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Sample records for cholestatic liver disease

  1. Nutrition for children with cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E. Leonie; Lukovac, Sabina; Werner, Anniek; Dijkstra, Tietie; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Cooke, RJ; Vandenplas, Y; Wahn, U

    2007-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease (CLD) in children negatively affects nutritional status, growth and development, which all lead to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This is illustrated by the fact that the clinical outcome of children with CLD awaiting a liver transplantation is in part predic

  2. Cholestatic liver disease masquerading as Wilson disease.

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    Sood, Vikrant; Rawat, Dinesh; Khanna, Rajeev; Alam, Seema

    2015-03-01

    Wilson disease and cholestatic liver diseases may present as a diagnostic dilemma if standard guidelines incorporating markers of copper overload are followed. We hereby present a series of four cases of sclerosing cholangitis masquerading as Wilson disease. True Wilson disease cases had significantly lower ceruloplasmin (6 vs. 16 mg/dL) and higher 24-hour urinary copper (322.3 vs. 74.5 μg/day) as compared to mimickers. Initial low serum ceruloplasmin levels normalized in mimickers on follow up, and this may used as a diagnostic indicator. Standard Wilson disease diagnostic criteria thus need further modification especially in developing countries to help avoid mismanagement.

  3. Utility of Noninvasive Markers of Fibrosis in Cholestatic Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpechot, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Methods of liver fibrosis assessment have changed considerably in the last 20 years, and noninvasive markers now have been recognized as major first-line tools in the management of patients with chronic viral hepatitis infection. But what about the efficiency and utility of these surrogate indices for the more uncommon chronic cholestatic liver diseases, namely primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis? This article provides clinicians with a global overview of what is currently known in the field. Both diagnostic and prognostic aspects of noninvasive markers of fibrosis in cholestatic liver diseases are presented and discussed.

  4. Recurrence of cholestatic liver disease after living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumihito Tamura; Masatoshi Hakuuchi; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Junichi Kaneko; Junichi Togashi; Yuichi Matsui; Noriyo Yamashiki; Norihiro Kokudo

    2008-01-01

    End-stage liver disease,due to cholestatic liver diseases with an autoimmune background such as primary biliary cirrhosis(PBC)and primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC),is considered a good indication for liver transplantation.Excellent overall patient and graft outcomes,based mostly on the experience from deceased donor liver ransplantation(DDLT),have been reported.Due to the limited number of oraan donations from deceased donors in most Asian countries,living donor liver transplantation(LDLT)is the mainstream treatment for end-stage liver disease,including that resulting from PBC and PSC.Although the initial experiences with LDLT for PBC and PSC seem satisfactory or comparable to that with DLT,some aspects,including the timing of transplantation,the risk of recurrent disease,and its long-term clinical implications,require further evaluation.Whether or not the long-term outcomes of LDLT from a biologically related donor are equivalent to that of DDLT requires further observations.The clinical course following LDLT may be affected by he genetic background shared between the recipient and the living related donor.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  5. Albumin liver dialysis as pregnancy-saving procedure in cholestatic liver disease and intractable pruritus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maud Lemoine; Aurélie Revaux; Claire Francoz; Guillaume Ducarme; Sabine Brechignac; Emmanuel Jacquemin; Michèle Uzan; Nathalie Ganne-Carrié

    2008-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC3) is a rare cholestatic liver disease. Such liver disease can get worse by female hormone disorder. Albumin dialysis or Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) has been reported to reverse severe cholestasis-linked pruritus. Here, we report the first use of HARS during a spontaneous pregnancy and its successful outcome in a patient with PFIC3 and intractable pruritus. Albumin dialysis could be considered as a pregnancy-saving procedure in pregnant women with severe cholestasis and refractory pruritus.C 2008 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.

  6. Antioxidant enzyme activities in hepatic tissue from children with chronic cholestatic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Nagwa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: To study the oxidative stress status in children with cholestatic chronic liver disease by determining activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT in liver tissue. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 children suffering from cholestatic chronic liver disease were studied. They were selected from the Hepatology Clinic, Cairo University, and compared with seven children who happened to have incidental normal liver biopsy. The patients were divided into three groups: extrahepatic biliary atresia (n=13, neonatal hepatitis (n=15 and paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts (n=6; GPx, SOD and CAT levels were measured in fresh liver tissue using ELISA . Results: In the cholestatic patients, a significant increase was found in mean levels of SOD, GPx and CAT in hepatic tissue compared to control children. The three enzymes significantly increased in the extrahepatic biliary atresia group, whereas in the groups of neonatal hepatitis and paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts, only GPx and CAT enzymes were significantly increased. Conclusion: Oxidative stress could play a role in the pathogenesis of cholestatic chronic liver diseases. These preliminary results are encouraging to conduct more extensive clinical studies using adjuvant antioxidant therapy.

  7. Xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors CAR and PXR as drug targets in cholestatic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizaki, Satoru; Takizawa, Daichi; Tojima, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-11-01

    Cholestasis results in the intrahepatic retention of cytotoxic bile acid and it can thus lead to liver injury and/or liver fibrosis. Cholestatic liver damage is counteracted by a variety of intrinsic hepatoprotective mechanisms including a complex network of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. During the last decade, much progress has been made in dissecting the mechanisms which regulate the hepatic xeno- and endobiotic metabolism by nuclear receptors. The xenobiotic receptors CAR and PXR are two important members of the NR1I nuclear receptor family. They function as sensors of toxic byproducts derived from the endogenous metabolism and of exogenous chemicals, in order to enhance their elimination. Ligands for both receptors, including phenobarbital, have already been used to treat cholestatic liver diseases before the mechanisms of these receptors were revealed. Furthermore, Yin Zhi Huang, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, which has been used to prevent and treat neonatal jaundice, was identified to be a CAR ligand which also accelerates bilirubin clearance. Therefore, CAR and PXR have a protective effect on cholestasis by activating both detoxification enzymes and transporters. As a result, novel compounds targeting CAR and PXR with specific effects and fewer side effects will therefore be useful for the treatment of cholestatic liver diseases. This article will review the current knowledge on xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors CAR and PXR, while also discussing their potential role in the treatment of cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:19925451

  8. Cholesterol metabolism in cholestatic liver disease and liver transplantation: From molecular mechanisms to clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Katriina; Åberg, Fredrik; Gylling, Helena; Isoniemi, Helena

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review is to enlighten the critical roles that the liver plays in cholesterol metabolism. Liver transplantation can serve as gene therapy or a source of gene transmission in certain conditions that affect cholesterol metabolism, such as low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene mutations that are associated with familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hand, cholestatic liver disease often alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholestasis can lead to formation of lipoprotein X (Lp-X), which is frequently mistaken for LDL on routine clinical tests. In contrast to LDL, Lp-X is non-atherogenic, and failure to differentiate between the two can interfere with cardiovascular risk assessment, potentially leading to prescription of futile lipid-lowering therapy. Statins do not effectively lower Lp-X levels, and cholestasis may lead to accumulation of toxic levels of statins. Moreover, severe cholestasis results in poor micellar formation, which reduces cholesterol absorption, potentially impairing the cholesterol-lowering effect of ezetimibe. Apolipoprotein B-100 measurement can help distinguish between atherogenic and non-atherogenic hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, routine serum cholesterol measurements alone cannot reflect cholesterol absorption and synthesis. Measurements of serum non-cholesterol sterol biomarkers - such as cholesterol precursor sterols, plant sterols, and cholestanol - may help with the comprehensive assessment of cholesterol metabolism. An adequate cholesterol supply is essential for liver-regenerative capacity. Low preoperative and perioperative serum cholesterol levels seem to predict mortality in liver cirrhosis and after liver transplantation. Thus, accurate lipid profile evaluation is highly important in liver disease and after liver transplantation. PMID:27574546

  9. Chinese Expert Consensus for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cholestatic Liver Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease (CLD) is a common problem in clinical practice with the main manifestation being cholestasis.Recently,there has been a steady increase in knowledge associated with the diagnosis and treatment of CLD.Therefore,the experts in China were organized by the editorial board of Chinese Journal of Experimental and Clinical Infectious Diseases (Electronic Edition),Chinese Journal of Liver Diseases (Electronic Edition) and Infection International (Electronic Edition) to collect and analyze relevant research,ultimately resulting in the development of this work (Chinese Expert consensus for the diagnosis and treatment of CLDs,also abbreviated as consensus).

  10. Serum Autotaxin is a Marker of the Severity of Liver Injury and Overall Survival in Patients with Cholestatic Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Ewa; Krawczyk, Marcin; Milkiewicz, Malgorzata; Trottier, Jocelyn; Barbier, Olivier; Neurath, Markus F.; Lammert, Frank; Kremer, Andreas E.; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is involved in the synthesis of lysophosphatidic acid. Both have recently been linked to cholestatic pruritus and liver injury. We aimed to investigate whether ATX is an indicator of cholestatic liver injury, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and prognosis based on a group of 233 patients, 118 with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and 115 with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Patients were followed for 1–60 months, cumulative survival rates were calculated. ATX activity was significantly higher in both groups than in the 103 controls, particularly in patients with cirrhosis and in patients with longer disease duration. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) non-responders with PBC exhibited increased ATX activity. ATX activity was correlated with liver biochemistry, MELD, Mayo Risk scores and was associated with worse disease-specific HRQoL aspects. In both groups, Cox model analysis indicated that ATX was a negative predictor of survival. Increased ATX levels were associated with a 4-fold higher risk of death/liver transplantation in patients with PBC and a 2.6-fold higher risk in patients with PSC. We conclude that in patients with cholestatic conditions, ATX is not only associated with pruritus but also indicates impairment of other HRQoL aspects, liver dysfunction, and can serve as a predictor of survival. PMID:27506882

  11. Medical treatment of cholestatic liver diseases: From pathobiology to pharmacological targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gustav Paumgartner

    2006-01-01

    Bile secretion is dependent on the coordinated functions of a number of hepatobiliary transport systems.Cholestasis may be caused by an impairment of bile secretion, an obstruction of bile flow or a combination of the two. The common consequence of all forms of cholestasis is retention of bile acids and other potentially toxic compounds in the hepatocytes leading to apoptosis or necrosis of hepatocytes and eventually to chronic cholestatic liver disease. In certain cholestatic disorders there is also leakage of bile acids into the peribiliary space causing portal inflammation and fibrosis. The following pharmacological targets for treatment of intrahepatic cholestasis can be identified: stimulation of orthograde biliary secretion and retrograde secretion of bile acids and other toxic cholephils into the systemic circulation for excretion via the kidneys to reduce their retention in the hepatocytes; stimulation of the metabolism of hydrophobic bile acids and other toxic compounds to more hydrophilic, less toxic metabolites;protection of injured cholangiocytes against toxic effects of bile; inhibition of apoptosis caused by elevated levels of cytotoxic bile acids; inhibition of fibrosis caused by leakage of bile acids into the peribiliary space. The clinical results of ursodeoxcholic acid therapy of primary biliary cirrhosis may be regarded as the first success of this strategy.

  12. Diffusion-weighted MRI versus transient elastography in quantification of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic cholestatic liver diseases

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    Kovač, Jelena Djokić, E-mail: jelenadjokic2003@yahoo.co.uk [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center of Serbia, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Daković, Marko [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Stanisavljević, Dejana [Institute for Statistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 8, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Alempijević, Tamara; Ješić, Rada [Clinic for Gastroenterohepatology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Seferović, Petar [Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Maksimović, Ružica [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) and transient elastography (TE) in quantification of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic cholestatic liver diseases. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients underwent DWMRI, TE, and liver biopsy for staging of liver fibrosis. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated for six locations in the liver for combination of five diffusion sensitivity values b = 0, 50, 200, 400 and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the diagnostic performance of DWMRI and TE. Segmental ADC variations were evaluated by means of coefficient of variation. Results: The mean ADCs (×10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s; b = 0–800 s/mm{sup 2}) were significantly different at stage F1 versus F ≥ 2 (p < 0.05) and F2 versus F4. However, no significant difference was found between F2 and F3. For prediction of F ≥ 2 and F ≥ 3 areas under the ROC curves were 0.868 and 0.906 for DWMRI, and 0.966 and 0.960 for TE, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 90.9% and 89.3% for F ≥ 2 (ADC ≤ 1.65), and 92.3% and 92.1% for F ≥ 3 (ADC ≤ 1.63). Segmental ADC variation was lowest for F4 (CV = 9.54 ± 6.3%). Conclusion: DWMRI and TE could be used for assessment of liver fibrosis with TE having higher diagnostic accuracy and DWMRI providing insight into liver fibrosis distribution.

  13. Pamidronate for the treatment of osteoporosis secondary to chronic cholestatic liver disease in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoporosis is a major complication of chronic cholestatic liver disease (CCLD). We evaluated the efficacy of using disodium pamidronate (1.0 mg/kg body weight) for the prevention (Pr) or treatment (Tr) of cholestasis-induced osteoporosis in male Wistar rats: sham-operated (Sham = 12); bile duct-ligated (Bi = 15); bile duct-ligated animals previously treated with pamidronate before and 1 month after surgery (Pr = 9); bile duct-ligated animals treated with pamidronate 1 month after surgery (Tr = 9). Rats were sacrificed 8 weeks after surgery. Immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I and GH receptor was determined in the proximal growth plate cartilage of the left tibia. Histomorphometric analysis was performed in the right tibia and the right femur was used for biomechanical analysis. Bone material volume over tissue volume (BV/TV) was significantly affected by CCLD (Sham = 18.1 ± 3.2 vs Bi = 10.6 ± 2.2%) and pamidronate successfully increased bone volume. However, pamidronate administered in a preventive regimen presented no additional benefit on bone volume compared to secondary treatment (BV/TV: Pr = 39.4 ± 12.0; Tr = 41.2 ± 12.7%). Moreover, the force on the momentum of fracture was significantly reduced in Pr rats (Sham = 116.6 ± 23.0; Bi = 94.6 ± 33.8; Pr = 82.9 ± 22.8; Tr = 92.5 ± 29.5 N; P < 0.05, Sham vs Pr). Thus, CCLD had a significant impact on bone histomorphometric parameters and pamidronate was highly effective in increasing bone mass in CCLD; however, preventive therapy with pamidronate has no advantage regarding bone fragility

  14. Pamidronate for the treatment of osteoporosis secondary to chronic cholestatic liver disease in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, F.A. [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Mattar, R. [1Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Facincani, I. [Departamento de Pediatria e Neonatologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Defino, H.L.A. [Departamento de Biomecânica, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ramalho, L.N.Z. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Jorgetti, V. [Departamento de Nefrologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Volpon, J.B. [Departamento de Biomecânica, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Paula, F.J.A. de [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-14

    Osteoporosis is a major complication of chronic cholestatic liver disease (CCLD). We evaluated the efficacy of using disodium pamidronate (1.0 mg/kg body weight) for the prevention (Pr) or treatment (Tr) of cholestasis-induced osteoporosis in male Wistar rats: sham-operated (Sham = 12); bile duct-ligated (Bi = 15); bile duct-ligated animals previously treated with pamidronate before and 1 month after surgery (Pr = 9); bile duct-ligated animals treated with pamidronate 1 month after surgery (Tr = 9). Rats were sacrificed 8 weeks after surgery. Immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I and GH receptor was determined in the proximal growth plate cartilage of the left tibia. Histomorphometric analysis was performed in the right tibia and the right femur was used for biomechanical analysis. Bone material volume over tissue volume (BV/TV) was significantly affected by CCLD (Sham = 18.1 ± 3.2 vs Bi = 10.6 ± 2.2%) and pamidronate successfully increased bone volume. However, pamidronate administered in a preventive regimen presented no additional benefit on bone volume compared to secondary treatment (BV/TV: Pr = 39.4 ± 12.0; Tr = 41.2 ± 12.7%). Moreover, the force on the momentum of fracture was significantly reduced in Pr rats (Sham = 116.6 ± 23.0; Bi = 94.6 ± 33.8; Pr = 82.9 ± 22.8; Tr = 92.5 ± 29.5 N; P < 0.05, Sham vs Pr). Thus, CCLD had a significant impact on bone histomorphometric parameters and pamidronate was highly effective in increasing bone mass in CCLD; however, preventive therapy with pamidronate has no advantage regarding bone fragility.

  15. A case of cholestatic autoimmune hepatitis and acute liver failure: an unusual hepatic manifestation of mixed connective tissue disease and Sjögren's syndrome.

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    Min, J. K.; Han, N. I.; Kim, J. A; Lee, Y. S.; Cho, C.S.; Kim, H. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Although hepatomegaly is reported to occur occasionally in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) or Sjögren's syndrome (SS), autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis in association with MCTD or SS have rarely been described. We report a case of severe cholestatic autoimmune hepatitis presenting with acute liver failure in a 40-yr-old female patient suffering from MCTD and SS. The diagnosis of MCTD and SS was m...

  16. The nutritional therapy of cholestatic liver disease in infants%婴儿胆汁淤积性肝病的营养治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志华; 李雪松

    2013-01-01

    There are various causes of cholestatic liver disease in infants that include extrahepatic biliary tract diseases, liver diseases, anatomical abnormality, metabolic or endocrine diseases, poisoning, infection, and so on. The causes leads to re-duction or interruption in bile lfow and thus results in nutrients malabsorption and comprehensive metabolic disorder. The aims of nutritional therapy for cholestatic liver disease are to reduce the risk of cholestasis related complications, to promote recov-ery of liver diseases, to restore bile flow, to promote growth and improve the comprehensive metabolic disorders, to improve quality of life and to prepare children for liver transplantation.%婴儿胆汁淤积性肝病的病因甚多,包括肝外胆道疾病、肝内疾病、解剖异常、代谢或内分泌疾病、中毒、感染等。由于胆流减少或中断,引起肠道营养物质吸收障碍及综合代谢紊乱。胆汁淤积性肝病的营养治疗,主要是减少胆汁淤积相关并发症;促进肝脏病变恢复,恢复胆流;促进生长发育和改善综合代谢紊乱;提高生存质量,为患儿后期肝移植奠定基础。

  17. Celecoxib-induced cholestatic liver failure requiring orthotopic liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ihab I El Hajj; Shahid M Malik; Hany R Alwakeel; Obaid S Shaikh; Eizaburo Sasatomi; Hossam M Kandil

    2009-01-01

    Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are widely used due to their efficacy and good safety profile.However, recent case reports have described varying degrees of liver injuries associated with the use of COX-2 inhibitors. We report the case of a patient who developed acute cholestatic hepatitis progressing to hepatic failure requiring liver transplantation, following a 3-d course of celecoxib for treatment of generalized muscle aches and pains. The clinical presentation, the laboratory data, as well as the liver histopathology were supportive of the putative diagnosis of drug induced liver injury.

  18. Febrile cholestatic disease as an initial presentation of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna; Mrzljak; Slavko; Gasparov; Ika; Kardum-Skelin; Vesna; Colic-Cvrlje; Slobodanka; Ostojic; Kolonic

    2010-01-01

    Febrile cholestatic liver disease is an extremely unusual presentation of Hodgkin lymphoma(HL).The liver biopsy of a 40-year-old man with febrile episodes and cholestatic laboratory pattern disclosed an uncommon subtype of HL,a nodular lymphocyte-predominant HL(NLPHL).Liver involvement in the early stage of the usually indolent NLPHL's clinical course suggests an aggressiveness and unfavorable outcome.Emphasizing a liver biopsy early in the diagnostic algorithm enables accurate diagnosis and appropriate tre...

  19. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M Verhaag

    Full Text Available Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis.To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions.HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1-50 μM of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h, menadione (50 μM, 6 h or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h. Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11 and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed.Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  20. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to cholestatic liver disease Abordaje diagnóstico y terapéutico del síndrome colestásico

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    T. Pérez Fernández

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available When cholestatic liver disease is present, liver ultrasound should be performed to ascertain if cholestasis is extrahepatic or intrahepatiic. If bile ducts appear dilated and the probability of interventional treatment is high, endoscopic retrograde cholagio-pancreatography (ERCP or trans-hepatic cholangiography (THC should be the next step. If the probability of interventional therapeutics is low, cholangio-MRI should be performed. Once bile duct dilation and space occupying lesions are excluded, a work up for intrahepatic cholestasis should be started. Some especific clinical situations may be helpful in the diagnostic strategy. If cholestasis occurs in the elderly, drug-induced cholestatic disease should be suspected, whereas if it occurs in young people with risk factors, cholestatic viral hepatitis is the most likely diagnosis. During the first trimester of pregnancy cholestasis may occur in hiperemesis gravidorum, and in the third trimester of gestation cholestasis of pregnancy should be suspected. A familial history of recurrent cholestasis points to benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis. The occurrence of intrahepatic cholestasis in a mid-dle-aged woman is a frequent presentation of primary biliary cirrhosis, whereas primary sclerosing cholangitis should be suspected in young males with inflammatory bowel disease. The presence of vascular spider nevi, ascites, and a history of alcohol abuse should point to alcoholic hepatitis. Neonatal cholestasis syndromes include CMV, toxoplasma and rubinfections or metabolic defects such as cystic fibrosis, α1-antitripsin deficiency, bile acid synthesis defects, or biliary atresia. The treatment of cholestasis should include a management of complications such as pruritus, osteopenia and correction of fat soluble vitamin deficiencies. When hepatocellular failure or portal hypertension-related complications occur, liver transplantation should be considered.Ante la presencia de colestasis, se debe

  1. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Manon Buist-Homan; Martijn Koehorst; Groen, Albert K; Han Moshage; Klaas Nico Faber

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes agai...

  2. Effect of hepatic iron concentration reduction on hepatic fibrosis and damage in rats with cholestatic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gil Peretz; Gabriela Link; Orit Pappo; Rafael Bruck; Zvi Ackerman

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of iron reduction after phlebotomy in rats with "normal" hepatic iron concentration (HIC) on the progression of hepatic fibrosis, as a result of bile duct ligation (BDL).METHODS: Rats underwent phlebotomy before or after sham operation or BDL. Animals undergone only BDL or sham operation served as controls. Two weeks after surgery, indices of hepatic damage and fibrosis were evaluated.RESULTS: Phlebotomy lowered HIC. Phlebotomy after BDL was associated with body weight increase, lower hepatic weight, less portal hypertension, less periportal necrosis, less portal inflammation, lower hepatic activity index score and higher albumin levels. On the other hand, phlebotomy before BDL was associated with body weight decrease and hepatic activity index score increase. Phlebotomy after sham operation was not associated with any hepatic or systemic adverse effects.CONCLUSION: Reduction of HIC after induction of liver damage may have beneficial effects in BDL rats.However, iron deficiency could induce impairment of liver function and may make the liver more susceptible to insults like BDL.

  3. Inhibition of PAR-4 and P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet activation produces distinct hepatic pathologies in experimental xenobiotic-induced cholestatic liver disease.

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    Joshi, Nikita; Kopec, Anna K; Ray, Jessica L; Luyendyk, James P

    2016-07-15

    Emerging evidence supports a protective effect of platelets in experimental cholestatic liver injury and cholangiofibrosis. Coagulation-mediated platelet activation has been shown to inhibit experimental chronic cholestatic liver necrosis and biliary fibrosis. This occurs through thrombin-mediated activation of protease activated receptor-4 (PAR-4) in mice. However, it is not known whether other pathways of platelet activation, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-mediated receptor P2Y12 activation is also protective. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of P2Y12-mediated platelet activation exacerbates hepatic injury and cholangiofibrosis, and examined the impact of P2Y12 inhibition in both the presence and absence of PAR-4. Treatment of wild-type mice with the P2Y12 receptor antagonist clopidogrel increased biliary hyperplasia and cholangiofibrosis in wild-type mice exposed to the xenobiotic alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) for 4 weeks compared to vehicle-treated mice exposed to ANIT. Interestingly, this effect of clopidogrel occurred without a corresponding increase in hepatocellular necrosis. Whereas biliary hyperplasia and cholangiofibrosis were increased in PAR-4(-/-) mice, clopidogrel treatment failed to further increase these pathologies in PAR-4(-/-) mice. The results indicate that inhibition of receptor P2Y12-mediated platelet activation exacerbates bile duct fibrosis in ANIT-exposed mice, independent of hepatocellular necrosis. Moreover, the lack of an added effect of clopidogrel administration on the exaggerated pathology in ANIT-exposed PAR-4(-/-) mice reinforces the prevailing importance of coagulation-mediated platelet activation in limiting this unique liver pathology. PMID:27475285

  4. Tetrathiomolybdate protects against bile duct ligation-induced cholestatic liver injury and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ming; Song, Zhenyuan; Barve, Shirish; Zhang, Jingwen; Chen, Theresa; Liu, Marcia; Arteel, Gavin E; Brewer, George J; McClain, Craig J

    2008-05-01

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM), a potent copper-chelating drug, was initially developed for the treatment of Wilson's disease. Our working hypothesis is that the fibrotic pathway is copper-dependent. Because biliary excretion is the major pathway for copper elimination, a bile duct ligation (BDL) mouse model was used to test the potential protective effects of TM. TM was given in a daily dose of 0.9 mg/mouse by means of intragastric gavage 5 days before BDL. All the animals were killed 5 days after surgery. Plasma liver enzymes and total bilirubin were markedly decreased in TM-treated BDL mice. TM also inhibited the increase in plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 seen in BDL mice. Cholestatic liver injury was markedly attenuated by TM treatment as shown by histology. Hepatic collagen deposition was significantly decreased, and it was paralleled by a significant suppression of hepatic smooth muscle alpha-actin and fibrogenic gene expression in TM-treated BDL mice. Although the endogenous antioxidant ability was enhanced, oxidative stress as shown by malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkenals, hepatic glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio, was not attenuated by TM treatment, suggesting the protective mechanism of TM may be independent of oxidative stress. In summary, TM attenuated BDL-induced cholestatic liver injury and fibrosis in mice, in part by inhibiting TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 secretion. The protective mechanism seems to be independent of oxidative stress. Our data provide further evidence that TM might be a potential therapy for hepatic fibrosis.

  5. Up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Tao-Sheng; Soyama, Akihiko; Tanaka, Takayuki; Yan, Chen; Sakai, Yusuke; Hidaka, Masaaki; Kinoshita, Ayaka; Natsuda, Koji; Fujii, Mio; Kugiyama, Tota; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Gu, Weili; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Although the healthy liver is known to have high regenerative potential, poor liver regeneration under pathological conditions remains a substantial problem. We investigated the key molecules that impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver. C57BL/6 mice were randomly subjected to partial hepatectomy and bile duct ligation (PH+BDL group, n = 16), partial hepatectomy only (PH group, n = 16), or sham operation (Sham group, n = 16). The liver sizes and histological findings were similar in the PH and sham groups 14 days after operation. However, compared with those in the sham group, the livers in mice in the PH+BDL group had a smaller size, a lower cell proliferative activity, and more fibrotic tissue 14 days after the operation, suggesting the insufficient regeneration of the cholestatic liver. Pathway-focused array analysis showed that many genes were up- or down-regulated over 1.5-fold in both PH+BDL and PH groups at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment. Interestingly, more genes that were functionally related to the extracellular matrix and inflammatory chemokines were found in the PH+BDL group than in the PH group at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Our data suggest that up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver.

  6. Liver disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel M Lee; Carla W Brady

    2009-01-01

    Liver diseases in pregnancy may be categorized into liver disorders that occur only in the setting of pregnancy and liver diseases that occur coincidentally with pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum, preeclampsia/eclampsia, syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver tests and low platelets (HELLP), acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are pregnancy-specific disorders that may cause elevations in liver tests and hepatic dysfunction. Chronic liver diseases, including cholestatic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson disease, and viral hepatitis may also be seen in pregnancy. Management of liver disease in pregnancy requires collaboration between obstetricians and gastroenterologists/hepatologists. Treatment of pregnancy-specific liver disorders usually involves delivery of the fetus and supportive care, whereas management of chronic liver disease in pregnancy is directed toward optimizing control of the liver disorder. Cirrhosis in the setting of pregnancy is less commonly observed but offers unique challenges for patients and practitioners. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of liver diseases seen in pregnancy.

  7. Up-regulated extracellular matrix components and inflammatory chemokines may impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver

    OpenAIRE

    Shuai Zhang; Tao-Sheng Li; Akihiko Soyama; Takayuki Tanaka; Chen Yan; Yusuke Sakai; Masaaki Hidaka; Ayaka Kinoshita; Koji Natsuda; Mio Fujii; Tota Kugiyama; Zhassulan Baimakhanov; Tamotsu Kuroki; Weili Gu; Susumu Eguchi

    2016-01-01

    Although the healthy liver is known to have high regenerative potential, poor liver regeneration under pathological conditions remains a substantial problem. We investigated the key molecules that impair the regeneration of cholestatic liver. C57BL/6 mice were randomly subjected to partial hepatectomy and bile duct ligation (PH+BDL group, n = 16), partial hepatectomy only (PH group, n = 16), or sham operation (Sham group, n = 16). The liver sizes and histological findings were similar in the ...

  8. 小儿胆汁淤积性肝病的病因学特征%Citrin deficiency is an important etiology for cholestatic liver disease in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋元宗; 牛飼美晴; 小林圭子; 佐伯武赖

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the major etiological features of cholestatie liver disease (CLD) in children, and to investigate the molecular epidemiological distribution of SLC25A13 mutations in CLD. Method A clinical cross-sectional invesitgation was performed on 63 CLD cases diagnosed from Oct. 2003 to Mar. 2009 in our department, including 36 males and 27 females. Their clinical data were collected, and etiology and prognosis were analyzed and summarized. Thirteen to 17 mutations in SLC25A13 gene were screened by means of procedures established previously by our group. Several SLC25A13 mutations were detected by direct sequencing of DNA fragments amplified by genomic DNA-PCR. Result No specific etiologies were identified in 24 of the 63 cases. Among the 39 cases with identified etiologies, inherited metabolic diseases were on top of the list, including 6 kinds and 27 cases in total, i.e. , neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD, 21 cases), transient galactosemia, tyrosinemia type Ⅰ, galactose kinase deficiency, omithine carbamoyl transferase deficiency and glycogen storage disease type Ⅰ, followed by acquired causes (7 cases in total ), such as total parenteral nutrition associated eholestasis (TPNAC), congenital syphilis and CMV hepatitis; and then biliary tract malformation (5 casesin total), including biliary atresia, Caroli's disease and gallbladder polyp, were the third. Ten of the 55 patients on follow-up have passed away, while the remaining 45 cases were improved or recovered clinically. SLC25A13 gene analysis were performed in 44 CLD subjects and 21 of them from 20 families (with 40 SLC25AI3 alleles in total) were found to have mutations, and the seven mutations detected were 851-854del (23/40), IVS6 +5G > A (6/40), IVS16ins3kb (3/40), 1638-1660dup (2/30), A541D (1/30), R319X (1/30) and G333D (1/30), respectively, and there were other 3 mutations (3/40) still needing identification in the remaining 3 alleles. Conclusion The

  9. The Role of Bile Salt Export Pump Gene Repression in Drug-Induced Cholestatic Liver Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Garzel, Brandy; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E.; Wang, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) is predominantly responsible for the efflux of bile salts, and disruption of BSEP function is often associated with altered hepatic homeostasis of bile acids and cholestatic liver injury. Accumulating evidence suggests that many drugs can cause cholestasis through interaction with hepatic transporters. To date, a relatively strong association between drug-induced cholestasis and attenuated BSEP activity has been proposed. However, whether repression of...

  10. Unusual causes of intrahepatic cholestatic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elias E Mazokopakis; John A Papadakis; Diamantis P Kofteridis

    2007-01-01

    We report five cases with unusual causes of intrahepatic cholestasis,including consumption of Teucrium polium (family Lamiaceae) in the form of tea,Stauffer's syndrome,treatment with tamoxifen citrate for breast cancer,infection with Coxiella Burnetii (acute Q fever),and infection with Brucella melitensis (acute brucellosis).

  11. Aquaporins: Their role in cholestatic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on currant knowledge on hepato-cyte aquaporins (AQPs) and their significance in bile formation and cholestasis. Canalicular bile secretion results from a combined interaction of several solute transporters and AQP water channels that facilitate wa-ter flow in response to the osmotic gradients created. During choleresis, hepatocytes rapidly increase their canalicular membrane water permeability by modulat-ing the abundance of AQP8. The question was raised as to whether the opposite process, i.e. a decreased canalicular AQP8 expression would contribute to the development of cholestasis. Studies in several experi-mental models of cholestasis, such as extrahepatic obstructive cholestasis, estrogen-induced cholestasis, and sepsis-induced cholestasis demonstrated that the protein expression of hepatocyte AQP8 was impaired. In addition, biophysical studies in canalicular plasma membranes revealed decreased water permeability as-sociated with AQP8 protein downregulation. The com-bined alteration in hepatocyte solute transporters and AQP8 would hamper the efficient coupling of osmotic gradients and canalicular water flow. Thus cholestasis may result from a mutual occurrence of impaired sol-ute transport and decreased water permeability.

  12. Unusual causes of intrahepatic cholestatic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mazokopakis, Elias E.; Papadakis, John A; Kofteridis, Diamantis P.

    2007-01-01

    We report five cases with unusual causes of intrahepatic cholestasis, including consumption of Teucrium polium (family Lamiaceae) in the form of tea, Stauffer’s syndrome, treatment with tamoxifen citrate for breast cancer, infection with Coxiella Burnetii (acute Q fever), and infection with Brucella melitensis (acute brucellosis).

  13. Endotoxin detoxification by alkaline phosphatase in cholestatic livers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelstra, K; Bakker, WW; Hardonk, MJ; Meijer, DKF; Wisse, E; Knook, DL; Balabaud, C

    1997-01-01

    Increased expression of alkaline phosphatase (AP) in the liver is a hallmark of cholestasis but the pathophysiological role of this is not clear. We argue that deprotonation of carboxyl groups at the active site of the enzyme may be a prerequisite for optimal AP activity. Such a creation of negative

  14. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, ... the skin, can be one sign of liver disease. Cancer can affect the liver. You could also ...

  15. Risk Factors for Development of Cholestatic Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Inhibition of Hepatic Basolateral Bile Acid Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins 3 and 4

    OpenAIRE

    Köck, Kathleen; Ferslew, Brian C.; Netterberg, Ida; Yang, Kyunghee; Urban, Thomas J.; Swaan, Peter W.; Stewart, Paul W.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired hepatic bile acid export may contribute to development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 3 and 4 are postulated to be compensatory hepatic basolateral bile acid efflux transporters when biliary excretion by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is impaired. BSEP inhibition is a risk factor for cholestatic DILI. This study aimed to characterize the relationship between MRP3, MRP4, and BSEP inhibition and cholestatic potentia...

  16. Fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis C in post-transplant adult recipients of liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomohide; Onishi, Yasuharu; Kamei, Hideya; Kurata, Nobuhiko; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Ogura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C recurrence continues to present a major challenge in liver transplantation (LT). Approximately 10% of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive recipients will develop fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis (FCH) after LT. FCH is clinically characterized as marked jaundice with cholestatic hepatic dysfunction and high titers of viremia. Pathologically, FCH manifests as marked hepatocyte swelling, cholestasis, periportal peritrabecular fibrosis and only mild inflammation. This progressive form usually involves acute liver failure, and rapidly results in graft loss. A real-time and precise diagnosis based on histopathological examination and viral measurement is indispensable for the adequate treatment of FCH. Typical pathological findings of FCH are shown. Currently, carefully selected combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) offer the potential for highly effective and safe regimens for hepatitis C, both in the pre- and post-transplant settings. Here, we review FCH caused by HCV in LT recipients, and current strategies for sustained virological responses after LT. Only a few cases of successfully treated FCH C after LT by DAAs have been reported. The diagnostic findings and therapeutic dilemma are discussed based on a literature review.

  17. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Browse Related Terms Progression of Liver Disease , Family History of Liver Disease , Liver Wellness , Liver Failure , Liver Biopsy Home > Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > The Progression ...

  18. 婴儿肠道菌群与分娩方式、喂养方式及胆汁淤积性肝病的关系%Relationship between Intestinal Flora of Infants, Delivery and Feeding Modes and Cholestatic Liver Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江玲; 单庆文; 王琳琳; 唐清; 陈秀奇; 杨少丽; 张智

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the influence of delivery and feeding modes on intestinal flora of healthy infants and investigate the role and significance of the molecular microbial ecology related to intestinal canal in the cholestatic liver disease. Methods Thirty - seven cases of healthy infants (including 21 cases of vaginal delivery, 16 cases of caesarean birth; 15 cases of breast - feeding ,22 cases of bottle -feeding) and 84 cases of cholestatic liver disease were selected, and their stool were collected, the bacterial DNA in the stool between the both groups and A260 value was measured, and the numbers of the 3 kinds of representative bacteria of bifidobacterium, lactobacillus and escherichia coli were determined by applying real - time fluorescent PCR. Results In comparison of the delivery infants to caesarean infants and breast - feeding infants to bottle - feeding infants, the bacterial DNA A^,, value in stool specimen and the numbers of the 3 kinds of representative bacteria had no statistically significant difference (Pt >0.05). The bacterial DNA Ajg, value in the stool specimen in the healthy control group and cholestatic liver disease group were (1.94 ± 0. 47) g ? L"' and (0.40±0.09) g ? L"', respectively, there was statistically significant difference between both groups(t = 8.91 ,P=0. 00) ;log value of the numbers of 3 kinds of representative bacteria in healthy control group and cholestatic liver disease group were:bifidobacterium 9.49 ±0.59 is 7.68 ±0.57;lactobacillus 8.58 ±0.32 us 8. 16 ±0. 70;escherichia coli 6.87 ±0.67 vs 7.26 ±0. 86,respectively. In comparison of the 3 kinds of representative bacteria in both groups had statistically significant difference(? = 15.96,3.46, -2.41 ;P =0.00,0.00,0.02). Conclusions Different modes of delivery and feeding had no influence on intestinal flora of healthy infants; the intestinal flora of infants with cholestatic liver disease is different from that of healthy infants, total bacteria in the stool of the

  19. Successful treatment with sofosbuvir of fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis C after liver transplantation in an HIV-HCV-coinfected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borentain, Patrick; Colson, Philippe; Dhiver, Catherine; Gregoire, Emilie; Hardwigsen, Jean; Botta-Fridlund, Danielle; Garcia, Stéphane; Gerolami, René

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis is a severe form of post-liver transplantation HCV recurrence. Fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis is characterized by its early onset and severe prognosis in HIV-infected patients. We report the case of an HIV-HCV genotype-4 coinfected patient successfully treated with a combination of sofosbuvir and ribavirin. After 4 weeks of treatment we observed a resolution of HCV recurrence related symptoms associated with a normalization of liver biochemistry and dramatic decrease of HCV viral load. This case illustrates the efficiency and tolerance of a sofosbuvir-based anti-HCV interferon-free regimen in post-liver HCV recurrence. Because of the absence of drug interactions between sofosbuvir and antiretroviral treatment or calcineurin inhibitors, its administration in HIV-HCV-coinfected liver transplanted patients is very promising.

