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Sample records for cholesterol ester transfer

  1. Inhibition of cholesterol ester transfer protein CGS 25159 and changes in lipoproteins in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, H V; Poirier, K J; Lee, W H; Satoh, Y

    1997-01-03

    As a result of screening, several isoflavans were identified to be antagonists of cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The present study evaluates CGS 25159, a synthetic isoflavan, as a putative inhibitor of CETP activity of human and hamster plasma. Determined by [3]CE transfer from HDL to VLDL + LDL fraction or by fluorescent-CE transfer assay, CGS 25159 inhibited CETP in both human plasma bottom fraction (d = 1.21 g/ml) and in plasma from Golden Syrian Hamsters with an IC50 time dependent changes in CETP activity. After two weeks of treatment at 10 mg/kg, the changes in VLDL + LDL cholesterol, total triglycerides and HDL cholesterol were -22 +/- 4.6*, -23 +/- 7.5 and +10 +/- 2.8%, respectively. The corresponding changes at 30 mg/kg were -28 +/- 5.5*, -38 +/- 6.8* and +29 +/-4.4.*%, (*, P, 0.05; mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6). A single spin gradient density ultracentrifugation of plasma lipoproteins and treated animals showed an increase in HDL cholesterol and a redistribution to larger HDL particles. These data support the contention that pharmacological down regulation of CETP activity could result in favorable changes in lipoprotein profile.

  2. Antiproteinuric therapy decreases LDL-cholesterol as well as HDL-cholesterol in non-diabetic proteinuric patients: relationships with cholesteryl ester transfer protein mass and adiponectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Krikken; F. Waanders; G.M. Dallinga-Thie; L.D. Dikkeschei; L. Vogt; G.J. Navis; R.P.F. Dullaart

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Dyslipidemia contributes to increased cardiovascular risk in nephrotic syndrome. We questioned whether reduction in proteinuria not only lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), but also high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)

  3. Antiproteinuric therapy decreases LDL-cholesterol as well as HDL-cholesterol in non-diabetic proteinuric patients : relationships with cholesteryl ester transfer protein mass and adiponectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, J. A.; Waanders, F.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; Dikkeschei, L. D.; Vogt, L.; Navis, G. J.; Dullaart, R. P. F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Dyslipidemia contributes to increased cardiovascular risk in nephrotic syndrome. We questioned whether reduction in proteinuria not only lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), but also high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)

  4. HDL cholesterol response to GH replacement is associated with common cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene variation (-629C > A) and modified by glucocorticoid treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, Robin P. F.; van den Berg, Gerrit; van der Knaap, Aafke M.; Dijck-Brouwer, Janneke; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Zelissen, Peter M. J.; Sluiter, Wim J.; van Beek, Andre P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: GH replacement lowers total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in GH-deficient adults, but effects on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) are variable. Both GH and glucocorticoids decrease cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity, which is

  5. The association of HDL cholesterol concentration with the-629C > A CETP promoter polymorphism is not fully explained by its relationship with plasma cholesteryl ester transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, R. P. F.; Borggreve, S. E.; Hillege, H. L.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective . HDL cholesterol is associated with the -629C>A cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) promoter polymorphism. This relationship may in part be explained via effects on plasma cholesteryl ester transfer (CET), which reflects the activity of CETP in the context of endogenous lipoproteins

  6. Insulin decreases plasma cholesteryl ester transfer but not cholesterol esterification in healthy subjects as well as in normotriglyceridaemic patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, RPF; Riemens, SC; Scheek, LM; van Tol, A

    1999-01-01

    Background Plasma cholesterol esterification (EST) and subsequent cholesteryl ester transfer (CET) from high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) towards apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins are key steps in HDL metabolism. Materials and methods The effects of exogenous hyperinsulinaemia on plasma

  7. The effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein-629C -> A promoter polymorphism on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is dependent on serum triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, SE; Hillege, HL; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; de Jong, PE; Bakker, SJL; van der Steege, G; van Tol, A; Dullaart, RPF

    2005-01-01

    Context: The -629C -> A cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) promoter polymorphism is a determinant of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). The effect of the closely linked CETP TaqIB polymorphism on HDL-C has been suggested to be modified by obesity and hyperinsulinemia. Objective: Because the CETP-mediat

  8. The effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein -629C→A promoter polymorphism on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is dependent on serum triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Borggreve (Susanna); H.L. Hillege (Hans); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); P. de Jong (Paul); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); G. van der Steege (Gerrit); A. van Tol (Arie); R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractContext: The -629C→A cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) promoter polymorphism is a determinant of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). The effect of the closely linked CETP TaqIB polymorphism on HDL-C has been suggested to be modified by obesity and hyperinsulinemia. Objective: Because the CE

  9. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol is related to the TaqIB cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene polymorphism and smoking, but not to moderate alcohol consumption in insulin-dependent diabetic men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, RPF; Beusekamp, BJ; Riemens, SC; Hoogenberg, K; Stulp, BK; Van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ

    1998-01-01

    In non-diabetic subjects, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level is increased by alcohol and decreased by smoking. The biallelic B1B2 polymorphism of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene is a genetic determinant of HDL cholesterol. We evaluated the effect of moderate alco

  10. An increased coronary risk is paradoxically associated with common cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene variations that relate to higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: A population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Borggreve (Susanna); H.L. Hillege (Hans); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); P. de Jong (Paul); M.W. Zuurman (Mike); G. van der Steege (Gerrit); A. van Tol (Arie); R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Several cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) polymorphisms affect high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but the impact of CETP gene variants on incident coronary disease in the general population is uncertain after correction for their effect on HDL cholesterol. De

  11. The cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) TaqIB polymorphism in the cholesterol and recurrent events study : no interaction with the response to pravastatin therapy and no effects on cardiovascular outcome: a prospective analysis of the CETP TaqIB polymorphism on cardiovascular outcome and interaction with cholesterol-lowering therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grooth, Greetje J; Zerba, Kim E; Huang, Shu-Pang; Tsuchihashi, Zenta; Kirchgessner, Todd; Belder, René; Vishnupad, Priya; Hu, Beihong; Klerkx, Anke H E M; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Jukema, J Wouter; Sacks, Frank M; Kastelein, John J P; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: On the basis of quantitative coronary angiography data, the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) TaqIB gene polymorphism has been postulated to predict the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and response to cholesterol-lowering therapy. BACKGROUND: Cholesteryl ester transfer pr

  12. Alcohol consumption, TaqIB polymorphism of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and risk of coronary heart disease in men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majken K; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Overvad, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether a common polymorphism in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene modifies the relationship of alcohol intake with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS AND RESULTS: Parallel nested case-control studies...... among women [Nurses' Health Study (NHS)] and men [Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS)] where 246 women and 259 men who developed incident CHD were matched to controls (1:2) on age and smoking. The TaqIB variant and alcohol consumption were associated with higher HDL-C, with the most pronounced...... effects of alcohol among B2 carriers. In the NHS we did not find an inverse association between alcohol and CHD in B2 non-carriers (P trend: 0.5), but did among B2 carriers (P trend

  13. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein TaqIB variant, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, cardiovascular risk, and efficacy of pravastatin treatment : individual patient meta-analysis of 13,677 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekholdt, S M; Sacks, F M; Jukema, J W; Shepherd, J; Freeman, D J; McMahon, A D; Cambien, F; Nicaud, V; de Grooth, G J; Talmud, P J; Humphries, S E; Miller, G J; Eiriksdottir, G; Gudnason, V; Kauma, H; Kakko, S; Savolainen, M J; Arca, M; Montali, A; Liu, S; Lanz, H J; Zwinderman, A H; Kuivenhoven, J A; Kastelein, J J P

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported that the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) TaqIB gene polymorphism is associated with HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), but the results are inconsistent. In addition, an interaction has been implicated betw

  14. Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer and hepatic lipase activity are related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in association with insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; Van Tol, A; Scheek, LM; Dullaart, RPF

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the: hypothesis that plasma cholesteryl ester transfer (CET) and lipase activities are influenced by insulin sensitivity and contribute to the low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol observed in type 2 diabetic patients and insulin-resistant non-diabetic subjects. Sixteen type 2

  15. Interaction of cholesterol ester transfer protein polymo- rphisms, body mass index, and birth weight with the risk of dyslipidemia in children and adolescents: the CASPIAN-III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motahar Heidari-Beni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study aims to investigate joint association between cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP polymorphisms and body mass index (BMI or birth weight with the risk of dyslipidemia in Iranian children and adolescents. Materials and Methods:This study was conducted as a sub-study of the “school-based nationwide health survey” (CASPIAN-III. We randomly selected 750 samples from the whole blood samples. Real-time PCR and high resolution melt (HRM analysis were performed to determine Taq1B (rs708272 and A373P (rs5880 polymorphisms. Results:Taq1B polymorphism increased HDL-C, and total cholesterol (TC as well as decreased triglyceride and LDL-C concentrations. LDL-C and triglyceride levels were significantly higher and HDL-C and TC levels were significantly lower among those with A373P polymorphism. CT/TT genotype in Taq1B polymorphism showed a protective effect on dyslipidemia (OR= 0.12, 95%CI: 0.07-0.20. G allele of A373P polymorphism increased the risk of dyslipidemia (OR=4.10, 95%CI: 2.14, 7.83 after adjusting the confounders. We observed interactive effects of CETP gene polymorphisms and BMI or birth weight on dyslipidemia. Conclusion:Findings showed Taq1B polymorphism might have a protective effect and A373P polymorphism had deleterious effect on dyslipidemia in Iranian children and adolescents. These associations interacted with BMI and birth weight.

  16. Relationship between the cholesterol ester transfer protein TaqIB polymorphism and the lipid-lowering effect of atorvastatin in patients with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Zhang, L; Xie, N Z; Deng, B; Lv, L X; Zheng, L Q

    2014-03-24

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) gene TaqIB polymorphism and the lipid-lowering effect of atorvastatin in patients with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease. Two hundred eighty-eight patients were divided into a control group, an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) group, and a stable coronary heart disease (CHD) group. Blood biochemical indices were determined using the enzyme method, and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis was performed to study the TaqIB polymorphism of the CETP gene. The ACS and stable CHD groups were treated with atorvastatin, and blood lipid levels were reexamined after three months. Plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and lipoprotein(a) were all significantly higher in the ACS and stable CHD groups compared to the control group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). After three months of treatment with atorvastatin, plasma levels of TC, LDL-C, triglycerides (TG) (only in patients with genotype B2B2), and lipoprotein(a) (only in patients with genotype B1B2) were all significantly decreased (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). After treatment, the plasma level of TG was lower in patients with genotype B2B2 compared to patients with genotypes B1B1 or B1B2 (B1 carriers) (P < 0.01). Therefore, the CETP TaqIB polymorphism is associated with the lipid-lowering effect of atorvastatin in patients with CHD.

  17. Phytosterol ester constituents affect micellar cholesterol solubility in model bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew W; Hang, Jiliang; Dussault, Patrick H; Carr, Timothy P

    2010-09-01

    Plant sterols and stanols (phytosterols) and their esters are nutraceuticals that lower LDL cholesterol, but the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. We hypothesized that intact esters and simulated hydrolysis products of esters (phytosterols and fatty acids in equal ratios) would differentially affect the solubility of cholesterol in model bile mixed micelles in vitro. Sodium salts of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were sonicated with phosphatidylcholine and either sterol esters or combinations of sterols and fatty acids to determine the amount of cholesterol solubilized into micelles. Intact sterol esters did not solubilize into micelles, nor did they alter cholesterol solubility. However, free sterols and fatty acids altered cholesterol solubility independently (no interaction effect). Equal contents of cholesterol and either campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol, or stigmastanol (sitostanol) decreased cholesterol solubility in micelles by approximately 50% compared to no phytosterol present, with stigmasterol performing slightly better than sitosterol. Phytosterols competed with cholesterol in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating a 1:1 M substitution of phytosterol for cholesterol in micelle preparations. Unsaturated fatty acids increased the micelle solubility of sterols as compared with saturated or no fatty acids. No differences were detected in the size of the model micelles. Together, these data indicate that stigmasterol combined with saturated fatty acids may be more effective at lowering cholesterol micelle solubility in vivo.

  18. The micromethod for determination of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters and phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okabe,Akinobu

    1974-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the method for determining microquantities of lipids, including cholesterol, cholesteryl esters and phospholipids. A standard colorimetric procedure of cholesteryl esters was modified to accommodate a quantitative thin-layer chromatography. This method involved the following steps. (1 Separation of lipids by a thin-layer chromatography: Lipids were applied to Silica gel G plates. Plates were developed with petroleum ether-diethyl etheracetic acid (82: 18: 2, vIvIv. (2 Elution of cholesterol and its esters from scraped silica gel: After scraping the silica gel with adhered cholesterol and its esters, they were eluted with chloroform-methanol (4: 1, v,tv. In the case of phspholipids, the silica gel was calcified. (3 Colorimetric determination of the lipids: Cholesterol and its esters eluted from the silica gel were determined by the method of ZAK with ROSENTHAL'S color reagent directly and after saponification, respectively. Phospholipids were calculated from the phosphorous content determined by the method of KATES. On the basis of examination of recovery and analyses of lipids extracted from tissue, it was concluded that this method permitted a reliable estimation of microquantities of cholesterol, its esters and phospholipids from small amounts of biological materials.

  19. Elevated plasma cholesteryl ester transfer in NIDDM : relationships with apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and phospholipid transfer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, S; van Tol, A; Sluiter, W; Dullaart, R

    1998-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesteryl acyl transferase (LCAT) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) are key factors in the esterification of cholesterol and the subsequent transfer of cholesteryl ester from high density lipoproteins (HDL) towards very low and low density lipoproteins (VLDL + LDL). Phospholip

  20. Phytosterol ester processing in the small intestine: impact on cholesterol availability for absorption and chylomicron cholesterol incorporation in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, Marie Josèphe; Knol, Diny; Cardinault, Nicolas; Nowicki, Marion; Bott, Romain; Antona, Claudine; Borel, Patrick; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Duchateau, Guus; Lairon, Denis

    2011-06-01

    Phytosterols (plant sterols and stanols) can lower intestinal cholesterol absorption, but the complex dynamics of the lipid digestion process in the presence of phytosterol esters (PEs) are not fully understood. We performed a clinical experiment in intubated healthy subjects to study the time course of changes in the distribution of all lipid moieties present in duodenal phases during 4 h of digestion of meals with 3.2 g PE (PE meal) or without (control meal) PE. In vitro experiments under simulated gastrointestinal conditions were also performed. The addition of PE did not alter triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis in the duodenum or subsequent chylomicron TG occurrence in the circulation. In contrast, cholesterol accumulation in the duodenum aqueous phase was markedly reduced in the presence of PE (-32%, P < 0.10). In vitro experiments confirmed that PE reduces cholesterol transfer into the aqueous phase. The addition of PE resulted in a markedly reduced presence of meal-derived hepta-deuterated cholesterol in the circulation, i.e., in chylomicrons (-43%, PE meal vs. control; P < 0.0001) and plasma (-54%, PE meal vs. control; P < 0.0001). The present data show that addition of PE to a meal does not alter TG hydrolysis but displaces cholesterol from the intestinal aqueous phase and lowers chylomicron cholesterol occurrence in humans.

  1. Relations Between Atherogenic Index of Plasma, Ratio of Small Dense Low Density Lipoprotein/Lecithin Cholesterol Acyl Transferase and Ratio of Small Dense Low Density Lipoprotein/Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein of Controlled and Uncontrolled Type 2 DM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis Susanti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with Diabetes Melitus are proven to be prone to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, especially type 2 Diabetes Melitus (T2DM patient who have higher risk and mortality for cardiovascular risk factor. The Dyslipidemia condition is very common in T2DM as one of the risk factors. Diabetic dyslipidemia is marked by the increased triglyceride (TG, low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C, and increased small dense LDL and apolipoprotein B. Therefore the aim of this study is to assess the differential and correlation between Atherogenic Index of Plasma (AIP, ratio of small dense low density lipoprotein (sdLDL/lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT and ratio of sdLDL/cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP of controlled and uncontrolled T2DM. METHODS: This study was observational with cross sectional design. In total of 72 patients with T2DM consist of 36 controlled and 36 uncontrolled, participated in this study. The serum TG, HDL-C, sdLDL, LCAT and CETP were examined in their relationship with to T2DM risk. RESULTS: The results of the study indicate that the AIP (p<0.001 increase controlled and uncontrolled T2DM and the ratio of sdLDL/CETP (p=0.004, odds ratio of AIP was 4 (95% CI: 1.501-10.658 and odds ratio of sdLDL/CETP ratio was 4 (95% CI: 1.501-10.658 in uncontrolled T2DM. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the AIP and ratio of small dense LDL/CETP had a significant correlation with the uncontrolled T2DM. The AIP and ratio of small dense LDL/CETP increase was found at the uncontrolled T2DM to be 4 times greater than the controlled T2DM. KEYWORDS: T2DM, atherosclerosis, atherogenic index of plasma, small dense LDL, LCAT, CETP, ratio of sdLDL/LCAT, ratio of sdLDL/CETP.

  2. The effect of dietary rape-seed oil on cholesterol-ester metabolism and cholesterol-ester-hydrolase activity in the rat adrenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, G J; Boyd, G S

    1975-05-06

    The effects of stock diet and stock diet supplemented by olive oil and rape seed on rat adrenal cholesterol ester metabolism have been studied. Rats fed rape seed oil failed to gain weight at the same rate as rats fed olive oil. A prominent feature of the rats fed rape seed oil was an accumulation of high concentrations of cholesterol erucate in the adrenal lipid droplets. When these rats were subjected to an ether stress no percentage decrease in the amount of cholesterol erucate was observed. Adrenal cholesterol ester hydrolase activity was higher in rats fed the olive oil and rape seed oil diets than rats fed the stock diet. In rats fed stock or olive oil diets, a ten-minute ether anaesthesia stress resulted in a two-fold increase in activity of adrenal cholesterol ester hydrolase. Cofactor addition of ATP, cyclic AMP and MgCl-2 in vitro resulted in a stimulation of cholesterol ester hydrolase to a similar activity in both quiescent and ether-stressed rats. By contrast rats fed the rape seed oil diet gave no significant stimulation of cholesterol ester hydrolase activity when given an ether stress or when cofactors were added in vitro. Cholesterol erucate was hydrolysed at only 25% to 30% of the rate of cholesterol oleate in vitro in all groups of animals. Oleic acid added in vitro gave an inhibition of cholesterol ester hydrolase activity in rats fed stock diet while erucic acid activated the enzyme. The accumulation of cholesterol erucate in the adrenal when rats are fed rape seed oil could be due to the reduced ability of cholesterol ester hydrolase to hydrolyse this ester.

  3. Effect of 6 dietary fatty acids on the postprandial lipid profile, plasma fatty acids, lipoprotein lipase, and cholesterol ester transfer activities in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T.; Sandstrøm, B.; Bysted, Anette;

    2001-01-01

    to the test-fat meals were observed for plasma lipoprotein triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations, plasma fatty acid concentrations, and lipoprotein lipase and CETP activities (diet x time interaction: 0.001 saturated fatty acids stearic and palmitic acids resulted...... in a relatively lower lipemic response than did intake of the unsaturated fatty acids, probably because the saturated fatty acids were absorbed less and at a lower rate; therefore, the lipemic response took longer to return to postabsorptive values. Conclusions: Fatty acid chain length and degree of saturation...

  4. A case of abdominal pain with dyslipidemia: difficulties diagnosing cholesterol ester storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, S J; Daimee, U; Block, R C

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol ester storage disease is an exceptionally rare dyslipidemia with less than 150 cases reported in the medical literature. The diagnosis of Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is often missed by virtue of the fact that the symptoms mimic both inborn metabolic defects and hepatic steatosis. Patients with Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease usually present with atypical complaints including abdominal pain from altered gut motility. Blood analysis typically reveals abnormal liver function tests with coincident dyslipidemia. We present a case of a young woman with Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease who was followed over two decades. We discuss issues common to her initial protracted diagnosis with management options over time.

  5. Reduced leucocyte cholesteryl ester transfer protein expression in acute coronary syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, D; Kraaijeveld, A O; Grauss, R W; Willems, S M; van Vark-van der Zee, L C; de Jager, S C A; Jauhiainen, M; Kuivenhoven, J A; Dallinga-Thie, G M; Atsma, D E; Hogendoorn, P C W; Biessen, E A L; Van Berkel, T J C; Jukema, J W; van Eck, M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) plays an important role in HDL cholesterol metabolism. Leucocytes, including monocyte-derived macrophages in the arterial wall synthesize and secrete CETP, but its role in atherosclerosis is unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate

  6. Stanol esters attenuate the aggravating effect of dietary cholesterol on atherosclerosis in homozygous Watanabe rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene; Husche, Constanze; Pilegaard, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Plant stanols are marketed as natural means to lower blood cholesterol in humans; hence the effect on combined familial hyperlipidemia is not known. The objective was to investigate the effect of stanol esters on blood lipids and aortic atherosclerosis in homozygous WHHL rabbits challenged...... with dietary cholesterol. A total of 36 rabbits, 6 weeks of age, with initial plasma cholesterol of 22.5 mmol/L were assigned to two treatment groups fed a standard rabbit chow with 1 g/kg cholesterol or this diet added 34 g/kg stanol ester, respectively, for 16 weeks. Plasma cholesterol was measured initially...... and at termination, also in lipoproteins. Aortic atherosclerosis was evaluated as cholesterol content and area covered by plaque. Plasma cholesterol was not significantly different between the groups at termination (35.7 mmol/L vs. 35.5 mmol/L). A significant increase in LDL was seen (13.1 mmol/L vs. 16.5 mmol...

  7. Higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol associated with moderate alcohol consumption is not related to altered plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; vanTol, A; Hoogenberg, K; vanGent, T; Scheek, LM; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    1997-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) are important factors involved in HDL metabolism. Altered plasma activity levels of these factors could play a role in the increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) choles

  8. Effects of oxidation on the hydrolysis by cholesterol esterase of sitosteryl esters as compared to a cholesteryl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien-David, Diane; Ennahar, Saïd; Miesch, Michel; Geoffroy, Philippe; Raul, Francis; Aoude-Werner, Dalal; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Marchioni, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Phytosteryl esters (PE) are used as ingredients in functional food to decrease plasma concentration of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). Effective impairment of cholesterol absorption by PE suggests that these esters are hydrolyzed by the pancreatic cholesterol esterase (CEase, EC 3.1.1.13) and the liberated sterol may interfere with cholesterol reducing its intestinal absorption. PE-enriched foods are marketed for cooking purposes, and temperature is one of the most important factors leading to the formation of oxidation products. Very little is known about the outcome of PE oxides during the digestive process. A new analytical method based on mass spectrometric detection directly after enzymatic reaction was developed to determine in vitro the activity of CEase on PE and their oxides present in functional food. Using this method, we identified a new inhibitor of CEase: sitosteryl 9,10-dihydroxystearate, which behaves as a non-competitive inhibitor of the hydrolysis of cholesteryl oleate and sitosteryl oleate.

  9. Mice lacking lipid droplet-associated hydrolase, a gene linked to human prostate cancer, have normal cholesterol ester metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kory, Nora; Grond, Susanne; Kamat, Siddhesh S

    2017-01-01

    , such as triacylglycerols and sterol esters, as precursors for membrane components and as reservoirs of metabolic energy. LDAH is reported to hydrolyze cholesterol esters and to be important in macrophage cholesterol ester metabolism. Here, we confirm that LDAH is localized to LDs in several model systems. We generated...... a murine model in which Ldah is disrupted but found no evidence for a major function of LDAH in cholesterol ester or triacylglycerol metabolism in vivo, nor a role in energy or glucose metabolism. Our data suggest that LDAH is not a major cholesterol ester hydrolase, and an alternative metabolic function...

  10. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with differential effects on plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein activities and concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, RPF; De Vries, R; Scheek, L; Borggreve, SE; Van Gent, T; Dallinga-Thie, GM; Ito, M; Nagano, M; Sluiter, WJ; Hattori, H; Van Tol, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Human plasma contains two lipid transfer proteins, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which are crucial in reverse cholesterol transport. Methods: Plasma CETP and PLTP activity levels and concentrations in 16 type 2 diabetic patients and 1

  11. Macrophage cholesterol homeostasis and metabolic diseases: critical role of cholesteryl ester mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shobha

    2011-03-01

    Atherogenic dyslipidemia, including low HDL levels, is the major contributor of residual risk of cardiovascular disease that remains even after aggressive statin therapy to reduce LDL-cholesterol. Currently, distinction is not made between HDL-cholesterol and HDL, which is a lipoprotein consisting of several proteins and a core containing cholesteryl esters (CEs). The importance of assessing HDL functionality, specifically its role in facilitating cholesterol efflux from foam cells, is relevant to atherogenesis. Since HDLs can only remove unesterified cholesterol from macrophages while cholesterol is stored as CEs within foam cells, intracellular CE hydrolysis by CE hydrolase is vital. Reduction in macrophage lipid burden not only attenuates atherosclerosis but also reduces inflammation and linked pathologies such as Type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Targeting reduction in macrophage CE levels and focusing on enhancing cholesterol flux from peripheral tissues to liver for final elimination is proposed.

  12. Transfer of cholesterol from macrophages to lymphocytes in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bittencourt Júnior, P I; Curi, R

    1998-02-01

    A major feature of macrophage metabolism is its capacity to produce and export cholesterol. Several reports have shown that the manipulation of lymphocyte cholesterol content elicits important changes in lymphocyte proliferation. These findings lead to an inquiry as to whether macrophage-derived cholesterol released into the lymphocyte surroundings may be transferred to the latter thus affecting lymphocyte function. In this study, cholesterol transfer from macrophages to lymphocytes was examined in vitro using rat cells in culture. The findings indicate that there may be a significant transfer of cholesterol from [4-14C]cholesterol labeled resident peritoneal macrophages to mesenteric lymph node resting lymphocytes (up to 173.9 +/- 2.7 pmol/10(7) lymphocytes/10(7) macrophages when co-cultivated for 48 h), in a lipoprotein-dependent manner. This represents the mass transfer of ca. 17 nmoles of cholesterol molecules per 10(7) lymphocytes from 10(7) macrophages (calculated on the basis of specific radioactivity incorporated into macrophages after the pre-labelling period), which suggests that macrophages are capable of replacing the whole lymphocyte cholesterol pool every 21 h. Moreover, an 111%-increase in the total cholesterol content of lymphocytes was found after co-cultivation with macrophages for 48 h. When compared to peritoneal cells, monocytes/macrophages obtained from circulating blood leukocytes presented a much higher cholesterol transfer capacity to lymphocytes (3.06 +/- 0.10 nmol/10(7) lymphocytes/10(7) macrophages co-cultivated for 24 h). Interestingly, inflammatory macrophages dramatically reduced their cholesterol transfer ability (by up to 91%, as compared to resident macrophages). Cholesterol transfer may involve a humoral influence, since it is not only observed when cells are co-cultivated in a single-well chamber system (cells in direct contact), but also in a two-compartment system (where cells can communicate but not by direct contact). Co

  13. Xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone from Humulus lupulus L., inhibits cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Takazumi, Koji; Segawa, Shuichi; Okada, Yukio; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2012-10-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are correlated with a low risk of atherosclerosis. The inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which catalyses cholesterol transfer between lipoproteins, leads to an increase in HDL-cholesterol and is expected to be the next anti-atherogenic target. This study revealed that xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone, showed the highest inhibition against CETP from screening of natural products in various plants. We investigated the inhibitory activity of some chalcones and flavanones. Naringenin chalcone showed weak CETP inhibition compared with xanthohumol. In addition, isoxanthohumol and naringenin drastically decreased the inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the prenyl group and chalcone structure of xanthohumol were responsible for the CETP inhibitory activity.

  14. Separating the Mechanism-Based and Off-Target Actions of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Inhibitors With CETP Gene Polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sofat, Reecha; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Smeeth, Liam; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Cooper, Jackie; Shah, Tina; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Ricketts, Sally L.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Wareham, Nicholas; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van der Harst, Pim; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Navis, Gerjan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gilst, Wiek H.; Thompson, John F.; McCaskie, Pamela; Palmer, Lyle J.; Arca, Marcello; Quagliarini, Fabiana; Gaudio, Carlo; Cambien, Francois; Nicaud, Viviane; Poirer, Odette; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Isaacs, Aaron; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Pencina, Michael; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Ordovas, Jose; Li, Tricia Y.; Kakko, Sakari; Kauma, Heikki; Savolainen, Markku J.; Kesaniemi, Y. Antero; Sandhofer, Anton; Paulweber, Bernhard; Sorli, Jose V.; Goto, Akimoto; Yokoyama, Shinji; Okumura, Kenji; Horne, Benjamin D.; Packard, Chris; Freeman, Dilys; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; McCormack, Valerie; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ebrahim, Shah; Smith, George Davey; Kastelein, John J. P.; Deanfield, John; Casas, Juan P.

    2010-01-01

    Background-Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the hypertensive

  15. Separating the mechanism-based and off-target actions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors with CETP gene polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Sofat (Reecha); A. Hingorani (Aroon); L. Smeeth (Liam); S.E. Humphries (Steve); P.J. Talmud; J. Cooper (Jim); T. Shah (Tina); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); S.L. Ricketts (Sally); S.M. Boekholdt (Matthijs); N.J. Wareham (Nick); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); M. Kumari (Meena); M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Marmot (Michael); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); P. van der Harst (Pim); R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin); G. Navis (Gerjan); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); J.F. Thompson (John); P. McCaskie (Pamela); C. Palmer (Cameron); M. Arca (Marcello); F. Quagliarini (Fabiana); C. Gaudio (Carlo); F. Cambien (François); V. Nicaud; O. Poirer (Odette); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); M. Pencina (Michael); R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); R.B. D'Agostino (Ralph); J.M. Ordovas (Jose); T.Y. Li (Tricia); S. Kakko (Sakari); H. Kauma (Heikki); M.J. Savolainen (Markku); Y.A. Kesäniemi (Antero); A. Sandhofer (Anton); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); J.V. Sorli (Jose); A. Goto (Akimoto); S. Yokoyama (Shinji); K. Okumura (Kenji); B.D. Horne (Benjamin); C. Packard (Chris); D. Freeman (Dilys); I. Ford (Ian); N. Sattar (Naveed); V. McCormack (Valerie); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); G.D. Smith; J.J.P. Kastelein (John); J. Deanfield (John); J.P. Casas (Juan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the

  16. Atorvastatin affects low density lipoprotein and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol relations with apolipoprotein B in type 2 diabetes mellitus : modification by triglycerides and cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappelle, Paul J.W.H.; Zwang, Louwerens; Huisman, Menno V.; Banga, Jan Dirk; Sluiter, Wim. J.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Non-HDL-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo) B are proposed as treatment targets. The extent to which statin therapy affects relationships of LDL-C and non-HDL-C with apoB was examined in type 2 diabetes. Methods: Analyses were performed in 217 hypertriglyceridaemic type 2 di

  17. Atorvastatin affects low density lipoprotein and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol relations with apolipoprotein B in type 2 diabetes mellitus: modification by triglycerides and cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.W.H. Kappelle; L. Zwang; M.V. Huisman; J.D. Banga; W.J. Sluiter; G.M. Dallinga-Thie; R.P.F. Dullaart

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Non-HDL-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo) B are proposed as treatment targets. The extent to which statin therapy affects relationships of LDL-C and non-HDL-C with apoB was examined in type 2 diabetes. Methods: Analyses were performed in 217 hypertriglyceridaemic type 2 di

  18. An activation-collision mechanism for cholesterol transfer between membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, T L; Kezdy, F J; Lange, Y

    1988-09-15

    We report the results of experiments which show that cholesterol transfer between membranes cannot proceed by aqueous diffusion, as widely held, but must involve a more complex mechanism. (a) The rate of transfer of [3H]cholesterol from red blood cells was found to vary inversely with the size of the acceptor particle (ghosts, vesicles of ghosts, liposomes, and plasma lipoproteins). (b) The transfer of [3H]cholesterol from red blood cells to ghosts was accelerated by the presence of plasma, even though the plasma competed with the ghosts as an acceptor. (c) The rate of transfer of [3H]cholesterol from red blood cells to ghosts decreased to zero with increasing dilution but was not simply second-order. (d) The cholesterol in retinal rod disc membranes is not at equilibrium with plasma lipoproteins in that disc cholesterol increased when the homogenates were incubated in vitro with plasma. (e) The kinetics of cholesterol transfer cannot be limited by unstirred layer effects since the transfer of lysolecithin in the same system was faster than that of cholesterol by 3 orders of magnitude. The simplest model compatible with all the data suggests a two-step pathway involving a first-order followed by a second-order process. The first step could be a unimolecular activation event, perhaps the movement of the sterol in the donor particle to a more exposed (hydrated) position. In the second step, the activated sterol would be transferred during transient collisions between donor and acceptor particles. When collision is not rate-limiting, the overall process would appear to be simply first-order, hence kinetically indistinguishable from the aqueous diffusion mechanism. The activation-collision model thus not only rationalizes our data but is also consistent with the simpler kinetics previously reported for the transfer of both membrane phospholipids and sterols.

  19. Structure of N-Terminal Domain of NPC1 Reveals Distinct Subdomains for Binding and Transfer of Cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Wang, Michael L.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Infante, Rodney E.; (UTSMC)

    2010-09-21

    LDL delivers cholesterol to lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Exit of cholesterol from lysosomes requires two proteins, membrane-bound Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) and soluble NPC2. NPC2 binds cholesterol with its isooctyl side chain buried and its 3{beta}-hydroxyl exposed. Here, we describe high-resolution structures of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1 and complexes with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. NPC1(NTD) binds cholesterol in an orientation opposite to NPC2: 3{beta}-hydroxyl buried and isooctyl side chain exposed. Cholesterol transfer from NPC2 to NPC1(NTD) requires reorientation of a helical subdomain in NPC1(NTD), enlarging the opening for cholesterol entry. NPC1 with point mutations in this subdomain (distinct from the binding subdomain) cannot accept cholesterol from NPC2 and cannot restore cholesterol exit from lysosomes in NPC1-deficient cells. We propose a working model wherein after lysosomal hydrolysis of LDL-cholesteryl esters, cholesterol binds NPC2, which transfers it to NPC1(NTD), reversing its orientation and allowing insertion of its isooctyl side chain into the outer lysosomal membranes.

  20. Self-assembled monolayers of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters on graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi

    2014-06-17

    The molecular arrangements of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of cholesterol, cholesteryl laurate, and cholesteryl stearate adsorbed on a graphite surface were studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the liquid-solid interface. The STM images of the SAMs showed two-dimensional periodic arrays of bright regions that corresponded to the sterol rings. However, individual sterol rings could not be observed in the bright regions in the STM images of the cholesterol monolayers. Nevertheless, by comparing the STM images and the crystallographic data, it is concluded that the cholesterol molecules are arranged in pairs oriented head-to-head owing to the hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyl groups. These dimers, in turn, are oriented parallel to each other, owing to the interactions between the sterol rings. The STM images of cholesteryl ester monolayers had molecular resolution and showed pairs of cholesteryl ester molecules oriented in an antiparallel manner, with their fatty acid chains located in the central regions. Furthermore, the fatty acid chains of cholesteryl stearate were observed to be oriented in the (1120) zigzag direction of the graphite lattice, whereas those of cholesteryl laurate were oriented in the (1010) armchair direction. These observations reveal that the interactions between the fatty acid chains affect the structure of the SAMs. The molecular arrangements also depend on the lengths of the fatty acid chains of the cholesterol esters and hence on the interactions between the alkyl chains and the graphite surface. The self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface is therefore controlled by the interactions between sterol rings, between alkyl chains, and between alkyl chains and the substrate.

  1. Uptake of dexamethasone incorporated into liposomes by macrophages and foam cells and its inhibitory effect on cellular cholesterol ester accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-09-01

    To confirm the efficacy of dexamethasone incorporated into liposomes in the treatment of atherosclerosis, the uptake of dexamethasone-liposomes by macrophages and foam cells and its inhibitory effect on cellular cholesterol ester accumulation in these cells were investigated in-vitro. Dexamethasone-liposomes were prepared with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and dicetylphosphate in a lipid molar ratio of 7/2/1 by the hydration method. This was adjusted to three different particle sizes to clarify the influence of particle size on the uptake by the macrophages and foam cells, and the inhibitory effect on cellular cholesterol ester accumulation. The distribution of particle sizes of dexamethasone-liposomes were 518.7+/-49.5 nm (L500), 202.2+/-23.1 nm (L200), and 68.6+/-6.5 nm (L70), respectively. For each size, dexamethasone concentration and dexamethasone/lipid molar ratio in dexamethasone-liposome suspension were 1 mg dexamethasone mL-1 and 0.134 mol dexamethasone mol-1 total lipids, respectively. The zeta potential was approximately -70 mV for all sizes. Dexamethasone-liposomes or free dexamethasone were added to the macrophages in the presence of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and foam cells, and then incubated at 37 degrees C. The uptake amount of dexamethasone by the macrophages and foam cells after a 24-h incubation was L500>L200>free dexamethasone>L70. The macrophages in the presence of oxLDL and foam cells were incubated with dexamethasone-liposomes or free dexamethasone for 24 h at 37 degrees C to evaluate the inhibitory effect on the cellular cholesterol ester accumulation. The cellular cholesterol ester level in the macrophages treated with oxLDL was significantly increased compared with that in macrophages without additives. L500, L200 and free dexamethasone significantly inhibited this cholesterol ester accumulation. L500, L200 and free dexamethasone also significantly reduced cellular cholesterol ester accumulation in foam cells. In

  2. Efficacy and safety of a novel cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor, JTT-705, in humans : a randomized phase II dose-response study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grooth, Greetje J.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Stalenhoef, Anton F.H.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Posma, Jan L.; van Tol, Arie; Kastelein, John J.P.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of neutral lipids between lipoproteins. High plasma levels of CETP are correlated with low HDL cholesterol levels, a strong risk factor for coronary artery disease. In earlier studies, JTT-705, a novel CETP inhibitor, was sh

  3. Serum Cholesterol Reduction Efficacy of Biscuits with Added Plant Stanol Ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wantanee Kriengsinyos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study’s aim was to test the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol- (LDL-c- lowering efficacy of biscuits containing 2 g of plant stanols, which corresponded to 3.4 g of plant stanol esters. The biscuit is a new food format that can be consumed as a snack. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel design study, 119 mildly to moderately hypercholesterolemic volunteers were randomized to plant stanol or control groups. Subjects were comparable in age, gender, lipid profiles, and body mass index. They consumed a control biscuit once a day for a two-week period, followed by a four-week intervention period that either had a plant stanol ester biscuit or a control. During the habitual diet, one biscuit per day was consumed at any time that subjects wished. Serum lipid profiles were measured at the first day of run-in, at baseline, and at the study’s end. Compared to the control, the total cholesterol (TC, LDL-c, and the LDL-to-high-density lipoprotein (LDL/HDL ratio had serum reductions of 4.9%, 6.1%, and 4.3%, respectively, and were observed after 4 weeks of biscuit consumption with added plant stanols (P < 0.05. A significantly higher reduction in LDL-c (8.9% and LDL/HDL ratio (11.4% was measured in those taking a plant stanol biscuit with a meal compared to those who consumed a plant stanol biscuit without other food. In conclusion, incorporating plant stanols into a biscuit is an attractive, convenient, and acceptable way to modestly lower elevated cholesterol concentrations. For optimal efficacy, biscuits should be consumed with a meal as part of a healthy diet.

  4. Lipoprotein composition and serum cholesterol ester fatty acids in nonwesternized Melanesians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeberg, S; Nilsson-Ehle, P; Vessby, B

    1996-02-01

    In this study, the relationships between dietary fat [as measured by serum cholesterol ester fatty acids (CE-FA)], age, smoking, body mass index, and serum lipids were analyzed in 151 subsistence horticulturalists, aged 20-86 yr, from Kitava, Trobriand Islands, Papua New Guinea. Their diet consists of tubers, fruit, coconut, fish, and vegetables with a negligible influence of western food and alcohol. Total fat intake is low [21% of energy (en%)], while saturated fat intake from coconuts is high (17 en%, mainly lauric and myristic acid). In multivariate analysis, 11-43% of the variation of the serum lipoprotein composition was explained by CE-FA, age, and smoking habits. The proportion of CE20:5n-3 explained much of the variation of triglycerides (TG, negative relation) and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, positive) in both sexes and serum apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1, positive) in the males. CE16:0 was positively related to TG and negatively related to HDL-C and ApoA1 in both sexes, and in males it related negatively to total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). In males, negative relationships were present between CE18:2n-6 and TC and between CE14:0 and serum lipoprotein(a). Smoking was independently associated with lower ApoA1 in both sexes and with lower HDL-C and higher TG, TC, LDL-C, and apolipoprotein B in males. In conclusion, marine n-3 fatty acids and linoleic acid showed the same potentially beneficial relationships with lipoproteins and apolipoproteins as in western populations. The relations of palmitic acid to serum lipids may be explained in terms of endogenous fat synthesis at a low-fat intake, rather than reflecting its relative intake.

  5. Accumulation of Cholesterol Esters in ex vivo Lymphocytes from Scrapie-susceptible Sheep and in Scrapie-infected Mouse Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Our studies on the role of cholesterol homeostasis in the pathogenesis of scrapie in sheep, revealed abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters in brains and in ex vivo skin fibroblasts from genetically scrapie-susceptible, as compared to sheep with resistant genotype. We now report that PBMCs isolated from scrapie-susceptible sheep, as well as mouse neuroblastoma cell lines persistently infected with two different mouse-adapted strains of scrapie, showed similar alterations with up to 3-fold higher cholesterol ester levels than their resistant or uninfected counterparts. Treatments with drugs that interfere with intracellular cholesterol metabolism strongly reduced accumulation of cholesterol esters in scrapie-infected cell lines, whereas had significantly lower, or no effect, in uninfected cell line. These data add support to our hypothesis that accumulation of cholesterol esters may represent a biological marker of susceptibility to prion infection and a potential molecular target for prion inhibitors.

  6. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Äijänen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Transferable force field for carboxylate esters: application to fatty acid methylic ester phase equilibria prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Nicolas; Lachet, Véronique; Boutin, Anne

    2012-03-15

    In this work, a new transferable united-atoms force field for carboxylate esters is proposed. All Lennard-Jones parameters are reused from previous parametrizations of the AUA4 force field, and only a unique set of partial electrostatic charges is introduced for the ester chemical function. Various short alkyl-chain esters (methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, methyl propionate, ethyl propionate) and two fatty acid methylic esters (methyl oleate and methyl palmitate) are studied. Using this new force field in Monte Carlo simulations, we show that various pure compound properties are accurately predicted: saturated liquid densities, vapor pressures, vaporization enthalpies, critical properties, liquid-vapor surface tensions. Furthermore, a good accuracy is also obtained in the prediction of binary mixture pressure-composition diagrams, without introducing empirical binary interaction parameters. This highlights the transferability of the proposed force field and gives the opportunity to simulate mixtures of industrial interest: a demonstration is performed through the simulation of the methyl oleate + methanol mixture involved in the purification sections of biodiesel production processes.

  8. Intermolecular and intramolecular electron transfer from eosin ester to viologen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丰雷; 张曼华; 沈涛

    1996-01-01

    The covalently -(CH2)10- linked eosin-butylviologen compound has been synthesized. The photoinduced electron transfer of eosin ester and butylviologen as well as the influence of addition of cyclodextrin or amylose into the solution of linked compound on the system have been studied by the absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime. The results indicated that the intramolecular electron transfer is much more efficient than the intermolecular one. Due to the formation of inclusion complex, the process of intramolecular electron transfer was changed after adding cydodextrin or amylose.

  9. TaqI B1/B2 and -629A/C cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP gene polymorphisms and their association with CETP activity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in a Tehranian population. Part of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam S Daneshpour

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP gene TaqI intron 1 B1/B2 polymorphism and the -629A/C CETP promoter polymorphism in respect to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C in a healthy Iranian population taken from the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS. The relationship between CETP activity and HDL-C level was also determined along with body mass index, blood pressure and tobacco smoking status. PCR-RFLP used to amplify a segment of the CETP intron 1 TaqI (B2/B1 polymorphism from 1021 individuals and we selected 345 individuals from the lowest, middle and highest HDL-C deciles and investigated the -629A/C polymorphism. We also evaluated the CETP activity of 103 of these individuals, each with at least one homozygous allele. The presence of the TaqI B2 and -629A/C A alleles were significantly associated with increased HDL-C levels (B2B2 = 1.19 ± 0.31 mmolL-1 vs. B1B1 = 1.01 ± 0.2 mmol L-1 for p < 0.001; AA = 1.15 ± 0.41 mmol L-1 vs. CC = 0.95 ± 0.28 mmol L-1 for p < 0.001 and decreased the CETP activity (B1B1 = 67.8 ± 8.9 pmol L-1 vs. B2B2 = 62.6 ± 9.6 pmol L-1 for p < 0.01; CC = 68.6 ± 8.4 pmol L-1 vs. AA = 62.7 ± 9.7 pmol L-1 for p < 0.002. The frequencies were 0.382 for the TaqI B2 allele and 0.462 for the -629A/C A allele, with linkage disequilibrium analysis giving D = 0.0965 and D' = 0.4695. We demonstrated that the TaqI B1 and B2 alleles and the -629A/C A and C alleles were in linkage disequilibrium in our population and that there was a significant association between the B2 and A alleles and high HDL-C levels and low CETP activity. Linkage disequilibrium between the TaqI A and B2 alleles also detected.

  10. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Gas chromatographic separation of fatty acid esters of cholesterol and phytosterols on an ionic liquid capillary column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2015-12-15

    Steryl esters are high molecular weight compounds (600-700g/mol) regularly present as a minor lipid class in animal and plant lipids. Different sterol backbones (e.g., cholesterol, β-sitosterol and brassicasterol) which can be esterified with various fatty acids can result in highly complex steryl ester patterns in food samples. The gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of intact steryl esters is challenging, since high elution temperatures are required for their elution. On nonpolar GC phases, steryl esters with fatty acids with differing degree of unsaturation (e.g., oleate and linoleate) cannot be separated and there are only few polar columns available with sufficient temperature stability. In this study, we used gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and analyzed intact steryl esters on a commercial room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) column which was shortened to a length of 12m. The column separated the steryl esters both by total carbon number and by degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. For instance, cholesteryl esters with stearic acid (18:0), oleic acid (18:1n-9), linoleic acid (18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) could be resolved (R≥1.3) from each other. By analysis of synthesized standard substances, the elution orders for different steryl backbones and different fatty acids on a given sterol backbone could be determined. Analysis of spreads and plant oils allowed to determine retention times for 37 steryl esters, although a few co-elutions were observed. The ionic liquid column proved to be well-suited for the analysis of intact steryl esters.

  12. Enzymatic hydrolysis of structurally diverse phthalic acid esters by porcine and bovine pancreatic cholesterol esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takao; Hong, Peng; Tanabe, Rima; Nagai, Kazuo; Kato, Katsuya

    2010-12-01

    A weak hydrolyzing activity against bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was discovered in a commercial crude lipase (EC 3.1.1.3) preparation from porcine pancreas. DEHP was hydrolyzed to mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) not by a pancreatic lipase but by a cholesterol esterase (CEase, EC 3.1.1.13), a trace contaminant in the crude lipase preparation. Enzymatic hydrolysis of phthalic acid esters (PAEs), suspected to be endocrine-disrupting chemicals, was investigated using CEases from two species of mammals and a microorganism. Eight structurally diverse PAEs, namely diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-propyl phthalate (DPrP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), di-n-pentyl phthalate (DPeP), di-n-hexyl phthalate (DHP), DEHP, n-butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), and dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP), were hydrolyzed to their corresponding monoesters by both porcine and bovine pancreatic CEases, while a microbial CEase from Pseudomonas sp. had no hydrolyzing activity against these PAEs. The hydrolysis experiments with bovine pancreatic CEase (50 U) indicated complete hydrolysis of every PAE (5 μmole) except for BBP and DCHP within 15 min; BBP and DCHP were hydrolyzed within 30 min and 6h, respectively. The rates of PAE hydrolysis could be affected by the bulkiness of alkyl side chains in the PAEs. This study provides important evidence that mammalian pancreatic CEases, such as those from porcine and bovine sources, are potential enzymes for nonspecific degradation of structurally diverse PAEs.

  13. Oxidized Cholesteryl Esters and Phospholipids in Zebrafish Larvae Fed a High Cholesterol Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Longhou; Harkewicz, Richard; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Wiesner, Philipp; Choi, Soo-Ho; Almazan, Felicidad; Pattison, Jennifer; Deer, Elena; Sayaphupha, Tiffany; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miller, Yury I.

    2010-01-01

    A novel hypercholesterolemic zebrafish model has been developed to study early events of atherogenesis. This model utilizes optically transparent zebrafish larvae, fed a high cholesterol diet (HCD), to monitor processes of vascular inflammation in live animals. Because lipoprotein oxidation is an important factor in the development of atherosclerosis, in this study, we characterized the oxidized lipid milieu in HCD-fed zebrafish larvae. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we show that feeding an HCD for only 2 weeks resulted in up to 70-fold increases in specific oxidized cholesteryl esters, identical to those present in human minimally oxidized LDL and in murine atherosclerotic lesions. The levels of oxidized phospholipids, such as 1-palmitoyl-2-oxovaleroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and of various lysophosphatidylcholines were also significantly elevated. Moreover, lipoproteins isolated from homogenates of HCD-fed larvae induced cell spreading as well as ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK phosphorylation in murine macrophages. Removal of apoB-containing lipoproteins from the zebrafish homogenates with an anti-human LDL antibody, as well as reducing lipid hydroperoxides with ebselen, resulted in inhibition of macrophage activation. The TLR4 deficiency in murine macrophages prevented their activation with zebrafish lipoproteins. Using biotinylated homogenates of HCD-fed larvae, we demonstrated that their components bound to murine macrophages, and this binding was effectively competed by minimally oxidized LDL but not by native LDL. These data provide evidence that molecular lipid determinants of proatherogenic macrophage phenotypes are present in large quantities in hypercholesterolemic zebrafish larvae and support the use of the HCD-fed zebrafish as a valuable model to study early events of atherogenesis. PMID:20710028

  14. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  15. Polyoxygenated cholesterol ester hydroperoxide activates TLR4 and SYK dependent signaling in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Ho Choi

    Full Text Available Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis.

