oxide synthase might serve as the distal converging point. In addition, adenosine contributes to the invigorating effect of adenosine on muscarinic receptor thereby prompting to regulation of cardiac function. These findings argue for a potentially novel mechanism behind the adenosine

  6. Effects of Modulating M3 Muscarinic Receptor Activity on Azoxymethane-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that azoxymethane (AOM)-induced liver injury is robustly exacerbated in M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R)-deficient mice. We used the same mouse model to test the hypothesis that selective pharmacological modulation of M3R activity regulates the liver injury response. Initial experiments confirmed that giving a selective M3R antagonist, darifenacin, to AOM-treated mice mimicked M3R gene ablation. Compared to vehicle controls, mice treated with the M3R antagonist had reduced...

  7. The structure of the third intracellular loop of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyama, Susumu; Oka, Yoshiaki; Haga, Kazuko; Kojima, Shuichi; Tateishi, Yukihiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Haga, Tatsuya

    2006-01-09

    We have examined whether the long third intracellular loop (i3) of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype has a rigid structure. Circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of M2i3 expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli indicated that M2i3 consists mostly of random coil. In addition, the differential CD spectrum between the M2 and M2deltai3 receptors, the latter of which lacks most of i3 except N- and C-terminal ends, gave no indication of secondary structure. These results suggest that the central part of i3 of the M2 receptor has a flexible structure.

  8. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjun Zuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4. These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  9. Cholinergic modulation of cognitive processing: insights drawn from computational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehren L Newman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine plays an important role in cognitive function, as shown by pharmacological manipulations that impact working memory, attention, episodic memory and spatial memory function. Acetylcholine also shows striking modulatory influences on the cellular physiology of hippocampal and cortical neurons. Modeling of neural circuits provides a framework for understanding how the cognitive functions may arise from the influence of acetylcholine on neural and network dynamics. We review the influences of cholinergic manipulations on behavioral performance in working memory, attention, episodic memory and spatial memory tasks, the physiological effects of acetylcholine on neural and circuit dynamics, and the computational models that provide insight into the functional relationships between the physiology and behavior. Specifically, we discuss the important role of acetylcholine in governing mechanisms of active maintenance in working memory tasks and in regulating network dynamics important for effective processing of stimuli in attention and episodic memory tasks. We also propose that theta rhythm play a crucial role as an intermediary between the physiological influences of acetylcholine and behavior in episodic and spatial memory tasks. We conclude with a synthesis of the existing modeling work and highlight future directions that are likely to be rewarding given the existing state of the literature for both empiricists and modelers.

  10. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD. PMID:27827986

  11. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-11-07

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4,CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  12. Whole-brain mapping of inputs to projection neurons and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingchun; Wang, Daqing; He, Xiaobin; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Xu, Fuqiang; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal striatum integrates inputs from multiple brain areas to coordinate voluntary movements, associative plasticity, and reinforcement learning. Its projection neurons consist of the GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine receptor type 1 (D1) or dopamine receptor type 2 (D2). Cholinergic interneurons account for a small portion of striatal neuron populations, but they play important roles in striatal functions by synapsing onto the MSNs and other local interneurons. By combining the modified rabies virus with specific Cre- mouse lines, a recent study mapped the monosynaptic input patterns to MSNs. Because only a small number of extrastriatal neurons were labeled in the prior study, it is important to reexamine the input patterns of MSNs with higher labeling efficiency. Additionally, the whole-brain innervation pattern of cholinergic interneurons remains unknown. Using the rabies virus-based transsynaptic tracing method in this study, we comprehensively charted the brain areas that provide direct inputs to D1-MSNs, D2-MSNs, and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum. We found that both types of projection neurons and the cholinergic interneurons receive extensive inputs from discrete brain areas in the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other subcortical areas, several of which were not reported in the previous study. The MSNs and cholinergic interneurons share largely common inputs from areas outside the striatum. However, innervations within the dorsal striatum represent a significantly larger proportion of total inputs for cholinergic interneurons than for the MSNs. The comprehensive maps of direct inputs to striatal MSNs and cholinergic interneurons shall assist future functional dissection of the striatal circuits.