  20. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie, E-mail: JLiu@kumc.edu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Lu, Yuan-Fu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Fan, Fang [Cytopathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D. [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport.

  1. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie; Fan, Fang; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential.

  2. Low Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lyberopoulou, Aggeliki; Chachami, Georgia; Gatselis, Nikolaos K.; Kyratzopoulou, Eleni; Saitis, Asterios; Gabeta, Stella; Eliades, Petros; Paraskeva, Efrosini; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoulis, George K.; Mamalaki, Avgi; Dalekos, George N; Simos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin, a liver hormone, is important for both innate immunity and iron metabolism regulation. As dysfunction of the hepcidin pathway may contribute to liver pathology, we analysed liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Hepcidin mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies obtained from 126 patients with HCV (n = 21), HBV (n = 23), autoimmune cholestatic disease (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis; PBC/PSC; n = 34), autoimm...

  3. Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Borglykke, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among patients with liver diseases. Both cholestatic and non-cholestatic liver diseases can cause vitamin D deficiency. Whether vitamin D status can also affect liver function is poorly understood. To investigate the association between vitamin D status, liver enzymes......, and incident liver disease, we included a total of 2,649 individuals from the Monica10 study conducted in 1993-1994. Vitamin D status as assessed by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin, serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) were measured at baseline....... Information on fatal and non-fatal liver disease was obtained from the Danish National Patient Register and The Danish Registry of Causes of Death, respectively. Median follow-up time was 16.5 years, and there were 62 incident cases of fatal and non-fatal liver disease. Multivariable Cox regression analyses...

  4. S ciprofloksacinom povzročena holestatska okvara jeter: a case report: Ciprofloxacin-induced cholestatic liver injury: prikaz primera:

    OpenAIRE

    Ferlan-Marolt, Vera; Hafner, Matjaž; Kikec, Zdenko; Vujasinović, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Background: Drug-induced liver injury has been described for a large number ofdrugs. It is a common cause of drug withdrawal from the market. Ciprofloxacin is a commonly prescribed fluoroquinolone antibiotic and is a rare cause of hepatotoxicity. To our best knowledge this is the first case of ciprofloxacin-induced cholestatic liver injury in Slovenia. Case report: A 19year old man has been treated with ciprofloxacin at a daily dose of 500 mg twice a day due to a mild respiratory infection. A...

  5. Cephalexin Induced Cholestatic Jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Abhinav Agrawal; Mana Rao; Sarfaraz Jasdanwala; Ajay Mathur; Margaret Eng

    2014-01-01

    Cephalexin is a very commonly prescribed orally administered antibiotic which has many potential side effects. Amongst these cholestatic jaundice has been infrequently reported as an adverse reaction. We present a case of a 57-year-old male who exhibited features of cholestatic jaundice including elevated liver function tests (LFTs) after taking cephalexin and showed improvement on removal of the offending agent. During this time he was symptomatically treated with cholestyramine. Complete re...

  6. Ondansetron to Treat Pruritus Due to Cholestatic Jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Sarah; Tobias, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    Intractable itching is a symptom of cholestatic liver disease of various causes that is bothersome and difficult to manage. Although treatment of the primary cause of cholestasis is paramount in resolving the issue, given the debilitating consequences of pruritus, symptomatic treatment is frequently necessary. Although many medications including cholestyramine, rifampin, opioid antagonists (i.e., naloxone, naltrexone), phenobarbital, and antihistamines have been used to treat cholestatic-indu...

  7. An acqueous extract of Bidens pilosa L. protects liver from cholestatic disease: experimental study in young rats Um extrato aquoso de Bidens pilosa L. protege o fígado da doença colestática: estudo experimental em ratos jovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Izabel Suzigan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To test the hepatoprotective effect of water extract from Bidens Pilosa L. (BPE in cholestatic liver disease induced by ligature and resection of the common bile ducts (LRBD in young rats. METHODS: We studied four groups of ten 21 days old (P21 Wistar rats, Group SW: sham operation and water; Group SD: sham operation and BPE (160 mg of fresh leaves/100 g of body weight/day; Group LW: LRBD and water and Group LD: LRBD and BPE daily. Pentobarbital sleeping time (PST and serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and of alanine aminotransferase (ALT were determined after the sacrifice (P70. A Ruwart's score for hepatic fibrosis (RS was given to each animal. Were employed two way ANOVA and the test of Tukey or a non-parametric test for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences between LW and LD in the measurements of the PST ((means LW=390; LD=173, AST (means LW=8, LD=5, ALT (medians LW=2; LD=1 e RS (medians LW=2; LD=1. CONCLUSION: BPE could be used in the phytotherapy of the hepatic damage induced by chronic obstructive cholestasis, because protects liver function, decreases the rate of necrosis and liver fibrosis in cholestatic liver disease.OBJETIVO: Testar o efeito hepatoprotetor do extrato aquoso de Bidens pilosa L. (EBP na doença hepática induzida pela ligadura e ressecção do ducto biliar comum (LRDBC em ratos jovens. MÉTODOS: Estudamos ratos Wistar com 21º. dia de vida (P21 divididos em quatro grupos de 10 animais, Grupo SA: operação simulada e água; Grupo SD: operação simulada e EBP (160mg de folhas frescas/100g de peso corporal/dia; Grupo LA: LRDBC e água e Grupo LD: LRDBC e EBP diariamente. O tempo de sono por pentobarbital (TSP, aspartato (AST e alanina (ALT aminotransferase foram determinadas após o sacrifício (P70. O Score de Ruwart (SR para fibrose hepática foi atribuído para cada animal. Foi realizada análise de variância com dois fatores e pelo teste de Tukey

  8. Fibrosing Cholestatic Hepatitis in a Complicated Case of an Adult Recipient After Liver Transplantation: Diagnostic Findings and Therapeutic Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomohide; Onishi, Yasuharu; Kamei, Hideya; Kurata, Nobuhiko; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Ogura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis Symptoms: Prolonged jaundice and intractable ascites Medication: Steroid pulse therapy and direct-acting antivirals Clinical Procedure: Liver transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Hepatitis C recurrence is a serious matter after liver transplantation (LT). Approximately 10% of hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive recipients develop fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis (FCH). FCH rapidly results in graft loss. Currently, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are effective and safe for hepatitis C, even after LT. However, only a few cases of successfully treated FCH after LT have been reported. We present FCH in a complicated case with sepsis and portal flow obstruction after LT. Case Report: A 66-year-old man underwent cadaveric LT. Liver function disorders were observed from post-operative day (POD) 22. Sepsis repeated on POD 38, 74, and 101. Steroid pulse therapy was given from POD 40 to 54. The infectious focus was surgically removed on POD 89. Interventional radiology for portal venous obstruction was completed on POD 96. To make a real-time diagnosis and to investigate the graft condition, repeat liver needle biopsies (LNBs) were taken. Although there was a combined impact of sepsis, portal flow decrease, and recurrent hepatitis C on graft failure, it was interesting that recurrent hepatitis C was consistently detectable from the first LNB. HCV-ribonucleic acid increased on POD 68. Liver function disorders peaked on POD 71 and 72. Jaundice peaked on POD 82. DAA induction was regrettably delayed because of a reluctance to introduce DAAs under conditions of graft dysfunction. DAAs were administered after hospital discharge. Conclusions: A real-time and precise diagnosis based on histopathological examination and viral measurement is important for FCH treatment. Well-considered therapy with DAAs should be aggressively introduced for potentially fatal

  9. Liver disease - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - liver disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on liver disease : American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org Children's Liver Association for Support Services -- www.classkids.org Hepatitis ...

  10. Liver in systemic disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Potential causes of abnormal liver function tests include viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, autoimmune liver diseases, hereditary diseases, hepatobiliary malignancies or infection, gallstones and drug-induced liver injury. Moreover, the liver may be involved in systemic diseases that mainly affect other organs. Therefore, in patients without etiology of liver injury by screening serology and diagnostic imaging, but who have systemic diseases, the abnormal liver function test results might be caused by the systemic disease. In most of these patients, the systemic disease should be treated primarily. However, some patients with systemic disease and severe liver injury or fulminant hepatic failure require intensive treatments of the liver.

  11. Pyrazinamide Induced Rat Cholestatic Liver Injury through Inhibition of FXR Regulatory Effect on Bile Acid Synthesis and Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong-Li; Hassan, Hozeifa M; Zhang, Yun; Dong, Si-Zhe; Ding, Ping-Ping; Wang, Tao; Sun, Li-Xin; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an indispensable first-line drug used for the treatment of tuberculosis which may cause serious hepatotoxicity; however, the mechanisms underlying these toxicities are poorly understood. Cholestasis plays an important role in drug-induced liver injury. Since there were no previous published works reported cholestasis and PZA hepatotoxicity relationship, this study aimed to identify whether PZA can induce liver injury with characterized evidences of cholestasis and to clarify expression changes of proteins related to both bile acid synthesis and transport in PZA-induced liver injury. PZA (2 g/kg) was administered for 7 consecutive days by oral gavage. Results showed there were 2-fold elevation in both ALT and AST serum levels in PZA-treated rats. In addition, a 10-fold increment in serum total bile acid was observed after PZA administration. The mRNA and protein expressions of bile acid synthesis and transport parameters were markedly altered, in which FXR, Bsep, Mrp2, Mdr2, Ostα/β, Oatp1a1, Oatp1b2, and Cyp8b1 were decreased (P < .05), while Mrp3, Ntcp, Oatp1a4, and Cyp7a1 were increased (P < .05). Moreover, treatment with the FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) generated obvious reductions in serum ALT, AST, and TBA levels in PZA-treated rats. Those effects were due to transcriptional regulation of pre-mentioned target genes by OCA. Taken together, these results suggested that PZA-induced cholestatic liver injury was related to FXR inhibition, leading to the dysfunction in bile acid synthesis and transport. PMID:27255380

  12. Cross-activating invariant NKT cells and kupffer cells suppress cholestatic liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C Duwaerts

    Full Text Available Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry, mRNA expression (qtPCR, nitric oxide (NO (. production (Griess reaction, and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs were determined. To address the potential role of NO (. in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO (. , and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury.

  13. Management of Pruritus in Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Bhalerao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There continues to be uncertainty on the ideal treatment of pruritus in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to gather the latest information on the evidence-based management of pruritus in chronic liver disease. Methodology. A literature search for pruritus in chronic liver disease was conducted using Pubmed and Embase database systems using the MeSH terms “pruritus,” “chronic liver disease,” “cholestatic liver disease,” and “treatment.” Results. The current understanding of the pathophysiology of pruritus is described in addition to detailing research into contemporary treatment options of the condition. These medical treatments range from bile salts, rifampicin, and opioid receptor antagonists to antihistamines. Conclusion. The burden of pruritus in liver disease patients persists and, although it is a common symptom, it can be difficult to manage. In recent years there has been greater study into the etiology and treatment of the condition. Nonetheless, pruritus remains poorly understood and many patients continue to suffer, reiterating the need for further research to improve our understanding of the etiology and treatment for the condition.

  14. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to run events. Please support us. Donate | Volunteer Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on Inspire Support Community ... Liver > Liver Disease Information > Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Explore this section to learn ...

  15. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have liver disease, you are at risk for pulmonary ... to the liver without cirrhosis. How does liver disease relate to pulmonary hypertension? Liver disease can cause what is known ...

  16. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  17. Iron and Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fargion, Silvia; Mattioli, Michela; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Fiorelli, Gemino

    2000-01-01

    A mild to moderate iron excess is found in patients with liver diseases apparently unrelated to genetic hemochromatosis. Iron appears to affect the natural history of hepatitis C virus-related chronic liver diseases, alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by leading to a more severe fibrosis and thus aiding the evolution to cirrhosis.Ahigher frequency of mutations of the HFE gene, the gene responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis, is found in patients with liver diseases a...

  18. Repeated Oral Administration of Oleanolic Acid Produces Cholestatic Liver Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasha Xu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Oleanolic acid (OA is a triterpenoid and a fantastic molecule with many beneficial effects. However, high-doses and long-term use can produce adverse effects. This study aimed to characterize the hepatotoxic potential of OA. Mice were given OA at doses of 100–3,000 µmol/kg (45–1,350 mg/kg, po for 10 days, and the hepatotoxicity was determined by serum biochemistry, histopathology, and toxicity-related gene expression via real-time RT-PCR. Animal body weight loss was evident at OA doses of 1,000 µmol/kg and above. Serum alanine aminotransferase activities were increased in a dose-dependent manner, indicative of hepatotoxicity. Serum total bilirubin concentrations were increased, indicative of cholestasis. OA administration produced dose-dependent pathological lesions to the liver, including inflammation, hepatocellular apoptosis, necrosis, and feathery degeneration indicative of cholestasis. These lesions were evident at OA doses of 500 µmol/kg and above. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that OA produced dose-dependent increases in acute phase proteins (MT-1, Ho-1, Nrf2 and Nqo1, decreases in bile acid synthesis genes (Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, and decreases in liver bile acid transporters (Ntcp, Bsep, Oatp1a1, Oatp1b2, and Ostβ. Thus, the clinical use of OA and OA-type triterpenoids should balance the beneficial effects and toxicity potentials.

  19. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Rust; Ulrich Beuers

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes,although there has been no standardised definition.Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC.The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form,affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC.Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported.The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children,adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC.Interestingly,transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients,especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome.Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment.Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric,since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders.Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes.In end-stage disease,liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  20. Cell Therapies for Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Fisher, James E.; Lillegard, Joseph B.; Rodysill, Brian; Amiot, Bruce; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell therapies, which include bioartificial liver support and hepatocyte transplantation, have emerged as potential treatments for a variety of liver diseases. Acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure, and inherited metabolic liver diseases are examples of liver diseases that have been successfully treated with cell therapies at centers around the world. Cell therapies also have the potential for wide application in other liver diseases, including non-inherited liver diseases and liver cancer, and in improving the success of liver transplantation. Here we briefly summarize current concepts of cell therapy for liver diseases. PMID:22140063

  1. Panhypopituitarism : a rare cause of neonatal cholestatic jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Vella, Cecil; Gauci, Bettina; Torpiano, John

    2013-01-01

    Although not uncommon, neonatal cholestatic jaundice is usually caused by congenital anatomical defects of the biliary tree or intrinsic liver pathology. We describe a case of persistent cholestatic jaundice in a six week old female infant caused by panhypopituitarism. To our knowledge this is the first report of hypopituitarism presenting with cholestatic jaundice in Malta. Prolonged obstructive jaundice in the neonatal period should be urgently investigated until a cause is found.

  2. Cholestatic hepatitis with intravenous ceftriaxone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderpal Kaur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury is a major health problem. Its predominant forms include acute hepatitis, cholestasis, and a mixed pattern. Ceftriaxone is a third-generation cephalosporin and is widely used in the postoperative period due to its wider spectrum, longer half-life, and better tissue penetrability. Earlier cases of high aminotransferase levels and hepatitis have also been reported with the use of ceftriaxone. Here we report a case of cholestatic hepatitis with intravenous ceftriaxone.

  3. Metabolic Disturbances in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    . In various liver diseases, there may be reduced bile production by inadequately functioning hepatocytes, reduced hepatocyte excretion into the bile canaliculus (as in PFIC, or obstruction to biliary flow. The circulating bile salt pool may be depleted secondary to treatment with binding agents, such as cholestyramine, which is often prescribed for pruritus in cholestatic patients. Pancreatic insufficiency may further exacerbate fat malabsorption in certain cholestatic liver diseases. Vitamins: Fat malabsorption occurs in cholestatic disorders, and one must also consider any accompanying fat-soluble vitamin and essential fatty acid deficiencies.Breastfed infants with CLD are at high risk for vitamin D and K deficiencies.   Conclusion: The clinician should proactively evaluate, treat, and re-evaluate response to treatment of nutritional deficiencies. Because a better nutritional state is associated with better survival before and after LT, aggressive nutritional management is an important part of the care of these children.

  4. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  5. Prolactin and liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.C. Bauer (Alexander)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractCirrhosis of the liver is associated with profound endocrinological disturbances. Until recently it was thought that these disturbances were caused mainly by ineffective elimination of hormones by the diseased liver. It is now known that the pathogenesis of disturbed hormonal function in

  6. Ondansetron to Treat Pruritus Due to Cholestatic Jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Sarah; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Intractable itching is a symptom of cholestatic liver disease of various causes that is bothersome and difficult to manage. Although treatment of the primary cause of cholestasis is paramount in resolving the issue, given the debilitating consequences of pruritus, symptomatic treatment is frequently necessary. Although many medications including cholestyramine, rifampin, opioid antagonists (i.e., naloxone, naltrexone), phenobarbital, and antihistamines have been used to treat cholestatic-induced pruritus, none has resulted in uniform success. We report anecdotal success with the use of ondansetron to treat pruritus associated with cholestasis following prolonged intensive care unit course of a 16-year-old. The theories accounting for pruritus with cholestasis are presented, treatment options are reviewed, and the role of ondansetron in the treatment of pruritus is discussed. PMID:24052788

  7. Monogenic diseases that can be cured by liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiuoli, Stefano; Daina, Erica; D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Colledan, Michele; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    While the prevalence of most diseases caused by single-gene mutations is low and defines them as rare conditions, all together, monogenic diseases account for approximately 10 in every 1000 births according to the World Health Organisation. Orthotopic liver transplantation (LT) could offer a therapeutic option in monogenic diseases in two ways: by substituting for an injured liver or by supplying a tissue that can replace a mutant protein. In this respect, LT may be regarded as the correction of a disease at the level of the dysfunctional protein. Monogenic diseases that involve the liver represent a heterogeneous group of disorders. In conditions associated with predominant liver parenchymal damage (i.e., genetic cholestatic disorders, Wilson's disease, hereditary hemochromatosis, tyrosinemia, α1 antitrypsin deficiency), hepatic complications are the major source of morbidity and LT not only replaces a dysfunctional liver but also corrects the genetic defect and effectively cures the disease. A second group includes liver-based genetic disorders characterised by an architecturally near-normal liver (urea cycle disorders, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome-1). In these defects, extrahepatic complications are the main source of morbidity and mortality while liver function is relatively preserved. Combined transplantation of other organs may be required, and other surgical techniques, such as domino and auxiliary liver transplantation, have been attempted. In a third group of monogenic diseases, the underlying genetic defect is expressed at a systemic level and liver involvement is just one of the clinical manifestations. In these conditions, LT might only be partially curative since the abnormal phenotype is maintained by extrahepatic synthesis of the toxic metabolites (i.e., methylmalonic acidemia, propionic acidemia). This review focuses on principles of diagnosis, management

  8. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F; Charlton, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Excessive alcohol use is a common health care problem worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease represents the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation in North America and Europe. The pretransplant evaluation of patients with alcoholic liver disease should aim at identifying those at high risk for posttransplant relapse of alcohol use disorder, as return to excessive drinking can be deleterious to graft and patient survival. Carefully selected patients with alcoholic liver disease, including those with severe alcoholic hepatitis, will have similar short-term and long-term outcomes when compared with other indications for liver transplantation. PMID:27373614

  9. Antioxidant supplements for liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Nikolova, Dimitrinka;

    2011-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal.......Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  10. Microarray Study of Pathway Analysis Expression Profile Associated with MicroRNA-29a with Regard to Murine Cholestatic Liver Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chou Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence demonstrates that microRNA-29 (miR-29 expression is prominently decreased in patients with hepatic fibrosis, which consequently stimulates hepatic stellate cells’ (HSCs activation. We used a cDNA microarray study to gain a more comprehensive understanding of genome-wide gene expressions by adjusting miR-29a expression in a bile duct-ligation (BDL animal model. Methods: Using miR-29a transgenic mice and wild-type littermates and applying the BDL mouse model, we characterized the function of miR-29a with regard to cholestatic liver fibrosis. Pathway enrichment analysis and/or specific validation were performed for differentially expressed genes found within the comparisons. Results: Analysis of the microarray data identified a number of differentially expressed genes due to the miR-29a transgene, BDL, or both. Additional pathway enrichment analysis revealed that TGF-β signaling had a significantly differential activated pathway depending on the occurrence of miR-29a overexpression or the lack thereof. Furthermore, overexpression was found to elicit changes in Wnt/β-catenin after BDL. Conclusion: This study verified that an elevated miR-29a level could alleviate liver fibrosis caused by cholestasis. Furthermore, the protective effects of miR-29a correlate with the downregulation of TGF-β and associated with Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway following BDL.

  11. Low Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggeliki Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Hepcidin, a liver hormone, is important for both innate immunity and iron metabolism regulation. As dysfunction of the hepcidin pathway may contribute to liver pathology, we analysed liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Hepcidin mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies obtained from 126 patients with HCV (n = 21, HBV (n = 23, autoimmune cholestatic disease (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis; PBC/PSC; n = 34, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH; n = 16 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD; n = 32. Sera sampled on the biopsy day from the same patients were investigated for serum hepcidin levels. Hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels correlated positively with ferritin and negatively with serum γ-GT levels. However, no correlation was found between serum hepcidin and either ferritin or liver hepcidin mRNA. Both serum hepcidin and the serum hepcidin/ferritin ratio were significantly lower in AIH and PBC/PSC patients' sera compared to HBV, HCV or NAFLD (P<0.001 for each comparison and correlated negatively with serum ALP levels. PBC/PSC and AIH patients maintained low serum hepcidin during the course of their two-year long treatment. In summary, parallel determination of liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases shows that circulating hepcidin and its respective ratio to ferritin are significantly diminished in patients with autoimmune liver diseases. These novel findings, once confirmed by follow-up studies involving bigger size and better-matched disease subgroups, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune liver diseases.

  12. Liver disease and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnak, Tugrul; Yilmaz, Yusuf

    2013-08-01

    Patients with hepatic disorders are exceptionally vulnerable to developing malnutrition because of the key role played by the liver in regulating the nutritional state and the energy balance. Moreover, the presence of chronic liver disorders could reduce the appetite and thus influence the nutrient intake. Poor nutritional status has been shown in various patient groups with hepatic disorders, and particularly in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis who are at high nutritional risk. It is well established that malnourished patients with liver diseases generally have a higher risk of developing adverse clinical outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Nutrition screening with the Subjective Global Assessment and anthropometric measurements are an important first step in the early identification of malnutrition and initiates the whole nutrition care process. It is therefore important for appropriate nutrition policies and protocols to be implemented so that all patients with chronic liver diseases are monitored closely from a nutritional standpoint. Early and evidence-based nutritional interventions are eagerly needed to minimize the nutritional decline associated with chronic liver disorders and ultimately improve the prognosis of such patients. This review includes a comprehensive analysis of methods to identify malnutrition in patients with chronic liver diseases as well as the extent and impact of the malnutrition problem in selected patient populations.

  13. Liver regeneration in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Aldo Lagomarsino

    2012-01-01

    Steatosis is the accumulation of fat in hepatocytes, which may be the result of liver regeneration or pathological processes such as alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Despite its importance, in both cases the exact mechanism that prevails in fatty liver regeneration is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that patients with fatty liver express dispar regeneration, possibly due to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species generated by inflammatory processes caused by ...

  14. Ultrasonography and computed tomography in diffuse liver disease with cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partanen, K.; Pikkarainen, P.; Pasanen, P.; Alhava, E.; Soimakallio, S. (Kuopio Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Radiology Kuopio Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Gastroenterology Kuopio Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Surgery)

    1990-09-01

    Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on respectively 67 and 42 (altogether 72) patients, for the assessment of intrahepatic cholestasis. The diagnostic ability to differentiate between malignant (17 patients) and benign (55 patients) liver disease was analyzed. Coarse echogenicity of the liver led to inconclusive results in differentiating between cirrhosis (2 out of 29 patients) and malignant infiltration (4 out of 15 patients) by US. Other benign liver diseases in 23 patients, including acute hepatitis, chronic active hepatitis, fatty liver, and liver congestion, were correctly interpreted as benign. CT correctly disclosed malignant liver disease in all cases. A false positive diagnosis of malignancy was encountered in 4 (out of 17) patients with decompensated hepatic cirrhosis because of non-homogeneous expansive areas on CT in 3 cases. The true cause was in 2 patients non-uniform fatty infiltration, and in one patient with acute hepatitis A, small hypodense lesions. Among cholestatic patients, decompensated cirrhosis and malignant liver infiltration could not always be differentiated on US or CT. (orig.).

  15. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masami Minemura; Kazuto Tajiri; Yukihiro Shimizu

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases.

  16. Research Progress of Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lie-ming; JIA Ji-dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Liver diseases are widespread in China.The disease mostly includes viral hepatitis,alcoholic or non alcoholic fatty degeneration or steatohepatitis, autoimmune liver disease,hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis and hepatic cancer.The mechanism of most liver diseases was studied clearly in developed countries.

  17. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    You, Jie; Huang, Sha; Huang, Gui-Qian; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Ma, Rui-Min; Liu, Wen-yue; Shi, Ke-Qing; Guo, Gui-Long; Chen, Yong-Ping; Braddock, Martin; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is known to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the relationship between NAFLD and the prognosis of CRC remains unclear. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates in patients with CRC and the secondary objective was to compare clinicopathologic variables which were stratified by NAFLD. We performed a large cohort study of 1314 patien...

  18. in Human Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Fujimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling pathways are strictly coordinated by several mechanisms to regulate adequate innate immune responses. Recent lines of evidence indicate that the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family proteins, originally identified as negative-feedback regulators in cytokine signaling, are involved in the regulation of TLR-mediated immune responses. SOCS1, a member of SOCS family, is strongly induced upon TLR stimulation. Cells lacking SOCS1 are hyperresponsive to TLR stimulation. Thus, SOCS1 is an important regulator for both cytokine and TLR-induced responses. As an immune organ, the liver contains various types of immune cells such as T cells, NK cells, NKT cells, and Kupffer cells and is continuously challenged with gut-derived bacterial and dietary antigens. SOCS1 may be implicated in pathophysiology of the liver. The studies using SOCS1-deficient mice revealed that endogenous SOCS1 is critical for the prevention of liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, and cancers. Recent studies on humans suggest that SOCS1 is involved in the development of various liver disorders in humans. Thus, SOCS1 and other SOCS proteins are potential targets for the therapy of human liver diseases.

  19. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fede, Giuseppe; Germani, Giacomo; Gluud, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  20. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Elizabeth M; Wong, Vincent W-S; Nobili, Valerio; Day, Christopher P; Sookoian, Silvia; Maher, Jacquelyn J; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Sirlin, Claude B; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A; Rinella, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a disorder characterized by excess accumulation of fat in hepatocytes (nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL)); in up to 40% of individuals, there are additional findings of portal and lobular inflammation and hepatocyte injury (which characterize nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)). A subset of patients will develop progressive fibrosis, which can progress to cirrhosis. Hepatocellular carcinoma and cardiovascular complications are life-threatening co-morbidities of both NAFL and NASH. NAFLD is closely associated with insulin resistance; obesity and metabolic syndrome are common underlying factors. As a consequence, the prevalence of NAFLD is estimated to be 10-40% in adults worldwide, and it is the most common liver disease in children and adolescents in developed countries. Mechanistic insights into fat accumulation, subsequent hepatocyte injury, the role of the immune system and fibrosis as well as the role of the gut microbiota are unfolding. Furthermore, genetic and epigenetic factors might explain the considerable interindividual variation in disease phenotype, severity and progression. To date, no effective medical interventions exist that completely reverse the disease other than lifestyle changes, dietary alterations and, possibly, bariatric surgery. However, several strategies that target pathophysiological processes such as an oversupply of fatty acids to the liver, cell injury and inflammation are currently under investigation. Diagnosis of NAFLD can be established by imaging, but detection of the lesions of NASH still depend on the gold-standard but invasive liver biopsy. Several non-invasive strategies are being evaluated to replace or complement biopsies, especially for follow-up monitoring. PMID:27188459

  1. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2002-01-01

    Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  2. Investigation of Homocystein Plasma Level in Cholestatic Rat and Its Effect on Nitric Oxide Secretion in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mirazi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Homocystein (Hcy,one of the thio-amino acid is known as a risk factor in some cardiovascular diseases with releasing O2 radical . It has also been reported that; there is oxidative stress effects of Hcy in cholestasis. The aim of this study is to determine plasma Hcy alteration and nitric oxide (NO in liver and its effects on pathologic disfunction.In this study , 150 Spraque – Dawley male rats with 200 ± 20g body weight were used in the experiments and they were randomly divided in three control, SHAM and bile duct ligation (BDL groups (n= 10-12 . In 7th,14th,21st and 28th days cholestasis was observed in BDL group,the animal were anesthetized with ether and then blood samples were taken from heart directly and analysed for cystein , methionine by HPLC and HPLC-UV. Two hours before blood sampling , 40 and 100 mg/kg methionine were injected (I.P .All data are expressed as mean  SEM. Statistical evaluation of data performed by SPSS soft ware using analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by post hoc test. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant .The results suggest that billirubin and hepatic enzymes were significantly elevated in BDL rats compared with SHAM and controls (P<0.05. Homocystein concentration was significantly rised in 14th day in BDL group (P<0.05. The plasma cystein and methionine level were significantly elevated in BDL rats compared with SHAM and control groups ( p = 0.01 . Plasma nitrate / nitrite ratio were significantly increased in BDL rats compared with SHAM and control rats (P<0.05. With these data we suppose that some of the systemic oxidative stresses in BDL rat model of cholestasis contributes possibly through NO-dependent mechanisms disorders.

  3. [Dietotherapy children with liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskaia, E V; Strokova, T V; Topil'skaia, N V; Isakova, V A

    2009-01-01

    In children with liver diseases disorders of the nutritional status appear more quickly and delay normal growth and development. Administration of the nutritional support based on nosological and syndromal approaches lets provide optimal conditions for normalization of the liver functions, improves efficiency of therapy and prognosis of the disease. The article contents modern recommendations on the organization of nutrition in children with different liver diseases, correction of metabolic disorders during complications of liver pathology. PMID:20120964

  4. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin......Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...

  5. Polycystic Liver Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile

  6. Polycystic Liver Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda, Nguyen, E-mail: nguyenli@einstein.edu [5501 Old York Road, Philadelphia, PA 19141 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile.

  7. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin......Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...... activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This is a topic for future research....

  8. Probiotics in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloh, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis involves complex interaction between the intestinal microbiome and the liver parenchyma. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are used in a variety of diseases. With currently only 2 randomized-controlled studies (one with Lactobacillus GG and the other with VSL #3), data are scarce to support the clinical effect of probiotic use in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. There is evidence that probiotics decrease the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and thereby reduce the prevalence of total parenteral nutrition-induced chronic liver disease. Probiotics are used with a few reported positive outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis and familial hypercholesterolemia and may be promising in other liver conditions. Probiotics are generally safe and well tolerated in children, premature infants, and in patients after liver transplantation. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the benefit of probiotics in children with liver diseases. PMID:26447962

  9. Screening in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Del Poggio; Marzio Mazzoleni

    2006-01-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines,although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors,such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction,is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation.

  10. Screening in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Poggio, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-09-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  11. A cholestatic syndrome may be a surprising cause of medical error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pătrășescu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune cholangitis defines a spectrum of cholestatic liver diseases that are characterized by inflammation of bile ducts and a reasonable response to immunosuppressive therapy. The two most common diseases associated with this term in the literature are: an overlap syndrome of primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune hepatitis and a form of hyper IgG4 syndrome (currently associated with autoimmune pancreatitis. Liver biopsy is mandatory for the diagnosis. There are, whatsoever, in clinical practice, many cases that do not meet current diagnostic criteria but that have a good response to corticosteroid treatment.

  12. Fibropolycystic liver disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veigel, Myka Call [Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City, St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Prescott-Focht, Julia; Zinati, Reza [University of Missouri-Kansas City, St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Rodriguez, Michael G. [University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Shao, Lei [Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Pathology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Moore, Charlotte A.W.; Lowe, Lisa H. [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Fibropolycystic liver diseases are a group of associated congenital disorders that present most often in childhood. These disorders include congenital hepatic fibrosis, biliary hamartomas, autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease, choledochal cysts and Caroli disease. We present a discussion and illustrations of the embryology, genetics, anatomy, pathology, imaging approach and key imaging features that distinguish fibropolycystic liver disease in children. The pathogenesis of these disorders is believed to be abnormal development of the embryonic ductal plates, which ultimately form the liver and biliary systems. An understanding of the abnormal embryogenesis helps to explain the characteristic imaging features of these disorders. (orig.)

  13. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within week

  14. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, Lea Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease...... and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. METHODS: A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including 'liver cirrhosis', 'end-stage liver disease', 'liver diseases', 'oral...... in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%-79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among...

  15. Liver transplantation for Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilsky, Michael L

    2014-05-01

    Although Wilsons's disease (WD) may be treated with copper chelation (to remove copper) or zinc salts (to prevent absorption) to alleviate or prevent symptom development in most patients, there are WD patients for whom medical therapy is inadequate and survival would be unlikely without liver transplantation. Liver transplantation is indicated for the ∼5% of WD patients with acute liver failure as the first presentation of disease, most commonly in the second decade of life, or those who present with end-stage liver disease and severe hepatic insufficiency, most commonly in the third and fourth decades. Liver transplantation restores normal biliary copper excretion (thereby preventing disease recurrence) and promotes removal of copper from extrahepatic sites. Outcomes of liver transplantation for WD are excellent, including both cadaveric and living donors.

  16. Alcoholic liver disease and changes in bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán López-Larramona

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis and osteopenia are alterations in bone mineral density (BMD that frequently occur in the context of chronic liver disease (CLD. These alterations have been studied predominantly in chronic cholestatic disease and cirrhosis of the liver. Alcohol consumption is an independent risk factor for the onset of osteoporosis, whose estimated prevalence in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD ranges between 5 % and 40 %. The loss of BMD in ALD is the result of an imbalance between bone formation and resorption. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes the toxic effects of alcohol on bone and endocrine and nutritional disorders secondary to alcoholism and a deficiency of osteocalcin, vitamin D and insulin growth factor-1. The diagnosis of BMD alterations in ALD is based on its measurement using bone densitometry. Treatment includes smoking and alcohol cessation and general measures such as changes in nutrition and exercise. Calcium and vitamin D supplements are recommended in all patients with ALD and osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the specific treatment of this condition. Alternatives include raloxifene, hormone replacement therapy and calcitonin. This review will address the most important aspects involved in the clinical management of abnormal BMD in the context of ALD, including its prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis. We will also review the treatment of osteoporosis in CLD in general, focusing on specific aspects related to bone loss in ALD.

  17. Altered expression and function of canalicular transporters during early development of cholestatic liver injury in Abcb4-deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Shi-Ying; Mennone, Albert; Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of ABCB4 is associated with several forms of cholestasis in humans. Abcb4−/− mice also develop cholestasis, but it remains uncertain what role other canalicular transporters play in the development of this disease. We examined the expression of these transporters in Abcb4−/− mice compared with their wild-type littermate controls at ages of 10 days and 3, 6, and 12 wk. Elevated plasma bile acid levels were already detected at 10 days and at all ages thereafter in Abcb4−/− mice. The ...