  16. Cholesteryl ester transfer-protein modulator and inhibitors and their potential for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkai H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hisashi ShinkaiCentral Pharmaceutical Research Institute, JT Inc, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol and lowered high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, raising HDL cholesterol induced by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibition is an attractive approach for reducing the residual risk of cardiovascular events that persist in many patients receiving low-density LDL cholesterol-lowering therapy with statins. The development of torcetrapib, a CETP inhibitor, was terminated due to its adverse cardiovascular effects. These adverse effects did not influence the mechanism of CETP inhibition, but affected the molecule itself. Therefore a CETP modulator, dalcetrapib, and a CETP inhibitor, anacetrapib, are in Phase III of clinical trials to evaluate their effects on cardiovascular outcomes. In the dal-VESSEL (dalcetrapib Phase IIb endothelial function study and the dal-PLAQUE (safety and efficacy of dalcetrapib on atherosclerotic disease using novel non-invasive multimodality imaging clinical studies, dalcetrapib reduced CETP activity by 50% and increased HDL cholesterol levels by 31% without changing LDL cholesterol levels. Moreover, dalcetrapib was associated with a reduction in carotid vessel-wall inflammation at 6 months, as well as a reduced vessel-wall area at 24 months compared with the placebo. In the DEFINE (determining the efficacy and tolerability of CETP inhibition with anacetrapib clinical study, anacetrapib increased HDL cholesterol levels by 138% and decreased LDL cholesterol levels by 36%. In contrast with torcetrapib, anacetrapib had no adverse cardiovascular effects. The potential of dalcetrapib and anacetrapib in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases will be revealed by two large-scale clinical trials, the dal-OUTCOMES (efficacy and safety of dalcetrapib in patients with recent acute coronary syndrome study and the

  17. Cloning and characterization of cholesteryl ester transfer protein isolated from the tree shrew

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾武威; 张坚; 陈保生; 吴钢; 薛红

    2003-01-01

    ObjectiveTo obtain the nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence of cholesterylester transfer protein (CETP) cDNA from the tree shrew (Tupaia glis). MethodsThe cDNA sequence of the tree shrew CETP was obtained by utilizing the techniqueof switching mechanism at 5' end of RNA transcript (SMART) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) from the first strand of the cDNA. The amino acidsequence of CETP was deduced from the cDNA sequence and its primary and secondary structures were predicted. ResultsThe sequence of CETP cDNA from tree shrew (GenBank accession number AF334033) covers 1636 bp, including 178 bp at the 3' end of the untranslated region anda 1458 bp fragment in a coding region, which provides the complete sequence of mature tree shrew CETP, although not the initiator methionine. The first 24 bp encodes a partial signal peptide. The mature protein consists of 477 amino acids and is longer than the human version by one amino acid (Gly318). Comparing this amino acid sequence with those of other animals' CETPs, the identity between tree shrew and human and rabbit CETP is 88% and 82%, respectively. The protein is extremely hydrophobic as it contains many hydrophobic residues, especially at the C-terminal, consistent with its function in the transfer of neutral lipids. The amino acid residues concerning with binding and transferringneutral lipids are highly conserved. There is a deletion of an N-linked glycosylation site at Asn342 in the tree shrew CETP protein that may participate in the removal of peripheral cholesterol and cholesteryl ester by increasing its activity of transferring cholesteryl ester. ConclusionThe possible glycosylation in the tree shrew CETP may be involved in the molecular mechanism of its insusceptibility to atherosclerosis.

  18. Increased large VLDL particles confer elevated cholesteryl ester transfer in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, Robin P. F.; de Vries, Rindert; Kwakernaak, Arjan J.; Perton, Frank; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundPlasma cholesteryl ester transfer (CET), reflecting transfer of cholesteryl esters from high density lipoproteins (HDL) towards apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, may promote atherosclerosis development, and is elevated in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We determined the extent to

  19. Hepatic expression of inflammatory genes and microRNAs in pigs with high “cholesteryl ester transfer protein” (CETP) activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera, Susanna; Tørsleff, Benedicte C Juul; Ritz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    with obesity; e.g., low levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) are high risk factors of cardiovascular events. A number of genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors have been shown to contribute to the lowering of HDL-cholesterol. One of these factors is cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP......) promoting the redistribution of cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and phospholipids between plasma proteins. Moreover, obesity and ORD are often linked with chronic low-grade inflammation leading to insulin resistance and endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to detect...

  20. Rice bran oil and oryzanol reduce plasma lipid and lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and aortic cholesterol ester accumulation to a greater extent than ferulic acid in hypercholesterolemic hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas A; Nicolosi, Robert J; Woolfrey, Benjamin; Kritchevsky, David

    2007-02-01

    plasma triglyceride concentrations compared to the control (-53% and -65%, respectively) and ferulic acid (-47% and -60%, respectively) diets. Hamsters fed the control and ferulic acid diets had significantly higher plasma vitamin E concentrations compared to the RBO (201% and 161%, respectively) and oryzanol (548% and 462%, respectively) diets; the ferulic acid and oryzanol diets had significantly lower plasma lipid hydroperoxide levels than the control (-57% and -46%, respectively) diet. The oryzanol-fed hamsters excreted significantly more coprostenol and cholesterol in their feces than the ferulic acid (127% and 120%, respectively) diet. The control diet had significantly greater aortic TC and FC accumulation compared to the RBO (115% and 89%, respectively), ferulic acid (48% and 58%, respectively) and the oryzanol (74% and 70%, respectively) diets. However, only the RBO and oryzanol diets had significantly lower aortic cholesterol ester accumulation compared to the control (-73% and -46%, respectively) diet. The present study suggests that at equal dietary levels, oryzanol has a greater effect on lowering plasma non-HDL-C levels and raising plasma HDL-C than ferulic acid, possibly through a greater extent to increase fecal excretion of cholesterol and its metabolites. However, ferulic acid may have a greater antioxidant capacity via its ability to maintain serum vitamin E levels compared to RBO and oryzanol. Thus, both oryzanol and ferulic acid may exert similar antiatherogenic properties, but through different mechanisms.

  1. THE ACTIVITY OF CHOLESTERYL ESTER TRANSFER PROTEIN IS DECREASED IN HYPOTHYROIDISM - A POSSIBLE CONTRIBUTION TO ALTERATIONS IN HIGH-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; HOOGENBERG, K; GROENER, JEM; DIKKESCHEI, LD; ERKELENS, DW; DOORENBOS, H

    1990-01-01

    The activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein is instrumental in the distribution of cholesteryl ester between lipoproteins in plasma. We measured the activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein in plasma, designated cholesteryl ester transfer activity, as the rate of cholesteryl ester trans

  2. Toward Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Directed Peptide Translation Using Ester Based Aminoacyl Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singhal, Abhishek; Bagnacani, Valentina; Corradini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    intermolecular aminoacyl transfer using simple ester aminolysis chemistry primitively analogous to the ribosomal peptidyl transferase reaction in the absence of anchimeric assistance from ribose and ribosome catalysis. These results help define the minimum chemical boundary conditions for the translation process...

  3. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oninla, Vincent O; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-12-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747-1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion.

  4. Low-Fat Nondairy Minidrink Containing Plant Stanol Ester Effectively Reduces LDL Cholesterol in Subjects with Mild to Moderate Hypercholesterolemia as Part of a Western Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarit Hallikainen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cholesterol-lowering efficacy of plant stanol ester (STAEST added to fat- or milk-based products is well documented. However, their efficacy when added to nondairy liquid drinks is less certain. Therefore, we have investigated the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of STAEST added to a soymilk-based minidrink in the hypercholesterolemic subjects. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study, the intervention group (n=27 consumed 2.7 g/d of plant stanols as the ester in soymilk-based minidrink (65 mL/d with the control group (n=29 receiving the same drink without added plant stanols once a day with a meal for 4 weeks. Serum total, LDL, and non-HDL cholesterol concentrations were reduced by 8.0, 11.1, and 10.2% compared with controls (P<0.05 for all. Serum plant sterol concentrations and their ratios to cholesterol declined by 12–25% from baseline in the STAEST group while the ratio of campesterol to cholesterol was increased by 10% in the controls (P<0.05 for all. Serum precursors of cholesterol remained unchanged in both groups. In conclusion, STAEST-containing soymilk-based low-fat minidrink consumed once a day with a meal lowered LDL and non-HDL cholesterol concentrations without evoking any side effects in subjects consuming normal Western diet. The clinical trial registration number is NCT01716390.

  5. Cholesterol oxides inhibit cholesterol esterification by lecithin: cholesterol acyl transferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder de Carvalho Pincinato

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxides are atherogenic and can affect the activity of diverse important enzymes for the lipidic metabolism. The effect of 7β-hydroxycholesterol, 7-ketocholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol, cholestan-3β,5α,6β-triol,5,6β-epoxycholesterol, 5,6α-epoxycholesterol and 7α-hydroxycholesterol on esterification of cholesterol by lecithin:cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT, EC 2.3.1.43 and the transfer of esters of cholesterol oxides from high density lipoprotein (HDL to low density lipoproteins (LDL and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP was investigated. HDL enriched with increasing concentrations of cholesterol oxides was incubated with fresh plasma as source of LCAT. Cholesterol and cholesterol oxides esterification was followed by measuring the consumption of respective free sterol and oxysterols. Measurements of cholesterol and cholesterol oxides were done by gas-chromatography. 14C-cholesterol oxides were incorporated into HDL2 and HDL3 subfractions and then incubated with fresh plasma containing LCAT and CETP. The transfer of cholesterol oxide esters was followed by measuring the 14C-cholesterol oxide-derived esters transferred to LDL and VLDL. All the cholesterol oxides studied were esterified by LCAT after incorporation into HDL particles, competing with cholesterol by LCAT. Cholesterol esterification by LCAT was inversely related to the cholesterol oxide concentration. The esterification of 14C-cholesterol oxides was higher in HDL3 and the transfer of the derived esters was greater from HDL2 to LDL and VLDL. The results suggest that cholesterol esterification by LCAT is inhibited in cholesterol oxide-enriched HDL particles. Moreover, the cholesterol oxides-derived esters are efficiently transferred to LDL and VLDL. Therefore, we suggest that cholesterol oxides may exert part of their atherogenic effect by inhibiting cholesterol esterification on the HDL surface and thereby disturbing

  6. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aijanen, T.; Koivuniemi, A.; Javanainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides) and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity...... of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability...

  7. New Phase Transfer Agent for Dye:Application for Hyperbranched Poly(ester-amine)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teng QIU; Li Ming TANG; Xin Lin TUO; De Shan LIU

    2004-01-01

    Hydrophilic hyperbranched poly(ester-amine) (HPEA) synthesized from diethanolamine and methyl acrylate was used as phase transfer agent for the first time to transfer methyl orange (MO) from water into chloroform.This process was quantified by UV-Vis spectra.A possible mechanism was put forward based on the formation of amphiphilic aggregates.

  8. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors in the treatment of dyslipidemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanwei Li

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibitors are gaining substantial research interest for raising high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The aim of the research was to estimate the efficacy and safety of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors as novel lipid modifying drugs. Systematic searches of English literature for randomized controlled trials (RCT were collected from MEDLINE, EBASE, CENTRAL and references listed in eligible studies. Two independent authors assessed the search results and only included the double-blind RCTs by using cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors as exclusively or co-administrated with statin therapy irrespective of gender in enrolled adult subjects. Two independent authors extracted the data by using predefined data fields. Of 503 studies identified, 14 studies met the inclusion criteria, and 12 studies were included into the final meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis revealed that CETP inhibitors increased the HDL-c levels (n = 2826, p<0.00001, mean difference (MD = 20.47, 95% CI [19.80 to 21.15] and total cholesterol (n = 3423, p = 0.0002, MD = 3.57, 95%CI [1.69 to 5.44] to some extent combined with a reduction in triglyceride (n = 3739, p<0.00001, MD = -10.47, 95% CI [-11.91 to -9.03] and LDL-c (n = 3159, p<0.00001, MD = -17.12, 95% CI [-18.87 to -15.36] irrespective of mono-therapy or co-administration with statins. Subgroup analysis suggested that the lipid modifying effects varied according to the four currently available CETP inhibitors. CETP inhibitor therapy did not increase the adverse events when compared with control. However, we observed a slight increase in blood pressure (SBP, n = 2384, p<0.00001, MD = 2.73, 95% CI [2.14 to 3.31], DBP, n = 2384, p<0.00001, MD = 1.16, 95% CI [0.73 to 1.60] after CETP inhibitor treatment, which were mainly ascribed to the torcetrapib treatment subgroup. CETP inhibitors therapy is associated with significant increase in HDL-c and decrease in

  9. The relationship between cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels and risk factor profile in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grooth, Greetje J; Smilde, Tineke J; Van Wissen, Sanne; Klerkx, Anke H E M; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Kastelein, John J P; Stalenhoef, Anton F H; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of neutral lipids between lipoproteins. The role of CETP in atherogenesis is controversial. To better understand the relationships between plasma CETP levels, lipoproteins and atherosclerosis, we assessed these parameters in

  10. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) genotype and cognitive function in persons aged 35 years or older

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izaks, Gerbrand J.; van der Knaap, Aafke M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Navis, Gerjan; Slaets, Joris P. J.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Common polymorphisms of the Cholestryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) gene may predict lower risk of cognitive decline. We investigated the association of cognitive function with CETP genotype in a population-based cohort of 4135 persons aged 35-82 years. Cognitive function was measured with the Ruff

  11. A Novel Missense Mutation (L296Q) in Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Gene Related to Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-QinZHENG; Si-ZhongZHANG; LiZHANG; De-JiaHUANG; Lin-ChuanLIAO; Yi-PingHOU

    2004-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is a key participant in the, reverse transport of cholesterol from the peripheral tissues to the liver. To understand the role that CETP gene plays in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), the promoter region, all 16 exons and adjacent intronic regions of CETP gene were screened for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 203 CHD patients and 209 controls by a combination of PCR, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC),molecular cloning, and DNA sequencing. A novel missense mutation in the CETP geve was identified. This mutation (L296Q) was a T-to-A conversion at codon 296 of exon 10 which replaced the codon for leucine (CTG) with the codon for glutamine (CAG). Association study revealed that L296Q mutation was associated with CHD with a significantly higher mutant allele frequency in the CHD patients than that in the controls (0.160 vs. 0.091,x2=9.014, P=0.003), and that the odds ratio for the development of CHD was 1.83 for the 296Q allele carriers relative to 296LL homozygotes. Statistical analyses demonstrated thai the mutant 296Q allele carrier patients displayed significantly higher total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations than non-carrier patients. The results of the present study suggest that the L296Q mutation is related to CHD, and the identification of new mutations in the CETP gene will afford the opportunity to investigate the relationship between CETP gene and CHD.

  12. Patient considerations and clinical impact of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors in the management of dyslipidemia: focus on anacetrapib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyares, Marta A; Davis, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality within the United States and worldwide. Although targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in the prevention of CVD has been shown to be effective, evidence exists to indicate that significant cardiovascular (CV) risk remains in patients receiving 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) - a risk that may be correlated with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Among the various tactics under investigation to increase HDL-C, inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) appears the most adept to raise these levels. Although torcetrapib, a CETP inhibitor, demonstrated significant beneficial changes in HDL-C and LDL-C after 12 months of therapy when coadministered with atorvastatin, patients in the torcetrapib arm experienced a rise in mortality, including increased risk of death from CV and non-CV causes as well as a significant rise in major CV events. Later studies established that the adverse effects of torcetrapib were produced from molecule-specific off-target effects and not to the mechanism of CETP inhibition. These untoward outcomes have not been detected with anacetrapib, the third of the CETP inhibitors to enter Phase III trials. Furthermore, treatment with anacetrapib revealed both a statistically significant decrease in LDL-C and increase in HDL-C over placebo. While the place in therapy of niacin and fibrates to reduce CV events is currently in question secondary to the Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL Cholesterol/High Triglyceride and Impact on Global Health Outcomes and the Action to Control CV Risk in Diabetes trials, the ongoing large-scale, randomized-placebo, controlled-outcomes study with anacetrapib coadministered with statin treatment will not only test the hypothesis if CETP inhibition lowers residual CV risk but will also provide insight as to which patient

  13. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the modification of the authorisation of a health claim related to plant sterol esters and lowering blood LDL-cholesterol; high blood LDL-cholesterol is a risk factor in the development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    of a health claim related to plant sterol esters and lowering blood LDL-cholesterol (high blood LDL-cholesterol is a risk factor in the development of (coronary) heart disease), pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. The applicant requested an extension of the conditions of use to powder...... supplements to be diluted in water at a dose of 2 g per day, which would lower blood LDL-cholesterol concentrations by “5.4-8.1 %” after six weeks of daily consumption. Plant sterol esters are sufficiently characterised. Lowering blood LDL-cholesterol concentrations is a beneficial physiological effect...... and elevated blood LDL-cholesterol concentration is a risk factor for coronary heart disease. The target population is subjects who need and want to lower their blood cholesterol. In weighing the evidence, the Panel took into account that only one human intervention study showed a reduction in blood LDL-cholesterol...

  14. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (cetp) inhibition in the treatment of cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-09-01

    In one embodiment, the invention provides methods of treatment which use therapeutically effective amounts of Choleste ryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) inhibitors to treat a variety of cancers. In certain embodiments, the inhibitor is a CETP-inhibiting small molecule, CETP-inhibiting antisense oligonucleotide, CETP-inhibiting siRNA or a CETP- inhibiting antibody. Related pharmaceutical compositions, kits, diagnostics and screens are also provided.

  15. Lipid Exchange Mechanism of the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Clarified by Atomistic and Coarse-grained Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivuniemi, A.; Vuorela, T.; Kovanen, P. T.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) transports cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in blood plasma. The inhibition of CETP has been shown to be a sound strategy to prevent and treat the development of coronary heart disease. We employed...... change of helix X of CETP to an open state, in which we found the accessibility of cholesteryl esters to the C-terminal tunnel opening of CETP to increase. Furthermore, in the absence of helix X, cholesteryl esters rapidly diffused into CETP through the C-terminal opening. The results provide compelling...

  16. A Novel Missense Mutation (L296Q) in Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Gene Related to Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Qin ZHENG; Si-Zhong ZHANG; Li ZHANG; De-Jia HUANG; Lin-Chuan LIAO; Yi-Ping HOU

    2004-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is a key participant in the reverse transport ofcholesterol from the peripheral tissues to the liver. To understand the role that CETP gene plays in thepathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), the promoter region, all 16 exons and adjacent intronicregions of CETP gene were screened for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 203 CHD patients and209 controls by a combination of PCR, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC),molecular cloning, and DNA sequencing. A novel missense mutation in the CETP gene was identified. Thismutation (L296Q) was a T-to-A conversion at codon 296 of exon 10 which replaced the codon for leucine(CTG) with the codon for glutamine (CAG). Association study revealed that L296Q mutation was associatedwith CHD with a significantly higher mutant allele frequency in the CHD patients than that in the controls (0.160 vs. 0.091,x2= 9.014, P = 0.003), and that the odds ratio for the development of CHD was 1.83 for the296Q allele carriers relative to 296LL homozygotes. Statistical analyses demonstrated that the mutant 296Q allelecarrier patients displayed significantly higher total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol(LDL-C) concentrations than non-carrier patients. The results of the present study suggest that the L296Qmutation is related to CHD, and the identification of new mutations in the CETP gene will afford the oppor-tunity to investigate the relationship between CETP gene and CHD.

  17. The Relationship Between Genetic Variations of the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Gene and Coronary Artery Disease in Turkish Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Fuat; Gurlertop, Yekta; Pirim, Ibrahim; Sevimli, Serdar; Dogan, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Aksoy, Hulya; Karakelloglu, Sule; Senocak, Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    Objective Although the relationship between cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and cholesterol metabolism has been characterized in recent years, the effect of CETP genetic variants associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) is still unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between CETP gene polymorphism and levels of lipid in patients with CAD. Materials and Methods We conducted a case-control study that included 194 unrelated subjects who underwent coronary angiography for suspected ischemic heart disease. This group was divided into 96 patients with angiographically documented CAD and 98 subjects (individuals matched for age and gender) without angiographically documented CAD (CAD-free subjects), all of whom were studied to examine the genotypic distribution of the CETP gene polymorphism in CAD. Genotyping was performed via polymerase chain reaction. Results Of the 96 patients with CAD, 38 (40%) were B1B1, 42 (44%) B1B2 and 16 (16%) B2B2, compared with the control subjects, of which 35 (36%) were B1B1, 44 (45%) B1B2 and 19 (19%) B2B2. There were no significant differences between patients with CAD and control subjects in the distribution of the CETP gene polymorphism. Patients with the B1B1 genotype had lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and higher triglyceride (TG) levels than patients with the B2B2 genotype (p<0.05). In addition, among control subjects HDL-C levels were significantly higher in subjects with the B2B2 genotype than in subjects with the B1B1 genotype (p<0.01). Conclusion Our results suggest that genetic variations of the CTEP gene may be responsible for low HDL-C levels but may not be considered as a risk factor for CAD in the Turkish population. PMID:25610061

  18. Amyloidogenic Properties of a D/N Mutated 12 Amino Acid Fragment of the C-Terminal Domain of the Cholesteryl-Ester Transfer Protein (CETP

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    Victor García-González

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP facilitates the transfer of cholesterol esters and triglycerides between lipoproteins in plasma where the critical site for its function is situated in the C-terminal domain. Our group has previously shown that this domain presents conformational changes in a non-lipid environment when the mutation D470N is introduced. Using a series of peptides derived from this C-terminal domain, the present study shows that these changes favor the induction of a secondary β-structure as characterized by spectroscopic analysis and fluorescence techniques. From this type of secondary structure, the formation of peptide aggregates and fibrillar structures with amyloid characteristics induced cytotoxicity in microglial cells in culture. These supramolecular structures promote cell cytotoxicity through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and change the balance of a series of proteins that control the process of endocytosis, similar to that observed when β-amyloid fibrils are employed. Therefore, a fine balance between the highly dynamic secondary structure of the C-terminal domain of CETP, the net charge, and the physicochemical characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment define the type of secondary structure acquired. Changes in this balance might favor misfolding in this region, which would alter the lipid transfer capacity conducted by CETP, favoring its propensity to substitute its physiological function.

  19. A low-saturated-fat, low-cholesterol diet decreases plasma CETP activity and pre beta-HDL formation but does not affect cellular cholesterol efflux to plasma from type 1 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, R; Beusekamp, BJ; Kerstens, MN; Groen, AK; Van Tol, A; Dullaart, RPF

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a low-saturated-fat, low-cholesterol diet on plasma lipopoproteins, pre beta-high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation, lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP)

  20. Aspartame-fed zebrafish exhibit acute deaths with swimming defects and saccharin-fed zebrafish have elevation of cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity in hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Seo, Juyi; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2011-11-01

    Although many artificial sweeteners (AS) have safety issues, the AS have been widely used in industry. To determine the physiologic effect of AS in the presence of hyperlipidemia, zebrafish were fed aspartame or saccharin with a high-cholesterol diet (HCD). After 12 days, 30% of zebrafish, which consumed aspartame and HCD, died with exhibiting swimming defects. The aspartame group had 65% survivability, while the control and saccharin groups had 100% survivability. Under HCD, the saccharin-fed groups had the highest increase in the serum cholesterol level (599 mg/dL). Aspartame-fed group showed a remarkable increase in serum glucose (up to 125 mg/dL), which was 58% greater than the increase in the HCD alone group. The saccharin and HCD groups had the highest cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity (52% CE-transfer), while the HCD alone group had 42% CE-transfer. Histologic analysis revealed that the aspartame and HCD groups showed more infiltration of inflammatory cells in the brain and liver sections. Conclusively, under presence of hyperlipidemia, aspartame-fed zebrafish exhibited acute swimming defects with an increase in brain inflammation. Saccharin-fed zebrafish had an increased atherogenic serum lipid profile with elevation of CETP activity.

  1. The role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein in the remodeling of plasma high-density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrost, L

    1997-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that alterations in the size distribution of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) constitute reliable markers for the risk of coronary artery disease. These observations suggested that the determination of the size distribution of HDL subpopulations by using polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis might constitute an effective tool in clinical practice for the detection of patients with elevated risk. During the last decade, concordant observations revealed that all the HDL subpopulations are metabolically interrelated, and their relative abundances are dependent on the activity of several plasma factors, among them the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). As reviewed in the present article, although both CETP and PLTP can promote the size redistribution or conversion of HDL, the two plasma lipid transfer proteins can alter differently the plasma HDL distribution profile through distinct mechanisms. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:218-224). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  2. Taq1B Polymorphism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) and Its Effects on the Serum Lipid Levels in Metabolic Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroufi, Nazila Fathi; Farzaneh, Khadijeh; Alibabrdel, Mahdi; Zarei, Leila; Cheraghi, Omid; Soltani, Sina; Montazersaheb, Soheila; Akbarzadeh, Maryam; Nouri, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is one of the most important risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This syndrome is characterized by abdominal obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. The plasma origin of Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is responsible for transferring cholesterol esters from high-density lipoprotein particles to apolipoprotein B containing lipoproteins compartment. We conducted this study to investigate the association between CETP gene Taq1B (rs708272) polymorphism in the metabolic syndrome among Iranian subjects. A sample size of 200 patients diagnosed with MetS together with 200 healthy donors as control were enrolled in this study. The investigation of polymorphism was performed by the use of polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. To determine the relationship between polymorphism and lipid profile, we measured lipids and CETP concentration in metabolic syndrome and control subjects. Genotype distribution and allelic frequencies of polymorphism were determined and compared in both groups. Our findings showed that all clinical and biochemical characteristics in patients differed from the control group. The results showed that genotype and allele frequency of the Taq1B polymorphism was not significantly different between two groups. Instinctively, CETP was significantly higher in metabolic syndrome (1.64 ± 0.32 µg/ml) than in control (1.53 ± 0.34 µg/ml). A low level of CETP was found in blood of B2B2 typified genotype. In spite of Taq1B polymorphism on ester transfer protein concentration, no direct correlation was found between this polymorphism and metabolic syndrome.

  3. ERYTHROCYTE AND PLASMA-CHOLESTEROL ESTER LONG-CHAIN POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS OF LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT BABIES FED PRETERM FORMULA WITH AND WITHOUT RIBONUCLEOTIDES - COMPARISON WITH HUMAN-MILK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTIL, HA; VANBEUSEKOM, CM; SIEMENSMA, AD; POLMAN, HA; MUSKIET, FAJ; OKKEN, A

    1995-01-01

    We investigated whether a regular formula for premature infants (pre) supplemented with ribonucleotides (pre+RN) raises erythrocyte and plasma cholesterol ester (CE) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) of low-birthweight babies (less than or equal to 2.50 kg) compared with their breast-

  4. SEPARATION OF CHOLESTEROL ESTERS BY SILVER ION CHROMATOGRAPHY USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY OR SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION COLUMNS PACKED WITH A BONDED SULFONIC-ACID PHASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOVING, EB; MUSKIET, FAJ; CHRISTIE, WW

    1991-01-01

    Two methods for the separation of cholesterol esters, based on the number of double bonds in their fatty acid moieties, are presented. Silver ion chromatography, usually performed on thin-layer chromatographic plates, was made suitable for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and solid-phas

  5. SYNTHESIS OF ACRYLIC ESTERS IN PHASE TRANSFER CATALYSIS: KINETICS AND ECOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAGIK TOROSYAN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Phase-Transfer Catalysis (PTC technology is used in the commercial manufacture and also in pollution mitigation treatment processes. In the paper is demonstrated the synthesis of esters of acrylic and metacrylic acids, which have wide applications in the industry for the synthesis of unique polymeric materials, by phase transfer catalysis method. It is necessary to notice that the synthesis of acrylic acids in PTC medium is more important because that compounds are more sensitive at acidic and basic conditions. Here is shown that the offered method has more advantages in comparison with the traditional methods. PTC is characterized by a higher degree of conversion of raw materials into useful products, smaller material and power resources consumption. The offered method for acrylic ester synthesis in comparison with the traditional methods has more advantages: higher process rates, mild reaction conditions, allowing lower energy costs, the complete elimination of hazardous and dangerous organic solvents, all leading to a sharp reduction of air pollution, and volume of generated wastewaters.

  6. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein, low density lipoprotein particle size and intima media thickness in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosheska, Katerina; Labudovic, Danica; Jovanova, Silvana; Jaglikovski, Branko; Alabakovska, Sonja

    2011-08-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) plays a key role in reverse cholesterol transport and high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Predominance of small, dense LDL particles is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD).The aim of the study was to determine the potential relationship between the CETP concentration and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size and their association with intima media thickness (IMT) in patients with CHD. Lipid parameters, CETP concentration and LDL particle size were determined in 100 healthy subjects (control group) and in 100 patients with CHD, aged 43 to 77 years. Plasma CETP concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay with two different monoclonal antibodies. LDL subclasses were separated by nondenaturing polyacrilamide 3-31% gradient gel electrophoresis. CETP concentration was higher in patients compared to controls (2.02 ± 0.75 mg/ml vs. 1.74 ± 0.63 mg/ml, p<0.01). Mean LDL particle size (nm) was significantly smaller in patients than in controls (24.5 ± 1.1 vs. 26.1 ± 0.9; p<0.001). There was no relation between LDL particle size and CETP concentration (r=-0.1807, p=0.072). Age, diastolic blood pressure, CETP concentration and LDL particle size were independent factors for determing IMT by multiple linear regression analysis. They accounted for 35.2 % of the observed variability in IMT. CETP is not an independent contributor of LDL particle size. CETP might play a role in determining lipoprotein distributions, but did not seem to be the sole factor in the formation of small LDL particles.

  7. Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer is a determinant of intima-media thickness in type 2 diabetic and nondiabetic subjects : Role of CETP and triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R; Perton, FG; Dallinga-Thie, GM; van Roon, AM; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; van Tol, A; Dullaart, RPF

    2005-01-01

    We tested whether carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is associated with plasma cholesteryl ester transfer (CET) and/or the plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentration in type 2 diabetic and control subjects. In 87 male and female subjects with type 2 diabetes (nonsmokers,

  8. Creation of recognition sites for organophosphate esters based on charge transfer and ligand exchange imprinting methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Say, Ridvan

    2006-10-01

    This manuscript describes a method for the selective binding behavior of paraoxan and parathion compounds on surface imprinted polymers which were prepared using both charge transfer (CT) (methacryloyl-antipyrine, MAAP) and ligand-exchange (LE) (methacryloyl-antipyrine-gadalonium, MAAP-Gd) monomers. These polymers were prepared in the presence of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator and crosslinking EDMA and were imprinted with organophosphate esters. Influence of CT and LE imprinting on the creation of recognition sites toward paraoxan and parathion was determined applying adsorption isotherms. The effect of initial concentration of paraoxan and parathion, adsorption time and imprinting efficiency on adsorption selectivity for MIP-CT and MIP-LE was investigated. Association constant (K(ass)), number of accessible sites (Q(max)), relative selectivity coefficient (k') and binding ability were also evaluated.

  9. Triphenylethanamine Derivatives as Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Inhibitors: Discovery of N-[(1R)-1-(3-Cyclopropoxy-4-fluorophenyl)-1-[3-fluoro-5-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy)phenyl]-2-phenylethyl]-4-fluoro-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide (BMS-795311).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jennifer X; Wang, Tammy C; Adam, Leonard P; Chen, Alice Ye A; Taylor, David S; Yang, Richard Z; Zhuang, Shaobin; Sleph, Paul G; Li, Julia P; Li, Danshi; Yin, Xiaohong; Chang, Ming; Chen, Xue-Qing; Shen, Hong; Li, Jianqing; Smith, Daniel; Wu, Dauh-Rurng; Leith, Leslie; Harikrishnan, Lalgudi S; Kamau, Muthoni G; Miller, Michael M; Bilder, Donna; Rampulla, Richard; Li, Yi-Xin; Xu, Carrie; Lawrence, R Michael; Poss, Michael A; Levesque, Paul; Gordon, David A; Huang, Christine S; Finlay, Heather J; Wexler, Ruth R; Salvati, Mark E

    2015-11-25

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise HDL-C in animals and humans and may be antiatherosclerotic by enhancing reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). In this article, we describe the lead optimization efforts resulting in the discovery of a series of triphenylethanamine (TPE) ureas and amides as potent and orally available CETP inhibitors. Compound 10g is a potent CETP inhibitor that maximally inhibited cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer activity at an oral dose of 1 mg/kg in human CETP/apoB-100 dual transgenic mice and increased HDL cholesterol content and size comparable to torcetrapib (1) in moderately-fat fed hamsters. In contrast to the off-target liabilities with 1, no blood pressure increase was observed with 10g in rat telemetry studies and no increase of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) was detected in H295R cells. On the basis of its preclinical profile, compound 10g was advanced into preclinical safety studies.

  10. High plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels may favour reduced incidence of cardiovascular events in men with low triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, Susanna E.; Hillege, Hans L.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Grobbee, Diederik E.; van Tol, Arie; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims High cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentrations are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in subjects with high triglycerides. We determined the relationship of plasma CETP with incident CVD in a population with relatively low triglycerides. Methods and re

  11. Association of cholesteryl ester transfer protein genotypes with CETP mass and activity, lipid levels, and coronary risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Alexander; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Sarwar, Nadeem; Erqou, Sebhat; Saleheen, Danish; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Keavney, Bernard; Ye, Zheng; Danesh, John

    2008-01-01

    Context The importance of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) pathway in coronary disease is uncertain. Study of CETP genotypes can help better understand the relevance of this pathway to lipid metabolism and disease risk. Objective To assess associations of CETP genotypes with CETP phenot

  12. [Effect of protein-vitamin deficiency on the enzyme activity of lipolysis and the synthesis of cholesterol esters during hypokinesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkenbaev, B Kh; Tazhibaev, Sh S; Maksimenko, V B; Sisemalieva, Zh S

    1985-01-01

    Balanced diet during 60-day hypokinesia leads to inhibition of lipoprotein lypase (LPLA) and liver triglyceride lypase (L-TGLA) activity of the rat blood serum. The level of very low density lipoproteins (VLDLP) grows, and suppression of lecithin-cholesteryl-acyltransferase (LCAT) activity is accompanied by reduction of the share of cholesterol derivatives with polyunsaturated fatty acids. Combined effects of protein-vitamin insufficiency and hypokinesia result in parversion of the lipolysis processes, that manifests in prevalence of L-TGLA over LPLA. The levels of VLDLP increase, and growth of LCAT activity is acompanied by the growth of cholesteryl linoleate share and level. Hypokinesia combined with the studied experimental diets was found to lead to increase of the free fatty acid level and to decrease of the blood serum levels of phospholipids and triglycerides.

  13. Evaluation of lipids, drug concentration, and safety parameters following cessation of treatment with the cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor anacetrapib in patients with or at high risk for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotto, Antonio M; Cannon, Christopher P; Li, Xiujiang Susie; Vaidya, Sanskruti; Kher, Uma; Brinton, Eliot A; Davidson, Michael; Moon, Jennifer E; Shah, Sukrut; Dansky, Hayes M; Mitchel, Yale; Barter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects on lipids and safety during a 12-week reversal period after 18 months of treatment with anacetrapib. The cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor anacetrapib was previously shown to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 39.8% (estimated using the Friedewald equation) and increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 138.1%, with an acceptable side-effect profile, in patients with or at high risk for coronary heart disease in the Determining the Efficacy and Tolerability of CETP Inhibition With Anacetrapib (DEFINE) trial. A total of 1,398 patients entered the 12-week reversal-phase study, either after completion of the active-treatment phase or after early discontinuation of the study medication. In patients allocated to anacetrapib, placebo-adjusted mean percentage decreases from baseline were observed at 12 weeks off the study drug for Friedewald-calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (18.6%), non-HDL cholesterol (17.6%), and apolipoprotein B (10.2%); placebo-adjusted mean percentage increases were observed for HDL cholesterol (73.0%) and apolipoprotein A-I (24.5%). Residual plasma anacetrapib levels (about 40% of on-treatment apparent steady-state trough levels) were also detected 12 weeks after cessation of anacetrapib. No clinically important elevations in liver enzymes, blood pressure, electrolytes, or adverse experiences were observed during the reversal phase. Preliminary data from a small cohort (n = 30) revealed the presence of low concentrations of anacetrapib in plasma 2.5 to 4 years after the last anacetrapib dose. In conclusion, after the cessation of active treatment, anacetrapib plasma lipid changes and drug levels decreased to approximately 40% of on-treatment trough levels at 12 weeks after dosing, but modest HDL cholesterol elevations and low drug concentrations were still detectable 2 to 4 years after the last dosing.

  14. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels and gene deficiency in Chinese patients with cardio-cerebrovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄一义; 汪俊军; 张宏娟; 李勇; 刘小传; 李露言; 陈光辉

    2002-01-01

    Objective To detect cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) levels, frequencies of CETP D442G and Ⅰ14A mutations and characteristics of abnormal lipids in patients with cardio-cerebro vascular diseases. Methods Ninety-four myocardial infarction (MI) patients,110 stroke patients and 335 healthy controls were selected. The CETP concentration was determined using ELISA. The CETP activity was measured using a substrate of 14 C-radiolabeled discoidal bilayer particles. The CETP gene mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP. Results The CETP concentrations in the MI and stroke group, were higher than those in the controls. The gene mutation frequencies of D442G in the MI, stroke and control group were 3.5%, 3.6% and 5%, respectively, and the frequencies of Ⅰ14A were 1.05%, 0.91% and 1%, respectively. One case of D442G homozygote was detected in the healthy group. The frequency of two CETP gene mutations showed no significant difference among the patients and controls. The CETP concentration and activity in subjects with CETP mutations were one-third of those in the control group. The level of HDL-C, apo-A1 increased in the mutation subjects, while the TG level decreased. Conclusions The CETP level increased significantly in patients with cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. The carriers of CETP deficiency had CETP and lipid abnormalities.

  15. Cholesterol and ocular pathologies: focus on the role of cholesterol-24S-hydroxylase in cholesterol homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fourgeux Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The retina is responsible for coding the light stimulus into a nervous signal that is transferred to the brain via the optic nerve. The retina is formed by the association of the neurosensory retina and the retinal pigment epithelium that is supported by Bruch’s membrane. Both the physical and metabolic associations between these partners are crucial for the functioning of the retina, by means of nutrient intake and removal of the cell and metabolic debris from the retina. Dysequilibrium are involved in the aging processes and pathologies such as age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of visual loss after the age of 50 years in Western countries. The retina is composed of several populations of cells including glia that is involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Cholesterol is the main sterol in the retina. It is present as free form in cells and as esters in Bruch’s membrane. Accumulation of cholesteryl esters has been associated with aging of the retina and impairment of the retinal function. Under dietary influence and in situ synthesized, the metabolism of cholesterol is regulated by cell interactions, including neurons and glia via cholesterol-24S-hydroxylase. Several pathophysiological associations with cholesterol and its metabolism can be suggested, especially in relation to glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration.

  16. Targeting cholesteryl ester transfer protein for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Barter; J.J.P. Kastelein

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that the concentration of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is a strong, independent, inverse predictor of coronary heart disease risk. This identifies HDL-C as a potential therapeutic target. Compared with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lower

  17. Lipid exchange mechanism of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein clarified by atomistic and coarse-grained simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artturi Koivuniemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP transports cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in blood plasma. The inhibition of CETP has been shown to be a sound strategy to prevent and treat the development of coronary heart disease. We employed molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the mechanisms associated with the CETP-mediated lipid exchange. To this end we used both atomistic and coarse-grained models whose results were consistent with each other. We found CETP to bind to the surface of high density lipoprotein (HDL -like lipid droplets through its charged and tryptophan residues. Upon binding, CETP rapidly (in about 10 ns induced the formation of a small hydrophobic patch to the phospholipid surface of the droplet, opening a route from the core of the lipid droplet to the binding pocket of CETP. This was followed by a conformational change of helix X of CETP to an open state, in which we found the accessibility of cholesteryl esters to the C-terminal tunnel opening of CETP to increase. Furthermore, in the absence of helix X, cholesteryl esters rapidly diffused into CETP through the C-terminal opening. The results provide compelling evidence that helix X acts as a lid which conducts lipid exchange by alternating the open and closed states. The findings have potential for the design of novel molecular agents to inhibit the activity of CETP.

  18. D38-cholesterol as a Raman active probe for imaging intracellular cholesterol storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Pfisterer, Simon G.; Riezman, Howard; Ikonen, Elina; Potma, Eric O.

    2016-06-01

    We generated a highly deuterated cholesterol analog (D38-cholesterol) and demonstrated its use for selective vibrational imaging of cholesterol storage in mammalian cells. D38-cholesterol produces detectable signals in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, is rapidly taken up by cells, and is efficiently metabolized by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase to form cholesteryl esters. Using hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol, we visualized cholesterol storage in lipid droplets. We found that some lipid droplets accumulated preferentially unesterified D38-cholesterol, whereas others stored D38-cholesteryl esters. In steroidogenic cells, D38-cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols were partitioned into distinct sets of lipid droplets. Thus, hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol demonstrates a heterogeneous incorporation of neutral lipid species, i.e., free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols, between individual lipid droplets in a cell.

  19. Simultaneous transfer of cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids to high-density lipoprotein in aging subjects with or without coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    AZEVEDO, Carolina H. M; Maurício Wajngarten; Ana C. Lo Prete; Jayme Diament; Raul C. Maranhão

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To verify whether the capacity of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to simultaneously receive non-esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, cholesteryl esters, and phospholipids changes with aging and the presence of coronary artery disease. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study with biochemical analyses. SUBJECTS: Eleven elderly patients with coronary artery disease (74±5 years) were compared with the following groups of non-coronary artery disease subjects (referred to as “healthy”): 25 young ...

  20. ABC-transporters and lipid transfer proteins : important players in macrophage cholesterol homeostasis and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Local modulation of macrophage cholesterol metabolism in the arterial wall and systemic regulation of lipoprotein metabolism (LDL-lowering and/or HDL-raising) are both attractive targets for future drug design for the prevention of atherosclerosis. As described in this thesis, bone marrow transplant

  1. Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein is predominantly derived from Kupffer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Tuin, S. van der; Tjeerdema, N.; Dam, A.D. van; Rensen, S.S.; Hendrikx, T.; Berbee, J.F.; Atanasovska, B.; Fu, J.; Hoekstra, M.; Bekkering, S.; Riksen, N.P.; Buurman, W.A.; Greve, J.W.; Hofker, M.H.; Shiri-Sverdlov, R.; Meijer, O.C.; Smit, J.W.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Dijk, K.W. van; Rensen, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of Kupffer cells (KCs) in the pathophysiology of the liver has been firmly established. Nevertheless, KCs have been underexplored as a target for diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases owing to the lack of noninvasive diagnostic tests. We addressed the hypothesis that cholesteryl ester t

  2. Plasma Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Is Predominantly Derived From Kupffer Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yanan; van der Tuin, Sam; Tjeerdema, Nathanja; van Dam, Andrea D.; Rensen, Sander S.; Hendrikx, Tim; Berbee, Jimmy F. P.; Atanasovska, Biljana; Fu, Jingyuan; Hoekstra, Menno; Bekkering, Siroon; Riksen, Niels P.; Buurman, Wim A.; Greve, Jan Willem; Hofker, Marten H.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Meijer, Onno C.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Havekes, Louis M.; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2015-01-01

    The role of Kupffer cells (KCs) in the pathophysiology of the liver has been firmly established. Nevertheless, KCs have been underexplored as a target for diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases owing to the lack of noninvasive diagnostic tests. We addressed the hypothesis that cholesteryl ester t

  3. Mathematically modelling the dynamics of cholesterol metabolism and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A E; Mooney, K M; Wilkinson, S J; Pickles, N A; Mc Auley, M T

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This condition becomes increasingly prevalent during ageing; 34.1% and 29.8% of males and females respectively, over 75 years of age have an underlying cardiovascular problem. The dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism is inextricably correlated with cardiovascular health and for this reason low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are routinely used as biomarkers of CVD risk. The aim of this work was to use mathematical modelling to explore how cholesterol metabolism is affected by the ageing process. To do this we updated a previously published whole-body mathematical model of cholesterol metabolism to include an additional 96 mechanisms that are fundamental to this biological system. Additional mechanisms were added to cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), bile acid synthesis, and their enterohepatic circulation. The sensitivity of the model was explored by the use of both local and global parameter scans. In addition, acute cholesterol feeding was used to explore the effectiveness of the regulatory mechanisms which are responsible for maintaining whole-body cholesterol balance. It was found that our model behaves as a hypo-responder to cholesterol feeding, while both the hepatic and intestinal pools of cholesterol increased significantly. The model was also used to explore the effects of ageing in tandem with three different cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) genotypes. Ageing in the presence of an atheroprotective CETP genotype, conferring low CETP activity, resulted in a 0.6% increase in LDL-C. In comparison, ageing with a genotype reflective of high CETP activity, resulted in a 1.6% increase in LDL-C. Thus, the model has illustrated the importance of CETP genotypes such as I405V, and their potential role in healthy ageing.

  4. Associations of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein TaqIB Polymorphism with the Composite Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease Risk and HDL-C Concentrations: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shu-xia; Yao, Ming-hong; Ding, Yu-song; Zhang, Jing-yu; Yan, Yi-zhong; Liu, Jia-ming; Zhang, Mei; Rui, Dong-sheng; Niu, Qiang; He, Jia; Guo, Heng; Ma, Ru-lin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have evaluated the associations between the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) TaqIB polymorphism (rs708272), the risk of developing composite ischemic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the concentration of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), but results remain controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a relationship exists between these factors. Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of available studies to clarify the associations of the CETP TaqIB polymorphism with HDL-C concentration and the composite ischemic CVD risk in both Asians and Caucasians. All statistical analyses were done with Stata 12.0. Results: Through utilization of the Cochrane Library, Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, Springer, China Science and Technology Journal Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Google Scholar, and Baidu Library, a total of 45 studies from 44 papers with 20,866 cases and 21,298 controls were combined showing a significant association between the CETP TaqIB variant and composite ischemic CVD risk. Carriers of allele TaqIB-B1 were found to have a higher risk of composite ischemic CVD than non-carriers: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.09–1.21, p < 0.001. Meanwhile, 28 studies with 23,959 subjects were included in the association between the CETP TaqIB polymorphism and the concentration of HDL-C. Results suggested that carriers of the B1B1 genotype had lower concentrations of HDL-C than those of the B2B2 genotype: SMD = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.36–0.65, p < 0.001. Conclusions: The synthesis of available evidence demonstrates that the CETP TaqIB polymorphism protects against composite ischemic CVD risk and is associated with a higher HDL-C concentration in both Asians and Caucasians. PMID:27608031

  5. Associations of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein TaqIB Polymorphism with the Composite Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease Risk and HDL-C Concentrations: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-xia Guo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have evaluated the associations between the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP TaqIB polymorphism (rs708272, the risk of developing composite ischemic cardiovascular disease (CVD and the concentration of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, but results remain controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a relationship exists between these factors. Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of available studies to clarify the associations of the CETP TaqIB polymorphism with HDL-C concentration and the composite ischemic CVD risk in both Asians and Caucasians. All statistical analyses were done with Stata 12.0. Results: Through utilization of the Cochrane Library, Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, Springer, China Science and Technology Journal Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Google Scholar, and Baidu Library, a total of 45 studies from 44 papers with 20,866 cases and 21,298 controls were combined showing a significant association between the CETP TaqIB variant and composite ischemic CVD risk. Carriers of allele TaqIB-B1 were found to have a higher risk of composite ischemic CVD than non-carriers: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.09–1.21, p < 0.001. Meanwhile, 28 studies with 23,959 subjects were included in the association between the CETP TaqIB polymorphism and the concentration of HDL-C. Results suggested that carriers of the B1B1 genotype had lower concentrations of HDL-C than those of the B2B2 genotype: SMD = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.36–0.65, p < 0.001. Conclusions: The synthesis of available evidence demonstrates that the CETP TaqIB polymorphism protects against composite ischemic CVD risk and is associated with a higher HDL-C concentration in both Asians and Caucasians.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene and recurrent coronary heart disease or mortality in patients with established atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Salim S; Lee, Vei-Vei; Brautbar, Ariel; Grove, Megan L; Nambi, Vijay; Alam, Mahboob; Elayda, MacArthur; Wilson, James M; Willerson, James T; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2013-11-01

    It is not known whether genetic variants in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene are associated with recurrent coronary heart disease events or mortality in secondary prevention patients. Among 3,717 patients with acute coronary syndrome or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) enrolled in a prospective genetic registry, we evaluated whether CETP gene variants previously shown to be associated with reduced CETP activity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increase ("A" allele for both TaqIB [rs708272] and rs12149545) are associated with a reduction in recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), recurrent revascularization, or death. At 4.5 years of follow-up, 439 recurrent MI, 698 recurrent revascularizations, and 756 deaths occurred. Using an additive model of inheritance, the "A" allele for rs708272 was not associated with recurrent MI (hazard ratio [HR] 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78 to 1.17 for AG; HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.19 for AA; compared with GG genotype), recurrent revascularization (HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.33 for AG; HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.32 for AA), or mortality (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.19 for AG; HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.37 for AA) in the overall cohort. Similar results were seen for the "A" allele for rs12149545. In the CABG subgroup, AG genotype for rs708272 was associated with an increased mortality (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.79) compared with GG genotype. Results remained consistent using dominant model of inheritance. In conclusion, genetic CETP variants were not associated with recurrent MI or recurrent revascularization in overall cohort with a possible mortality increase in patients who underwent CABG.

  7. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors in coronary heart disease: Validated comparative QSAR modeling of N, N-disubstituted trifluoro-3-amino-2-propanols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Chanchal; Halder, Amit Kumar; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Jha, Tarun

    2013-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) converts high density lipoprotein cholesterol to low density lipoproteins. It is a promising target for treatment of coronary heart disease. Two dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (2D-QSAR), hologram QSAR (HQSAR) studies and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) as well as comparative molecular similarity analysis (CoMSIA) were performed on 104 CETP inhibitors. The statistical qualities of generated models were justified by internal and external validation, i.e., q(2) and R(2)pred respectively. The best 2D-QSAR model was obtained with q(2) and R(2)pred values of 0.794 and 0.796 respectively. The 2D-QSAR study suggests that unsaturation, branching and van der Waals volumes may play important roles. The HQSAR model showed q(2) and R(2)pred values of 0.628 and 0.550 respectively. Similarly, CoMFA model showed q(2) and R(2)pred values of 0.707 and 0.755 respectively whereas CoMSIA model was obtained with q(2) and R(2)pred values of 0.696 and 0.703 respectively. CoMFA and CoMSIA studies indicate that steric factors are important at substituted phenoxy and tetrafluoroethoxy groups whereas electropositive factors play important role at difluoromethyl group. The results of 3D-QSAR studies validate those of 2D-QSAR and HQSAR studies as well as the earlier observed SAR data. Current work may help to develop better CETP inhibitors.