  13. The muscarinic M1/M4 receptor agonist xanomeline exhibits antipsychotic-like activity in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Peacock, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Xanomeline is a muscarinic M(1)/M(4) preferring receptor agonist with little or no affinity for dopamine receptors. The compound reduces psychotic-like symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease and exhibits an antipsychotic-like profile in rodents without inducing extrapyramidal side effects ...... that xanomeline inhibits D-amphetamine- and (-)-apomorphine-induced behavior in Cebus apella monkeys at doses that do not cause EPS. These data further substantiate that muscarinic receptor agonists may be useful in the pharmacological treatment of psychosis....

  14. The level of cholinergic nucleus basalis activation controls the specificity of auditory associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Norman M; Miasnikov, Alexandre A; Chen, Jemmy C

    2006-11-01

    Learning involves not only the establishment of memory per se, but also the specific details of its contents. In classical conditioning, the former concerns whether an association was learned while the latter discloses what was learned. The neural bases of associativity have been studied extensively while neural mechanisms of memory specificity have been neglected. Stimulation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis (NBs) paired with a preceding tone induces CS-specific associative memory. As different levels of acetylcholine may be released naturally during different learning situations, we asked whether the level of activation of the cholinergic neuromodulatory system can control the degree of detail that is encoded and retrieved. Adult male rats were tested pre- and post-training for behavioral responses (interruption of ongoing respiration) to tones of various frequencies (1-15 kHz, 70 dB, 2 s). Training consisted of 200 trials/day of tone (8.0 kHz, 70 dB, 2 s) either paired or unpaired with NBs (CS-NBs = 1.8 s) at moderate (65.7+/-9.0 microA, one day) or weak (46.7+/-12.1 microA, three training days) levels of stimulation, under conditions of controlled behavioral state (pre-trial stable respiration rate). Post-training (24 h) responses to tones revealed that moderate activation induced both associative and CS-specific behavioral memory, whereas weak activation produced associative memory lacking frequency specificity. The degree of memory specificity 24 h after training was positively correlated with the magnitude of CS-elicited increase in gamma activity within the EEG during training, but only in the moderate NBs group. Thus, a low level of acetylcholine released by the nucleus basalis during learning is sufficient to induce associativity whereas a higher level of release enables the storage of greater experiential detail. gamma waves, which are thought to reflect the coordinated activity of cortical cells, appear to index the encoding of CS detail. The findings

  15. Caffeine elicits c-Fos expression in horizontal diagonal band cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Leah R; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Fadel, Jim R

    2009-12-09

    Caffeine is a widely self-administered psychostimulant with purported neuroprotective and procognitive effects in rodent models of aging. The cholinergic basal forebrain is important for arousal and attention and is implicated in age-related cognitive decline. Accordingly, we determined the effects of caffeine on cholinergic neuron activation in the rat basal forebrain. Young adult (age 2 months) male rats were treated with caffeine (0, 10, or 50 mg/kg) and killed 2 h later. Caffeine significantly increased c-Fos expression in cholinergic neurons of the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca but not other basal forebrain regions such as the medial septum or substantia innominata. The horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca provides cholinergic innervation to the olfactory bulb, suggesting that deficits in this structure may contribute to diminished olfactory function observed in Alzheimer's disease patients. These results suggest that part of the cognitive-enhancing effects of caffeine may be mediated through activation of this part of the cholinergic basal forebrain.

  16. Possible Mechanisms for Functional Antagonistic Effect of Ferula assafoetida on Muscarinic Receptors in Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyanmehr, Majid; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzehi, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of histamine (H1) receptors inhibitory and/or β-adrenoceptors stimulatory mechanisms in the relaxant property of Ferula assa-foetida. (F. asafoetida) was examined in the present study. Methods We evaluated the effect of three concentrations of F. asafoetida extract (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL), a muscarinic receptors antagonist, and saline on methacholine concentration-response curve in tracheal smooth muscles incubated with β-adrenergic and histamine (H1) (group 1), and only β-adrenergic (group 2) receptors antagonists. Results EC50 values in the presence of atropine, extract (5 and 10 mg/mL) and maximum responses to methacholine due to the 10 mg/mL extract in both groups and 5 mg/mL extract in group 1 were higher than saline (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0477, and P = 0.0008 in group 1 and P < 0.0001, P = 0.0438, and P = 0.0107 in group 2 for atropine, 5 and 10 mg/mL extract, respectively). Values of concentration ratio minus one (CR-1), in the presence of extracts were lower than atropine in both groups (P = 0.0339 for high extract concentration in group 1 and P < 0.0001 for other extract concentrations in both groups). Conclusion Histamine (H1) receptor blockade affects muscarinic receptors inhibitory property of F. asafoetida in tracheal smooth muscle PMID:27540324