  18. The Use of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Study and Treatment of Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Marc C; Davila, Julio C; Vosough, Massoud; Gramignoli, Roberto; Skvorak, Kristen J; Dorko, Kenneth; Marongiu, Fabio; Blake, William; Strom, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Liver disease is a major global health concern. Liver cirrhosis is one of the leading causes of death in the world and currently the only therapeutic option for end-stage liver disease (e.g., acute liver failure, cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, cholestatic diseases, metabolic diseases, and malignant neoplasms) is orthotropic liver transplantation. Transplantation of hepatocytes has been proposed and used as an alternative to whole organ transplant to stabilize and prolong the lives of patients in some clinical cases. Although these experimental therapies have demonstrated promising and beneficial results, their routine use remains a challenge due to the shortage of donor livers available for cell isolation, variable quality of those tissues, the potential need for lifelong immunosuppression in the transplant recipient, and high costs. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies and more reliable clinical treatments are urgently needed. Recent and continuous technological advances in the development of stem cells suggest they may be beneficial in this respect. In this review, we summarize the history of stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology in the context of hepatic differentiation and discuss the potential applications the technology may offer for human liver disease modeling and treatment. This includes developing safer drugs and cell-based therapies to improve the outcomes of patients with currently incurable health illnesses. We also review promising advances in other disease areas to highlight how the stem cell technology could be applied to liver diseases in the future. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26828329

  19. Detection of Autoantibodies to Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3 in Bile Duct Ligated Rats and Correlations with a Panel of Traditional Markers of Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Florent; Cruz-Vega, Delia Elva; González-Gamboa, Ivonne; González-Garza, María Teresa; Ponz, Fernando; Sánchez, Flora; Alarcón-Galván, Gabriela; Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for new noninvasive biomarkers (NIBMs) able to assess cholestasis and fibrosis in chronic cholestatic liver diseases (CCLDs). Tumorigenesis can arise from CCLDs. Therefore, autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) may be early produced in response to abnormal self-antigen expression caused by cholestatic injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) has TAA potential since it is involved in cholangiocytes and lymphatic vessels proliferations during CCLDs. This study aims to detect autoantibodies directed at VEGFR-3 during bile duct ligation- (BDL-) induced cholestatic injury in rat sera and investigate whether they could be associated with traditional markers of liver damage, cholestasis, and fibrosis. An ELISA was performed to detect anti-VEGFR-3 autoantibodies in sera of rats with different degree of liver injury and results were correlated with aminotransferases, total bilirubin, and the relative fibrotic area. Mean absorbances of anti-VEGFR-3 autoantibodies were significantly increased from week one to week five after BDL. The highest correlation was observed with total bilirubin (R2 = 0.8450, P = 3.04e − 12). In conclusion, anti-VEGFR-3 autoantibodies are early produced during BDL-induced cholestatic injury, and they are closely related to cholestasis, suggesting the potential of anti-VEGFR-3 autoantibodies as NIBMs of cholestasis in CCLDs and justifying the need for further investigations in patients with CCLD. PMID:27212785

  20. [Wilson's disease: clinical spectrum of liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Palominos, Alejandra; Ibáñez Samaniego, Luis; Catalina Rodríguez, María-Vega; Pajares Díaz, José; Clemente Ricote, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Wilson's disease is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism,characterized by copper accumulation in the liver and brain. This rare entity, which has a broad clinical spectrum, is often difficult to diagnose and should therefore always be suspected in patients with liver disease of unclear cause. We describe two types of manifestation of liver disease in two patients; the first developed fulminant hepatic failure requiring urgent liver transplantation and the second showed advanced chronic liver disease and received standard medical treatment. The objective of this clinical observation is to analyze the diagnosis of Wilson's disease in two patients with distinct onset, illustrating the broad clinical spectrum of the disease, and its treatment.

  1. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Paul S; Hillingsø, Jens; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX....../kidney transplantation. One patient had undergone kidney transplantation 10 years earlier. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 55 months. One patient who underwent combined transplantation died after 5.4 months because of multiorgan failure after re-LTX, and one patient, with well-functioning grafts, died of lymphoma after 7...

  2. Acute cholestatic hepatitis caused by amoxicillin/clavulanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldo, Daniel Oliveira; Melo, Joanderson Fernandes; Bonfim, Alexandre Vidal; Teixeira, Andrei Alkmim; Teixeira, Ricardo Alkmim; Duarte, André Loyola

    2013-01-01

    Amoxicillin/clavulanate is a synthetic penicillin that is currently commonly used, especially for the treatment of respiratory and cutaneous infections. In general, it is a well-tolerated oral antibiotic. However, amoxicillin/clavulanate can cause adverse effects, mainly cutaneous, gastrointestinal, hepatic and hematologic, in some cases. Presented here is a case report of a 63-year-old male patient who developed cholestatic hepatitis after recent use of amoxicillin/clavulanate. After 6 wk of prolonged use of the drug, he began to show signs of cholestatic icterus and developed severe hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin > 300 mg/L). Diagnostic investigation was conducted by ultrasonography of the upper abdomen, serum tests for infection history, laboratory screening of autoimmune diseases, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of the abdomen with bile duct-NMR and transcutaneous liver biopsy guided by ultrasound. The duration of disease was approximately 4 mo, with complete resolution of symptoms and laboratory changes at the end of that time period. Specific treatment was not instituted, only a combination of anti-emetic (metoclopramide) and cholestyramine for pruritus. PMID:24379601

  3. Pathogenesis of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Winston; Shah, Vijay H

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease includes a broad clinical-histological spectrum from simple steatosis, cirrhosis, acute alcoholic hepatitis with or without cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma as a complication of cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can be conceptually divided into (1) ethanol-mediated liver injury, (2) inflammatory immune response to injury, (3) intestinal permeability and microbiome changes. Corticosteroids may improve outcomes, but this is controversial and probably only impacts short-term survival. New pathophysiology-based therapies are under study, including antibiotics, caspase inhibition, interleukin-22, anakinra, FXR agonist and others. These studies provide hope for better future outcomes for this difficult disease. PMID:27373608

  4. Interventional Treatments for Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeds Radiation Safety IR History Bibliographies Meetings and Education ... radiology techniques. Portal Hypertension Seen most frequently in patients with liver disease such as cirrhosis or hepatitis, portal hypertension is a condition in which the ...

  5. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 900 drugs and supplements.​​ Recent discoveries from NIDDK research include: New medication shows promise against liver fibrosis ... linked to biliary atresia in newborn animals Support Research NIDDK invests in basic, clinical and translational research ...

  6. Nutrition in Chronic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Silva; Sara Gomes; Armando Peixoto; Paulo Torres-Ramalho; Hélder Cardoso; Rosa Azevedo; Carla Cunha; Guilherme Macedo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition is a transversal condition to all stages of chronic liver disease. Early recognition of micro or macronutrient deficiencies is essential, because the use of nutritional supplements reduces the risk of complications. The diet of patients with chronic liver disease is based on a standard diet with supplements addition as necessary. Restrictions may be harmful and should be individualized. Treatment management should aim to maintain an adequate protein and caloric...

  7. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective.

  8. The Bile Salt Export Pump: Clinical and Experimental Aspects of Genetic and Acquired Cholestatic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Ping; Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2010-01-01

    The primary transporter responsible for bile salt secretion is the bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, which is located at the bile canalicular apical domain of hepatocytes. In humans, BSEP deficiency results in several different genetic forms of cholestasis, which include progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2), benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (BRIC2), as well as other acquired forms of cholestasi...

  9. HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS IN LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Minov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an essential player in the pathway of coagulation in both primary and secondary hemostasis as it is the site of synthesis of all coagulation factors and their inhibitors. Liver diseases are associated with complex changes in coagulation and the delicate balance between pro and antithrombotic factors is preserved but reset to a lower level. There is growing evidence that portal and hepatic vein thrombosis is cause of disease progression in cirrhotic patients and worsens hemostatic abnormalities. These hemostatic abnormalities do not always lead to spontaneous bleeding, which may be triggered only by additional factors, such as infections. Usually therapy for coagulation disorders in liver disease is needed only during bleeding or before invasive procedures. In patients with end stage liver disease liver transplantation is the only treatment available, which can restore normal hemostasis, and correct genetic clotting defects. During liver transplantation hemorrhage may occur due to the pre-existing hypocoagulable state, the collateral circulation caused by portal hypertension and increased fibrinolysis. 

  10. MEDICINAL PLANTS AGAINST LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Govind

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available India is the largest producer of medicinal plants and is rightly called the “Botanical Garden of the World”. The medicinal plants have very important place in the health and vitality of human beings as well as animals. As per the WHO estimates, about three quarters of the world’s population currently use herbs and other traditional medicines to cure various diseases, including liver disorders. Hence, several phytomedicines (medicinal plants or herbal drugs are now used for the prevention and treatment of various liver disorders. Although experimental studies have been conducted on a number of these plants and their formulations, however, only some plants have clearly shown the hepatogenic / hepatoprotective effects against liver diseases or hepatotoxicity caused by variety of hepatotoxic agents such as chemicals, drugs, pollutants, and infections from parasites, bacteria or viruses (e.g., hepatitis A, B and C, etc. Indeed, to obtain satisfactory herbal drugs for treating severe liver diseases, the medicinal plants must be evaluated systematically for properties like antiviral activity (Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, etc., antihepatotoxicity activity (antioxidants and others, stimulation of liver regeneration and choleretic activity. A combination of different herbal extracts / fractions is likely to provide desired activities to cure severe liver diseases. The medicinal plants contain several phytochemicals which possess strong antioxidant property, leading to antihepatotoxic activity.

  11. Living donor liver transplantation for patients with alcoholic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yo-Han; Hwang, Shin; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Kim, Ki-Hun; Moon, Deok-Bog; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Namgoong, Jung-Man; Park, Hyung-Woo; Park, Chun-Soo; Kang, Sung-Hwa; Jung, Bo-Hyeon; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Since most transplantation studies for alcoholic liver disease (ALD) were performed on deceased donor liver transplantation, little was known following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Methods The clinical outcome of 18 ALD patients who underwent LDLT from Febraury 1997 to December 2004 in a large-volume liver transplantation center was assessed retrospectively. Results The model for end-stage liver disease score was 23±11, and mean pretransplant abstinence period w...

  12. Folate, alcohol, and liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Valentina; Halsted, Charles H

    2013-04-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is typically associated with folate deficiency, which is the result of reduced dietary folate intake, intestinal malabsorption, reduced liver uptake and storage, and increased urinary folate excretion. Folate deficiency favors the progression of liver disease through mechanisms that include its effects on methionine metabolism with consequences for DNA synthesis and stability and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression involved in pathways of liver injury. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of ALD with particular focus on ethanol-induced alterations in methionine metabolism, which may act in synergy with folate deficiency to decrease antioxidant defense as well as DNA stability while regulating epigenetic mechanisms of relevant gene expressions. We also review the current evidence available on potential treatments of ALD based on correcting abnormalities in methionine metabolism and the methylation regulation of relevant gene expressions. PMID:23136133

  13. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  14. Mineral Requirements in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Decreased oral intake or impaired function / structure in the gut, such as hypertension port associated with atrophic changes in the protein nutrition - calories can lead to micronutrient deficiencies.This paper examines the status of micronutrients in chronic liver disease in children.   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"” minerals””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 3 related articles have been found.   Results: In chronic liver disease changes in micronutrient metabolism lead to changes in the daily requirements, such that in certain circumstances intake increasing or decreasing  is needed. Low serum calcium and phosphate concentrations are often the reflection of malabsorption-induced bone disease that is unresponsive to vitamin D store normalization. Iron is usually deficient in children with CLD and supplementation frequently needed. The origin of iron deficiency is multifactorial and includes ongoing losses, inadequate intakes, serial blood draws and malabsorption secondary to hypertensive enteropathy. Zinc plays an important role in cognitive function, appetite and taste, immune function, wound healing, and protein metabolism. Low plasma zinc levels are frequent in children with chronic cholestasis, but unfortunately plasma concentrations are not reflective of total body zinc status. Copper and manganese, unlike other minerals, are increased in CLD, because they are normally excreted through bile. Parenteral nutrition in cholestatic patients can induce manganese intoxication and accumulation in basal ganglia.   Conclusion:  In fants with CLD are prone to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Mineral state should be evaluated, treated and reevaluated, until sufficient daily requirement achieved. Poster  Presentation, N 33  

  15. Hepatobiliary Disorders in Celiac Disease: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushal K Prasad; Uma Debi; Sinha, Saroj K.; Nain, Chander K.; Kartar Singh

    2011-01-01

    This communication reviews recent literature and summarizes hepatobiliary abnormalities that may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. A wide spectrum of hepatobiliary diseases has been described, including asymptomatic elevations of liver enzyme levels, nonspecific hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. Moreover, in the majority of patients, liver enzyme levels will normalize on a gluten-free diet. In addition, celiac disease ma...

  16. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...

  17. Liver transplantation for Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Andreea M; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-27

    The aim of this paper is to review the current status of liver transplantation (LT) for Wilson disease (WD), focusing on indications and controversies, especially in patients with neuropsychiatric disease, and on identification of acute liver failure (ALF) cases related to WD. LT remains the treatment of choice for patients with ALF, as initial presentation of WD or when anti-copper agents are stopped, and for patients with chronic liver disease progressed to cirrhosis, unresponsive to chelating medications or not timely treated with copper chelating agents. The indication for LT in WD remains highly debated in patients with progressive neurological deterioration and failure to improve with appropriate medical treatment. In case of Wilsonian ALF, early identification is key as mortality is 100% without emergency LT. As many of the copper metabolism parameters are believed to be less reliable in ALF, simple biochemical tests have been proposed for diagnosis of acute WD with good sensitivity and specificity. LT corrects copper metabolism and complications resulting from WD with excellent 1 and 5 year survival. Living related liver transplantation represents an alternative to deceased donor LT with excellent long-term survival, without disease recurrence. Future options may include hepatocyte transplantation and gene therapy. Although both of these have shown promising results in animal models of WD, prospective human studies are much needed to demonstrate their long-term beneficial effects and their potential to replace the need for medical therapy and LT in patients with WD. PMID:22312450

  18. Epigenetics in liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Derek A.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics is a term that encompasses a variety of regulatory processes that are able to crosstalk in order to influence gene expression and cell phenotype in response to environmental cues. A deep understanding of epigenetics offers the potential for fresh insights into the basis for complex chronic diseases and improved diagnostic and prognostic tools. Moreover, as epigenetic modifications are highly plastic and responsive to the environment, there is much excitement around the theme of ep...

  19. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  20. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torruellas, Cara; French, Samuel W; Medici, Valentina

    2014-09-01

    Alcohol is a hepatotoxin that is commonly consumed worldwide and is associated with a spectrum of liver injury including simple steatosis or fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a general term used to refer to this spectrum of alcohol-related liver injuries. Excessive or harmful alcohol use is ranked as one of the top five risk factors for death and disability globally and results in 2.5 million deaths and 69.4 million annual disability adjusted life years. All patients who present with clinical features of hepatitis or chronic liver disease or who have elevated serum elevated transaminase levels should be screened for an alcohol use disorder. The diagnosis of ALD can generally be made based on history, clinical and laboratory findings. However, the diagnosis of ALD can be clinically challenging as there is no single diagnostic test that confirms the diagnosis and patients may not be forthcoming about their degree of alcohol consumption. In addition, clinical findings may be absent or minimal in early ALD characterized by hepatic steatosis. Typical laboratory findings in ALD include transaminase levels with aspartate aminotransferase greater than alanine aminotransferase as well as increased mean corpuscular volume, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, and IgA to IgG ratio. In unclear cases, the diagnosis can be supported by imaging and liver biopsy. The histological features of ALD can ultimately define the diagnosis according to the typical presence and distribution of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and Mallory-Denk bodies. Because of the potential reversible nature of ALD with sobriety, regular screening of the general population and early diagnosis are essential. PMID:25206273

  1. Diagnosis and management of polycystic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, T.J.G.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is arbitrarily defined as a liver that contains >20 cysts. The condition is associated with two genetically distinct diseases: as a primary phenotype in isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and as an extrarenal manifestation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidn

  2. Autoimmune BSEP disease: disease recurrence after liver transplantation for progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitz, Ralf; Dröge, Carola; Kluge, Stefanie; Stross, Claudia; Walter, Nathalie; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter; Stindt, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Severe cholestasis may result in end-stage liver disease with the need of liver transplantation (LTX). In children, about 10 % of LTX are necessary because of cholestatic liver diseases. Apart from bile duct atresia, three types of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) are common causes of severe cholestasis in children. The three subtypes of PFIC are defined by the involved genes: PFIC-1, PFIC-2, and PFIC-3 are due to mutations of P-type ATPase ATP8B1 (familial intrahepatic cholestasis 1, FIC1), the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB11 (bile salt export pump, BSEP), or ABCB4 (multidrug resistance protein 3, MDR3), respectively. All transporters are localized in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes and together mediate bile salt and phospholipid transport. In some patients with PFIC-2 disease, recurrence has been observed after LTX, which mimics a PFIC phenotype. It could be shown by several groups that inhibitory anti-BSEP antibodies emerge, which most likely cause disease recurrence. The prevalence of severe BSEP mutations (e.g., splice site and premature stop codon mutations) is very high in this group of patients. These mutations often result in the complete absence of BSEP, which likely accounts for an insufficient auto-tolerance against BSEP. Although many aspects of this "new" disease are not fully elucidated, the possibility of anti-BSEP antibody formation has implications for the pre- and posttransplant management of PFIC-2 patients. This review will summarize the current knowledge including diagnosis, pathomechanisms, and management of "autoimmune BSEP disease." PMID:25342496

  3. COAGULATION ACTIVITY IN LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sheikh Sajjadieh Mohammad Reza

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation markers were assayed in 60 participants: 20 patients with chronic hepatitis, 20 patients with cirrhosis, and 20 healthy individuals (control. Plasma levels of anti-thrombin III were determined by a chromogenic substrate method, and plasma concentrations of fibrinogen were analyzed by the Rutberg method. Commercially available assays were used for laboratory coagulation tests. The levels of coagualation activity markers in patients with chronic liver disease were significantly different in comparison to those in healthy participants. These results indicate the utility of measuring markers for coagulation activity in determining which cirrhosis patients are more susceptible to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  4. MEDICINAL PLANTS AGAINST LIVER DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey Govind

    2011-01-01

    India is the largest producer of medicinal plants and is rightly called the “Botanical Garden of the World”. The medicinal plants have very important place in the health and vitality of human beings as well as animals. As per the WHO estimates, about three quarters of the world’s population currently use herbs and other traditional medicines to cure various diseases, including liver disorders. Hence, several phytomedicines (medicinal plants or herbal drugs) are now used for the prevention and...

  5. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasing in pediatric age group parallel to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight all around the world. So changing in life style and   interventions on obesogenic environment is cornerstone of NAFLD therapy in obese children. Some experts recommend that children and adolescents be encouraged to follow a low-fat, low-glycemic-index diet that includes eating a minimum of 5 servings of vegetables and fruits daily, engaging in physical activity for at least 1 hour daily, and minimizing television/computer time to 2 hours daily.  In spite of effectiveness of weight loss and exercise in improvement NAFLD, this goal is very difficult to be achieved and pharmacological approaches have become necessary. Pharmacologic therapies against one or more specific factors and/or molecules involved in the development of NAFLD (i.e., insulin resistance, free fatty acid lipid toxicity, and oxidative stress also might slow the progression of NAFLD to NASH or cirrhosis.  On this basis, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, cytoprotective agents, and dietary supplementations have been evaluated in pediatric clinical trials but there is no approved pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD or NASH. Not all obese children affected by NAFLD. Diet modification and regular exercise beside to serial medical follow up highly suggested for this group of children. Normal weight and thin children with NAFLD or NASH should be investigated appropriately in a logical manner based on causes of primary liver steatosis in children and treatment of underlying disease can cause improvement fatty liver in these patients.   Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; Children; Steatosis; Treatment

  6. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Hartleb; Krzysztof Gutkowski

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI),defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL,occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis.Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state,reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones.The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia,hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development,natriuresis,urine osmolality,response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion,and rarely on renal biopsy.Chronic glomeruIonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients.AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease,therefore,such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation.Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension,and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections,nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions,excessive diuresis,gastrointestinal hemorrhage,diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents.Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy.The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion,which is effective in about 50% of patients.The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt,renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support.

  7. Liver disease in transfusion dependent thalassaemia major

    OpenAIRE

    C. Li; Chik, K; Lam, C.; To, K; Yu, S.; Lee, V.; Shing, M.; Cheung, A; Yuen, P

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To study the prevalence and severity of liver diseases of transfusion dependent thalassaemia major patients, and correlate the histological and biochemical changes of iron overload in liver with the peripheral blood markers.

  8. Alcoholic liver disease and the gut-liver axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gyongyi; Szabo; Shashi; Bala

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the leading causes of liver diseases and liver-related death worldwide. Of the many factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of ALD, gut-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a central role in induction of steatosis, inflammation, and fi brosis in the liver. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which alcohol contributes to increased gut permeability, the activation of Kupffer cells, and the infl ammatory cascade by LPS. The role of the Toll-like receptor 4...

  9. The Complement System in Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuebin Qin; Bin Gao

    2006-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in mediating both acquired and innate responses to defend against microbial infection, and in disposing immunoglobins and apoptotic cells. The liver (mainly hepatocytes) is responsible for biosynthesis of about 80-90% of plasma complement components and expresses a variety of complement receptors.Recent evidence from several studies suggests that the complement system is also involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders including liver injury and repair, fibrosis, viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and liver ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of liver diseases.

  10. TNFR1 determines progression of chronic liver injury in the IKK gamma/Nemo genetic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cubero, F.J.; Singh, A.; Borkham-Kamphorst, E.; Nevzorova, Y.A.; Masaoudi, Al M.; Haas, U.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Gassler, N.; Weiskirchen, R.; Muller, M.; Liedtke, C.; Trautwein, C.

    2013-01-01

    Death receptor-mediated hepatocyte apoptosis is implicated in a wide range of liver diseases including viral and alcoholic hepatitis, ischemia/reperfusion injury, fulminant hepatic failure, cholestatic liver injury, as well as cancer. Deletion of NF-kappa B essential modulator in hepatocytes (IKK ga

  11. Cytokines, STATs and Liver Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Gao

    2005-01-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, activated by more than 50 cytokines or growth factors, plays critical roles in a wide variety of cellular functions in the hematopoietic, immune, neuronal and hepatic systems. In the liver, this signaling pathway, activated by more than 20 cytokines, growth factors, hormones, and hepatitis viral proteins, plays critical roles in antiviral defense, acute phase response, hepatic injury, repair, inflammation, transformation, and hepatitis. This article reviews the biological significance of STAT1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 in hepatic functions and diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2005;2(2):92-100.

  12. Cytokines, STATs and Liver Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BinGao

    2005-01-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, activated by more than 50 cytokines or growth factors, plays critical roles in a wide variety of cellular functions in the hematopoietic, immune, neuronal and hepatic systems. In the liver, this signaling pathway, activated by more than 20 cytokines, growth factors, hormones, and hepatitis viral proteins, plays critical roles in antiviral defense, acute phase response, hepatic injury, repair, inflammation, transformation, and hepatitis. This article reviews the biological significance of STAT1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 in hepatic functions and diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):92-100.

  13. Targeting collagen expression in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyle J Thompson; Iain H McKillop; Laura W Schrum

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of liver disease and liver-related deaths globally, particularly in developed nations. Liver fibrosis is a consequence of ALD and other chronic liver insults, which can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma if left untreated. Liver fibrosis is characterized by accumulation of excess extracellular matrix components, including type Ⅰ collagen, which disrupts liver microcirculation and leads to injury. To date, there is no therapy for the treatment of liver fibrosis; thus treatments that either prevent the accumulation of type Ⅰ collagen or hasten its degradation are desirable. The focus of this review is to examine the regulation of type Ⅰ collagen in fibrogenic cells of the liver and to discuss current advances in therapeutics to eliminate excessive collagen deposition.

  14. Effect of Autophagy Over Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-qian Yi; Xue-feng Yang; Duan-fang Liao; Qing Wu; Nian Fu; Yang Hu; Ting Cao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, increasingly evidences show that autophagy plays an important role in the pathogenesis and development of liver diseases, and the relationship between them has increasingly become a focus of concern. Autophagy refers to the process through which the impaired organelles, misfolded protein, and intruding microorganisms is degraded by lysosomes to maintain stability inside cells. This article states the effect of autophagy on liver diseases (hepatic fibrosis, fatty liver, viral hepatitis, and liver cancer), which aims to provide a new direction for the treatment of liver diseases.

  15. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease : an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, Rene; Porte, Robert J.; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Becker, Thomas; Kirkegaard, Preben; Metselaar, Herold J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR) d

  16. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, René;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR...

  17. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keimpema, L. van; Nevens, F.; Adam, R.; Porte, R.J.; Fikatas, P.; Becker, T.; Kirkegaard, P.; Metselaar, H.J.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR) d

  18. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  19. Trace elements and chronic liver diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loguercio, C.; De Girolamo, V.; Federico A., A.; Del Vecchio Blanco, C. [Seconda Universita di Napoli, Naples (Italy). Cattedra di Gastroenterologia; Feng, S.L.; Gialanella, G. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche; Cataldi, V. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Prima Medicina Ospedale Ascalesi

    1997-12-31

    The relationships between chronic liver diseases and trace element (TE) contents are debated. Particularly, no defined data are available about the TE levels in viral liver disease patients with or without malnutrition. In this study we evaluated blood and plasma levels of various trace elements in patients with HCV-related chronic liver disease, at different stages of liver damage (8 patients with chronic hepatitis and 32 with liver cirrhosis) with or without malnutrition. We also studied 10 healthy volunteers as control group. We found that cirrhotic subjects had a significant decrease of blood levels of Zn and Se, independently on the nutritional status, whereas plasma levels of Fe were significantly reduced only in malnourished cirrhotic patients. Our data indicate that liver impairment is the main cause of the blood decrease of Se and Zn levels in patients with non alcoholic liver disease, whereas the malnutrition affects Fe levels only. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of prognostic markers in severe drug-induced liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Li; Zhi Wang; Jian-Jiang Fang; Ci-Yi Xu; Wei-Xing Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcome of patients with severe drug-induced liver disease (DILD) associated with jaundice classified as hepatocellular, cholestatic or mixed liver injury and to evaluate the validity of Hy's rule and the most important predictors for outcome.METHODS: The Adverse Drug Reaction Advisory Committee was set up in 1997 in our hospital to identify all suspicions of DILD following a structured prospective report form. Liver damage was divided into hepatocellular, cholestatic, and mixed types according to laboratory and histologic criteria when available. Further evaluation of causality assessment was performed.RESULTS: From January 1997 to December 2004, 265 patients were diagnosed with DILD, and 140 (52.8%) of them were female. Hepatocellular damage was the most common (72.1%), the incidence of death was 9.9% in patients with hepatocellular damage and 9.5% in patients with cholestatic/mixed damage (P < 0.05). There was no difference in age of dead and recovered patients. The proportion of females and males was similar in recovered and dead patients, no difference was observed in duration of treatment between the two groups. The serum total bilirubin (P < 0.001), direct bilirubin (P < 0.001) and aspartate transaminase (AST) (P = 0.013) values were higher in dead patients than in recovered patients. Chinese herbal medicine was the most frequently prescribed, accounting for 24.2% of the whole series. However, antitubercular drugs (3.4%) were found to be the primary etiological factor for fetal DILD. Factors associated with the development of fulminant hepatic failure were hepatic encephalopathy (OR = 43.66, 95% CI = 8.47-224.95, P < 0.0001), ascite (OR = 28.48, 95% CI = 9.26-87.58, P < 0.0001), jaundice (OR = 11.43, 95% CI = 1.52-85.96, P = 0.003), alcohol abuse (OR = 3.83, 95% CI = 1.26-11.67, P = 0.035) and direct bilirubin (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.25-2.58, P = 0.012).CONCLUSION: Death occurs in 9.8% of patients with DILD. Chinese herbal

  1. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-24

    Essential facts Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an excess of fat in the liver that is not the result of excessive alcohol consumption or other secondary causes, such as hepatitis C. According to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, fatty liver - steatosis - affects between 20% and 30% of the population and its prevalence is increasing. PMID:27641564

  2. Correlation between liver morphology and haemodynamics in alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl;

    1985-01-01

    was found with haemodynamic variables. The present data substantiate the concept that established portal hypertension in alcoholic liver disease is mainly accomplished by a derangement in hepatic architecture, whereas parenchymal changes, including hepatocyte size, are of less importance....

  3. Interaction between periodontitis and liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pengyu; Sun, Dianxing; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an oral disease that is highly prevalent worldwide, with a prevalence of 30–50% of the population in developed countries, but only ~10% present with severe forms. It is also estimated that periodontitis results in worldwide productivity losses amounting to ~54 billion USD yearly. In addition to the damage it causes to oral health, periodontitis also affects other types of disease. Numerous studies have confirmed the association between periodontitis and systemic diseases, such as diabetes, respiratory disease, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidence also indicated that periodontitis may participate in the progression of liver diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as affecting liver transplantation. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no reviews elaborating upon the possible links between periodontitis and liver diseases. Therefore, the current review summarizes the human trials and animal experiments that have been conducted to investigate the correlation between periodontitis and liver diseases. Furthermore, in the present review, certain mechanisms that have been postulated to be responsible for the role of periodontitis in liver diseases (such as bacteria, pro-inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress) are considered. The aim of the review is to introduce the hypothesis that periodontitis may be important in the progression of liver disease, thus providing dentists and physicians with an improved understanding of this issue. PMID:27588170

  4. Helicobacter Infection and Chronic Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-chun Chi; Xin-juan Yu; Quan-jiang Dong

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recentHelicobacter infection associated with chronic liver disease. The bacteriology, prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis were reviewed. Future work should be conducted on the pathogenesis and treatment of this disease.

  5. Obstructive Jaundice Associated with Polcystic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitrewski, J.; Olliff, S; Buckels, J. A. C.

    1996-01-01

    A 65 year old patient with polycystic liver disease presented with obstructive jaundice thought to be a cholangiocarcinoma. Subsequent investigations demonstrated a large cyst compressing the confluence of the hepatic ducts. Percutaneous decompression of the biliary tree led to a complication necessitating surgery. Treatment options for symptomatic polycystic liver disease are reviewed.

  6. Metabolic therapy: lessons from liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Marí, Montserrat; Colell, Anna; Morales, Albert; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C

    2011-12-01

    Fatty liver disease is one of most prevalent metabolic liver diseases, which includes alcoholic (ASH) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Its initial stage is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver, that can progress to steatohepatitis, a stage of the disease in which steatosis is accompanied by inflammation, hepatocellular death, oxidative stress and fibrosis. Recent evidence in experimental models as well as in patients with steatohepatitis have uncovered a role for cholesterol and sphingolipids, particularly ceramide, in the transition from steatosis to steatohepatitis, insulin resistance and hence disease progression. Cholesterol accumulation and its trafficking to mitochondria sensitizes fatty liver to subsequent hits including inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF/Fas, in a pathway involving ceramide generation by acidic sphingomyelinase (ASMase). Thus, targeting both cholesterol and/or ASMase may represent a novel therapeutic approach of relevance in ASH and NASH, two of the most common forms of liver diseases worldwide. PMID:21933146

  7. Hepatic lipogranulomas in patients with chronic liver disease: Association with hepatitis C and fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry; C; Bodenheimer; David; J; Clain; Albert; D; Min; Neil; D; Theise

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the significance and clinical implication of hepatic lipogranuloma in chronic liver diseases, including fatty liver disease and hepatitis C. METHODS: A total of 376 sequential, archival liver biopsy specimens were reviewed. Lipogranuloma, steatosis and steato-fibrosis were evaluated with combined hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining. RESULTS: Fifty-eight (15.4%) patients had lipogranuloma, including 46 patients with hepatitis C, 14 patients with fatty liver disease, and 5 pati...

  8. Role of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Parfieniuk; Robert Flisiak

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds acting primarily via CB1 and CB2 receptors. The expression of cannabinoid receptors in normal liver is low or absent. However, many reports have proven up-regulation of the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in hepatic myofibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells, as well as increased concentration of endocannabinoids in liver in the course of chronic progressive liver diseases. It has been shown that CB1 receptor signalling exerts profibrogenic and proinflammatory effects in liver tissue, primarily due to the stimulation of hepatic stellate cells, whereas the activation of CB2 receptors inhibits or even reverses liver fibrogenesis. Similarly, CB1 receptor stimulation contributes to progression of liver steatosis. In end-stage liver disease, the endocannabi-noid system has been shown to contribute to hepatic encephalopathy and vascular effects, such as portal hypertension, splanchnic vasodilatation, relative pe-ripheral hypotension and probably cirrhotic cardiomy-opathy. So far, available evidence is based on cellular cultures or animal models. Clinical data on the effects of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases are limited. However, recent studies have shown the contribution of cannabis smoking to the progression of liver fibrosis and steatosis. Moreover, controlling CB1 or CB2 signal-ling appears to be an attractive target in managing liver diseases.

  9. Cirrhosis and autoimmune liver disease: Current understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) constitute the classic autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). While AIH target the hepatocytes, in PBC and PSC the targets of the autoimmune attack are the biliary epithelial cells. Persistent liver injury, associated with chronic AILD, leads to un-resolving inflammation, cell proliferation and the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins by hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts. Liver cirrhosis, and the resultant loss of normal liver function, inevitably ensues. Patients with cirrhosis have higher risks or morbidity and mortality, and that in the decompensated phase, complications of portal hypertension and/or liver dysfunction lead to rapid deterioration. Accurate diagnosis and monitoring of cirrhosis is, therefore of upmost importance. Liver biopsy is currently the gold standard technique, but highly promising non-invasive methodology is under development. Liver transplantation (LT) is an effective therapeutic option for the management of end-stage liver disease secondary to AIH, PBC and PSC. LT is indicated for AILD patients who have progressed to end-stage chronic liver disease or developed intractable symptoms or hepatic malignancy; in addition, LT may also be indicated for patients presenting with acute liver disease due to AIH who do not respond to steroids. PMID:27729952

  10. [Clinic-epidemiological significance of drug hepatotoxicity in liver disease consultation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jmelnitzky, A C; Guidi, M; Bologna, A; Viola, M; Soccini, C; Barbero, R; Belloni, P; Apraiz, M

    2000-01-01

    To assess epidemiological and clinical significance of drug hepatotoxicity in the setting of liver diseases consultation, ten thousand and three hundred forty two prospectively designed clinical records from patient cared for in our Liver Unit in the period 1988-1998 were incorporated into the study; 58 out of 10,342 (prevalence = 5.6%) fulfilled at least the first three of the following causality requirements: 1.--Liver injury associated in time to drug exposition; 2.--Negative evaluation of more common other etiologies; (alcohol, viruses, immunologic, metabolic, etc) 3.--Favourable response to drug withdrawal (ALT 75%), moderate (presence of clinical complications, bilirubin > 5 mg/dl and prothrombin concentration between 50-75%), and severe (major clinical complications with bilirubin > 5 mg/dl and prothrombin concentration hypersensibility (fever, adenomegalies, rush, mononucleosis like syndrome, eosinophilia) in 29.3%. Acute injury represented 91.4% of the cases: 41.4% acute hepatitis, 15.5% "pure" cholestasis, 24.1% cholestatic hepatitis, and 10.3% indeterminate type. Four patients (4.5% of acute injury cases) were presented as severe acute liver failure, leading to liver transplant in one of them, drug association (INH-rifampicin and carbamazepine-phenobarbital) and inadverted challenge (sulphonamides and pemoline) were associated to clinical severity. Chronic injury were found in five patient (8.6%), four of them associated to chronic hepatitis and the other one to a ductopenic syndrome. Six drugs represented 53.4% of our cases; oral contraceptives (7 cases), INH alone or combined with rifampicin (6 cases), sulfonamides and clorpropamida (5 cases each), carbamazepine and amiodarone (4 cases each). Normalization of liver enzymes after drug suppression took 2 to 8 weeks in acute hepatitis type (X = 4 weeks), 4 to 20 in "pure" cholestasis (X = 12 weeks) and 8 to 24 weeks in cholestatic hepatitis or mixed type (X = 16 weeks). Two cases of chronic hepatitis

  11. Recurrence of autoimmune liver diseases after livertransplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatmentmodality for end stage liver disease caused by manyetiologies including autoimmune processes. That said,the need for transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis(AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but not forprimary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), has decreasedover the years due to the availability of effective medicaltreatment. Autoimmune liver diseases have superiortransplant outcomes than those of other etiologies. WhileAIH and PBC can recur after LT, recurrence is of limitedclinical significance in most, but not all cases. RecurrentPSC, however, often progresses over years to a stagerequiring re-transplantation. The exact incidence andthe predisposing factors of disease recurrence remaindebated. Better understanding of the pathogenesis andthe risk factors of recurrent autoimmune liver diseasesis required to develop preventive measures. In thisreview, we discuss the current knowledge of incidence,diagnosis, risk factors, clinical course, and treatmentof recurrent autoimmune liver disease (AIH, PBC, PSC)following LT.

  12. Clindamycin-induced acute cholestatic hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of acute hepatotoxicity in a 42-yearold woman after administration of clindamycin for a dental infection. After 6 d of treatment, she had fatigue, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, pruritus and jaundice. Her laboratory analysis showed alanine aminotransferase (ALT), 1795 IU/L (normal range 0-40); aspartate aminotransferase (AST), 1337 IU/L (normal range 5-34); alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 339 IU/L (normal range 40-150); γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), 148 IU/L (normal range 9-64 IU/L); total bilirubin, 4.1 mg/dL; direct bilirubin, 2.9 mg/dL and prothrombin time (PT), 13.5 s, with international normalized ratio (INR), 1.04. She was hospitalized, with immediate drug discontinuation. Her liver biopsy specimen showed mixed-type (both hepatocellular and cholestatic) hepatic injury, compatible with a diagnosis of drug-induced hepatitis. An objective causality assessment using the Naranjo probability scale suggested that clindamycin was the probable cause of the acute hepatitis. In susceptible individuals, clindamycin use may lead to acute mixedtype liver toxicity. Complete recovery may be possible if the drug is discontinued before severe liver injury is established.