  8. The effect of a novel intergenic polymorphism (rs11774572) on HDL cholesterol concentrations depends on the TaqIB polymorphism in the cholesterol ester transfer protein gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Plasma lipid levels have a strong genetic component and many different loci, including those identified by genome-wide association studies, affect lipoprotein metabolism in humans. Hence, the study of gene-gene interactions may be useful to provide additional predictive value as well as ...

  9. Identification of CETP as a molecular target for estrogen positive breast cancer cell death by cholesterol depleting agents

    OpenAIRE

    Esau, Luke; Sagar, Sunil; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth; Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites act as steroid hormone precursors, which promote estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) progression. Development of cholesterol targeting anticancer drugs has been hindered due to the lack of knowledge of viable molecular targets. Till now, Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) has been envisaged as a feasible molecular target in atherosclerosis, but for the first time, we show that CETP contributes to BC cell survival when challenged with chol...

  10. Cholesterol Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Cholesterol Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Blood Cholesterol Formal name: Total Cholesterol Related tests: HDL Cholesterol , ...

  11. What's Cholesterol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What's Cholesterol? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cholesterol? Print A A ... thing for food to be low in it? Cholesterol and Your Body Cholesterol (say: kuh-LES-tuh- ...

  12. What's Cholesterol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What's Cholesterol? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cholesterol? A A A ... thing for food to be low in it? Cholesterol and Your Body Cholesterol (say: kuh-LES-tuh- ...

  13. CoMFA, CoMSIA and Eigenvalue Analysis on Dibenzodioxepinone and Dibenzodioxocinone Derivatives as Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-sheng Cheng

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: CoMFA, CoMSIA and eigenvalue analysis (EVA were performed to study the structural features of 61 diverse dibenzodioxepinone and dibenzodioxocinone analogues to probe cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibitory activity. Three methods yielded statistically significant models upon assessment of cross-validation, bootstrapping, and progressive scrambling. This was further validated by an external set of 13 derivatives. Our results demonstrate that three models have a good interpolation as well as extrapolation. The hydrophobic features were confirmed to contribute significantly to inhibitor potencies, while a pre-oriented hydrogen bond provided by the hydroxyl group at the 3-position indicated a good correlation with previous SAR, and a hydrogen bond acceptor may play a crucial role in CETP inhibition. These derived models may help us to gain a deeper understanding of the binding interaction of these lactone-based compounds and aid in the design of new potent compounds against CETP.

  14. Comparative Fluorescence Resonance Energy-Transfer Study in Pluronic Triblock Copolymer Micelle and Niosome Composed of Biological Component Cholesterol: An Investigation of Effect of Cholesterol and Sucrose on the FRET Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-01-14

    The formation of pluronic triblock copolymer (F127)-cholesterol-based niosome and its interaction with sugar (sucrose) molecules have been investigated. The morphology of F127-cholesterol -based niosome in the presence of sucrose has been successfully demonstrated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. The DLS profiles and TEM images clearly suggest that the size of the niosome aggregates increases significantly in the presence of sucrose. In addition to structural characterization, a detailed comparative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study has been carried out in these F127-containing aggregates, involving coumarin 153 (C153) as donor (D) and rhodamine 6G (R6G) as an acceptor (A) to monitor the dynamic heterogeneity of the systems. Besides, time-resolved anisotropy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements have been carried out to monitor the rotational and lateral diffusion motion in these F127-cholesterol-based aggregates using C153 and R6G, respectively. During the course of FRET study, we have observed multiple time constants of FRET inside the F127-cholesterol-based niosomes in contrast with the F127 micelle. This corresponds to the presence of more than one preferential donor-acceptor (D-A) distance in niosomes than in F127 micelle. FRET has also been successfully used to probe the effect of sucrose on the morphology of F127-cholesterol-based niosome. In the presence of sucrose, the time constant of FRET further increases as the D-A distances increase in sucrose-decorated niosome. Finally, the excitation-wavelength-dependent FRET studies have indicated that as the excitation of donor molecules varies from 408 to 440 nm the contribution of the faster rise component of the acceptor enhances considerably, which clearly establishes the dynamics heterogeneity of both systems. Our findings also indicate that FRET is completely intravesicular in nature in these block copolymer-cholesterol

  15. Effect of rapeseed oil derived plant sterol and stanol esters on atherosclerosis parameters in cholesterol challenged heterozygous Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene; Fricke, Christiane; Pilegaard, Kirsten;

    2009-01-01

    Rapeseed oil (RSO) is a novel source of plant sterols, containing the unique brassicasterol in concentrations higher than allowed for plant sterol blends in food products in the European Union. Effects of RSO sterols and stanols on aortic atherosclerosis were studied in cholesterol-fed heterozygous...

  16. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone responsiveness to low sodium and blood pressure reactivity to angiotensin-II are unrelated to cholesteryl ester transfer protein mass in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, Jan A.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Navis, Gerjan; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The blood pressure increase associated with the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, torcetrapib is probably attributable to an off-target effect but it is unknown whether activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may be related to variation in the pla

  17. Elevated cholesteryl ester transfer protein concentration is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease in women, but not in men, with Type 2 diabetes : the Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alssema, M; Dekker, J M; Kuivenhoven, J A; Nijpels, G; Teerlink, T; Scheffer, P G; Diamant, M; Stehouwer, C D A; Bouter, L M; Heine, R J

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) exchanges neutral lipids between lipoproteins. As the role of CETP in the atherogenic process is still not fully clarified, we studied the association of CETP concentration with the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and with intima-media thick

  18. The effects of apolipoprotein F deficiency on high density lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Lagor

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein F (apoF is 29 kilodalton secreted sialoglycoprotein that resides on the HDL and LDL fractions of human plasma. Human ApoF is also known as Lipid Transfer Inhibitor protein (LTIP based on its ability to inhibit cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP-mediated transfer events between lipoproteins. In contrast to other apolipoproteins, ApoF is predicted to lack strong amphipathic alpha helices and its true physiological function remains unknown. We previously showed that overexpression of Apolipoprotein F in mice reduced HDL cholesterol levels by 20-25% by accelerating clearance from the circulation. In order to investigate the effect of physiological levels of ApoF expression on HDL cholesterol metabolism, we generated ApoF deficient mice. Unexpectedly, deletion of ApoF had no substantial impact on plasma lipid concentrations, HDL size, lipid or protein composition. Sex-specific differences were observed in hepatic cholesterol content as well as serum cholesterol efflux capacity. Female ApoF KO mice had increased liver cholesteryl ester content relative to wild type controls on a chow diet (KO: 3.4+/-0.9 mg/dl vs. WT: 1.2+/-0.3 mg/dl, p<0.05. No differences were observed in ABCG1-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity in either sex. Interestingly, ApoB-depleted serum from male KO mice was less effective at promoting ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux from J774 macrophages relative to WT controls.

  19. A pH-responsive drug nanovehicle constructed by reversible attachment of cholesterol to PEGylated poly(l-lysine) via catechol-boronic acid ester formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Lv, Yin; Zhu, Jing-Yi; Han, Yun-Tao; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Wei-Hai; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2014-08-01

    The present work reports the construction of a drug delivery nanovehicle via a pH-sensitive assembly strategy for improved cellular internalization and intracellular drug liberation. Through spontaneous formation of boronate linkage in physiological conditions, phenylboronic acid-modified cholesterol was able to attach onto catechol-pending methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-lysine). This comb-type polymer can self-organize into a micellar nanoconstruction that is able to effectively encapsulate poorly water-soluble agents. The blank micelles exhibited negligible in vitro cytotoxicity, yet doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles could effectively induce cell death at a level comparable to free DOX. Owing to the acid-labile feature of the boronate linkage, a reduction in environmental pH from pH 7.4 to 5.0 could trigger the dissociation of the nanoconstruction, which in turn could accelerate the liberation of entrapped drugs. Importantly, the blockage of endosomal acidification in HeLa cells by NH4Cl treatment significantly decreased the nuclear uptake efficiency and cell-killing effect mediated by the DOX-loaded nanoassembly, suggesting that acid-triggered destruction of the nanoconstruction is of significant importance in enhanced drug efficacy. Moreover, confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry assay revealed the effective internalization of the nanoassemblies, and their cellular uptake exhibited a cholesterol dose-dependent profile, indicating the contribution of introduced cholesterol functionality to the transmembrane process of the nanoassembly.

  20. About Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cholesterol Updated:Apr 3,2017 It may surprise you ... our bodies to keep us healthy. What is cholesterol and where does it come from? Cholesterol is ...

  1. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  2. SNARE-Mediated Cholesterol Movement to Mitochondria Supports Steroidogenesis in Rodent Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye; Hou, Xiaoming; Shen, Wen-Jun; Hanssen, Ruth; Khor, Victor K; Cortez, Yuan; Roseman, Ann N; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2016-02-01

    Vesicular transport involving soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins is known to be responsible for many major cellular activities. In steroidogenic tissues, chronic hormone stimulation results in increased expression of proteins involved in the steroidogenic pathway, whereas acute hormone stimulation prompts the rapid transfer of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane to be utilized as substrate for steroid hormone production. Several different pathways are involved in supplying cholesterol to mitochondria, but mobilization of stored cholesteryl esters appears to initially constitute the preferred source; however, the mechanisms mediating this cholesterol transfer are not fully understood. To study the potential contribution of SNARE proteins in steroidogenesis, we examined the expression levels of various SNARE proteins in response to hormone stimulation in steroidogenic tissues and cells and established an in vitro mitochondria reconstitution assay system to assess the contribution of various SNARE proteins on cholesterol delivery for steroidogenesis. Our results from reconstitution experiments along with knockdown studies in rat primary granulosa cells and in a Leydig cell line show that soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein-α, synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, syntaxin-5, and syntaxin-17 facilitate the transport of cholesterol to mitochondria. Thus, although StAR is required for efficient cholesterol movement into mitochondria for steroidogenesis, specific SNAREs participate and are necessary to mediate cholesterol movement to mitochondria.

  3. Cholesterol (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that is present in all parts of the body including the ... and obtained from animal products in the diet. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and is needed ...

  4. Association between cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene polymorphisms and variations in lipid levels in patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑克勤; 张思仲; 贺勇; 张立; 张克兰; 黄德嘉; 孙岩

    2004-01-01

    Background The TaqⅠB, MspⅠ and I405V polymorphisms of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), an important regulatory factor of lipid metabolism, have been attracted much more attention by the researchers. In this study, we investigated the associations between these 3 polymorphisms of CETP gene and variations in plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD).Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of 203 CHD patients and 100 control subjects using the salting out method. Genotyping of the CETP gene was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques. Statistical analysis was conducted using the SPSS 10.0 software package.Results The distribution of allele and genotype frequencies of the TaqⅠB, MspⅠ, and I405V polymorphisms was similar in the CHD patient group and the control group. The B1B1 genotype of the TaqⅠB polymorphism was associated with significantly higher TC (P=0.039) and LDL-C (P=0.044) levels than the B2B2 genotype in CHD patients, and with significantly higher LDL-C (P=0.034) levels than the B2B2 genotype in controls. Homozygotes of the I405V polymorphism exhibited significantly higher HDL-C levels than VV homozygotes among control subjects (P=0.023). In male CHD patients with unambiguously assigned haplotypes, B2-M2-V/B2-M2-I patients demonstrated significantly higher HDL-C concentrations than B1-M2-V/B1-M2-I (P=0.023) and B1-M2-V/B1-M2-V patients (P=0.047). Conclusions Genetic variations in the CETP gene may account for a significant proportion of the differences in plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentrations among the general population. The B1B1 genotype of the TaqⅠB polymorphism is probably a genetic risk factor for CHD in the study population.

  5. 13-week oral toxicity study with stanol esters in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnbull, D.; Whittaker, M.H.; Frankos, V.H.; Jonker, D.

    1999-01-01

    Plant sterols and their saturated derivatives, known as stanols, reduce serum cholesterol when consumed in amounts of approximately 2 g per day. Stanol fatty acid esters have been developed as a highly fat-soluble form that may lower cholesterol more effectively than stanols. Stanol esters occur nat

  6. JTT-130, a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP inhibitor lowers plasma triglycerides and LDL cholesterol concentrations without increasing hepatic triglycerides in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrestha Sudeep

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsomal transfer protein inhibitors (MTPi have the potential to be used as a drug to lower plasma lipids, mainly plasma triglycerides (TG. However, studies with animal models have indicated that MTPi treatment results in the accumulation of hepatic TG. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether JTT-130, a unique MTPi, targeted to the intestine, would effectively reduce plasma lipids without inducing a fatty liver. Methods Male guinea pigs (n = 10 per group were used for this experiment. Initially all guinea pigs were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet containing 0.08 g/100 g dietary cholesterol for 3 wk. After this period, animals were randomly assigned to diets containing 0 (control, 0.0005 or 0.0015 g/100 g of MTPi for 4 wk. A diet containing 0.05 g/100 g of atorvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor was used as the positive control. At the end of the 7th week, guinea pigs were sacrificed to assess drug effects on plasma and hepatic lipids, composition of LDL and VLDL, hepatic cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism. Results Plasma LDL cholesterol and TG were 25 and 30% lower in guinea pigs treated with MTPi compared to controls (P Conclusion These results suggest that JTT-130 could have potential clinical applications due to its plasma lipid lowering effects with no alterations in hepatic lipid concentrations.

  7. 逆相转移催化合成葵花籽油蔗糖酯%Synthesis of sunflower oil sucrose ester catalyzed by inverse phase - transfer catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊国栋; 康丽; 林振宇

    2012-01-01

    Using water solvent method, sunflower oil sucrose ester was synthesized by inverse phase -transfer catalyst DMAP with sucrose and fatty acid methyl ester prepared by ester - exchange method in the presence of basic catalyst from sunflower oil and methanol. The effects of molar ratio of fatty acids methyl ester to sucrose, catalyst dosage, reaction temperature and reaction time were studied. The results showed that the optimal conditions were as follows; molar ratio of fatty acids methyl ester to sucrose 2.5:1, catalyst dosage 4% , reaction temperature 85 °C and reaction time 7 h. Under the optimal conditions, the conversion rate of sunflower oil fatty acid methyl ester could reach 65. 32%. The final product had good surface activity, the critical micelle concentration(CMC) was 6. 5 g/L, surface tension was 27.41 mN/ m, emulsifying power was 79s, water count was 7. 2 mL, HLB was 10. 1 and iodine value was 126. 9 gI/ 100 g.%先由食用葵花籽油和甲醇在碱性催化剂条件下酯交换反应制得脂肪酸甲酯,然后脂肪酸甲酯与蔗糖通过水溶剂法,以逆相转移催化剂DMAP催化制备蔗糖脂肪酸酯.通过对酯糖摩尔比、催化剂用量、反应温度、反应时间进行考察,确定最佳合成条件为:酯糖摩尔比2.5∶1,催化剂用量4%,反应温度 85℃,反应时间7h.在最佳合成条件下,葵花籽油脂肪酸甲酯的转化率高达65.32%,所得产品具有良好的表面活性,其临界胶束质量浓度(CMC)为6.5 g/L,表面张力为27.41 mN/m,乳化力为79 s,浊点指数为7.2 mL,HLB值为10.1,碘值(Ⅰ)为126.9 g/100 g.

  8. Alterations in high-density lipoprotein metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus : role of lipolytic enzymes, lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, SE; de Vries, R; Dullaart, RPF

    2003-01-01

    Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus are generally accompanied by low HDL cholesterol and high plasma triglycerides, which are major cardiovascular risk factors. This review describes abnormalities in HDL metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport, i.e. the transport of cholesterol from

  9. Assessment of dietary exposure to flavouring substances via consumption of flavoured teas. Part II: transfer rates of linalool and linalyl esters into Earl Grey tea infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Anne-Marie; Poplacean, Iulia; Fastowski, Oxana; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of dietary exposure via the consumption of flavoured foods is a key element of the safety evaluation of flavouring substances. Linalyl acetate and linalool are the major flavouring substances in Earl Grey teas; the objective of this study was to determine their transfer rates from the tea leaves into the tea beverage upon preparation of a hot water infusion. Spiking experiments revealed a transfer rate of 66% for linalool. In contrast, the transfer rate for linalyl acetate was only 1.9%; in turn, the hydrolysis product linalool (17.0%) and a spectrum (19.9%) of degradation and rearrangement products (monoterpene alcohols, esters and hydrocarbons) were present in the tea beverage. The transfer rates were shown to be proportional to the length of the infusion. The impact of the hot water treatment on the enantiomeric compositions of linalyl acetate and linalool was determined, and structure-dependent experiments were performed by variation of the acyl and the alcohol moiety of the monoterpene ester. Comparative dietary exposure assessments demonstrated the need to take correction factors based on the experimentally determined transfer rates into account. Based on tea consumption data from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2000/2001), the exposure to linalyl acetate ranges from 0.2 mg day(-1) (average) to 1.8 mg day(-1) (high). The corresponding values for linalool are 4.2 mg day(-1) (average) and 46.6 mg day(-1) (high). The exposure of linalool via consumption of the tea beverage is approximately 26 times higher than that of linalyl acetate, although in the flavoured tea leaves the median content of linalyl acetate is approximately 1.8 times higher than that of linalool.

  10. Cholesterol-lowering interventions and stroke: Insights from IMPROVE-IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caterina, Raffaele; Salvatore, Tanya; Marchioli, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The relationship of cholesterol with stroke is much less clear than its relationship with myocardial infarction, thus confounding the interpretation of results with cholesterol-lowering trials. Because for long time the only lipid-lowering intervention reducing stroke was statins, it has been actually argued that reduction in stroke found in statin trials is not due to statins' ability to reduce LDL cholesterol, but to other "pleiotropic" effects, unrelated to cholesterol lowering. In re-analyzing the relationship of cholesterol lowering versus changes in the risk of stroke in a meta-regression of all cholesterol-lowering interventions, including also non-statin interventions, we had previously reached the opposite conclusion: that some reduction in stroke has to be expected proportional to cholesterol reduction. We had predicted that a 1% reduction of total cholesterol-no matter by what intervention produced-was associated with a 0.8% relative risk reduction of stroke. Data from the recently published Improved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) now offer a clear proof of this concept, demonstrating that pure cholesterol lowering, as obtained with ezetimibe, plays an important role in reducing stroke. IMPROVE-IT data, showing a 13.3% reduction in total cholesterol at one year in association with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.86 for total stroke during the trial, are very closely aligned with the relative risk of 0.90 predicted on the basis of the totality of lipid lowering interventions. These data are important to predict stroke outcomes in currently ongoing trials now testing PCSK9 or cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors.

  11. Characterization of placental cholesterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie L; Wassif, Christopher A; Vaisman, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Patients with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) are born with multiple congenital abnormalities. Postnatal cholesterol supplementation is provided; however, it cannot correct developmental malformations due to in utero cholesterol deficit. Increased transport of cholesterol from maternal to fetal...... circulation might attenuate congenital malformations. The cholesterol transporters Abca1, Abcg1, and Sr-b1 are present in placenta; however, their potential role in placental transport remains undetermined. In mice, expression analyses showed that Abca1 and Abcg1 transcripts increased 2-3-fold between...... embryonic days 13.5 and 18.5 in placental tissue; whereas, Sr-b1 expression decreased. To examine the functional role of Abca1, Abcg1 and Sr-b1 we measured the maternal-fetal transfer of (14)C-cholesterol in corresponding mutant embryos. Disruption of either Abca1 or Sr-b1 decreased cholesterol transfer...

  12. Photoinduced intramolecular charge-transfer reactions in 4-amino-3-methyl benzoic acid methyl ester: A fluorescence study in condensedphase and jet-cooled molecular beams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amrita Chakraborty; Samiran Kar; D N Nath; Nikhil Guchhait

    2007-03-01

    Photoinduced intramolecular charge-transfer reactions in 4-amino-3-methyl benzoic acid methyl ester (AMBME) have been investigated spectroscopically. AMBME, with its weak charge donor primary amino group, shows dual emission in polar solvents. Absorption and emission measurements in the condensed phase support the premise that the short wavelength emission band corresponds to local emission and the long wavelength emission band to the charge transfer emission. Laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectra show the presence of two low-energy conformers in jet-cooled molecular beams. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory help to determine structure, vibrational modes, potential energy surface, transition energy and oscillator strength for correlating experimental findings with theoretical results.

  13. Good vs. Bad Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Good vs. Bad Cholesterol Updated:Apr 3,2017 Cholesterol can't dissolve ... test . View an animation of cholesterol . LDL (Bad) Cholesterol LDL cholesterol is considered the “bad” cholesterol because ...

  14. High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Cholesterol What is High Blood Cholesterol? What is Cholesterol? Cholesterol is a ... heart disease. If Your Blood Cholesterol Is Too High Too much cholesterol in your blood is called ...

  15. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol: How High

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rajagopal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C is considered anti-atherogenic good cholesterol. It is involved in reverse transport of lipids. Epidemiological studies have found inverse relationship of HDL-C and coronary heart disease (CHD risk. When grouped according to HDL-C, subjects having HDL-C more than 60 mg/dL had lesser risk of CHD than those having HDL-C of 40-60 mg/dL, who in turn had lesser risk than those who had HDL-C less than 40 mg/dL. No upper limit for beneficial effect of HDL-C on CHD risk has been identified. The goals of treating patients with low HDL-C have not been firmly established. Though many drugs are known to improve HDL-C concentration, statins are proven to improve CHD risk and mortality. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP is involved in metabolism of HDL-C and its inhibitors are actively being screened for clinical utility. However, final answer is still awaited on CETP-inhibitors.

  16. Ester Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Garzon, C.S.; Straathof, A.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a process for producing an ester, such as a biobased ester, from an aqueous biomass comprising solution, batch wise or continuously, wherein use of raw material is limited and if possible re-used. The present invention is in the field of green technology.

  17. HEAT TRANSFER THROUGH CYANATE ESTER EPOXY MIX AND EPOXY GPAP–DETDA ELECTRICAL INSULATIONS AT SUPERFLUID HELIUM TEMPERATURE

    CERN Document Server

    Pietrowicz, S; Canfer, S; Jones, S; Baudouy, B

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the European project EuCARD (FP7) aiming at constructing a high magnetic field accelerator magnet of 13 T with Nb3Sn superconducting cables, new electrical insulation are thermally tested. This technology will use “conventional” electrical insulation in combination with pressurized superfluid helium (He II) or saturated helium at atmospheric pressure as coolant. Two composite insulation systems composed of cyanate ester epoxy mix or a tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) with fiberglass tape frame, have been chosen as potential candidates. The knowledge of their thermal properties is necessary for the thermal design and therefore samples have been tested in pressurized He II where heat is applied perpendicularly to the fibers between 1.6 K and 2.0 K. Overall thermal resistance is determined as a function of temperature and the results are compared with other electrical insulation systems used for accelerator magnets.

  18. A Study on Correlation between Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein and Coronary Heart Disease%胆固醇酯转运蛋白水平与冠心病患者血脂指标的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘祎; 刘寅; 高静

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) on lipid parameters in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods Five hundred and fifty-five cases were divided into CHD group (n= 430) and control group (n=120) according to the result of coronary angiography (CAG). The plasma levels of CETP, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein A1(ApoA1), apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and ApoA1/ApoB were measured and analyzed respectively in two groups. Results The values of HDL-C, ApoA1 and ApoAl/ApoB were significantly lower in CHD group compared with those of control group (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the level of CETP hetween two groups, hut the level of CETP was negatively correlated with the levels of HDL-C and ApoAl (r,= -0.141 and r,= -0.165 ,P < 0.05). The multivari-ate logistic regression analysis showed that CETP level was not independent risk factors of CHD.Conclusion Although CETP was not influencing factors of coronary heart disease, this study provided clinical data for regulating hlood lipids and treatment of coronary heart disease hy the intervention of CETP.%目的 探讨血浆胆固醇酯转运蛋白(CETP)对冠心病(CHD)患者相关血脂指标的影响.方法 行冠状动脉造影的患者550例,根据冠状动脉造影结果分为CHD组(n=430)和正常组(n=120).测定2组血浆CETP、总胆固醇(TC)、三酰甘油(TG)、高密度脂蛋白胆固醇(HDL-C)、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL-C)、载脂蛋白A1(ApoA1)、载脂蛋白B(ApoB)及ApoA1/ApoB水平.结果 CHD组患者血浆中HDL-C、ApoA1及ApoA1/ApoB的水平显著低于正常组(P < 0.01);CETP水平在CHD组与正常组间差异无统计学意义,CETP水平与HDL-C和ApoA1值呈负相关(rs分别为-0.141和-0.165,P < 0.05);多因素Logistic回归分析显示,CETP不是CHD的独立影响因素.结论 CETP虽然不是冠心病的

  19. Online LC-GC analysis of free sterols/stanols and intact steryl/stanyl esters in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esche, Rebecca; Scholz, Birgit; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-11-20

    The suitability of online liquid chromatography-gas chromatography for the analysis of free sterols/stanols, steryl/stanyl fatty acid esters, and trans-steryl/stanyl ferulic acid esters in cereals is demonstrated. The silylated lipid extracts were fractionated via liquid chromatography on a normal phase, and the fractions containing the sterol classes were transferred online to the gas chromatograph for the analysis of their individual compositions. The study provides for the first time data on free sterols/stanols and intact steryl/stanyl esters in sweet corn, popcorn, and proso millet. Sweet corn revealed the highest contents of free sterols/stanols and steryl/stanyl fatty acid esters, and popcorn, in turn, the highest amounts of trans-steryl/stanyl ferulic acid esters. The distribution patterns of the proso millet samples revealed pronounced differences from those of sweet corn and popcorn as they particularly exhibited high proportions of free cholesterol and cholesteryl fatty acid esters. Furthermore, no trans-steryl/stanyl ferulic acid esters could be detected.

  20. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to 3 g/day plant stanols as plant stanol esters and lowering blood LDL-cholesterol and reduced risk of (coronary) heart disease pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    related to 3 g/day plant stanols as plant stanol esters per day and lowering blood LDL-cholesterol by 12 % and reduced risk of (coronary) heart disease. The applicant has further requested that the minimum duration to obtain the effect be stated to be one to two weeks, and that the claims be authorised...... for an extended range of foods, including yellow fat spreads, dairy products, cheese, rye bread, oatmeal, fermented soy milk based products (drinkable and spoonable yoghurt-type products), and oat based milk drinks. The applicant provided an unpublished meta-analysis with 18 randomised, controlled human studies...... on the LDL-lowering efficacy of plant stanol esters at intakes between 2.7 to 3.3 g per day plant stanols. On the basis of the data presented, the Panel concludes that plant stanol esters at a daily intake of 3 g plant stanols (range 2.7 g to 3.3 g) in matrices approved by Regulation (EC) No 376/2010 (yellow...

  1. Scavenger receptor BI: a multi-purpose player in cholesterol and steroid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Menno; Van Berkel, Theo-Jc; Van Eck, Miranda

    2010-12-21

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) is an important member of the scavenger receptor family of integral membrane glycoproteins. This review highlights studies in SR-BI knockout mice, which concern the role of SR-BI in cholesterol and steroid metabolism. SR-BI in hepatocytes is the sole molecule involved in selective uptake of cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoprotein (HDL). SR-BI plays a physiological role in binding and uptake of native apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins by hepatocytes, which identifies SR-BI as a multi-purpose player in lipid uptake from the blood circulation into hepatocytes in mice. In adrenocortical cells, SR-BI mediates the selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters, which is efficiently coupled to the synthesis of glucocorticoids (i.e. corticosterone). SR-BI knockout mice suffer from adrenal glucocorticoid insufficiency, which suggests that functional SR-BI protein is necessary for optimal adrenal steroidogenesis in mice. SR-BI in macrophages plays a dual role in cholesterol metabolism as it is able to take up cholesterol associated with HDL and apoB-containing lipoproteins and can possibly facilitate cholesterol efflux to HDL. Absence of SR-BI is associated with thrombocytopenia and altered thrombosis susceptibility, which suggests a novel role for SR-BI in regulating platelet number and function in mice. Transgenic expression of cholesteryl ester transfer protein in humanized SR-BI knockout mice normalizes hepatic delivery of HDL-cholesteryl esters. However, other pathologies associated with SR-BI deficiency, i.e. increased atherosclerosis susceptibility, adrenal glucocorticoid insufficiency, and impaired platelet function are not normalized, which suggests an important role for SR-BI in cholesterol and steroid metabolism in man. In conclusion, generation of SR-BI knockout mice has significantly contributed to our knowledge of the physiological role of SR-BI. Studies using these mice have identified SR-BI as a

  2. Quantum confinement-tunable ultrafast charge transfer at the PbS quantum dot and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester interface

    KAUST Repository

    El-Ballouli, AlA'A O.

    2014-05-14

    Quantum dot (QD) solar cells have emerged as promising low-cost alternatives to existing photovoltaic technologies. Here, we investigate charge transfer and separation at PbS QDs and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) interfaces using a combination of femtosecond broadband transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy and steady-state photoluminescence quenching measurements. We analyzed ultrafast electron injection and charge separation at PbS QD/PCBM interfaces for four different QD sizes and as a function of PCBM concentration. The results reveal that the energy band alignment, tuned by the quantum size effect, is the key element for efficient electron injection and charge separation processes. More specifically, the steady-state and time-resolved data demonstrate that only small-sized PbS QDs with a bandgap larger than 1 eV can transfer electrons to PCBM upon light absorption. We show that these trends result from the formation of a type-II interface band alignment, as a consequence of the size distribution of the QDs. Transient absorption data indicate that electron injection from photoexcited PbS QDs to PCBM occurs within our temporal resolution of 120 fs for QDs with bandgaps that achieve type-II alignment, while virtually all signals observed in smaller bandgap QD samples result from large bandgap outliers in the size distribution. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that charge transfer rates at QD interfaces can be tuned by several orders of magnitude by engineering the QD size distribution. The work presented here will advance both the design and the understanding of QD interfaces for solar energy conversion. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  3. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C.Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as...

  4. Metabolism of adrenal cholesterol in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Abraham; Delcroix, Claude; Levin, Sam

    1972-01-01

    The synthesis of adrenal cholesterol, its esterification and the synthesis of the glucocorticosteroid hormones were studied in vitro on human adrenal tissue. It was found that the synthesis of adrenal cholesterol may normally be small in the zona “fasciculata,” particularly when compared with the synthesis of the glucocorticosteroid hormones, that it is several times higher in the zona “reticularis” where esterified cholesterol is less abundant, and that under ACTH stimulation it increases strikingly and proportionally to the degree of esterified adrenal cholesterol depletion. On the other hand, the relative rate of esterification as well as the concentration of free adrenal cholesterol are remarkably stable: they do not differ according to the adrenal zonation and are unaffected by ACTH. Furthermore, from a qualitative point of view, the relative proportions of Δ1 and Δ2 cholesteryl esters formed in situ are similar to those anticipated from their relative concentrations, suggesting that the characteristic fatty acid distribution of the adrenal cholesteryl esters results from an in situ esterification rather than from a selective uptake of the plasma cholesteryl esters. Besides, the in vitro esterification reveals a propensity to the formation of the most unsaturated cholesteryl esters. Regarding hydrocortisone and corticosterone, their synthesis tends to be more elevated in the zona “fasciculata.” Despite its higher cholesterol concentration the zona “fasciculata” should not therefore be viewed as a quiescent functional complement to the zona “reticularis” and the cortical distribution of glucocorticosteroid hormone synthesis is quite distinct from that of adrenal cholesterol synthesis. PMID:4338120

  5. Biochemical and Bioimaging Evidence of Cholesterol in Acquired Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, Bjarne; Bloksgaard, Maria; Groza, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    : The results show that the total lipid content of the cholesteatoma matrix is similar to that of stratum corneum from skin and that the cholesteatoma matrix unquestionably contains cholesterol. The cholesterol content in the cholesteatoma matrix is increased by over 30% (w/w dry weight) compared to the control....... The cholesterol sulfate content is below 1% of the total lipids in both the cholesteatoma and the control. Cholesterol ester was reduced by over 30% when compared to the control. CONCLUSIONS: The content of cholesterol in the cholesteatoma matrix is significantly different from that in stratum corneum from skin...

  6. Women and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Women and Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 The female sex hormone ... 2014. Related Sites Nutrition Center My Life Check Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  7. HDL Cholesterol Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities HDL Cholesterol Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... HDL; HDL-C Formal name: High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Related tests: Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; Lipid Profile ; ...

  8. Cholesterol IQ Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cholesterol IQ Quiz Updated:Feb 2,2015 Begin the quiz Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  9. Cholesterol and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cholesterol and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Cholesterol and ... child's risk of developing heart disease later. About Cholesterol Cholesterol is a waxy substance produced by the ...

  10. Lifestyle Changes and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Lifestyle Changes and Cholesterol Updated:Sep 26,2016 As part of a ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  11. Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol Updated:Apr 3,2017 Cholesterol can be both ... misconceptions about cholesterol. Click on each misconception about cholesterol to see the truth: My choices about diet ...

  12. LDL Cholesterol Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities LDL Cholesterol Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... LDL; LDL-C Formal name: Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; Lipid Profile ; ...

  13. Drugs targeting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary artery disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Pamela M; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    Many patients remain at high risk for future cardiovascular events despite levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) at, or below, target while taking statin therapy. Much effort is therefore being focused on strategies to reduce this residual risk. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is a strong, independent, inverse predictor of coronary heart disease risk and is therefore an attractive therapeutic target. Currently available agents that raise HDL-C have only modest effects and there is limited evidence of additional cardiovascular risk reduction on top of background statin therapy associated with their use. It was hoped that the use of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors would provide additional benefit, but the results of clinical outcome studies to date have been disappointing. The results of ongoing trials with other CETP inhibitors that raise HDL-C to a greater degree and also lower LDL-C, as well as with other emerging therapies are awaited.

  14. Niacin increases HDL by reducing hepatic expression and plasma levels of cholesteryl ester transfer protein in APOE*3Leiden.CETP mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.W.A. van der; Haan, W. de; Berbée, J.P.P.; Havekes, L.M.; Jukema, J.W.; Rensen, P.C.; Princen, H.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective - Niacin potently decreases plasma triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol. In addition, niacin is the most potent HDL-cholesterol- increasing drug used in the clinic. In the present study, we aimed at elucidation of the mechanism underlying its HDL-raising effect. Methods and Results - InAPOE*3

  15. New CETP inhibitor K-312 reduces PCSK9 expression: a potential effect on LDL cholesterol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyosawa, Katsutoshi; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Murakami, Kentaro; Murakami, Takeshi; Shibata, Haruki; Iwashita, Masaya; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Koichi; Ohgiya, Tadaaki; Shibuya, Kimiyuki; Mizuno, Ken; Tanabe, Sohei; Singh, Sasha A; Aikawa, Masanori

    2015-07-15

    Despite significant reduction of cardiovascular events by statin treatment, substantial residual risk persists, driving emerging needs for the development of new therapies. We identified a novel cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, K-312, that raises HDL and lowers LDL cholesterol levels in animals. K-312 also suppresses hepatocyte expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9), a molecule that increases LDL cholesterol. We explored the underlying mechanism for the reduction of PCSK9 expression by K-312. K-312 inhibited in vitro human plasma CETP activity (IC50; 0.06 μM). Administration of K-312 to cholesterol-fed New Zealand White rabbits for 18 wk raised HDL cholesterol, decreased LDL cholesterol, and attenuated aortic atherosclerosis. Our search for additional beneficial characteristics of this compound revealed that K-312 decreases PCSK9 expression in human primary hepatocytes and in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. siRNA silencing of CETP in HepG2 did not compromise the suppression of PCSK9 by K-312, suggesting a mechanism independent of CETP. In HepG2 cells, K-312 treatment decreased the active forms of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP-1 and -2) that regulate promoter activity of PCSK9. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that K-312 decreased the occupancy of SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 on the sterol regulatory element of the PCSK9 promoter. PCSK9 protein levels decreased by K-312 treatment in the circulating blood of cholesterol-fed rabbits, as determined by two independent mass spectrometry approaches, including the recently developed, highly sensitive parallel reaction monitoring method. New CETP inhibitor K-312 decreases LDL cholesterol and PCSK9 levels, serving as a new therapy for dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease.

  16. Using positive-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and H/D exchange study phosphoryl group transfer reactions involved in amino acid ester isopropyl phosphoramidates of Brefeldin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Mei-Juan; Zhang, He; Liao, Chao; Qiu, Ying-Kun [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiang-An South Road, Xiamen 361102 (China); Fang, Hua [The Third Institute of Oceanography of the State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zheng, Zhen-Yu [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Gao, Xiang [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiang-An South Road, Xiamen 361102 (China); Zhao, Yu-Fen [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiang-An South Road, Xiamen 361102 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wu, Zhen, E-mail: wuzhen@xmu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiang-An South Road, Xiamen 361102 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ESI-MS{sup n}, HRMS and H/D exchange were used. • The fragmentation pathways of NPAAE-BFA in ESI-MS{sup n} were described. • Fragment ions involved in phosphorus group’s rearrangement reactions were observed. • Two rearrangement mechanisms about phosphorylation–dephosphorylation were proposed. - Abstract: As mini-chemical models, amino acid ester isopropyl phosphoramidates of Brefeldin A (compounds 2a–2d) were synthesized and investigated by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in combination with H/D exchange. To further confirm the fragments’s structures, off-line Fourier transform resonance tandem mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS/MS) was also performed. The fragmentation rules of compounds 2a–2d have been summarized and the plausible schemes for the fragmentation pathways were proposed. In this study, one dephosphorylated ion and two phosphorylated ions were observed in ESI-MS{sup 2} spectra of [M + Na]{sup +} ions for compounds 2a–2d. The possible mechanisms about phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were proposed and confirmed by H/D exchange. For the “dephosphorylation” rearrangement, a nitrogen atom was migrated from the phosphoryl group to the carbon atom of Brefeldin A’s backbone with losing a molecule of C{sub 3}H{sub 7}PO{sub 3} (122 Da). For the “phosphorylation” rearrangement, an oxygen atom of one phosphoryl group attacked the sideward phosphorus atom to form a nine-member ring intermediate, then two steps of C-H covalent bond cleavage with consecutive migration of hydrogen atom to lose a molecule of C{sub 16}H{sub 20}O{sub 2} (244 Da). The two proposed rearrangement mechanisms about phosphoryl group transfer might be valuable for the structure analysis of other analogs and provide insights into elucidating the dynamic process of the phosphorylation–dephosphorylation of proteins.

  17. What Is Cholesterol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cholesterol KidsHealth > For Teens > Cholesterol Print A A A ... High Cholesterol? en español ¿Qué es el colesterol? Cholesterol Is a Fat in the Blood Cholesterol (kuh- ...

  18. What Is Cholesterol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cholesterol KidsHealth > For Teens > Cholesterol A A A What's ... High Cholesterol? en español ¿Qué es el colesterol? Cholesterol Is a Fat in the Blood Cholesterol (kuh- ...

  19. Cholesterol-Dependent Energy Transfer between Fluorescent Proteins—Insights into Protein Proximity of APP and BACE1 in Different Membranes in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern von Einem

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET -based techniques have recently been applied to study the interactions between β-site APP-cleaving enzyme-GFP (BACE1-GFP and amyloid precursor protein-mRFP (APP-mRFP in U373 glioblastoma cells. In this context, the role of APP-BACE1 proximity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis has been discussed. FRET was found to depend on intracellular cholesterol levels and associated alterations in membrane stiffness. Here, NPC1 null cells (CHO-NPC1−/−, exhibiting increased cholesterol levels and disturbed cholesterol transport similar to that observed in Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC, were used to analyze the influence of altered cholesterol levels on APP-BACE1 proximity. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of whole CHO-wild type (WT and CHO-NPC1−/− cells (EPI-illumination microscopy, as well as their plasma membranes (total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, TIRFM, were performed. Additionally, generalized polarization (GP measurements of CHO-WT and CHO-NPC1−/− cells incubated with the fluorescence marker laurdan were performed to determine membrane stiffness of plasma- and intracellular-membranes. CHO-NPC1−/− cells showed higher membrane stiffness at intracellular- but not plasma-membranes, equivalent to cholesterol accumulation in late endosomes/lysosomes. Along with higher membrane stiffness, the FRET efficiency between BACE1-GFP and APP-mRFP was reduced at intracellular membranes, but not within the plasma membrane of CHO-NPC1−/−. Our data show that FRET combined with TIRF is a powerful technique to determine protein proximity and membrane fluidity in cellular models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Cholesterol Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program High Cholesterol Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir As ... the facts about high cholesterol [PDF-281K] . High Cholesterol in the United States 73.5 million adults ( ...

  1. Get Your Cholesterol Checked

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Checked Print This Topic En español Get Your Cholesterol Checked Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cholesterol Test ... How often do I need to get my cholesterol checked? The general recommendation is to get your ...

  2. Dietary Fat and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Dietary Fat and Cholesterol Posted under Health Guides . Updated 7 March 2017. + ... saturated fat found in red meat. What is cholesterol? Cholesterol is a fatlike substance that’s found in ...

  3. High Blood Cholesterol Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Prevention and Management of High LDL Cholesterol: What You Can Do Recommend on ... like eating a healthy diet, can help prevent high cholesterol. High low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol increases ...

  4. Cholesterol lowering, low cholesterol, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRosa, J C

    1993-10-01

    Cholesterol lowering in both primary and secondary prevention has been clearly demonstrated to lower coronary morbidity and, in secondary prevention, to lower coronary mortality as well. Putative dangers of cholesterol lowering remain unproven. Population studies linking low cholesterol to noncoronary mortalities do not demonstrate cause-and-effect relations. In fact, based on current studies, the opposite is more likely to be the case. Neither gender nor age should automatically exclude persons from cholesterol screening. Drug intervention, however, should be used conservatively, particularly in young adults and the elderly. Drugs should be used only after diet and lifestyle interventions have failed. The evidence linking high blood cholesterol to coronary atherosclerosis and cholesterol lowering to its prevention is broad-based and definitive. Concerns about cholesterol lowering and spontaneously low cholesterols should be pursued but should not interfere with the implementation of current public policies to reduce the still heavy burden of atherosclerosis in Western society.

  5. Xanthohumol Prevents Atherosclerosis by Reducing Arterial Cholesterol Content via CETP and Apolipoprotein E in CETP-Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Hirata; Yimin; Shuichi Segawa; Moeko Ozaki; Naoyuki Kobayashi; Tatsuro Shigyo; Hitoshi Chiba

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Xanthohumol is expected to be a potent anti-atherosclerotic agent due to its inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). In this study, we hypothesized that xanthohumol prevents atherosclerosis in vivo and used CETP-transgenic mice (CETP-Tg mice) to evaluate xanthohumol as a functional agent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two strains of mice, CETP-Tg and C57BL/6N (wild-type), were fed a high cholesterol diet with or without 0.05% (w/w) xanthohumol ad libitum for 18 ...

  6. Identification of CETP as a molecular target for estrogen positive breast cancer cell death by cholesterol depleting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Luke; Sagar, Sunil; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth; Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites act as steroid hormone precursors, which promote estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) progression. Development of cholesterol targeting anticancer drugs has been hindered due to the lack of knowledge of viable molecular targets. Till now, Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) has been envisaged as a feasible molecular target in atherosclerosis, but for the first time, we show that CETP contributes to BC cell survival when challenged with cholesterol depleting agents. We show that MCF-7 CETP knockout BC cells pose less resistance towards cytotoxic compounds (Tamoxifen and Acetyl Plumbagin (AP)), and were more susceptible to intrinsic apoptosis. Analysis of differentially expressed genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), in vivo tumor inhibition, and in vitro phenotypic responses to AP revealed a unique CETP-centric cholesterol pathway involved in sensitizing ER+ BC cells to intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of cell line, tissue and patient data available in publicly available databases linked elevated CETP expression to cancer, cancer relapse and overall poor survival. Overall, our findings highlight CETP as a pharmacologically relevant and unexploited cellular target in BC. The work also highlights AP as a promising chemical entity for preclinical investigations as a cholesterol depleting anticancer therapeutic agent.

  7. Xanthohumol prevents atherosclerosis by reducing arterial cholesterol content via CETP and apolipoprotein E in CETP-transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Hirata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xanthohumol is expected to be a potent anti-atherosclerotic agent due to its inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP. In this study, we hypothesized that xanthohumol prevents atherosclerosis in vivo and used CETP-transgenic mice (CETP-Tg mice to evaluate xanthohumol as a functional agent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two strains of mice, CETP-Tg and C57BL/6N (wild-type, were fed a high cholesterol diet with or without 0.05% (w/w xanthohumol ad libitum for 18 weeks. In CETP-Tg mice, xanthohumol significantly decreased accumulated cholesterol in the aortic arch and increased HDL cholesterol (HDL-C when compared to the control group (without xanthohumol. Xanthohumol had no significant effect in wild-type mice. CETP activity was significantly decreased after xanthohumol addition in CETP-Tg mice compared with the control group and it inversely correlated with HDL-C (% (P<0.05. Furthermore, apolipoprotein E (apoE was enriched in serum and the HDL-fraction in CETP-Tg mice after xanthohumol addition, suggesting that xanthohumol ameliorates reverse cholesterol transport via apoE-rich HDL resulting from CETP inhibition. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest xanthohumol prevents cholesterol accumulation in atherogenic regions by HDL-C metabolism via CETP inhibition leading to apoE enhancement.

  8. Cooking for Lower Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cooking for Lower Cholesterol Updated:Oct 28,2016 A heart-healthy eating ... content was last reviewed on 04/21/2014. Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  9. Reverse cholesterol transport revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Astrid; E; van; der; Velde

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport was originally described as the high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol flux from the periphery via the hepatobiliary tract to the intestinal lumen, leading to fecal excretion. Since the introduction of reverse cholesterol transport in the 1970s, this pathway has been intensively investigated. In this topic highlight, the classical reverse cholesterol transport concepts are discussed and the subject reverse cholesterol transport is revisited.

  10. Safety evaluation of phytosterol esters. Part 3. Two-generation reproduction study in rats with phytosterol esters - A novel functional food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Wijnands, M.V.W.; Richold, M.; Hepburn, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    Phytosterol esters (PE) are intended for use as a novel food ingredient with plasma cholesterol lowering activity which works by inhibiting the absorption of cholesterol from the gut. Although PE are naturally present in the normal diet, the levels are insufficiently large to ensure lowering of plas

  11. The impact of cholesteryl ester transfer protein on glucose metabolism in 3T3-L1 adipocytes%胆固醇酯转运蛋白对3T3-L1脂肪细胞糖代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓慧; 常毅娜; 付真真; 郭雯; 高贝贝; 符金香; 陈晓丽; 周红文

    2014-01-01

    3T3-L1 adipocytes stably expressing different levels of human cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) were constructed and identified.Glucose uptake and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein levels of these cells were also measured.Insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake was significantly higher in 3T3-L1 adipocytes which expressed high,medium,and low levels of CETP than that in control ceils,and the elevated levels of glucose uptake were positively related with CETP expression in a dose-dependent manner.After insulin stimulation,there was no difference in GLUT4 protein expression among control cell and those expressing CETP.CETP plays a role in the regulation of glucose metabolism in adipocytes.%建立人胆固醇酯转运蛋白(CETP)不同表达水平的3T3-L1脂肪前体细胞株,并进行鉴定,测定葡萄糖摄取率以及葡萄糖转运体4(GLUT4)蛋白表达水平.与对照组相比,表达CETP的3T3-L1脂肪细胞葡萄糖摄取显著增高,且此作用与CETP表达量呈正相关.胰岛素刺激后,稳定表达CETP的3T3-L1脂肪细胞GLUT4蛋白表达水平与对照组相比无显著差异.推测CETP可能通过调节脂肪细胞内胆固醇含量的变化而促进脂肪细胞的糖代谢.

  12. ACAT1 deficiency increases cholesterol synthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Dwayne E; Su, Yan Ru; Swift, Larry L; Linton, MacRae F; Fazio, Sergio

    2006-06-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) esterifies free cholesterol and stores cholesteryl esters in lipid droplets. Macrophage ACAT1 deficiency results in increased atherosclerotic lesion area in hyperlipidemic mice via disrupted cholesterol efflux, increased lipoprotein uptake, accumulation of intracellular vesicles, and accelerated apoptosis. The objective of this study was to determine whether lipid synthesis is affected by ACAT1. The synthesis, esterification, and efflux of new cholesterol were measured in peritoneal macrophages from ACAT1(-/-) mice. Cholesterol synthesis was increased by 134% (p=0.001) in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages. Increased synthesis resulted in a proportional increase in the efflux of newly synthesized cholesterol. Although the esterification of new cholesterol was reduced by 93% (pSREBP1a mRNA was increased 6-fold in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages, suggesting an up-regulation of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages. Increased cholesterol synthesis and up-regulation of SREBP in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages suggests that ACAT1 affects the regulation of lipid metabolism in macrophages. This change in cholesterol homeostasis may contribute to the atherogenic potential of ACAT1(-/-) macrophages.

  13. Serum Lipid Transfer Proteins in Hypothyreotic Patients Are Inversely Correlated with Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczyńska, Anna; Wojakowska, Anna; Turczyn, Barbara; Zatońska, Katarzyna; Wołyniec, Maria; Rogala, Natalia; Szuba, Andrzej; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity is often decreased in patients with hypothyroidism, whereas less is known about the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). We aimed to evaluate simultaneously serum CETP and PLTP activity in patients diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Material/Methods The selection criteria for control group members (without thyroid dysfunction) in this case to case study were levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides similar to those in study group patients (101 patients diagnosed with hypothyroidism). Serum CETP and PLTP activities were measured by homogenous fluorometric assays using synthetic donor particle substrates. Results Serum CETP and PLTP activities in hypothyreotic patients were lower (p<0.001) compared with those in healthy subjects. This lowering was associated with significant changes in HDL-C subclasses: decrease in HDL2- and increase in HDL3 cholesterol levels. Multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking habits, and alcohol drinking showed a strong association between hypothyroidism and activity of lipid transfer proteins. A linear inverse relationship between thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and CETP (r=−0.21; p<0.01) and between TSH and PLTP (r=−0.24; p<0.001) was shown. There also was a positive correlation (p<0.001) between CETP and HDL2 cholesterol (r=0.27) and between PLTP and HDL2 cholesterol (r=0.37). A negative correlation between CETP and HDL3 cholesterol (r=−0.22: p<0.01) and between PLTP and HDL3 cholesterol (r=−0.24; p<0.001) has been demonstrated as well. Conclusions The decreased HDL2 and increased HDL3 cholesterol levels in subjects with hypothyroidism are consequences of decreased activity of lipid transfer proteins. These changes are early symptoms of lipid disturbances in hypothyroidism. PMID:27899788

  14. Application of pooled genotyping to scan candidate regions for association with HDL cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinds David A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Association studies are used to identify genetic determinants of complex human traits of medical interest. With the large number of validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs currently available, two limiting factors in association studies are genotyping capability and costs. Pooled DNA genotyping has been proposed as an efficient means of screening SNPs for allele frequency differences in case-control studies and for prioritising them for subsequent individual genotyping analysis. Here, we apply quantitative pooled genotyping followed by individual genotyping and replication to identify associations with human serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels. The DNA from individuals with low and high HDL cholesterol levels was pooled separately, each pool was amplified by polymerase chain reaction in triplicate and each amplified product was separately hybridised to a high-density oligonucleotide array. Allele frequency differences between case and control groups with low and high HDL cholesterol levels were estimated for 7,283 SNPs distributed across 71 candidate gene regions spanning a total of 17.1 megabases. A novel method was developed to take advantage of independently derived haplotype map information to improve the pooled estimates of allele frequency differences. A subset of SNPs with the largest estimated allele frequency differences between low and high HDL cholesterol groups was chosen for individual genotyping in the study population, as well as in a separate replication population. Four SNPs in a single haplotype block within the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP gene interval were significantly associated with HDL cholesterol levels in both populations. Our study is among the first to demonstrate the application of pooled genotyping followed by confirmation with individual genotyping to identify genetic determinants of a complex trait.