  17. Connexins and M3 Muscarinic Receptors Contribute to Heterogeneous Ca2+ Signaling in Mouse Aortic Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Boittin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Smooth muscle tone is controlled by Ca2+ signaling in the endothelial layer. Mouse endothelial cells are interconnected by gap junctions made of Connexin40 (Cx40 and Cx37, which allow the exchange of signaling molecules to coordinate their activity. Here, we investigated the role of Cx40 in the endothelial Ca2+ signaling of the mouse aorta. Methods: Ca2+ imaging was performed on intact aortic endothelium from both wild type (Cx40+/+ and Connexin40-deficient (Cx40 -/- mice. Results: Acetylcholine (ACh induced early fast and high amplitude Ca2+ transients in a fraction of endothelial cells expressing the M3 muscarinic receptors. Inhibition of intercellular communication using carbenoxolone or octanol fully blocked the propagation of ACh-induced Ca2+ transients toward adjacent cells in WT and Cx40-/- mice. As compared to WT, Cx40-/- mice displayed a reduced propagation of ACh-induced Ca2+ waves, indicating that Cx40 contributes to the spreading of Ca2+ signals. The propagation of those Ca2+ responses was not blocked by suramin, a blocker of purinergic ATP receptors, indicating that there is no paracrine effect of ATP release on the Ca2+ waves. Conclusions: Altogether our data show that Cx40 and Cx37 contribute to the propagation and amplification of the Ca2+ signaling triggered by ACh in endothelial cells expressing the M3 muscarinic receptors.

  18. Stereoselectivity of satropane, a novel tropane analog, on iris muscarinic receptor activation and intraocular hypotension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang ZHU; Hong-zhuan CHEN; Li-min YANG; Yong-yao CUI; Pei-li ZHENG; Yin-yao NIU; Hao WANG; Yang LU; Qiu-shi REN; Pi-jing WEI

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the stereoselectivity of satropane (3-paramethylbenzene sulfonyloxy-6-acetoxy tropane), a novel tropane analog, on iris muscarinic receptor activation and intraocular hypotension. Methods: The assays for radioligand-receptor binding, the contractile responses of isolated iris muscle, the miosis response, and the intraocular hypotension of the enantiomers of satropane were investigated. Results: In the binding analysis, S(-)satropane (lesatropane) completely com-peted against the [3H]quinuclydinyl benzilate-labeled ligand at muscarinic recep-tors in the iris muscle, whereas R(+)satropane failed to completely compete. In an isolated iris contractile assay, R,S(±)satropane and S(-)satropane produced a concentration-dependent contractile response with similar efficacy and potency to that of carbachol. R(+)satropane did not induce any contractile response. In the pupil diameter measurement assay in vivo, S(-)satropane induced miosis much more effectively than pilocarpine, while R(+)satropane failed to produce any miosis. In the water loading-induced and methylcellulose-induced ocular hypertensive models, S(-)satropane, but not R(+)satropane, significantly suppressed intraocu-lar pressure at a much lower concentration than pilocarpine. Conclusion: The ago-nistic and hypotensive properties of satropane on rabbit eyes are stereoselective, with the S(-)isomer being its active form.

  19. Permanent alterations in muscarinic receptors and pupil size produced by chronic atropinization in kittens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.L.; Redburn, D.A.; Harwerth, R.S.; Maguire, G.W.