  13. Telomere length in human liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Y; Nouso, K; Higashi, T; Nakatsukasa, H; Hino, N; Ashida, K; Kinugasa, N; Yoshida, K; Uematsu, S; Tsuji, T

    1996-10-01

    To determine the role of telomere-mediated gene stability in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined the telomere length of human liver with or without chronic liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). The mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) length of normal liver (n = 13), chronic hepatitis (n = 11), liver cirrhosis (n = 24) and HCC (n = 24) was 7.8 +/- 0.2, 7.1 +/- 0.3, 6.4 +/- 0.2 and 5.2 +/- 0.2 kb, respectively (mean +/- standard error). TRF length decreased with a progression of chronic liver diseases and that in HCC was significantly shorter than that in other chronic liver diseases (p HCC to that of corresponding surrounding liver of well differentiated (n = 7), moderately differentiated (n = 10) and poorly differentiated (n = 4) HCCs were 0.83 +/- 0.06, 0.75 +/- 0.05 and 0.98 +/- 0.09, respectively. The ratio of poorly differentiated HCC was significantly higher than that of moderately differentiated HCC (p telomere length ratio of moderately differentiated HCCs revealed a decrease of the ratio with size until it reached 50 mm in diameter. In contrast, the ratio increased as the size enlarged over 50 mm. These findings suggest that the gene stability of the liver cells mediated by the telomere is reduced as chronic liver disease progresses and that telomerase is activated in poorly differentiated HCC and moderately differentiated HCC over 50 mm in diameter. PMID:8938628

  14. Hepatite aguda colestática pelo propiltiouracil: relato de caso Acute cholestatic hepatitis induced by propylthiouracil: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Beatriz PAROLIN

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Propiltiouracil é uma droga amplamente utilizada no tratamento do hipertiroidismo. A hepatotoxicidade é um dos efeitos colaterais mais raros e também mais graves associados a ela. Relata-se um caso de hepatite aguda colestática que acomete um jovem de 15 anos em uso de propiltiouracil para tratamento de hipertiroidismo. Causas virais, metabólicas e autoimunes foram excluídas e a biopsia hepática revelou achados histopatológicos sugestivos de hepatite colestática induzida por droga. Com a suspensão da droga, houve remissão dos sintomas e normalização progressiva das provas de função hepática. Raramente, os pacientes em uso de propiltiouracil podem desenvolver injúria hepática grave.Propylthiouracil is widely used to treat patients with hyperthyroidism. However, propylthiouracil-induced hepatitis is an uncommon entity. The case of a 15-year-old boy treated with propylthiouracil for hyperthyroidism who developed a cholestatic acute hepatitis is reported. Viral, metabolic and autoimmune liver diseases were excluded and liver biopsy showed a pattern suggestive of drug-induced cholestatic hepatitis. After discontinuating the drug, there was a progressive resolution of symptoms and normalization of liver biochemical tests. Despite its rarity, patients receiving propylthiouracil are exposed to develop severe hepatotoxicity.

  15. GFR Estimating Equations and Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beben, Tomasz; Rifkin, Dena E

    2015-09-01

    It is important to accurately assess the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of patients with liver disease to deliver care and allocate organs for transplantation in a way that improves outcomes. The most commonly used methods to estimate GFR in this population are based on creatinine, which is biased by these patients' low creatinine production and potentially by elevated serum bilirubin and decreased albumin levels. None of the creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) equations have been specifically modified for a population with liver disease, and even measurement of a 24-hour creatinine clearance has limitations. In liver disease, all creatinine-based estimates of GFR overestimate gold standard-measured GFR, and the degree of overestimation is highest at lower measured GFR values and in more severe liver disease. Cystatin C-based eGFR has shown promise in general population studies by demonstrating less bias than creatinine-based eGFR and improved association with clinically important outcomes, but results in the liver disease population have been mixed, and further studies are necessary. Ultimately, specific eGFR equations for liver disease or novel methods for estimating GFR may be necessary. However, for now, the limitations of currently available methods need to be appreciated to understand kidney function in liver disease.

  16. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region...... and a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy controls...... underwent a liver vein catheterization. Blood samples from the femoral artery and the hepatic and renal veins were simultaneously collected before and after stimulation with galactose. Results. The fasting lactate levels, both in the hepatic vein and in the femoral artery, were higher in the patients than...

  17. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of treatment. As disease progression is slow in the majority of NAFLD patients, most can be managed well by primary care physicians. NAFLD patients with advanced liver fibrosis should be referred to specialist care for further assessment. PMID:27439352

  18. Nuclear Receptor Variants in Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Müllenbach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to provide a snapshot of the actual state of knowledge on genetic variants of nuclear receptors (NR involved in regulating important aspects of liver metabolism. It recapitulates recent evidence for the application of NR in genetic diagnosis of monogenic (“Mendelian” liver disease and their use in clinical diagnosis. Genetic analysis of multifactorial liver diseases such as viral hepatitis or fatty liver disease identifies key players in disease predisposition and progression. Evidence from these analyses points towards a role of NR polymorphisms in common diseases, linking regulatory networks to complex and variable phenotypes. The new insights into NR variants also offer perspectives and cautionary advice for their use as handles towards diagnosis and treatment.

  19. TGF-β signalling and liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat, Isabel; Moreno-Càceres, Joaquim; Sánchez, Aránzazu; Dooley, Steven; Dewidar, Bedair; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) family signalling pathways play essential roles in the regulation of different cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration or cell death, which are essential for the homeostasis of tissues and organs. Because of the diverse and pleiotropic TGF-β functions, deregulation of its pathways contributes to human disease. In the case of the liver, TGF-β signalling participates in all stages of disease progression, from initial liver injury through inflammation and fibrosis, to cirrhosis and cancer. TGF-β has cytostatic and apoptotic effects in hepatocytes, promoting liver differentiation during embryogenesis and physiological liver regeneration. However, high levels of TGF-β, as a consequence of chronic liver damage, result in activation of stellate cells to myofibroblasts and massive hepatocyte cell death, which contributes to the promotion of liver fibrosis and later cirrhosis. During liver tumorigenesis, TGF-β may behave as a suppressor factor at early stages; however, there is strong evidence that overactivation of TGF-β signalling might contribute to later tumour progression, once cells escape from its cytostatic effects. For these reasons, targeting the TGF-β signalling pathway is being explored to counteract liver disease progression. In this review, we aim to shed light on the state-of-the-art in the signalling pathways induced by TGF-β that are involved in different stages of liver physiology and pathology. PMID:26807763

  20. TGF-β signalling and liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat, Isabel; Moreno-Càceres, Joaquim; Sánchez, Aránzazu; Dooley, Steven; Dewidar, Bedair; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) family signalling pathways play essential roles in the regulation of different cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration or cell death, which are essential for the homeostasis of tissues and organs. Because of the diverse and pleiotropic TGF-β functions, deregulation of its pathways contributes to human disease. In the case of the liver, TGF-β signalling participates in all stages of disease progression, from initial liver injury through inflammation and fibrosis, to cirrhosis and cancer. TGF-β has cytostatic and apoptotic effects in hepatocytes, promoting liver differentiation during embryogenesis and physiological liver regeneration. However, high levels of TGF-β, as a consequence of chronic liver damage, result in activation of stellate cells to myofibroblasts and massive hepatocyte cell death, which contributes to the promotion of liver fibrosis and later cirrhosis. During liver tumorigenesis, TGF-β may behave as a suppressor factor at early stages; however, there is strong evidence that overactivation of TGF-β signalling might contribute to later tumour progression, once cells escape from its cytostatic effects. For these reasons, targeting the TGF-β signalling pathway is being explored to counteract liver disease progression. In this review, we aim to shed light on the state-of-the-art in the signalling pathways induced by TGF-β that are involved in different stages of liver physiology and pathology.

  1. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Risk and Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluate the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF in patients with liver disease in the peritransplant period. Materials and Methods. This IRB approved study retrospectively reviewed patients requiring transplantation for cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, or both from 2003 to 2013. Records were reviewed identifying those having gadolinium enhanced MRI within 1 year of posttransplantation to document degree of liver disease, renal disease, and evidence for NSF. Results. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI was performed on 312 of 837 patients, including 23 with severe renal failure (GFR 30. Two of 23 patients with renal failure developed NSF compared to zero NSF cases in 289 patients with GFR > 30 (0/289; P<0.003. High dose gadodiamide was used in the two NSF cases. There was no increased incidence of NSF with severe liver disease (1/71 compared to nonsevere liver disease (1/241; P=0.412. Conclusion. Renal disease is a risk factor for NSF, but in our small sample our evidence suggests liver disease is not an additional risk factor, especially if a low-risk gadolinium agent is used. Noting that not all patients received high-risk gadolinium, a larger study focusing on patients receiving high-risk gadolinium is needed to further evaluate NSF risk in liver disease in the peritransplant period.

  2. Genetic variants in adult liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröge, C; Häussinger, D; Keitel, V

    2015-12-01

    In the last decades, understanding of genetic variants contributing to liver disease development has considerably improved through novel genotyping techniques. Genetic variants of single genes are known to be decisive for the development of monogenetic liver diseases of varying severity. Identification of genetic variants is an important part of the diagnostic process, e. g. the majority of patients with high iron [Fe] (HFE)-associated hemochromatosis carry the homozygous mutation p.C282Y. Detection of mutations in genes encoding hepatobiliary transport proteins like familial intrahepatic cholestasis 1 (FIC1), bile salt export pump (BSEP), or multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3) is the basis to differentiate various forms of intrahepatic cholestasis. Moreover, genetic variants in a variety of genes are known to act as disease modifiers and represent risk factors for disease progression and the development of cirrhosis or even hepatocellular carcinoma. Success of drug treatment or appearance of severe side effects can also be influenced by specific genetic variants. All these aspects underscore the increasing importance of genetic variants, which in the future may help to identify patients at risk for disease progression or help to guide treatment decisions. In the present overview, specific frequent genetic variants are summarized that play roles in monogenetic liver diseases, forms of intrahepatic cholestasis, gallstone development, fatty liver disease, drug-induced liver injury, and liver disease progression as well as hepatocellular carcinoma development. PMID:26666282

  3. Immune-mediated diseases in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, Laetitia E.; Janse, Marcel; Haagsma, Elizabeth B.; van den Berg, Arie P.; Weersma, Rinse K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease. An immune aetiology is suggested by associations between PSC and inflammatory bowel disease. Data on concomitant prevalence of other immune-mediated diseases is limited. Aim: To assess the prevalence of concomitant im

  4. Telomeres, NAFLD and Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Benedetta; Valenti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres consist of repeat DNA sequences located at the terminal portion of chromosomes that shorten during mitosis, protecting the tips of chromosomes. During chronic degenerative conditions associated with high cell replication rate, progressive telomere attrition is accentuated, favoring senescence and genomic instability. Several lines of evidence suggest that this process is involved in liver disease progression: (a) telomere shortening and alterations in the expression of proteins protecting the telomere are associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; (b) advanced liver damage is a feature of a spectrum of genetic diseases impairing telomere function, and inactivating germline mutations in the telomerase complex (including human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) and human Telomerase RNA Component (hTERC)) are enriched in cirrhotic patients independently of the etiology; and (c) experimental models suggest that telomerase protects from liver fibrosis progression. Conversely, reactivation of telomerase occurs during hepatocarcinogenesis, allowing the immortalization of the neoplastic clone. The role of telomere attrition may be particularly relevant in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver, an emerging cause of advanced liver disease. Modulation of telomerase or shelterins may be exploited to prevent liver disease progression, and to define specific treatments for different stages of liver disease. PMID:26999107

  5. [Treatment of parasitic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuna, V

    1989-01-01

    Most of primary and secondary parasitic liver diseases, at present can be property treated with drugs. Venezuelan pharmaceutic market has some peculiarities that have determined the disappearance from the market of many drugs such as emetine, thiabendazole, quinacrine and niclosamide. Diloxanide never appeared. Venezuela has no commercial international treatises that protect international patents in the pharmaceutical area. In addition, government regulation of cost of drugs is very strict. This is particularly true with old drugs (such as emetine or quinacrine) which had such a low price that is non-commercial for the maker of the drug, usually a large transnational, and is withdrawn from the market. Flexibility of prices is quite easy for new antibiotics which are very expensive. Frequently small national companies import the drug from Italy and Japan which sell the drug independently from international treats. Such companies frequently produce the drug for the government social system, but are unreliable and also frequently they withdraw the drug a variable period of time. The government, through the Ministry of Public Health administer free treatment with drugs for malaria, tuberculosis and leprosy. The severe economic crisis of the country has severely impaired the preventive programs and there is an increase of malaria due to gold mining in the south of the country and falciparum chloroquine resistance and an increase of schistosomiasis in a previous free area. Also administration of drugs for malaria has been severely impaired, mainly for economic reasons. The establishment of a National Government Laboratory is an old (as far as 1946) political goal, but has remained in the political intention.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2535455

  6. Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159416.html Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later Study found risk ... Overweight is defined as a BMI above 25. Obesity is defined as a BMI above 30, according ...

  7. Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159416.html Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later Study found risk ... Overweight is defined as a BMI above 25. Obesity is defined as a BMI above 30, according ...

  8. Chronic liver disease in Aboriginal North Americans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John D Scott; Naomi Garland

    2008-01-01

    A structured literature review was performed to detail the frequency and etiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in Aboriginal North Americans. CLD affects Aboriginal North Americans disproportionately and is now one of the most common causes of death.Alcoholic liver disease is the leading etiology of CLD,but viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis C, is an important and growing cause of CLD. High rates of autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are reported in regions of coastal British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. Non-alcoholic liver disease is a common, but understudied, cause of CLD.Future research should monitor the incidence and etiology of CLD and should be geographically inclusive.In addition, more research is needed on the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-alcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD) in this population.

  9. Treatment of Decompensated Alcoholic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    John Menachery; Ajay Duseja

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a spectrum ranging from simple hepatic steatosis to alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis can have clinical presentation almost similar to those with decompensated cirrhosis. Scoring with models like Maddrey discriminant function, a model for end-stage liver disease, Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score, and Lille model are helpful in prognosticating patients with ALD. One of the first therapeutic goals in ALD is to induce al...

  10. Interleukin-10 and chronic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, LI-JUAN; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory cytokine produced by many cell populations. Numerous investigations suggest that IL-10 plays a major role in chronic liver diseases. IL-10 gene polymorphisms are possibly associated with liver disease susceptibility or severity. Recombinant human IL-10 has been produced and is currently tested in clinical trials. These trials may give new insights into the immunobiology of IL-10 and suggest that the IL-10/IL-10 receptor system may become a ...

  11. Interleukin-10 and chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Juan Zhang; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory cytokine produced by many cell populations. Numerous investigations suggest that IL-10 plays a major role in chronic liver diseases. IL-10 gene polymorphisms are possibly associated with liver disease susceptibility or severity. Recombinant human IL-10 has been produced and is currently tested in clinical trials. These trials may give new insights into the immunobiology of IL-10 and suggest that the IL-10/IL-10 receptor system may become a new therapeutic target.

  12. Reduced leucocyte zinc in liver disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Keeling, P W; Jones, R.B.; Hilton, P J; Thompson, R P

    1980-01-01

    The zinc content of peripheral blood leucocytes has been measured in normal controls and in three groups of patients with liver disease. A significant reduction in leucocyte zinc, but not erythrocyte zinc, was observed in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, alcoholic cirrhosis, and active chronic hepatitis. It is suggested that the nucleated tissues of some patients with liver disease are therefore zinc deficient, and that leucocyte zinc may prove of value in the assessment of the zinc s...

  13. Role of Gut Microbiota in Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, David A; Paik, Yong-Han; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Many lines of research have established a relationship between the gut microbiome and patients with liver disease. For example, patients with cirrhosis have increased bacteremia, increased blood levels of lipopolysaccharide, and increased intestinal permeability. Patients with cirrhosis have bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. Selective intestinal decontamination with antibiotics is beneficial for patients with decompensated cirrhosis. In experimental models of chronic liver injury with fibrosis, several toll-like receptors (TLR) are required to make mice sensitive to liver fibrosis. The presumed ligand for the TLRs are bacterial products derived from the gut microbiome, and TLR knockout mice are resistant to liver inflammation and fibrosis. We and others have characterized the association between preclinical models of liver disease in mice with the microbial diversity in their gut microbiome. In each model, including intragastric alcohol, bile duct ligation, chronic carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), administration, and genetic obesity, there is a significant change in the gut microbiome from normal control mice. However, there is not a single clear bacterial strain or pattern that distinguish mice with liver injury from controlled mice. So how can the gut microbiota affect liver disease? We can identify at least 6 changes that would result in liver injury, inflammation, and/or fibrosis. These include: (1) changes in caloric yield of diet; (2) regulation of gut permeability to release bacterial products; (3) modulation of choline metabolism; (4) production of endogenous ethanol; (5) regulation of bile acid metabolism; and (6) regulation in lipid metabolism.

  14. Hepatic progenitors for liver disease: current position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alice Conigliaro1, David A Brenner2, Tatiana Kisseleva21University “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia Policlinico Umberto I, V Clinica Medica, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Liver regeneration restores the original functionality of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in response to injury. It is regulated on several levels, with different cellular populations contributing to this process, eg, hepatocytes, liver precursor cells, intrahepatic stem cells. In response to injury, mature hepatocytes have the capability to proliferate and give rise to new hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Meanwhile, liver precursor cells (oval cells have become the most recognized bipotential precursor cells in the damaged liver. They rapidly proliferate, change their cellular composition, and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes to compensate for the cellular loss and maintain liver homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that oval cells originate from the intrahepatic stem cell(s, which in turn give(s rise to epithelial, including oval cells, and/or other hepatic cells of nonepithelial origin. Since there is a close relationship between the liver and hematopoiesis, bone marrow derived cells can also contribute to liver regeneration by the fusion of myeloid cells with damaged hepatocytes, or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. The current review discusses the contribution of different cells to liver regeneration and their characteristics.Keywords: hepatic progenitor, liver disease, liver precursor cells, oval cells, hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cells, cholangiocytes

  15. Dame Sheila Sherlock: pioneer in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-04-01

    Within living memory of some of us, liver disease was a Cinderella subject. If you look up the first edition of the standard medical textbook of the time, Sir William Osler's 'Principles and Practice of Medicine', published in 1892, you will find a mere 24 of its 1079 pages devoted to the liver, compared with 38 pages on typhoid fever alone; and matters hardly changed throughout the first half of the 20th century. Although 'cirrhosis' and 'hepatitis' were well recognised conditions when I was a house surgeon in 1948, their classification, aetiologies, detailed pathology and management were little understood, while laboratory investigations of the liver diseases were few and non-specific.

  16. UNUSUAL CASE OF POLYCYSTIC LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Brumaru

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic liver disease (PCLD is a rare disease defined as the presence of four or more thin-walled cyst within the hepatic parenchyma.The most common form of autosomal dominant PCLD coexist with renal cystic disease. In contrast to the concomitant renal and liver cystic disease, the isolated form of PCLD is a comparatively rare form, that displays no renal involvement.Only 7% of patients with PCDL do not have associated renal cyst. Most cases are asymptomatic. Patients generally have preserved hepatic functions.The liver function tests are normal. Polycystic liver is rarely associated with portal hypertension , obstructive jaundice or infection of hepatic cysts. Autopsy series show that 20 % of patients with PCLD have associated intracranial aneurism. There are no effective medical therapies for PCLD.Surgical options for those with refractory symptoms or complications include percutaneous puncture and sclerosys of cysts, cysts fenestration by open or laparoscopic technique, hepatic resection, and isolated hepatic or combined liver kidney transplantation. We present the case of a 68 years male subject , diagnosed with alcoholic liver cirrhosis based on the chronic alcohol consumption,negative serological markers for the B and C hepatitis viruses, hepatoprive and biliar retention tests, portal hypertension. The abdominal echography revealed a diffuse enlargement of the liver , witch contains numerous cysts scattered throughout the liver. The cysts vary in size from less than 1 cm to more than 5 cm. There is no evidence of renal or pancreatic cysts. The treatment is addressed to the portal hypertension due to alcoholic liver disease. The PCLD is not complicated and therefore requires no surgical treatment.

  17. UNUSUAL CASE OF POLYCYSTIC LIVER DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Brumaru; Catalina Mihai; Cristina Cijevschi Prelipcean

    2005-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PCLD) is a rare disease defined as the presence of four or more thin-walled cyst within the hepatic parenchyma.The most common form of autosomal dominant PCLD coexist with renal cystic disease. In contrast to the concomitant renal and liver cystic disease, the isolated form of PCLD is a comparatively rare form, that displays no renal involvement.Only 7% of patients with PCDL do not have associated renal cyst. Most cases are asymptomatic. Patients generally have pre...

  18. Micronutrient Antioxidants and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanliang; Ni, Yinhua; Nagata, Naoto; Xu, Liang; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most important chronic liver diseases worldwide and has garnered increasing attention in recent decades. NAFLD is characterized by a wide range of liver changes, from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The blurred pathogenesis of NAFLD is very complicated and involves lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. NAFLD is closely associated with complications such as obesity, diabetes, steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis. During the progression of NAFLD, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are activated and induce oxidative stress. Recent attempts at establishing effective NAFLD therapy have identified potential micronutrient antioxidants that may reduce the accumulation of ROS and finally ameliorate the disease. In this review, we present the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and introduce some dietary antioxidants that may be used to prevent or cure NAFLD, such as vitamin D, E, and astaxanthin. PMID:27563875

  19. Acute renal dysfunction in liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in liver diseases, either as part of multiorgan involvement in acute illness or secondary to advanced liver disease. The presence of renal impairment in both groups is a poor prognostic indicator. Renal failure is often multifactorial and can present as pre-renal or intrinsic renal dysfunction. Obstructive or post renal dysfunction only rarely complicates liver disease. Hepatorenal syndrome (MRS) is a unique form of renal failure associated with advanced liver disease or cirrhosis, and is characterized by functional renal impairment without significant changes in renal histology. Irrespective of the type of renal failure, renal hypoperfusion is the central pathogenetic mechanism, due either to reduced perfusion pressure or increased renal vascular resistance. Volume expansion, avoidance of precipitating factors and treatment of underlying liver disease constitute the mainstay of therapy to prevent and reverse renal impairment. Splanchnic vasoconstrictor agents, such as terlipressin, along with volume expansion, and early placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be effective in improving renal function in HRS. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and molecular absorbent recirculating system (MARS) in selected patients may be life saving while awaiting liver transplantation.

  20. Nuclear receptor variants in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Vincent; Liebe, Roman; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This snapshot reviews the current state of knowledge on genetic variants of nuclear receptors (NRs) involved in regulating various aspects of liver metabolism. Interindividual differences in responses to diet and other 'in-' and environmental stressors can be caused by variants in components of the NR regulatory gene network. We recapitulate recent evidence for the application of NRs in genetic diagnosis of monogenic liver disease. Genetic analysis of multifactorial liver diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and diabetes mellitus, pinpoints key players in disease predisposition and progression. In particular, NR1H4 variants have been associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and gallstone disease. Other examples include studies of NR1I2 and NR1I3 polymorphisms in patients with drug-induced liver injury and NR5A2 variation in cholangiocarcinoma. Associations of NR gene variants have been identified in patients with dyslipidemia and other metabolic syndrome-associated traits by genome-wide studies. Evidence from these analyses confirms a role for NR variation in common diseases, linking regulatory networks to complex and variable phenotypes. These new insights into the impact of NR variants offer perspectives for their future use in diagnosis and treatment of common diseases. PMID:26045277

  1. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  2. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension...

  3. Acetaldehyde Adducts in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiko Setshedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol abuse causes liver disease that progresses from simple steatosis through stages of steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatic failure. In addition, chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD, with or without cirrhosis, increases risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Acetaldehyde, a major toxic metabolite, is one of the principal culprits mediating fibrogenic and mutagenic effects of alcohol in the liver. Mechanistically, acetaldehyde promotes adduct formation, leading to functional impairments of key proteins, including enzymes, as well as DNA damage, which promotes mutagenesis. Why certain individuals who heavily abuse alcohol, develop HCC (7.2–15% versus cirrhosis (15–20% is not known, but genetics and co-existing viral infection are considered pathogenic factors. Moreover, adverse effects of acetaldehyde on the cardiovascular and hematologic systems leading to ischemia, heart failure, and coagulation disorders, can exacerbate hepatic injury and increase risk for liver failure. Herein, we review the role of acetaldehyde adducts in the pathogenesis of chronic ALD and HCC.

  4. Histopathology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth; M; Brunt; Dina; G; Tiniakos

    2010-01-01

    Histological analysis of liver biopsies remains a standard against which other methods of assessment for the presence and amount of hepatic injury due to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) are measured.Histological evaluation remains the sole method of distinguishing steatosis from advanced forms of NAFLD,i.e.nonalcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH) and fibrosis.Included in the lesions of NAFLD are steatosis,lobular and portal inflammation,hepatocyte injury in the forms of ballooning and apoptosis,and fibros...

  5. Role of mitochondria in drug-induced cholestatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, George E N; Price, Shirley C

    2008-02-01

    Mitochondria have multiple functions in eukaryotic cells and are organized into dynamic tubular networks that continuously undergo changes through coordinated fusion and fission and migration through the cytosol. Mitochondria integrate cell-signaling networks, especially those involving the intracellular messenger Ca(2+), into the regulation of metabolic pathways. Recently, it has become clear that mitochondria are central to the three main cell death pathways, namely necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death. This article discusses the role of mitochondria in drug-induced cholestatic injury to the liver. The role of mitochondria in the cellular adaptation against the toxic effects of bile acids is discussed also. PMID:18242496

  6. Utility of Modeling End-Stage Liver Disease in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Kianifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic liver diseases consist of wide spectrum disorders that may be complicated by cirrhosis and therefore need to transplantation. The pediatric end-stage liver disease (PELD score and model of end-stage liver disease (MELD score has been used as predictors of mortality chronic liver diseases listed for liver transplantation. The aim of this study is evaluation of relation between PELDMELD score and evidence of cirrhosis in children with choronic liver disease.   Materials and Method: This cross-sectional study conducted on 106 patients of chronic liver disease referred to Ghaem Haspital, Mashhad University of Medical Science, Iran during 24 months period (2010-2013. PELD and MELD score were calculated for all patients. Clincal and patholoogical findings of cirrhosis were recorded.   Results: Mean age of patients was 68/3 ± 41.8 months. Mean PELDMELD score was -1/59± 9/64. There was significant correlation between PELDMELD score and clinical icter, spelenomegaly, evidence of hepatopulminary syndrome, esophageal varices, evidence of cirrhosis in tissue specimences.   Conclusion: PELDMELD score appear to be benefit for detection of cirrhotic children among paients with choronic liver disease.

  7. Vascular Disease in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, Wilma; Siddiqui, M. Shadab; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasingly being diagnosed and is considered to be the most frequent chronic liver disorder in Western countries. It represents a histopathological spectrum ranging from simple hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis and finally cirrhosis. NAFLD is consider

  8. Transcending chronic liver disease: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, S P

    1997-01-01

    This study explores and describes experiences of chronic liver disease from the patient's perspective. No qualitative research studies appear to have examined the experiences of these patients. In-depth focused interviews and grounded theory data collection and data analysis methods were used. A two-stage theoretical framework (becoming ill, and not living) of the experience of transcending chronic liver disease is presented. Sociological and psychological literature on common sense models of health and illness are briefly reviewed. Several suggestions for further research are made. The way in which this qualitative research study is leading to a quantitative and qualitative appraisal of the psychological adjustment in end-stage chronic liver disease patients is outlined.

  9. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Impaired homeostasis of the blood volume, with increased fluid and sodium retention, is a prevailing element in the deranged systemic and splanchnic haemodynamics in patients with liver disease. In this review, some basic elements of the circulatory changes that take place and of neurohumoral fluid...... regulation are outlined in order to provide an update of recent investigations on the neuroendocrine compensation of circulatory and volume dysfunction in chronic liver disease. The underlying pathophysiology is a systemic vasodilatation in which newly described potent vasoactive substances such as nitric...... and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal neurohumoral...

  10. Worldwide Incidence of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter; Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variation that occurs in the incidence patterns of autoimmune liver diseases may provide insight into the risk factors causing the diseases. We systematically reviewed studies on the incidence of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing...... England. Most studies of PSC found incidence rates around 1 per 100,000 population per year, but there were no incident cases among 100,000 Alaska natives during the period 1984-2000. The incidence of IAC remains unknown. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of the autoimmune liver diseases is around 1-2 per 100......,000 population per year for each disease. The variation in incidence over time and place suggests that there are differences in the prevalence of risk factors for the diseases, but the studies used different methods and so it is difficult to draw firm conclusions. We recommend that groups of investigators...

  11. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  12. Research Progression of Cellular Autophagy in Liver System Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chunyun; Gong Xiangwen; Xiao Xinfa; Yuan Xiangying

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a basic biological phenomenon widely existed in eukaryotic cells and an important mechanism for cells to adjust to the surrounding environment, prevent invasion of pathogenic micro-organisms and maintain homeostasis, whose activity changes evidently in multiple liver system diseases, suggesting that there is close association between autophagy and the generation and development of liver system diseases. It is also reported that autophagy develops and exerts an important function in many liver-related diseases, such as hepatic carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, viral liver disease and acute liver injury. Therefore, this study aimed to summarize the relationship between autophagy and multiple liver diseases, hoping to explore the effect of autophagy in liver system diseases and further study the regulative effect of autophagy so as to provide new thoughts for their treatment.

  13. Defining Normal Liver Stiffness Range in a Normal Healthy Chinese Population without Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    James Fung; Cheuk-kwong Lee; Monica Chan; Wai-kay Seto; Danny Ka-ho Wong; Ching-lung Lai; Man-fung Yuen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic liver disease, different optimal liver stiffness cut-off values correspond to different stages of fibrosis, which are specific for the underlying liver disease and population. AIMS: To establish the normal ranges of liver stiffness in the healthy Chinese population without underlying liver disease. METHODS: This is a prospective cross sectional study of 2,528 healthy volunteers recruited from the general population and the Red Cross Transfusion Center in ...

  14. Nutritional therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Lanti, Claudia; Riso, Patrizia; Valenti, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Following the epidemics of obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of liver disease in western countries. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. To date, there are no approved drugs for the treatment of NAFLD, and the main clinical recommendation is lifestyle modification, including increase of physical activity and the adoption of a healthy eating behavior. In this regard, studies aimed to elucidate the effect of dietary interventions and the mechanisms of action of specific food bioactives are urgently needed. The present review tries to summarize the most recent data evidencing the effects of nutrients and dietary bioactive compounds intake (i.e., long-chain PUFA, Vitamin E, Vitamin D, minerals and polyphenols) on the modulation of molecular mechanisms leading to fat accumulation, oxidative stress, inflammation and liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:26895659

  15. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paula; Iruzubieta; lvaro; Terán; Javier; Crespo; Emilio; Fábrega

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis,but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation,has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties.Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD)and chronic hepatitis C(CHC)virus infection.The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known,but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases.Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease.Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required.

  16. Outcome in cystic fibrosis liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowland, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) does not affect mortality or morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The importance of gender and age in outcome in CF makes selection of an appropriate comparison group central to the interpretation of any differences in mortality and morbidity in patients with CFLD.

  17. Circadian rhythms in liver metabolism and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Ferrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mounting research evidence demonstrates a significant negative impact of circadian disruption on human health. Shift work, chronic jet lag and sleep disturbances are associated with increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, and consequently result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Here, these associations are reviewed with respect to liver metabolism and disease.

  18. Wilson's disease; increased aluminum in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, M; Yoshimasu, F; Yase, Y; Uebayashi, Y

    1979-01-01

    Interaction of trace metal metabolism was studied in a patient with Wilson's dease. Atomic absorption analysis showed markedly increased urinary excretion of copper and aluminum and an increased aluminum content was found in the biopsied liver by neutron activation analysis. These findings suggest a complicated pathogenetic mechanism involving other metals besides copper in the Wilson's disease.

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in developing countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein Bahrami

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly known medical entity with high prevalence, about 1 0 to 24 percent in general population and up to 74% in obese population[1]. The prevalence of the disease is expected to increase worldwide, as we are encountering the global obesity epidemic and the trend in developing countries toward the Western lifestyles. However, it looks that there are some differences between the demographic and epidemiologic features of NAFLD in developing and developed countries.

  20. Immunological response in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) can be attributed to many factors that cause damage to the liver and alter its functions. Data collected over the last 30 years strongly suggests that an immune component may be involved in the onset of this disease. This is best evidenced by the detection of circulating autoantibodies,infiltration of immune cells in the liver, and the detection of hepatic aldehyde modified proteins in patients with ALD. Experimentally, there are numerous immune responses that occur when proteins are modified with the metabolites of ethanol. These products are formed in response to the high oxidative state of the liver during ethanol metabolism, causing the release of many inflammatory processes and potential of necrosis or apoptosis of liver cells. Should cellular proteins become modified with these reactive alcohol metabolites and be recognized by the immune system, then immune responses may be initiated. Therefore, it was the purpose of this article to shed some insight into how the immune system is involved in the development and/or progression of ALD.

  1. Medical therapy for polycystic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Dennison, A; Garcea, G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Somatostatin analogues and rapamycin inhibitors are two classes of drugs available for the management of polycystic liver disease but their overall impact is not clearly established. This article systematically reviews the literature on the medical management of polycystic liver disease. The outcomes assessed include reduction in liver volume and the impact on quality of life. Methods The English language literature published between 1966 and August 2014 was reviewed from a MEDLINE(®), PubMed, Embase™ and Cochrane Library search. Search terms included 'polycystic', 'liver', 'sirolimus', 'everolimus', 'PCLD', 'somatostatin', 'octreotide', 'lanreotide' and 'rapamycin'. Both randomised trials and controlled studies were included. References of the articles retrieved were also searched to identify any further eligible publications. The studies included were appraised using the Jadad score. Results Seven studies were included in the final review. Five studies, of which three were randomised trials, investigated the role of somatostatin analogues and the results showed a mean reduction in liver volume ranging from 2.9% at six months to 4.95 ±6.77% at one year. Only one randomised study examined the influence of rapamycin inhibitors. This trial compared dual therapy with everolimus and octreotide versus octreotide monotherapy. Liver volume reduced by 3.5% and 3.8% in the control and intervention groups respectively but no statistical difference was found between the two groups (p=0.73). Two randomised trials investigating somatostatin analogues assessed quality of life using SF-36(®). Only one subdomain score improved in one of the trials while two subdomain scores improved in the other with somatostatin analogue therapy. Conclusions Somatostatin analogues significantly reduce liver volumes after six months of therapy but have only a modest improvement on quality of life. Rapamycin inhibitors do not confer any additional advantage.

  2. Liver Transplantation for Hepatitis C and Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carbone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available End-stage liver disease due to hepatitis C (HCV and cirrhosis from alcohol (ALD are the commonest indications for liver transplantation in the western countries. Up to one third of HCV-infected transplant candidates have a history of significant alcohol intake prior to transplantation. However, there are few data available about the possible interaction between alcohol and HCV in the post-transplant setting. Patients with both HCV and alcohol are more likely to die on the waiting list than those with ALD and HCV alone. However, after transplantation, non-risk adjusted graft and patient survival of patients with HCV + ALD are comparable to those of patients with HCV cirrhosis or ALD cirrhosis alone. In the short and medium term HCV recurrence after transplant in patients with HCV + ALD cirrhosis does not seem more aggressive than that in patients with HCV cirrhosis alone. A relapse in alcohol consumption in patients with HCV + ALD cirrhosis does not have a major impact on graft survival. The evidence shows that, as is currently practiced, HCV + ALD as an appropriate indication for liver transplantation. However, these data are based on retrospective analyses with relatively short follow-up so the conclusions must be treated with caution.

  3. Caroli's disease and orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid; Shakil, Obaid; Couto, Osvaldo F; Demetris, Anthony J; Fung, John J; Marcos, Amadeo; Chopra, Kapil

    2006-03-01

    Caroli's disease is a rare congenital hepatic disease, characterized by segmental dilatation of the biliary tree. Patients who have recurrent bouts of biliary infection, particularly those with complications related to portal hypertension, may require orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Few case reports have described the outcome of OLT in patients with Caroli's disease and to date there is no large series reported in the literature. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of OLT in patients with Caroli's disease who underwent OLT between 1982 and 2002 at Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh. Patients were identified and data was collected by computerized search of the electronic database system. All patients had confirmation of diagnosis by histopathology of explanted liver. A total of 33 patients with Caroli's disease were listed for liver transplantation, 3 of whom were excluded, as they were not transplanted. A total of 90% had signs of hepatic decompensation at the time of OLT. Median posttransplantation follow-up was 7.7 yr. Short-term graft and patient survival at 1 month was 83% and 86%, whereas overall long-term graft survival rates at 1, 5, and 10 yr were 73%, 62%, and 53%, respectively, and patient survival rates were 76%, 65%, and 56%, respectively. Long-term outcome in patients who survived the first year after transplantation was significantly better. Their survival rate at 5 and 10 yr was 90% and 78%. On univariable analysis, recipient age, donor male gender, coexistent congenital hepatic fibrosis, and re-OLT were associated with poor patient survival. Eight patients were retransplanted, 3 of whom had primary nonfunction. A total of 13 patients died; the most common cause of death being sepsis and cardiovascular complications. Patients who died of sepsis had cholangitis pre-OLT. In conclusion, OLT is a form of curative and life-saving therapy in patients with Caroli's disease, especially in those with decompensated liver

  4. [Liver, bile ducts and pancreatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, T

    1995-06-01

    A fundamental guideline for the use of test results concerning liver, bile duct and pancreatic diseases was proposed in 1991 from the Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (JSCP). This guideline was principally based on the document of 1988 from the Committee on liver function tests of the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSG). The document from the JSG was revised in May, 1994. Also a guideline for selection of markers of hepatitis virus in hepatic disorders, was proposed in January, 1994 from the same Committee of JSG. Here, we reevaluated and discussed the JSCP guideline as taking into consideration the two 1994 JSG documents. PMID:7602802

  5. Treatment of Decompensated Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Menachery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease (ALD is a spectrum ranging from simple hepatic steatosis to alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis can have clinical presentation almost similar to those with decompensated cirrhosis. Scoring with models like Maddrey discriminant function, a model for end-stage liver disease, Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score, and Lille model are helpful in prognosticating patients with ALD. One of the first therapeutic goals in ALD is to induce alcohol withdrawal with psychotherapy or drugs. Most studies have shown that nutritional therapy improves liver function and histology in patients with ALD. The rationale for using glucocorticoids is to block cytotoxic and inflammatory pathways in patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis. Pentoxifylline, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα suppressor, and infliximab, an anti-TNFα mouse/human chimeric antibody, has been extensively studied in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. Liver transplantation remains the definitive therapy for decompensated cirrhosis/alcoholic hepatitis despite the issues of recidivism, poor compliance with postoperative care, and being a self-inflicted disease.