  15. Cholesterol testing and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholesterol test results; LDL test results; VLDL test results; HDL test results; Coronary risk profile results; Hyperlipidemia- ... Some cholesterol is considered good and some is considered bad. Different blood tests can be done to measure each ...

  16. Controlling Cholesterol with Statins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Controlling Cholesterol with Statins Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... not, the following tips can help keep your cholesterol in check: Talk with your healthcare provider about ...

  17. Cholesterol - drug treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000314.htm Cholesterol - drug treatment To use the sharing features on ... treatment; Hardening of the arteries - statin Statins for Cholesterol Statins reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, ...

  18. Cholesterol and public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRosa, J C

    1994-08-01

    Cholesterol lowering in both primary and secondary prevention has been clearly demonstrated to lower coronary morbidity and, in secondary prevention, to lower coronary mortality as well. Putative dangers of cholesterol lowering remain unproven. Population studies linking low cholesterol to noncoronary mortalities do not demonstrate cause-and-effect relations. In fact, based on current studies, the opposite is more likely to be the case. Neither gender nor age should automatically exclude persons from cholesterol screening. Drug intervention, however, should be used conservatively, particularly in young adults and the elderly. Drugs should be used only after diet and lifestyle interventions have failed. The evidence linking high blood cholesterol to coronary atherosclerosis and cholesterol lowering to its prevention is broad-based and definitive. Concerns about cholesterol lowering and spontaneously low cholesterols should be pursued but should not interfere with the implementation of current public policies to reduce the still heavy burden of atherosclerosis in Western society.

  19. High blood cholesterol levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000403.htm High blood cholesterol levels To use the sharing features ... stroke, and other problems. The medical term for high blood cholesterol is lipid disorder, hyperlipidemia, or hypercholesterolemia. ...

  20. Optimal Use of Plant Stanol Ester in the Management of Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Rosin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant stanol ester is a natural compound which is used as a cholesterol-lowering ingredient in functional foods and food supplements. The safety and efficacy of plant stanol ester have been confirmed in more than 70 published clinical studies and the ingredient is a well-established and widely recommended dietary measure to reduce serum cholesterol. Daily intake of 2 g plant stanols as plant stanol ester lowers LDL-cholesterol by 10%, on average. In Europe, foods with added plant stanol ester have been on the market for 20 years, and today such products are also available in many Asian and American countries. Despite the well-documented efficacy, the full potential in cholesterol reduction may not be reached if plant stanol ester is not used according to recommendations. This review therefore concentrates on the optimal use of plant stanol ester as part of dietary management of hypercholesterolemia. For optimal cholesterol lowering aiming at a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, plant stanol ester should be used daily, in sufficient amounts, with a meal and in combination with other recommended dietary changes.

  1. Making Aggressive Prostate Cancer Quiescent by Abrogating Cholesterol Esterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    using combination of cutting edge spectroscopic imaging and other technologies, including biochemistry assays and preclinical testing. The innovation of...research team has been assembled, with expertise in spectroscopic imaging & nanomedicine (Dr. J. X. Cheng, PI), biochemistry (Dr. X. Liu, co-PI), and...of cholesterol ester accumulation significantly suppressed prostate cancer aggressiveness without affecting normal cell viability. Based on these

  2. What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean Updated:Apr 3,2017 Keeping your ... content was last reviewed on 04/21/2014. Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  3. Home-Use Tests - Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Cholesterol Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... a home-use test kit to measure total cholesterol. What cholesterol is: Cholesterol is a fat (lipid) ...

  4. Effect of doxazosin on cholesterol synthesis in cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Eletto, R.D.; Javitt, N.B.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of doxazosin on cholesterol synthesis was determined by measuring the content of deuterium-enriched cholesterol in rabbit fibroblasts with and without receptors for low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and in hepatoma (Hep G2 cells). Doxazosin, at concentrations of 5-20 mumol/L, increased LDL binding to hepatic cells in a dose-related manner. Also, in these hepatic cells, doxazosin produced dose-related decreases in both newly synthesized cholesterol and cholesterol ester. In rabbit fibroblasts that were LDL receptor negative, de novo cholesterol synthesis was markedly reduced by increasing concentrations of doxazosin. Taken together, these results suggest that doxazosin may have a direct inhibitory effect on cholesterol synthesis independent of the LDL receptor. The inhibition of cholesterol synthesis by doxazosin may cause cells to compensate by upregulating the LDL receptor, thereby increasing the importation of lipoprotein cholesterol and reducing LDL cholesterol in the medium. This hypothesis supports findings in the clinical setting whereby doxazosin has a beneficial effect on the lipid profile, and suggests a useful additional property for this antihypertensive agent.

  5. Constrained photophysics of partially and fully encapsulated charge transfer probe (E)-3-(4-Methylaminophenyl) acrylic acid methyl ester inside cyclodextrin nano-cavities: Evidence of cyclodextrins cavity dependent complex stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shalini; Jana, Sankar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2011-12-01

    The polarity sensitive intra-molecular charge transfer (ICT) emission from (E)-3-(4-Methylaminophenyl) acrylic acid methyl ester (MAPAME) is found to show distinct changes once introduced into the nano-cavities of cyclodextrins in aqueous environment. Movement of the molecule from the more polar aqueous environment to the less polar, hydrophobic cyclodextrin interior is marked by the blue shift of the CT emission band with simultaneous fluorescence intensity enhancement. The emission spectral changes on complexation with the α- and β-CD show different stoichiometries as observed from the Benesi-Hildebrand plots. Fluorescence anisotropy and lifetime measurements were performed to probe the different behaviors of MAPAME in aqueous α- and β-CD solutions.

  6. Cholesterol-lowering activity of soy-derived glyceollins in the golden Syrian hamster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiqiu; Xie, Zhuohong; Boue, Stephen M; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Yokoyama, Wallace; Yu, Liangli Lucy; Wang, Thomas T Y

    2013-06-19

    Hypercholesterolemia is one of the major factors contributing to the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading cause of death in developed countries. Consumption of soy foods has been recognized to lower the risk of CVD, and phytochemicals in soy are believed to contribute to the health benefits. Glyceollin is one of the candidate phytochemicals synthesized in stressed soy that may account for many unique biological activities. In this study, the in vivo cholesterol-lowering effect of glyceollins was investigated. Male golden Syrian hamsters were fed diets including (1) 36 kcal% fat diet, (2) 36 kcal% fat diet containing 250 mg/kg diet glyceollins, or (3) chow for 28 days. Hepatic cholesterol esters and free cholesterol, hepatic total lipid content, plasma lipoproteins, fecal bile acid, fecal total cholesterol, and cholesterol metabolism related gene expressions were measured. Glyceollin supplementation led to significant reduction of plasma VLDL, hepatic cholesterol esters, and total lipid content. Consistent with changes in circulating cholesterol, glyceollin supplementation also altered expression of the genes related to cholesterol metabolism in the liver. In contrast, no change in plasma LDL and HDL, fecal bile acid, or cholesterol content was observed. The cholesterol-lowering effect of glyceollins appeared not to go through the increase of bile excretion. These results supported glyceollins' role as novel soy-derived cholesterol-lowering phytochemicals that may contribute to soy's health effects.

  7. Acute sterol o-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2 knockdown rapidly mobilizes hepatic cholesterol for fecal excretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Marshall

    Full Text Available The primary risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is LDL cholesterol, which can be reduced by increasing cholesterol excretion from the body. Fecal cholesterol excretion can be driven by a hepatobiliary as well as a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE. We previously showed that chronic knockdown of the hepatic cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2 increased fecal cholesterol loss via TICE. To elucidate the initial events that stimulate TICE, C57Bl/6 mice were fed a high cholesterol diet to induce hepatic cholesterol accumulation and were then treated for 1 or 2 weeks with an antisense oligonucleotide targeting SOAT2. Within 2 weeks of hepatic SOAT2 knockdown (SOAT2HKD, the concentration of cholesteryl ester in the liver was reduced by 70% without a reciprocal increase in hepatic free cholesterol. The rapid mobilization of hepatic cholesterol stores resulted in a ∼ 2-fold increase in fecal neutral sterol loss but no change in biliary cholesterol concentration. Acute SOAT2HKD increased plasma cholesterol carried primarily in lipoproteins enriched in apoB and apoE. Collectively, our data suggest that acutely reducing SOAT2 causes hepatic cholesterol to be swiftly mobilized and packaged onto nascent lipoproteins that feed cholesterol into the TICE pathway for fecal excretion.

  8. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wulp, Mariëtte Y M; Verkade, Henkjan J; Groen, Albert K

    2013-04-10

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-coding RNA's. The last two decades insight into underlying mechanisms has increased vastly but there are still a lot of unknowns, particularly regarding intracellular cholesterol transport. After decades of concentration on the liver, in recent years the intestine has come into focus as an important control point in cholesterol homeostasis. This review will discuss current knowledge of cholesterol physiology, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and new (possible) therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia.

  9. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology.

  10. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about cholesterol ... What is my cholesterol level? What should my cholesterol level be? What are HDL ("good") cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Does my cholesterol ...

  11. Current guidelines for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in therapy and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subedi BH

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bishnu H Subedi,1,2 Parag H Joshi,1 Steven R Jones,1 Seth S Martin,1 Michael J Blaha,1 Erin D Michos1 1Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, 2Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Many studies have suggested that a significant risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD is low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. Therefore, increasing HDL-C with therapeutic agents has been considered an attractive strategy. In the prestatin era, fibrates and niacin monotherapy, which cause modest increases in HDL-C, reduced ASCVD events. Since their introduction, statins have become the cornerstone of lipoprotein therapy, the benefits of which are primarily attributed to decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Findings from several randomized trials involving niacin or cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have challenged the concept that a quantitative elevation of plasma HDL-C will uniformly translate into ASCVD benefits. Consequently, the HDL, or more correctly, HDL-C hypothesis has become more controversial. There are no clear guidelines thus far for targeting HDL-C or HDL due to lack of solid outcomes data for HDL specific therapies. HDL-C levels are only one marker of HDL out of its several structural or functional properties. Novel approaches are ongoing in developing and assessing agents that closely mimic the structure of natural HDL or replicate its various functions, for example, reverse cholesterol transport, vasodilation, anti-inflammation, or inhibition of platelet aggregation. Potential new approaches like HDL infusions, delipidated HDL, liver X receptor agonists, Apo A-I upregulators, Apo A mimetics, and gene therapy are in early phase trials. This review will outline current therapies and describe future directions for HDL therapeutics. Keywords: high-density lipoprotein, lipids, cholesterol, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, therapy

  12. Functional group induced excited state intramolecular proton transfer process in 4-amino-2-methylsulfanyl-pyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid ethyl ester: a combined spectroscopic and density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Sankar; Dalapati, Sasanka; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-09-01

    The molecule methyl-2-aminonicotinate (2-MAN) does not exhibit excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), but its derivative 4-amino-2-methylsulfanyl-pyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (AMPCE), widely used in the preparation of pyrimidopyrimidines as a protein kinase inhibitor, does exhibit ESIPT. Increasing acidic and basic character at the proton donor and proton acceptor sites by adding functional groups is found to be responsible for the large Stokes shifted ESIPT emission (Δν = 12,706 cm(-1)) in AMPCE. The photophysics of AMPCE have been explored on the basis of steady state and time resolved spectral measurements, quantum yield calculation with variation of polarity, as well as hydrogen bonding ability of solvents. Experimental findings have been correlated with the calculated structure and potential energy surfaces based on the intramolecular proton transfer model obtained by density functional theory (DFT). Properties based on the calculated excited state surfaces generated in vacuo and methanol solvent using time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and time dependent density functional theory polarized continuum model (TDDFT-PCM), respectively, show good agreement with the experimental findings. HOMO and LUMO diagrams also support the favorable ESIPT process in the first excited state potential energy surface.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes Are Able to Manage Internal Cholesterol Levels under Nutritional Lipid Stress Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Miria Gomes; Visbal, Gonzalo; Salgado, Leonardo T.; Vidal, Juliana Cunha; Godinho, Joseane L. P.; De Cicco, Nuccia N. T.; Atella, Geórgia C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes store high amounts of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in reservosomes. These unique organelles are responsible for cellular digestion by providing substrates for homeostasis and parasite differentiation. Here we demonstrate that under nutritional lipid stress, epimastigotes preferentially mobilized reservosome lipid stocks, instead of lipid bodies, leading to the consumption of parasite cholesterol reservoirs and production of ergosterol. Starved epimastigotes acquired more LDL-NBD-cholesterol by endocytosis and distributed the exogenous cholesterol to their membranes faster than control parasites. Moreover, the parasites were able to manage internal cholesterol levels, alternating between consumption and accumulation. With normal lipid availability, parasites esterified cholesterol exhibiting an ACAT-like activity that was sensitive to Avasimibe in a dose-dependent manner. This result also implies that exogenous cholesterol has a role in lipid reservoirs in epimastigotes. PMID:26068009

  14. National Cholesterol Education Month

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    Do you know your cholesterol numbers? Your doctor can do a simple test to check your cholesterol levels and help you make choices that lower your risk for heart disease and stroke.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  15. What Causes High Blood Cholesterol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes High Blood Cholesterol? Many factors can affect the cholesterol levels in your blood. You can control some ... but not others. Factors You Can Control Diet Cholesterol is found in foods that come from animal ...

  16. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000787.htm Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol To use the sharing features on this page, ... are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can stick ...

  17. Fluorescent assay of total serum cholesterol, with use of gas-liquid chromatography to study saponification efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeski, E J; Seltzer, E J; Carter, P L; Howlett, D R; Stuart, J D

    1977-11-01

    We describe a fluorescent determination of total cholesterol in serum for which the accuracy and precision are comparable to that for the method of Abell-Kendall, a method of generally accepted accuracy. By the use of quality reagents and the rigorous exclusion of water, the strong fluorophor that develops on reacting concentrated sulfuric acid with cholesterol can be used to quantitatively determine the total cholesterol in serum. We used gas-liquid chromatography to monitor the extent of saponification of the cholesterol esters, because we found them to have fluorescent efficiencies that differed from that of free cholesterol. Sodium methoxide in methanol/methylene chloride (1/3 by vol) was shown by gas-liquid chromatography to very effectively saponify the cholesterol esters in serum.

  18. Increased plant sterol and stanol levels in brain of Watanabe rabbits fed rapeseed oil derived plant sterol or stanol esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fricke, Christiane B.; Schrøder, Malene; Poulsen, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    Foods containing plant sterol or stanol esters can be beneficial in lowering LDL-cholesterol concentration, a major risk factor for CVD. The present study examined whether high dietary intake of rapeseed oil (RSO) derived plant sterol and stanol esters is associated with increased levels...

  19. Serum lipid and antioxidant responses in hypercholesterolemic men and women receiving plant sterol esters vary by apolipoprotein E genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant sterol esters reduce serum total cholesterol (TC) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), but with striking inter-individual variability. In this randomized, double-blind, controlled study, serum lipid, plant sterol, fat-soluble vitamin, and carotenoid responses to plant sterols were studied according to...

  20. FXR-mediated down-regulation of CYP7A1 dominates LXRalpha in long-term cholesterol-fed NZW rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guorong; Li, Hai; Pan, Lu-Xing; Shang, Quan; Honda, Akira; Ananthanarayanan, M; Erickson, Sandra K; Shneider, Benjamin L; Shefer, Sarah; Bollineni, Jaya; Forman, Barry M; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Suchy, Frederick J; Tint, G Stephen; Salen, Gerald

    2003-10-01

    We investigated how cholesterol feeding regulates cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) via the nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha) in New Zealand white rabbits. After 1 day of 2% cholesterol feeding, when the bile acid pool size had not expanded, mRNA levels of the FXR target genes short-heterodimer partner (SHP) and sterol 12alpha-hydroxylase (CYP8B) were unchanged, indicating that FXR activation remained constant. In contrast, the mRNA levels of the LXRalpha target genes ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) increased 5-fold and 2.3-fold, respectively, associated with significant increases in hepatic concentrations of oxysterols. Activity and mRNA levels of CYP7A1 increased 2.4 times and 2.2 times, respectively. After 10 days of cholesterol feeding, the bile acid pool size increased nearly 2-fold. SHP mRNA levels increased 4.1-fold while CYP8B declined 64%. ABCA1 mRNA rose 8-fold and CETP mRNA remained elevated. Activity and mRNA of CYP7A1 decreased 60% and 90%, respectively. Feeding cholesterol for 1 day did not enlarge the ligand pool size or change FXR activation, while LXRalpha was activated highly secondary to increased hepatic oxysterols. As a result, CYP7A1 was up-regulated. After 10 days of cholesterol feeding, the bile acid (FXR ligand) pool size increased, which activated FXR and inhibited CYP7A1 despite continued activation of LXRalpha. Thus, in rabbits, when FXR and LXRalpha are activated simultaneously, the inhibitory effect of FXR overrides the stimulatory effect of LXRalpha to suppress CYP7A1 mRNA expression.

  1. Cholesterol and Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can I make to reduce my risk of cardiovascular disease? • Is there medication that can help reduce my cholesterol ... It also helps your body make vitamin D and produces the bile that helps you ...

  2. Ester Tuiksoo / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2007-01-01

    Juhan Partsi valitsuse (05.04.2004-13.04.2005) ja Andrus Ansipi valitsuse (13.04.2005-) põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo oma lapsepõlvest ja elukutsevalikust, poliitilise karjääri algusest ja erakonna valikust, ministritöö kogemustest, naistest poliitikas

  3. The origin of cholesterol in chyle demonstrated by nuclear indicator methods; Origines du cholesterol du chyle mises en evidence par la methode des indicateurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, M

    1962-07-01

    In order to obtain information about the mechanism of the intestinal absorption of cholesterol, rats having a lymphatic abdominal fistula are used. The animals receive either 4-{sup 14}C- cholesterol subcutaneously or orally, or the 1-{sup 14}C acetate. The study of the specific radio-activities of the cholesterol in chyle, in serum, in the lining, and in the intestinal contents makes it possible to define the roles played by the transfer cholesterol from the serum, by the cholesterol synthesised intestinally, and by the absorption cholesterol, in the formations of the lymph and of the chylomicrons. A new theory is proposed for the mechanism of cholesterol absorption. (author) [French] Pour obtenir des renseignements concernant le mecanisme de l'absorption intestinale du cholesterol, on utilise des rats porteurs d'une fistule lymphatique abdominale. Les animaux recoivent soit du cholesterol 4-{sup 14}C par voie sous-cutanee ou par voie orale, soit de l'acetate 1-{sup 14}C. L'etude des radioactivites specifiques du cholesterol du chyle, du serum, de la paroi et du contenu intestinal permet de preciser les roles joues par le cholesterol de transfert d'origine serique, par le cholesterol de synthese intestinale et par le cholesterol d'absorption, dans la formation de la lymphe et des chylomicrons. Une theorie nouvelle concernant le mecanisme de l'absorption du cholesterol est proposee. (auteur)

  4. Cholesterol in unusual places

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucerka, N; Nieh, M P; Marquardt, D; Harroun, T A; Wassail, S R; Katsaras, J, E-mail: John.Katsaras@nrc.gc.ca, E-mail: Norbert.Kucerka@nrc.gc.ca

    2010-11-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of mammalian cells, and is required for building and maintaining cell membranes, regulating their fluidity, and possibly acting as an antioxidant. Cholesterol has also been implicated in cell signaling processes, where it has been suggested that it triggers the formation of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane. Aside from cholesterol's physiological roles, what is also becoming clear is its poor affinity for lipids with unsaturated fatty acids as opposed to saturated lipids, such as sphingomyelin with which it forms rafts. We previously reported the location of cholesterol in membranes with varying degrees of acyl chain unsaturation as determined by neutron diffraction studies (Harroun et al 2006 Biochemistry 45, 1227; Harroun et al 2008 Biochemistry 47, 7090). In bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules with a saturated acyl chain at the sn-1 position or a monounsaturated acyl chain at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions, cholesterol was found in its much-accepted 'upright' position. However, in dipolyunsaturated 1,2-diarachidonyl phosphatidylcholine (20:4-20:4PC) membranes the molecule was found sequestered in the center of the bilayers. In further experiments, mixing l-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (16:0-18:1 PC) with 20:4-20:4PC resulted in cholesterol reverting to its upright orientation at approximately 40 mol% 16:0-18:1 PC. Interestingly, the same effect was achieved with only 5 mol% 1,2-dimyristoyl phosphatidylchoile (14:0-14:0PC).

  5. New conception concerning the dynamical state of cholesterol in rat; Conception nouvelle concernant l'etat dynamyque du cholesterol chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallier, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-03-15

    It presents the study of the cholesterol metabolism in rats. This thesis has been divided in three chapters. In a first part, it will discuss about the dynamic state of biological constituents in organism and in particular the dynamic state of cholesterol. This matter will be considered, firstly under its theoretical aspect and secondly under an experimental point of view with isotopic techniques. The current data on the dynamic state of cholesterol will allow to identify the essential points which are the subject of this research. In particular, the full understanding of the different cholesterol origins (diet, biosynthesis or formation of cholesterol from degradation or transformation of precursors as acetate or butyric acid for example) and the different cholesterol disappearance way (excretion, destruction, transformation or esters formation) is necessary to further research. In a second part, the experimental techniques and methods are described. A brief presentation of the methods for the study of the cholesterol transport and synthesis will be given as well as the experimental conditions and in particular the animal diet and cholesterol ingestion, the administration of acetate and {gamma}-phenyl {alpha}-aminobutyric. The different preparations of the {sup 14}C labelled cholesterol are also described as well as the extraction and measuring of the specific {sup 14}C radioactivity in the animal tissues extract, carbon dioxide gas and sodium acetate. Finally, the results will be given and discussed according to the way of intake: a radioactive cholesterol ingestion or an acetate intraperitoneal injection. (M.P.)

  6. STUDY ON THE SEPARATION THROUGH THIN LAYER CHROMATOGRAPHY OF THE CHOLESTEROL IN THE BUFFALO MILK ORIGINATING IN THE MESENDORF FARM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AURELIA PECE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the present study, we conducted a thin layer chromatographic separation of neuter fats in buffalo milk, following sodium metoxyde saponification and the exposition to λ=366 nm. The extraction of free and esterized milk cholesterol was conducted according to the Folch et al. (1957 method. The free and esterized cholesterol, as well as triglycerids appear as brown spots (iodine complexes with the double connections between the compounds under anlysis. Qualitative identification was conducted through the comparison of Rfs for free and esterized cholesterol, in the samples analyzed with existing standards. The semi-quantitative anlysis was conducted through a visual comparison of the intensity encountered in free cholesterol spots within samples under anlysis and the standard of different concentrations applied on the same board. Buffalo milk samples originated in the Mesendorf Farm, considered and certified as an ecologic farm.

  7. Lysosomal acid lipase: At the crossroads of normal and atherogenic cholesterol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A Dubland

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Unregulated cellular uptake of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the arterial intima leads to the formation of foam cells in atherosclerosis. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL plays a crucial role in both lipoprotein lipid catabolism and excess lipid accumulation as it is the primary enzyme that hydrolyzes cholesteryl esters derived from both low density lipoprotein (LDL and modified forms of LDL. Evidence suggests that as atherosclerosis progresses, accumulation of excess free cholesterol in lysosomes leads to impairment of LAL activity, resulting in accumulation of cholesteryl esters in the lysosome as well as the cytosol in foam cells. Impaired metabolism and release of cholesterol from lysosomes can lead to downstream defects in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 regulation, needed to offload excess cholesterol from plaque foam cells. This review focuses on the role LAL plays in normal cholesterol metabolism and how the associated changes in its enzymatic activity may ultimately contribute to atherosclerosis progression.

  8. Cellular cholesterol delivery, intracellular processing and utilization for biosynthesis of steroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Salman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Steroid hormones regulate diverse physiological functions such as reproduction, blood salt balance, maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics, response to stress, neuronal function and various metabolic processes. They are synthesized from cholesterol mainly in the adrenal gland and gonads in response to tissue-specific tropic hormones. These steroidogenic tissues are unique in that they require cholesterol not only for membrane biogenesis, maintenance of membrane fluidity and cell signaling, but also as the starting material for the biosynthesis of steroid hormones. It is not surprising, then, that cells of steroidogenic tissues have evolved with multiple pathways to assure the constant supply of cholesterol needed to maintain optimum steroid synthesis. The cholesterol utilized for steroidogenesis is derived from a combination of sources: 1 de novo synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER; 2 the mobilization of cholesteryl esters (CEs stored in lipid droplets through cholesteryl ester hydrolase; 3 plasma lipoprotein-derived CEs obtained by either LDL receptor-mediated endocytic and/or SR-BI-mediated selective uptake; and 4 in some cultured cell systems from plasma membrane-associated free cholesterol. Here, we focus on recent insights into the molecules and cellular processes that mediate the uptake of plasma lipoprotein-derived cholesterol, events connected with the intracellular cholesterol processing and the role of crucial proteins that mediate cholesterol transport to mitochondria for its utilization for steroid hormone production. In particular, we discuss the structure and function of SR-BI, the importance of the selective cholesterol transport pathway in providing cholesterol substrate for steroid biosynthesis and the role of two key proteins, StAR and PBR/TSO in facilitating cholesterol delivery to inner mitochondrial membrane sites, where P450scc (CYP11A is localized and where the conversion of cholesterol to

  9. Triterpenic Acids Present in Hawthorn Lower Plasma Cholesterol by Inhibiting Intestinal ACAT Activity in Hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida is an edible fruit used in traditional Chinese medicine to lower plasma lipids. This study explored lipid-lowering compounds and underlying mechanisms of action of hawthorn. Hawthorn powder extracts inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT activity in Caco-2 cells. The inhibitory activity was positively associated with triterpenic acid (i.e., oleanolic acid (OA and ursolic acid (UA contents in the extracts. Cholesterol lowering effects of hawthorn and its potential additive effect in combination with plant sterol esters (PSE were further studied in hamsters. Animals were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.08% (w/w cholesterol (control or the same diet supplemented with (i 0.37% hawthorn dichloromethane extract, (ii 0.24% PSE, (iii hawthorn dichloromethane extract (0.37% plus PSE (0.24% or (iv OA/UA mixture (0.01% for 4 weeks. Compared to the control diet, hawthorn, PSE, hawthorn plus PSE and OA/UA significantly lowered plasma non-HDL (VLDL + LDL cholesterol concentrations by 8%, 9%, 21% and 6% and decreased hepatic cholesterol ester content by 9%, 23%, 46% and 22%, respectively. The cholesterol lowering effects of these ingredients were conversely associated with their capacities in increasing fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, OA and UA are responsible for the cholesterol lowering effect of hawthorn by inhibiting intestinal ACAT activity. In addition, hawthorn and particularly its bioactive compounds (OA and UA enhanced the cholesterol lowering effect of plant sterols.

  10. Inhibition of Cholesterol Esterification Influences Cytokine Exspression in Lypopolisaccharide-activated P388D1 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rita Bonatesta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Several in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated the involvement of infectious agents in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanisms by which micro-organisms induce and/or aggravate atherosclerosis, are so far unclear. Accumulation of cholesterol esters and lipid laden cell formation are hallmark of the atherogenesis, however, the possible relationship between cholesterol esterification and the signal-transducing component of LPS recognition complex inducing cytokine secretion has not been yet investigated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of mevinolin, the ACAT inhibitor, Sandoz 58035, and plasma from statin-treated hypercholesterolemic patients on cholesterol metabolism and cytokine expression in LPS activated P388D1 macrophages. In P388D1 macrophages cholesterol synthesis and uptake, as well as cholesterol ester synthesis, were unchanged following LPS-activation. When cells were grown in presence of serum from patients under statin therapy, cholesterol esterification was lower compared to cells grown with plasma from healthy subjects, independently from the type of statin used. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of IL-1β expression in LPS activated cells. The ACAT inhibitor, Sandoz 58035, which completely blocked cholesterol esterification in normal and LPS-activated macrophages, prevented IL-1β and IL-6 over-expression in LPS activated cells. Although preliminary, these data point to a possible relationship between cholesterol esterification and cytokine production in macrophages, prospecting new possible mechanisms by which microbial or inflammatory agents may induce and/or accelerate the atherosclerotic process.

  11. Composition and functional properties of cholesterol reduced egg yolk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, A C; Bennink, M R; Smith, D M

    1997-04-01

    The composition and functional properties of cholesterol reduced egg yolk (CREY) were compared to those of control egg yolk (EY). The CREY was prepared by absorbing cholesterol with beta-cyclodextrin after dilution and dissociation of granules at pH 10.5. The CREY contained less lipid and protein and more carbohydrate and ash than EY. Egg lipids were fractionated into triglycerides, cholesterol esters, free cholesterol, phosphatidyl choline, and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Free and esterified cholesterol in CREY were reduced by 91.6 and 94.4%, respectively. Triglycerides were the major lipid class in CREY. The CREY contained more oleic acid and less linoleic acid than the control. Protein solubility in 0.1 and 0.6 M NaCl and sponge cake volume did not differ. The composition of proteins soluble in 0.6 M NaCl in both egg preparations were similar as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The electrophoretic profiles of proteins soluble in 0.1 M NaCl were similar, except that lipovitellin form EY was insoluble under these conditions. The CREY was less yellow than EY, as indicated by beta-carotene concentrations and Hunter b values. These results suggest that beta-cyclodextrin can be used to produce a low cholesterol egg product with compositional and functional properties similar to EY.

  12. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Kristine; Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer risk can be modified by environmental factors, however the molecular mechanisms affecting susceptibility to this disease are not well understood. As a result of a series of recently published studies, the steroidal lipid, cholesterol, has emerged as a clinically relevant therapeutic target in prostate cancer. This review summarizes the findings from human studies as well as animal and cell biology models, which suggest that high circulating cholesterol increases risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while cholesterol lowering strategies may confer protective benefit. Relevant molecular processes that have been experimentally tested and might explain these associations are described. We suggest that these promising results now could be applied prospectively to attempt to lower risk of prostate cancer in select populations.

  13. ProAlgaZyme and its subfractions increase plasma HDL cholesterol via upregulation of ApoA1, ABCA1, and SRB1, and inhibition of CETP in hypercholesterolemic hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geamanu A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Andreea Geamanu, Nadia Saadat, Arvind Goja, Monika Wadehra, Xiangming Ji, Smiti V GuptaNutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USABackground: Plasma HDL cholesterol levels are inversely related to cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death worldwide. This study investigated the effect of an algae infusion, ProAlgaZyme (PAZ, and its subfractions (P1, P2, P3, P4 on plasma HDL in a hamster model.Methods: Sixty male golden Syrian hamsters (8 weeks old were randomized into controls (W or PAZ (P, P1, P2, P3, and P4 (n = 10 per group. An infusion of either 5% (P1, P2, P3 or 20% (P, P4 concentration (v/v was administered via the drinking water for 4 weeks, while the hamsters were being fed a high-fat diet (30% of calories from fat. Serum lipids were assayed and liver samples subjected to reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the relative transcription levels of genes involved in HDL/reverse cholesterol transport metabolism, ie, ApoA1, ABCA1, CETP, and SRB1.Results: Non-HDL cholesterol was significantly reduced in the P (P < 0.05, P3 and P4 (P < 0.001 groups as compared with the W group, while HDL cholesterol showed a significant increase in the P, P3, and P4 groups (P < 0.001. Moreover, the total cholesterol/HDL ratio was significantly improved in the P, P1, and P2 (P < 0.05, and P3 and P4 (P < 0.001 groups. The shift in cholesterol towards the higher density fractions was validated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed a significant increase in hepatic ApoA1 (P, P4 and ABCA1 (P3, P4 expression, consistent with an increase in HDL production, biogenesis, and maturation. A two-fold increase in SRB1 expression indicates that P4 further augments the reverse cholesterol transport mechanism. Reduction of CETP expression (P4 is consistent with a decrease in the transfer of cholesteryl ester to LDL, further increasing the amount of

  14. Evolving neural network optimization of cholesteryl ester separation by reversed-phase HPLC

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Michael A.; Kiwata, Jacqueline; Arceo, Jennifer; Faull, Kym F.; Hanrahan, Grady; Porter, Edith

    2010-01-01

    Cholesteryl esters have antimicrobial activity and likely contribute to the innate immunity system. Improved separation techniques are needed to characterize these compounds. In this study, optimization of the reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography separation of six analyte standards (four cholesteryl esters plus cholesterol and tri-palmitin) was accomplished by modeling with an artificial neural network–genetic algorithm (ANN-GA) approach. A fractional factorial design was emp...

  15. Steroid balance and tissue cholesterol accumulation in germfree and conventional rats fed diets containing saturated and polyunsaturated fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, T F

    1974-11-01

    Steroid balance studies were conducted on 24 conventional and 12 germfree male rats, 90-120 days old, fed diets containing either 20% safflower or 20% coconut oil. Both germfree and conventional rats fed the safflower oil diets had significantly lower serum cholesterol levels and significantly higher liver cholesterol levels than did the rats fed coconut oil. No significant differences in total fecal neutral sterols, coprostanol, Delta(7)-cholestenol, or total fecal bile acid excretion were seen between dietary groups of rats of either status. There was no evidence of qualitative differences in fecal bile acid excretion as a function of diet. The increased liver cholesterol was in the ester form, with cholesteryl linoleate the largest single component. There was no significant difference in the cholesterol content of the skin, muscle, adipose tissue, or gastrointestinal tract. The significance of a large increase in liver cholesteryl ester, lowered serum cholesterol, and no change in steroid excretion is discussed.

  16. Orbitofrontal cholesterol granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, L P; McNab, A A

    2005-02-01

    Cholesterol granuloma of the orbital bones is a rare but readily recognisable condition. It is an osteolytic lesion with a granulomatous reaction surrounding cholesterol crystals, old haemorrhage and a fibrous capsule. There is a male preponderance and it usually occurs in young or middle-aged men. It is treatable with drainage and curettage via an orbitotomy, and craniotomy or wide bone removal is almost never required. Six cases of this condition were reviewed to highlight the typical clinical presentation, computed tomography and magnetic resonance results, and surgical management.

  17. Cholesterol and myelin biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Simons, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Myelin consists of several layers of tightly compacted membranes wrapped around axons in the nervous system. The main function of myelin is to provide electrical insulation around the axon to ensure the rapid propagation of nerve conduction. As the myelinating glia terminally differentiates, they begin to produce myelin membranes on a remarkable scale. This membrane is unique in its composition being highly enriched in lipids, in particular galactosylceramide and cholesterol. In this review we will summarize the role of cholesterol in myelin biogenesis in the central and peripheral nervous system.

  18. Convergent Signaling Pathways Controlled by LRP1 (Receptor-related Protein 1) Cytoplasmic and Extracellular Domains Limit Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Asmar, Zeina; Terrand, Jérome; Jenty, Marion; Host, Lionel; Mlih, Mohamed; Zerr, Aurélie; Justiniano, Hélène; Matz, Rachel L; Boudier, Christian; Scholler, Estelle; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Bertaccini, Diego; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herz, Joachim; Bruban, Véronique; Boucher, Philippe

    2016-03-04

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface receptor that protects from intracellular cholesterol accumulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that the extracellular (α) chain of LRP1 mediates TGFβ-induced enhancement of Wnt5a, which limits intracellular cholesterol accumulation by inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis and by promoting cholesterol export. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic (β) chain of LRP1 suffices to limit cholesterol accumulation in LRP1(-/-) cells. Through binding of Erk2 to the second of its carboxyl-terminal NPXY motifs, LRP1 β-chain positively regulates the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and of neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH1). These results highlight the unexpected functions of LRP1 and the canonical Wnt5a pathway and new therapeutic potential in cholesterol-associated disorders including cardiovascular diseases.

  19. An enzyme thermistor-based assay for total and free cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, V; Ramanathan, K; Sundaram, P V; Danielsson, B

    1999-11-01

    A method to evaluate the free (FC) and total cholesterol (TC) in human serum, bile and gallstone extract using an enzyme thermistor (ET)-based flow injection analysis (FIA) is presented. The cholesterol in high-density (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) have also been evaluated. A heparin functionalized Sepharose column was employed for the isolation of HDL and LDL fractions from serum. The estimation of cholesterol and its esters was based on their reaction with cholesterol oxidase (CO), cholesterol esterase (CE) and catalase (CAT). Three different enzyme columns, i.e. co-immobilized CO/CAT (column A), only CE (column B) and co-immobilized CO/CE/CAT (column C) were prepared by cross-linking the enzymes on glass beads using glutaraldehyde. Column A was used for estimating FC and column C was used for estimating total cholesterol (cholesterol plus esterified cholesterol). Column B was used as a pre-column which could be switched 'in' or 'out' in conjunction with column A for the estimation of TC or FC, respectively. A calibration between 1.0 and 8.0 mmol/l for FC and 0. 25 and 4.0 mmol/l for TC was obtained. For more than 2000 assays with the ET device a C.V. of less than 4% was obtained. The assay time was approximately 4 min per assay. The cholesterol estimations on the ET correlated well with similar estimations using a commercially available cholesterol diagnostic kit.

  20. Intestinal cholesterol transport: Measuring cholesterol absorption and its reverse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakulj, L.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal cholesterol transport might serve as an attractive future target for cardiovascular disease reduction, provided that underlying molecular mechanisms are more extensively elucidated, combined with improved techniques to measure changes in cholesterol fluxes and their possible anti-atherosc

  1. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wulp, Mariette Y. M.; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Groen, Albert K.

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-codin

  2. Transintestinal cholesterol efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Astrid E.; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis is a complex interplay of a multitude of metabolic pathways situated in different organs. The liver plays a central role and has received most attention of the research community. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the understanding

  3. Cholesterol: Up in Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raloff, Janet

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the contribution cooked meat makes to air pollution. The dozens of compounds, including cholesterol, that are released when a hamburger is grilled are described. The potential effects of these emissions on humans and the urban environment are discussed. (KR)

  4. Cholesterol transport in model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sumit; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Physiological processes distribute cholesterol unevenly within the cell. The levels of cholesterol are maintained by intracellular transport and a disruption in the cell's ability to keep these normal levels will lead to disease. Exchange rates of cholesterol are generally studied in model systems using labeled lipid vesicles. Initially donor vesicles have all the cholesterol and acceptor vesicles are devoid of it. They are mixed and after some time the vesicles are separated and cholesterol is traced in each vesicle. The studies performed up to date have significant scatter indicating that the methodologies are not consistent. The present work shows in-situ Time-Resolved SANS studies of cholesterol exchange rates in unsaturated PC lipid vesicles. Molecular dynamics simulations were done to investigate the energetic and kinetic behavior of cholesterol in this system. This synergistic approach will provide insight into our efforts to understand cholesterol traffic.

  5. Cholesterol excretion and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, S A

    1981-09-01

    Populations consuming diets high in fat and cholesterol exhibit a greater incidence of colon cancer than those consuming less fat and cholesterol. Lowering elevated serum cholesterol levels experimentally or clinically is associated with increased large-bowel tumorigenesis. Thus, cholesterol lost to the gut, either dietary or endogenously synthesized, appears to have a role in large-bowel cancer. Whether the effect(s) is mediated by increases in fecal bile acid excretion or some other mechanism is not clear.

  6. HDL cholesterol levels are an important factor for determining the lifespan of erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, I.; Hoekstra, M; van Wanrooij, EJA; Hildebrand, RB; Kuiper, J; Kuipers, F; Hardeman, MR; Van Berkel, TJC; Van Eck, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective. Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) is a multifunctional receptor that promotes the selective uptake of cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Disruption of SR-BI in mice results in a dramatic increase in HDL cholesterol. Interestingly, mice lacking SR-BI also deve

  7. Apomorphine and its esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkar, Nrupa; Chen, Zhizhong; Saaby, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Oral delivery of apomorphine via prodrug principle may be a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the transport and stability of apomorphine and its esters across Caco-2 cell monolayer and their affinity towards chylomicrons. Apomorphine...... cells. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to understand the stability of the esters on a molecular level. The affinity of the compounds towards plasma derived chylomicrons was assessed. The A-B transport of intact DLA was about 150 times lower than the transport of apomorphine...

  8. Antiprion activity of cholesterol esterification modulators: a comparative study using ex vivo sheep fibroblasts and lymphocytes and mouse neuroblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Alessandra; Norfo, Claudia; Abete, Claudia; Mulas, Claudia; Putzolu, Marirosa; Laconi, Sergio; Orrù, Christina Doriana; Cannas, M Dolores; Vascellari, Sarah; La Colla, Paolo; Dessì, Sandra

    2007-11-01

    Our studies on the role of cholesterol homeostasis in the pathogenesis of scrapie revealed abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters in ex vivo peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and skin fibroblasts from healthy and scrapie-affected sheep carrying a scrapie-susceptible genotype compared to sheep with a resistant genotype. Similar alterations were observed in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cell lines persistently infected with mouse-adapted 22L and RML strains of scrapie that showed up to threefold-higher cholesterol ester levels than parental N2a cells. We now report that proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrPres)-producing cell populations of subclones from scrapie-infected cell lines were characterized by higher cholesterol ester levels than clone populations not producing PrPres. Treatments with a number of drugs known to interfere with different steps of cholesterol metabolism strongly reduced the accumulation of cholesterol esters in ex vivo PBMCs and skin fibroblasts from scrapie-affected sheep but had significantly less or no effect in their respective scrapie-resistant or uninfected counterparts. In scrapie-infected N2a cells, inhibition of cholesterol esters was associated with selective antiprion activity. Effective antiprion concentrations of cholesterol modulators (50% effective concentration [EC(50)] range, 1.4 to 40 microM) were comparable to those of antiprion reference compounds (EC(50) range, 0.6 to 10 microM). These data confirm our hypothesis that abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters may represent a biological marker of susceptibility to prion infection/replication and a novel molecular target of potential clinical importance.

  9. How to Get Your Cholesterol Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How To Get Your Cholesterol Tested Updated:Apr 3,2017 Cholesterol plays a ... factors for heart disease and stroke . How is cholesterol tested? A cholesterol screening measures your level of ...

  10. Successful topical dissolution of cholesterol gallbladder stones using ethyl propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A F; Amelsberg, A; Esch, O; Schteingart, C D; Lyche, K; Jinich, H; Vansonnenberg, E; D'Agostino, H B

    1997-06-01

    Topical dissolution of cholesterol gallbladder stones using methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is useful in symptomatic patients judged too ill for surgery. Previous studies showed that ethyl propionate (EP), a C5 ester, dissolves cholesterol gallstones rapidly in vitro, but differs from MTBE in being eliminated so rapidly by the liver that blood levels remain undetectable. Our aim was to test EP as a topical dissolution agent for cholesterol gallbladder stones. Five high-risk patients underwent topical dissolution of gallbladder stones by EP. In three patients, the solvent was instilled via a cholecystostomy tube placed previously to treat acute cholecystitis; in two patients, a percutaneous transhepatic catheter was placed in the gallbladder electively. Gallstone dissolution was assessed by chromatography, by gravimetry, and by catheter cholecystography. Total dissolution of gallstones was obtained in four patients after 6-10 hr of lavage; in the fifth patient, partial gallstone dissolution facilitated basketing of the stones. In two patients, cholesterol dissolution was measured and averaged 30 mg/min. Side effects were limited to one episode of transient hypotension and pain at the infusion site; no patient developed somnolence or nausea. Gallstone elimination was associated with relief of symptoms. EP is an acceptable alternative to MTBE for topical dissolution of cholesterol gallbladder stones in high-risk patients. The lower volatility and rapid hepatic extraction of EP suggest that it may be preferable to MTBE in this investigational procedure.

  11. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  12. Cholesterol crystal embolism (atheroembolism)

    Science.gov (United States)

    VENTURELLI, CHIARA; JEANNIN, GUIDO; SOTTINI, LAURA; DALLERA, NADIA; SCOLARI, FRANCESCO

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol crystal embolism, known as atheroembolic disease, is caused by showers of cholesterol crystals from an atherosclerotic plaque that occludes small arteries. Embolization can occur spontaneously or as an iatrogenic complication from an invasive vascular procedure (angiography or vascular surgery) and after anticoagulant therapy. The atheroembolism can give rise to different degrees of renal impairment. Some patients show a moderate loss of renal function, others severe renal failure requiring dialysis. Renal outcome can be variable: some patients deteriorate or remain on dialysis, some improve and some remain with chronic renal impairment. Clinically, three types of atheroembolic renal disease have been described: acute, subacute or chronic. More frequently a progressive loss of renal function occurs over weeks. Atheroembolization can involve the skin, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. The diagnosis is difficult and controversial for the protean extrarenal manifestations. In the past, the diagnosis was often made post-mortem. In the last 10 yrs, awareness of atheroembolic renal disease has improved. The correct diagnosis requires the clinician to be alert. The typical patient is a white male aged >60 yrs with a history of hypertension, smoking and arterial disease. The presence of a classic triad (precipitating event, renal failure and peripheral cholesterol crystal embolization) suggests the diagnosis. This can be confirmed by a biopsy of the target organs. A specific treatment is lacking; however, it is an important diagnosis to make because an aggressive therapeutic approach can be associated with a more favorable clinical outcome. PMID:21977265

  13. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena eLevitan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions.

  14. Phosphate Esters, Thiophosphate Esters and Metal Thiophosphates as Lubricant Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Johnson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate esters, thiophosphate esters and metal thiophosphates have been used as lubricant additives for over 50 years. While their use has been extensive, a detailed knowledge of how they work has been a much more recent development. In this paper, the use of phosphate esters and thiophosphate esters as anti-wear or extreme pressure additives is reviewed with an emphasis on their mechanism of action. The review includes the use of alkyl phosphates, triaryl phosphates and metal containing thiophosphate esters. The mechanisms of these materials interacting with a range of iron and steel based bearing material are examined.

  15. Interaction between dietary lipids and gut microbiota regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caesar, Robert; Nygren, Heli; Orešič, Matej;

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota influences many aspects of host metabolism. We have previously shown that the presence of a gut microbiota remodels lipid composition. Here we investigated how interaction between gut microbiota and dietary lipids regulates lipid composition in the liver and plasma, and gene...... of most lipid classes differed between mice fed lard and fish oil. However, the gut microbiota also affected lipid composition. The gut microbiota increased hepatic levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in mice fed lard, but not in mice fed fish oil. Serum levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl...... esters were not affected by the gut microbiota. Genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis were downregulated by the gut microbiota in mice fed lard and were expressed at a low level in mice fed fish oil independent of microbial status. In summary, we show that gut microbiota...

  16. Cholesteryl esters in human malignant neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, M R; Bottura, G; Lucchi, P; Reggiani, A; Trinchero, A; Tugnoli, V

    2003-01-01

    Cholesteryl esters (CholE) were detected in human malignant neoplasms by means of in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analysis of the total lipid extracts obtained from cerebral tumors revealed appreciable amount of esterified cholesterol in high grade gliomas such as glioblastomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, characterized by prominent neovascularity. The finding that no CholE were detected in the healthy brain and in low grade and benign tumors supports a possible correlation between this class of lipids and histological vascular proliferation. Compared with high grade gliomas, renal cell carcinomas show higher levels of CholE, absent in the healthy renal parenchyma and in benign oncocytomas. In nefro-carcinomas, cytoplasmic lipid inclusions and prominent vascularization contribute to the increased levels of CholE present mainly as oleate. CholE are discussed as potential biochemical markers of cancer and as a target for new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Environmentally Compliant Vinyl Ester Resin (VER) Composite Matrix Resin Derived from Renewable Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    UV Ultraviolet VARTM vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding VE vinyl ester VER QNA vinyl ester resin QinetiQ North America -v...tempera- ture using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) into massive carbon-fiber- reinforced composite structures such as ship hulls and...weapons system components using a low-cost vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded ( VARTM ) process. Steps to commercialize the pro- cess would

  18. STARD4 knockdown in HepG2 cells disrupts cholesterol trafficking associated with the plasma membrane, ER, and ERC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbarino, J.; Pan, M. H.; Chin, H. F.

    2012-01-01

    STARD4, a member of the evolutionarily conserved START gene family, has been implicated in the non-vesicular intracellular transport of cholesterol. However, the direction of transport and the membranes with which this protein interacts are not clear. We present studies of STARD4 function using...... small hairpin RNA knockdown technology to reduce STARD4 expression in HepG2 cells. In a cholesterol-poor environment, we found that a reduction in STARD4 expression leads to retention of cholesterol at the plasma membrane, reduction of endoplasmic reticulum-associated cholesterol, and decreased ACAT...... synthesized cholesteryl esters. Furthermore, D4 KD cells exhibited a reduced rate of sterol transport to the endocytic recycling compartment after cholesterol repletion. Although these cells displayed normal endocytic trafficking in cholesterol-poor and replete conditions, cell surface low density lipoprotein...