    1984-02-01

    Chronic mydriasis was induced in six kittens (four monocular, two binocular) and two adult cats (both monocular) by the daily topical application of atropine. Both the kittens and the adult cats were atropinized for a 13-week period with the treatment regimen beginning at the time of eye opening for the kittens. Pupil size measurements, obtained 1 year after the atropinization were discontinued, revealed that, although the pupils of the adult cats were normal, the pupils of the kittens' treated eyes were consistently smaller than pupils in control eyes. The status of the muscarinic receptors in the kittens' irides was investigated using /sup 3/H-QNB binding assays. In comparison with iris muscle homogenates from the control eyes, those from the treated eyes demonstrated an eightfold increase in the number of receptor binding sites. The results indicate that pupil size can be altered permanently by chronic mydriasis initiated early in the life of a kitten and that the permanent change in pupil size may result, in part, from a type of permanent supersensitivity response in the muscle following chronic blockade of muscarinic transmission by atropine.

  20. Endocrine and metabolic response to muscarinic stimulation and inhibition in the ruminant: effects of slaframine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, A M; Fernandez, J M; Thompson, D L; Tempelman, R J; Berrio, L F; Croom, W J; Hagler, W M

    1995-12-01

    The influence of slaframine (SF), a parasympathomimetic compound isolated from the fungus Rizoctonia leguminicola, on circulating metabolic hormone concentrations was investigated in goats. In Exp. 1, SF was administered i.v. at 0 (CONT), 50 (LSF), 100 (MSF), or 150 (HSF) microgram/kg.75 BW in four mature Spanish-cross does (average BW 36 +/- 7 kg) fitted with indwelling jugular vein catheters in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Plasma glucose peaked (P .10) by SF. In Exp. 2, four mature Spanish-cross wethers (average BW 27 +/- 2 kg) fitted with jugular vein catheters were administered SF (0 and 114 micrograms/kg.75 BW) and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide (4DAMP; 0 and 258 micrograms/kg.75 BW), a M3-muscarinic receptor antagonist, i.v. in a 4 x 4 Latin square design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. With SF, glucose peaked (P < .06) at 60 min and insulin peaked (P < .05) at 180 min. Plasma triiodothyronine levels were maintained (P < .05) with SF but declined with other treatments. Plasma NEFA and thyroxine concentrations remained unchanged regardless of treatment. Slaframine administration induced hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in goats; however, these changes were blocked by preadministration of isomolar quantities of the M3-muscarinic receptor antagonist, 4DAMP.

  1. Therapeutic potential and limitations of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanashiro, Alexandre; Sônego, Fabiane; Ferreira, Raphael G; Castanheira, Fernanda V S; Leite, Caio A; Borges, Vanessa F; Nascimento, Daniele C; Cólon, David F; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Ulloa, Luis; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2017-03-01

    Sepsis is one of the main causes of mortality in hospitalized patients. Despite the recent technical advances and the development of novel generation of antibiotics, severe sepsis remains a major clinical and scientific challenge in modern medicine. Unsuccessful efforts have been dedicated to the search of therapeutic options to treat the deleterious inflammatory components of sepsis. Recent findings on neuronal networks controlling immunity raised expectations for novel therapeutic strategies to promote the regulation of sterile inflammation, such as autoimmune diseases. Interesting studies have dissected the anatomical constituents of the so-called "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway", suggesting that electrical vagus nerve stimulation and pharmacological activation of beta-2 adrenergic and alpha-7 nicotinic receptors could be alternative strategies for improving inflammatory conditions. However, the literature on infectious diseases, such as sepsis, is still controversial and, therefore, the real therapeutic potential of this neuroimmune pathway is not well defined. In this review, we will discuss the beneficial and detrimental effects of neural manipulation in sepsis, which depend on the multiple variables of the immune system and the nature of the infection. These observations suggest future critical studies to validate the clinical implications of vagal parasympathetic signaling in sepsis treatment.

  2. Direction-selective circuitry in rat retina develops independently of GABAergic, cholinergic and action potential activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Sun

    Full Text Available The ON-OFF direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs in the mammalian retina code image motion by responding much more strongly to movement in one direction. They do so by receiving inhibitory inputs selectively from a particular sector of processes of the overlapping starburst amacrine cells, a type of retinal interneuron. The mechanisms of establishment and regulation of this selective connection are unknown. Here, we report that in the rat retina, the morphology, physiology of the ON-OFF DSGCs and the circuitry for coding motion directions develop normally with pharmacological blockade of GABAergic, cholinergic activity and/or action potentials for over two weeks from birth. Wi