  6. [Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villares, J M

    2008-05-01

    Parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD) is an important problem in patients who require longterm parenteral nutrition as well as in preterm infants. Prevalence varies according to different series. Clinical presentation is different in adults and infants. Although since its first descriptions several hypothesis have been elucidated, the aetiology is not quite clear. It is possible that different factors could be involved. PNALD risk factors can be classified in three groups: 1) those derived from the lack of enteral nutrition stimulus; 2) parenteral nutrition components acting as toxic or the lack of specific nutrients and 3) those due to the underlying disease. If PNALD appears in short-term PN and it presents only as a mild elevation of liver enzymes, there is no need to treat. On the contrary, when direct bilirubin is > 2 mg/dL and lasts longer, there is a need to consider different causes and to minimize risk factors. We review the different approaches to manage PNALD, including optimizing enteral nutrition, modify parenteral solutions, use of specific nutrients -taurine, choline, etc.- or the use of drugs (mainly ursodeoxicolic acid). If liver disease progresses to cirrhosis a liver transplant must be considered.

  7. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per ...

  8. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  9. Arterial hypertension and chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, S

    2005-01-01

    , calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and other vasodilators, and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area. This provides an effective (although relative) counterbalance to raised arterial blood pressure. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during......This review looks at the alterations in the systemic haemodynamics of patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of renal origin. Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic...... the development of chronic liver disease, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in those with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial...

  10. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Tsutsui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases.

  11. Liver diseases in pregnancy: Diseases not unique to pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Ahmed, Khulood T; Rahman, Rubayat N; Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy is a special clinical state with several normal physiological changes that influence body organs including the liver. Liver disease can cause significant morbidity and mortality in both pregnant women and their infants. Few challenges arise in reaching an accurate diagnosis in light of such physiological changes. Laboratory test results should be carefully interpreted and the knowledge of what normal changes to expect is prudent to avoid clinical misjudgment. Other challenges entail...

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongzhong Wei; R Scott Rector; John P Thyfault; Jamal A Ibdah

    2008-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes hepatic steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis,and cirrhosis. NAFLD is the most common liver disorder in the United States and worldwide. Due to the rapid rise of the metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of NAFLD has recently dramatically increased and will continue to increase. NAFLD has also the potential to progress to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver failure. NAFLD is strongly linked to caloric overconsumption, physical inactivity, insulin resistance and genetic factors. Although significant progress in understanding the pathogenesis of NAFLD has been achieved in years, the primary metabolic abnormalities leading to lipid accumulation within hepatocytes has remained poorly understood.Mitochondria are critical metabolic organelles serving as "cellular power plants". Accumulating evidence indicate that hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. This review is focused on the significant role of mitochondria in the development of NAFLD.

  13. Treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juergen Siebler; Peter R Galle

    2006-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause for elevated liver enzymes in the developed nations. Beyond prevention programs which are of particular interest because of the increasing number of overweight children, treatment should be focussed on the most important risk factors, obesity and insulin resistance. As a consequence of elucidating the pathomechanisms of NAFLD, the number of potential therapeutic options increased. However, many studies investigating the therapeutic effect show shortcomings in at least one of the following points: lack of a serial liver biopsy, short term of treatment and limited number of included patients. The second generation insulin sensitizer pioglitazone and rosiglitazone show the most promising improvements in NAFLD, but weight gain and potential hepatotoxicity calls for attention. In conclusion,a general recommendation for the application of specific drugs cannot be given. Besides controlled clinical trials,weight reduction and physical activity to improve insulin sensitivity in obese patients should be the priority objective.

  14. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Iaquinto, G; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  15. Proteasome inhibitor treatment in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia Bardag-Gorce

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress, generated by chronic ethanol consumption, is a major cause of hepatotoxicity and liver injury. Increased production of oxygen-derived free radicals due to ethanol metabolism by CYP2E1 is principally located in the cytoplasm and in the mitochondria, which does not only injure liver cells, but also other vital organs, such as the heart and the brain. Therefore, there is a need for better treatment to enhance the antioxidant response elements. To date, there is no established treatment to attenuate high levels of oxidative stress in the liver of alcoholic patients. To block this oxidative stress, proteasome inhibitor treatment has been found to significantly enhance the antioxidant response elements of hepatocytes exposed to ethanol. Recent studies have shown in an experimental model of alcoholic liver disease that proteasome inhibitor treatment at low dose has cytoprotective effects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and liver steatosis. The beneficial effects of proteasome inhibitor treatment against oxidative stress occurred because antioxidant response elements (glutathione peroxidase 2, superoxide dismutase 2, glutathione synthetase, glutathione reductase, and GCLC) were upregulated when rats fed alcohol were treated with a low dose of PS-341 (Bortezomib, Velcade(r)). This is an important finding because proteasome inhibitor treatment up-regulated reactive oxygen species removal and glutathione recycling enzymes, while ethanol feeding alone down-regulated these antioxidant elements. For the first time, it was shown that proteasome inhibition by a highly specific and reversible inhibitor is different from the chronic ethanol feeding-induced proteasome inhibition. As previously shown by our group, chronic ethanol feeding causes a complex dysfunction in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which affects the proteasome system, as well as the ubiquitination system. The beneficial effects of proteasome inhibitor treatment in alcoholic liver disease

  16. Vitamin E reduces liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiko; Fukui; Naoto; Kawabe; Senju; Hashimoto; Michihito; Murao; Takuji; Nakano; Hiroaki; Shimazaki; Toshiki; Kan; Kazunori; Nakaoka; Masashi; Ohki; Yuka; Takagawa; Tomoki; Takamura; Hiroyuki; Kamei; Kentaro; Yoshioka

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of vitamin E treatment on liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD).METHODS: Thirty-eight NAFLD patients were administered vitamin E for > 1 year. The doses of vitamin E were 150, 300, or 600 mg; three times per day after each meal. Responses were assessed by liver enzyme levels [aspartate aminotransferase(AST), alanine aminotranferease(ALT), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase(γ-GTP)], noninvasive scoring systems of hepatic fibrosis-4 [FIB-4 index and aspartate aminotransferaseto-platelet index(APRI)], and liver stiffness [velocity of shear wave(Vs)] measured by acoustic radiation force impulse elastography. Vs measurements were performed at baseline and 12 mo after baseline. The patients were genotyped for the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3(PNPLA3) polymorphisms and then divided into either the CC/CG or GG group to examine each group’s responses to vitamin E treatment. RESULTS: We found marked differences in the platelet count, serum albumin levels, alkaline phosphatase levels, FIB-4 index, APRI, and Vs at baseline depending on the PNPLA3 polymorphism. AST, ALT, and γ-GTP levels(all P < 0.001); FIB-4 index(P = 0.035); APRI(P < 0.001); and Vs(P < 0.001) significantly decreased from baseline to 12 mo in the analysis of all patients. In the subset analyses of PNPLA3 genotypes, AST levels(P = 0.011), ALT levels(P < 0.001), γ-GTP levels(P = 0.005), APRI(P = 0.036), and Vs(P = 0.029) in genotype GG patients significantly improved, and AST and ALT levels(both P < 0.001), γ-GTP levels(P = 0.003), FIB-4 index(P = 0.017), and APRI(P < 0.001) in genotype CC/CG patients. CONCLUSION: One year of vitamin E treatment improved noninvasive fibrosis scores and liver stiffness in NAFLD patients. The responses were similar between different PNPLA3 genotypes.

  17. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-11-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations.

  18. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  19. Surgical management of polycystic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Adult polycystic liver disease (PCLD) is an autosomal dominant condition commonly associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). However in the last decade, it has been recognized that there is a distinct form of autosomal dominant PCLD that arises without concomitant ADPKD. Early knowledge of the pathogenesis was gained from the study of hepatic cysts in patients with ADPKD. Bile duct overgrowth after embryogenesis results in cystic hepatic dilatations that are known as biliary microhamartomas or von Meyenburg complexes. Further dilatation arises from cellular proliferation and fluid secretion into these cysts.There is a variable, broad spectrum of manifestations of PCLD. Although PCLD is most often asymptomatic,massive hepatomegaly can lead to disabling symptoms of abdominal pain, early satiety, persistent nausea,dyspnea, ascites, biliary obstruction, and lower body edema. Complications of PCLD include cyst rupture and cyst infection. Also, there are associated medical problems, especially intracranial aneurysms and valvular heart disease, which clinicians need to be aware of and evaluate in patients with PCLD. In asymptomatic patients, no treatment is indicated for PCLD. In the symptomatic patient, surgical therapy is the mainstay of treatment tailored to the extent of disease for each patient. Management options include cyst aspiration and sclerosis, open or laparoscopic fenestration, liver resection with fenestration, and liver transplantation.The surgical literature discussing treatment of PCLD,including techniques, outcomes, and complication rates,are summarized in this review.

  20. Vitamin A-induced cholestatic hepatitis: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, P.; Maurer, B.; Schirrmacher, P.;

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of intrahepatic cholestasis due to chronic vitamin A supplementation. A 70-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital for jaundice and reduced nutritional and general status with a 2-month history of increasing cholestasis. Some years previously she had suffered from breast...... and ovarian cancer with subsequent surgery and chemotherapy. Chemotherapy was terminated one month before elevated serum transaminase activities and cholestatic serum markers were noted. Following the chemotherapy, supportive care included weekly vitamin A injections (100,000 IU per injection). Liver biopsy...... showed an acute toxic liver injury with focal parenchymal necrosis, sinusoidal lesions, inflammatory infiltrate (round cells, macrophages), and activation and proliferation of stellate cells. The hepatic vitamin A concentration was found to be significantly elevated. There were no signs of intrahepatic...

  1. Epigenetic regulation in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pranoti Mandrekar

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by steatosis or fat deposition in the liver and inflammation, which leads to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Induction of target genes without involving changes in DNA sequence seems to contribute greatly to liver injury. Chromatin modifications including alterations in histones and DNA, as well as post-transcriptional changes collectively referred to as epigenetic effects are altered by alcohol. Recent studies have pointed to a significant role for epigenetic mechanisms at the nucleosomal level influencing gene expression and disease outcome in ALD. Specifically, epigenetic alterations by alcohol include histone modifications such as changes in acetylation and phosphorylation, hypomethylation of DNA, and alterations in miRNAs. These modifications can be induced by alcohol-induced oxidative stress that results in altered recruitment of transcriptional machinery and abnormal gene expression. Delineating these mechanisms in initiation and progression of ALD is becoming a major area of interest. This review summarizes key epigenetic mechanisms that are dysregulated by alcohol in the liver. Alterations by alcohol in histone and DNA modifications, enzymes related to histone acetylation such as histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetylases and sirtuins, and methylation enzymes such as DNA methyltransferases are discussed. Chromatin modifications and miRNA alterations that result in immune cell dysfunction contributing to inflammatory cytokine production in ALD is reviewed. Finally, the role of alcohol-mediated oxidative stress in epigenetic regulation in ALD is described. A better understanding of these mechanisms is crucial for designing novel epigenetic based therapies to ameliorate ALD.

  2. The Role of Liver Biopsy in the Management of Patients with Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Florence

    2003-01-01

    The role of liver biopsy in the diagnosis and management of liver disease is a controversial issue even among hepatologists. Although most causes of elevated liver enzymes can be determined, or at least suspected, on the basis of a careful history and laboratory tests, histological assessment remains the gold standard for most liver diseases. Histological evaluation can either confirm or refute clinical diagnoses and can provide information about the severity and stage of disease. Occasionall...

  3. Noninvasive investigations for non alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver fi brosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carmen; Fierbinteanu-Braticevici; Ion; Dina; Ana; Petrisor; Laura; Tribus; Lucian; Negreanu; Catalin; Carstoiu

    2010-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a spectrum of diseases that have insulin resistance in common and are associated with metabolic conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. NAFLD ranges from simple liver steatosis, which follows a benign course, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more severe entity, with necroinflmmation and f ibrosis, which can progress to cryptogenic cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for evalu...

  4. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and dive...

  5. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  6. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  7. Correlation between liver morphology and haemodynamics in alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C; Henriksen, J H;

    1985-01-01

    destruction and wedged-to-free hepatic vein pressure (W-FHVP) (p less than 0.001). The degree of necrosis, fatty change and inflammation showed no correlation with portal pressure, whereas a significant positive correlation was found between the occurrence of Mallory bodies and W-FHVP (p less than 0......, hepatic architectural destruction (p less than 0.01) was positively correlated to hepatic resistance. Necrosis, fatty change, occurrence of Mallory bodies or inflammation showed no significant correlation with hepatic resistance. Mean hepatocyte volume was calculated in 29 patients, but no correlation...... was found with haemodynamic variables. The present data substantiate the concept that established portal hypertension in alcoholic liver disease is mainly accomplished by a derangement in hepatic architecture, whereas parenchymal changes, including hepatocyte size, are of less importance....

  8. Adipose tissue-liver axis in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains an important healthproblem worldwide. The disease spectrum is featuredby early steatosis, steatohepatitis (steatosis with inflammatorycells infiltration and necrosis), with someindividuals ultimately progressing to fibrosis/cirrhosis.Although the disease progression is well characterized,no effective therapies are currently available for thetreatment in humans. The mechanisms underlying theinitiation and progression of ALD are multifactorial andcomplex. Emerging evidence supports that adiposetissue dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis ofALD. In the first part of this review, we discuss themechanisms whereby chronic alcohol exposure contributedto adipose tissue dysfunction, including cell death,inflammation and insulin resistance. It has been longknown that aberrant hepatic methionine metabolismis a major metabolic abnormality induced by chronicalcohol exposure and plays an etiological role in thepathogenesis of ALD. The recent studies in our groupdocumented the similar metabolic effect of chronicalcohol drinking on methionine in adipose tissue. Inthe second part of this review, we also briefly discussthe recent research progress in the field with a focuson how abnormal methionine metabolism in adiposetissue contributes to adipose tissue dysfunction and liverdamage.

  9. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Li Zhou; Claire N Medine; Liang Zhu; David C Hay

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation.This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells.Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease.In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases.In recent years,efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own.In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology.

  10. Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and cholestasis: Novel advances in pathomechanisms-based prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orso, Giuseppe; Mandato, Claudia; Veropalumbo, Claudio; Cecchi, Nicola; Garzi, Alfredo; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition constitutes a life-saving therapeutic tool in patients unable to ingest/absorb oral or enteral delivered nutrients. Liver function tests abnormalities are a common therapy-related complication, thus configuring the so-called Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD) or cholestasis (PNAC). Although the damage is frequently mild, and resolves after discontinuation of parenteral nutrition, in some cases it progresses into cirrhotic changes, especially in neonates and infants. We present a literature review focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms-driven prevention and therapies for the cases where parenteral nutrition cannot be discontinued. Ursodeoxycholic acid has been proposed in patients with cholestatic hepatopathy, but its efficacy needs to be better established. Little evidence is available on efficacy of anti-oxidants, antibiotics, probiotics and anti TNFα. Lipid emulsions based on fish oil with a high content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 appear effective both in decreasing intrahepatic inflammation and in improving biliary flow. Most recent promising variations such as soybean/MCT/olive/fish oil emulsion [third generation lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid)] are under investigation. In conclusion, we remark the emergence of a number of novel pathomechanisms underlying the severe liver impairment damage (PNALD and PNAC) in patients treated with parenteral nutrition. Only few traditional and innovative therapeutic strategies have hitherto been shown promising. PMID:26698410

  11. Molecular Therapy and Prevention of Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hubert E. Blum

    2008-01-01

    Molecular analyses have become an integral part of biomedical research as well as clinical medicine. The definition of the genetic basis of many human diseases has led to a better understanding of their pathogenesis and has in addition offered new perspectives for their diagnosis, therapy and prevention. Genetically, human diseases can be classified as hereditary monogenic, acquired monogenic and polygenic diseases. Based on this classification, gene therapy is based on six concepts: (1) gene repair, (2) gene substitution, (3) cell therapy, (4) block of gene expression or function, (5) DNA vaccination and (6) gene augmentation. While major advances have been made in all areas of gene therapy during the last years, various delivery, targeting and safety issues need to be addressed before these strategies will enter clinical practice. Nevertheless, gene therapy will eventually become part of the management of patients with various liver diseases, complementing or replacing existing therapeutic and preventive strategies.

  12. Regenerative and fibrotic pathways in canine liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Liver diseases occur quite frequently in dogs; the overall incidence in dogs has been estimated around 1-2% of the clinical cases. Most liver diseases are, like in humans, chronic and occur through chronic inflammation due to different causes. In all cases the on-going liver cell damage leads to a r

  13. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and histopathology of fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Adam P; Goldin, Robert D

    2012-08-01

    Fatty liver disease includes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), each of which is increasing in prevalence. Each represents a histological spectrum that extends from isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance, and is considered to be the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and ALD involves cytokines, adipokines, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Histopathology is the gold standard for assessing the severity of liver damage in NAFLD and ALD. We have reviewed the literature, and described and compared the epidemiology, natural disease history, pathogenesis and histopathology of NAFLD and ALD.

  14. Autonomic dysfunction in chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frith J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available James Frith, Julia L NewtonNIHR Biomedical Research Centre in Ageing, Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UKAbstract: It is becoming increasingly clear that quality of life (QOL is impaired in those with chronic liver disease (CLD. One of the most important contributors to impaired QOL is the symptomatic burden which can range from slight to debilitating. Autonomic dysfunction accounts for a significant proportion of these symptoms, which can be common, non-specific and challenging to treat. Investigating the autonomic nervous system can be straight forward and can assist the clinician to diagnose and treat specific symptoms. Evidence-based treatment options for autonomic symptoms, specifically in CLD, can be lacking and must be extrapolated from other studies and expert opinion. For those with severely impaired quality of life, liver transplantation may offer an improvement; however, more research is needed to confirm this.Keywords: quality of life, treatment, fatigue, angiotensin II

  15. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-08-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future.

  16. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future. PMID:27570425

  17. Liver stiffness: a novel parameter for the diagnosis of liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Sebastian Mueller1, Laurent Sandrin21Department of Medicine and Center for Alcohol Research, Liver Disease and Nutrition, Salem Medical Center, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Echosens, Department of Research and Development, Paris, FranceAbstract: The noninvasive quantitation of liver stiffness (LS) by ultrasound based transient elastography using FibroScan® has revolutionized the diagnosis of liver diseases, namely liver cirrhosis. Alternative techniques such as acou...

  18. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ Ultrasonography, CT and magnetic resonance have been widely used in the diagnosis of liver diseases in the past 20 years, but the final definite diagnosis of liver space occupying (LSO)lesions can not be made only by imaging methods.

  19. Hepatic encephalopathy as a complication of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephan vom Dahl; Gerald Kircheis; Dieter Haussinger

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Hepatic encephalopathy ( HE) is a frequent complication of chronic liver disease .It is defined as a characteristic functional and reversible alteration of the mental state ,due to impaired liver function and / or increased portosystemic shunting .

  20. Replacement of Diseased Mouse Liver by Hepatic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jonathan A.; Sandgren, Eric P.; Degen, Jay L.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    1994-02-01

    Adult liver has the unusual ability to fully regenerate after injury. Although regeneration is accomplished by the division of mature hepatocytes, the replicative potential of these cells is unknown. Here, the replicative capacity of adult liver cells and their medical usefulness as donor cells for transplantation were investigated by transfer of adult mouse liver cells into transgenic mice that display an endogenous defect in hepatic growth potential and function. The transplanted liver cell populations replaced up to 80 percent of the diseased recipient liver. These findings demonstrate the enormous growth potential of adult hepatocytes, indicating the feasibility of liver cell transplantation as a method to replace lost or diseased hepatic parenchyma.

  1. Endocrine-Manifestations of Cirrhosis and Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Khalili, M

    2014-01-01

    The liver is involved in the synthesis and metabolism of many kinds of hormones, various abnormalities hormone levels are found in advanced liver disease. For example the liver is, extremely sensitive to changes in insulin or glucagon levels. The liver is the primary organ of iron storage is frequently involved, diabetes is common in patients with iron overload and may be seen in cirrhosis. Chronic infection with HCV is associated with insulin resistance. Thyroid disease often accompanies chr...

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Harmeet; Kaufman, Randal J

    2011-04-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated upon the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are sensed by the binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP)/glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). The accumulation of unfolded proteins sequesters BiP so it dissociates from three ER-transmembrane transducers leading to their activation. These transducers are inositol requiring (IRE) 1α, PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), and activating transcription factor (ATF) 6α. PERK phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) resulting in global mRNA translation attenuation, and concurrently selectively increases the translation of several mRNAs, including the transcription factor ATF4, and its downstream target CHOP. IRE1α has kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase) activities. IRE1α autophosphorylation activates the RNase activity to splice XBP1 mRNA, to produce the active transcription factor sXBP1. IRE1α activation also recruits and activates the stress kinase JNK. ATF6α transits to the Golgi compartment where it is cleaved by intramembrane proteolysis to generate a soluble active transcription factor. These UPR pathways act in concert to increase ER content, expand the ER protein folding capacity, degrade misfolded proteins, and reduce the load of new proteins entering the ER. All of these are geared toward adaptation to resolve the protein folding defect. Faced with persistent ER stress, adaptation starts to fail and apoptosis occurs, possibly mediated through calcium perturbations, reactive oxygen species, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP. The UPR is activated in several liver diseases; including obesity associated fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, and alcohol-induced liver injury, all of which are associated with steatosis, raising the possibility that ER stress-dependent alteration in lipid homeostasis is the mechanism that underlies the steatosis. Hepatocyte apoptosis is a pathogenic event in several liver

  3. Is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease? - A mechanistic hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Ivanildo Coutinho; de Lima, Josivan Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) are so similar that only a detailed history of alcohol intake can distinguish one from the other. Because subjects with NAFLD produce significantly more endogenous ethanol (EE) than controls, some researchers suspected that these similarities are not merely coincidental. For this reason, it was attempted to show that NAFLD is actually an endogenous alcoholic fatty liver disease (EAFLD). However, negligible blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) and the inability of gut microbiota to produce hepatotoxic concentrations of EE rejected this hypothesis. To clarify these conflicting results, we provide a mechanistic framework explaining how NAFLD may be an EAFLD. First of all, the key finding is that ethanol is a prodrug, enabling the idea that AFLD may develop with negligible/absent BAC. Second, extrahepatic acetaldehyde (ACD) alone recapitulates AFLD and is about 330-fold more hepatotoxic than that generated inside the liver. Third, gut microbiota can even produce much larger amounts of EE than those currently considered cirrhotogenic for man. Fourth, an extensive gut-liver axis first-pass metabolism of ethanol prevents the development of significant BAC in NAFLD. Fifth, all genes involved in EE metabolism are upregulated in the livers of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Last, overexpression of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 4 implicates liver exposure to high concentrations of EE. In conclusion, this work provides mechanistic explanation supporting the assumption that NAFLD may indeed be an EAFLD. If validated by further testing, the hypothesis may help develop novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against this ubiquitous condition.

  4. New insights into the coagulopathy of liver disease and liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Senzolo; P Burra; E Cholongitas; AK Burroughs

    2006-01-01

    The liver is an essential player in the pathway of coagulation in both primary and secondary haemostasis.Only von Willebrand factor is not synthetised by the liver, thus liver failure is associated with impairment of coagulation. However, recently it has been shown that the delicate balance between pro and antithrombotic factors synthetised by the liver might be reset to a lower level in patients with chronic liver disease. Therefore,these patients might not be really anticoagulated in stable condition and bleeding may be caused only when additional factors, such as infections, supervene. Portal hypertension plays an important role in coagulopathy in liver disease, reducing the number of circulating platelets, but platelet function and secretion of thrombopoietin have been also shown to be impaired in patients with liver disease. Vitamin K deficiency may coexist, so that abnormal clotting factors are produced due to lack of gamma carboxylation. Moreover during liver failure, there is a reduced capacity to clear activated haemostatic proteins and protein inhibitor complexes from the circulation. Usually therapy for coagulation disorders in liver disease is needed only during bleeding or before invasive procedures. When end stage liver disease occurs, liver transplantation is the only treatment available, which can restore normal haemostasis, and correct genetic clotting defects, such as haemophilia or factor V Leiden mutation. During liver transplantation haemorrage may occur due to the pre-existing hypocoagulable state, the collateral circulation caused by portal hypertension and increased fibrinolysis which occurs during this surgery.

  5. Mechanisms of disease progression in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Janice; Choi, Steve S; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2008-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of hepatic pathology, ranging from simple steatosis (also called nonalcoholic fatty liver or NAFL) in its most benign form, to cirrhosis in its most advanced form. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an intermediate level of hepatic pathology. Hepatocyte accumulation of triglyceride is a hallmark of NAFL and NASH, but this sometimes subsides once cirrhosis has developed. Triglyceride storage per se is not hepatotoxic. Rather, it is a marker of increased exposure of hepatocytes to potentially toxic fatty acids. NAFL progresses to NASH when adaptive mechanisms that protect hepatocytes from fatty acid-mediated lipotoxicity become overwhelmed and rates of hepatocyte death begin to outstrip mechanisms that normally regenerate dead hepatocytes. This triggers repair responses that involve activation of hepatic stellate cells to myofibroblasts. The myofibroblasts generate excessive matrix and produce factors that stimulate expansion of liver progenitor populations. The progenitor cells produce chemokines to attract various kinds of inflammatory cells to the liver. They also differentiate to replace the dead hepatocytes. The intensity of these repair responses generally parallel the degree of hepatocyte death, resulting in variable distortion of the hepatic architecture with fibrosis, infiltrating immune cells, and regenerating epithelial nodules. As in other types of chronic liver injury, cirrhosis ensues in patients with NAFLD when repair is extreme and sustained, but ultimately unsuccessful, at reconstituting healthy hepatic epithelia. PMID:18956293

  6. Differential DNA methylation of genes involved in fibrosis progression in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Zeybel, Müjdat; Hardy, Timothy; Robinson, Stuart M.; Fox, Christopher; Anstee, Quentin M.; Ness, Thomas; Masson, Steven; Masson, Steven; French, Jeremy; White, Steve; Mann, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic liver injury can lead to the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis but only in a minority of patients. Currently, it is not clear which factors determine progression to fibrosis. We investigated whether DNA\\methylation profile as determined by pyrosequencing can distinguish patients with mild from those with advanced/severe fibrosis in non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD). To this end, paraffin-embedded liverbiopsies were collected fr...

  7. Recurrence of autoimmune liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease after pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% of children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 30% of those with sclerosing cholangitis (SC) require liver transplantation (LT). LT is indicated in patients who present with fulminant hepatic failure (ie, with encephalopathy) and in those who develop end-stage liver disease despite treatment. After LT, recurrent AIH is reported in approximately 30% of patients and recurrent SC in up to 50%. Diagnosis of recurrence is based on biochemical abnormalities, seropositivity for autoantibodies, interface hepatitis on histology, steroid dependence, and, for SC, presence of cholangiopathy. Recurrence of SC after LT is often associated with poorly controlled inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recurrence may even appear years after LT; therefore, steroid-based immunosuppression should be maintained at a higher dose than that used for patients transplanted for nonautoimmune liver diseases. Although the impact of recurrent disease on graft function is controversial, it seems that in pediatric LT recipients recurrence of AIH or SC is associated with compromised graft survival. Exacerbation of preexistent IBD may be observed after LT for SC or AIH, and IBD appears to have a more aggressive course than before LT. In addition, IBD can develop de novo following LT. Liver Transplantation 22 1275-1283 2016 AASLD. PMID:27257963

  8. Liver Disorders in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Uko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the hepatobiliary system are relatively common extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. These disorders are sometimes due to a shared pathogenesis with IBD as seen in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC and small-duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (small-duct PSC. There are also hepatobiliary manifestations such as cholelithiasis and portal vein thrombosis that occur due to the effects of chronic inflammation and the severity of bowel disease. Lastly, medications used in IBD such as sulfasalazine, thiopurines, and methotrexate can adversely affect the liver. It is important to be cognizant of these disorders as some do have serious long-term consequences. The management of these disorders often requires the expertise of multidisciplinary teams to achieve the best outcomes.

  9. Psychosocial stress and liver disease status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristin Constantin Vere; Costin Teodor Streba; Letitia Maria Streba; Alin Gabriel Ionescu; Felix Sima

    2009-01-01

    "Psychosocial stress" is an increasingly common concept in the challenging and highly-demanding modern society of today. Organic response to stress implicates two major components of the stress system,namely the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system. Stress is anamnestically reported by patients during the course of disease, usually accompanied by a decline in their overall health status. As the mechanisms involving glucocorticoids and catecholamines have been deciphered, and their actions on immune cell function deeper understood, it has become clear that stress has an impact on hepatic inflammatory response. An increasing number of articles have approached the link between psychosocial stress and the negative evolution of hepatic diseases. This article reviews a number of studies on both human populations and animal models performed in recent years, all linking stress, mainly of psychosocial nature, and the evolution of three important liver-related pathological entities: viral hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes. PMID:26421020

  11. Simultaneous liver-pancreas transplantation for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease : A multicenter experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, R. H. J.; Bozic, M. A.; Fridell, J. A.; Crull, M. H.; Molleston, J.; Avitzur, Y.; Mozer-Glassberg, Y.; Gonzalez-Peralta, R. P.; Hodik, M.; Fecteau, A.; de Angelis, M.; Durie, P.; Ng, V. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While liver transplantation is well established for CF-related liver disease (CFLD), the role of simultaneous liver pancreas transplantation is less understood. Methods: We polled 81 pedi

  12. Polycystic liver disease: ductal plate malformation and the primary cilium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wills, E.S.; Roepman, R.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic livers are found in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), caused by polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1 and PKD2 mutations in virtually all cases, and in isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD), where 20% of cases are caused by mutations in Protein kinase C substrate 80K-H (

  13. Towards quantitative magnetic resonance assessment in parenchymal liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stoker, J.; Beuers, U.H.W.; Nederveen, A.J.; Runge, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis several advanced magnetic resonance (MR) techniques for quantitative measurements in parenchymal liver disease are studied. In particular, certain important hallmarks of liver disease such as steatosis, fibrosis, iron overload and inflammation are studied. Steatosis or fatty liver disease can be ascertained invasively—with biopsy—but is preferable assessed non-invasively, for example with MR techniques. This thesis shows that both MR imaging and spectroscopy are preferable over...

  14. Long term prognosis of fatty liver: risk of chronic liver disease and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Larsen, S; Franzmann, M; Andersen, I B;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Fatty liver is a common histological finding in human liver biopsy specimens. It affects 10-24% of the general population and is believed to be a marker of risk of later chronic liver disease. The present study examined the risk of development of cirrhotic liver disease...... and the risk of death in a cohort diagnosed with pure fatty liver without inflammation. METHODS: A total of 215 patients who had a liver biopsy performed during the period 1976-1987 were included in the study. The population consisted of 109 non-alcoholic and 106 alcoholic fatty liver patients. Median follow...... of Patients and the nationwide Registry of Causes of Death, and all admissions, discharge diagnoses, and causes of death were obtained. RESULTS: In the non-alcoholic fatty liver group, one patient developed cirrhosis during the follow up period compared with 22 patients in the alcoholic group. Survival...

  15. Liver diseases in pregnancy: diseases not unique to pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Ahmed, Khulood T; Rahman, Rubayat N; Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2013-11-21

    Pregnancy is a special clinical state with several normal physiological changes that influence body organs including the liver. Liver disease can cause significant morbidity and mortality in both pregnant women and their infants. Few challenges arise in reaching an accurate diagnosis in light of such physiological changes. Laboratory test results should be carefully interpreted and the knowledge of what normal changes to expect is prudent to avoid clinical misjudgment. Other challenges entail the methods of treatment and their safety for both the mother and the baby. This review summarizes liver diseases that are not unique to pregnancy. We focus on viral hepatitis and its mode of transmission, diagnosis, effect on the pregnancy, the mother, the infant, treatment, and breast-feeding. Autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, Wilson's disease, Budd Chiari and portal vein thrombosis in pregnancy are also discussed. Pregnancy is rare in patients with cirrhosis because of the metabolic and hormonal changes associated with cirrhosis. Variceal bleeding can happen in up to 38% of cirrhotic pregnant women. Management of portal hypertension during pregnancy is discussed. Pregnancy increases the pathogenicity leading to an increase in the rate of gallstones. We discuss some of the interventions for gallstones in pregnancy if symptoms arise. Finally, we provide an overview of some of the options in managing hepatic adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma during pregnancy.

  16. Ovarian carcinoma in two patients with chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehlika Isildak; Gulay Sain Guven; Murat Kekilli; Yavuz Beyazit; Mustafa Erman

    2005-01-01

    Ascites is a common and debilitating complication of cirrhosis. However, patients with chronic liver disease are not spared from other causes of ascites and physicians should be careful not to miss an underlying malignancy.Ovarian cancer is an insidious disease, which is difficult to diagnose and it ranks first in mortality among all gynecological cancers. Here, we present two cases of patients with chronic liver disease that developed ascites not simply because of cirrhosis but as a manifestation of ovarian cancer. We would like to emphasize that the causes of ascites, other than the liver itself, should not be overlooked in patients with chronic liver disease.

  17. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  18. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Gitto; Erica Villa

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent signifi...

  19. Regenerative and fibrotic pathways in canine liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Spee, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Liver diseases occur quite frequently in dogs; the overall incidence in dogs has been estimated around 1-2% of the clinical cases. Most liver diseases are, like in humans, chronic and occur through chronic inflammation due to different causes. In all cases the on-going liver cell damage leads to a reduction of the functional liver cell mass and progressive deposition of fibrous tissue in the liver. These two phenomena, atrophy and fibrosis, are two sides of one medal and go hand in hand to ca...

  20. Molecular Basis and Current Treatment for Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Armendariz-Borunda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorders and alcohol dependency affect millions of individuals worldwide. The impact of these facts lies in the elevated social and economic costs. Alcoholic liver disease is caused by acute and chronic exposure to ethanol which promotes oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Chronic consumption of ethanol implies liver steatosis, which is the first morphological change in the liver, followed by liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. This review comprises a broad approach of alcohol use disorders, and a more specific assessment of the pathophysiologic molecular basis, and genetics, as well as clinical presentation and current modalities of treatment for alcoholic liver disease.

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 is a member of the TLR family that can recognize double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, playing an important role in antiviral immunity. Recent studies have shown that TLR3 is also expressed on parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells in the liver as well as on several types of immune cells. In this review, we summarize the role of TLR3 in liver injury, inflammation, regeneration, and liver fibrosis, and discuss the implication of TLR3 in the pathogenesis of human liver diseases including viral hepatitis and autoimmune liver disease.

  2. Nutrition and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Effects of Alcoholism on Nutrition, Effects of Nutrition on Alcoholic Liver Disease, and Nutritional Therapies for Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2016-08-01

    Malnutrition is the most frequent and nearly universal consequence in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) that adversely affects clinical outcomes. Sarcopenia or skeletal muscle loss is the major component of malnutrition in liver disease. There are no effective therapies to prevent or reverse sarcopenia in ALD because the mechanisms are not well understood. Consequences of liver disease including hyperammonemia, hormonal perturbations, endotoxemia and cytokine abnormalities as well as the direct effects of alcohol and its metabolites contribute to sarcopenia in ALD. This article focuses on the prevalence, methods to quantify malnutrition, specifically sarcopenia and potential therapies including novel molecular targeted treatments. PMID:27373615

  3. Liver transplantation in PBC and PSC: indications and disease recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James

    2011-06-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represent major indications for liver transplantation (LT). Despite the steady increase in the incidence and prevalence of PBC, the number of liver transplants for PBC has fallen in recent years, whereas the number of transplants for PSC has remained stable. Indications for LT for PBC and PSC are no different from those of other causes of chronic liver disease, apart from some disease-specific indications. PBC and PSC have more favourable outcomes after LT, compared to viral hepatitis and alcohol-associated liver disease. Numerous studies have clearly demonstrated that PBC and PSC recur after LT. The diagnosis of recurrent disease should be made on agreed criteria. The impact of recurrent disease on survival is unclear. Study of recurrent PBC and PSC may provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of these diseases in the native liver.

  4. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cholestatic hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Perrini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There are few reports in the literature of hepatitis as a manifestation of Parvovirus B19 infection. We describe a case of Parvovirus B19 associated acute cholestatic hepatitis diagnosed based on a positive serologic test (IgM and molecular detection of parvovirus B19 DNA in peripheral blood. Parvovirus B19 infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patient presenting with acute hepatitis of unknown etiology.

  5. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cholestatic hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Perrini, S; B. Guidi; Torelli, P; A. Forte

    2014-01-01

    There are few reports in the literature of hepatitis as a manifestation of Parvovirus B19 infection. We describe a case of Parvovirus B19 associated acute cholestatic hepatitis diagnosed based on a positive serologic test (IgM) and molecular detection of parvovirus B19 DNA in peripheral blood. Parvovirus B19 infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patient presenting with acute hepatitis of unknown etiology.

  6. Novel approaches to assessing renal function in cirrhotic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Andrew J; Austin, Mark; Heneghan, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in patients with end-stage liver disease. Etiological factors include conditions as diverse as acute tubular necrosis, immunoglobulin A nephropathy and hepatorenal syndrome. Current standard tests of renal function, such as measurement of serum urea and creatinine levels, are inaccurate as the synthesis of these markers is affected by the native liver pathology. This article reviews novel markers of renal function and their potential use in patients with liver disease.

  7. Diagnostic challenges in alcohol use disorder and alcoholic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vonghia, Luisa; Michielsen, Peter; Dom, Geert; Francque, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders represent a heterogeneous spectrum of clinical manifestations that have been defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5. Excessive alcohol intake can lead to damage of various organs, including the liver. Alcoholic liver disease includes different injuries ranging from steatosis to cirrhosis and implicates a diagnostic assessment of the liver disease and of its possible complications. There is growing interest in the possible different tools f...