  19. Conversion of Exogenous Cholesterol into Glycoalkaloids in Potato Shoots, Using Two Methods for Sterol Solubilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Erik V.; Nahar, Nurun; Dahlin, Paul; Broberg, Anders; Tröger, Rikard; Dutta, Paresh C.; Jonsson, Lisbeth; Sitbon, Folke

    2013-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) are toxic secondary metabolites naturally occurring in the potato, as well as in certain other Solanaceous plant species, such as tomato, eggplant and pepper. To investigate the steroidal origin of SGA biosynthesis, cut potato shoots were fed cholesterol labelled with deuterium (D) in the sterol ring structure (D5- or D6-labelled), or side chain (D7-labelled), and analysed after three or five weeks. The labelled cholesterol and presence of D-labelled SGA were analysed by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS, respectively. When feeding D-labelled cholesterol solubilised in Tween-80, labelled cholesterol in free form became present in both leaves and stems, although the major part was recovered as steryl esters. Minor amounts of D-labelled SGA (α-solanine and α-chaconine) were identified in cholesterol-treated shoots, but not in blank controls, or in shoots fed D6-27-hydroxycholesterol. Solubilising the labelled cholesterol in methyl-β-cyclodextrin instead of Tween-80 increased the levels of labelled SGA up to 100-fold, and about 1 mole% of the labelled cholesterol was recovered as labelled SGA in potato leaves. Both side chain and ring structure D labels were retained in SGA, showing that the entire cholesterol molecule is converted to SGA. However, feeding side chain D7-labelled cholesterol resulted in D5-labelled SGA, indicating that two hydrogen atoms were released during formation of the SGA nitrogen-containing ring system. Feeding with D7-sitosterol did not produce any labelled SGA, indicating that cholesterol is a specific SGA precursor. In conclusion, we have demonstrated a superior performance of methyl-β-cyclodextrin for delivery of cholesterol in plant tissue feeding experiments, and given firm evidence for cholesterol as a specific sterol precursor of SGA in potato. PMID:24349406

  20. Conversion of exogenous cholesterol into glycoalkaloids in potato shoots, using two methods for sterol solubilisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik V Petersson

    Full Text Available Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA are toxic secondary metabolites naturally occurring in the potato, as well as in certain other Solanaceous plant species, such as tomato, eggplant and pepper. To investigate the steroidal origin of SGA biosynthesis, cut potato shoots were fed cholesterol labelled with deuterium (D in the sterol ring structure (D5- or D6-labelled, or side chain (D7-labelled, and analysed after three or five weeks. The labelled cholesterol and presence of D-labelled SGA were analysed by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS, respectively. When feeding D-labelled cholesterol solubilised in Tween-80, labelled cholesterol in free form became present in both leaves and stems, although the major part was recovered as steryl esters. Minor amounts of D-labelled SGA (α-solanine and α-chaconine were identified in cholesterol-treated shoots, but not in blank controls, or in shoots fed D6-27-hydroxycholesterol. Solubilising the labelled cholesterol in methyl-β-cyclodextrin instead of Tween-80 increased the levels of labelled SGA up to 100-fold, and about 1 mole% of the labelled cholesterol was recovered as labelled SGA in potato leaves. Both side chain and ring structure D labels were retained in SGA, showing that the entire cholesterol molecule is converted to SGA. However, feeding side chain D7-labelled cholesterol resulted in D5-labelled SGA, indicating that two hydrogen atoms were released during formation of the SGA nitrogen-containing ring system. Feeding with D7-sitosterol did not produce any labelled SGA, indicating that cholesterol is a specific SGA precursor. In conclusion, we have demonstrated a superior performance of methyl-β-cyclodextrin for delivery of cholesterol in plant tissue feeding experiments, and given firm evidence for cholesterol as a specific sterol precursor of SGA in potato.

  1. Cholesterol metabolism in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasinska, Joanna M; Hayden, Michael R

    2011-09-06

    The CNS is rich in cholesterol, which is essential for neuronal development and survival, synapse maturation, and optimal synaptic activity. Alterations in brain cholesterol homeostasis are linked to neurodegeneration. Studies have demonstrated that Huntington disease (HD), a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting from polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein, is associated with changes in cellular cholesterol metabolism. Emerging evidence from human and animal studies indicates that attenuated brain sterol synthesis and accumulation of cholesterol in neuronal membranes represent two distinct mechanisms occurring in the presence of mutant huntingtin that influence neuronal survival. Increased knowledge of how changes in intraneuronal cholesterol metabolism influence the pathogenesis of HD will provide insights into the potential application of brain cholesterol regulation as a therapeutic strategy for this devastating disease.

  2. Cholesterol Embolism: An Overlooked Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Nihal ESATOĞLU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure following angiography is usually due to radiocontrast nephropathy; however, cholesterol embolism should be kept in mind when making the differential diagnosis. Cholesterol embolism is a multisystem disease, usually seen in elderly men who have severe atherosclerosis. In this case report, we describe a patient with cholesterol embolism who had a typical clinical history of progressive renal failure. We hope that this case report will emphasize the importance of this overlooked syndrome.

  3. Synthesis, Formulation, and Adjuvanticity of Monodesmosidic Saponins with Olenanolic Acid, Hederagenin and Gypsogenin Aglycones, and some C-28 Ester Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greatrex, Ben W.; Daines, Alison M.; Hook, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    and cholesterol, and the structures analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. 3-O-(Manp(13)Glcp)hederagenin was found to produce numerous ring-like micelles when formulated, while C-28 choline ester derivatives preferred self-assembly and did not interact with the liposomes. When alone and in the presence...... of cholesterol and phospholipid, the choline ester derivatives produced nanocrystalline rods or helical micelles. The effects of modifying sugar stereochemistry and the aglycone on the immunostimulatory effects of the saponins was then evaluated using the activation markers MHC class II and CD86 in murine bone...

  4. Food combinations for cholesterol lowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harland, Janice I

    2012-12-01

    Reducing elevated LDL-cholesterol is a key public health challenge. There is substantial evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) that a number of foods and food components can significantly reduce LDL-cholesterol. Data from RCT have been reviewed to determine whether effects are additive when two or more of these components are consumed together. Typically components, such as plant stanols and sterols, soya protein, β-glucans and tree nuts, when consumed individually at their target rate, reduce LDL-cholesterol by 3-9 %. Improved dietary fat quality, achieved by replacing SFA with unsaturated fat, reduces LDL-cholesterol and can increase HDL-cholesterol, further improving blood lipid profile. It appears that the effect of combining these interventions is largely additive; however, compliance with multiple changes may reduce over time. Food combinations used in ten 'portfolio diet' studies have been reviewed. In clinical efficacy studies of about 1 month where all foods were provided, LDL-cholesterol is reduced by 22-30 %, whereas in community-based studies of >6 months' duration, where dietary advice is the basis of the intervention, reduction in LDL-cholesterol is about 15 %. Inclusion of MUFA into 'portfolio diets' increases HDL-cholesterol, in addition to LDL-cholesterol effects. Compliance with some of these dietary changes can be achieved more easily compared with others. By careful food component selection, appropriate to the individual, the effect of including only two components in the diet with good compliance could be a sustainable 10 % reduction in LDL-cholesterol; this is sufficient to make a substantial impact on cholesterol management and reduce the need for pharmaceutical intervention.

  5. Method of making alkyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-09-14

    Methods of making alkyl esters are described herein. The methods are capable of using raw, unprocessed, low-cost feedstocks and waste grease. Generally, the method involves converting a glyceride source to a fatty acid composition and esterifying the fatty acid composition to make alkyl esters. In an embodiment, a method of making alkyl esters comprises providing a glyceride source. The method further comprises converting the glyceride source to a fatty acid composition comprising free fatty acids and less than about 1% glyceride by mass. Moreover, the method comprises esterifying the fatty acid composition in the presence of a solid acid catalyst at a temperature ranging firm about 70.degree. C. to about 120.degree. C. to produce alkyl esters, such that at least 85% of the free fatty acids are converted to alkyl esters. The method also incorporates the use of packed bed reactors for glyceride conversion and/or fatty acid esterification to make alkyl esters.

  6. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanocarrier Improved Cellular Transport of Lysosomal Cholesterol in Human Sterol Carrier Protein-Deficient Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Da-Eun; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Jeongmin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2), which is not found in tissues of people with Zellweger syndrome, facilitates the movement of cholesterol within cells, resulting in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient cells. This study investigated whether synthetic high-density lipoprotein-like nanocarrier (sHDL-NC) improves the cellular transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts. Human SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts were incubated with [(3)H-cholesterol]LDL as a source of cholesterol and sHDL-NC. The cells were fractionated by centrifugation permit tracking of [(3)H]-cholesterol from lysosome into plasma membrane. Furthermore, cellular content of cholesteryl ester as a storage form and mRNA expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor were measured to support the cholesterol transport to plasma membrane. Incubation with sHDL-NC for 8 h significantly increased uptake of [(3)H]-cholesterol to lysosome by 53% and further enhanced the transport of [(3)H]-cholesterol to plasma membrane by 32%. Treatment with sHDL-NC significantly reduced cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased mRNA expression of LDL receptor (LDL-R). In conclusion, sHDL-NC enables increased transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane. In addition, these data were indirectly supported by decreased cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased gene expression of LDL-R. Therefore, sHDL-NC may be a useful vehicle for transporting cholesterol, which may help to prevent accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts.

  7. Intestine-specific MTP and global ACAT2 deficiency lowers acute cholesterol absorption with chylomicrons and HDLs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Rudel, Lawrence L; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2014-11-01

    Intestinal cholesterol absorption involves the chylomicron and HDL pathways and is dependent on microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and ABCA1, respectively. Chylomicrons transport free and esterified cholesterol, whereas HDLs transport free cholesterol. ACAT2 esterifies cholesterol for secretion with chylomicrons. We hypothesized that free cholesterol accumulated during ACAT2 deficiency may be secreted with HDLs when chylomicron assembly is blocked. To test this, we studied cholesterol absorption in mice deficient in intestinal MTP, global ACAT2, and both intestinal MTP and global ACAT2. Intestinal MTP ablation significantly increased intestinal triglyceride and cholesterol levels and reduced their transport with chylomicrons. In contrast, global ACAT2 deficiency had no effect on triglyceride absorption but significantly reduced cholesterol absorption with chylomicrons and increased cellular free cholesterol. Their combined deficiency reduced cholesterol secretion with both chylomicrons and HDLs. Thus, contrary to our hypothesis, free cholesterol accumulated in the absence of MTP and ACAT2 is unavailable for secretion with HDLs. Global ACAT2 deficiency causes mild hypertriglyceridemia and reduces hepatosteatosis in mice fed high cholesterol diets by increasing hepatic lipoprotein production by unknown mechanisms. We show that this phenotype is preserved in the absence of intestinal MTP in global ACAT2-deficient mice fed a Western diet. Further, we observed increases in hepatic MTP activity in these mice. Thus, ACAT2 deficiency might increase MTP expression to avoid hepatosteatosis in cholesterol-fed animals. Therefore, ACAT2 inhibition might avert hepatosteatosis associated with high cholesterol diets by increasing hepatic MTP expression and lipoprotein production.

  8. Top Five Lifestyle Changes to Reduce Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top 5 lifestyle changes to improve your cholesterol Lifestyle changes can help reduce cholesterol, keep you off cholesterol-lowering medications or enhance the effect of your medications. Here are five lifestyle ...

  9. Understand Your Risk for High Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Understand Your Risk for High Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 LDL (bad) cholesterol is ... content was last reviewed on 04/21/2014. Cholesterol Guidelines: Putting the pieces together Myth vs. Truth – ...

  10. How Is High Blood Cholesterol Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is High Blood Cholesterol Treated? High blood cholesterol is treated with lifestyle ... need to follow a heart healthy diet . Lowering Cholesterol Using Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes TLC is a set ...

  11. Cholesterol metabolism and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, S A; Cerda, S; Wilkinson, J

    1993-01-01

    While epidemiologic and concordant experimental data indicate a direct relationship between dietary fat (and presumably caloric) intake and the development of colon cancer, the effect of dietary cholesterol on this disease is still not clear. However, there appears to be a developing literature concerning an inverse relationship between serum and plasma cholesterol levels, and the risk for colon cancer. Findings that low serum cholesterol levels are apparent as early as ten years prior to the detection of colon cancer implies that sub clinical disease is probably not involved initially in this process. The possibility of low serum cholesterol as a bio-marker was considered in epidemiologic studies which focused upon obese men with lower than normal serum cholesterol levels who were found to be at increased risk to colon cancer. While the relationship between low serum cholesterol and colonic or intestinal cholesterol metabolism is presently not understood, current genetic studies provide a promising though as yet unexplored potential association. Alterations which occur during the developmental progression of colonic cancer include changes in chromosome 5, which also carries two genes vital to the biosynthesis and regulation of systemic and cellular cholesterol metabolism, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoA R). Regulation of cholesterol metabolism in intestinal cells in vivo and in vitro varies from that seen in normal fibroblasts or hepatocytes in terms of exogenous sources of cholesterol and how these sources regulate internal synthesis. Colonic cancer cells have been used to assess small bowel enterocyte cholesterol metabolism, which has been possible because of their ability to differentiate in culture, however information regarding true colonic enterocyte cholesterol metabolism is relatively scarce. Colonic cancer cells have been shown to possess a diminished or nonexistent ability to use

  12. A mechanistic study on the amidation of esters mediated by sodium formamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Antonio; Mudryk, Boguslaw; Rossano, Lucius; Tummala, Srinivas

    2012-01-06

    Kinetic and computational studies on the amidation of esters with mixtures of formamide and sodium methoxide are described. Rate studies are consistent with a fast deprotonation of formamide followed by two reversible acyl transfers affected by solvent participation. MP2 calculations suggest that the first acyl transfer between the ester and sodium formamide is rate-determining. The transition structures leading to the formation and collapse of the first tetrahedral intermediate are calculated to be isoenergetic.

  13. Enzymatic assay of total cholesterol in serum or plasma by amperometric measurement of rate of oxygen depletion following saponification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A; Christian, G D

    1977-01-17

    A method for serum or plasma cholesterol assay involving amperometric measurement of the rate of oxygen depletion in the cholesterol oxidase-catalyzed oxidation of cholesterol is described. The hydrolysis of the serum cholesterol esters is accomplished by saponification of 50 mul of sample with 0.2 ml of ethanolic KOH (1.0 mol/1) containing 0.5% Triton X-100 for 5 min at 75 degrees C. The rate of oxygen consumption in a 25-mul aliquot of this is measured with a Clark electrode in a Beckman Glucose Analyzer and the assay takes about one minute after incubation; results are read digitally on the instrument. The analyzer cell contains 1 ml of 1 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, with 100 mg sodium cholate/100 ml and 0.1-0.2 U cholesterol oxidase.

  14. Critical role of neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolase 1 in cholesteryl ester hydrolysis in murine macrophages[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kent; Igarashi, Masaki; Yamamuro, Daisuke; Ohshiro, Taichi; Nagashima, Shuichi; Takahashi, Manabu; Enkhtuvshin, Bolormaa; Sekiya, Motohiro; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Ishibashi, Shun

    2014-01-01

    Hydrolysis of intracellular cholesteryl ester (CE) is the rate-limiting step in the efflux of cholesterol from macrophage foam cells. In mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPMs), this process is thought to involve several enzymes: hormone-sensitive lipase (Lipe), carboxylesterase 3 (Ces3), neutral CE hydrolase 1 (Nceh1). However, there is some disagreement over the relative contributions of these enzymes. To solve this problem, we first compared the abilities of several compounds to inhibit the hydrolysis of CE in cells overexpressing Lipe, Ces3, or Nceh1. Cells overexpressing Ces3 had negligible neutral CE hydrolase activity. We next examined the effects of these inhibitors on the hydrolysis of CE and subsequent cholesterol trafficking in MPMs. CE accumulation was increased by a selective inhibitor of Nceh1, paraoxon, and two nonselective inhibitors of Nceh1, (+)-AS115 and (−)-AS115, but not by two Lipe-selective inhibitors, orlistat and 76-0079. Paraoxon inhibited cholesterol efflux to apoA-I or HDL, while 76-0079 did not. These results suggest that Nceh1 plays a dominant role over Lipe in the hydrolysis of CE and subsequent cholesterol efflux in MPMs. PMID:24868095

  15. Lowering of plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity by acute hyperglycaemia-induced hyperinsulinaemia in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanTol, A; Ligtenberg, JJM; Riemens, SC; vanHaeften, TW; Dullaart, RPF

    1997-01-01

    Human plasma contains two lipid transfer proteins involved in the remodelling of plasma lipoproteins: cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). CETP mediates the transfer/exchange of cholesterylesters, triglycerides and phospholipids between high-density lip

  16. New lipophilic tyrosyl esters. Comparative antioxidant evaluation with hydroxytyrosyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Raquel; Trujillo, Mariana; Pereira-Caro, Gema; Madrona, Andrés; Cert, Arturo; Espartero, José Luis

    2008-11-26

    New lipophilic esters of tyrosol, a naturally occurring phenol with interesting biological properties, have been synthesized in good yields by a chemoselective procedure, using lipase from Candida antarctica or p-toluenesulfonic acid as catalysts. Their antioxidant activities have been evaluated by the Rancimat test in lipophilic food matrices, as well as by FRAP and ABTS assays in methanolic solutions, and compared with those of previously synthesized hydroxytyrosyl esters. Free tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, butylhydroxytoluene, and alpha-tocopherol were used as standards. All methods used for the antioxidant activity evaluation emphasized the high influence of the ortho-diphenolic structure on the antioxidant capacity, tyrosol and its derivatives being less active than hydroxytyrosol and its analogues and even less than BHT and alpha-tocopherol. In addition, the Rancimat test revealed a lower activity for ester derivatives than for their respective reference compounds (HTy or Ty), in agreement with the polar paradox. On the other hand, FRAP and ABTS methods reported an opposite behavior between the synthetic esters and their respective references. Thus, hydroxytyrosyl esters were more active than HTy, whereas tyrosyl esters were less active than Ty. The length and nature of the acyl side chain did not seem to play an important role in the antioxidant activity of either the hydroxytyrosyl or tyrosyl ester series, since no significant differences were observed among them.

  17. How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Solanko, Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways as well as by non-vesicular sterol exchange between organelles. In this article, we will review recent progress in elucidating sterol-lipid and sterol-protein interactions contributing to proper sterol transport in living cells. We outline recent biophysical models of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in membranes and explain how such models are related to sterol flux between organelles. An overview of various sterol-transfer proteins is given, and the physico-chemical principles of their function in non-vesicular sterol transport are explained. We also discuss selected experimental approaches for characterization of sterol-protein interactions and for monitoring intracellular sterol transport. Finally, we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol import into mammalian cells and describe the process of cellular cholesterol efflux. Overall, we emphasize how specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions help overcoming the extremely low water solubility of cholesterol, thereby controlling intracellular cholesterol movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  18. Formation of cholesterol bilayer domains precedes formation of cholesterol crystals in cholesterol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes: EPR and DSC studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K

    2013-08-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol %. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogues, it was shown that the CBDs begin to form at ~50 mol % cholesterol. It was confirmed by DSC that the cholesterol solubility threshold for DMPC membranes is detected at ~66 mol % cholesterol. At levels above this cholesterol content, monohydrate cholesterol crystals start to form. The major finding is that the formation of CBDs precedes formation of cholesterol crystals. The region of the phase diagram for cholesterol contents between 50 and 66 mol % is described as a structured one-phase region in which CBDs have to be supported by the surrounding DMPC bilayer saturated with cholesterol. Thus, the phase boundary located at 66 mol % cholesterol separates the structured one-phase region (liquid-ordered phase of DMPC with CBDs) from the two-phase region where the structured liquid-ordered phase of DMPC coexists with cholesterol crystals. It is likely that CBDs are precursors of monohydrate cholesterol crystals.

  19. Cholesterol testing on a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncescu, Vlad; Mancuso, Matthew; Erickson, David

    2014-02-21

    Home self-diagnostic tools for blood cholesterol monitoring have been around for over a decade but their widespread adoption has been limited by the relatively high cost of acquiring a quantitative test-strip reader, complicated procedure for operating the device, and inability to easily store and process results. To address this we have developed a smartphone accessory and software application that allows for the quantification of cholesterol levels in blood. Through a series of human trials we demonstrate that the system can accurately quantify total cholesterol levels in blood within 60 s by imaging standard test strips. In addition, we demonstrate how our accessory is optimized to improve measurement sensitivity and reproducibility across different individual smartphones. With the widespread adoption of smartphones and increasingly sophisticated image processing technology, accessories such as the one presented here will allow cholesterol monitoring to become more accurate and widespread, greatly improving preventive care for cardiovascular disease.

  20. Americans' Cholesterol Levels Keep Falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and 2013-2014, the CDC reported. Dr. David Friedman is chief of heart failure services at Long ... for cholesterol treatment, all seem to be working," Friedman said. The study was published online Nov. 30 ...

  1. Cholesterol Worships a New Idol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ira G. Schulman

    2009-01-01

    The growing worldwide epidemic of cardiovascular disease suggests that new therapeutic strategies are needed to complement statins in the lowering of cholesterol levels. In a recent paper in Science, Tontonoz and colleagues have identified Idol as a protein that can control cholesterol levels by regulating the stability of the low-density lipoprotein receptor; inhibiting the activity of Idol could provide novel approaches for the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  2. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept.

  3. Steroidal Triterpenes of Cholesterol Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjana Rozman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol synthesis is a ubiquitous and housekeeping metabolic pathway that leads to cholesterol, an essential structural component of mammalian cell membranes, required for proper membrane permeability and fluidity. The last part of the pathway involves steroidal triterpenes with cholestane ring structures. It starts by conversion of acyclic squalene into lanosterol, the first sterol intermediate of the pathway, followed by production of 20 structurally very similar steroidal triterpene molecules in over 11 complex enzyme reactions. Due to the structural similarities of sterol intermediates and the broad substrate specificity of the enzymes involved (especially sterol-Δ24-reductase; DHCR24 the exact sequence of the reactions between lanosterol and cholesterol remains undefined. This article reviews all hitherto known structures of post-squalene steroidal triterpenes of cholesterol synthesis, their biological roles and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis. Furthermore, it summarises kinetic parameters of enzymes (Vmax and Km and sterol intermediate concentrations from various tissues. Due to the complexity of the post-squalene cholesterol synthesis pathway, future studies will require a comprehensive meta-analysis of the pathway to elucidate the exact reaction sequence in different tissues, physiological or disease conditions. A major reason for the standstill of detailed late cholesterol synthesis research was the lack of several steroidal triterpene standards. We aid to this efforts by summarizing commercial and laboratory standards, referring also to chemical syntheses of meiosis-activating sterols.

  4. Niacin to Boost Your HDL "Good" Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niacin can boost 'good' cholesterol Niacin is a B vitamin that may raise your HDL ("good") cholesterol. But side effects might outweigh benefits for most ... been used to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol — the "good" cholesterol that helps remove low-density ...

  5. Amperometric determination of serum total cholesterol with nanoparticles of cholesterol esterase and cholesterol oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, V; Malik, J; Prashant, A; Jaiwal, P K; Pundir, C S

    2016-05-01

    We describe the preparation of glutaraldehyde cross-linked and functionalized cholesterol esterase nanoparticles (ChENPs) and cholesterol oxidase nanoparticles (ChOxNPs) aggregates and their co-immobilization onto Au electrode for improved amperometric determination of serum total cholesterol. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of ChENPs and ChOxNPs showed their spherical shape and average size of 35.40 and 56.97 nm, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies of Au electrode confirmed the co-immobilization of enzyme nanoparticles (ENPs). The biosensor exhibited optimal response at pH 5.5 and 40°C within 5 s when polarized at +0.25 V versus Ag/AgCl. The working/linear range of the biosensor was 10-700 mg/dl for cholesterol. The sensor showed high sensitivity and measured total cholesterol as low as 0.1 mg/dl. The biosensor was evaluated and employed for total cholesterol determination in sera of apparently healthy and diseased persons. The analytical recovery of added cholesterol was 90%, whereas the within-batch and between-batch coefficients of variation (CVs) were less than 2% and less than 3%. There was a good correlation (r = 0.99) between serum cholesterol values as measured by the standard enzymic colorimetric method and the current method. The initial activity of ENPs/working electrode was reduced by 50% during its regular use (200 times) over a period of 60 days when stored dry at 4°C.

  6. Fatty acid composition in major depression: decreased omega 3 fractions in cholesteryl esters and increased C20: 4 omega 6/C20:5 omega 3 ratio in cholesteryl esters and phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Smith, R; Christophe, A; Cosyns, P; Desnyder, R; Meltzer, H

    1996-04-26

    Recently, there were some reports that major depression may be accompanied by alterations in serum total cholesterol, cholesterol ester and omega 3 essential fatty acid levels and by an increased C20: 4 omega 6/C20: 5 omega 3, i.e., arachidonic acid/eicosapentaenoic, ratio. The present study aimed to examine fatty acid composition of serum cholesteryl esters and phospholipids in 36 major depressed, 14 minor depressed and 24 normal subjects. Individual saturated (e.g., C14:0; C16:0, C18:0) and unsaturated (e.g., C18:1, C18:2, C20:4) fatty acids in phospholipid and cholesteryl ester fractions were assayed and the sums of the percentages of omega 6 and omega 3, saturated, branched chain and odd chain fatty acids, monoenes as well as the ratios omega 6/omega 3 and C20:4 omega 6/C20:5 omega 3 were calculated. Major depressed subjects had significantly higher C20:4 omega 6/C20:5 omega 3 ratio in both serum cholesteryl esters and phospholipids and a significantly increased omega 6/omega 3 ratio in cholesteryl ester fraction than healthy volunteers and minor depressed subjects. Major depressed subjects had significantly lower C18:3 omega 3 in cholesteryl esters than normal controls. Major depressed subjects showed significantly lower total omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in cholesteryl esters and significantly lower C20:5 omega 3 in serum cholesteryl esters and phospholipids than minor depressed subjects and healthy controls. These findings suggest an abnormal intake or metabolism of essential fatty acids in conjunction with decreased formation of cholesteryl esters in major depression.

  7. Liquid Crystalline Esters of Dibenzophenazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin John Anthony Bozek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of esters of 2,3,6,7-tetrakis(hexyloxydibenzo[a,c]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid was prepared in order to probe the effects of the ester groups on the liquid crystalline behavior. These compounds exhibit columnar hexagonal phases over broad temperature ranges. Variations in chain length, branching, terminal groups, and the presence of cyclic groups were found to modify transition temperatures without substantially destabilizing the mesophase range.

  8. Mitochondrial triglyceride transfer protein inhibition: new achievements in the treatment of dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostapanos, Michael S; Rizos, Evangelos C; Papanas, Nikolaos; Maltezos, Efstratios; Elisaf, Moses S

    2013-01-01

    Current lipid-lowering drugs are often unable to achieve low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals. Moreover, despite LDL-C lowering mostly by statins, a considerable residual vascular risk remains. This is partly associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia where apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins predominate. Mitochondrial Triglyceride (TG) transfer protein (MTP) is a key enzyme for apoB-containing lipoprotein assembly and secretion. This is mostly attributed to its capacity to transfer lipid components (TGs, cholesterol esters and phospholipids) to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, where these lipoproteins are assembled. Several agents were developed to inhibit MTP wherever it is expressed, namely the liver and/or the intestine. Liver-specific MTP inhibitors reduce secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) mostly containing apoB100, while the intestine-specific ones reduce secretion of chylomicrons containing apoB48. These drugs can significantly reduce total cholesterol, LDL-C, TGs, VLDL cholesterol, as well as apoB levels in vivo. They may also exert anti-atherosclerotic and insulin-sensitizing effects. Limited clinical data suggest that these compounds can also improve the serum lipid profile in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). The accumulation of unsecreted fat in the liver and intestinal lumen is associated with elevation of aminotransferases and steatorrhea. Liver steatosis can be avoided by the use of intestine-specific MTP inhibitors, while steatorrhea by low-fat diet. Future indications for these developing drugs may include dyslipidemia associated with insulin resistant states, familial combined hyperlipidemia and HoFH. Future clinical trials are warranted to assess the efficacy and safety of MTP inhibitors in various clinical states.

  9. LDL Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1 Regulates Cholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna P Lillis

    Full Text Available Within the circulation, cholesterol is transported by lipoprotein particles and is taken up by cells when these particles associate with cellular receptors. In macrophages, excessive lipoprotein particle uptake leads to foam cell formation, which is an early event in the development of atherosclerosis. Currently, mechanisms responsible for foam cell formation are incompletely understood. To date, several macrophage receptors have been identified that contribute to the uptake of modified forms of lipoproteins leading to foam cell formation, but the in vivo contribution of the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 to this process is not known [corrected]. To investigate the role of LRP1 in cholesterol accumulation in macrophages, we generated mice with a selective deletion of LRP1 in macrophages on an LDL receptor (LDLR-deficient background (macLRP1-/-. After feeding mice a high fat diet for 11 weeks, peritoneal macrophages isolated from Lrp+/+ mice contained significantly higher levels of total cholesterol than those from macLRP1-/- mice. Further analysis revealed that this was due to increased levels of cholesterol esters. Interestingly, macLRP1-/- mice displayed elevated plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels resulting from accumulation of large, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in the circulation. This increase did not result from an increase in hepatic VLDL biosynthesis, but rather results from a defect in catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in macLRP1-/- mice. These studies reveal an important in vivo contribution of macrophage LRP1 to cholesterol homeostasis.

  10. The TMAO-Generating Enzyme Flavin Monooxygenase 3 Is a Central Regulator of Cholesterol Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manya Warrier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating levels of the gut microbe-derived metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO have recently been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. Here, we performed transcriptional profiling in mouse models of altered reverse cholesterol transport (RCT and serendipitously identified the TMAO-generating enzyme flavin monooxygenase 3 (FMO3 as a powerful modifier of cholesterol metabolism and RCT. Knockdown of FMO3 in cholesterol-fed mice alters biliary lipid secretion, blunts intestinal cholesterol absorption, and limits the production of hepatic oxysterols and cholesteryl esters. Furthermore, FMO3 knockdown stimulates basal and liver X receptor (LXR-stimulated macrophage RCT, thereby improving cholesterol balance. Conversely, FMO3 knockdown exacerbates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and inflammation in part by decreasing hepatic oxysterol levels and subsequent LXR activation. FMO3 is thus identified as a central integrator of hepatic cholesterol and triacylglycerol metabolism, inflammation, and ER stress. These studies suggest that the gut microbiota-driven TMA/FMO3/TMAO pathway is a key regulator of lipid metabolism and inflammation.

  11. Selective cholesterol adsorption by molecular imprinted polymeric nanospheres and application to GIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanan, Tülden; Tüzmen, Nalan; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2016-11-01

    Molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) are tailor-made materials with selective recognition to the target. The goals of this study were to prepare cholesterol imprinted polymeric nanospheres (CIPNs) and optimize their adsorption parameters and also to use CIPNs for adsorption of cholesterol (CHO), which is an important physiological biomacromolecule, from gastrointestinal mimicking solution (GIMS). Pre-polymerization complex was prepared using CHO as template and N-methacryloylamido-(l)-phenylalanine methyl ester (MAPA). This complex was polymerized with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). CHO was removed by MeOH and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Adsorption studies were performed after chacterization studies to interrogate the effects of time, initial concentration, temperature, and ionic strength on CHO adsorption onto CIPNs. Maximum adsorption capacity (714.17mg/g) was higher than that of cholesterol imprinted polymers in literature. Pseudo-second-order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm fitted best with the adsorption onto CIPNs. 86% of adsorbed cholesterol was desorbed with MeOH:HAc (80:20, v/v) and CIPNs were used in adsorption-desorption cycle for 5-times with a decrease as 12.28%. CHO analogues; estron, estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone were used for competitive adsorption. The relative selectivity coefficients of CINPs for cholesterol/estron and cholesterol/testosterone were 3.84 and 10.47 times greater than the one of non-imprinted polymeric nanospheres (NIPNs) in methanol, respectively.

  12. Exploring unsaturated fatty acid cholesteryl esters as transdermal permeation enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambharose, Sanjeev; Kalhapure, Rahul S; Jadhav, Mahantesh; Govender, Thirumala

    2017-04-01

    The intrinsic protective barrier property of skin, one of the major challenges in the design of transdermal drug delivery systems, can be overcome through the use of chemical permeation enhancers (CPEs). Herein, we explore the potential of unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) esters of cholesterol (Chol) viz., oleate, linoleate and linolenate, as transdermal CPEs using tenofovir (TNF) as a model drug. All Chol UFA esters at 1% w/w were found to be more effective enhancers when compared to their respective parent fatty acids (FAs) and saturated FA counterparts. Cholesteryl linolenate (Chol-LLA) showed the most superior performance (enhancement ratio (ER) = 3.71). The greatest ER for Chol-LLA (5.93) was achieved at a concentration of 2% w/w. The histomorphological and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) evaluations supported the results of the permeability studies. These findings showed no significant loss in the integrity of the epidermis, with drug and enhancer treatment having temporary effects on the barrier property of the epidermis. Chol UFA esters can therefore be considered as new CPEs for exploitation in topical formulations for various classes of drugs.

  13. Interaction between dietary lipids and gut microbiota regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesar, Robert; Nygren, Heli; Orešič, Matej; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiota influences many aspects of host metabolism. We have previously shown that the presence of a gut microbiota remodels lipid composition. Here we investigated how interaction between gut microbiota and dietary lipids regulates lipid composition in the liver and plasma, and gene expression in the liver. Germ-free and conventionally raised mice were fed a lard or fish oil diet for 11 weeks. We performed lipidomics analysis of the liver and serum and microarray analysis of the liver. As expected, most of the variation in the lipidomics dataset was induced by the diet, and abundance of most lipid classes differed between mice fed lard and fish oil. However, the gut microbiota also affected lipid composition. The gut microbiota increased hepatic levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in mice fed lard, but not in mice fed fish oil. Serum levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters were not affected by the gut microbiota. Genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis were downregulated by the gut microbiota in mice fed lard and were expressed at a low level in mice fed fish oil independent of microbial status. In summary, we show that gut microbiota-induced regulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism is dependent on dietary lipid composition.

  14. Cholesterol confusion and statin controversy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert; Du; Broff; Michel; de; Lorgeril

    2015-01-01

    The role of blood cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease(CHD) and the true effect of cholesterollowering statin drugs are debatable. In particular,whether statins actually decrease cardiac mortality and increase life expectancy is controversial. Concurrently,the Mediterranean diet model has been shown to prolong life and reduce the risk of diabetes,cancer,and CHD. We herein review current data related to both statins and the Mediterranean diet. We conclude that the expectation that CHD could be prevented or eliminated by simply reducing cholesterol appears unfounded. On the contrary,we should acknowledge the inconsistencies of the cholesterol theory and recognize the proven benefits of a healthy lifestyle incorporating a Mediterranean diet to prevent CHD.

  15. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins) as a contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and IHD. Observational studies show association between elevated remnant cholesterol and IHD, and mechanistic studies show remnant cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall like LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) accumulation. Furthermore, large...... genetic studies show evidence of remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for IHD independent of HDL-cholesterol levels. Genetic studies also show that elevated remnant cholesterol is associated with low-grade inflammation, whereas elevated LDL-C is not. There are several pharmacologic ways of lowering...

  16. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  17. LDL Cholesterol, Statins And PCSK 9 Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is of vital importance for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Statin is the most effective therapy today to lower LDLc by inhibiting HMG-CoA-reductase. However despite intensive statin therapy, there remains a residual risk of recurrent myocardial infarction in about 20–30% cases. Moreover a few patients develop statin intolerance. For severe hypercholesterolemia, statins alone or in combination of ezetimibe, niacin and fenofibrate have been advocated. For homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HOFH), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein MTP inhibitor (Lopitamide) and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (Mipomersen) have recently been approved by FDA, USA through ‘Risk evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)’. Possible future therapies include PCSK-9 inhibitors which have excellent lipid lowering properties. Three monoclonal antibodies (PCSK 9 Inhibitors) alirocumab, evolocumab and Bococizumab are under advanced clinical stage IV trials and awaiting approval by FDA and European Medicines Agency. PMID:26432726

  18. Regulation of biliary cholesterol secretion and reverse cholesterol transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Arne

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization the number one cause of death throughout the world is cardiovascular disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease. One possible way is to target the HDL-driven reverse cholesterol tra

  19. Cholesterol absorption and excretion in ileostomy subjects on high- and low-dietary-cholesterol intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegård, L; Bosaeus, I

    1994-01-01

    Six healthy ileostomy subjects were given [3H]cholesterol and [14C]beta-sitosterol in a single meal together with two controlled diets containing 150 or 450 mg cholesterol/d. Each diet was eaten for 3 d. Cholesterol absorption and excretion of cholesterol, bile acids, fat, energy, and nitrogen were analyzed. Fractional cholesterol absorption increased from 44 +/- 2.6% (mean +/- SE) to 61 +/- 3.4% (P effluent, or excretion of energy, nitrogen, fat, and bile acids did not differ between periods. Endogenous cholesterol excretion remained unchanged whereas net cholesterol excretion (output minus intake) was 37% higher (P < 0.05) on low compared with high cholesterol intake.

  20. The dynamin chemical inhibitor dynasore impairs cholesterol trafficking and sterol-sensitive genes transcription in human HeLa cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Girard

    Full Text Available Intracellular transport of cholesterol contributes to the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis by mechanisms that are yet poorly defined. In this study, we characterized the impact of dynasore, a recently described drug that specifically inhibits the enzymatic activity of dynamin, a GTPase regulating receptor endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Dynasore strongly inhibited the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL in HeLa cells, and to a lower extent in human macrophages. In both cell types, dynasore treatment led to the abnormal accumulation of LDL and free cholesterol (FC within the endolysosomal network. The measure of cholesterol esters (CE further showed that the delivery of regulatory cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER was deficient. This resulted in the inhibition of the transcriptional control of the three major sterol-sensitive genes, sterol-regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-coenzymeA reductase (HMGCoAR, and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR. The sequestration of cholesterol in the endolysosomal compartment impaired both the active and passive cholesterol efflux in HMDM. Our data further illustrate the importance of membrane trafficking in cholesterol homeostasis and validate dynasore as a new pharmacological tool to study the intracellular transport of cholesterol.

  1. Intermolecular Phosphoryl Transfer Between Serine and Histidine Residues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Qian SU; Ming Yu NIU; Shu Xia CAO; Jian Chen ZHANG; Yu Fen ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    A novel intermolecular phosphoryl transfer from O-trimethylsilyl-N-(O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl serine trimethylsilyl ester to N, N'-bis(trimethylsilyl) histidine trimethylsilyl ester was studied through electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). It was proposed that the transfer reaction went through penta-coordinated phosphorus intermediate.

  2. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas-phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ɛ-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters.

  3. Reduction of VLDL secretion decreases cholesterol excretion in niemann-pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Stephanie M; Kelley, Kathryn L; Davis, Matthew A; Wilson, Martha D; McDaniel, Allison L; Lee, Richard G; Crooke, Rosanne M; Graham, Mark J; Rudel, Lawrence L; Brown, J Mark; Temel, Ryan E

    2014-01-01

    An effective way to reduce LDL cholesterol, the primary risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is to increase cholesterol excretion from the body. Our group and others have recently found that cholesterol excretion can be facilitated by both hepatobiliary and transintestinal pathways. However, the lipoprotein that moves cholesterol through the plasma to the small intestine for transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) is unknown. To test the hypothesis that hepatic very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) support TICE, antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) were used to knockdown hepatic expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), which is necessary for VLDL assembly. While maintained on a high cholesterol diet, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic (L1Tg) mice, which predominantly excrete cholesterol via TICE, and wild type (WT) littermates were treated with control ASO or MTP ASO. In both WT and L1Tg mice, MTP ASO decreased VLDL triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol secretion. Regardless of treatment, L1Tg mice had reduced biliary cholesterol compared to WT mice. However, only L1Tg mice treated with MTP ASO had reduced fecal cholesterol excretion. Based upon these findings, we conclude that VLDL or a byproduct such as LDL can move cholesterol from the liver to the small intestine for TICE.

  4. Reduction of VLDL secretion decreases cholesterol excretion in niemann-pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Marshall

    Full Text Available An effective way to reduce LDL cholesterol, the primary risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is to increase cholesterol excretion from the body. Our group and others have recently found that cholesterol excretion can be facilitated by both hepatobiliary and transintestinal pathways. However, the lipoprotein that moves cholesterol through the plasma to the small intestine for transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE is unknown. To test the hypothesis that hepatic very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL support TICE, antisense oligonucleotides (ASO were used to knockdown hepatic expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP, which is necessary for VLDL assembly. While maintained on a high cholesterol diet, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic (L1Tg mice, which predominantly excrete cholesterol via TICE, and wild type (WT littermates were treated with control ASO or MTP ASO. In both WT and L1Tg mice, MTP ASO decreased VLDL triglyceride (TG and cholesterol secretion. Regardless of treatment, L1Tg mice had reduced biliary cholesterol compared to WT mice. However, only L1Tg mice treated with MTP ASO had reduced fecal cholesterol excretion. Based upon these findings, we conclude that VLDL or a byproduct such as LDL can move cholesterol from the liver to the small intestine for TICE.

  5. Mitochondrial function is involved in regulation of cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein (apoA-I from murine RAW 264.7 macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Anne Marie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA damage, increased production of reactive oxygen species and progressive respiratory chain dysfunction, together with increased deposition of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters, are hallmarks of atherosclerosis. This study investigated the role of mitochondrial function in regulation of macrophage cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I, by the addition of established pharmacological modulators of mitochondrial function. Methods Murine RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with a range of concentrations of resveratrol, antimycin, dinitrophenol, nigericin and oligomycin, and changes in viability, cytotoxicity, membrane potential and ATP, compared with efflux of [3H]cholesterol to apolipoprotein (apo A-I. The effect of oligomycin treatment on expression of genes implicated in macrophage cholesterol homeostasis were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting, relative to the housekeeping enzyme, Gapdh, and combined with studies of this molecule on cholesterol esterification, de novo lipid biosynthesis, and induction of apoptosis. Significant differences were determined using analysis of variance, and Dunnett’s or Bonferroni post t-tests, as appropriate. Results The positive control, resveratrol (24 h, significantly enhanced cholesterol efflux to apoA-I at concentrations ≥30 μM. By contrast, cholesterol efflux to apoA-I was significantly inhibited by nigericin (45%; ppAbca1 mRNA. Oligomycin treatment did not affect cholesterol biosynthesis, but significantly inhibited cholesterol esterification following exposure to acetylated LDL, and induced apoptosis at ≥30 μM. Finally, oligomycin induced the expression of genes implicated in both cholesterol efflux (Abca1, Abcg4, Stard1 and cholesterol biosynthesis (Hmgr, Mvk, Scap, Srebf2, indicating profound dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis. Conclusions Acute loss of mitochondrial function, and in particular Δψm, reduces

  6. The ABC of cholesterol transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plösch, Torsten

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol fulfills an indispensable role in mammalian physiology. It is an important constituent of all cell membranes. Furthermore, it is the precursor of steroid hormones, which regulate a variety of physiological functions, and of bile salts, which are necessary for the generation of bile flow

  7. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates Superwarfarin Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marangoni, M. Natalia; Martynowycz, Michael W.; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Braun, David; Polak, Paul E.; Weinberg, Guy; Rubinstein, Israel; Gidalevitz, David; Feinstein, Douglas L.

    2016-04-26

    Superwarfarins are modified analogs of warfarin with additional lipophilic aromatic rings, up to 100-fold greater potency, and longer biological half-lives. We hypothesized that increased hydrophobicity allowed interactions with amphiphilic membranes and modulation of biological responses. We find that superwarfarins brodifacoum and difenacoum increase lactate production and cell death in neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, neither causes changes in glioma cells that have higher cholesterol content. After choleterol depletion, lactate production was increased and cell viability was reduced. Drug-membrane interactions were examined by surface X-ray scattering using Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and/or cholesterol. Specular X-ray reflectivity data revealed that superwarfarins, but not warfarin, intercalate between dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine molecules, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction demonstrated changes in lateral crystalline order of the film. Neither agent showed significant interactions with monolayers containing >20% cholesterol. These findings demonstrate an affinity of superwarfarins to biomembranes and suggest that cellular responses to these agents are regulated by cholesterol content.

  8. Temperature Distribution in Fibre-glass Composite Impregnated with Epoxy-Cyanate ester Blend

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Brahmbhatt; Moni Banaudha; Subrata Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    Cyanate ester and epoxy blends have been identified as an attractive insulating material for fusion grade magnet winding packs. An insulation system comprising of fibre glass composites and cyanate ester and blend has been analyzed during its vacuum pressure impregnation and curing. The transient one dimensional distribution of temperature and extent of cure has been evaluated both analytically and experimentally in this paper. The one dimensional transient (1-D) heat transfer cha...

  9. Novel Catalytic Method for Synthesis of Glycosyl Esters by Combining PTC with DMAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Song-tao; ZHANG Suo-qin; ZHANG Guang-liang; WANG Xiao-ming; LI Yao-xian

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a novel catalytic method by combining phase-transfer catalyst, benzyltriethylammonium chloride, with 4-dimethylaminopyridine for the syntheses of glycosyl esters from substituted phenoxyacetic acids and the peracetate of α-D-l-bromosugars to produce eight novel β-glycosyl esters in high yields. The structures of the synthesized compounds were established by IR, MS, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectra and elemental analyses.

  10. What You Need to Know about Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 164304.html What You Need to Know About Cholesterol Heart expert explains the difference between good and ... 28, 2017 MONDAY, March 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cholesterol plays a vital role in your health, so ...

  11. Do You Know Your Cholesterol Levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Health Information Center Do You Know Your Cholesterol Levels? Print-friendly Version (PDF, 6.1 MB) ... Eat Smart Did you know that high blood cholesterol is a serious problem among Latinos? About one ...

  12. High Cholesterol: Medicines to Help You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Cholesterol--Medicines To Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... side effects for each drug, check Drugs@FDA . Cholesterol Absorption Inhibitors Brand Name Generic Name Zetia Ezetimibe ...

  13. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily.

  14. Cholesterol, bile acid and triglyceride metabolism intertwined

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemie wordt gekarakteriseerd door verhoogd plasma cholesterol en/of triglyceriden en sterk geassocieerd met het risico op cardiovasculaire aandoeningen. Dit proefschrift beschrijft onderzoek naar de regulatie van plasma cholesterol en triglyceriden concentraties en de achterliggende mechani

  15. Effect of various eicosanoid products of arachidonic acid on the acyl CoA: Cholesterol acyl transferase activity in three different mammalian cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malo, P.El.

    1988-01-01

    Acylcoenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes cholesterol ester synthesis intracellularly and has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. An in vitro assay has been adapted for determining ACAT activity from rat FU5AH hepatoma, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and rat thoracic aortic smooth muscle (RSM) cells. Formation of {sup 14}C-labelled cholesteryl oleate at 0 to 60 min {plus minus} cholesterol was determined; in the presence of exogenous cholesterol, ACAT activity was approximately linear and surpassed the plateau observed in ACAT activity without cholesterol. Increasing exogenous cholesterol concentration, the amount of oleoyl CoA or the amount of microsomal protein produced a corresponding increase in ACAT activity, while ester formation was slightly increased by decreasing the ratio of Triton WR-1339 to cholesterol. Both the thromboxane A{sub 2} (TxA{sub 2}) mimic, U-44069, and the inflammatory lipoxygenase product, LTB{sub 4}, decreased optimal in vitro microsomal ACAT activity from RSM, but not form FU5AH, while CHO ACAT activity was suppressed by LTB{sub r} only. PGI{sub 2}, PGE{sub 2} and PGF{sub 2{alpha}} had minimal effects for each cell type.

  16. Cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Juan; Qiang LIU

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component for neuronal physiology not only during development stage but also in the adult life. Cholesterol metabolism in brain is independent from that in peripheral tissues due to blood-brain barrier. The content of cholesterol in brain must be accurately maintained in order to keep brain function well. Defects in brain cholesterol metabolism has been shown to be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Huntington’s disease (HD)...

  17. Quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism by promoting cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and cholesterol efflux in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Xie, Zongkai; Gao, Weina; Pu, Lingling; Wei, Jingyu; Guo, Changjiang

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin, a common member of the flavonoid family, is widely present in plant kingdom. Despite that quercetin is implicated in regulating cholesterol metabolism, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesized that quercetin regulates cholesterol homeostasis through regulating the key enzymes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared the profile of key enzymes and transcription factors involved in the hepatic cholesterol metabolism in rats with or without quercetin supplementation. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control and quercetin-supplemented groups. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids in feces and bile were measured. Hepatic enzymatic activities were determined by activity assay kit and high-performance liquid chromatography-based analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. The results showed that the activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, a critical enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was significantly elevated by quercetin. The expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, as well as liver X receptor α, an important transcription factor, was also increased at both mRNA and protein levels by quercetin. However, quercetin exposure had no impact on the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. We also found that quercetin treatment significantly increased ATP binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA and protein expression in the liver, suggesting that quercetin may increase hepatic cholesterol efflux. Collectively, the results presented here indicate that quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism mainly through the pathways that promote cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and

  18. Serum albumin acts as a shuttle to enhance cholesterol efflux from cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Sandhya; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Drazul-Schrader, Denise; Phillips, Michael C; Kellner-Weibel, Ginny; Rothblat, George H

    2013-03-01

    An important mechanism contributing to cell cholesterol efflux is aqueous transfer in which cholesterol diffuses from cells into the aqueous phase and becomes incorporated into an acceptor particle. Some compounds can enhance diffusion by acting as shuttles transferring cholesterol to cholesterol acceptors, which act as cholesterol sinks. We have examined whether particles in serum can enhance cholesterol efflux by acting as shuttles. This task was accomplished by incubating radiolabeled J774 cells with increasing concentrations of lipoprotein-depleted sera (LPDS) or components present in serum as shuttles and a constant amount of LDL, small unilamellar vesicles, or red blood cells (RBC) as sinks. Synergistic efflux was measured as the difference in fractional efflux in excess of that predicted by the addition of the individual efflux values of sink and shuttle alone. Synergistic efflux was obtained when LPDS was incubated with cells and LDL. When different components of LPDS were used as shuttles, albumin produced synergistic efflux, while apoA-I did not. A synergistic effect was also obtained when RBC was used as the sink and albumin as shuttle. The previously observed negative association of albumin with coronary artery disease might be linked to reduced cholesterol shuttling that would occur when serum albumin levels are low.

  19. Mechanism of Resistance to Dietary Cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey R. Boone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alterations in expression of hepatic genes that could contribute to resistance to dietary cholesterol were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, which are known to be resistant to the serum cholesterol raising action of dietary cholesterol. Methods. Microarray analysis was used to provide a comprehensive analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in rats in response to dietary cholesterol. Changes were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Western blotting was employed to measure changes in hepatic cholesterol 7α hydroxylase protein. Results. Of the 28,000 genes examined using the Affymetrix rat microarray, relatively few were significantly altered. As expected, decreases were observed for several genes that encode enzymes of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. The largest decreases were seen for squalene epoxidase and lanosterol 14α demethylase (CYP 51A1. These changes were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. LDL receptor expression was not altered by dietary cholesterol. Critically, the expression of cholesterol 7α hydroxylase, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in bile acid synthesis, was increased over 4-fold in livers of rats fed diets containing 1% cholesterol. In contrast, mice, which are not resistant to dietary cholesterol, exhibited lower hepatic cholesterol 7α hydroxylase (CYP7A1 protein levels, which were not increased in response to diets containing 2% cholesterol.

  20. Isolation of Cholesterol from an Egg Yolk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Douglass F.; Li, Rui; Anson, Cory M.

    2011-01-01

    A simple procedure for the isolation of the cholesterol, by hydrolysis and extraction followed by column chromatography, is described. The cholesterol can be further purified by complexation with oxalic acid. It can also be oxidized and conjugated to cholestenone. The source of the cholesterol is one egg yolk, which contains about 200 mg of…

  1. Intestinal cholesterol secretion : future clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakulj, L.; Besseling, J.; Stroes, E. S. G.; Groen, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Together with the liver, the intestine serves as a homeostatic organ in cholesterol metabolism. Recent evidence has substantiated the pivotal role of the intestine in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). RCT is a fundamental antiatherogenic pathway, mediating the removal of cholesterol from tissues

  2. Public health aspects of serum cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Houterman (Saskia)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn the beginning of this century Anitschkow and De Langen started pioneering work concerning the relation between cholesterol and coronary heart disease. Both showed that there was a possible relation between cholesterol in the diet, blood cholesterol levels and atherosclerosis. It took

  3. Cholesterol Screening: A Practical Guide to Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingery, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    Dry-chemistry cholesterol analysis has made screening feasible in a variety of settings. The article provides practical tips for the implementation of mass cholesterol screening using a portable dry-chemistry analyzer and discusses issues involved in conducting effective cholesterol screening programs from start to finish. (SM)

  4. Amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on the direct electrochemistry of cholesterol oxidase and catalase on a graphene/ionic liquid-modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher; Khodadadian, Mehdi

    2014-03-15

    Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) and catalase (CAT) were co-immobilized on a graphene/ionic liquid-modified glassy carbon electrode (GR-IL/GCE) to develop a highly sensitive amperometric cholesterol biosensor. The H2O2 generated during the enzymatic reaction of ChOx with cholesterol could be reduced electrocatalytically by immobilized CAT to obtain a sensitive amperometric response to cholesterol. The direct electron transfer between enzymes and electrode surface was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Both enzymes showed well-defined redox peaks with quasi-reversible behaviors. An excellent sensitivity of 4.163 mA mM(-1)cm(-2), a response time less than 6s, and a linear range of 0.25-215 μM (R(2)>0.99) have been observed for cholesterol determination using the proposed biosensor. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (KM(app)) was calculated to be 2.32 mM. The bienzymatic cholesterol biosensor showed good reproducibility (RSDsanalytical performance for the determination of free cholesterol in human serum samples.

  5. Synthesis of substituted 2-cyanoarylboronic esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysén, Morten; Hansen, Henriette M; Begtrup, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of substituted 2-cyanoarylboronic esters is described via lithiation/in situ trapping of the corresponding methoxy-, trifluoromethyl-, fluoro-, chloro-, and bromobenzonitriles. The crude arylboronic esters were obtained in high yields and purities and with good regioselectivities....

  6. Ester Tuiksoo otsib endiselt pesa / Paavo Kangur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kangur, Paavo, 1966-

    2012-01-01

    Maadevahetuse protsessi raames süüdistati Ester Tuiksood, et põllumajandusministrina sai ta altkäemaksu Rävala 19 asunud korteri kasutamise eest. Ester Tuiksoo ja kinnisvaraeksperdi Tõnis Rüütli kommentaarid

  7. Non-cholesterol sterols and cholesterol metabolism in sitosterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Rgia A; Myrie, Semone B; Jones, Peter J H

    2013-12-01

    Sitosterolemia (STSL) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, manifested by extremely elevated plant sterols (PS) in plasma and tissue, leading to xanthoma and premature atherosclerotic disease. Therapeutic approaches include limiting PS intake, interrupting enterohepatic circulation of bile acid using bile acid binding resins such as cholestyramine, and/or ileal bypass, and inhibiting intestinal sterol absorption by ezetimibe (EZE). The objective of this review is to evaluate sterol metabolism in STSL and the impact of the currently available treatments on sterol trafficking in this disease. The role of PS in initiation of xanthomas and premature atherosclerosis is also discussed. Blocking sterols absorption with EZE has revolutionized STSL patient treatment as it reduces circulating levels of non-cholesterol sterols in STSL. However, none of the available treatments including EZE have normalized plasma PS concentrations. Future studies are needed to: (i) explore where cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols accumulate, (ii) assess to what extent these sterols in tissues can be mobilized after blocking their absorption, and (iii) define the factors governing sterol flux.

  8. Liquid Crystalline Thermosets from Ester, Ester-imide, and Ester-amide Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Theodorus J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Main chain thermotropic liquid crystal esters, ester-imides, and ester-amides were prepared from AA, BB, and AB type monomeric materials and end-capped with phenylacetylene, phenylmaleimide, or nadimide reactive end-groups. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are thermotropic and have, preferably, molecular weights in the range of approximately 1000-15,000 grams per mole. The end-capped liquid crystaloligomers have broad liquid crystalline melting ranges and exhibit high melt stability and very low melt viscosities at accessible temperatures. The end-capped liquid crystal oli-gomers are stable forup to an hour in the melt phase. They are highly processable by a variety of melt process shape forming and blending techniques. Once processed and shaped, the end-capped liquid crystal oigomers were heated to further polymerize and form liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT). The fully cured products are rubbers above their glass transition temperatures.

  9. Mechanical properties and chemical stability of pivalolactone-based poly(ether ester)s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsma, E.J.; Does, van der L.; Bantjes, A.; Vulic, I.

    1994-01-01

    The processing, mechanical and chemical properties of poly(ether ester)s, prepared from pivalolactone (PVL), 1,4-butanediol (4G) and dimethyl terephthalate (DMT), were studied. The poly(ether ester)s could easily be processed by injection moulding, owing to their favourable rheological and thermal p

  10. Cholesterol Depletion from a Ceramide/Cholesterol Mixed Monolayer: A Brewster Angle Microscope Study

    KAUST Repository

    Mandal, Pritam

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol is crucial to the mechanical properties of cell membranes that are important to cells’ behavior. Its depletion from the cell membranes could be dramatic. Among cyclodextrins (CDs), methyl beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) is the most efficient to deplete cholesterol (Chol) from biomembranes. Here, we focus on the depletion of cholesterol from a C16 ceramide/cholesterol (C16-Cer/Chol) mixed monolayer using MβCD. While the removal of cholesterol by MβCD depends on the cholesterol concentration in most mixed lipid monolayers, it does not depend very much on the concentration of cholesterol in C16-Cer/Chol monolayers. The surface pressure decay during depletion were described by a stretched exponential that suggested that the cholesterol molecules are unable to diffuse laterally and behave like static traps for the MβCD molecules. Cholesterol depletion causes morphology changes of domains but these disrupted monolayers domains seem to reform even when cholesterol level was low.

  11. Dietary cholesterol and plasma lipoprotein profiles: Randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early work suggested that dietary cholesterol increased plasma total cholesterol concentrations in humans. Given the relationship between elevated plasma cholesterol concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk, dietary guidelines have consistently recommended limiting food sources of cholesterol....

  12. Biliary cholesterol secretion : More than a simple ABC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol originat

  13. Intestinal Farnesoid X Receptor Controls Transintestinal Cholesterol Excretion in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan Freark; Schonewille, Marleen; Boesjes, Marije; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Bos, Trijnie; van Dijk, Theo H; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Boverhof, Renze; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; van Deursen, Jan M; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Moschetta, Antonio; Kremoser, Claus; Verkade, Henkjan J; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The role of the intestine in the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis is increasingly recognized. Fecal excretion of cholesterol is the last step in the atheroprotective reverse cholesterol transport pathway, to which biliary and transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE) cont

  14. Transcriptional profiling uncovers a network of cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Skogsberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr(-/-Apo(100/100Mttp(flox/flox Mx1-Cre. Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies.

  15. Polyunsaturated fatty acyl-coenzyme As are inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis in zebrafish and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Karanth

    2013-11-01

    Lipid disorders pose therapeutic challenges. Previously we discovered that mutation of the hepatocyte β-hydroxybutyrate transporter Slc16a6a in zebrafish causes hepatic steatosis during fasting, marked by increased hepatic triacylglycerol, but not cholesterol. This selective diversion of trapped ketogenic carbon atoms is surprising because acetate and acetoacetate can exit mitochondria and can be incorporated into both fatty acids and cholesterol in normal hepatocytes. To elucidate the mechanism of this selective diversion of carbon atoms to fatty acids, we fed wild-type and slc16a6a mutant animals high-protein ketogenic diets. We find that slc16a6a mutants have decreased activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr, despite increased Hmgcr protein abundance and relative incorporation of mevalonate into cholesterol. These observations suggest the presence of an endogenous Hmgcr inhibitor. We took a candidate approach to identify such inhibitors. First, we found that mutant livers accumulate multiple polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and PUFA-CoAs, and we showed that human HMGCR is inhibited by PUFA-CoAs in vitro. Second, we injected mice with an ethyl ester of the PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid and observed an acute decrease in hepatic Hmgcr activity, without alteration in Hmgcr protein abundance. These results elucidate a mechanism for PUFA-mediated cholesterol lowering through direct inhibition of Hmgcr.

  16. Effects of partial replacement of dietary fat by olestra on dietary cholesterol absorption in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandacek, R.J.; Ramirez, M.M.; Crouse, J.R. III (Procter Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Olestra, a nonabsorbable fat substitute comprising long-chain fatty acid esters of sucrose, had been previously shown to reduce cholesterol absorption in humans when ingested at a level of 50 g/d. To determine whether or not a lower level of dietary olestra would also reduce cholesterol absorption, we studied the effect of 7 g of olestra twice a day in 20 normocholesterolemic male inpatients in a double-blind, crossover trial. Two 6-day diet treatment and stool collection periods were separated by a 14-day washout period. Half of the subjects received butter, and half, a butter-olestra blend during each treatment period according to a crossover design. All subjects ingested trace amounts of 3H-cholesterol and 14C-beta-sitosterol with the butter or the butter-olestra blend. Cholesterol absorption was determined from the 3H/14C ratios in the diet and in saponified and extracted stools according to previously validated methodology. Cholesterol absorption during the butter regimen was significantly greater than that during the olestra regimen (56.1% +/- 1.6% v 46.7% +/- 1.1%, P less than .01).

  17. Avasimibe encapsulated in human serum albumin blocks cholesterol esterification for selective cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steve Seung-Young; Li, Junjie; Tai, Jien Nee; Ratliff, Timothy L; Park, Kinam; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-03-24

    Undesirable side effects remain a significant challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Here we report a strategy for cancer-selective chemotherapy by blocking acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1)-mediated cholesterol esterification. To efficiently block cholesterol esterification in cancer in vivo, we developed a systemically injectable nanoformulation of avasimibe (a potent ACAT-1 inhibitor), called avasimin. In cell lines of human prostate, pancreatic, lung, and colon cancer, avasimin significantly reduced cholesteryl ester storage in lipid droplets and elevated intracellular free cholesterol levels, which led to apoptosis and suppression of proliferation. In xenograft models of prostate cancer and colon cancer, intravenous administration of avasimin caused the concentration of avasimibe in tumors to be 4-fold higher than the IC50 value. Systemic treatment of avasimin notably suppressed tumor growth in mice and extended the length of survival time. No adverse effects of avasimin to normal cells and organs were observed. Together, this study provides an effective approach for selective cancer chemotherapy by targeting altered cholesterol metabolism of cancer cells.

  18. Hepatic entrapment of esterified cholesterol drives continual expansion of whole body sterol pool in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqul, Amal; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Taylor, Anna M; Repa, Joyce J; Burns, Dennis K; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-10-15

    Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) results from loss-of-function mutations in LIPA, the gene that encodes lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). Hepatomegaly and deposition of esterified cholesterol (EC) in multiple organs ensue. The present studies quantitated rates of synthesis, absorption, and disposition of cholesterol, and whole body cholesterol pool size in a mouse model of CESD. In 50-day-old lal(-/-) and matching lal(+/+) mice fed a low-cholesterol diet, whole animal cholesterol content equalled 210 and 50 mg, respectively, indicating that since birth the lal(-/-) mice sequestered cholesterol at an average rate of 3.2 mg·day(-1)·animal(-1). The proportion of the body sterol pool contained in the liver of the lal(-/-) mice was 64 vs. 6.3% in their lal(+/+) controls. EC concentrations in the liver, spleen, small intestine, and lungs of the lal(-/-) mice were elevated 100-, 35-, 15-, and 6-fold, respectively. In the lal(-/-) mice, whole liver cholesterol synthesis increased 10.2-fold, resulting in a 3.2-fold greater rate of whole animal sterol synthesis compared with their lal(+/+) controls. The rate of cholesterol synthesis in the lal(-/-) mice exceeded that in the lal(+/+) controls by 3.7 mg·day(-1)·animal(-1). Fractional cholesterol absorption and fecal bile acid excretion were unchanged in the lal(-/-) mice, but their rate of neutral sterol excretion was 59% higher than in their lal(+/+) controls. Thus, in this model, the continual expansion of the body sterol pool is driven by the synthesis of excess cholesterol, primarily in the liver. Despite the severity of their disease, the median life span of the lal(-/-) mice was 355 days.

  19. 40 CFR 721.3034 - Methylamine esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylamine esters. 721.3034 Section... Substances § 721.3034 Methylamine esters. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as methylamine esters (PMN P-94-982) is...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  1. 40 CFR 721.537 - Organosilane ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organosilane ester. 721.537 Section... § 721.537 Organosilane ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an organosilane ester (PMN P-96-1661/P-95-1654)...

  2. RAFT Polymerization of Vinyl Esters: Synthesis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Harrisson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is the first comprehensive review on the study and use of vinyl ester monomers in reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization. It covers all the synthetic aspects associated with the definition of precision polymers comprising poly(vinyl ester building blocks, such as the choice of RAFT agent and reaction conditions in order to progress from simple to complex macromolecular architectures. Although vinyl acetate was by far the most studied monomer of the range, many vinyl esters have been considered in order to tune various polymer properties, in particular, solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2. A special emphasis is given to novel poly(vinyl alkylates with enhanced solubilities in scCO2, with applications as reactive stabilizers for dispersion polymerization and macromolecular surfactants for CO2 media. Other miscellaneous uses of poly(vinyl esters synthesized by RAFT, for instance as a means to produce poly(vinyl alcohol with controlled characteristics for use in the biomedical area, are also covered.

  3. Boiling heat transfer characteristics of fatty acid methyl ester(FAME)in falling film evaporator%脂肪酸甲酯降膜蒸发器沸腾传热性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐委托; 马晓建; 马力; 陈俊英; 杨闪; 张芬芬

    2016-01-01

    利用传统的多管排列式蒸发器对高黏度、易结垢的混合物进行蒸发,容易造成布液器堵塞,且结垢后的传热管难以清理。因此根据物料特性,本文设计了一种新型的降膜蒸发器,采用大降液孔加倾斜环板进行布膜,利用内径较大的锥筒作为传热壁面,并以粗甲酯作为试验工质对蒸发器的降膜蒸发传热系数随蒸发器筒体半锥度角、液膜流动雷诺数以及输入热通量之间的关系进行了试验研究。结果表明:该型蒸发器对于上述工质具有较好的适用性,蒸发系统能够在保持较高的传热系数的条件下,连续运行而不发生堵塞;蒸发器筒体锥度角有效地强化了降膜蒸发传热过程,而较大的热通量及进料流量在一定程度上却不利于蒸发传热。最后建立了降膜蒸发传热系数随蒸发器筒体半锥角和流动准数之间的经验关联式。%Using conventional line-tube heat exchanger for evaporation of high viscosity and easy-to-scaling mixture can easily block liquid distributor and make the cleaning of foul tube impossible. Therefore,a new type of falling film evaporator was designed,which used large liquid orifice plus tilt ring plate for liquid distribution and took larger diameter of conical shell as heat transfer wall. The variation of boiling heat transfer coefficients with shell’s taper angle,Reynolds number and heat fluxes were determined by a pilot scale falling film evaporation system,using the FAME mixture as liquid model. Result showed that this type of evaporator worked well for FAME,the system could work smoothly with high heat transfer efficiency for a long time and without the occurrence of clogging. The evaporator shell’s taper angle can intensify heat transfer process. The increase of heat flux and feed flow had a negative influence on heat transfer coefficient. Experimental correlation for boiling heat transfer coefficients with consideration of

  4. Esters van tetrathioorthokiezelzuur en tetrathioorthogermaniumzuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Folkert Jans

    1934-01-01

    The germaniun tetrachloride required was prepared from the mineral germanite. For this a simpler method was elaborated. For the preparation of the esters of tetrathioorthosilicic acid and tetrathioorthogermanic acid, silicon tetrachloride and germanium tetrachloride were made to react with a suspens

  5. Epididymis cholesterol homeostasis and sperm fertilizing ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabrice Saez; Aurélia Ouvrier; Jo(e)l R Drevet

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol, being the starting point of steroid hormone synthesis, is a long known modulator of both female and male reproductive physiology especially at the level of the gonads and the impact cholesterol has on gametogenesis. Less is known about the effects cholesterol homeostasis may have on postgonadic reproductive functions. Lately, several data have been reported showing how imbalanced cholesterol levels may particularly affect the post-testicular events of sperm maturation that lead to fully fertile male gametes. This review will focus on that aspect and essentially centers on how cholesterol is important for the physiology of the mammalian epididymis and spermatozoa.

  6. Analysis of Cholesterol Trafficking with Fluorescent Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wustner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in determining the biophysical properties of biological membranes, and its concentration is tightly controlled by homeostatic processes. The intracellular transport of cholesterol among organelles is a key part of the homeostatic mechanism, but sterol transport...... that can bind to cholesterol to reveal its distribution in cells. We also discuss the use of intrinsically fluorescent sterols that closely mimic cholesterol, as well as some minimally modified fluorophore-labeled sterols. Methods for imaging these sterols by conventional fluorescence microscopy...... and by multiphoton microscopy are described. Some label-free methods for imaging cholesterol itself are also discussed briefly....

  7. Peptide mediators of cholesterol efflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan

    2013-04-09

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  8. Iridoid enriched fraction from Ajuga iva reduce cholesterolemia, triacylglycerolemia and increase the lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity of rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie A. Lacaille-Dubois

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we examined the effect of iridoid (I derived from lyophilized aqueous extract of Ajuga iva on serum HDL2 and HDL3 compositions and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT activity, enzyme responsible for reverse cholesterol transport. Methods: Male Wistar rats (n=24 weighing 120±5 g were fed a diet containing 1% cholesterol-rich diet for 15 days. After this phase, the hypercholesterolemic (HC rats were divided into groups fed the same diet and received or not doses (5, 10 or 15 mg/kg b.w by intraperitoneal injection of iridoid for 15 days. Results: Compared to HC group, serum total cholesterol value was 1.4- and 1.2-fold lower in the I5-HC and I10-HC groups. C-HDL2 and C-HDL3 values were increased in the I5-HC, I10-HC and I15-HC groups (3.2- and 4-, 2.2- and 4.2-, and 3.2- and 8.7-fold, respectively. HDL2 amounts were 4-, 4- and 2.5-fold higher in the I5-HC, I10-HC and I15-HC groups. In HDL3, phospholipids contents were similar, whereas, unesterified cholesterol values were 3.3-, 2.8- and 3-fold higher in the I5-HC, I10-HC and I15-HC groups. In HDL2, cholesteryl esters contents were significantly higher in the groups treated with iridoid (p<0.05. LCAT activity was increased in the I5-HC and I10-HC groups. Conclusion: Treatment with iridoid at doses 5 or 10mg/kg b.w reduce cholesterolemia. These molecules act efficiently on the efflux of cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver by increasing LCAT activity. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(1.000: 55-60

  9. Evaluating computational models of cholesterol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paalvast, Yared; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Groen, Albert K

    2015-10-01

    Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis has been studied extensively during the last decades. Many of the metabolic pathways involved have been discovered. Yet important gaps in our knowledge remain. For example, knowledge on intracellular cholesterol traffic and its relation to the regulation of cholesterol synthesis and plasma cholesterol levels is incomplete. One way of addressing the remaining questions is by making use of computational models. Here, we critically evaluate existing computational models of cholesterol metabolism making use of ordinary differential equations and addressed whether they used assumptions and make predictions in line with current knowledge on cholesterol homeostasis. Having studied the results described by the authors, we have also tested their models. This was done primarily by testing the effect of statin treatment in each model. Ten out of eleven models tested have made assumptions in line with current knowledge of cholesterol metabolism. Three out of the ten remaining models made correct predictions, i.e. predicting a decrease in plasma total and LDL cholesterol or increased uptake of LDL upon treatment upon the use of statins. In conclusion, few models on cholesterol metabolism are able to pass a functional test. Apparently most models have not undergone the critical iterative systems biology cycle of validation. We expect modeling of cholesterol metabolism to go through many more model topologies and iterative cycles and welcome the increased understanding of cholesterol metabolism these are likely to bring.

  10. Intracellular transport of cholesterol in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasaemle, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The erythrocyte was selected as a simple cell for the study of transbilayer movement of cholesterol. Cholesterol oxidase was used to measure the distribution of ({sup 3}H)cholesterol across the erythrocyte membrane. Cholesterol oxidase was also used to estimate the rate of transport of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to the plasma membrane of cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts; the half-time of this process was 42 minutes. The rate of transport of LDL cholesterol to the plasma membrane was confirmed by a second procedure using amphotericin B. Amphotericin B was also used to estimate the rate of transport of endogenously synthesized cholesterol to the plasma membrane of CHO cells. New methodology was developed including improvements of the previously published cholesterol oxidase assay for plasma membrane cholesterol. A new method for detecting transport of cholesterol to the plasma membrane in cultured cells was developed using amphotericin B. Preliminary studies investigated the use of fluorescent polyenes, pimaricin and etruscomycin, as probes for plasma membrane cholesterol in transport studies. Finally, a modification of a previously published cell staining protocol yielded a simple, quantitative assay for cell growth.

  11. Cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component for neuronal physiology not only during development stage but also in the adult life. Cholesterol metabolism in brain is independent from that in peripheral tissues due to blood-brain barrier. The content of cholesterol in brain must be accurately maintained in order to keep brain function well. Defects in brain cholesterol metabolism has been shown to be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and some cognitive deficits typical of the old age. The brain contains large amount of cholesterol, but the cholesterol metabolism and its complex homeostasis regulation are currently poorly understood. This review will seek to integrate current knowledge about the brain cholesterol metabolism with molecular mechanisms.

  12. Biosynthesis of membrane cholesterol during peripheral nerve development, degeneration and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, J K

    1988-09-01

    Biosynthesis of peripheral nerve cholesterol was investigated by the in vivo and in vitro incorporation of [1-14C]-acetate into sciatic endoneurium of normal rats during development, degeneration and regeneration. Labeled sterols were rapidly formed (less than 10 min) within the endoneurial portion of sciatic nerve after [1-14C]acetate administration by intraneural injection. The majority of labeled sterols were initially found in lanosterol and desmosterol. After six hr, the 14C-labeling in both precursors was decreased to minimum, whereas cholesterol became the major labeled product of sterol. As myelination proceeded, the incorporation of [1-14C]acetate into endoneurial cholesterol decreased rapidly and reached a minimum after six mo. In mature adult nerve, an increased proportion of biosynthesis of lanosterol and desmosterol also was demonstrated. The in vitro incorporation of [1-14C]acetate into cholesterol was inhibited during Wallerian degeneration. Instead, cholesteryl esters were labeled as the major sterol product. Such inhibition, however, was not observed in the adult Trembler nerve (Brain Res. 325, 21-27, 1985), which is presumed to be due to a primary metabolic disorder of Schwann cells. The cholesterol biosynthesis was gradually resumed in degenerated nerve by either regeneration of crush-injured nerve or reattachment of the transected nerve. These results suggest that cholesterol biosynthesis in peripheral nerve relies on the axon to provide necessary substrates. De novo synthesis appears to be one of the major sources of endoneurial cholesterol that forms and maintains peripheral nerve myelin.

  13. Niacin and cholesterol: role in cardiovascular disease (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Shobha H; Kamanna, Vaijinath S; Kashyap, Moti L

    2003-06-01

    Niacin has been widely used as a pharmacologic agent to regulate abnormalities in plasma lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and in the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Although the use of niacin in the treatment of dyslipidemia has been reported as early as 1955, only recent studies have yielded an understanding about the cellular and molecular mechanism of action of niacin on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. In brief, the beneficial effect of niacin to reduce triglycerides and apolipoprotein-B containing lipoproteins (e.g., VLDL and LDL) are mainly through: a) decreasing fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissue triglyceride stores, and b) inhibiting hepatocyte diacylglycerol acyltransferase and triglyceride synthesis leading to increased intracellular apo B degradation and subsequent decreased secretion of VLDL and LDL particles. The mechanism of action of niacin to raise HDL is by decreasing the fractional catabolic rate of HDL-apo AI without affecting the synthetic rates. Additionally, niacin selectively increases the plasma levels of Lp-AI (HDL subfraction without apo AII), a cardioprotective subfraction of HDL in patients with low HDL. Using human hepatocytes (Hep G2 cells) as an in vitro model system, recent studies indicate that niacin selectively inhibits the uptake/removal of HDL-apo AI (but not HDL-cholesterol ester) by hepatocytes, thereby increasing the capacity of retained HDL-apo AI to augment cholesterol efflux through reverse cholesterol transport pathway. The studies discussed in this review provide evidence to extend the role of niacin as a lipid-lowering drug beyond its role as a vitamin.

  14. The enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase esterifies cerebrosterol and limits the toxic effect of this oxysterol on SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Valeria; Spagnuolo, Maria Stefania; Cigliano, Luisa; Marasco, Daniela; Abrescia, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Cholesterol is mostly removed from the CNS by its conversion to cerebrosterol (24(S)-hydroxycholesterol, 24(S)OH-C), which is transported to the circulation for bile formation in liver. A neurotoxic role of this oxysterol was previously demonstrated in cell culture. Here, we provide evidence that the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, long known to esterify cholesterol, also produces monoesters of 24(S)OH-C. Proteoliposomes containing apolipoprotein A-I or apolipoprotein E were used to stimulate the enzyme activity and entrap the formed esters. Proteoliposomes with apolipoprotein A-I were found to be more active than those with apolipoprotein E in stimulating the production of oxysteryl esters. Cholesterol and 24(S)OH-C were found to compete for enzyme activity. High levels of haptoglobin, as those circulating during the acute inflammatory phase, inhibited 24(S)OH-C esterification. When highly neurotoxic 24(S)OH-C was treated with enzyme and proteoliposomes before incubation with differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, the neuron survival improved. The esters of 24(S)OH-C, embedded into proteoliposomes by the enzyme and isolated from unesterified 24(S)OH-C by gel filtration chromatography, did not enter the neurons in culture. These results suggest that the enzyme, in the presence of the apolipoproteins, converts 24(S)OH-C into esters restricted to the extracellular environment, thus preventing or limiting oxysterol-induced neurotoxic injuries to neurons in culture. 24-hydroxycholesterol (24(S)OH-C) is neurotoxic. The enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) synthesizes monoesters of 24(S)OH-C in reaction mixtures with proteoliposomes containing phospholipids and apolipoprotein A-I or apolipoprotein E. The esters, also produced by incubation of cerebrospinal fluid only with tritiated 24(S)OH-C, are embedded into lipoproteins that do not enter neurons in culture. The enzyme activity limits the toxicity of 24-hydroxycholesterol in neuron culture.

  15. Translocator protein-mediated pharmacology of cholesterol transport and steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Fan, Jinjiang; Campioli, Enrico; Zirkin, Barry; Midzak, Andrew

    2015-06-15

    Steroidogenesis begins with cholesterol transfer into mitochondria through the transduceosome, a complex composed of cytosolic proteins that include steroidogenesis acute regulatory protein (STAR), 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, and the outer mitochondrial membrane proteins Translocator Protein (TSPO) and Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC). TSPO is a drug- and cholesterol-binding protein found at particularly high levels in steroid synthesizing cells. Its aberrant expression has been linked to cancer, neurodegeneration, neuropsychiatric disorders and primary hypogonadism. Brain steroids serve as local regulators of neural development and excitability. Reduced levels of these steroids have been linked to depression, anxiety and neurodegeneration. Reduced serum testosterone is common among subfertile young men and aging men, and is associated with depression, metabolic syndrome and reduced sexual function. Although testosterone-replacement therapy is available, there are undesired side-effects. TSPO drug ligands have been proposed as therapeutic agents to regulate steroid levels in the brain and testis.

  16. Methods of making alkyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-08-03

    A method comprising contacting an alcohol, a feed comprising one or more glycerides and equal to or greater than 2 wt % of one or more free fatty acids, and a solid acid catalyst, a nanostructured polymer catalyst, or a sulfated zirconia catalyst in one or more reactors, and recovering from the one or more reactors an effluent comprising equal to or greater than about 75 wt % alkyl ester and equal to or less than about 5 wt % glyceride.

  17. Imbalanced cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue-shan, Zhao; Juan, Peng; Qi, Wu; Zhong, Ren; Li-hong, Pan; Zhi-han, Tang; Zhi-sheng, Jiang; Gui-xue, Wang; Lu-shan, Liu

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex and multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that is mainly caused by β-amyloid accumulation. A large number of studies have shown that elevated cholesterol levels may perform a function in AD pathology, and several cholesterol-related gene polymorphisms are associated with this disease. Although numerous studies have shown the important function of cholesterol in AD pathogenesis and development, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To further elucidate cholesterol metabolism disorder and AD, we first, review metabolism and regulation of the cholesterol in the brain. Second, we summarize the literature stating that hypercholesterolemia is one of the risk factors of AD. Third, we discuss the main mechanisms of abnormal cholesterol metabolism that increase the risk of AD. Finally, the relationships between AD and apolipoprotein E, PCSK9, and LRP1 are discussed in this article.

  18. Biophysical studies of cholesterol effects on chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Isabel T G; Fernandes, Vinicius; Souza, Caio; Treptow, Werner; Santos, Guilherme Martins

    2017-03-22

    Changes in chromatin structure regulate gene expression and genome maintenance. Molecules that bind to the nucleosome, the complex of DNA and histone proteins, are key modulators of chromatin structure. Previous work indicated that cholesterol, a ubiquitous cellular lipid, may bind to chromatin in vivo, suggesting a potential function for lipids in modulating chromatin architecture. However, the molecular mechanisms of cholesterol action on chromatin structure have remained unclear. Here, we explored the biophysical impact of cholesterol on nucleosome and chromatin fibers reconstituted in vitro and characterized in silico the cholesterol binding to nucleosome. Our findings support that cholesterol assists 10nm and 30nm chromatin formation and induces folding of long chromatin fibers as a result of direct interaction of the cholesterol to six nucleosomal binding sites.

  19. Biliary cholesterol secretion: More than a simple ABC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arne; Dikkers; Uwe; JF; Tietge

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease. With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the f inal step for the elimination of cholesterol originating from cholesterol-laden macrophage foam cells in the vessel wall in a pathway named reverse cholesterol transport. On the other hand, cholesterol hypersecretion into the bile is considered the main pathophys...

  20. Biliary cholesterol secretion: More than a simple ABC

    OpenAIRE

    Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe JF

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease. With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol originating from cholesterol-laden macrophage foam cells in the vessel wall in a pathway named reverse cholesterol transport. On the other hand, cholesterol hypersecretion into the bile is considered the ...

  1. Enhanced Reactivity in Nucleophilic Acyl Substitution Ion/Ion Reactions Using Triazole-Ester Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Jiexun; Peng, Zhou; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-02-01

    The acyl substitution reactions between 1-hydroxy-7-aza-benzotriazole (HOAt)/1-hydroxy-benzotriazole (HOBt) ester reagents and nucleophilic side chains on peptides have been demonstrated in the gas phase via ion/ion reactions. The HOAt/HOBt ester reagents were synthesized in solution and ionized via negative nano-electrospray ionization. The anionic reagents were then reacted with doubly protonated model peptides containing amines, guanidines, and imidazoles in the gas phase. The complexes formed in the reaction cell were further probed with ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID) yielding either a covalently modified analyte ion or a proton transfer product ion. The covalent reaction yield of HOAt/HOBt ester reagents was demonstrated to be higher than the yield with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester reagents over a range of equivalent conditions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed with a primary amine model system for both triazole-ester and NHS-ester reactants, which indicated a lower transition state barrier for the former reagent, consistent with experiments. The work herein demonstrates that the triazole-ester reagents are more reactive, and therefore less selective, than the analogous NHS-ester reagent. As a consequence, the triazole-ester reagents are the first to show efficient reactivity with unprotonated histidine residues in the gas phase. For all nucleophilic sites and all reagents, covalent reactions are favored under long time, low amplitude activation conditions. This work presents a novel class of reagents capable of gas-phase conjugation to nucleophilic sites in analyte ions via ion/ion chemistry.

  2. Fish-oil esters of plant sterols differ from vegetable-oil sterol esters in triglycerides lowering, carotenoid bioavailability and impact on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 concentrations in hypercholesterolemic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yen-Ming

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumption of plant sterol (PS esters lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol levels by suppressing intestinal absorption of cholesterol. Commercially available PS are mainly esterified to omega-6 fatty acid (FA, such as sunflower oil (SO FA. Emerging trends include using other sources such as olive oil (OO or omega-3 FA from fish oil (FO, known to exert potent hypotriglyceridemic effects. Our objective was to compare the actions of different FA esterified to PS on blood lipids, carotenoid bioavailability as well as inflammatory and coagulation markers. Methods Twenty-one moderately overweight, hypercholesterolemic subjects consumed experimental isoenergetic diets enriched with OO (70% of fat, each lasting 28-day and separated by 4-week washout periods, using a randomized crossover design. Diets were supplemented with three PS esters preparations, PS-FO, PS-SO, or PS-OO. All PS treatments contained an equivalent of 1.7 PS g/d, and the PS-FO provided a total of 5.4 g/d FO FA (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. Results There were no differences between PS-containing diet effects on total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol levels. However, PS-FO consumption resulted in markedly lower (P Conclusion Our findings suggest that, in hypercholesterolemic subjects consuming an OO-based diet, PS-FO results in lowered blood triglyceride and PAI-1 concentrations, and higher fat-soluble vitamin levels in comparison to the vegetable oil FA esters of PS (PS-SO and PS-OO. Thus, PS-FO may offer hyperlipidemic subjects a more comprehensive lipid lowering approach while reducing the potential risk of decreased plasma carotenoid concentrations.

  3. Raising HDL cholesterol in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny J Eapen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Danny J Eapen1, Girish L Kalra1, Luay Rifai1, Christina A Eapen2, Nadya Merchant1, Bobby V Khan11Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2University of South Florida School of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C concentration is essential in the determination of coronary heart disease (CHD risk in women. This is especially true in the postmenopausal state, where lipid profiles and CHD risk mimic that of age-matched men. Thus, interventions designed to reduce CHD risk by raising HDL-C levels may have particular significance during the transition to menopause. This review discusses HDL-C-raising therapies and the role of HDL in the primary prevention of CHD in women. Lifestyle-based interventions such as dietary change, aerobic exercise regimens, and smoking cessation are initial steps that are effective in raising HDL-C, and available data suggest women respond similarly to men with these interventions. When combined with pharmacotherapy, the effects of these lifestyle alterations are further amplified. Though studies demonstrating gender-specific differences in therapy are limited, niacin continues to be the most effective agent in raising HDL-C levels, especially when used in combination with fibrate or statin therapy. Emerging treatments such as HDL mimetic therapy show much promise in further raising HDL-C levels and improving cardiovascular outcomes.Keywords: high-density lipoprotein, HDL, women, cholesterol, heart disease

  4. Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs/SOATs): Enzymes with multiple sterols as substrates and as activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Maximillian A; Liu, Jay; Song, Bao-Liang; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C Y; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Cholesterol is essential to the growth and viability of cells. The metabolites of cholesterol include: steroids, oxysterols, and bile acids, all of which play important physiological functions. Cholesterol and its metabolites have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple human diseases, including: atherosclerosis, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. Thus, understanding how cells maintain the homeostasis of cholesterol and its metabolites is an important area of study. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs, also abbreviated as SOATs) converts cholesterol to cholesteryl esters and play key roles in the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. ACATs are most unusual enzymes because (i) they metabolize diverse substrates including both sterols and certain steroids; (ii) they contain two different binding sites for steroidal molecules. In mammals, there are two ACAT genes that encode two different enzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2. Both are allosteric enzymes that can be activated by a variety of sterols. In addition to cholesterol, other sterols that possess the 3-beta OH at C-3, including PREG, oxysterols (such as 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, etc.), and various plant sterols, could all be ACAT substrates. All sterols that possess the iso-octyl side chain including cholesterol, oxysterols, various plant sterols could all be activators of ACAT. PREG can only be an ACAT substrate because it lacks the iso-octyl side chain required to be an ACAT activator. The unnatural cholesterol analogs epi-cholesterol (with 3-alpha OH in steroid ring B) and ent-cholesterol (the mirror image of cholesterol) contain the iso-octyl side chain but do not have the 3-beta OH at C-3. Thus, they can only serve as activators and cannot serve as substrates. Thus, within the ACAT holoenzyme, there are site(s) that bind sterol as substrate and site(s) that bind sterol as activator; these sites are distinct from each other. These features form

  5. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulig, Waldemar; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The main biological cause of oxysterols is the oxidation of cholesterol. They differ from cholesterol by the presence of additional polar groups that are typically hydroxyl, keto, hydroperoxy, epoxy, or carboxyl moieties. Under typical conditions, oxysterol concentration is maintained at a very low...... and precisely regulated level, with an excess of cholesterol. Like cholesterol, many oxysterols are hydrophobic and hence confined to cell membranes. However, small chemical differences between the sterols can significantly affect how they interact with other membrane components, and this in turn can have...

  6. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  7. Cholesterol and late-life cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Peter

    2012-01-01

    High cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but their role in dementia and cognitive decline is less clear. This review highlights current knowledge on the role of cholesterol in late-life cognitive function, cognitive decline, and dementia. When measured in midlife, high cholesterol levels associate with an increased risk of late-life dementia and cognitive decline. However, when measured in late-life, high cholesterol levels show no association with cognitive function, or even show an inverse relation. Although statin treatment has been shown to associate with a lower risk of dementia and cognitive decline in observational studies, randomized controlled trials show no beneficial effect of statin treatment on late-life cognitive function. Lowering cholesterol levels may impair brain function, since cholesterol is essential for synapse formation and maturation and plays an important role in the regulation of signal transduction through its function as a component of the cell membrane. However, membrane cholesterol also plays a role in the formation and aggregation of amyloid-β. Factors that influence cholesterol metabolism, such as dietary intake, are shown to play a role in late-life cognitive function and the risk of dementia. In conclusion, cholesterol associates with late-life cognitive function, but the association is strongly age-dependent. There is no evidence that treatment with statins in late-life has a beneficial effect on cognitive function.

  8. Data related to inflammation and cholesterol deposition triggered by macrophages exposition to modified LDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Toledo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article supports experimental evidence on the time-dependent effect on gene expression related to inflammation and cholesterol deposition in lipid-loaded cells. The cells employed were human monocytes THP1 line transformed into macrophages by treatment with phorbol esters. Macrophages were treated at different times with oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL and then gene expression was measured. We also include data about the different types of oxidized lipoprotein obtained (low, media or high oxidation for differential exposure with Cu ions. These data include characterization to lipid and protein peroxidative damage and also quantification of cell viability by exposure to native and modified LDL. The present article complements data published in “Decreased OxLDL uptake and cholesterol efflux in THP1 cells elicited by cortisol and by cortisone through 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1” Ledda et al. (in press [1].

  9. Data related to inflammation and cholesterol deposition triggered by macrophages exposition to modified LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Juan; Esteve, Montserrat; Grasa, Mar; Ledda, Angelo; Garda, Horacio; Gulfo, José; Ludovico, Ivo Díaz; Ramella, Nahuel; Gonzalez, Marina

    2016-09-01

    This article supports experimental evidence on the time-dependent effect on gene expression related to inflammation and cholesterol deposition in lipid-loaded cells. The cells employed were human monocytes THP1 line transformed into macrophages by treatment with phorbol esters. Macrophages were treated at different times with oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) and then gene expression was measured. We also include data about the different types of oxidized lipoprotein obtained (low, media or high oxidation) for differential exposure with Cu ions. These data include characterization to lipid and protein peroxidative damage and also quantification of cell viability by exposure to native and modified LDL. The present article complements data published in "Decreased OxLDL uptake and cholesterol efflux in THP1 cells elicited by cortisol and by cortisone through 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1" Ledda et al. (in press) [1].

  10. Cholesterol esters are detected by Raman microspectroscopy in HeLa cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manen, van Henk-Jan; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    The detection of trans-unsaturated lipids in single HeLa cells by Raman microspectroscopy was recently reported in this journal by Onogi et al. Based on our previously published Raman microspectroscopy data of individual macrophage foam cells, a detailed comparison between our spectra and spectrum r

  11. Potential of BODIPY-cholesterol for analysis of cholesterol transport and diffusion in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Lund, Frederik Wendelboe; Röhrl, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an abundant and important lipid component of cellular membranes. Analysis of cholesterol transport and diffusion in living cells is hampered by the technical challenge of designing suitable cholesterol probes which can be detected for example by optical microscopy. One strategy...... is to use intrinsically fluorescent sterols, as dehydroergosterol (DHE), having minimal chemical alteration compared to cholesterol but giving low fluorescence signals in the UV region of the spectrum. Alternatively, one can use dye-tagged cholesterol analogs and in particular BODIPY-cholesterol (BChol......), whose synthesis and initial characterization was pioneered by Robert Bittman. Here, we give a general overview of the properties and applications but also limitations of BODIPY-tagged cholesterol probes for analyzing intracellular cholesterol trafficking. We describe our own experiences...

  12. Black pepper and piperine reduce cholesterol uptake and enhance translocation of cholesterol transporter proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangjai, Acharaporn; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Praputbut, Sakonwun; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2013-04-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) lowers blood lipids in vivo and inhibits cholesterol uptake in vitro, and piperine may mediate these effects. To test this, the present study aimed to compare actions of black pepper extract and piperine on (1) cholesterol uptake and efflux in Caco-2 cells, (2) the membrane/cytosol distribution of cholesterol transport proteins in these cells, and (3) the physicochemical properties of cholesterol micelles. Piperine or black pepper extract (containing the same amount of piperine) dose-dependently reduced cholesterol uptake into Caco-2 cells in a similar manner. Both preparations reduced the membrane levels of NPC1L1 and SR-BI proteins but not their overall cellular expression. Micellar cholesterol solubility of lipid micelles was unaffected except by 1 mg/mL concentration of black pepper extract. These data suggest that piperine is the active compound in black pepper and reduces cholesterol uptake by internalizing the cholesterol transporter proteins.

  13. [Is there a relationship between cholesterol reduction, low levels of cholesterol and mortality?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRosa, J C

    1995-01-01

    Cholesterol lowering in both primary and secondary prevention has been clearly demonstrated to lower coronary morbidity and, in secondary prevention, to lower coronary mortality as well. Putative dangers of cholesterol lowering remain unproven. Population studies linking low cholesterol to noncoronary mortalities do not demonstrate cause-and-effect relations. In fact, based on current studies, the opposite is more likely to be the case. Neither gender nor age should automatically exclude persons from cholesterol screening. Drug intervention, however, should be used conservatively, particularly in young adults and the elderly. Drugs should be used only after diet and lifestyle interventions have failed. The evidence linking high blood cholesterol to coronary atherosclerosis and cholesterol lowering to its prevention is broad-based and definitive. Concerns about cholesterol lowering and spontaneously low cholesterols should be pursued but should not interfere with the implementation of current public policies to reduce the still heavy burden of atherosclerosis in Western society.

  14. Scavenger receptor BI: A multi-purpose player in cholesterol and steroid metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Menno; Hoekstra; Theo; JC; Van; Berkel; Miranda; Van; Eck

    2010-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type Ⅰ (SR-BI) is an important member of the scavenger receptor family of integral membrane glycoproteins. This review highlights studies in SR-BI knockout mice, which concern the role of SR-BI in cholesterol and steroid metabolism. SR-BI in hepatocytes is the sole molecule involved in selective uptake of cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoprotein (HDL). SR-BI plays a physiological role in binding and uptake of native apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins by hepato...

  15. Fatty acid steryl, stanyl, and steroid esters by esterification and transesterification in vacuo using Candida rugosa lipase as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, N; Weitkamp, P; Mukherjee, K D

    2001-01-01

    Sterols (sitosterol, cholesterol, stigmasterol, ergosterol, and 7-dehydrocholesterol) and sitostanol have been converted in high to near-quantitative yields to the corresponding long-chain acyl esters via esterification with fatty acids or transesterification with methyl esters of fatty acids or triacylglycerols using lipase from Candida rugosa as biocatalyst in vacuo (20-40 mbar) at 40 degrees C. Neither organic solvent nor water is added in these reactions. Under similar conditions, cholesterol has been converted to cholesteryl butyrate and steroids (5alpha-pregnan-3beta-ol-20-one or 5-pregnen-3beta-ol-20-one) have been converted to their propionic acid esters, both in moderate to high yields, via transesterification with tributyrin and tripropionin, respectively. Reaction parameters studied in esterification include the temperature and the molar ratio of the substrates as well as the amount and reuse properties of the C. rugosa lipase. Lipases from porcine pancreas, Rhizopus arrhizus, and Chromobacterium viscosum are quite ineffective as biocatalysts for the esterification of cholesterol with oleic acid under the above conditions.

  16. Effects of CYP7A1 overexpression on cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandak, W M; Schwarz, C; Hylemon, P B; Mallonee, D; Valerie, K; Heuman, D M; Fisher, R A; Redford, K; Vlahcevic, Z R

    2001-10-01

    The initial and rate-limiting step in the classic pathway of bile acid biosynthesis is 7alpha-hydroxylation of cholesterol, a reaction catalyzed by cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1). The effect of CYP7A1 overexpression on cholesterol homeostasis in human liver cells has not been examined. The specific aim of this study was to determine the effects of overexpression of CYP7A1 on key regulatory steps involved in hepatocellular cholesterol homeostasis, using primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepG2 cells. Overexpression of CYP7A1 in HepG2 cells and PHH was accomplished by using a recombinant adenovirus encoding a CYP7A1 cDNA (AdCMV-CYP7A1). CYP7A1 overexpression resulted in a marked activation of the classic pathway of bile acid biosynthesis in both PHH and HepG2 cells. In response, there was decreased HMG-CoA-reductase (HMGR) activity, decreased acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity, increased cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) activity, and increased low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mRNA expression. Changes observed in HMGR, ACAT, and CEH mRNA levels paralleled changes in enzyme specific activities. More specifically, LDLR expression, ACAT activity, and CEH activity appeared responsive to an increase in cholesterol degradation after increased CYP7A1 expression. Conversely, accumulation of the oxysterol 7alpha-hydroxycholesterol in the microsomes after CYP7A1 overexpression was correlated with a decrease in HMGR activity.

  17. IMPACTS OF HIGH DIETARY FAT ON SERUM CHOLESTEROL AND DEVELOPMENT OF FATTY LIVER IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Pandey et al

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the impacts of high dietary fat on serum Total cholesterol and fatty liver syndrome in rats. Rats are fed on diets containing cholesterol; they develop fatty livers which are characterized by the presence in the liver of excessive amounts of cholesteryl esters, and glyceride. Increasement of glyceride content depend on a number of factors, such as the dietary contents of choline, While the nature of the "cholesterol" fatty liver and the effects on its composition of a number of dietary and other factors. In the present paper, we investigated the quantitative changes which occur in the "cholesterol" fatty liver, as a result of variations in the fat content of the diet, with particular reference to the deposition of cholesterol and of glyceride on diets of constant cholesterol content. Investigation was conducted on 90 day old Wister rats. It was observed that the serum TC values in rats of groups B and C were higher than control group. Furthermore, the serum TC and TG value was higher in rats of group C than group B. Grossly, the livers of rats of groups B and C were enlarged, pale in colour, soft in consistency and were having petechial haemorrhages with fat and fibrin deposits. Histopathologically, livers of groups B and C showed fatty infiltration, haemorrhages and mass of eosinophilic materials. The vacuoles coalesced to create clear space that displaced the nucleus to the periphery of the cell. The results suggested that addition of dietary fat from animal and vegetable sources in the diet of rats not only resulted in increase in serum TC and TG but also in marked macroscopic and microscopic changes in vital organ liver.

  18. Differential regulation of gene expression by LXRs in response to macrophage cholesterol loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Irena D; Angdisen, Jerry; Moran, Erin; Schulman, Ira G

    2013-07-01

    The ability of cells to precisely control gene expression in response to intracellular and extracellular signals plays an important role in both normal physiology and in pathological settings. For instance, the accumulation of excess cholesterol by macrophages initiates a genetic response mediated by the liver X receptors (LXRs)-α (NR1H3) and LXRβ (NR1H2), which facilitates the transport of cholesterol out of cells to high-density lipoprotein particles. Studies using synthetic LXR agonists have also demonstrated that macrophage LXR activation simultaneously induces a second network of genes that promotes fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis that may support the detoxification of excess free cholesterol by storage in the ester form. We now show that treatment of human THP-1 macrophages with endogenous or synthetic LXR ligands stimulates both transcriptional and posttranscriptional pathways that result in the selective recruitment of the LXRα subtype to LXR-regulated promoters. Interestingly, when human or mouse macrophages are loaded with cholesterol under conditions that mimic the development of atherogenic macrophage foam cells, a selective LXR response is generated that induces genes mediating cholesterol transport but does not coordinately regulate genes involved in fatty acid synthesis. The gene-selective response to cholesterol loading occurs, even in the presence of LXRα binding to the promoter of the gene encoding the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, the master transcriptional regulator of fatty acid synthesis. The ability of promoter bound LXRα to recruit RNA polymerase to the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c promoter, however, appears to be ligand selective.