  8. Telomere and telomerase in chronic liver disease and hepatocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Carulli, Lucia; Anzivino, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis is not completely elucidated. Although in the majority of patients, the risk factors may be identified in B and C viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, drugs or fatty liver disease, there is a small percentage of patients with no apparent risk factors. In addition, the evolution of chronic liver disease is highly heterogeneous from one patient to another. Among patient with identical risk factors, some rapidly progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (...

  9. Successful Treatment of Recurrent Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation with Oral Vancomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinka K. Davies

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a progressive, cholestatic disease of the liver that is marked by inflammation of the bile ducts and damage to the hepatic biliary tree. Approximately 60–70% of patients also have inflammatory bowel disease and progression of PSC can lead to ulcerative colitis and cirrhosis of the liver. Due to limited understanding of the etiology and mechanism of PSC, the only existing treatment option is orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT; however, recurrence of PSC, after OLT is estimated to be between 5% and 35%. We discuss the successful treatment of a pediatric patient, with recurrent PSC, after OLT with oral Vancomycin.

  10. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases (mainl

  11. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: From patient to population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Koehler (Edith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries, in parallel with epidemics in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. NAFLD comprises a wide range of histological findings, extending from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic stea

  12. S-adenosyl-L-methionine for alcoholic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is a major cause of liver disease and disrupts methionine and oxidative balances. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) acts as a methyl donor for methylation reactions and participates in the synthesis of glutathione, the main cellular antioxidant. Randomised clinical trials have addressed...... the question whether SAMe may benefit patients with alcoholic liver diseases....

  13. Endocrine-Manifestations of Cirrhosis and Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khalili

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The liver is involved in the synthesis and metabolism of many kinds of hormones, various abnormalities hormone levels are found in advanced liver disease. For example the liver is, extremely sensitive to changes in insulin or glucagon levels. The liver is the primary organ of iron storage is frequently involved, diabetes is common in patients with iron overload and may be seen in cirrhosis. Chronic infection with HCV is associated with insulin resistance. Thyroid disease often accompanies chronic hepatitis C infection .Anti thyroid autoantibodies are also found in chronic HCV infection. Nonalcoholic liver disease (NAFLDas a most common cause of chronic liver disease in western world ,as well accompanied by Type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Hypopituitarism and hypothyroidism also have been in NAFLD.The patients with NAFLD and Hypopituitarism may be susceptible to central obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance leading to disease progression. Hepatic cirrhosis as the end stage of chronic liver disease is also associated with hypogonadism and signs of feminization. The peripheral metabolism of steroids is altered in many of hypogonadism, low testosterone level decreased libido, infertility, reduced secondary sex hair and gynecomastia, reduced spermatogenesis and peritubular fibrosis are found in men with cirrhosis .The normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis is affected in liver disease. In cirrhotic patients the estrogen/androgen ratio is usually increased, the level of testosterone and dihydroepiandosteron are reduced while the estradiol level are normal or slightly elevated, these alterations are dependent on the severity of the liver disease.Succsesfull orthotropic liver transplantation  leads to improvement of the sex hormone disturbances. The pathogenesis of gynecomastia is due to the loss of equilibrium between estrogen and androgen caused by a feminizing state but it is due to increased estrogen precursor in

  14. The application of radioimmunoassay to diagnosis of liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of serum hyaluronic acid and serum prolactin were determined by radioimmunoassay in patients with liver diseases. The results show that the level of serum hyaluronic acid in patients with CAH or liver cirrhosis is significantly higher than those of normal control subjects. The difference is remarkable (P<0.01). The mean value of patient group gradually increases with the increasing of liver damage. The serum hyaluronic acid can be used as a predictive indicator to diagnose CAH and early liver cirrhosis. In addition, the level of serum prolactin in patients with liver cirrhosis is also much higher than those of normal control subjects. Thus the serum prolactin may be used as an associate biochemical marker for detecting liver cirrhosis. The mechanism of the change of serum hyaluronic acid and prolactin in patients with liver diseases is presented

  15. Gut microbiota and probiotics in chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Claudia; Tiso, Angelo; Del Prete, Anna; Cariello, Rita; Tuccillo, Concetta; Cotticelli, Gaetano; Del Vecchio Blanco, Camillo; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-06-01

    There is a strong relationship between liver and gut: the portal system receives blood from the gut, and intestinal blood content activates liver functions. The liver, in turn, affects intestinal functions through bile secretion into the intestinal lumen. Alterations of intestinal microbiota seem to play an important role in induction and promotion of liver damage progression, in addition to direct injury resulting from different causal agents. Bacterial overgrowth, immune dysfunction, alteration of the luminal factors, and altered intestinal permeability are all involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis, such as infections, hepatic encephalopathy, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and renal failure. Probiotics have been suggested as a useful integrative treatment of different types of chronic liver damage, for their ability to augment intestinal barrier function and prevent bacterial translocation. This review summarizes the main literature findings about the relationships between gut microbiota and chronic liver disease, both in the pathogenesis and in the treatment by probiotics of the liver damage. PMID:21163715

  16. Assessment of fibrotic liver disease with multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Tai, Dean C. S.; Lin, Jian; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagens, which may result in cirrhosis, liver failure, and portal hypertension. In this study, we apply a multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform developed to investigate the fibrotic liver diseases in rat models established by performing bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery. The three nonlinear microscopy imaging modalities are implemented on the same sectioned tissues of diseased model sequentially: i.e., second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging quantifies the contents of the collagens, the two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging reveals the morphology of hepatic cells, while coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging maps the distributions of fats or lipids quantitatively across the tissue. Our imaging results show that during the development of liver fibrosis (collagens) in BDL model, fatty liver disease also occurs. The aggregated concentrations of collagen and fat constituents in liver fibrosis model show a certain correlationship between each other.

  17. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: The liver disease of our age?

    OpenAIRE

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric preval...

  18. Steatosis as a co-factor in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcello; Persico; Achille; Iolascon

    2010-01-01

    The finding of lipid accumulation in the liver, so-called hepatic steatosis or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, is a common condition frequently found in healthy subjects. Its prevalence, in fact, has been estimated by magnetic resonance studies to be about 35% in the general population and 75% in obese persons. Nevertheless, its presence generates liver damage only in a small percentage of subjects not affected by other liver diseases. It should be defined as a "co-factor" capable of affecting severity a...

  19. Roles of liver innate immune cells in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disease in the United States and other developed countries and is expected to increase in the next few years. Emerging data suggest that some patients with NAFLD may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD can also promote the development and progression of disease in other organ systems, such as the cardiovascular and endocrine (i.e. diabetes) systems. Thus, understanding th...

  20. Markers of autoimmune liver diseases in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Secil Demirdal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a common complication of chronic liver diseases. However, there is limited information about autoimmune liver diseases as a factor of secondary osteoporosis. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the autoantibodies of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis. METHODS: One hundred fifty female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis were included. Bone mineral density was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. We analysized autoantibodies including antinuclear antibodies, liver membrane antibodies, anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, liver-specific protein, antismooth muscle antibodies, and anti-mitochondrial antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. Serum was assayed for the levels of aminotransferases. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 63,13±8,6 years. The mean values of L1-L4 T-scores and femur total T-scores were -3,08±0,58 and -1,53±0,81, respectively. Among the 150 patients with osteoporosis, 14 (9.3% were antinuclear antibodies, four (2.7% were liver membrane antibodies, three (2.0% were anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, and two (1.3% were liver-specific protein positive. None of the patients had anti-mitochondrial antibodies or smooth muscle antibodies positivity. The mean values of levels of aminotransferases were within normal range. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of liver membrane antibodies, liver-specific protein, and anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1 has permitted us to see that there may be some suspicious clues of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis as a secondary risk factor. On the other hand, there is a need for comprehensive studies with a larger sample size and studies designed to compare the results with a normal population to understand the clinical importance of our findings.

  1. Cell therapy for liver diseases: current medicine and future promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandra, Meza-Ríos; Juan, Armendáriz-Borunda; Ana, Sandoval-Rodríguez

    2015-06-01

    Liver diseases are a major health problem worldwide since they usually represent the main causes of death in most countries, causing excessive costs to public health systems. Nowadays, there are no efficient current therapies for most hepatic diseases and liver transplant is infrequent due to the availability of organs, cost and risk of transplant rejection. Therefore, alternative therapies for liver diseases have been developed, including cell-based therapies. Stem cells (SCs) are characterized by their self-renewing capacity, unlimited proliferation and differentiation under certain conditions into tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. Cell-based therapies for liver diseases have been successful in experimental models, showing anti-inflammatory, antifibrogenic and regenerative effects. Nowadays, clinical trials using SCs for liver pathologies are increasing in number, and those that have reached publication have achieved favorable effects, encouraging us to think that SCs will have a potential clinical use in a short time.

  2. Role of lipid rafts in liver health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angela Dolganiuc

    2011-01-01

    Liver diseases are an increasingly common cause of morbidity and mortality; new approaches for investigation of mechanisms of liver diseases and identification of therapeutic targets are emergent. Lipid rafts (LRs) are specialized domains of cellular membranes that are enriched in saturated lipids; they are small, mobile, and are key components of cellular architecture, protein partition to cellular membranes, and signaling events. LRs have been identified in the membranes of all liver cells, parenchymal and non-parenchymal; more importantly, LRs are active participants in multiple physiological and pathological conditions in individual types of liver cells. This article aims to review experimental-based evidence with regard to LRs in the liver, from the perspective of the liver as a whole organ composed of a multitude of cell types. We have gathered up-to-date information related to the role of LRs in individual types of liver cells, in liver health and diseases, and identified the possibilities of LR-dependent therapeutic targets in liver diseases.

  3. Ovarian carcinoma in two patients with chronic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Isildak, Mehlika; Guven, Gulay Sain; Kekilli, Murat; Beyazit, Yavuz; Erman, Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    Ascites is a common and debilitating complication of cirrhosis. However, patients with chronic liver disease are not spared from other causes of ascites and physicians should be careful not to miss an underlying malignancy. Ovarian cancer is an insidious disease, which is difficult to diagnose and it ranks first in mortality among all gynecological cancers. Here, we present two cases of patients with chronic liver disease that developed ascites not simply because of cirrhosis but as a manifes...

  4. Differential DNA methylation of genes involved in fibrosis progression in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zeybel, Müjdat; Hardy, Timothy; Robinson, Stuart M.; Fox, Christopher; Anstee, Quentin M.; Ness, Thomas; Masson, Steven; Masson, Steven; French, Jeremy; White, Steve; Mann, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    RESEARCH Open Access Differential DNA methylation of genes involved in fibrosis progression in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease Müjdat Zeybel1, Timothy Hardy1, Stuart M Robinson1, Christopher Fox1, Quentin M Anstee1, Thomas Ness2, Steven Masson1, John C Mathers1, Jeremy French1, Steve White1 and Jelena Mann1* Abstract Background: Chronic liver injury can lead to the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis but only in a minority of patie...

  5. Gut microbiome and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lixin; Baker, Robert D; Baker, Susan S

    2015-01-01

    We review recent findings and hypotheses on the roles of gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). Microbial metabolites and cell components contribute to the development of hepatic steatosis and inflammation, key components of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the severe form of NAFLD. Altered gut microbiome can independently cause obesity, the most important risk factor for NAFLD. This capability is attributed to short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), major gut microbial fermentation products. SCFAs account for a large portion of caloric intake of the host, and they enhance intestinal absorption by activating GLP-2 signaling. However, elevated SCFAs may be an adaptive measure to suppress colitis, which could be a higher priority than imbalanced calorie intake. The microbiome of NASH patients features an elevated capacity for alcohol production. The pathomechanisms for alcoholic steatohepatitis may apply to NASH. NAFLD/NASH is associated with elevated Gram-negative microbiome and endotoxemia. However, many NASH patients exhibited normal serum endotoxin indicating that endotoxemia is not required for the pathogenesis of NASH. These observations suggest that microbial intervention may benefit NAFLD/NASH patients. However, very limited effects were observed using traditional probiotic species. Novel probiotic therapy based on NAFLD/NASH specific microbial composition represents a promising future direction. PMID:25310763

  6. Concepts in leptin and liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Badawy Reda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is a cytokine l6kd peptide hormone. Its crucial role is regulation of appetite and the body fat mass mainly through action on the hypothalamus. It is produced mainly in adipocytes of white fat, as well as from other tissues e.g. placenta, skeletal muscles, fundus of the stomach and activated hepatic stellate cell (HSC and recently reported that leptin is produced from B cell of islands of the pancreas. The gene responsible for production is present on chromosome 7 called obse gene (ob/gene. Leptin receptors (OB-R were present in two forms short (OB-Ra or OB-RS and long one (OB-Rb or OB-RI. The main action of leptin depends on long form (OB-Rl, where very little evidence is available implicating a role for the short form in the action of leptin. One of the unconventional areas in which leptin is now receiving great attention is liver diseases as several published studies indicate that circulating leptin level are increased in cirrhosis, hepatitis C virus (HCV and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH

  7. Uncoupling protein and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xi; XIANG Zun; CHEN Yi-peng; MA Kui-fen; YE Yue-fang; LI You-ming

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the current advances on the role of uncoupling protein (UCP) in the pathogenesis and progress of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).Data sources A comprehensive search of the PubMed literature without restriction on the publication date was carried out using keywords such as UCP and NAFLD.Study selection Articles containing information related to NAFLD and UCP were selected and carefully analyzed.Results The typical concepts,up-to-date findings,and existing controversies of UCP2 in NAFLD were summarized.Besides,the effect of a novel subtype of UCP (hepatocellular down regulated mitochondrial carrier protein,HDMCP) in NAFLD was also analyzed.Finally,the concept that any mitochondrial inner membrane carrier protein may have,more or less,the uncoupling ability was reinforced.Conclusions Considering the importance of NAFLD in clinics and UCP in energy metabolism,we believe that this review may raise research enthusiasm on the effect of UCP in NAFLD and provide a novel mechanism and therapeutic target for NAFLD.

  8. Bone changes in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism has been associated with growth impairment,osteomalacia, delayed fracture healing, and asepticnecrosis (primarily necrosis of the femoral head), butthe main alterations observed in the bones of alcoholicpatients are osteoporosis and an increased risk offractures. Decreased bone mass is a hallmark of osteoporosis,and it may be due either to decreased bone synthesis and/or to increased bone breakdown. Ethanolmay affect both mechanisms. It is generally acceptedthat ethanol decreases bone synthesis, and most authorshave reported decreased osteocalcin levels (a "marker" ofbone synthesis), but some controversy exists regardingthe effect of alcohol on bone breakdown, and, indeed,disparate results have been reported for telopeptideand other biochemical markers of bone resorption.In addition to the direct effect of ethanol, systemicalterations such as malnutrition, malabsorption, liverdisease, increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines,alcoholic myopathy and neuropathy, low testosteronelevels, and an increased risk of trauma, play contributoryroles. The treatment of alcoholic bone disease should beaimed towards increasing bone formation and decreasingbone degradation. In this sense, vitamin D and calciumsupplementation, together with biphosphonates areessential, but alcohol abstinence and nutritional improvementare equally important. In this review we study thepathogenesis of bone changes in alcoholic liver diseaseand discuss potential therapies.

  9. [Liver damage caused by drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeyer, G; Weik, C

    1999-05-01

    The liver has a central role in the metabolism of many drugs, since this organ is the main site of biotransformation of endo- and xenobiotics. Water-soluble drugs have a small volume of distribution and can be eliminated unchanged in the urine. By contrast, lipid-soluble drugs have a larger volume of distribution and require conversion to water-soluble metabolites for their elimination in urine or bile. The liver with its specific receptors, transporters and enzymes is responsible for the uptake, transformation and excretion of the lipophilic drugs. While most of the drugs are transformed into stable metabolites, other drugs form reactive, potentially toxic, metabolites producing liver cell damage. Liver injury caused by drugs may mimic almost any kind of liver disease. Clinical findings are gastrointestinal symptoms with nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, cholestatic liver injury with jaundice and pruritus of severe inflammatory and cirrhotic liver damage with signs of liver failure, encephalopathy and cerebral edema. The morphological changes vary from hepatitis, cholestasis, fatty liver, granulomatous hepatitis, peri-/portal inflammation, to fibrosis with cirrhotic alterations and vascular lesions and tumors. The most commonly used drugs causing severe liver injury are discussed in detail. These are anabolics, oral contraceptives, antituberculous and antifungal agents, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ring substituted amphetamins ("designer drugs"), antiarrhythmics and antibiotics.

  10. Soft drinks consumption and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William; Nseir; Fares; Nassar; Nimer; Assy

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) is a common clinical condition which is associated with metabolic syndrome in 70% of cases.Inappropriate dietary fat intake,excessive intake of soft drinks,insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress combine to increase free fatty acid delivery to the liver,and increased hepatic triglyceride accumulation contributes to fatty liver.Regular soft drinks have high fructose corn syrup which contains basic sugar building blocks,fructose 55% and glucose 45%.Soft drinks...

  11. Scintigraphic patterns of veno-occlusive disease in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstine, Hanna; Mor, Eytan; Ben Ari, Ziv; Belinki, Alexander; Hardoff, Ruth

    2004-05-01

    Venous vascular complications in liver transplant recipients are rare. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical criteria and typical findings on liver biopsy. The scintigraphic patterns of posttransplant liver veno-occlusive disease are described, and the value of follow-up studies is suggested. The authors present 2 patients who developed posttransplantation hepatic veno-occlusive disease. The first patient had a severe form of the disease and a fatal outcome. The second patient had a mild to moderate form of this disorder with complete resolution following treatment. PMID:15069326

  12. Adiponectin and its receptors in rodent models of fatty liver disease and liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Markus Neumeier; Jürgen Sch(o)lmerich; Christa Buechler; Claus Hellerbrand; Erwin G(a)bele; Roland Buettner; Cornelius Bollheimer; Johanna Weigert; Andreas Sch(a)ffler; Thomas S Weiss; Monika Lichtenauer

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine circulating and hepatic adiponectin in rodents with fatty liver disease or liver cirrhosis and investigate expression of the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 on the mRNA and protein level and AdipoR2 on the mRNA level.METHODS: Fat fed rats were used as a model for fatty liver disease and bile duct ligation in mice to investigate cirrhotic liver. Expression of AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mRNA was determined by real time RT-PCR. AdipoR1 protein was analysed by immunoblot. Adiponectin was measured by ELISA.RESULTS: Systemic adiponectin is reduced in fat fed rats but is elevated in mice after bile duct ligation (BDL). Hepatic adiponectin protein is lower in steatotic liver but not in the liver of BDL-mice when compared to controls. Adiponectin mRNA was not detected in human liver samples or primary human hepatocytes nor in rat liver but recombinant adiponectin is taken up by isolated hepatocytes in-vitro. AdipoR1 mRNA and AdipoR1 protein levels are similar in the liver tissue of control and fat fed animals whereas AdipoR2 mRNA is induced. AdipoR2 mRNA and AdipoR1 mRNA and protein is suppressed in the liver of BDL-mice.CONCLUSION: Our studies show reduced circulating adiponectin in a rat model of fatty liver disease whereas circulating adiponectin is elevated in a mouse model of cirrhosis and similar findings have been described in humans. Diminished hepatic expression of adiponectin receptors was only found in liver cirrhosis.

  13. Reversal of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian; Kodjabashia, Kamelia; Nixon, Emma;

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intestinal failure (IF) and home parenteral nutrition commonly develop abnormal liver function tests. The presentations of IF-associated liver disease (IFALD) range from mild cholestasis or steatosis to cirrhosis and decompensated liver disease. We describe the reversal of IFALD...... in an adult patient with IF secondary to severe Crohn's disease and multiple small bowel resections. The patient developed liver dysfunction and pathology consistent with IFALD. Multiple causal factors were implicated, including nutrition-related factors, catheter sepsis and the use of hepatotoxic medications....... Multidisciplinary treatment in a tertiary IF referral centre included aggressive sepsis management, discontinuation of hepatotoxic medications and a reduction of parenteral nutrition dependency through optimisation of enteral nutrition via distal enteral tube feeding. Upon this, liver function tests normalised....

  14. Role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Kolios; Vassilis Valatas; Elias Kouroumalis

    2006-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages have long been considered as mostly scavenger cells responsible for removing particulate material from the portal circulation. However, evidence derived mostly from animal models, indicates that Kupffer cells may be implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases including viral hepatitis, steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, intrahepatic cholostasis, activation or rejection of the liver during liver transplantation and liver fibrosis. There is accumulating evidence, reviewed in this paper, suggesting that Kupffer cells may act both as effector cells in the destruction of hepatocytes by producing harmful soluble mediators as well as antigen presenting cells during viral infections of the liver. Moreover they may represent a significant source of chemoattractant molecules for cytotoxic CD8 and regulatory T cells. Their role in fibrosis is well established as they are one of the main sources of TGFβ1 production, which leads to the transformation of stellate cells into myofibroblasts. Whether all these variable functions in the liver are mediated by different Kupffer cell subpopulations remains to be evaluated. In this review we propose a model that demonstrates the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  15. Nuclear Accident Crisis and Liver Disease: A Summary on Evidences

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2013-01-01

    The present global concern is on the adverse effect due to exposure to nuclides expelled from the disrupted nuclear power plant accident in Japan. The exposure can induce several adverse effects. In this specific brief review, the author summarizes the evidences on the effect on liver. Discussion is focused on several liver diseases.

  16. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined. We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens. The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating. Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN. PMID:26222864

  17. The Natural Course of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzadilla Bertot, Luis; Adams, Leon Anton

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease in the world, paralleling the epidemic of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). NAFLD exhibits a histological spectrum, ranging from "bland steatosis" to the more aggressive necro-inflammatory form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may accumulate fibrosis to result in cirrhosis. Emerging data suggests fibrosis, rather than NASH per se, to be the most important histological predictor of liver and non-liver related death. Nevertheless, only a small proportion of individuals develop cirrhosis, however the large proportion of the population affected by NAFLD has led to predictions that NAFLD will become a leading cause of end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and indication for liver transplantation. HCC may arise in non-cirrhotic liver in the setting of NAFLD and is associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and male gender. The MetS and its components also play a key role in the histological progression of NAFLD, however other genetic and environmental factors may also influence the natural history. The importance of NAFLD in terms of overall survival extends beyond the liver where cardiovascular disease and malignancy represents additional important causes of death. PMID:27213358

  18. Epidemiology of alcoholic liver disease in Denmark 2006-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Thomas; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Becker, Ulrik;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To describe incidence, prevalence, hospitalization rates and survival for alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in Denmark 2006-2011. METHODS: Using nationwide healthcare registries we identified all Danish residents with a hospital diagnosis of ALD and computed standardized incidence, prevalence, ...

  19. Encephalopathy in Wilson disease: copper toxicity or liver failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenci, Peter; Litwin, Tomasz; Seniow, Joanna; Czlonkowska, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex syndrome of neurological and psychiatric signs and symptoms that is caused by portosystemic venous shunting with or without liver disease irrespective of its etiology. The most common presentation of Wilson disease (WD) is liver disease and is frequently associated with a wide spectrum of neurological and psychiatric symptoms. The genetic defect in WD leads to copper accumulation in the liver and later in other organs including the brain. In a patient presenting with Wilsonian cirrhosis neuropsychiatric symptoms may be caused either by the metabolic consequences of liver failure or by copper toxicity. Thus, in clinical practice a precise diagnosis is a great challenge. Contrary to HE in neurological WD consciousness, is very rarely disturbed and pyramidal signs, myoclonus dominate. Asterixis and many other clinical symptoms may be present in both disease conditions and are quite similar. However details of neurological assessment as well as additional examinations could help in differential diagnosis.

  20. Adiponectin, a key adipokine in obesity related liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christa Buechler; Josef Wanninger; Markus Neumeier

    2011-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprising hepatic steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH),and progressive liver fibrosis is considered the most common liver disease in western countries. Fatty liver is more prevalent in overweight than normal-weight people and liver fat positively correlates with hepatic insulin resistance. Hepatic steatosis is regarded as a benign stage of NAFLD but may progress to NASH in a subgroup of patients. Besides liver biopsy no diagnostic tools to identify patients with NASH are available, and no effective treatment has been established. Visceral obesity is a main risk factor for NAFLD and inappropriate storage of triglycerides in adipocytes and higher concentrations of free fatty acids may add to increased hepatic lipid storage, insulin resistance, and progressive liver damage. Most of the adipose tissue-derived proteins are elevated in obesity and may contribute to systemic inflammation and liver damage. Adiponectin is highly abundant in human serum but its levels are reduced in obesity and are even lower in patients with hepatic steatosis or NASH. Adiponectin antagonizes excess lipid storage in the liver and protects from inflammation and fibrosis. This review aims to give a short survey on NAFLD and the hepatoprotective effects of adiponectin.

  1. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stål, Per

    2015-10-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD.

  2. Anaphylaxis from intravascular rupture of Hydatid disease following liver trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Marriott

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Echinococcosis also known as cystic hydatid disease is a parasitic infection endemic in many parts of the world. Humans are accidental intermediate hosts with cysts most commonly developing in the liver. This case describes a rare presentation of hydatid disease following trauma to the liver. Intraparenchymal cyst rupture led to haemodynamic instability with release of the parasites protoscolices into hepatic venules producing severe life threatening anaphylaxis.

  3. Role of spleen elastography in patients with chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Mariangela; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella

    2016-09-21

    The development of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension (PH), one of its major complications, are structural and functional alterations of the liver, occurring in many patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). Actually the progressive deposition of hepatic fibrosis has a key role in the prognosis of CLD patients. The subsequent development of PH leads to its major complications, such as ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding and decompensation. Liver biopsy is still considered the reference standard for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis, whereas the measurement of hepatic vein pressure gradient is the standard to ascertain the presence of PH and upper endoscopy is the method of choice to detect the presence of oesophageal varices. However, several non-invasive tests, including elastographic techniques, are currently used to evaluate the severity of liver disease and predict its prognosis. More recently, the measurement of the spleen stiffness has become particularly attractive to assess, considering the relevant role accomplished by the spleen in splanchnic circulation in the course of liver cirrhosis and in the PH. Moreover, spleen stiffness as compared with liver stiffness better represents the dynamic changes occurring in the advanced stages of cirrhosis and shows higher diagnostic performance in detecting esophageal varices. The aim of this review is to provide an exhaustive overview of the actual role of spleen stiffness measurement as assessed by several elastographic techniques in evaluating both liver disease severity and the development of cirrhosis complications, such as PH and to highlight its potential and possible limitations.

  4. DIFFERENT MODELS OF HEPATOTOXICITY AND RELATED LIVER DISEASES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Robin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver is among the most complex and important organs in the human body. Its primary function is to control the flow and safety of substances absorbed from the digestive system before distribution of these substances to the systemic circulatory system. Hepatotoxicity implies chemical-driven liver damage. Chemicals that cause liver injury are called hepatotoxins. Hepatic injury leads to disturbances in transport function of hepatocytes resulting in leakage of plasma membrane thereby causing an increased enzyme level in serum. There are many diseases that are related with hepatotoxicity caused by certain chemicals or hepatotoxins. Herbal medicines are great demand in various chemicals and drugs disordered hepatic, the developed world for primary health care because of their efficacy, safety, lesser side effects and narrow therapeutic window. This review focus on liver, its function, liver diseases and different models of hepatotoxicity.

  5. Alcoholic liver disease and hepatitis C: A frequently underestimated combination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sebastian Mueller; Gunda Millonig; Helmut K Seitz

    2009-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represent, either alone or in combination, more than two thirds of all patients with liver disease in the Western world. This review discusses the epidemiology and combined impact of ALD and HCV on the progression of liver disease. ALD and HCV affect the progression of liver disease to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a synergistic manner. Thus, the risk for HCC increases five times with a daily alcohol consumption of 80 g; in the presence of HCV it is increased 20-fold, and a combination of both risk factors leads to a more than 100-fold risk for HCC development. Alcohol consumption also decreases the response to interferon treatment which is probably due to a lack of compliance than a direct effect on HCV replication. Several molecular mechanisms are discussed that could explain the synergistic interaction of alcohol and HCV on disease progression. They include modulation of the immune response and apoptosis, increased oxidative stress via induction of CYP2E1 and the hepatic accumulation of iron. Thus, both HCV and alcohol independently cause hepatic iron accumulation in > 50% of patients probably due to suppression of the liver-secreted systemic iron hormone hepcidin. A better understanding of hepcidin regulation could help in developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat the chronic disease in the future. For now, it can be generally concluded that HCV-infected patients should abstain from alcohol and alcoholics should be encouraged to participate in detoxification programs.

  6. Chronic liver disease related mortality pattern in northern Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the mortality pattern pertaining to chronic liver disease (CLD) in Northern Pakistan. Results: There were a total of 8529 admissions in twelve months period from August 2001 to July 2002. There were 283 (3.31%) total deaths. Out of these, 160 deaths were pertaining to medical causes. Out of these medical cases, 33 (20.6%) patients had died of chronic liver disease. Other major causes of death were cerebro-vascular accident (18.7%), malignancy (18.1%) and acute myocardial infarction (10.6%). Out of 33 patients of CLD, 12 (36%) presented with acute gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding, 9(27%) presented with Ascites and 6(18%) presented with altered mental status due to hepatic encephalopathy. Rest of them had jaundice and fever as their initial presentation. Out of these 33 patients with CLD, 23 (70%) had hepatitis C virus (HCV) as cause of their liver disease, 4 (12%) had hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, 3(9%) had both hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections and 3 (9%) had no known cause of their chronic liver disease. Conclusion: Chronic liver disease is a major cause of mortality in this part of Pakistan at a tertiary care hospital. HCV infection is the main cause of chronic liver disease followed by either HBV or a combination of these viruses. Major manifestations of CLD have been gastrointestinal bleeding, hepatic failure and portal hypertension.(author)

  7. Fontan-associated liver disease: Implications for heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Steven C; Crossland, David S; Hudson, Mark; Martin, Steven R; Myers, Robert P; Prieur, Tim; Hasan, Asif; Kirk, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are associated with multiple complications, including cirrhosis, portal hypertension, ascites, synthetic dysfunction and hepatocellular carcinoma, and these processes are increasingly recognized in post-Fontan patients. Fontan-associated liver disease (FALD) can be defined as abnormalities in liver structure and function that result from the Fontan circulation and are not related to another disease process. FALD arises due to chronic congestion of the liver created by the elevated venous pressure and low cardiac output of the Fontan circulation, which may be superimposed on previous liver injury. Pathology studies have generally shown that FALD worsens as time post-Fontan increases, but the prevalence of FALD is not well defined because the majority of Fontan patients, even those with significant hepatic fibrosis, appear to be asymptomatic and biochemical or functional hepatic abnormalities are usually subtle or absent. Alternate non-invasive investigations, derived from the study of other chronic liver diseases, have been tested in small series of pediatric and adult Fontan patients, but they have been confounded by congestion and do not correlate well with liver biopsy findings. Liver disease can complicate Fontan circulatory failure and may even be significant enough to be considered a contraindication to heart transplantation or require combined heart-liver transplantation. The search for the optimal management strategy continues in the setting of increasing numbers of Fontan patients surviving to adulthood and being referred for heart transplantation. Thus, in this review we attempt to define the scope and significance of FALD and address transplant-related assessment and management of this challenging disorder. PMID:26586487

  8. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-10-21

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current "gold standard" for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence.

  9. MR imaging features of focal liver lesions in Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohan, Anthony; Vargas, Ottavia; Dautry, Raphael; Guerrache, Youcef; Woimant, France; Hamzi, Lounis; Boudiaf, Mourad; Poujois, Aurelia; Faraoun, Sid Ahmed; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic involvement in Wilson disease (WD) manifests as a diffuse chronic disease in the majority of patients. However, in a subset of patients focal liver lesions may develop, presenting with a wide range of imaging features. The majority of focal liver lesions in patients with WD are benign nodules, but there are reports that have described malignant liver tumors or dysplastic nodules in these patients. Because of the possibility of malignant transformation of liver nodules, major concerns have been raised with respect to the management and follow-up of patients with WD in whom focal liver lesions have been identified. The assessment of liver involvement in patients with WD is generally performed with ultrasonography. However, ultrasonography conveys limited specificity so that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is often performed to improve lesion characterization. This review was performed to illustrate the spectrum of MR imaging features of focal liver lesions that develop in patients with WD. It is assumed that familiarity with the MR imaging presentation of focal liver lesions in WD may help clarify the actual nature of hepatic nodules in patients with this condition.

  10. MR imaging features of focal liver lesions in Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohan, Anthony; Vargas, Ottavia; Dautry, Raphael; Guerrache, Youcef; Woimant, France; Hamzi, Lounis; Boudiaf, Mourad; Poujois, Aurelia; Faraoun, Sid Ahmed; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic involvement in Wilson disease (WD) manifests as a diffuse chronic disease in the majority of patients. However, in a subset of patients focal liver lesions may develop, presenting with a wide range of imaging features. The majority of focal liver lesions in patients with WD are benign nodules, but there are reports that have described malignant liver tumors or dysplastic nodules in these patients. Because of the possibility of malignant transformation of liver nodules, major concerns have been raised with respect to the management and follow-up of patients with WD in whom focal liver lesions have been identified. The assessment of liver involvement in patients with WD is generally performed with ultrasonography. However, ultrasonography conveys limited specificity so that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is often performed to improve lesion characterization. This review was performed to illustrate the spectrum of MR imaging features of focal liver lesions that develop in patients with WD. It is assumed that familiarity with the MR imaging presentation of focal liver lesions in WD may help clarify the actual nature of hepatic nodules in patients with this condition. PMID:27116011

  11. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M F; Al-Mahtab, M; Rahman, S; Debnath, C R

    2015-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging problem in Hepatology clinics. It is closely related to the increased frequency of overweight or obesity. It has recognised association with metabolic syndrome. Central obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia are commonest risk factors. Association with hepatitis C genotype 3 is also recognised. NAFLD is an important cause of cyptogenic cirrhosis of liver. It affects all populations and all age groups. Most patients with NAFLD are asymptomatic or vague upper abdominal pain. Liver function tests are mostly normal or mild elevation of aminotranferases. Histological features almost identical to those of alcohol-induced liver damage and can range from mild steatosis to cirrhosis. Two hit hypothesis is prevailing theory for the development of NAFLD. Diagnosis is usually made by imaging tools like ultrasonogram which reveal a bright liver while liver biopsy is gold standard for diagnosis as well as differentiating simple fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Prognosis is variable. Simple hepatic steatosis generally has a benign long-term prognosis. However, one to two third of NASH progress to fibrosis or cirrhosis and may have a similar prognosis as cirrhosis from other liver diseases. Treatment is mostly control of underlying disorders and dietary advice, exercise, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, or cytoprotective agents. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing. So it needs more research to address this problem. PMID:26620035

  12. Meta-analysis: antioxidant supplements for liver diseases - the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, L L; Nikolova, D;

    2010-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal.......Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  13. Hepatobiliary Disorders in Celiac Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal K. Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication reviews recent literature and summarizes hepatobiliary abnormalities that may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. A wide spectrum of hepatobiliary diseases has been described, including asymptomatic elevations of liver enzyme levels, nonspecific hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. Moreover, in the majority of patients, liver enzyme levels will normalize on a gluten-free diet. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma. Because many celiac patients do not have overt gastrointestinal symptoms, a high index of suspicion is required. Simple methods of detecting celiac disease such as serum antibody tests help in the early identification of the disease, thus preventing serious complications of the disorder. The IgG DGP antibody test and IgA tTG antibody test used in combination are an excellent screening test for suspected cases of celiac disease.

  14. Clopidogrel-induced cholestatic liver injury in an old woman and literature review%氯吡格雷致胆汁淤积性肝损伤一例报道并文献回顾

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳勋; 吴静; 魏南; 王沧海

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction Clopidogrel is a thienopyridine derivative platelet aggrega-tion inhibitor that irreversibly and selectively binding to adenylate cyclase-coupled ADP receptors on the platelet surface,which has been shown to be effective in the secondary prevention of cardio-vascular events.Hepatotoxicity is a rare side-effect of clopi-dogrel, however, cases has been reported gradually since 2000,including one case of fatal liver injury[1] and two cases of system-ic inflammatory response syndrome ( SIRS)[2-3] associated with clopidogrel.

  15. Increased Porphyrins in Primary Liver Cancer Mainly Reflect a Parallel Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kaczynski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic porphyries have been associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer (PLC, which on the other hand may cause an increased porphyrin production. To evaluate the role of an underlying liver disorder we analyzed porphyrins in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC (n=65, cholangiocellular carcinoma (n=3, or suspected PLC, which turned out to be metastases (n=18 or a benign disorder (n=11. None of the patients had a family history of porphyry or clinical signs of porphyry. Increased aminolevulinic acid or porphyrin values were common not only in patients with PLC (43% but also in metastatic (50% and benign (64% liver disorders. The corresponding proportion for HCC patients with liver cirrhosis (55% was higher (P<.05 than in those without cirrhosis (17%. We conclude that symptomatic porphyries are unusual in PLC, whereas elevated urinary and/or faecal porphyrins are common, primarily reflecting a parallel liver disease and not the PLC.