  19. Deficient Cholesterol Esterification in Plasma of apoc2 Knockout Zebrafish and Familial Chylomicronemia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Gaudet, Daniel; Miller, Yury I.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2) is an obligatory cofactor for lipoprotein lipase (LPL), the major enzyme catalyzing plasma triglyceride hydrolysis. We have created an apoc2 knockout zebrafish model, which mimics the familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) in human patients with a defect in the APOC2 or LPL gene. In this study, we measured plasma levels of free cholesterol (FC) and cholesterol esters (CE) and found that apoc2 mutant zebrafish have a significantly higher FC to CE ratio (FC/CE), when compared to the wild type. Feeding apoc2 mutant zebrafish a low-fat diet reduced triglyceride levels but not the FC/CE ratio. In situ hybridization and qPCR results demonstrated that the hepatic expression of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (lcat), the enzyme responsible for esterifying plasma FC to CE, and of apolipoprotein A-I, a major protein component of HDL, were dramatically decreased in apoc2 mutants. Furthermore, the FC/CE ratio was significantly increased in the whole plasma and in a chylomicron-depleted fraction of human FCS patients. The FCS plasma LCAT activity was significantly lower than that of healthy controls. In summary, this study, using a zebrafish model and human patient samples, reports for the first time the defect in plasma cholesterol esterification associated with LPL deficiency. PMID:28107429

  20. From blood to gut : Direct secretion of cholesterol via transintestinal cholesterol efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrins, Carlos L. J.

    2010-01-01

    The reverse cholesterol transport pathway (RCT) is the focus of many cholesterol lowering therapies By way of this pathway, excess cholesterol is collected from peripheral tissues and delivered back to the liver and gastrointestinal tract for excretion from the body For a long time this removal via

  1. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W.; Wolters, Justina C.; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K.

    2016-01-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we

  2. Dietary cholesterol and fats at a young age : do they influence cholesterol metabolism in adult life?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmerman, A M; Vonk, R J; Niezen-Koning, K; Berger, R.; Fernandes, J

    1989-01-01

    The effects of dietary cholesterol and fats on cholesterol metabolism later in life were studied in Mongolian gerbils. Three groups were given a basic diet with soybean oil, palm kernel oil amounting to 8.75% (w/w), or the basic diet only. In three other groups, cholesterol (0.05%) was added to the

  3. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Brufau Dones, Gemma; Groen, Albert K

    2016-01-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins we

  4. Ester Tuiksoo. Proua Suhkru kibedad päevad / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2005-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo, kellel peagi täitub ministri ametis aasta Euroopa Liidu suhkrutrahvist, maaettevõtlusest, põllumajandusest, Euroopa Liidu toetustest, ministri elu- ja teenistuskäigust. Lisa: Ester Tuiksoo

  5. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.859 Sucrose fatty acid esters. Sucrose fatty acid esters identified...) Sucrose fatty acid esters are the mono-, di-, and tri-esters of sucrose with fatty acids and are...

  6. Method of making a cyanate ester foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry

    2014-08-05

    A cyanate ester resin mixture with at least one cyanate ester resin, an isocyanate foaming resin, other co-curatives such as polyol or epoxy compounds, a surfactant, and a catalyst/water can react to form a foaming resin that can be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form a cyanate ester foam. The cyanate ester foam can be heated to a temperature greater than 400.degree. C. in a non-oxidative atmosphere to provide a carbonaceous char foam.

  7. Cholesterol orientation and tilt modulus in DMPC bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Khelashvili, George; Pabst, Georg; Harries, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of hydrated bilayers containing mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and Cholesterol at various ratios, to study the effect of cholesterol concentration on its orientation, and to characterize the link between cholesterol tilt and overall phospholipid membrane organization. The simulations show a substantial probability for cholesterol molecules to transiently orient perpendicular to the bilayer normal, and suggest that cholesterol...

  8. Simvastatin promotes NPC1-mediated free cholesterol efflux from lysosomes through CYP7A1/LXRα signalling pathway in oxLDL-loaded macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Aolin; Halquist, Matthew S; Yuan, Xinxu; Henderson, Scott C; Dewey, William L; Li, Pin-Lan; Li, Ningjun; Zhang, Fan

    2017-02-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are the first-line medications prescribed for the prevention and treatment of coronary artery diseases. The efficacy of statins has been attributed not only to their systemic cholesterol-lowering actions but also to their pleiotropic effects that are unrelated to cholesterol reduction. These pleiotropic effects have been increasingly recognized as essential in statins therapy. This study was designed to investigate the pleiotropic actions of simvastatin, one of the most commonly prescribed statins, on macrophage cholesterol homeostasis with a focus on lysosomal free cholesterol egression. With simultaneous nile red and filipin staining, analysis of confocal/multi-photon imaging demonstrated that simvastatin markedly attenuated unesterified (free) cholesterol buildup in macrophages loaded with oxidized low-density lipoprotein but had little effect in reducing the sizes of cholesteryl ester-containing lipid droplets; the reduction in free cholesterol was mainly attributed to decreases in lysosome-compartmentalized cholesterol. Functionally, the egression of free cholesterol from lysosomes attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. It was determined that the reduction of lysosomal free cholesterol buildup by simvastatin was due to the up-regulation of Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a lysosomal residing cholesterol transporter. Moreover, the enhanced enzymatic production of 7-hydroxycholesterol by cytochrome P450 7A1 and the subsequent activation of liver X receptor α underscored the up-regulation of NPC1. These findings reveal a novel pleiotropic effect of simvastatin in affecting lysosomal cholesterol efflux in macrophages and the associated significance in the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  9. Systematic coarse graining from structure using internal states: application to phospholipid/cholesterol bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murtola, Teemu; Karttunen, Mikko; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional coarse-grained (CG) model for a lipid membrane composed of phospholipids and cholesterol. The effective CG interactions are determined using radial distribution functions (RDFs) from atom-scale molecular dynamics simulations using the inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) technique...... in the presence of internal states, in general, and present a modified IMC method for their inclusion. The new model agrees with the original models on large-scale structural features such as density fluctuations in pure dipalmitoylphosphocholine and cholesterol domain formation at intermediate concentrations...... and also indicates that ordered and disordered domains form at all cholesterol concentrations, even if the global density remains uniform. The inclusion of ordering also improves transferability of the interactions between different concentrations, but does not eliminate transferability problems completely...

  10. Monomolecular films of cholesterol oxidase and S-Layer proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Helen Conceição; Guimarães, Juliana Aguilar; Alves, Tito Livio Moitinho; Constantino, Carlos José Leopoldo

    2011-05-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-5-en-3-one and subsequently the isomerization to cholest-4-en-3-one. ChOx has been very commonly studied as the detection element in cholesterol biosensors. In the biosensor development field, a relatively new approach is the use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers, known as S-Layer proteins. These proteins exhibit the ability of self-assembling at surfaces, opening a vast spectrum of applications, both in basic and applied researches. In our study, monomolecular films of ChOx and mixed films of ChOx/S-Layer proteins and DPPC/S-Layer proteins were produced using the Langmuir technique. Characterization of the films was performed by means of surface pressure-molecular area ( π- A) isotherms. Stable monolayers were obtained, which means that they can be transferred to solid substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Mixed monolayers showed an ideal like behavior.

  11. Cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to alcohols: unexpected reactivity trend indicates ester enolate intermediacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Arup; Goldberg, Alexander F G; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Ben David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    The atom-efficient and environmentally benign catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acid esters to alcohols has been accomplished in recent years mainly with precious-metal-based catalysts, with few exceptions. Presented here is the first cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to the corresponding alcohols. Unexpectedly, the evidence indicates the unprecedented involvement of ester enolate intermediates.

  12. Fumaric acid esters in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumaric acid esters (FAE are substances of interest in dermatology. FAE exert various activities on cutaneous cells and cytokine networks. So far only a mixture of dimethylfumarate (DMF and three salts of monoethylfumarate (MEF have gained approval for the oral treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque-type psoriasis in Germany. DMF seems to be the major active component. There is evidence that FAE are not only effective and safe in psoriasis but granulomatous non-infectious diseases like granuloma annulare, necrobiosis lipoidica and sarcoidosis. In vitro and animal studies suggest some activity in malignant melanoma as well.

  13. Steroidal esters from Ferula sinkiangensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangzhi; Li, Xiaojin; Cao, Li; Shen, Liangang; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Junchi; Zhang, Lijing; Si, Jianyong

    2014-09-01

    Two new steroidal esters with an unusual framework, Sinkiangenorin A and B, a new organic acid glycoside, Sinkiangenorin C, and four known lignin compounds were isolated from the seeds of Ferula sinkiangensis. The structures of these compounds were established by spectroscopic analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All of the isolated compounds were tested against Hela, K562 and AGS human cancer cell lines. Sinkiangenorin C showed cytotoxic activity against AGS cells with an IC50 of 36.9 μM.

  14. Cholesterol, the central lipid of mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maxfield, F. R.; van Meer, G.

    2010-01-01

    Despite its importance for mammalian cell biology and human health, there are many basic aspects of cholesterol homeostasis that are not well understood. Even for the well-characterized delivery of cholesterol to cells via lipoproteins, a novel regulatory mechanism has been discovered recently, invo

  15. Evaluating computational models of cholesterol metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paalvast, Yared; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Groen, Albert K.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis has been studied extensively during the last decades. Many of the metabolic pathways involved have been discovered. Yet important gaps in our knowledge remain. For example, knowledge on intracellular cholesterol traffic and its relation to the regulation of chol

  16. Prosopis farcta beans increase HDL cholesterol and decrease LDL cholesterol in ostriches (Struthio camelus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Arash; Ansari nik, Hossein; Ghazaghi, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    Ten blue-neck male ostriches (Struthio camelus) were fed Prosopis farcta beans throughout a 30-day experiment. Blood samples were collected from ostriches on days 0 and 30 to measure levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, total serum protein, albumin, globulin, cholesterol, calcium, inorganic phosphorus, the activity of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT). From days 0 to 30, HDL cholesterol, total protein, and globulins levels increased significantly whereas LDL cholesterol, inorganic phosphorus, and γ-GT activity decreased significantly.

  17. Trapping crystal nucleation of cholesterol monohydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.; Kjær, K.

    2005-01-01

    Crystalline nucleation of cholesterol at the air-water interface has been studied via grazing incidence x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The various stages of cholesterol molecular assembly from monolayer to three bilayers incorporating interleaving hydrogen-bonded water layers...... in a monoclinic cholesterol . H2O phase, has been monitored and their structures characterized to near atomic resolution. Crystallographic evidence is presented that this multilayer phase is similar to that of a reported metastable cholesterol phase of undetermined structure obtained from bile before...... transformation to the triclinic phase of cholesterol . H2O, the thermodynamically stable macroscopic form. According to grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements and crystallographic data, a transformation from the monoclinic film structure to a multilayer of the stable monohydrate phase involves...

  18. The Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    CERN Document Server

    Toppozini, Laura; Armstrong, Clare L; Yamani, Zahra; Kucerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstaedter, Maikel C

    2014-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking and lipid/protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short-lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules we observe raft-like structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to orderin...

  19. Cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and hypomyelinating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Stumpf, Sina Kristin

    2015-08-01

    The largest pool of free cholesterol in mammals resides in myelin membranes. Myelin facilitates rapid saltatory impulse propagation by electrical insulation of axons. This function is achieved by ensheathing axons with a tightly compacted stack of membranes. Cholesterol influences myelination at many steps, from the differentiation of myelinating glial cells, over the process of myelin membrane biogenesis, to the functionality of mature myelin. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate-limiting for the development of myelin in the central and peripheral nervous system. Moreover, disorders that interfere with sterol synthesis or intracellular trafficking of cholesterol and other lipids cause hypomyelination and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes recent results on the roles of cholesterol in CNS myelin biogenesis in normal development and under different pathological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  20. Synthesis of insecticidal sucrose esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Zi-juan; Li Shu-jun; Chen Xi; Liu Li-mei; Song Zhan-qian

    2006-01-01

    Some synthetic sucrose esters (SE) are a relatively new class of insecticidal compounds produced by reacting sugars with fatty acids, which are safe for the environment. Especially, sucrose esters composed of C6-C12 fatty acids have desirable insecticidal properties against many soft-bodied arthropod pests. In our study, sucrose octanoate which has the highest activity against a range of arthropod species was synthesized by a trans-esterification method and proved its insecticidal property. Under the condition of a homogeneous liquid, sucrose octanoate was prepared by reacting ethyl octanoate with sucrose at reduced pressure; the yield was 79.11%. Sucrose octanoate synthesized was identified and its property analyzed by IR, TLC and spectrophotometric analysis. It was shown that the ratio of monoester to polyester in sucrose octanoate was 1.48:1. The insecticidal activity of the synthetic sucrose octanoate was evaluated at a concentration of 4 and 8 mg·mL-1. The mortality of first-instar larvae ofLymantria dispar from its contact toxicity was 72.5% after 36 hours, the revision insect reduced rate of Aphis glycines reached above 80% at 4 and 8 mg·mL-1 after being treated for 5 days. Since the SE products are nontoxic to humans and higher animals, fully biodegradable and hydrolyzed to readily metabolizable sucrose and fatty acid, they are not harmful to crops and appear to be good insecticide candidates.

  1. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  2. High Blood Cholesterol: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audiences Contact The Health Information Center High Blood Cholesterol: What You Need To Know Table of Contents ... Lifestyle Changes (TLC) Drug Treatment Resources Why Is Cholesterol Important? Your blood cholesterol level has a lot ...

  3. Cholesterol: Top Five Foods to Lower Your Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholesterol: Top foods to improve your numbers Diet can play an important role in lowering your cholesterol. Here are the top foods to lower your cholesterol and protect your heart. By Mayo Clinic Staff ...

  4. Endogenous cholesterol synthesis, fecal steroid excretion and serum lanosterol in subjects with high or low response of serum cholesterol to dietary cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beynen, A.C.; Katan, M.B.; Gent, van C.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study we addressed the question whether hypo- and hyper-responders to dietary cholesterol differ with regard to the flexibility of endogenous cholesterol synthesis after changes in cholesterol intake. Whole-body cholesterol synthesis was measured as faecal excretion of neutral steroids and b

  5. Esteróles en esponjas marinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmenza Duque

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisión bibliográfica comprende la mayona del trabajo publicado hasta el momento sobre esteróles aislados de esponjas marinas. Estos esteróles comprenden compuestos desde Cig hasta C31 con estructuras convencionales y con estructuras novedosas (núcleo y/o cadena lateral no convencional.

  6. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-04-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l(-1)). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters.

  7. Ethanolysis of rapeseed oil - distribution of ethyl esters, glycerides and glycerol between ester and glycerol phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernoch, Michal; Hájek, Martin; Skopal, Frantisek

    2010-04-01

    The distribution of ethyl esters, triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, and glycerol between the ester and glycerol phase was investigated after the ethanolysis of rapeseed oil at various reaction conditions. The determination of these substances in the ester and glycerol phases was carried out by the GC method. The amount of ethyl esters in the glycerol phase was unexpectedly high and therefore the possibility of the reduction of this amount was investigated. The distribution coefficients and the weight distributions of each investigated substance were calculated and compared mutually. The distribution coefficients between the ester and glycerol phase increase in this sequence: glycerol, monoglycerides, diglycerides, ethyl esters, and triglycerides. Soaps and monoglycerides in the reaction mixture cause a worse separation of ethyl esters from the reaction mixture. The existence of a non-separable reaction mixture was observed also, and its composition was determined.

  8. Anticholinesterase activity of fluorochloronitroacetic acid esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Yu.Ya.; Brel, V.K. Martynov, I.V.

    1984-11-01

    Results are presented from pharmacologic and biochemical experiments leading to the conclusion that fluorochloronitroacetic acid esters have anticholinesterase activity. Since the esters caused muscular weakness in mice, experiments were performed on isolated tissue preparation. The biochemical experiments consisted of finding the biomolecular constants of irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by the esters, using acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes, as well as horse serum cholinesterase. The ethyl and n-propyl esters of halogen nitroacetic acid were used in all experiments. It was found that the propyl ester caused an increase in the force of individual contractions in the isolated muscle specimens, plus an inability of the muscle to retain tetanus. The substances were determined to have an anticholinesterase effect. The mechanism of cholinesterase inhibition is not yet known. It is probable that the substances acylate the serine hydroxyl of the esterase center of the cholinestersase. 7 references, 1 figure.

  9. Physiological and pathological implications of cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Victor A; Busso, Dolores; Maiz, Alberto; Arteaga, Antonio; Nervi, Flavio; Rigotti, Attilio

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol has evolved to fulfill sophisticated biophysical, cell signaling and endocrine requirements of animal systems. At a cellular level, cholesterol is found in membranes, where it increases both bilayer stiffness and impermeability to water and ions. Furthermore, cholesterol is integrated into specialized lipid-protein membrane microdomains with critical topographical and signaling functions. At an organismal level, cholesterol is the precursor for all steroid hormones, including gluco- and mineralo-corticoids, sex hormones and vitamin D, all of which regulate carbohydrate, sodium, reproductive and bone homeostasis, respectively. This sterol is also the precursor for bile acids, which are important for intestinal absorption of dietary lipids as well as energy and glucose metabolic regulation. Importantly, complex mechanisms maintain cholesterol within physiological ranges and the disregulation of these mechanisms results in embryonic or adult diseases, caused by either excessive or reduced tissue cholesterol levels. The causative role of cholesterol in these diseases has been demonstrated by diverse genetic and pharmacologic animal models that are commented in this review.

  10. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), a novel mitochondrial cholesterol transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Walter L

    2007-06-01

    Cholesterol is a vital component of cellular membranes, and is the substrate for biosynthesis of steroids, oxysterols and bile acids. The mechanisms directing the intracellular trafficking of this nearly insoluble molecule have received increased attention through the discovery of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and similar proteins containing StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domains. StAR can transfer cholesterol between synthetic liposomes in vitro, an activity which appears to correspond to the trans-cytoplasmic transport of cholesterol to mitochondria. However, trans-cytoplasmic cholesterol transport in vivo appears to involve the recently-described protein StarD4, which is expressed in most cells. Steroidogenic cells must also move large amounts of cholesterol from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the first steroidogenic enzyme, which lies on the matrix side of the inner membrane; this action requires StAR. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, a rare and severe disorder of human steroidogenesis, results from mutations in StAR, providing a StAR knockout of nature that has provided key insights into its activity. Cell biology experiments show that StAR moves large amounts of cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane, but acts exclusively on the outer membrane. Biophysical data show that only the carboxyl-terminal alpha-helix of StAR interacts with the outer membrane. Spectroscopic data and molecular dynamics simulations show that StAR's interactions with protonated phospholipid head groups on the outer mitochondrial membrane induce a conformational change (molten globule transition) needed for StAR's activity. StAR appears to act in concert with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, but the precise itinerary of a cholesterol molecule entering the mitochondrion remains unclear.

  11. Effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide on the expression of key genes involved in cholesterol metabolism in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fen; Wang, Yi; Xu, Jing; Liu, Fangqiang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular diseases are positively correlated with periodontal disease. However, the molecular mechanisms linking atherosclerosis and periodontal infection are not clear. This study aimed to determine whether Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (Pg-LPS) altered the expression of genes regulating cholesterol metabolism in macrophages in the presence of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Material and methods THP-1-derived macrophages were exposed to different concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 µg/ml) of LPS in the presence of 50 µg/ml native LDL. Macrophages were also incubated with 1 µg/ml LPS for varying times (0, 24, 48, or 72 h) in the presence of native LDL. Foam cell formation was determined by oil red O staining and cholesterol content quantification. CD36, lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1), and acetyl CoA acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) expression levels were measured by western blot and qRT-PCR. Results Foam cell formation was induced in a time- and concentration-dependent manner as assessed by both morphological and biochemical criteria. Pg-LPS caused downregulation of CD36 and ABCG1 but upregulation of ACAT1, while LOX-1 expression was not affected (p = 0.137). Conclusions Pg-LPS appears to be an important link in the development of atherosclerosis by mechanisms targeting cholesterol homeostasis, namely, excess cholesterol ester formation via ACAT1 and reduced cellular cholesterol efflux via ABCG1. PMID:27695485

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Experimental Studies of Gold Nanoparticle Templated HDL-like Nanoparticles for Cholesterol Metabolism Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Tsung; Sun, Wangqiang; Palekar, Rohun U; Thaxton, C Shad; Schatz, George C

    2017-01-18

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays an important role in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol. Mimics of HDL are being explored as potentially powerful therapeutic agents for removing excess cholesterol from arterial plaques. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with apolipoprotein A-I and with the lipids 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] have been demonstrated to be robust acceptors of cellular cholesterol. However, detailed structural information about this functionalized HDL AuNP is still lacking. In this study, we have used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase activation experiments together with coarse-grained and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to model the structure and cholesterol uptake properties of the HDL AuNP construct. By simulating different apolipoprotein-loaded AuNPs, we find that lipids are oriented differently in regions with and without apoA-I. We also show that in this functionalized HDL AuNP, the distribution of cholesteryl ester maintains a reverse concentration gradient that is similar to the gradient found in native HDL.

  13. A church-based cholesterol education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiist, W H; Flack, J M

    1990-01-01

    The leading cause of death among black people in the United States is coronary heart disease, accounting for about 25 percent of the deaths. The Task Force on Black and Minority Health formed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services in 1985 subsequently recommended increased efforts to reduce risk factors for coronary heart disease in the black population. A stated focus of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's National Cholesterol Education Program has been that of reaching minority groups. This report describes a pilot cholesterol education program conducted in black churches by trained members of those churches. Cholesterol screening, using a Reflotron, and other coronary heart disease risk factor screening was conducted in six churches with predominantly black members and at a neighborhood library. A total of 348 persons with cholesterol levels of 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg per dl) or higher were identified. At the time of screening, all were provided brief counseling on lowering their cholesterol and were given a copy of the screening results. Half of those identified, all members of one church, were invited to attend a 6-week nutrition education class of 1 hour each week about techniques to lower blood cholesterol. Information about cholesterol was also mailed to them. They were designated as the education group. Persons in the church were trained to teach the classes. A report of the screening results was sent to the personal physicians of the remaining 174 people in other churches who had cholesterol levels of 200 mg per dl or higher. This group served as a usual care comparison group.Six months after the initial screening, members of both groups were invited for followup screening.Among the 75 percent of the education group who returned for followup screening there was a 23.4 mg per dl (10 percent) decrease in the mean cholesterol level. Thirty-six percent of the usual care group returned for followup screening; their mean cholesterol

  14. Genetic therapies to lower cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    This review surveys the state-of-the-art in genetic therapies for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), caused most commonly by mutations in the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene. FH manifests as highly elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and consequently accelerated atherosclerosis. Modern pharmacological therapies for FH are insufficiently efficacious to prevent premature cardiovascular disease, can cause significant adverse effects and can be expensive. Genetic therapies for FH have been mooted since the mid 1990s but gene replacement strategies using viral vectors have so far been unsuccessful. Other strategies involve knocking down the expression of Apolipoprotein B100 (APOB100) and the protease PCSK9 which designates LDLR for degradation. The antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen, which knocks down APOB100, is currently marketed (with restrictions) in the USA, but is not approved in Europe due to its adverse effects. To address this problem, we have devised a novel therapeutic concept, APO-skip, which is based on modulation of APOB splicing, and which has the potential to deliver a cost-effective, efficacious and safe therapy for FH.

  15. Association studies of several cholesterol-related genes (ABCA1, CETP and LIPC with serum lipids and risk of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhijie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Accumulating evidence suggested that dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis might be a major etiologic factor in initiating and promoting neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1, hepatic lipase (HL, coding genes named LIPC and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP are important components of high-density lipoprotein (HDL metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT implicated in atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we will investigate the possible association of several common polymorphisms (ABCA1R219K, CETPTaqIB and LIPC-250 G/A with susceptibility to AD and plasma lipid levels. Methods Case–control study of 208 Han Chinese (104 AD patients and 104 non-demented controls from Changsha area in Hunan Province was performed using the PCR-RFLP analysis. Cognitive decline was assessed using Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE as a standardized method. Additionally, fasting lipid profile and the cognitive testing scores including Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST were recorded. Results and conclusions We found significant differences among the genotype distributions of these three genes in AD patients when compared with controls. But after adjusting other factors, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed only ABCA1R219K (B = −0.903, P = 0.005, OR = 0.405, 95%CI:0.217-0.758 and LIPC-250 G/A variants(B = −0.905, P = 0.018, OR = 0.405, 95%CI:0.191-0.858 were associated with decreased AD risk. There were significantly higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and apolipoproteinA-I in the carriers of KK genotype and K allele (P F = 5.598, P = 0.004, while -250 G/A polymorphisms had no significant effect on HDL-C. In total population, subjects carrying ABCA1219K allele or LIPC-250A allele obtained higher MMSE or WMS scores than non-carriers, however

  16. Thermal properties and nanodispersion behavior of synthesized β-sitosteryl acyl esters: a structure-activity relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panpipat, Worawan; Dong, Mingdong; Xu, Xuebing; Guo, Zheng

    2013-10-01

    The efficiency (dose response) of cholesterol-lowering effect of phytosterols in humans depends on their chemical forms (derived or non-derived) and formulation methods in a delivery system. With a series of synthesized β-sitosteryl fatty acid esters (C2:0-C18:0 and C18:1-C18:3), this work examined their thermal properties and applications in preparation of nanodispersion with β-sitosterol as a comparison. Inspection of the melting point (Tm) and the heat of fusion (ΔH) of β-sitosteryl fatty acid esters and the chain length and unsaturation degree of fatty acyl moiety revealed a pronounced structure-property relationship. The nanodispersions prepared with β-sitosterol and β-sitosteryl saturated fatty acid (SFA) esters displayed different particle size distribution patterns (polymodal vs bimodal), mean diameter (115 nm vs less than 100 nm), and polydispersity index (PDI) (0.50 vs 0.23-0.38). β-sitosteryl unsaturated fatty acid (USFA) esters showed a distinctly different dispersion behavior to form nanoemulsions, rather than nanodispersions, with more homogeneous particle size distribution (monomodal, mean diameter 27-63 nm and PDI 0.18-0.25). The nanodispersion of β-sitosteryl medium chain SFA ester (C14:0) demonstrated a best storage stability.

  17. Antifungal properties of halofumarate esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, H; Shanks, L

    1978-04-01

    Alkyl esters (C1--C4) of the four halofumaric acids were tested for antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Mucor mucedo, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes at pH 5.6 and 7.0 in the absence and presence of 10% beef serum in Sabouraud dextrose agar. The most toxic compound to each organism was: C. albicans, ethyl iodofumarate (0.054 mmole/liter); A. niger, methyl bromofumarate (0.090 mmole/liter); M. mucedo, methyl fluorofumarate (0.037 mmole/liter); and T. mentagrophytes, ethyl iodofumarate (0.020 mmole/liter). The order of overall activity of the six most toxic compounds was: ethyl iodofumarate greater than ethyl chlorofumarate greater than methyl iodofumarate = methyl bromofumarate greater than methyl chlorofumarate greater than bromofumarate.

  18. Self-Assembling of Dendritic Poly (Amine - Ester) and Its Application Phase - Transfer of Dyes%树枝状聚(胺-酯)的自组装及其在染料分子相转移中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁春花; 陈志凯; 邱艳遐; 吴靖云

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic poly (amine-ester) (PAE (NH,)8)-lauric acid was prepared by electrostatic force self-assembling and was characterized by means of FTIR. The effects of lauric acid dosage, PAE(NH,)s mole concentration and aqueous phase pH on the phase-transfer rates of dyes(namely methyl orange, titan yellow and xylenol orange)were investigated. The results showed that the phase-transfer rates of the dyes increased firstly and then decreased with increasing lauric acid dosage and aqueous phase pH, and increased with increasing PAE (NH2) s dosage. In the mixture of 20 mL lauric acid toluene solution with 9.09% (w) lauric acid, 10 mL PAE (NH2)g aqueous solution with 4.2 x 10~4 mol/L PAE (NH2) 8 and 10 mL dye (methyl orange, titan yellow or xylenol orange) aqueous solution with about 1.200 × 10~5 mol/L dye, when aqueous phase pH were 7.72, 6.64 and 7.72, the phase-transfer rates of titan yellow, methyl orange and xylenol orange reached the maximum value of 40.06%, 47.09% and 33.70%, respectively.%通过静电力自组装制得了树枝状聚(胺-酯)-月桂酸(PAE (NH2)8- LA),并利用FTIR技术对PAE (NH2)8 - LA进行了表征;考察了月桂酸含量、PAE (NH2)8浓度及水相pH对染料相转移率的影响.实验结果表明,染料的相转移率随月桂酸含量和水相pH的增大呈先增大后减小的趋势,随PAE( NH2)8浓度的增大而增大.在20 mL质量分数为9.09%的月桂酸甲苯溶液、10 mL浓度为4.2 × 10-4 mol/L的PAE (NH2)8水溶液与10mL浓度约为1.200×10-5 mol/L的染料水溶液的混合液中,当水相pH分别为7.72,6.64,7.72时,染料达旦黄、甲基橙、二甲酚橙的相转移率分别达到最大值(49.60%,41.35%,35.58%).

  19. Thyroid hormones and thyroid hormone receptors: Effects of thyromimetics on reverse cholesterol transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matteo; Pedrelli; Camilla; Pramfalk; Paolo; Parini

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is a complex process which transfers cholesterol from peripheral cells to the liver for subsequent elimination from the body via feces. Thyroid hormones (THs) affect growth, develop- ment, and metabolism in almost all tissues. THs exert their actions by binding to thyroid hormone receptors (TRs). There are two major subtypes of TRs, TRα and TRβ, and several isoforms (e.g. TRα1, TRα2, TRβ1, and TRβ2). Activation of TRα1 affects heart rate, whereas activation of TRβ1 has po...

  20. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease.

  1. Cholesterol lowering effect of a soy drink enriched with plant sterols in a French population with moderate hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bard Jean-Marie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant sterols are an established non-pharmacological means to reduce total and LDL blood cholesterol concentrations and are therefore recommended for cholesterol management by worldwide-renown health care institutions. Their efficacy has been proven in many types of foods with the majority of trials conducted in spreads or dairy products. As an alternative to dairy products, soy based foods are common throughout the world. Yet, there is little evidence supporting the efficacy of plant sterols in soy-based foods. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a soy drink enriched with plant sterols on blood lipid profiles in moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. Methods In a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind mono-centric study, 50 subjects were assigned to 200 ml of soy drink either enriched with 2.6 g plant sterol esters (1.6 g/d free plant sterol equivalents or without plant sterols (control for 8 weeks. Subjects were instructed to maintain stable diet pattern and physical activity. Plasma concentrations of lipids were measured at initial visit, after 4 weeks and after 8 weeks. The primary measurement was the change in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C. Secondary measurements were changes in total cholesterol (TC, non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-C, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides. Results Regular consumption of the soy drink enriched with plant sterols for 8 weeks significantly reduced LDL- C by 0.29 mmol/l or 7% compared to baseline (p 96%, and products were well tolerated. Conclusion Daily consumption of a plant sterol-enriched soy drink significantly decreased total, non-HDL and LDL cholesterol and is therefore an interesting and convenient aid in managing mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia.

  2. A new framework for reverse cholesterol transport: Non-biliary contributions to reverse cholesterol transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan; E; Temel; J; Mark; Brown

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol through statin therapy has only modestly decreased coronary heart disease (CHD)-associated mortality in developed countries, which has prompted the search for alternative therapeutic strategies for CHD. Major efforts are now focused on therapies that augment high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and ultimately increase the fecal disposal of cholesterol. The process of RCT has long been thought to simply involve HDL-media...

  3. From blood to gut: Direct secretion of cholesterol via transintestinal cholesterol efflux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlos; LJ; Vrins

    2010-01-01

    The reverse cholesterol transport pathway (RCT) is the focus of many cholesterol-lowering therapies. By way of this pathway, excess cholesterol is collected from peripheral tissues and delivered back to the liver and gastrointestinal tract for excretion from the body. For a long time this removal via the hepatobiliary secretion was considered to be the sole route involved in the RCT. However, observations from early studies in animals and humans already pointed towards the possibility of another route. In t...

  4. Assessing possible hazards of reducing serum cholesterol.

    OpenAIRE

    Law, M. R.; Thompson, S. G.; Wald, N J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess whether low serum cholesterol concentration increases mortality from any cause. DESIGN--Systematic review of published data on mortality from causes other than ischaemic heart disease derived from the 10 largest cohort studies, two international studies, and 28 randomised trials, supplemented by unpublished data on causes of death obtained when necessary. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Excess cause specific mortality associated with low or lowered serum cholesterol concentration....

  5. Cholesterol treatment practices of primary care physicians.

    OpenAIRE

    Hyman, D J; Maibach, E W; Flora, J A; Fortmann, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The active involvement of primary care physicians is necessary in the diagnosis and treatment of elevated blood cholesterol. Empirical evidence suggests that primary care physicians generally initiate dietary and pharmacological treatment at threshold values higher than is currently recommended. To determine current treatment thresholds and establish factors that distinguish physicians who are more likely to initiate therapy at lower cholesterol values, 119 primary care physicians in four nor...

  6. Cholesterol-based cationic lipids for gene delivery: contribution of molecular structure factors to physico-chemical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ruilong; Luo, Ting; Li, Hui; Sun, Jingjing; Wang, Zhao; Cao, Amin

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we prepared a series of cholesterol-based cationic (Cho-cat) lipids bearing cholesterol hydrophobe, natural amino acid headgroups (lysine/histidine) and linkage (carbonate ester/ether) bonds. In which, the natural amino acid headgroups made dominant contribution to their physico-chemical and biological properties. Among the lipids, the l-lysine headgroup bearing lipids (Cho-es/et-Lys) showed higher pDNA binding affinity and were able to form larger sized and higher surface charged lipoplexes than that of l-histidine headgroup bearing lipids (Cho-es/et-His), they also demonstrated higher transfection efficacy and higher membrane disruption capacities than that of their l-histidine headgroup bearing counterparts. However, compared to the contributions of the headgroups, the (carbonate ester/ether) linkage bonds showed much less affects. Besides, it could be noted that, Cho-es/et-Lys lipids exhibited very high luciferase gene transfection efficiency that almost reached the transfection level of "gold standard" bPEI-25k, made them potential transfection reagents for practical application. Moreover, the results facilitated the understanding for the structure-activity relationship of the cholesterol-based cationic lipids, and also paved a simple and efficient way for achieving high transfection efficiency by modification of suitable headgroups on lipid gene carriers.

  7. Cholesterol modulates the dimer interface of the β₂-adrenergic receptor via cholesterol occupancy sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Xavier; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Sengupta, Durba

    2014-03-18

    The β2-adrenergic receptor is an important member of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, whose stability and function are modulated by membrane cholesterol. The recent high-resolution crystal structure of the β2-adrenergic receptor revealed the presence of possible cholesterol-binding sites in the receptor. However, the functional relevance of cholesterol binding to the receptor remains unexplored. We used MARTINI coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations to explore dimerization of the β2-adrenergic receptor in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol. A novel (to our knowledge) aspect of our results is that receptor dimerization is modulated by membrane cholesterol. We show that cholesterol binds to transmembrane helix IV, and cholesterol occupancy at this site restricts its involvement at the dimer interface. With increasing cholesterol concentration, an increased presence of transmembrane helices I and II, but a reduced presence of transmembrane helix IV, is observed at the dimer interface. To our knowledge, this study is one of the first to explore the correlation between cholesterol occupancy and GPCR organization. Our results indicate that dimer plasticity is relevant not just as an organizational principle but also as a subtle regulatory principle for GPCR function. We believe these results constitute an important step toward designing better drugs for GPCR dimer targets.

  8. New ester alkaloids from lupins (genus lupinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbauer, P; Witte, L; Wink, M

    1988-06-01

    Esters of 13-hydroxylupanine and 4-hydroxylupanine with acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric, tiglic, benzoic, and TRANS-cinnamic acid have been synthesized and characterized by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (EI-MS, CI-MS). In LUPINUS POLYPHYLLUS, L. ALBUS, L. ANGUSTIFOLIUS, and L. MUTABILIS we could identify new ester alkaloids (e.g. 13-propyloxylupanine, 13-butyryloxylupanine, 13-isobutyryloxylupanine, and 4-tigloyloxylupanine) besides the known esters, i.e. 13-acetoxylupanine, 13-isovaleroyloxylupanine, 13-angeloyloxylupanine, 13-tigloyloxylupanine, 13-benzoyloxylupanine, 13- CIS-cinnamoyloxylupanine nine, and 13- TRANS-cinnamoyloxylupanine.

  9. Cold Flow Properties of Fatty Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kleinová

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of cold fl ow properties of neat esters of branched chain alcohols with fatty acids and blends of these esters with fossil diesel fuel. According to the determined CFPP values, the influence of alcohol branching on the fuel filterability is negligible and was detected only in the case of 2-ethyl hexanol. Fossil fuel blending with fatty esters up to 10 % vol. does not substantially change the cold flow properties of fossil fuel. DSC cooling scan parameters should be employed to predict CFPP of blended diesel fuel.

  10. Dietary cholesterol modulates pathogen blocking by Wolbachia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P Caragata

    Full Text Available The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis protects its hosts from a range of pathogens by limiting their ability to form infections inside the insect. This "pathogen blocking" could be explained by innate immune priming by the symbiont, competition for host-derived resources between pathogens and Wolbachia, or the direct modification of the cell or cellular environment by Wolbachia. Recent comparative work in Drosophila and the mosquito Aedes aegypti has shown that an immune response is not required for pathogen blocking, implying that there must be an additional component to the mechanism. Here we have examined the involvement of cholesterol in pathogen blocking using a system of dietary manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster in combination with challenge by Drosophila C virus (DCV, a common fly pathogen. We observed that flies reared on cholesterol-enriched diets infected with the Wolbachia strains wMelPop and wMelCS exhibited reduced pathogen blocking, with viral-induced mortality occurring 2-5 days earlier than flies reared on Standard diet. This shift toward greater virulence in the presence of cholesterol also corresponded to higher viral copy numbers in the host. Interestingly, an increase in dietary cholesterol did not have an effect on Wolbachia density except in one case, but this did not directly affect the strength of pathogen blocking. Our results indicate that host cholesterol levels are involved with the ability of Wolbachia-infected flies to resist DCV infections, suggesting that cholesterol contributes to the underlying mechanism of pathogen blocking.

  11. Obesity, Cholesterol Metabolism and Breast Cancer Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Donald P.; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T.; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E.; Chang, Ching-yi; Norris, John D.; Guyton, John R.; Nelson, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor (LXR) in macrophages and possibly other cells is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25060521

  12. Cholesterol content in meat of some Cyprinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Dragić L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to examine cholesterol content in meat of five Cyprinidae species: white bream (Bllica bjoerkna L, carp bream (Abramis brama L, baltic vimba (Vimba vimba carinata Pallas, zope (Abramis balerus L and crucian carp (Carassius carassius gibelio Bloch from the river Danube. Cholesterol content was examined in the function of season factor and individual weight. Cholesterol concentration in meat of white bream carp bream, baltic vimba, zope and crucian carp is on average level below 20 mg/100 g of meat, which makes meat of these fish species nutritively very valuable. Cholesterol content is variable during the season. Its concentration in meat and in lipids is lowest during spring, during summer it increases and during autumn decreases, except in meat of white bream. Body weight has influence on cholesterol content when its concentration is expressed as % of cholesterol in lipids. Its content in lipids decreases with increasing of individual weight, except in meat of carp bream.

  13. Cholesterol suppresses antimicrobial effect of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Haeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Isoprenoid biosynthesis is a key metabolic pathway to produce a wide variety of biomolecules such as cholesterol and carotenoids, which target cell membranes. On the other hand, it has been reported that statins known as inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis and cholesterol lowering agents, may have a direct antimicrobial effect on the some bacteria. The exact action of statins in microbial metabolism is not clearly understood. It is possible that statins inhibit synthesis or utilization of some sterol precursor necessary for bacterial membrane integrity. Accordingly, this study was designed in order to examine if statins inhibit the production of a compound, which can be used in the membrane, and whether cholesterol would replace it and rescue bacteria from toxic effects of statins. Materials and Methods: To examine the possibility we assessed antibacterial effect of statins with different classes; lovastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, alone and in combination with cholesterol on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bacteria using gel diffusion assay. Results: Our results showed that all of the statins except for lovastatin had significant antibacterial property in S. aureus, E. coli, and Enter. faecalis. Surprisingly, cholesterol nullified the antimicrobial action of effective statins in statin-sensitive bacteria. Conclusion: It is concluded that statins may deprive bacteria from a metabolite responsible for membrane stability, which is effectively substituted by cholesterol.

  14. CHOLESTEROL ASSIMILATION BY COMMERCIAL YOGHURT STARTER CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Ziarno

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to in vitro cholesterol level reduction in laboratory media has been shown for numerous strains of lactic acid bacteria, but not for all strains of lactic bacteria used in the dairy industry. The aim of this work was the determination of the ability of selected thermophilic lactic acid bacteria to cholesterol assimilation during 24 h culture in MRS broth. Commercial starter cultures showed various ability to cholesterol assimilation from laboratory medium. In case of starter cultures used for production of traditional yoghurt, consisting of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, the quantity of assimilated cholesterol did not exceed 27% of its initial contents (0.7 g in 1 dm3. Starter cultures used for bioyoghurt production, containing also probiotic strains (came from Lactobacillus acidophilus species or Bifidobacterium genus assimilated from almost 18% to over 38% of cholesterol. For one monoculture of Lb. acidophilus, cholesterol assimilation ability of 49-55% was observed, despite that the number of bacterial cells in this culture was not different from number of bacteria in other cultures.

  15. Genomic organization and reproductive regulation of a large lipid transfer protein in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Duehl, A J; Donohue, K V; Grozinger, C M; Evans, J D; Teal, P E A

    2013-10-01

    The complete genomic region and corresponding transcript of the most abundant protein in phoretic varroa mites, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were sequenced and have homology with acarine hemelipoglycoproteins and the large lipid transfer protein (LLTP) super family. The genomic sequence of VdLLTP included 14 introns and the mature transcript coded for a predicted polypeptide of 1575 amino acid residues. VdLLTP shared a minimum of 25% sequence identity with acarine LLTPs. Phylogenetic assessment showed VdLLTP was most closely related to Metaseiulus occidentalis vitellogenin and LLTP proteins of ticks; however, no heme binding by VdLLTP was detected. Analysis of lipids associated with VdLLTP showed that it was a carrier for free and esterified C12 -C22 fatty acids from triglycerides, diacylglycerides and monoacylglycerides. Additionally, cholesterol and β-sitosterol were found as cholesterol esters linked to common fatty acids. Transcript levels of VdLLTP were 42 and 310 times higher in phoretic female mites when compared with males and quiescent deutonymphs, respectively. Coincident with initiation of the reproductive phase, VdLLTP transcript levels declined to a third of those in phoretic female mites. VdLLTP functions as an important lipid transporter and should provide a significant RNA interference target for assessing the control of varroa mites.

  16. Synthesis of Trimethylolpropane Esters of Calophyllum Methyl Esters : Effect of Temperature and Molar Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeti Widyawati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trimethylolpropane esters were synthesized by transesterification of calophyllum methyl esters and trimethylolpropane using a calcium oxide as the catalyst. The results showed that the optimal reaction conditions (temperature: 130 0C, reaction time: 5 h, reactant molar ratio: 3.9:1, catalyst amount 3%w/w, and formed  trimethylolpropane ester of 79.0% were obtained. The basic physicochemical properties of the trimethylolpropane esters were the following : kinematic viscosities of 56.40 cSt and 8.8 cSt at 40 0C and 100 0C,  viscosity index 193, flash point 218 0C and pour point -3 0C. So Methyl esters of fatty acids of would callophylum  methyl ester is good raw material for the synthesis of lubricating oils.

  17. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Activity in Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-10-15

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity.

  18. Cholesterol photo-oxidation: A chemical reaction network for kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaba, Carlo; Rodríguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lercker, Giovanni; García, Hugo Sergio; Medina-Meza, Ilce Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    In this work we studied the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) methyl esters on cholesterol photo-induced oxidation. The oxidative routes were modeled with a chemical reaction network (CRN), which represents the first application of CRN to the oxidative degradation of a food-related lipid matrix. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, T-I), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, T-II) and a mixture of both (T-III) were added to cholesterol using hematoporphyrin as sensitizer, and were exposed to a fluorescent lamp for 48h. High amounts of Type I cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were recovered (epimers 7α- and 7β-OH, 7-keto and 25-OH), as well as 5β,6β-epoxy. Fitting the experimental data with the CRN allowed characterizing the associated kinetics. DHA and EPA exerted different effects on the oxidative process. DHA showed a protective effect to 7-hydroxy derivatives, whereas EPA enhanced side-chain oxidation and 7β-OH kinetic rates. The mixture of PUFAs increased the kinetic rates several fold, particularly for 25-OH. With respect to the control, the formation of β-epoxy was reduced, suggesting potential inhibition in the presence of PUFAs.

  19. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. 172.854 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.854 Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids, up to and including the decaglycerol esters, may be safely used in food...

  20. Dairy products and plasma cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Ohlsson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol synthesized in the body or ingested is an essential lipid component for human survival from our earliest life. Newborns ingest about 3–4 times the amount per body weight through mother's milk compared to the dietary intake of adults. A birth level of 1.7 mmol/L plasma total cholesterol will increase to 4–4.5 mmol/L during the nursing period and continue to increase from adulthood around 40% throughout life. Coronary artery disease and other metabolic disorders are strongly associated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol as well as triacylglycerol concentration. Milk fat contains a broad range of fatty acids and some have a negative impact on the cholesterol rich lipoproteins. The saturated fatty acids (SFAs, such as palmitic acid (C16:0, myristic acid (C14:0, and lauric acid (C12:0, increase total plasma cholesterol, especially LDL, and constitute 11.3 g/L of bovine milk, which is 44.8% of total fatty acid in milk fat. Replacement of dairy SFA and trans-fatty acids with polyunsaturated fatty acids decreases plasma cholesterol, especially LDL cholesterol, and is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Available data shows different effects on lipoproteins for different dairy products and there is uncertainty as to the impact a reasonable intake amount of dairy items has on cardiovascular risk. The aim of this review is to elucidate the effect of milk components and dairy products on total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and the LDL/HDL quotients. Based on eight recent randomized controlled trials of parallel or cross-over design and recent reviews it can be concluded that replacement of saturated fat mainly (but not exclusively derived from high-fat dairy products with low-fat dairy products lowers LDL/HDL cholesterol and total/HDL cholesterol ratios. Whey, dairy fractions enriched in polar lipids, and techniques such as fermentation, or fortification of cows feeding can be used

  1. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Stephen M; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2012-04-15

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2/SCP-x/L-FABP null mice and hepatocytes. Taken together

  2. Chain mechanism in the photocleavage of phenacyl and pyridacyl esters in the presence of hydrogen donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literák, Jaromír; Dostálová, Anna; Klán, Petr

    2006-01-20

    [reaction: see text] Excited phenacyl and 3-pyridacyl esters of benzoic acid react with an excess of aliphatic alcohols in a chain reaction process involving hydrogen transfer from the ketyl radical intermediates, leading to benzoic acid in addition to acetophenone and 3-acetylpyridine, respectively, as the byproducts. While the maximum quantum yields reached 4 in both cases, the 2- or 4-pyridacyl ester photoreduction proceeded with the efficiency below 100% under the same conditions. The investigation indicates that a radical coupling between ketyl radicals, both formed from the excited ester by hydrogen abstraction from an alcohol, is accompanied by the elimination of benzoic acid from the ester ketyl radical itself. A partitioning between two reactions was found to be remarkably sensitive to the chromophore nature, such as a position of the nitrogen atom in the pyridacyl moiety. The magnitude of a radical chain process is dependent on the efficiency of consecutive steps that produce free radicals capable of a subsequent ester reduction. The driving force of a possible electron transfer from the ketyl radicals to the ester has been excluded on the basis of cyclic voltametry measurements. The observed quantum yields of photoreduction were found to be diminished by formation of relatively long-lived light absorbing transients, coproducts obtained apparently by secondary photochemical reactions. Additionally, it is shown that basic additives such as pyridine can further increase the efficiency of the photoreduction by a factor of 4. A radical nature of the reduction mechanism was supported by finding a large kinetic chain length of an analogous reaction initiated by free radicals generated thermally yet again when phenacyl or 3-pyridacyl benzoate was used. Both phenacyl and pyridacyl chromophores are pronounced to be valuable as the photoremovable protecting groups when high quantum and chemical yields of carboxylic acid elimination are important, but higher

  3. Space-Qualifiable Cyanate Ester Elastomer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG) proposes to design and develop a space-qualifiable cyanate ester elastomer for application in self-deployable space structures...

  4. Ester Tuiksoo - riigi peakokk / Peeter Kuimet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuimet, Peeter

    2007-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo eelseisvast vastuvõtust Estonias, jopede kinkimisest maaelu arengukava väljatöötamisega seotud inimestele. Minister Tuiksoo kohta tehtud kriitikast. SDE esimehe Ivari Padari arvamus. Lisa: Tuiksoo jopedest ja tassidest

  5. Space-Qualifiable Cyanate Ester Elastomer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase 1, CRG demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach to prepare cyanate ester based elastomers. This approach polymerizes in-situ siloxane within a...

  6. Conversion of carbohydrates to levulinic acid esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of converting carbohydrates into levulinic acid, a platform chemical for many chemical end products. More specifically the invention relates to a method for converting carbohydrates such as mono-, di- or polysaccharides, obtained from for example biomass...... production into a suitable levulinic acid ester in the presence of a zeolite or zeotype catalyst and a suitable alcohol, and the ester may be further converted into levulinic acid if desired....

  7. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  8. Rapid Output Growth of Special Acrylic Esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lianzhi

    2007-01-01

    @@ Acrylic esters are usually classified into general-purpose varieties and special varieties. The production and application of general-purpose varieties is already quite matured in the world and their output growth tends to be flat. Owing to the development of coatings, electronics, automobiles,textiles, printing and construction sectors, especially the application of radiation curing technology in various sectors, special acrylic esters have developed rapidly.