  16. Hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with liver disease: correlation of liver enhancement with biochemical liver function tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuk, Guido M.; Schaefer, Stephanie G.; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R.; Schild, Hans H.; Willinek, Winfried A. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Spengler, Ulrich [Department of Internal Medicine I, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA in relation to various liver function tests in patients with liver disorders. Fifty-one patients with liver disease underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI. Based on region-of-interest (ROI) analysis, liver signal intensity was calculated using the spleen as reference tissue. Liver-spleen contrast ratio (LSCR) and relative liver enhancement (RLE) were calculated. Serum levels of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin level (AL), prothrombin time (PT), creatinine (CR) as well as international normalised ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were tested for correlation with LSCR and RLE. Pre-contrast LSCR values correlated with total bilirubin (r = -0.39; p = 0.005), GGT (r = -0.37; p = 0.009), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), ALT (r = -0.29; p = 0.046), PT (r = 0.52; p < 0.001), GLDH (r = -0.55; p = 0.044), INR (r = -0.42; p = 0.003), and MELD Score (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). After administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA bilirubin (r = -0.45; p = 0.001), GGT (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), PT (r = 0.54; p < 0.001), AST (r = -0.46; p = 0.002), ALT (r = -0.31; p = 0.030), INR (r = -0.45; p = 0.001) and MELD Score (r = -0.56; p < 0.001) significantly correlated with LSCR. RLE correlated with bilirubin (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), PT (r = 0.42; p = 0.003), GGT (r = -0.33; p = 0.020), INR (r = -0.36; p = 0.011) and MELD Score (r = -0.43; p = 0.003). Liver-spleen contrast ratio and relative liver enhancement using Gd-EOB-DTPA correlate with a number of routinely used biochemical liver function tests, suggesting that hepatobiliary MRI may serve as a valuable biomarker for liver function. The strongest correlation with liver enhancement was found for the MELD Score. (orig.)

  17. [Rare case of cystic disease of the liver - alveolar echinococcosis of the liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupka, Tomáš; Baľa, Peter; Hozáková, Lubomíra; Havelka, Jaroslav; Bojková, Martina; Břegová, Bohdana; Martínek, Arnošt; Dítě, Petr

    2015-06-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a rare parasitic disease, especially of liver, caused by larval stage of tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. At the end of the last century France, Germany, Austria and Switzerland were the most often regions with this disease, these days is this infection diagnosed also in our territory. We describe the case of the disease of the twenty-five years old male with nonspecific signs and hepatomegaly, who was diagnosed on the basis of imaging and laboratory sampling. Due to inoperability the patient is now in infectologist follow-up on a long-term treatment with albendazole. He is clinically stable, included in waiting list for liver transplantation.Key words: alveolar echinococcosis - benzimidazols - Echinococcus multilocularis - parasitic disease of liver. PMID:26258967

  18. Clinical usefulness of biochemical markers of liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Sakugawa; Fukunori Kinjo; Atsushi Saito; Tomofumi Nakayoshi; Kasen Kobashigawa; Tsuyoshi Yamashiro; Tatsuji Maeshiro; Satoru Miyagi; Joji Shiroma; Akiyo Toyama; Tomokuni Nakayoshi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and progresses to the end stage of liver disease. Biochemical markers of liver fibrosis are strongly associated with the degree of histological liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease.However, data are few on the usefulness of markers in NAFLD patients. The aim of this study was to identify better noninvasive predictors of hepatic fibrosis, with special focus on markers of liver fibrosis, type Ⅵ collagen 7S domain and hyaluronic acid.METHODS: One hundred and twelve patients with histologically proven NAFLD were studied.RESULTS: The histological stage of NAFLD correlated with several clinical and biochemical variables, the extent of hepatic fibrosis and the markers of liver fibrosis were relatively strong associated. The best cutoff values to detect NASH were assessed by using receiver operating characteristic analysis: type Ⅵ collagen 7S domain ≥5.0 ng/mL, hyaluronic acid ≥43 ng/mL. Both markers had a high positive predictive value: type Ⅵ collagen 7S domain, 86% and hyaluronic acid,92%. Diagnostic accuracies of these markers were evaluated to detect severe fibrosis. Both markers showed high negative predictive values: type Ⅵ collagen 7S domain (≥5.0 ng/mL),84% and hyaluronic acid (≥50 ng/mL), 78%, and were significantly and independently associated with the presence of NASH or severe fibrosis by logistic regression analysis.CONCLUSION: Both markers of liver fibrosis are useful in discriminating NASH from fatty liver alone or patients with severe fibrosis from patients with non-severe fibrosis.

  19. Impact of Aging on Liver Histological Findings of Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Haga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to investigate the recent liver biopsy findings of autoimmune liver diseases at a university hospital located in an urban area of Japan. The study included 259 patients (mean age 56.8 ± 12.5; male/female, 46/213 who underwent a liver biopsy for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC or autoimmune hepatitis (AIH. We analyzed their liver biopsy findings according to age and gender. Among 127 PBC patients, Scheuer stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 42, 54, 18, and 13, respectively. Among 101 AIH patients, fibrosis stages F1, F2, F3, and F4 were 37, 32, 19, and 13, respectively, and inflammatory activity grades A1, A2, and A3 were 22, 25, and 54, respectively. Among PBC aged ≥65 years, Scheuer stages 1–3 and 4 patients were 27 and 6, respectively. The proportion of Scheuer stage 4 patients in PBC aged ≥65 years tended to be higher than that in PBC aged <65 years (p = 0.0659. Of interest, the proportion of AIH patients with moderate or severe activity (A2 or A3 in males was higher than in females (p = 0.0311. From the point of view of fibrosis stage or inflammatory activity grade of the liver, the proportion of AIH patients aged ≥65 years was similar to that aged <65 years. Although we identified six older cirrhotic patients with AIH, three of them were male. The progression of fibrosis and inflammatory activity of the liver should be noted when we treat older patients suffering from autoimmune liver diseases. Liver biopsy plays an important role in obtaining accurate information on autoimmune liver diseases in older patients.

  20. Liver-derived human mesenchymal stem cells: a novel therapeutic source for liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yini; Yu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Ermei; Li, Lanuan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an attractive cell type for research and therapy due to their ability to proliferate, differentiate, modulate immune reactions, and secrete trophic factors. MSCs exist in a multitude of tissues, including bone marrow, umbilical cord, and adipose tissues. Moreover, MSCs have recently been isolated from the liver. Compared with other MSC types, liver-derived human MSCs (LHMSCs) possess general morphologies, immune functions, and differentiation capacities. Interestingly, LHMCSs produce higher levels of pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic cytokines than those of bone marrow-derived MSCs. Thus, these cells may be a promising therapeutic source for liver diseases. This paper summarizes the biological characteristics of LHMSCs and their potential benefits and risks for the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:27176654

  1. Toxic and drug-induced liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970353 Distribution and significance of endothelin-1and endothelin receptor a mRNA in liver after endo-toxemia. LIU Baohua(刘宝华), et al. Dept Surg, Dap-ing Hosp, 3rd Milit Med Univ, Chongqing, 630042.Natl Med J China 1997; 77(3): 171-173. Objective: To study the distribution and significance

  2. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Synopsis of current developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyekwere, C A; Ogbera, A O; Samaila, A A; Balogun, B O; Abdulkareem, F B

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which is defined as the accumulation of fat>5% of liver weight is increasingly becoming an important cause of chronic liver disease. This article tries to chronicle advances that have occurred in the understanding of the pathogenesis, pathology as well as the management of this disease. We have done a Medline search on published work on the subject and reviewed major conference proceedings in the preceding years. The Pathogenesis involves a multi-hit process in which increased accumulation of triglycerides in face of insulin resistance results in increased susceptibility to inflammatory damage mediated by increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and adipokines, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and gut derived endotoxemia. An interplay of multiple metabolic genetic expression and environmental factors however determine which patient with NAFLD will progress from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and liver cirrhosis. The minimum criteria for diagnosis of NASH are steatosis, ballooning and lobular inflammation; fibrosis is not required. The NASH Clinical Research Network (CRN), histological scoring system is used to grade and stage the disease for standardization. The management of NAFLD consists of treating liver disease as well as associated metabolic co-morbidities such as obesity, hyperlipidaemia, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patient education is important as their insight and commitment is pivotal, and lifestyle modification is the first line of treatment. Improvement in liver histology in non-diabetic NASH patients has been reported with use of Vitamin E. Other liver-related therapies under investigations include pentoxyfiylins, Caspar inhibitors, Resveratrol as well as probiotics. The prognosis (both overall and liver-related mortality) for simple steatosis is not different from that of the general population however

  3. Prevalence of Hepatitis G Virus in Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Takagi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of hepatitis G virus (HGV in liver disease of non-A, -B, -C viral hepatitis, hepatitis B and hepatitis C was determined. Two of 44 patients (4.5% with liver injury without any hepatitis A, B or C marker were positive for HGV. One of five cases of hepatocellular carcinoma was positive for HGV. One of three cases with fulminant hepatitis was positive for HGV. This case was negative at the onset of fulminant hepatitis and became positive after plasmapheresis. No patient with acute (n=8 or chronic (n=5 hepatitis or liver cirrhosis (n=8 was positive for HGV in non-A, -B, -C liver disease. One of 30 patients with various HBV-positive liver diseases and nine (17.3 of 52 patients with type C liver disease were positive for HGV. In patients with hepatitis C, four (28.6% of 14 HGV-co-infected patients were complicated with diabetes mellitus compared with four (10.5% of 38 single hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients (not significant. In 12 HGV-positive patients, eight of 10 (80% had a history of blood transfusion. In HCV-positive patients, co-infection with HGV was not a risk factor in patients with diabetes mellitus as a complication. HGV appeared to cause non-A, -B, -C hepatitis rarely, and its main route of infection was blood transfusion.

  4. Polycystic liver diseases: advanced insights into the molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugorria, Maria J; Masyuk, Tatyana V; Marin, Jose J; Marzioni, Marco; Bujanda, Luis; LaRusso, Nicholas F; Banales, Jesus M

    2014-12-01

    Polycystic liver diseases are genetic disorders characterized by progressive bile duct dilatation and/or cyst development. The large volume of hepatic cysts causes different symptoms and complications such as abdominal distension, local pressure with back pain, hypertension, gastro-oesophageal reflux and dyspnea as well as bleeding, infection and rupture of the cysts. Current therapeutic strategies are based on surgical procedures and pharmacological management, which partially prevent or ameliorate the disease. However, as these treatments only show short-term and/or modest beneficial effects, liver transplantation is the only definitive therapy. Therefore, interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis is increasing so that new targets for therapy can be identified. In this Review, the genetic mechanisms underlying polycystic liver diseases and the most relevant molecular pathways of hepatic cystogenesis are discussed. Moreover, the main clinical and preclinical studies are highlighted and future directions in basic as well as clinical research are indicated.

  5. Chronic liver disease in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, M V; Zawawi, M M

    1990-08-01

    This study was undertaken to analyse the clinical spectrum of chronic liver disease (cirrhosis, and others with portal hypertension) in Kuala Lumpur. Eighty patients were diagnosed over a 6-year period. Twenty-two had biopsy proven cirrhosis while 58 others had portal hypertension with clinical and biochemical evidence of chronic liver disease. The commonest aetiology was alcohol (36%), followed by the idiopathic variety and hepatitis B. The male to female ratio was 4.4:1. Indians had a high prevalence of alcohol-associated chronic liver disease. Overall, ascites was the commonest presentation. Eight patients presented with hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis was diagnosed in 13% of patients undergoing abdominal paracentesis. Gallstones were detected in 37% of patients who underwent ultrasonography. Diabetes mellitus and peptic ulcer disease were noted in 22% and 31% of patients respectively.

  6. Hepatic stellate cells and innate immunity in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang-Gun Suh; Won-Il Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Constant alcohol consumption is a major cause of chronic liver disease, and there has been a growing concern regarding the increased mortality rates worldwide. Alcoholic liver diseases (ALDs) range from mild to more severe conditions, such as steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The liver is enriched with innate immune cells (e.g. natural killer cells and Kupffer cells) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and interestingly, emerging evidence suggests that innate immunity contributes to the development of ALDs (e.g. steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis). Indeed, HSCs play a crucial role in alcoholic steatosis via production of endocannabinoid and retinol metabolites. This review describes the roles of the innate immunity and HSCs in the pathogenesis of ALDs, and suggests therapeutic targets and strategies to assist in the reduction of ALD.

  7. Liver stiffness by transient elastography predicts liver-related complications and mortality in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack X Q Pang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver stiffness measurement (LSM by transient elastography (TE, FibroScan is a validated method for noninvasively staging liver fibrosis. Most hepatic complications occur in patients with advanced fibrosis. Our objective was to determine the ability of LSM by TE to predict hepatic complications and mortality in a large cohort of patients with chronic liver disease. METHODS: In consecutive adults who underwent LSM by TE between July 2008 and June 2011, we used Cox regression to determine the independent association between liver stiffness and death or hepatic complications (decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation. The performance of LSM to predict complications was determined using the c-statistic. RESULTS: Among 2,052 patients (median age 51 years, 65% with hepatitis B or C, 87 patients (4.2% died or developed a hepatic complication during a median follow-up period of 15.6 months (interquartile range, 11.0-23.5 months. Patients with complications had higher median liver stiffness than those without complications (13.5 vs. 6.0 kPa; P<0.00005. The 2-year incidence rates of death or hepatic complications were 2.6%, 9%, 19%, and 34% in patients with liver stiffness <10, 10-19.9, 20-39.9, and ≥40 kPa, respectively (P<0.00005. After adjustment for potential confounders, liver stiffness by TE was an independent predictor of complications (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05 per kPa; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.06. The c-statistic of liver-stiffness for predicting complications was 0.80 (95% CI 0.75-0.85. A liver stiffness below 20 kPa effectively excluded complications (specificity 93%, negative predictive value 97%; however, the positive predictive value of higher results was sub-optimal (20%. CONCLUSIONS: Liver stiffness by TE accurately predicts the risk of death or hepatic complications in patients with chronic liver disease. TE may facilitate the estimation of prognosis and guide management of these patients.

  8. Hepatitis C virus infection in chronic liver disease in Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceti, A; Taliani, G; Bruni, R; Sharif, O S; Moallin, K A; Celestino, D; Quaranta, G; Sebastiani, A

    1993-04-01

    To assess the role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in liver disease in Somalia, antibody to HCV (anti-HCV) was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) in 110 patients with chronic liver diseases, in 309 healthy adults, in 179 institutionalized subjects with a high prevalence of intestinal parasites and Schistosoma haematobium, and in 287 children with diseases other than hepatitis. According to the RIBA test, anti-HCV was present in three healthy adults (0.97%), in four institutionalized individuals (2.2%), but in none of the children. The prevalence of anti-HCV was 4.8% in patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive chronic liver diseases and 20.6% in patients with HBsAg-negative chronic liver diseases. Thus, HCV infection appears to play a minor role in HBsAg-positive liver disease in Somalia but may be an important factor in HBsAg-negative chronic liver disease. The low anti-HCV prevalence in individuals with no hepatic disorders is consistent with the fact that HCV does not spread by nonpercutaneous transfer. We found also a large proportion of both patients with hepatic disease and institutionalized individuals who tested positive by ELISA but not confirmed by RIBA. However, the likelihood of a true positive result increases proportionally with the ELISA value; thus, in most cases a low ELISA value probably represents a false-positive reaction, while a high ELISA value probably represents a true positive reaction. PMID:7683179

  9. Understanding mechanisms of the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Metin; Basaranoglu; Serra; Kayacetin; Nevin; Yilmaz; Ertugrul; Kayacetin; Orhan; Tarcin; Abdullah; Sonsuz

    2010-01-01

    A central issue in the understanding of the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the problem of the underlying mechanisms which are not fully understood.In the setting of excessive central adiposity,insulin resistance is the major underlying cause of fat accumulation in hepatocytes.Because of the difficulties with human trials,several animal models have been developed for this purpose mainly characterized as follows:genetically disturbed or murine fatty liver,methionine-choline deficient diet...

  10. Current Concepts and Management Approaches in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Attar, Bashar M.; Van Thiel, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver dysfunction worldwide. NAFLD may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and in turn cirrhosis. Importantly, hepatic cancer can occur in NASH in the absence of cirrhosis. The cardinal histologic feature of NAFLD is the presence of an excessive accumulation of triacylglycerols and diacylglycerols in hepatocytes. The presence of obesity and insulin resistance lead to an increased hepatic-free fatty acid (FFA) flu...

  11. Orthotropic liver transplantation for intractable neurological manifestations of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutariya, Vaibhav K; Tank, Anad H; Modi, Pranjal R

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder characterized by copper accumulation and toxicity, affecting mainly the liver and brain. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the definitive therapy for patients with WD. Acute fulminant hepatic failure and decompensated cirrhosis are well-established indications for OLT. Patients with severe neurologic impairment can also be benefited by OLT. Here, we present a patient who underwent OLT for isolated neurological WD.

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI) in Patients with Pre-Existing Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Danan, Gaby

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between drugs and pre-existing liver disease is complex, particularly when increased liver tests (LTs) or new symptoms emerge in patients with pre-existing liver disease during drug therapy. This requires two strategies to assess whether these changes are due to drug-induced liver injury (DILI) as a new event or due to flares of the underlying liver disease. Lacking a valid diagnostic biomarker, DILI is a diagnosis of exclusion and requires causality assessment by RUCAM, the Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method, to establish an individual causality grading of the suspected drug(s). Flares of pre-existing liver disease can reliably be assessed in some hepatotropic virus infections by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and antibody titers at the beginning and in the clinical course to ascertain flares during the natural course of the disease. Unfortunately, flares cannot be verified in many other liver diseases such as alcoholic liver disease, since specific tests are unavailable. However, such a diagnostic approach using RUCAM applied to suspected DILI cases includes clinical and biological markers of pre-existing liver diseases and would determine whether drugs or underlying liver diseases caused the LT abnormalities or the new symptoms. More importantly, a clear diagnosis is essential to ensure effective disease management by drug cessation or specific treatment of the flare up due to the underlying disease. PMID:27091053

  13. Obesity, Nutrition and Liver Disease in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Feldstein, Ariel E.; Patton-Ku, Dana; Boutelle, Kerri N.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the US and many other parts of the world. With obesity comes a variety of adverse health outcomes and metabolic complications. The liver in particular seems to be significantly impacted by fat deposition in the presence of obesity. In this article we discuss several aspects of childhood obesity from epidemiology and associated metabolic complications, to management strategies and therapy with particular attention to the i...

  14. Liver mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira C.P.M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondria play a role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the disease. Fatty liver was induced in Wistar rats with a choline-deficient diet (CD; N = 7 or a high-fat diet enriched with PUFAs-omega-3 (H; N = 7 for 4 weeks. The control group (N = 7 was fed a standard diet. Liver mitochondrial oxidation and phosphorylation were measured polarographically and oxidative stress was estimated on the basis of malondialdehyde and glutathione concentrations. Moderate macrovacuolar liver steatosis was observed in the CD group and mild liver steatosis was observed in the periportal area in the H group. There was an increase in the oxygen consumption rate by liver mitochondria in respiratory state 4 (S4 and a decrease in respiratory control rate (RCR in the CD group (S4: 32.70 ± 3.35; RCR: 2.55 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1 when compared to the H and control groups (S4: 23.09 ± 1.53, 17.04 ± 2.03, RCR: 3.15 ± 0.15, 3.68 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1, respectively, P < 0.05. Hepatic lipoperoxide concentrations were significantly increased and the concentration of reduced glutathione was significantly reduced in the CD group. A choline-deficient diet causes moderate steatosis with disruption of liver mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. These data suggest that lipid peroxidation products can impair the flow of electrons along the respiratory chain, causing overreduction of respiratory chain components and enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. These findings are important in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  15. Cellular senescence in livers from children with end stage liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Gutierrez-Reyes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Senescent cells occur in adults with cirrhotic livers independent of the etiology. AIM: Investigate the presence rate of cellular senescence and expression of cell cycle check points in livers from children with end stage disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Livers of five children aged three years or less undergoing liver transplantation due to tyrosinemia (n = 1, biliary atresia (n = 2, or fulminant hepatitis (n = 2 were analyzed for senescence associated beta-galactosidase (SA-betagal activity and p16INK4a, p21cip1 and p53. All livers displayed positive cellular staining for SA-betagal in the canals of Hering and interlobular biliary ducts. In the presence of cirrhosis (3/5 cases SA-betagal was found at the cholangioles and hepatocytes surrounding the regenerative nodules. Children with fulminant hepatic failure without cirrhosis had significant ductular transformation with intense SA-betagal activity. No SA-betagal activity was evident in the fibrous septa. Staining for p53 had a similar distribution to that observed for SA-betagal. Staining for p16(INK4a and p21(cip1 was positive in the explanted liver of the patient with tyrosinemia, in the hepatocytes, the canals of Hering, cholangioles and interlobular bile ducts. In the livers with fulminant hepatitis, p21(cip1 staining occurred in the areas of ductular transformation and in the interlobular bile ducts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cellular senescence in livers of children with end stage disease is associated with damage rather than corresponding to an age dependent phenomenon. Further studies are needed to support the hypothesis that these senescence markers correlate with disease progression.

  16. OSAS-related inflammatory mechanisms of liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschetta, Elena; Belci, Paola; Alisi, Anna; Liccardo, Daniela; Cutrera, Renato; Musso, Giovanni; Nobili, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep disorder, affecting over 4% of the general population, and is associated with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, independent of obesity and traditional risk factors. OSAS has been recently connected to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common chronic liver disease in the world, which can be found in 30% of the general adult population. Several studies suggest that the chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) of OSAS patients may per se trigger liver injury, inflammation, and fibrogenesis, promoting NAFLD development and the progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. In NAFLD patients, liver disease may be caused by hypoxia both indirectly by promoting inflammation and insulin resistance and directly by enhancing proinflammatory cytokine production and metabolic dysregulation in liver cells. In this review, we focus on molecular mechanisms linking OSAS to NAFLD, including hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), YKL-40, unfolded protein response, and hypoxic adipose tissue inflammation, which all could provide novel potential therapeutic approaches for the management of NAFLD patients with OSAS. PMID:25873773

  17. OSAS-Related Inflammatory Mechanisms of Liver Injury in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Paschetta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS is a common sleep disorder, affecting over 4% of the general population, and is associated with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, independent of obesity and traditional risk factors. OSAS has been recently connected to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, the most common chronic liver disease in the world, which can be found in 30% of the general adult population. Several studies suggest that the chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH of OSAS patients may per se trigger liver injury, inflammation, and fibrogenesis, promoting NAFLD development and the progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. In NAFLD patients, liver disease may be caused by hypoxia both indirectly by promoting inflammation and insulin resistance and directly by enhancing proinflammatory cytokine production and metabolic dysregulation in liver cells. In this review, we focus on molecular mechanisms linking OSAS to NAFLD, including hypoxia inducible factor (HIF, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, YKL-40, unfolded protein response, and hypoxic adipose tissue inflammation, which all could provide novel potential therapeutic approaches for the management of NAFLD patients with OSAS.

  18. Review article: hepatitis vaccination in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, G; Keeffe, E B

    2004-04-01

    Evidence regarding the outcomes of viral super-infection in patients with chronic liver disease and practical strategies for hepatitis A and B vaccination of these individuals are reviewed. Patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B have a more severe clinical course and a higher death rate compared with otherwise healthy individuals with hepatitis A, and these differences are most pronounced in older patients and those with histological evidence of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, rather than in asymptomatic hepatitis B carriers. Patients with acute hepatitis A super-infection and chronic hepatitis C have an increased risk of fulminant hepatitis and death. In addition, patients with other chronic liver diseases also appear to be at increased risk for more severe disease with superimposed hepatitis A. Patients with chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus co-infection have more severe laboratory abnormalities, more severe histological disease, a greater frequency of cirrhosis and complications of cirrhosis, and a higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Vaccines for both hepatitis A and B are safe and effective if used early in the course of chronic liver disease. Hepatitis A and B vaccination should be part of the routine management of patients with chronic liver disease, preferably as early as possible in the natural course of their disease.

  19. Systematic review: Preventive and therapeutic applicationsof metformin in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, a biguanide derivative, is the most commonlyprescribed medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetesmellitus. More recently, the use of metformin has shownpotential as a preventive and therapeutic agent for abroad spectrum of conditions, including liver diseaseand hepatic malignancies. In this systematic review,we critically analyze the literature behind the potentialuse of metformin across the spectrum of liver diseaseand malignancies. The PubMed and Ovid MEDLINEdatabases were searched from 2000 to March 2015,using a combination of relevant text words and MeSHterms: metformin and mammalian target of rapamycin,hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis B virus (HCV), nonalcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD), hepatocellularcarcinoma (HCC) or cholangiocarcinoma. The searchresults were evaluated for pertinence to the issue ofmetformin in liver disease as well as for quality of studydesign. Metformin has a number of biochemical effectsthat would suggest a benefit in treating chronic liverdiseases, particularly in the context of insulin resistanceand inflammation. However, the literature thus far doesnot support any independent therapeutic role in NAFLDor HCV. Nonetheless, there is Level Ⅲ evidence fora chemopreventive role in patients with diabetes andchronic liver disease, with decreased incidence of HCCand cholangiocarcinoma. The use of metformin seemsto be safe in patients with cirrhosis, and provides asurvival benefit. Once hepatic malignancies are alreadyestablished, metformin does not offer any therapeuticpotential. In conclusion, there is insufficient evidence torecommend use of metformin in the adjunctive treatmentof chronic liver diseases, including NAFLD and HCV.However, there is good evidence for a chemopreventiverole against HCC among patients with diabetes andchronic liver disease, and metformin should be continuedin patients even with cirrhosis to provide this benefit.

  20. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > Liver Transplant Liver Transplant Explore this section to learn more about liver ... harmful substances from your blood. What is a liver transplant? A liver transplant is the process of replacing ...

  1. Celiac disease markers in patients with liver diseases: A single center large scale screening study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavel Drastich; Eva Honsová; Alena Lodererová; Marcela Jare(s)ová; Aneta Pekáriková; Iva Hoffmanová; Ludmila Tu(c)ková

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the coincidence of celiac disease,we tested its serological markers in patients with various liver diseases.METHODS:Large-scale screening of serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG),and deamidated gliadin using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and serum antibodies against endomysium using immunohistochemistry,in patients with various liver diseases (n =962) and patients who underwent liver transplantation (OLTx,n =523) was performed.The expression of tTG in liver tissue samples of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and from various liver diseases using immunohistochemistry was carried out.The final diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by histological analysis of small-intestinal biopsy.RESULTS:We found that 29 of 962 patients (3%) with liver diseases and 5 of 523 patients (0.8%) who underwent OLTx were seropositive for IgA and IgG anti-tTG antibodies.However,celiac disease was biopsy-diagnosed in 16 patients:4 with autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ,3 with Wilson's disease,3 with celiac hepatitis,2 with primary sclerosing cholangitis,1with primary biliary cirrhosis,1 with Budd-Chiari syndrome,1 with toxic hepatitis,and 1 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.Unexpectedly,the highest prevalence of celiac disease was found in patients with Wilson's disease (9.7%),with which it is only rarely associated.On the other hand,no OLTx patients were diagnosed with celiac disease in our study.A pilot study of the expression of tTG in liver tissue using immunohistochemistry documented the overexpression of this molecule in endothelial cells and periportal hepatocytes of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and toxic hepatitis,primary sclerosing cholangitis or autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ.CONCLUSION:We suggest that screening for celiac disease may be beneficial not only in patients with associated liver diseases,but also in patients with Wilson's disease.

  2. microRNAs: Fad or future of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashley M Lakner; Herbert L Bonkovsky; Laura W Schrum

    2011-01-01

    microRNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate both mRNA and protein expression of target genes, which results in alterations in mRNA stability or translation inhibition. miRs influence at least one third of all human transcripts and are known regulators of various important cellular growth and differentiation factors. miRs have recently emerged as key regulatory molecules in chronic liver disease. This review details recent contributions to the field of miRs that influence liver development and the broad spectrum of disease, from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease to fibrosis/cirrhosis, with particular emphasis on hepatic stellate cells and potential use of miRs as therapeutic tools.

  3. Does vitamin C deficiency promote fatty liver disease development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, David Højland; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and the subsequent reprogramming of the white adipose tissue are linked to human disease-complexes including metabolic syndrome and concurrent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The dietary imposed dyslipidemia promotes redox imbalance...... in disease progression in specific subgroups. This review discusses the currently available data from human surveys and experimental models in search of a putative role of VitC deficiency in the development of NAFLD and NASH....

  4. Telomere and telomerase in chronic liver disease and hepatocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carulli, Lucia; Anzivino, Claudia

    2014-05-28

    The pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis is not completely elucidated. Although in the majority of patients, the risk factors may be identified in B and C viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, drugs or fatty liver disease, there is a small percentage of patients with no apparent risk factors. In addition, the evolution of chronic liver disease is highly heterogeneous from one patient to another. Among patient with identical risk factors, some rapidly progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) whereas others have a benign course. Therefore, a genetic predisposition may contribute to the development of cirrhosis and HCC. Evidence supporting the role of genetic factors as a risk for cirrhosis has been accumulating during the past years. In addition to the results from epidemiological studies, polymorphisms studies and data on twins, the concept of telomere shortening as a genetic risk factor for chronic liver disease and HCC has been proposed. Here we review the literature on telomerase mutations, telomere shortening and liver disease including hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24876749

  5. Focal inflammatory diseases of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oto, Aytekin; Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa

    1999-10-01

    Inflammatory lesions constitute an important subgroup of focal liver lesions. They may mimic primary or metastatic neoplastic lesions and their differentiation from neoplasia is clinically very important since management of the patient significantly changes. Radiologists should have an important role in both the diagnosis and therapy of these lesions by performing percutaneous aspirations and drainages. In this review we discussed the radiological findings of pyogenic abscesses, amebic abscesses, candidiasis, tuberculosis, hydatic cysts, fascioliasis, ascariasis, schistosomiasis, and sarcoidosis with a special emphasis on US, CT and MR characteristics.

  6. Focal inflammatory diseases of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory lesions constitute an important subgroup of focal liver lesions. They may mimic primary or metastatic neoplastic lesions and their differentiation from neoplasia is clinically very important since management of the patient significantly changes. Radiologists should have an important role in both the diagnosis and therapy of these lesions by performing percutaneous aspirations and drainages. In this review we discussed the radiological findings of pyogenic abscesses, amebic abscesses, candidiasis, tuberculosis, hydatic cysts, fascioliasis, ascariasis, schistosomiasis, and sarcoidosis with a special emphasis on US, CT and MR characteristics

  7. Liver transplant for 70 patients with end-stage liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Jiang; Yong-Biao Chen; Fan Pan; Li-Zhi Lv; Qiu-Cheng Cai; Kun Zhang; Huan-Zhang Hu; Shao-Geng Zhang; Fang Yang; Wei-Ming Wei; Xiao-Jin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation has evolved as a successful treatment for patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis and acute liver failure. Postoperative survival rates have increased to 90%in 1 year and 80%in 5 years as a result of improvements in immunosuppression, perioperative management and surgical techniques. However, a wide range of postoperative complications are of technical or medical origin. This study was undertaken to determine the relationship between the technical improvements and optimal timing of surgery and its outcome. METHODS: From April 1999 to October 2005, typical orthotopic or piggyback liver transplantation was performed in 70 patients (58 men and 12 women, aged 19-74 years). Twenty-four patients had liver carcinoma and cirrhosis, and 46 had benign liver disease. RESULTS:All patients survived the operation and 14 died in the ifrst month after surgery because of respiratory failure (6), respiratory failure accompanied by acute renal failure (4), intra-abdominal hemorrhage and infection (2), and cerebral edema (2). A total of 76 complications occurred in the 70 patients after operation: pneumonia (34), right pleural effusion (11), bile leakage (7), postoperative intra-abdominal hemorrhage and infection (4), acute renal failure (4), acute rejection (3), wound infection (2), biliary tract stenosis (2), severe cholangitis derived from cholelith (2), morphological alteration of biliary tree (2), cerebral edema (2), empyema (1), chronic rejection (1), and wound hematoma (1). Finally, 33 patients survived more than 6 months, 16 more than 1 year, 4 more than 2 years, and 2 more than 6 years after operation. The perioperative survival rate was 80%in this series. CONCLUSIONS: Liver transplantation is an effective treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease. To obtain good results, improvements of surgical technique, optimal timing and better postoperative care are needed.

  8. Emerging role of microRNAs in liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shashi Bala; Miguel Marcos; Gyongyi Szabo

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that are found in plants, animals, and some viruses. They modulate the gene function at the post-transcriptional level and act as a fine tuner of various processes, such as development, proliferation, cell signaling, and apoptosis. They are associated with different types and stages of cancer. Recent studies have shown the involvement of microRNAs in liver diseases caused by various factors,such as Hepatitis C, Hepatitis B, metabolic disorders, and by drug abuse. This review highlights the role of microRNAs in liver diseases and their potential use as therapeutic molecules.

  9. Per-rectal portal scintigraphy in chronic liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portal circulation has been evaluated by per-rectal portal scintigraphy in 21 controls and in 30 pts affected by chronic liver diseases. Tc99m-pertechnetate (10 mci) was given through a Nelaton's catheter in the upper rectum; a per-rectal portal shunt index (SI) was calculated. A relevant overlap is evident between controls and CHP pts; no overlap exists between controls and B or C graded cirrhosis. We conclude that the technique may be suggested to monitor the course of chronic liver diseases and different therapeutic regimens. (orig.)

  10. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and the Gut Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursier, Jerome; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress has allowed a more comprehensive study of the gut microbiota. Gut microbiota helps in health maintenance and gut dysbiosis associates with chronic metabolic diseases. Modulation of short-chain fatty acids and choline bioavailability, lipoprotein lipase induction, alteration of bile acid profile, endogenous alcohol production, or liver inflammation secondary to endotoxemia result from gut dysbiosis. Modulation of the gut microbiota by pre/probiotics gives promising results in animal, but needs to be evaluated in human before use in clinical practice. Gut microbiota adds complexity to the pathophysiology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease but represents an opportunity to discover new therapeutic targets. PMID:27063268

  11. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and the Gut Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursier, Jerome; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress has allowed a more comprehensive study of the gut microbiota. Gut microbiota helps in health maintenance and gut dysbiosis associates with chronic metabolic diseases. Modulation of short-chain fatty acids and choline bioavailability, lipoprotein lipase induction, alteration of bile acid profile, endogenous alcohol production, or liver inflammation secondary to endotoxemia result from gut dysbiosis. Modulation of the gut microbiota by pre/probiotics gives promising results in animal, but needs to be evaluated in human before use in clinical practice. Gut microbiota adds complexity to the pathophysiology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease but represents an opportunity to discover new therapeutic targets.

  12. Models of alcoholic liver disease in rodents: a critical evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la M. Hall, P.; Lieber, C.S.; De Carli, L.M.;

    2001-01-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chairs were J. Christian Bode and Hiroshi Fukui. The presentations were (1) Essentials and the course of the pathological spectrum of alcoholic liver disease in humans, by P. de la M. Hall; (2......) Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for alcohol-induced liver injury in rats, by C. S. Lieber and L. M. DeCarli; (3) Tsukamoto-French model of alcoholic liver injury, by S. W. French; (4) Animal models to study endotoxin-ethanol interactions, by K. O. Lindros and H. Järveläinen; and (5) Jejunoileal bypass...... operation in rats-A model for alcohol-induced liver injury? by Christiane Bode, Alexandr Parlesak, and J. Christian Bode....

  13. Plasma fibronectin concentrations in patients with liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Dejgaard, A; Clemmensen, I

    1983-01-01

    age- and sex-matched healthy controls in patients with chronic persistent or chronic active hepatitis (n = 7), primary biliary cirrhosis (n = 8), alcoholic fatty liver (n = 9), alcoholic hepatitis (n = 10), and alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 16). Patients with acute viral hepatitis (type A (n = 2); type B...... (n = 7); type non A, non B (n = 1] had significantly (P less than 0.01) raised plasma fibronectin concentrations (median 506 mg/l (range 339-804] compared to controls (median 399 mg/l (range 304-462]. Morbidly obese patients with fatty liver (n = 11) had significantly (P less than 0.001) raised......Plasma, obtained just prior to diagnostic liver biopsy in 71 patients with various liver diseases, was examined by electroimmunoassay using immunoglobulin against human fibronectin and purified plasma fibronectin as standard. The plasma fibronectin concentration was not significantly different from...

  14. Testosterone in men with advanced liver disease: abnormalities and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Marie; Grossmann, Mathis; Gow, Paul J; Angus, Peter W

    2015-02-01

    Serum testosterone is reduced in up to 90% of men with cirrhosis, with levels falling as liver disease advances. Testosterone is an important anabolic hormone, with effects on muscle, bone, and hematopoiesis. Many of the features of advanced liver disease are similar to those seen in hypogonadal men, including sarcopenia, osteoporosis, gynecomastia, and low libido. However, the relative contribution of testosterone deficiency to the symptomatology of advanced liver disease has not been well established. More recently, it has been demonstrated that low testosterone in men with cirrhosis is associated with increased mortality, independent of the classically recognized prognostic factors, such as the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. Only several small clinical trials have examined the role of testosterone therapy in men with cirrhosis, none of which have resolved the issue of whether or not testosterone is beneficial. However, in men with organic hypogonadism due to structural hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis disease, testosterone therapy has been shown to improve muscle mass and bone mineral density, increase hemoglobin, and reduce insulin resistance. Despite initial concerns linking testosterone with hepatocellular carcinoma, more recent data suggest that this risk has been overstated. There is, therefore, now a strong rationale to assess the efficacy and safety of testosterone therapy in cirrhosis in well-designed randomized controlled trials. PMID:25087838

  15. Effect of living donor liver transplantation on outcome of children with inherited liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçay, Figen; Canan, Oğuz; Bilezikçi, Banu; Torgay, Adnan; Karakayali, Hamdi; Haberal, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    We described six children with heritable liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma treated with living-related liver transplantation. Underlying liver diseases were type-1 tyrosinemia (three patients), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type II (two patients), and Wilson's disease (one patient). Two of the tumors were found incidentally during liver transplantation. Number of nodules was 12, 15, 3, 2, and 1 (in two patients). Three patients were treated with chemotherapy before the procedure. Chemotherapy was not given to any patient after liver transplantation. The mean follow-up was 17.7 +/- 6 months (range: 7-24). All patients are tumor recurrence free. Both graft and patient survival rates are 100% at a median of 18.5 months follow-up. Physicians in charge of treating children with heritable liver disease should screen them periodically for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver transplantation may offer these children better survival rates.