  9. Competitive homolytic and heterolytic decomposition pathways of gas-phase negative ions generated from aminobenzoate esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hanxue; Zhang, Yong; Pavlov, Julius; Jariwala, Freneil B; Attygalle, Athula B

    2016-03-01

    An alkyl-radical loss and an alkene loss are two competitive fragmentation pathways that deprotonated aminobenzoate esters undergo upon activation under mass spectrometric conditions. For the meta and para isomers, the alkyl-radical loss by a homolytic cleavage of the alkyl-oxygen bond of the ester moiety is the predominant fragmentation pathway, while the contribution from the alkene elimination by a heterolytic pathway is less significant. In contrast, owing to a pronounced charge-mediated ortho effect, the alkene loss becomes the predominant pathway for the ortho isomers of ethyl and higher esters. Results from isotope-labeled compounds confirmed that the alkene loss proceeds by a specific γ-hydrogen transfer mechanism that resembles the McLafferty rearrangement for radical cations. Even for the para compounds, if the alkoxide moiety bears structural motifs required for the elimination of a more stable alkene molecule, the heterolytic pathway becomes the predominant pathway. For example, in the spectrum of deprotonated 2-phenylethyl 4-aminobenzoate, m/z 136 peak is the base peak because the alkene eliminated is styrene. Owing to the fact that all deprotonated aminobenzoate esters, irrespective of the size of the alkoxy group, upon activation fragment to form an m/z 135 ion, aminobenzoate esters in mixtures can be quantified by precursor ion discovery mass spectrometric experiments.

  10. Aspirin prevention of cholesterol gallstone formation in prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S P; Carey, M C; LaMont, J T

    1981-03-27

    When prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are fed a diet containing cholesterol, a marked increase in gallbladder mucin secretion parallels the evolution of cholesterol supersaturated bile. Gelation of mucin precedes the precipitation of cholesterol liquid and solid crystals and the development of gallstones. Aspirin given to prairie dogs inhibited mucin hypersecretion and gel accumulation and prevented gallstone formation without influencing the cholesterol content of supersaturated bile. This suggests that gallbladder mucin is a nucleation matrix for cholesterol gallstones.

  11. Hampering Effect of Cholesterol on the Permeation of Reactive Oxygen Species through Phospholipids Bilayer: Possible Explanation for Plasma Cancer Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Paal, Jonas; Verheyen, Claudia; Neyts, Erik C.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the ability of cold atmospheric pressure plasmas (CAPS) to selectively induce cell death in cancer cells has been widely established. This selectivity has been assigned to the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) created in CAPs. To provide new insights in the search for an explanation for the observed selectivity, we calculate the transfer free energy of multiple ROS across membranes containing a varying amount of cholesterol. The cholesterol fraction is investigated as a selectivity parameter because membranes of cancer cells are known to contain lower fractions of cholesterol compared to healthy cells. We find that cholesterol has a significant effect on the permeation of reactive species across a membrane. Indeed, depending on the specific reactive species, an increasing cholesterol fraction can lead to (i) an increase of the transfer free energy barrier height and width, (ii) the formation of a local free energy minimum in the center of the membrane and (iii) the creation of extra free energy barriers due to the bulky sterol rings. In the context of plasma oncology, these observations suggest that the increased ingress of RONS in cancer cells can be explained by the decreased cholesterol fraction of their cell membrane.

  12. Hampering Effect of Cholesterol on the Permeation of Reactive Oxygen Species through Phospholipids Bilayer: Possible Explanation for Plasma Cancer Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Paal, Jonas; Verheyen, Claudia; Neyts, Erik C.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the ability of cold atmospheric pressure plasmas (CAPS) to selectively induce cell death in cancer cells has been widely established. This selectivity has been assigned to the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) created in CAPs. To provide new insights in the search for an explanation for the observed selectivity, we calculate the transfer free energy of multiple ROS across membranes containing a varying amount of cholesterol. The cholesterol fraction is investigated as a selectivity parameter because membranes of cancer cells are known to contain lower fractions of cholesterol compared to healthy cells. We find that cholesterol has a significant effect on the permeation of reactive species across a membrane. Indeed, depending on the specific reactive species, an increasing cholesterol fraction can lead to (i) an increase of the transfer free energy barrier height and width, (ii) the formation of a local free energy minimum in the center of the membrane and (iii) the creation of extra free energy barriers due to the bulky sterol rings. In the context of plasma oncology, these observations suggest that the increased ingress of RONS in cancer cells can be explained by the decreased cholesterol fraction of their cell membrane. PMID:28059085

  13. Phase behavior and crystalline structures of cholesteryl ester mixtures: a C-13 MASNMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W; Hamilton, J A

    1995-06-01

    Cholesteryl esters are a transport and storage form of cholesterol in normal physiology but also a significant lipid in atherosclerotic plaques. To understand better the molecular properties of cholesteryl esters in tissues and plaques, we have studied the polymorphic and mesomorphic features of pure and mixed cholesteryl esters by solid state C-13 NMR with magic angle sample spinning (MASNMR). The temperature-dependent properties of two single components (cholesteryl linoleate (CL, C18:2) and cholesteryl linolenate (CLL, C18:3)), four binary systems (cholesteryl palmitate (CP, C16:0) with CL, CLL or cholesteryl oleate (CO, C18:1), and CO/CL), one ternary system (CO/CP/CL), and one quaternary system (CO/CP/CL/CLL) were studied. The mixing ratios were based on the composition of an atherosclerosis plaque dissected from a cholesterol-fed New Zealand white rabbit. C-13 MASNMR determined the phase transition temperatures, identified the phases present in all systems, and provided novel information about molecular structures. For example, solid CL exhibited a disordered structure with multiple molecular conformations, whereas pure CLL had a crystalline structure different from the three most commonly characterized forms (MLII, MLI, BL). In binary mixtures, the crystalline structure of each cholesteryl ester species was identified by its own characteristic resonances. It was found that CP always existed in its native BL form, but CL and CO were influenced by the composition of the mixture. CL was induced to form MLII crystals by the coexisting CP (55 wt%). When CO was cooled from the isotropic phase, it existed as a mixture of MLII and an amorphous form. The presence of CP significantly accelerated the conversion of the amorphous form to the MLII form. For the ternary mixture co-dried from chloroform, CL cocrystallized with CO in the MLII form and CP existed in BL form. Addition of a small amount of CLL slightly increased the heterogeneity of the solid mixture, but had

  14. Cholesterol content and methods for cholesterol determination in meat and poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Available data for cholesterol content of beef, pork, poultry, and processed meat products were reported. Although the cholesterol concentration in meat and poultry can be influenced by various factors, effects of animal species, muscle fiber type, and muscle fat content are focused on in this revi...

  15. Intestinal SR-BI does not impact cholesterol absorption or transintestinal cholesterol efflux in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bura, Kanwardeep S.; Lord, Caleb; Marshall, Stephanie; McDaniel, Allison; Thomas, Gwyn; Warrier, Manya; Zhang, Jun; Davis, Matthew A.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Shah, Ramesh; Wilson, Martha D.; Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Collet, Xavier; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Temel, Ryan E.; Brown, J. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can proceed through the classic hepatobiliary route or through the non-biliary transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) pathway. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) plays a critical role in the classic hepatobiliary route of RCT. However, the role of SR-BI

  16. Transintestinal and Biliary Cholesterol Secretion Both Contribute to Macrophage Reverse Cholesterol Transport in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan Freark; Schonewille, Marleen; Dikkers, Arne; Koehorst, Martijn; Havinga, Rick; Kuipers, Folkert; Tietge, Uwe J F; Groen, Albert K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Reverse cholesterol transport comprises efflux of cholesterol from macrophages and its subsequent removal from the body with the feces and thereby protects against formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Because of lack of suitable animal models that allow for evaluation of the respective c

  17. Emerging roles of the intestine in control of cholesterol metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Janine K Kruit; Albert K Groen; Theo J van Berkel; Folkert Kuipers

    2006-01-01

    The liver is considered the major "control center" for maintenance of whole body cholesterol homeostasis. This organ is the main site for de novo cholesterol synthesis,clears cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants and low density lipoprotein particles from plasma and is the major contributor to high density lipoprotein (HDL; good cholesterol) formation. The liver has a central position in the classical definition of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway by taking up peripheryderived cholesterol from lipoprotein particles followed by conversion into bile acids or its direct secretion into bile for eventual removal via the feces. During the past couple of years, however, an additional important role of the intestine in maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis and regulation of plasma cholesterol levels has become apparent. Firstly, molecular mechanisms of cholesterol absorption have been elucidated and novel pharmacological compounds have been identified that interfere with the process and positively impact plasma cholesterol levels. Secondly, it is now evident that the intestine itself contributes to fecal neutral sterol loss as a cholesterol-secreting organ. Finally, very recent work has unequivocally demonstrated that the intestine contributes significantly to plasma HDL cholesterol levels.Thus, the intestine is a potential target for novel antiatherosclerotic treatment strategies that, in addition to interference with cholesterol absorption, modulate direct cholesterol excretion and plasma HDL cholesterol levels.

  18. Evolving neural network optimization of cholesteryl ester separation by reversed-phase HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Michael A; Kiwata, Jacqueline; Arceo, Jennifer; Faull, Kym F; Hanrahan, Grady; Porter, Edith

    2010-07-01

    Cholesteryl esters have antimicrobial activity and likely contribute to the innate immunity system. Improved separation techniques are needed to characterize these compounds. In this study, optimization of the reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography separation of six analyte standards (four cholesteryl esters plus cholesterol and tri-palmitin) was accomplished by modeling with an artificial neural network-genetic algorithm (ANN-GA) approach. A fractional factorial design was employed to examine the significance of four experimental factors: organic component in the mobile phase (ethanol and methanol), column temperature, and flow rate. Three separation parameters were then merged into geometric means using Derringer's desirability function and used as input sources for model training and testing. The use of genetic operators proved valuable for the determination of an effective neural network structure. Implementation of the optimized method resulted in complete separation of all six analytes, including the resolution of two previously co-eluting peaks. Model validation was performed with experimental responses in good agreement with model-predicted responses. Improved separation was also realized in a complex biological fluid, human milk. Thus, the first known use of ANN-GA modeling for improving the chromatographic separation of cholesteryl esters in biological fluids is presented and will likely prove valuable for future investigators involved in studying complex biological samples.

  19. Synthesis and enzymatic hydrolysis of esters, constituting simple models of soft drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffner-Nordberg, M; Sjödin, K; Tunek, A; Hallberg, A

    1998-04-01

    One way to minimise systemic side effects of drugs is to design molecules, soft drugs, in such a way that they are metabolically inactivated rapidly after having acted on their pharmacological target. Hydrolases (esterases, peptidases, lipases, glycosidases, etc.) are enzymes well suited to use for drug inactivation since they are ubiquitously distributed. Insertion of ester bonds susceptible to enzymatic cleavage may represent one approach to make the action of a drug more restricted to the site of application. The present study describes the chemical synthesis of fourteen model compounds comprising a bicyclic aromatic unit connected by an ester-containing bridge to another aromatic ring. Initial attempts to define a) the tissue selectivity of the hydrolytic metabolism and b) the molecular structural factors affecting the rate of enzymatic ester cleavage are presented. The data show that human and rat liver fractions were more active than human duodenal mucosa and human blood leukocytes at hydrolysing the compounds. The rank order of the compounds was, however, very similar in the different biological systems. Commercially available pig liver carboxyl esterase and cholesterol esterase both reasonably well predict the rank order in the tissue fractions.

  20. Degradation of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters derived from Jatropha oil cake and their tumor-promoting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Motoyuki; Hasegawa, Go; Yasuhara, Tadashi; Ishihara, Yoko

    2015-04-01

    Large amount of oil cake is generated during biodiesel production from Jatropha seeds. Although Jatropha oil cake is rich in plant nutrients, presence of toxic phorbol esters restricts the usage of oil cake as a fertilizer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the components and tumor promoting activity of phorbol esters in Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil and plants grown in the treated soil. Contents and their biological activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in soil and plants were sequentially analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in vitro cell transformation assay, respectively. Disappearance of Jatropha phorbol-ester-specific peaks were followed with HPLC during incubation of Jatropha oil cake with soil for five weeks. Along with the degradation of Jatropha phorbol ester in soil, tumor-promoting activity in the sample was also attenuated and ultimately disappeared. Jatropha phorbol esters and tumor promoting activity were not detected from mustard spinach grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil. In addition, the esterase KM109 degrades DHPB (see definition below; Jatropha phorbol ester) and reduced its tumor-promoting activity. From these data, we conclude: (1) components and tumor promoting activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in the oil cake disappeared completely by incubation with soil for five-week, (2) Jatropha phorbol esters did not transfer into plants grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil, and (3) DHPB can be degraded by esterase from soil bacterium. These observations are useful for utilization of Jatropha oil cake as a fertilizer.

  1. [Trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE): a new route for cholesterol excretion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Claire; Moreau, François; Cariou, Bertrand; Le May, Cédric

    2014-10-01

    The small intestine plays a crucial role in dietary and biliary cholesterol absorption, as well as its lymphatic secretion as chylomicrons (lipoprotein exogenous way). Recently, a new metabolic pathway called TICE (trans-intestinal excretion of cholesterol) that plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism has emerged. TICE is an inducible way, complementary to the hepatobiliary pathway, allowing the elimination of the plasma cholesterol directly into the intestine lumen through the enterocytes. This pathway is poorly characterized but several molecular actors of TICE have been recently identified. Although it is a matter of debate, two independent studies suggest that TICE is involved in the anti-atherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Thus, TICE is an innovative drug target to reduce -cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Lipoproteins, cholesterol homeostasis and cardiac health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler F. Daniels, Karen M. Killinger, Jennifer J. Michal, Raymond W. Wright Jr., Zhihua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is an essential substance involved in many functions, such as maintaining cell membranes, manufacturing vitamin D on surface of the skin, producing hormones, and possibly helping cell connections in the brain. When cholesterol levels rise in the blood, they can, however, have dangerous consequences. In particular, cholesterol has generated considerable notoriety for its causative role in atherosclerosis, the leading cause of death in developed countries around the world. Homeostasis of cholesterol is centered on the metabolism of lipoproteins, which mediate transport of the lipid to and from tissues. As a synopsis of the major events and proteins that manage lipoprotein homeostasis, this review contributes to the substantial attention that has recently been directed to this area. Despite intense scrutiny, the majority of phenotypic variation in total cholesterol and related traits eludes explanation by current genetic knowledge. This is somewhat disappointing considering heritability estimates have established these traits as highly genetic. Thus, the continued search for candidate genes, mutations, and mechanisms is vital to our understanding of heart disease at the molecular level. Furthermore, as marker development continues to predict risk of vascular illness, this knowledge has the potential to revolutionize treatment of this leading human disease.

  3. LDL cholesterol: controversies and future therapeutic directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridker, Paul M

    2014-08-16

    Lifelong exposure to raised concentrations of LDL cholesterol increases cardiovascular event rates, and the use of statin therapy as an adjunct to diet, exercise, and smoking cessation has proven highly effective in reducing the population burden associated with hyperlipidaemia. Yet, despite consistent biological, genetic, and epidemiological data, and evidence from randomised trials, there is controversy among national guidelines and clinical practice with regard to LDL cholesterol, its measurement, the usefulness of population-based screening, the net benefit-to-risk ratio for different LDL-lowering drugs, the benefit of treatment targets, and whether aggressive lowering of LDL is safe. Several novel therapies have been introduced for the treatment of people with genetic defects that result in loss of function within the LDL receptor, a major determinant of inherited hyperlipidaemias. Moreover, the usefulness of monoclonal antibodies that extend the LDL-receptor lifecycle (and thus result in substantial lowering of LDL cholesterol below the levels achieved with statins alone) is being assessed in phase 3 trials that will enrol more than 60,000 at-risk patients worldwide. These trials represent an exceptionally rapid translation of genetic observations into clinical practice and will address core questions of how low LDL cholesterol can be safely reduced, whether the mechanism of LDL-cholesterol lowering matters, and whether ever more aggressive lipid-lowering provides a safe, long-term mechanism to prevent atherothrombotic complications.

  4. Differential control of cholesterol and fatty acid biosynthesis in sensitive and multidrug-resistant LoVo tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Maria Teresa; Napolitano, Mariarosaria; Ferrante, Antonella; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Arancia, Giuseppe; Bravo, Elena

    2003-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) describes the decrease in sensitivity of tumor cells to a wide variety of cytotoxic compounds. Although a central role has been ascribed to the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) pump in MDR, lipids also appear to be extremely important. However, their precise role in MDR is not yet fully understood. It was the aim of the present paper to gain a deeper understanding of intracellular lipid equilibrium in both sensitive and MDR tumor cells. In particular, intracellular cholesterol biosynthesis and cholesterol esterification were examined in LoVo-sensitive and Pgp-overexpressing resistant cells. The data presented seem to suggest that the higher synthesis of cholesteryl ester and triglyceride observed in resistant with respect to wild-type cells is due to a greater production of fatty acids in these cells. The results are discussed in view of the possible roles of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins and Pgp in these phenomena.

  5. Elevated Remnant Cholesterol Causes Both Low-Grade Inflammation and Ischemic Heart Disease, Whereas Elevated Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Causes Ischemic Heart Disease Without Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-01-01

    Elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol are causally associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD), but whether elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol and LDL cholesterol both cause low-grade inflammation is currently unknown....

  6. Dietary cholesterol from eggs increases the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in humans : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weggemans, R.M.; Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Several epidemiologic studies found no effect of egg consumption on the risk of coronary heart disease. It is possible that the adverse effect of eggs on LDL-cholesterol is offset by their favorable effect on HDL cholesterol. Objective: The objective was to review the effect of dietary cholesterol o

  7. CHOBIMALT: a cholesterol-based detergent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Stanley C; Mittal, Ritesh; Huang, Lijun; Travis, Benjamin; Breyer, Richard M; Sanders, Charles R

    2010-11-01

    Cholesterol and its hemisuccinate and sulfate derivatives are widely used in studies of purified membrane proteins but are difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, even in the presence of detergent micelles. Other cholesterol derivatives do not form conventional micelles and lead to viscous solutions. To address these problems, a cholesterol-based detergent, CHOBIMALT, has been synthesized and characterized. At concentrations above 3−4 μM, CHOBIMALT forms micelles without the need for elevated temperatures or sonic disruption. Diffusion and fluorescence measurements indicated that CHOBIMALT micelles are large (210±30 kDa). The ability to solubilize a functional membrane protein was explored using a G-protein coupled receptor, the human kappa opioid receptor type 1 (hKOR1). While CHOBIMALT alone was not found to be effective as a surfactant for membrane extraction, when added to classical detergent micelles CHOBIMALT was observed to dramatically enhance the thermal stability of solubilized hKOR1.

  8. Ordering effects of cholesterol and its analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Róg, Tomasz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Without any exaggeration, cholesterol is one of the most important lipid species in eukaryotic cells. Its effects on cellular membranes and functions range from purely mechanistic to complex metabolic ones, besides which it is also a precursor of the sex hormones (steroids) and several vitamins....... In this review, we discuss the biophysical effects of cholesterol on the lipid bilayer, in particular the ordering and condensing effects, concentrating on the molecular level or inter-atomic interactions perspective, starting from two-component systems and proceeding to many-component ones e.g., modeling lipid...... rafts. Particular attention is paid to the roles of the methyl groups in the cholesterol ring system, and their possible biological function. Although our main research methodology is computer modeling, in this review we make extensive comparisons between experiments and different modeling approaches....

  9. [Fatty acid composition and cholesterol content in naturally canned jurel, sardine, salmon, and tuna].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, N; Robert, P; Masson, L; Luck, C; Buschmann, L

    1996-03-01

    To obtain more information about fatty acid profile and cholesterol content of fat extracted from canned fish in brine habitually consumed in Chile, four different species Jurel (Trachurus murphyi), Sardine (Sardinops sagax), Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and Tuna (Thunnus alalunga) were analyzed. The GLC of fatty acid methyl esters showed that the main group of fatty acids belongs to polyunsaturated, being omega-3 family the more important. The principal representants were eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA), with percentages between 5%-11% and 12%-22% respectively. Omega-6 family was represented mainly by arachidonic acid (AA) with percentages between 2%-4%. Cholesterol content was similar to the values found in other animal origen meats. The figures were between 41-86 mg of cholesterol per 100 g of edible product, Tuna in brine, was the product with the lowest content of cholesterol. The calculated amount of EPA, DHA and total omega-3 fatty acids indicated values between 95-604, 390-1163 and 609-2775 mg respectively per 100 g of edible product. Due these results is important to emphasize the consumption of this type of canned fish in brine, that they really represent a good dietary source of mainly polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids. The international recommendations indicate to increase the consumption of fish, due the beneficial effects described in relation with cardiovascular disease, which is the mean cause of death in Chile, country with a wide variety of marine origen foods, but with a contradictory answer about its consumption which is not incorporated in the current diet.

  10. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  11. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable.

  12. [Basic mechanisms: absorption and excretion of cholesterol and other sterols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofan Pujol, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is of vital importance for vertebrate cell membrane structure and function. It is obvious that adequate regulation of cholesterol homeostasis is essential. Hypercholesterolemia promotes atherosclerosis and thereby represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The liver has been considered the major site of control in maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. The liver facilitates clearance of (very) low density lipoprotein particles and cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants, synthesizes cholesterol, synthesizes and secretes (nascent) high density lipoprotein particles, secretes cholesterol and bile salts to bile, and is involved in reverse cholesterol transport. In recent years, however, the importance of the intestine in many aspects of cholesterol physiology is increasingly recognized. It has become apparent that direct secretion of cholesterol from the blood compartment into the intestine, or transintestinal cholesterol excretion, plays a major role in disposal of cholesterol via the feces. This review will discuss current knowledge on the physiology of cholesterol homeostasis, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia.

  13. Cholesterol homeostasis: How do cells sense sterol excess?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J; Alexopoulos, Stephanie J; Kunze, Sarah V; Chua, Ngee Kiat; Li, Dianfan; Brown, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is vital in mammals, but toxic in excess. Consequently, elaborate molecular mechanisms have evolved to maintain this sterol within narrow limits. How cells sense excess cholesterol is an intriguing area of research. Cells sense cholesterol, and other related sterols such as oxysterols or cholesterol synthesis intermediates, and respond to changing levels through several elegant mechanisms of feedback regulation. Cholesterol sensing involves both direct binding of sterols to the homeostatic machinery located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and indirect effects elicited by sterol-dependent alteration of the physical properties of membranes. Here, we examine the mechanisms employed by cells to maintain cholesterol homeostasis.

  14. Intestinal SR-BI does not impact cholesterol absorption or transintestinal cholesterol efflux in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura, Kanwardeep S; Lord, Caleb; Marshall, Stephanie; McDaniel, Allison; Thomas, Gwyn; Warrier, Manya; Zhang, Jun; Davis, Matthew A; Sawyer, Janet K; Shah, Ramesh; Wilson, Martha D; Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J F; Collet, Xavier; Rudel, Lawrence L; Temel, Ryan E; Brown, J Mark

    2013-06-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can proceed through the classic hepatobiliary route or through the nonbiliary transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) pathway. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) plays a critical role in the classic hepatobiliary route of RCT. However, the role of SR-BI in TICE has not been studied. To examine the role of intestinal SR-BI in TICE, sterol balance was measured in control mice and mice transgenically overexpressing SR-BI in the proximal small intestine (SR-BI(hApoCIII-ApoAIV-Tg)). SR-BI(hApoCIII-ApoAIV-Tg) mice had significantly lower plasma cholesterol levels compared with wild-type controls, yet SR-BI(hApoCIII-ApoAIV-Tg) mice had normal fractional cholesterol absorption and fecal neutral sterol excretion. Both in the absence or presence of ezetimibe, intestinal SR-BI overexpression had no impact on the amount of cholesterol excreted in the feces. To specifically study effects of intestinal SR-BI on TICE we crossed SR-BI(hApoCIII-ApoAIV-Tg) mice into a mouse model that preferentially utilized the TICE pathway for RCT (Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 liver transgenic), and likewise found no alterations in cholesterol absorption or fecal sterol excretion. Finally, mice lacking SR-BI in all tissues also exhibited normal cholesterol absorption and fecal cholesterol disposal. Collectively, these results suggest that SR-BI is not rate limiting for intestinal cholesterol absorption or for fecal neutral sterol loss through the TICE pathway.

  15. MCPIP is induced by cholesterol and participated in cholesterol-caused DNA damage in HUVEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Jingjing; Zhuo, Ming; Qian, Minzhang

    2015-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis and cholesterol treatment would cause multiple damages, including DNA damage, on endothelial cells. In this work, we have used human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUVEC) to explore the mechanism of cholesterol induced damage. We have found that cholesterol treatment on HUVEC could induce the expression of MCPIP1. When given 12.5 mg/L cholesterol on HUVEC, the expression of MCPIP1 starts to increase since 4 hr after treatment and at 24 hr after treatment it could reach to 10 fold of base line level. We hypothesis this induction of MCPIP1 may contribute to the damaging process and we have used siRNA of MCPIP1 in further research. This MCPIP1 siRNA (siMCPIP) could down regulate MCPIP1 by 73.4% and when using this siRNA on HUVECs, we could see the cholesterol induced DNA damage have been reduced. We have detected DNA damage by γH2AX foci formation in nuclear, γH2AX protein level and COMET assay. Compare to cholesterol alone group, siMCPIP group shows much less γH2AX foci formation in nuclear after cholesterol treatment, less γH2AX protein level in cell and also less tail moment detected in COMET assay. We have also seen that using siMCPIP1 could result in less reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell after cholesterol treatment. We have also seen that using siMCPIP could reduce the protein level of Nox4 and p47(phox), two major regulators in ROS production. These results suggest that MCPIP1 may play an important role in cholesterol induced damage.

  16. Curdlan ester derivatives: synthesis, structure, and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubayashi, Hironori; Yukinaka, Kazuyori; Enomoto-Rogers, Yukiko; Takemura, Akio; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2014-03-15

    A series of ester derivatives of curdlan, which is a β-(1 → 3)-D-glucan extracellularly produced by microorganism, with varying alkyl chain lengths (C2-C12) were synthesized by the heterogeneous reaction using trifluoroacetic anhydride. As a result, high-molecular-weight (Mw ≥ 6 × 10(5)) and fully-acylated curdlan was obtained with relatively high yield (>70%). Thermal stability of curdlan was greatly improved by esterification. Crystallization was observed for curdlan esters with C2-C6 side chains. Both Tg (170 → 50 °C) and Tm (290 → 170 °C) of curdlan esters decreased with increasing the side-chain length. By the increase in the side-chain carbon number, curdlan esters showed lower Young's modulus and tensile strength, and larger elongation at break. Thus, material properties of curdlan esters can be controlled by changing the side-chain length. It was found that the increase of the side-chain length resulted in the decrease of crystallinity and the change of crystal structures.

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibition decreases cholesterol levels in neuronal cells by modulating key genes in cholesterol synthesis, uptake and efflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Nunes

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is an essential component of the central nervous system and increasing evidence suggests an association between brain cholesterol metabolism dysfunction and the onset of neurodegenerative disorders. Interestingly, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi such as trichostatin A (TSA are emerging as promising therapeutic approaches in neurodegenerative diseases, but their effect on brain cholesterol metabolism is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that HDACi up-regulate CYP46A1 gene transcription, a key enzyme in neuronal cholesterol homeostasis. In this study, TSA was shown to modulate the transcription of other genes involved in cholesterol metabolism in human neuroblastoma cells, namely by up-regulating genes that control cholesterol efflux and down-regulating genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and uptake, thus leading to an overall decrease in total cholesterol content. Furthermore, co-treatment with the amphipathic drug U18666A that can mimic the intracellular cholesterol accumulation observed in cells of Niemman-Pick type C patients, revealed that TSA can ameliorate the phenotype induced by pathological cholesterol accumulation, by restoring the expression of key genes involved in cholesterol synthesis, uptake and efflux and promoting lysosomal cholesterol redistribution. These results clarify the role of TSA in the modulation of neuronal cholesterol metabolism at the transcriptional level, and emphasize the idea of HDAC inhibition as a promising therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative disorders with impaired cholesterol metabolism.

  18. Transport of maternal cholesterol to the fetus is affected by maternal plasma cholesterol concentrations in the golden Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Katie T; Colvin, Perry L; Myatt, Leslie; Graf, Gregory A; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Woollett, Laura A

    2009-06-01

    The fetus has a high requirement for cholesterol and synthesizes cholesterol at elevated rates. Recent studies suggest that fetal cholesterol also can be obtained from exogenous sources. The purpose of the current study was to examine the transport of maternal cholesterol to the fetus and determine the mechanism responsible for any cholesterol-driven changes in transport. Studies were completed in pregnant hamsters with normal and elevated plasma cholesterol concentrations. Cholesterol feeding resulted in a 3.1-fold increase in the amount of LDL-cholesterol taken up by the fetus and a 2.4-fold increase in the amount of HDL-cholesterol taken up. LDL-cholesterol was transported to the fetus primarily by the placenta, and HDL-cholesterol was transported by the yolk sac and placenta. Several proteins associated with sterol transport and efflux, including those induced by activated liver X receptor, were expressed in hamster and human placentas: NPC1, NPC1L1, ABCA2, SCP-x, and ABCG1, but not ABCG8. NPC1L1 was the only protein increased in hypercholesterolemic placentas. Thus, increasing maternal lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations can enhance transport of maternal cholesterol to the fetus, leading to 1) increased movement of cholesterol down a concentration gradient in the placenta, 2) increased lipoprotein secretion from the yolk sac (shown previously), and possibly 3) increased placental NPC1L1 expression.

  19. Different responsiveness to a high-fat/cholesterol diet in two inbred mice and underlying genetic factors: a whole genome microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Gang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate different responses to a high-fat/cholesterol diet and uncover their underlying genetic factors between C57BL/6J (B6 and DBA/2J (D2 inbred mice. Methods B6 and D2 mice were fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet for a series of time-points. Serum and bile lipid profiles, bile acid yields, hepatic apoptosis, gallstones and atherosclerosis formation were measured. Furthermore, a whole genome microarray was performed to screen hepatic genes expression profile. Quantitative real-time PCR, western blot and TUNEL assay were conducted to validate microarray data. Results After fed the high-fat/cholesterol diet, serum and bile total cholesterol, serum cholesterol esters, HDL cholesterol and Non-HDL cholesterol levels were altered in B6 but not significantly changed in D2; meanwhile, biliary bile acid was decreased in B6 but increased in D2. At the same time, hepatic apoptosis, gallstones and atherosclerotic lesions occurred in B6 but not in D2. The hepatic microarray analysis revealed distinctly different genes expression patterns between B6 and D2 mice. Their functional pathway groups included lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, immune/inflammation response and apoptosis. Quantitative real time PCR, TUNEL assay and western-blot results were consistent with microarray analysis. Conclusion Different genes expression patterns between B6 and D2 mice might provide a genetic basis for their distinctive responses to a high-fat/cholesterol diet, and give us an opportunity to identify novel pharmaceutical targets in related diseases in the future.

  20. Cholesterol levels in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Levin, Rebecca; Shah, Haroon; Mathur, Shaguna; Darnell, Jennifer C; Ouyang, Bichun

    2015-02-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is associated with intellectual disability and behavioral dysfunction, including anxiety, ADHD symptoms, and autistic features. Although individuals with FXS are largely considered healthy and lifespan is not thought to be reduced, very little is known about the long-term medical health of adults with FXS and no systematically collected information is available on standard laboratory measures from metabolic screens. During the course of follow up of a large cohort of patients with FXS we noted that many patients had low cholesterol and high density lipoprotein (HDL) values and thus initiated a systematic chart review of all cholesterol values present in charts from a clinic cohort of over 500 patients with FXS. Total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and HDL were all significantly reduced in males from the FXS cohort relative to age-adjusted population normative data. This finding has relevance for health monitoring in individuals with FXS, for treatments with cholesterol-lowering agents that have been proposed to target the underlying CNS disorder in FXS based on work in animal models, and for potential biomarker development in FXS.

  1. Structure of cholesterol/ceramide monolayer mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffer, L.; Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of monolayers of cholesterol/ ceramide mixtures was investigated using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, immunofluorescence, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements showed the existence of a crystalline mixed phase of the two...

  2. Blood cholesterol, a public health perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, W.M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in total cholesterol levels (TC) were studied using data from three epidemiological studies: about 30,000 men and women aged 37-43 were examined between 1974 and 1980 (CB Project), about 80,000 men aged 33-37 between 1981 and 1986 (RIFOH Project) and 42,000 men and women aged 20-59 from 1987

  3. Garbanzo diet lowers cholesterol in hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholesterol-lowering potential of diets with 22% protein from Chickpea (Cicer arietinum, European variety of Garbanzo, Kabuli Chana), Bengal gram (Cicer arietinum, Asian variety of Garbanzo, Desi Chana, smaller in size, yellow to black color), lentils, soy protein isolate, hydrolyzed salmon protein...

  4. Application conditions for ester cured alkaline phenolic resin sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-he Huang; Bao-ping Zhang; Yao-ji Tang

    2016-01-01

    Five organic esters with different curing speeds: propylene carbonate (i.e. high-speed ester A); 1, 4-butyrolactone; glycerol triacetate (i.e. medium-speed ester B); glycerol diacetate; dibasic ester (DBE) (i.e. low-speed ester C), were chosen to react with alkaline phenolic resin to analyze the application conditions of ester cured alkaline phenolic resin. The relationships between the curing performances of the resin (including pH value, gel pH value, gel time of resin solution, heat release rate of the curing reaction and tensile strength of the resin sand) and the amount of added organic ester and curing temperature were investigated. The results indicated the folowing: (1) The optimal added amount of organic ester should be 25wt.%-30wt.% of alkaline phenolic resin and it must be above 20wt.%-50 wt.% of the organic ester hydrolysis amount. (2) High-speed ester A (propylene carbonate) has a higher curing speed than 1, 4-butyrolactone, and they were both used as high-speed esters. Glycerol diacetate is not a high-speed ester in alkaline phenolic resin although it was used as a high-speed ester in ester cured sodium silicate sand; glycerol diacetate and glycerol triacetate can be used as medium-speed esters in alkaline phenolic resin. (3) High-speed ester A, medium-speed ester B (glycerol triacetate) and low-speed ester C (dibasic ester, i.e., DBE) should be used below 15 ºC, 35 ºC and 50 ºC, respectively. High-speed ester A or low-speed ester C should not be used alone but mixed with medium-speed ester B to improve the strength of the resin sand. (4) There should be a suitable solid content (generaly 45wt.%-65wt.% of resin), alkali content (generaly 10wt.%-15wt.% of resin) and viscosity of alkaline phenolic resin (generaly 50-300 mPa·s) in the preparation of alkaline phenolic resin. Finaly, the technique conditions of alkaline phenolic resin preparation and the application principles of organic ester were discussed.

  5. Mimicking Photosynthesis with Supercomplexed Lipid Nanoassemblies: Design, Performance, and Enhancement Role of Cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingming; Chen, Jinquan; Lian, Tianquan; Zhan, Wei

    2016-07-26

    We report here a new approach to mimicking photosynthesis that relies on supercomplexed lipid nanoassemblies to organize small organic species for coordinated light harvesting, energy/electron transfer, and photo-to-electrochemical energy conversion. Specifically, we demonstrate efficient photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) between rhodamine and fullerene assembled together via electrostatically bound liposome and lipid bilayer hosts. The remarkable impact of the lipid matrix on the photoconversion efficiency is further revealed by cholesterol, whose addition is found to modify the distribution and organization of the coassembled rhodamine dyes and thus their photodynamics. This significantly expedites the energy transfer (ET) among rhodamine dyes, as well as the PeT between rhodamines and fullerenes. A respectable 14% photon-to-electron conversion efficiency was achieved for this supercomplexed system containing 5% rhodamines, 5% fullerenes, and 30% cholesterol. The morphology, photodynamics, and photoelectrochemical behavior of these lipid supercomplexes were thoroughly characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence microscopy, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and transient absorption (TA) and photoaction spectroscopy. A detailed discussion on enhancement mechanisms of cholesterol in this lipid-complexed photosynthesis-mimicking system is provided at the end.

  6. Trans Fat Now Listed With Saturated Fat and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trans Fat Now Listed With Saturated Fat and Cholesterol Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... I Do About Saturated Fat, Trans Fat, and Cholesterol? When comparing foods, look at the Nutrition Facts ...

  7. Remnant cholesterol as a cause of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD), on its definition, measurement, atherogenicity, and levels in high risk patient groups; in addition, present and future pharmacological approaches to lowering remnant cholesterol levels...... are considered. Observational studies show association between elevated levels of remnant cholesterol and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even when remnant cholesterol levels are defined, measured, or calculated in different ways. In-vitro and animal studies also support the contention that elevated...... levels of remnant cholesterol may cause atherosclerosis same way as elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, by cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall. Genetic studies of variants associated with elevated remnant cholesterol levels show that an increment of 1mmol/L (39mg...

  8. Are You Taking the Right Treatment for Your High Cholesterol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you taking the right treatment for your high cholesterol? Our analysis and new guidelines could change your ... people consider a moderate-intensity statin (reduces LDL cholesterol by 30 percent to 50 percent) • People 40 ...

  9. Plasma Ubiquinone, Alpha-Tocopherol and Cholesterol in Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Jan; Diamant, Bertil; Edlund, Per Olof

    1992-01-01

    Farmakologi, Coenzyme Q10, free cholesterol, vitamin E, antioxidants, Alpha-Tocopherol, vitamin Q, plasma, LDL-particle......Farmakologi, Coenzyme Q10, free cholesterol, vitamin E, antioxidants, Alpha-Tocopherol, vitamin Q, plasma, LDL-particle...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the MMWR Science Clips High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Out of Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... cdc.gov/GISCVH2/ High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol Among US Adults SOURCES: National Health and Nutrition ...

  11. 1 in 7 Obese People Has Normal Blood Pressure, Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in 7 Obese People Has Normal Blood Pressure, Cholesterol But that doesn't mean the excess weight ... people studied, 14 percent had normal blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure readings, the study found. Doctors ...

  12. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population....

  13. Cholesterol paradox: a correlate does not a surrogate make.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBroff, Robert

    2017-03-01

    The global campaign to lower cholesterol by diet and drugs has failed to thwart the developing pandemic of coronary heart disease around the world. Some experts believe this failure is due to the explosive rise in obesity and diabetes, but it is equally plausible that the cholesterol hypothesis, which posits that lowering cholesterol prevents cardiovascular disease, is incorrect. The recently presented ACCELERATE trial dumbfounded many experts by failing to demonstrate any cardiovascular benefit of evacetrapib despite dramatically lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in high-risk patients with coronary disease. This clinical trial adds to a growing volume of knowledge that challenges the validity of the cholesterol hypothesis and the utility of cholesterol as a surrogate end point. Inadvertently, the cholesterol hypothesis may have even contributed to this pandemic. This perspective critically reviews this evidence and our reluctance to acknowledge contradictory information.

  14. Elevated Cholesterol in the Coxiella burnetii Intracellular Niche Is Bacteriolytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulye, Minal; Samanta, Dhritiman; Winfree, Seth; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen and a significant cause of culture-negative endocarditis in the United States. Upon infection, the nascent Coxiella phagosome fuses with the host endocytic pathway to form a large lysosome-like vacuole called the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The PV membrane is rich in sterols, and drugs perturbing host cell cholesterol homeostasis inhibit PV formation and bacterial growth. Using cholesterol supplementation of a cholesterol-free cell model system, we found smaller PVs and reduced Coxiella growth as cellular cholesterol concentration increased. Further, we observed in cells with cholesterol a significant number of nonfusogenic PVs that contained degraded bacteria, a phenotype not observed in cholesterol-free cells. Cholesterol had no effect on axenic Coxiella cultures, indicating that only intracellular bacteria are sensitive to cholesterol. Live-cell microscopy revealed that both plasma membrane-derived cholesterol and the exogenous cholesterol carrier protein low-density lipoprotein (LDL) traffic to the PV. To test the possibility that increasing PV cholesterol levels affects bacterial survival, infected cells were treated with U18666A, a drug that traps cholesterol in lysosomes and PVs. U18666A treatment led to PVs containing degraded bacteria and a significant loss in bacterial viability. The PV pH was significantly more acidic in cells with cholesterol or cells treated with U18666A, and the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin blocked cholesterol-induced PV acidification and bacterial death. Additionally, treatment of infected HeLa cells with several FDA-approved cholesterol-altering drugs led to a loss of bacterial viability, a phenotype also rescued by bafilomycin. Collectively, these data suggest that increasing PV cholesterol further acidifies the PV, leading to Coxiella death. PMID:28246364

  15. Polymer sorbent with the properties of an artificial cholesterol receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova, I. V.; Ezhova, N. M.; Osipenko, A. A.; Pisarev, O. A.

    2015-02-01

    A cholesterol-imprinted polymer sorbent and the corresponding reticular control copolymer were synthesized from hydroxyethyl methacrylate and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. The sorption isotherms of cholesterol were analyzed using the generalized Langmuir and Freundlich equations. In the case of the imprinted reticular polymer, cholesterol sorption occurred on the energetically homogeneous binding centers, forming one monolayer, while the nonspecific sorption of cholesterol on the control copolymer occurred with energetically nonhomogeneous binding of the sorbate and depended on the physicochemical conditions of sorption.

  16. Chiral extraction of ketoprofen enantiomers with chiral selector tartaric esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dan; LIU Jia-jia; TANG Ke-wen; HUANG Ke-long

    2007-01-01

    Distribution behavior of ketoprofen enantiomers was examined in methanol aqueous and organic solvent mixture containing tartaric esters. The influence of length of alkyl chain of tartaric esters, concentration of L-tartaric esters and methanol aqueous, kind of organic solvent on partition ratio and separation factors was investigated. The results show that L-tartaric and D-tartaric esters have different chiral recognition abilities. S-ketoprofen is easily extracted by L-tartaric esters, and R-ketoprofen is easily extracted by D-tartaric esters. L-tartaric esters form more stable diastereomeric complexes with S-enantiomer than that with R-enantiomer. This distribution behavior is consistent with chiral recognition mechanism. With the increase of the concentration of tartaric ester from 0 to 0.3 mol/L, partition coefficient K and separation factor α increase. Also, the kind of organic solvent and the concentration of the methanol aqueous have significant influence on K and α.

  17. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  18. Sex Differences in the Hepatic Cholesterol Sensing Mechanisms in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingemar Björkhem

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is linked to many multifactorial disorders, including different forms of liver disease where development and severity depend on the sex. We performed a detailed analysis of cholesterol and bile acid synthesis pathways at the level of genes and metabolites combined with the expression studies of hepatic cholesterol uptake and transport in female and male mice fed with a high-fat diet with or without cholesterol. Lack of dietary cholesterol led to a stronger response of the sterol sensing mechanism in females, resulting in higher expression of cholesterogenic genes compared to males. With cholesterol in the diet, the genes were down-regulated in both sexes; however, males maintained a more efficient hepatic metabolic flux through the pathway. Females had higher content of hepatic cholesterol but this was likely not due to diminished excretion but rather due to increased synthesis and absorption. Dietary cholesterol and sex were not important for gallbladder bile acids composition. Neither sex up-regulated Cyp7a1 upon cholesterol loading and there was no compensatory up-regulation of Abcg5 or Abcg8 transporters. On the other hand, females had higher expression of the Ldlr and Cd36 genes. These findings explain sexual dimorphism of cholesterol metabolism in response to dietary cholesterol in a high-fat diet in mice, which contributes to understanding the sex-basis of cholesterol-associated liver diseases.

  19. Emerging roles of the intestine in control of cholesterol metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, Janine K.; Groen, Albert K.; van Berkel, Theo J.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2006-01-01

    The liver is considered the major "control center" for maintenance of whole body cholesterol homeostasis. This organ is the main site for de novo cholesterol synthesis, clears cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants and low density lipoprotein particles from plasma and is the major contributor t

  20. Greased hedgehogs : new links between hedgehog signaling and cholesterol metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breitling, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    The close link between signaling by the developmental regulators of the Hedgehog family and cholesterol biochemistry has been known for some time. The morphogen is covalently attached to cholesterol in a peculiar autocatalytic reaction and embryonal disruption of cholesterol synthesis leads to malfo

  1. Carbon Inverse Opal Rods for Nonenzymatic Cholesterol Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qifeng; Xie, Zhuoying; Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Yang, Zixue; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-11-18

    Carbon inverse opal rods made from silica photonic crystal rods are used for nonenzymatic cholesterol sensing. The characteristic reflection peak originating from the physical periodic structure works as sensing signals for quantitatively estimating cholesterol concentrations. Carbon inverse opal rods work both in cholesterol standard solutions and human serum. They are suitable for practical use in clinical diagnose.

  2. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  3. Regulation of direct transintestinal cholesterol excretion in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Astrid E.; Vrins, Carlos L. J.; van den Oever, Karin; Seemann, Ingar; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; van Eck, Miranda; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2008-01-01

    Biliary secretion is generally considered to be an obligate step in the pathway of excess cholesterol excretion from the body. We have recently shown that an alternative route exists. Direct transintestinal cholesterol efflux ( TICE) contributes significantly to cholesterol removal in mice. Our aim

  4. Moderate alcohol consumption increases cholesterol efflux mediated by ABCA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Sierksma, A.; Tol, van A.; Fournier, C.

    2004-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption increases HDL cholesterol, which is involved in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of moderate alcohol consumption on cholesterol efflux, using J774 mouse macrophages and Fu5AH cells, and on other parameters in the RC

  5. Cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in regulation of the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Singh

    Full Text Available The cell cycle is a ubiquitous, multi-step process that is essential for growth and proliferation of cells. The role of membrane lipids in cell cycle regulation is not explored well, although a large number of cytoplasmic and nuclear regulators have been identified. We focus in this work on the role of membrane cholesterol in cell cycle regulation. In particular, we have explored the stringency of the requirement of cholesterol in the regulation of cell cycle progression. For this purpose, we utilized distal and proximal inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis, and monitored their effect on cell cycle progression. We show that cholesterol content increases in S phase and inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis results in cell cycle arrest in G1 phase under certain conditions. Interestingly, G1 arrest mediated by cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors could be reversed upon metabolic replenishment of cholesterol. Importantly, our results show that the requirement of cholesterol for G1 to S transition is absolute, and even immediate biosynthetic precursors of cholesterol, differing with cholesterol merely in a double bond, could not replace cholesterol for reversing the cell cycle arrest. These results are useful in the context of diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease, that are associated with impaired cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis.

  6. CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS IN THE ANALYSIS OF CHOLESTEROL AND RELATED LIPIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOVING, EB

    1995-01-01

    Methods using thin-layer chromatography, solid-phase extraction, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography are described for the analysis of single cholesterol, esterified and sulfated cholesterol, and for cholesterol in the context of other li

  7. Effects of switching from omega-3-acid ethyl esters to icosapent ethyl in a statin-treated patient with elevated triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Anurag W; Lynch, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In patients with dyslipidemia, elevated triglyceride (TG) levels, or TG-rich lipoproteins, and cardiovascular risk may remain despite statin therapy. Prescription omega-3 fatty acid formulations containing the ethyl esters of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (omega-3-acid ethyl esters; Lovaza®) or high-purity EPA ethyl ester (icosapent ethyl; Vascepa®) are TG-lowering treatments that may be administered in addition to statins. Here we describe the effects of switching from omega-3-acid ethyl esters to icosapent ethyl in a 44-year-old obese man with dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hypothyroidism. The patient was receiving stable treatment with medications, including atorvastatin 40 mg/day and extended-release niacin 1000 mg/day. Owing to persistently elevated TG levels and other cardiovascular risk factors, the patient was initiated on omega-3-acid ethyl esters 4 g/day. After approximately 2 years on omega-3-acid ethyl esters, his total cholesterol (TC) level was 184 mg/dL, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level was 81 mg/dL, TG level was elevated at 307 mg/dL despite statin therapy, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) level was 144 mg/dL. After the switch to icosapent ethyl, TC level decreased by 34% to 121 mg/dL, LDL-C level decreased by 28% to 58 mg/dL, TG level decreased by 41% to 180 mg/dL, and non-HDL-C level decreased by 44% to 81 mg/dL. Switching from omega-3-acid ethyl esters containing both EPA and DHA to icosapent ethyl containing high-purity EPA resulted in beneficial and substantial changes in the lipid profile with a notable reduction of TG levels along with additional reductions in LDL-C levels in a statin-treated obese patient with persistently high TG levels. Treatment with icosapent ethyl was well tolerated.

  8. Study of shellac glycerol esters as microencapsulating materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhasetwar, V D; Puranik, P K; Dorle, A K

    1989-01-01

    Shellac esters were prepared by heating shellac with glycerol and intermediate reaction products were withdrawn. Salicyclic acid granules were encapsulated using a 20 per cent w/v alcoholic solution of shellac and shellac esters. The coated microcapsules were evaluated for moisture absorption, flow properties, and dissolution studies. The drug release from coated granules was seen to depend upon the acid value of the esters. Results indicate that shellac esters could be better encapsulating material than shellac in sustained release formulation.

  9. Effects of Cholesterol-altering Pharmaceuticals on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharmaceuticals that target cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are among the most widely prescribed drugs and have been detected in the aquatic environment. Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome pr...

  10. The chemistry of dimethacrylate-styrene networks, and, Development of flame retardant, halogen-free fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Astrid Christa

    temperature viscosity so that fabrication of composites via Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) is possible. The first binder system investigated was a polycaprolactone layered silicate nanocomposite, which was prepared via intercalative polymerization. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) data indicated a mixed morphology of exfoliated and intercalated structures. The mechanical properties and the normalized peak heat release rates were comparable to the neat vinyl ester resin. Alternative binder systems possessing inherent flame retardance were also investigated. A series of binders comprised of novolac, bisphenol A diphosphate, and montmorillonite clay were developed and dispersed into the vinyl ester matrix. Cone calorimetry showed reductions in the peak heat release rate comparable to the brominated resin. Keywords: dimethacrylate; vinyl ester; network; reactivity ratios; nanocomposites; layered silicates; exfoliated; thermoset matrix resin; flame retardant

  11. An overview of the properties of fatty acid alkyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatty acid alkyl esters of plant oils, especially in the form of methyl esters, have numerous applications with fuel use having received the most attention in recent times due to the potential high volume. Various properties imparted by neat fatty acid alkyl esters have been shown to influence fuel ...

  12. 75 FR 71556 - Polyoxyalkylated Glycerol Fatty Acid Esters; Tolerance Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Polyoxyalkylated Glycerol Fatty Acid Esters; Tolerance Exemption AGENCY... from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of polyoxyalkylated glycerol fatty acid esters; the... ethylene oxide or propylene oxide, also known as polyoxyalkylated glycerol fatty acid esters, when used...

  13. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the...

  14. Saliva-catalyzed hydrolysis of a ketobemidone ester prodrug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L.B.; Christrup, Lona Louring; Bundgaard, H.

    1992-01-01

    Saliva enzyme-catalysed hydrolysis of ester prodrugs or drugs containing sensitive ester groups may be a limiting factor for the buccal absorption of such compounds. Using the isopropyl carbonate ester of ketobemidone as a model substance of a hydrolysis-sensitive prodrug the esterase activity...

  15. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5310 - Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.5310 Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl ester (PMN P-84-968) is subject to reporting under this...