  16. Severe liver dysfunction in an infant with cystic fibrosis masquerading as metabolic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K P Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare presentation of cystic fibrosis with neonatal cholestasis. Histological features of mucoviscidosis were present in liver involving the biliary tract, intestinal mucosa, pancreas, and lung. Besides, there was a rare association with autosomal dominant type of polycystic renal disease.

  17. An Unusual Presentation of Liver Failure in a Patient with Primary Gastrointestinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle B. Rocque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL presenting either with primary bowel involvement or with cholestasis is unusual. The combination of primary gastrointestinal HL presenting with cholestasis and ductopenia has not been previously described. Case Report. We present a case of primary gastrointestinal HL with evidence of liver involvement, but also with prominent ductopenia on liver biopsy and associated intrahepatic cholestasis. A 50-year-old man with a history of Crohn's disease presented with a bowel obstruction, for which he underwent a small bowel resection. Histology revealed HL. His course was complicated by cholestatic liver failure. A subsequent liver biopsy revealed both focal involvement by lymphoma and ductopenia, resembling vanishing bile duct syndrome (VBDS. He was treated with chemotherapy with improvement in his cholestasis, but he eventually succumbed due to further complications of his disease and treatment toxicities. Conclusion. This case of primary gastrointestinal HL associated with ductopenia does not meet classic criteria for VBDS, but the clinical presentation and pathology are suggestive of a VBDS-like paraneoplastic process. Therapies for HL in the setting of cholestatic liver failure require special consideration, but some reports of durable remissions and recovery of liver function have been reported.

  18. Hepatitis A and B superimposed on chronic liver disease: vaccine-preventable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeffe, Emmet B

    2006-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the acquisition of hepatitis A or hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Superimposition of acute hepatitis A in patients with chronic hepatitis C has been associated with a particularly high mortality rate, and chronic hepatitis B virus coinfection with hepatitis C virus is associated with an accelerated progression of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. With the availability of vaccines against hepatitis B and hepatitis A since 1981 and 1995, respectively, these are vaccine-preventable diseases. Studies have confirmed that hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines are safe and immunogenic in patients with mild to moderate chronic liver disease. However, hepatitis A and B vaccination is less effective in patients with advanced liver disease and after liver transplantation. These observations have led to the recommendation that patients undergo hepatitis A and B vaccination early in the natural history of their chronic liver disease. Vaccination rates are low in clinical practice, and public health and educational programs are needed to overcome barriers to facilitate timely implementation of these recommendations.

  19. Liver histology according to the presence of metabolic syndrome in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hüseyin Saadettin Uslusoy; Selim Giray Nak; Macit Gülten; Zeynep Blylkll

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the histologic features of the liver in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) cases according to the presence of metabolic syndrome or its individual components.METHODS: We enrolled 81 patients (40 male, 41 female) who were diagnosed with fatty liver by ultrasonographic scan and fulfilled the inclusion criteria. First anamnesis, anthropometric, clinical, laboratory and imaging features of all participants were recorded and then liver biopsy was performed after gaining consent from patients. Diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was dependent on patients having 3 or more out of 5 risk criteria defined by the WHO. Biopsy specimens were assessed according to Brunt et al's classification.RESULTS: Sixty-nine of the 81 patients had nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), 11 had simple fatty liver and 1 had cirrhosis according to histologic evaluation.Comparisons were made between two groups of NASH patients, those with and without metabolic syndrome.We did not detect statistically significant differences in liver histology between NASH patients with and without metabolic syndrome.CONCLUSION: NASH can progress without metabolic risk factors or the presence of metabolic syndrome.

  20. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gitto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis.

  1. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis. PMID:27347998

  2. Assessment of thyroid and gonadal function in liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kharb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver is involved with the synthesis of carrier proteins and metabolism of various hormones and liver diseases may, therefore, be associated with various endocrine disturbances. This study was conducted to assess thyroid and gonadal function in subjects with acute hepatitis (AH, chronic liver disease (CLD, and those who had undergone liver transplantation (LT. Materials and Methods: Patients with AH, CLD with Child-Pugh stage A (CLD-1 and Child-Pugh stage B or C (CLD-2, and LT seen at our tertiary level hospital were assessed clinically, biochemically, and for thyroid and gonadal functions besides 25 healthy controls. Results: Thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism were present in 14 (16% and 24 (28% patients with liver diseases respectively. Among thyroid dysfunction, the commonest was sick euthyroid syndrome six (7%, followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in three patients (3.5%, subclinical hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxicosis in two patients each (2.3% and overt hypothyroidism in one patient. Among patients with LT and AH groups, the only abnormality was significantly lower total T3 compared with healthy controls. The CLD2 group had significantly lower levels of all thyroid hormones compared with controls and CLD1 group. Hypogonadism was commonest in patients with CLD-2 (14; 50% followed by LT (3; 33%, CLD-1 (4; 20%, and AH (3; 14%. Hypogonadism was predicted by older age, lower levels of serum albumin, total cholesterol, and triglycerides and higher levels of plasma glucose, serum bilirubin, aspartate transaminases, and international normalized ratio. Gonadal functions showed recovery following LT. Conclusions: Thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism form an important part of the spectrum of acute and CLD, and patients with LT. Deterioration of synthetic functions of liver disease predicts presence of hypogonadism.

  3. Clinical and liver biopsy pathological features in military patients with liver diseases: An analysis of 231 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-ling SUN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore epidemiological, serological and histopathological (by liver biopsy features of liver diseases, and clinical manifestations in patients of the Chinese armed forces. Methods  The clinical data of 231 cases of military patients with liver diseases in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed in terms of their age, gender, location of enlistment, services, official rank, clinical manifestation, and laboratory examination, and also pathological characteristics of liver biopsy. Results  Among the 231 hospitalized military patients, 202 were male and 29 were female. The age at onset of the disease ranged from 18 to 73 years (mean age 29.7±9.1. Higher morbidity (48.1% was found in the 18-25 year age bracket, while lower (only about 7.4% in above 55-year-old age bracket. Virus infection accounted for 68.0% and non-virus infection accounted for 32.0%. About 64.9% of the patients suffered from chronic liver disease, while 35.1% from acute liver disease. In addition, the prevalence of liver disease was as high as 47.2% in the soldiers, slightly higher than that in the officers (about 38.1%. Transmission of the disease between comrades in arms accounted approximately for 14.0%. Conclusions  The mean age of onset of liver disease in military personnel is younger, ranging from 18 to 25 years old predominantly, and the incidence is gradually decreased along with the age. The prevalence of liver disease may be higher in soldiers than in officers. There is a higher percentage of virus infection-associated liver ailment and chronic liver ailment. For acute liver ailment, pathological diagnosis by liver biopsy should be made, and timely therapeutic measures should be taken to prevent transformation of acute to chronic stage.

  4. [Research advances in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Dong-Ling

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased because of the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight in the pediatric population. It has become the most common form of chronic liver diseases in children and the related research on NAFLD is expanded. The "two-hit" and "multiple hit" hypothesis have been widely accepted, and some research has shown that genetic, diet structure and environmental factors appear to play a crucial role in the development of pediatric NAFLD. Though it is expected by researchers, there is not an available satisfactory noninvasive marker for the diagnosis of this disease. Fortunately, some new non-invasive prediction scores for pediatric NAFLD have been developed. There is currently no established special therapy, and lifestyle intervention should be adequate for most cases of NAFLD in children. This article reviews the advances in the current knowledge and ideas concerning pediatric NAFLD, and discusses the diagnosis, perspective therapies and scoring methods for this disease.

  5. Sonographic fatty liver, overweight and ischemic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Cheng Lin; Huey-Ming Lo; Jong-Dar Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the prevalence of sonographic fatty liver, overweight and ischemic heart disease (IHD) among the male workers in Taiwan, and to investigate the possible association of these three factors.METHODS: From July to September 2003, a total of 2 088 male aircraft-maintenance workers aged from 22to 65 years (mean 40.5) underwent an annual health examination, including anthropometrical evaluation, blood pressure measurement, personal medical history assessment,biochemical blood analysis, abdominal ultrasonographic examination and digital electrocardiography (ECG). The Student's t-test, x2 test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were utilized to evaluate the relationship between IHD and salient risk factors.RESULTS: The all-over prevalence of overweight was 41.4%, and that of fatty liver was 29.5% (mild, moderate and severe fatty liver being 14.5%, 11.3%, and 3.7%,respectively); while the prevalence of ischemic changes on ECG was 17.1% in this study. The abnormal rates for conventional IHD risk factors including hypertension,dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and overweight increased in accordance with the severity of fatty liver. Overweight and severity of fatty liver were independently associated with increased risks for developing IHD. Overweight subjects had a 1.32-fold (95%CI: 1.01-1.73) increased IHD risk. Participants with mild, moderate, and severe fatty liver had a 1.88-fold (95%CI: 1.37-2.6), 2.37-fold (95%CI: 1.66-3.37) and 2.76-fold (95%CI: 1.62-4.72)increased risk for developing IHD. The prevalence of ischemic ECG for the fatty liver-affected subjects with or without overweight was 30.1% and 19.1%, while that of overweight subjects free from fatty liver was 14.4%.Compared to the subjects without fatty liver nor overweight,IHD risk for the three subgroups above was as follows:OR: 2.95 (95%CI:2.31-4.09), OR: 1.60 (95%CI: 1.07-2.39)and OR: 1.11 (95%CI: 0.78-1.56), respectively.CONCLUSION: The presence of fatty liver and its severity should

  6. Models of alcoholic liver disease in rodents: a critical evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la M. Hall, P.; Lieber, C.S.; De Carli, L.M.;

    2001-01-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chairs were J. Christian Bode and Hiroshi Fukui. The presentations were (1) Essentials and the course of the pathological spectrum of alcoholic liver disease in humans, by P. de la M. Hall; (2)...

  7. The occurrence of Helicobacter pylori in hydatid liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adil Edan Alsaimary; Hayder M Abdulnbi; Abdulhadi Laibi; Ahmed Rasheed Jwad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To detect the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in hydatid liver disease. Methods: A total of 58 patients with hydatid liver disease attending AL-Sadder Teaching Hospital in Al-Najaf and Al-Basrah governorate from February to August, 2008 were included in the study and served as group A. One hundred and twenty 1st degree relative patients (group B) and 20 normal persons including 10 male and 10 female (group C) as control were detected for the presence of H. pylori infection in general population. Chest X-ray was done for the above groups to exclude lung hydrated cyst. The patients were screened by ultrasound to obtain intra abdominal hydrated cyst and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) test was utilized to detect the H. pylori infection. Results: Fifty eight patients from group A with hydatid liver disease, 30 male (51.7%) and 28 female (48.3%) were screened for the presence of H. pylori infection by using ELISA test. We found that 28 patients from group A had positive ELISA test including 19 male (32.8%) and 9 female (15.5%) (P<0.01). However, there were no positive results of H. pylori infection in group B and C by chest X-ray, ultrasound and ELISA test. Conclusions: It can be concluded that there is a strong relationship between hydatid liver disease and presence of H. pylori.

  8. Protection effect of trigonelline on liver of rats with non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Fang Zhang; Fan Zhang; Jin Zhang; Rui-Ming Zhang; Ran Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of trigonelline on the change of indicators of serum transaminase, lipoprotein and liver lipid of model rats with non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases and on the expression level of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins.Methods:A total of 45 SD rats were randomly divided into Fthe control group, model group and trigonelline intervention group. Rats in the control group were fed with the common diet, while rats in the model group and intervention group were fed with the high fat diet. 8 weeks later, the intervention group received the intragastric administration of trigonellin e (with the dosage of 40 mg/kg/d) for 8 weeks; while control group and model group received the intragastric administration of saline with the equal dosage. Blood was taken from the abdominal aorta of rats 8 weeks later, detecting the level of a series of indicators of ALT, AST, TG, TC, HDL-C and LDL-C in the serum. After the rats were sacrificed, detect the indicators of TG, TC, SOD and MDA in the liver tissue of rats, as well as the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in the liver tissue.Results: Results of histopathologic examination showed that the damage degree of liver for rats in the trigonellineintervention group was smaller than the one in the model group, with significantly reduced hepatic steatosis and the partially visible hepatic lobule. The levels of ALT, AST, TC and LDL-C in the serum of rats in the trigonelline group were significantly reduced, while the change in the levels of TG and HDL-C was not significantly different. The levels of TG, TC and MDA in the liver tissues were significantly decreased, while the level of SOD significantly increased; the expression of Bcl-2 protein in the liver tissues of rats in the trigonelline intervention group was significantly increased, while the expression of Bax protein significantly decreased.Conclusions: The trigonelline contributes to the therapeutic effect of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases. It can also increase the

  9. Mitophagy: therapeutic potentials for liver disease and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sooyeon; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial integrity is critical for maintaining proper cellular functions. A key aspect of regulating mitochondrial homeostasis is removing damaged mitochondria through autophagy, a process called mitophagy. Autophagy dysfunction in various disease states can inactivate mitophagy and cause cell death, and defects in mitophagy are becoming increasingly recognized in a wide range of diseases from liver injuries to neurodegenerative diseases. Here we highlight our current knowledge on the mechanisms of mitophagy, and discuss how alterations in mitophagy contribute to disease pathogenesis. We also discuss mitochondrial dynamics and potential interactions between mitochondrial fusion, fission and mitophagy. PMID:25584143

  10. Is transient elastography a useful tool for screening liver disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Del Poggio; Silvia Colombo

    2009-01-01

    Transient elastography (TE) is a new non invasive tool for measuring liver stiffness, which is correlated to the histologic stage of liver fibrosis. Several studies in chronic liver disease (CLD) have determined a good accuracy of TE in predicting significant fibrosis and an optimal accuracy in predicting cirrhosis. Normal liver stiffness ranges between 3.3-7.8 KPa and using a cut off of 7.1 KPa, significant fibrosis and cirrhosis can be excluded with a very high negative predictive value (NPV). Positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of cirrhosis is lower using just a single scan but increases to 90% if high stiffness values are confirmed by a second independent scan. However the presence of fatty liver and metabolic syndrome slightly increases the readings and may reduce the accuracy of the test. It is uncertain if this increase is related to the presence of steatofibrosis or if it is caused by steatosis itself. TE can be used in screening patients attending the liver clinics to identify those with significant fibrosis or cirrhosis and may be particularly useful in discriminating HBV inactive carriers from chronic hepatitis B patients. TE, however, is not reliable in predicting the presence of esophageal varices in cirrhotics. Another potential indication for TE is the systematic screening of populations at high risk for CLD, such as intravenous drug users and alcoholics, but further studies are needed to determine its diagnostic accuracy in these settings.

  11. Circulating RNA Molecules as Biomarkers in Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Liviu S.; Enache, Elena L.; Ramière, Christophe; Diaz, Olivier; Bancu, Ligia; Sin, Anca; André, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Liver disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As in other fields of medicine, there is a stringent need for non-invasive markers to improve patient diagnostics, monitoring and prognostic ability in liver pathology. Cell-free circulating RNA molecules have been recently acknowledged as an important source of potential medical biomarkers. However, many aspects related to the biology of these molecules remain to be elucidated. In this review, we summarize current concepts related to the origin, transportation and possible functions of cell-free RNA. We outline current development of extracellular RNA-based biomarkers in the main forms of non-inherited liver disease: chronic viral hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver, hepato-toxicity, and liver transplantation. Despite recent technological advances, the lack of standardization in the assessment of these markers makes their adoption into clinical practice difficult. We thus finally review the main factors influencing quantification of circulating RNA. These factors should be considered in the reporting and interpretation of current findings, as well as in the proper planning of future studies, to improve reliability and reproducibility of results. PMID:25272224

  12. Association of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst Disease and Liver Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songul Ozyurt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst and tuberculosis are common infectious diseases in our country. However, co-incidence of these two diseases is a rare case. This refers to spontaneous emergence of cyst hydatid and tuberculosis lesion in liver which is presented in this paper. Liver tuberculosis can be detected either as a component of miliary tuberculosis or isolated liver tuberculosis. Herein we report a case of 46 year-old male. He applied to the emergency due to the severe right-side pain which coupled with breathing and movement. This was reported to last for 10 days. Lesion compatible to cyst hydatid with a size of 151 x 144 x 128 mm was detected in the right lobe anterior in his abdomen ultrasonography. Echinococcus indirect hemagglutination test resulted in 1/640 positive. The patient had liver cystectomy by general surgery clinic. After microscopic examination of excision material, chronic granulomatous inflamation with caseous necrosis was detected in parenchyma to which cyst hydatid and lesion were attached. PPD result was 16 mm. The patient, whose lungs were normal, received antituberculosis treatment due to primary liver tuberculosis.

  13. Increased liver stiffness in alcoholic liver disease:Differentiating fibrosis from steatohepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sebastian; Mueller; Gunda; Millonig; Lucie; Sarovska; Stefanie; Friedrich; Frank; M; Reimann; Maria; Pritsch; Silke; Eisele; Felix; Stickel; Thomas; Longerich; Peter; Schirmacher; Helmut; Karl; Seitz

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To test if inflammation also interferes with liver stiffness (LS) assessment in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and to provide a clinical algorithm for reliable fibrosis assessment in ALD by FibroScan (FS).METHODS:We first performed sequential LS analysis before and after normalization of serum transaminases in a learning cohort of 50 patients with ALD admitted for alcohol detoxification. LS decreased in almost all patients within a mean observation interval of 5.3 d. Six patients (12%) would have been m...

  14. Gut-liver axis, nutrition, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpich, Irina A; Marsano, Luis S; McClain, Craig J

    2015-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of diseases involving hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation with the potential progression to fibrosis and cirrhosis over time. NAFLD is often associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The interactions between the liver and the gut, the so-called "gut-liver axis", play a critical role in NAFLD onset and progression. Compelling evidence links the gut microbiome, intestinal barrier integrity, and NAFLD. The dietary factors may alter the gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, favoring the occurrence of metabolic endotoxemia and low grade inflammation, thereby contributing to the development of obesity and obesity-associated fatty liver disease. Therapeutic manipulations with prebiotics and probiotics to modulate the gut microbiota and maintain intestinal barrier integrity are potential agents for NAFLD management. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the complex interplay between the gut microbiota, intestinal barrier, and dietary factors in NAFLD pathogenesis. The concepts addressed in this review have important clinical implications, although more work needs to be done to understand how dietary factors affect the gut barrier and microbiota, and to comprehend how microbe-derived components may interfere with the host's metabolism contributing to NAFLD development. PMID:26151226

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease after liver transplantation : Risk factors for recurrence and De novo disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonka, RC; Dijkstra, G; Haagsma, EB; Shostrom, VK; Van den Berg, AP; Kleibeuker, JH

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and can recur or develop de novo after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of IBD after liver transplantatio

  16. Liver biopsy interpretation in the differential diagnosis of autoimmune liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Gerosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune liver disease  (AILD represents a group of complex inflammatory liver diseases, all characterized by an aberrant autoreactivity against hepatocytes and/or biliary structures. AILD may be subclassified into four major diseases: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC, and autoimmune cholangitis (AIC. Recently a new entity frequently associated with autoimmune pancreatitis and defined IgG4-related cholangitis (IgG4-RC,  has been added to the spectrum of AILD. The most frequent autoimmune liver diseases  of the AILD spectrum occurring in children and in young adults are  AIH  and PSC, overlap syndrome between AIH and PSC, also defined as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC, representing a frequent finding in pediatric patients. Here,  the morphological findings that may help liver pathologists in the differential diagnosis of AILD in pediatric patients are reviewed, underlying the frequency in liver biopsy interpretation of complex cases in which a precise diagnosis may remain controversial, due to overlap of hepatocytic and bile duct cell lesions. Among the multiple morphological changes typical of AILD,  the detection of an high number of plasma cell clusters in the portal and periportal regions is generally considered one of the main clue for the diagnosis of AIH. The recent report in a 13-year old  boy of IgG4-associated cholangitis, induces  pathologists when detecting a huge number of plasmacells, to consider the differential diagnosis between AIH and IgG4-RC.Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  17. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases: Implementation in clinical practice and decisional algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giada Sebastiani

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B and C together with alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases represent the major causes of progressive liver disease that can eventually evolve into cirrhosis and its end-stage complications, including decompensation, bleeding and liver cancer. Formation and accumulation of fibrosis in the liver is the common pathway that leads to an evolutive liver disease. Precise definition of liver fibrosis stage is essential for management of the patient in clinical practice since the presence of bridging fibrosis represents a strong indication for antiviral therapy for chronic viral hepatitis, while cirrhosis requires a specific follow-up including screening for esophageal varices and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver biopsy has always represented the standard of reference for assessment of hepatic fibrosis but it has some limitations being invasive, costly and prone to sampling errors. Recently, blood markers and instrumental methods have been proposed for the non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. However, there are still some doubts as to their implementation in clinical practice and a real consensus on how and when to use them is not still available. This is due to an unsatisfactory accuracy for some of them, and to an incomplete validation for others. Some studies suggest that performance of non-invasive methods for liver fibrosis assessment may increase when they re combined. Combination algorithms of non-invasive methods for assessing liver fibrosis may represent a rational and reliable approach to implement noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis in clinical practice and to reduce rather than abolish liver biopsies.

  18. Severity Assessment of Chronic Liver Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Tehranian

    2014-04-01

    A total of 106 patients, 53% females and 47% males with the mean age of 68.3±41.8 months participated. The most common clinical finding was hepatomegaly (76%, followed by jaundice and splenomegaly. Jaundice, hepatopulmonary syndrome, cirrhosis and splenomegaly were clearly correlated with PELD score. The increasing of PELD/MELD (model for end-stage liver disease scores were in line with the high level of liver alkaline phosphatase enzyme and there was a significant relation between them (P

  19. NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE AT OUR INSTITUTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION A Correlation clinical observational hospital based clinical study with 50 patients were undertaken to study the Clinical Profile of incidentally detected Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. The cases for the study were selected retrospectively who were diagnosed as fatty liver by ultrasound imaging who attended the Department of General Medicine, Government General Hospital Kakinada Rangaraya Medical College. Data has been enumerated for those who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. This study was conducted between January 2013-January 2015. The study has limitations of observer variant dependent diagnostic ultrasound for inclusion in to study. A BMI of>25 kg/m2 taken as definition for obesity for analysis.

  20. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease: a relevant treatment modality for adults?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, P.S.; Hillingso, J.G.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX....../kidney transplantation. One patient had undergone kidney transplantation 10 years earlier. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 55 months. One patient who underwent combined transplantation died after 5.4 months because of multiorgan failure after re-LTX, and one patient, with well-functioning grafts, died of lymphoma after 7...

  1. NK Cell Subtypes as Regulators of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    As major components of innate immunity, NK cells not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity to destroy tumors or infected cells, but also act to regulate the functions of other cells in the immune system by secreting cytokines and chemokines. Thus, NK cells provide surveillance in the early defense against viruses, intracellular bacteria, and cancer cells. However, the effecter function of NK cells must be exquisitely controlled to prevent inadvertent attack against normal “self” cells. In an organ such as the liver, where the distinction between immunotolerance and immune defense against routinely processed pathogens is critical, the plethora of NK cells has a unique role in the maintenance of homeostasis. Once self-tolerance is broken, autoimmune liver disease resulted. NK cells act as a “two-edged weapon” and even play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activities in the hepatic environment. That is, NK cells act not only to produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but also to alter the proliferation and activation of associated lymphocytes. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms at work in autoimmune liver diseases remain to be identified. In this review, we focus on recent research with NK cells and their potential role in the development of autoimmune liver disease. PMID:27462349

  2. DMPD: Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10807517 Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases....l) Show Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. PubmedID 10807517 Title Pathophysiological role

  3. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Chirra, Shivani [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Kohli, Rohit [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shull, Gary E. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  4. Genetics of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: An Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jharna Puppala; Siva Prasad Siddapuram; Jyothy Akka; Anjana Munshi

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the world today.Its incidence in adults and children is rising rapidly due to the ongoing epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes.Hence,it has become a global public health issue.Environmental factors have been found to play a major role in the etiology of NAFLD,especially for genetically susceptible populations.Among these,one of the most important factors is junk food,especially the typical "Western-style" diet rich in simple carbohydrates,saturated fat,and highly processed food materials.Genetic predisposition to NAFLD does occur; however,a precise definition of genetic factors responsible for NAFLD is still lacking.Specific variants of different genes have been shown to present a risk for NAFLD.Genetic studies might be helpful in the management of the disease by developing novel treatment strategies based on individual's genotype.

  5. Probiotics and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Treatment and Potential Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyuan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research, alcohol remains one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders, including steatosis, steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis. Although many agents and approaches have been tested in patients with ALD and in animals with experimental ALD in the past, there is still no FDA (Food and Drug Administration approved therapy for any stage of ALD. With the increasing recognition of the importance of gut microbiota in the onset and development of a variety of diseases, the potential use of probiotics in ALD is receiving increasing investigative and clinical attention. In this review, we summarize recent studies on probiotic intervention in the prevention and treatment of ALD in experimental animal models and patients. Potential mechanisms underlying the probiotic function are also discussed.

  6. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P. Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD.

  7. Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia Pacifico; Valerio Nobili; Caterina Anania; Paola Verdecchia; Claudio Chiesa

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a range of liver histology severity and outcomes in the absence of chronic alcohol use. The mildest form is simple steatosis in which triglycerides accumulate within hepatocytes. A more advanced form of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, includes inflammation and liver cell injury, progressive to cryptogenic cirrhosis. NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents. The recent rise in the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity likely explains the NAFLD epidemic worldwide. NAFLD is strongly associated with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and most patients have evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, NAFLD shares many features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a highly atherogenic condition, and this has stimulated interest in the possible role of NAFLD in the development of atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that NAFLD is associated with a significantly greater overall mortality than in the general population, as well as with increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), independently of classical atherosclerotic risk factors. Yet, several studies including the pediatric population have reported independent associations between NAFLD and impaired flow-mediated vasodilatation and increased carotid artery intimal medial thickness-two reliable markers of subclinical atherosclerosis-after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and MetS. Therefore, the rising prevalence of obesity-related MetS and NAFLD in childhood may lead to a parallel increase in adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In children, the cardiovascular system remains plastic and damage-reversible if early and appropriate interventions are established effectively. Therapeutic goals for NAFLD should address nutrition, physical activity, and avoidance of smoking to prevent not only end-stage liver disease but also CVD.

  8. Angiogenesis-Related Biomarkers in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease: Their Association with Liver Disease Complications and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Kasztelan-Szczerbinska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is believed to be implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD. We aimed to explore the usefulness and accuracy of plasma angiogenic biomarkers for noninvasive evaluation of the severity of liver failure and ALD outcome. One hundred and forty-seven patients with ALD were prospectively enrolled and assessed based on their (1 gender, (2 age, (3 severity of liver dysfunction according to the Child-Turcotte-Pugh and MELD scores, and (4 the presence of ALD complications. Plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A and angiopoietins 1 and 2 (Ang1 and Ang2 were investigated using ELISAs. Multivariable logistic regression was applied in order to select independent predictors of advanced liver dysfunction and the disease complications. Significantly higher concentrations of Ang2 and VEGF-A in ALD patients as compared to controls were found. There was no difference in Ang1 levels in both groups. A positive correlation of Ang2 levels with INR (Rho 0.66; P<0.0001 and its inverse correlation with plasma albumin levels (Rho –0.62; P<0.0001 were found. High Ang2 concentrations turned out to be an independent predictor of severe liver dysfunction, as well as hepatic encephalopathy and renal impairment. Ang2 possessed the highest diagnostic and prognostic potential among three studied angiogenesis-related molecules.

  9. Assessment of Liver Viscoelasticity for the Diagnosis of Early Stage Fatty Liver Disease Using Transient Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenieras, Jean-Pierre; Dejobert, Maelle; Bastard, Cécile; Miette, Véronique; Perarnau, Jean-Marc; Patat, Frédéric

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by accumulation of fat within the Liver. The main objective of this work is (1) to evaluate the feasibility of measuring in vivo in the liver the shear wave phase velocity dispersion cs(ω) between 20 Hz and 90 Hz using vibration-controlled transient elastography (VCTE); (2) to estimate through the rheological Kelvin-Voigt model the shear elastic μ and shear viscosity η modulus; (3) to correlate the evolution of these viscoelastic parameters on two patients at Tours Hospital with the hepatic fat percentage measured with T1-weighted gradient-echo in-and out-phase MRI sequence. For the first volunteer who has 2% of fat in the liver, we obtained μ = 1233 ± 133 Pa and η = 0.5 ± 0.4 Pa.s. For the patient with 22% of fat, we measure μ = 964 ± 91 Pa and η = 1.77 ± 0.3 Pa.s. In conclusion, this novel method showed to be sensitive in characterizing the visco-elastic properties of fatty liver.

  10. Animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshihisa Takahashi; Yurie Soejima; Toshio Fukusato

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a condition in which excess fat accumulates in the liver of a patient without a history of alcohol abuse.Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH),a severe form of NAFLD,can progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.NAFLD is regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and incidence has been increasing worldwide in line with the increased prevalence of obesity,type 2 diabetes,and hyperlipemia.Animal models of NAFLD/NASH give crucial information,not only in elucidating pathogenesis of NAFLD/NASH but also in examining therapeutic effects of various agents.An ideal model of NAFLD/NASH should correctly reflect both hepatic histopathology and pathophysiology of human NAFLD/NASH.Animal models of NAFLD/NASH are divided into genetic,dietary,and combination models.In this paper,we review commonly used animal models of NAFLD/NASH referring to their advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Role of bioactive fatty acids in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Hernández, Eva; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Uribe, Misael; Barbero-Becerra, Varenka J

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat deposition in hepatocytes, and a strong association with nutritional factors. Dietary fatty acids are classified according to their biochemical properties, which confer their bioactive roles. Monounsaturated fatty acids have a dual role in various human and murine models. In contrast, polyunsaturated fatty acids exhibit antiobesity, anti steatosic and anti-inflammatory effects. The combination of these forms of fatty acids-according to dietary type, daily intake and the proportion of n-6 to n-3 fats-can compromise hepatic lipid metabolism. A chemosensory rather than a nutritional role makes bioactive fatty acids possible biomarkers for NAFLD. Bioactive fatty acids provide health benefits through modification of fatty acid composition and modulating the activity of liver cells during liver fibrosis. More and better evidence is necessary to elucidate the role of bioactive fatty acids in nutritional and clinical treatment strategies for patients with NAFLD. PMID:27485440

  12. Milk thistle for alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Jacobs, B P; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol and hepatotoxic viruses cause the majority of liver diseases. Randomised clinical trials have assessed whether extracts of milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L) Gaertneri, have any effect in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases.......Alcohol and hepatotoxic viruses cause the majority of liver diseases. Randomised clinical trials have assessed whether extracts of milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L) Gaertneri, have any effect in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases....

  13. Milk thistle for alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Jacobs, B P; Iaquinto, G;

    2005-01-01

    Alcohol and hepatotoxic viruses cause the majority of liver diseases. Randomised clinical trials have assessed whether extracts of milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L) Gaertneri, have any effect in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases.......Alcohol and hepatotoxic viruses cause the majority of liver diseases. Randomised clinical trials have assessed whether extracts of milk thistle, Silybum marianum (L) Gaertneri, have any effect in patients with alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C virus liver diseases....

  14. A Case of Wilson's Disease in Patient with Mildly Elevated Liver Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Young-Hye; Jeong, Dong-Wook; Lee, Sang-Yeoup; Park, Son-Ki; Yoon, Ki-Tae; Kim, Yun-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Ku; Lee, Yu-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting copper transport; it results in the accumulation of copper in the liver, brain, and other organs. Wilson's disease is the most common inherited liver disease with more than 500 cases reported in Korea. An impairment in biliary excretion process leads to copper accumulation in the liver, which progressively damages the liver, leading to cirrhosis. Since effective treatment is available for this disease, early and correct diagnosis i...

  15. Ticlopidine-induced cholestatic hepatitis: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Anastasio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cholestatic hepatitis is frequently a drug-related syndrome. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who developed cholestatic hepatitis two months after starting therapy with ticlopidine following a carotid endarterectomy.Materials and methods The patient presented with anorexia, nausea, and dark-colored urine. The work-up included laboratory tests and imaging studies of the liver (ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The authors analyze the case using the scale developed by Maria and Victorino for the diagnosis of drug-induced hepatitis, the Naranjo algorithm for adverse drug reactions, and the RUCAM algorithm for causality assessment of hepatotoxicity. They also review data from the MedLine database on cases of ticlopidine-induced cholestatic hepatitis reported during the period 1982–2011.Results Bilirubin, aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatases, and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase levels were elevated at admission and progressively declined after ticlopidine was discontinued. The absence of biliary obstruction at ultrasonography and magnetic resonance cholangiography, the negative results of viral and immunologic tests, and the resolution of the syndrome after discontinuation of the drug all suggested ticlopidine-induced hepatotoxicity. The assessment of this case with toxicity algorithms confirmed that a causal link to ticlopidine was “probable” or “highly probable.” The patient was treated with ursodesoxycholic acid, clopidogrel (75 mg/day, and (after the laboratory parameters had normalized rosuvastatin (10 mg/day. No further clinical and laboratory abnormalities have been observed during two month follow-up.Discussion The toxicity of ticlopidine is well established: our review revealed reports of 57 cases of ticlopidine-induced cholestatic hepatitis during the period 1982–2011. The mechanisms underlying the toxic effects of this drug are not clear, but they are probably related to the chemical structure

  16. Association between retinal artery lesions and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wen; Xu, Hongtao; Yu, Xiaohong; Wang, Yuzhu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Retinal artery lesions have been reported to be a risk marker of morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in various study populations. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is also a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between retinal artery lesions and NAFLD is less certain. Methods Data were obtained from 2,454 patients who attended their annual health examination (2,143 males and 311 females, aged 62.34 ± 10.03 year...

  17. Update on Berberine in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberine (BBR, an active ingredient from nature plants, has demonstrated multiple biological activities and pharmacological effects in a series of metabolic diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. The recent literature points out that BBR may be a potential drug for NAFLD in both experimental models and clinical trials. This review highlights important discoveries of BBR in this increasing disease and addresses the relevant targets of BBR on NAFLD which links to insulin pathway, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling, gut environment, hepatic lipid transportation, among others. Developing nuanced understanding of the mechanisms will help to optimize more targeted and effective clinical application of BBR for NAFLD.

  18. Definitive exclusion of biliary atresia in infants with cholestatic jaundice: the role of percutaneous cholecysto-cholangiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwomeh, Benedict C; Caniano, Donna A; Hogan, Mark

    2007-09-01

    Definitive exclusion of biliary atresia in the infant with cholestatic jaundice usually requires operative cholangiography. This approach suffers from the disadvantage that sick infants are subjected to a time-consuming and potentially negative surgical exploration. The purpose of this study was to determine if percutaneous cholecystocholangiography (PCC) prevents unnecessary laparotomy in infants whose cholestasis is caused by diseases other than biliary atresia. This study is a 10 year retrospective review of all infants with persistent direct hyperbilirubinemia and inconclusive biliary nuclear scans who underwent further evaluation for suspected biliary atresia. A gallbladder ultrasound (US) was obtained in all patients. When the gallbladder was visualized, further imaging by PCC was done under intravenous sedation; otherwise, the standard operative cholangiogram (OCG) was performed, with liver biopsy as indicated. The primary outcome was the diagnostic accuracy of PCC, especially with respect to preventing a laparotomy. There were 35 infants with suspected biliary atresia, with a mean age of 8 weeks (range 1-14 weeks). Nine infants whose gallbladder was visualized by ultrasound underwent PCC that definitively excluded biliary atresia. Of this group, the most frequent diagnosis (five patients) was total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis. The other 26 infants with absent or decompressed gallbladder had laparotomy and OCG, which identified biliary atresia in 16 patients (61%). Laparotomy was avoided in all 9 patients who underwent PCC, thus reducing the negative laparotomy rate by 47%. There were no complications associated with PCC. Several alternative techniques to operative cholangiogram have been described for the definitive exclusion of biliary atresia, but many of these have distinct drawbacks. Advances in interventional radiology techniques have permitted safe percutaneous contrast evaluation of the biliary tree. Identification of a normal gall

  19. Olive oil consumption and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nimer Assy; Faris Nassar; Gattas Nasser; Maria Grosovski

    2009-01-01

    The clinical implications of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) derive from their potential to progress to fibrosis and cirrhosis. Inappropriate dietary fat intake, excessive intake of soft drinks, insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress results in increased free fatty acid delivery to the liver and increased hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation. An olive oil-rich diet decreases accumulation of TGs in the liver, improves postprandial TGs, glucose and glucagonlike peptide-1 responses in insulin-resistant subjects, and upregulates glucose transporter-2 expression in the liver. The principal mechanisms include: decreased nuclear factor-kappaB activation, decreased lowdensity lipoprotein oxidation, and improved insulin resistance by reduced production of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6) and improvement of jun N-terminal kinase-mediated phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1. The beneficial effect of the Mediterranean diet is derived from monounsaturated fatty acids, mainly from olive oil. In this review, we describe the dietary sources of the monounsaturated fatty acids, the composition of olive oil, dietary fats and their relationship to insulin resistance and postprandial lipid and glucose responses in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, clinical and experimental studies that assess the relationship between olive oil and NAFLD, and the mechanism by which olive oil ameliorates fatty liver, and we discuss future perspectives.

  20. Liver transplantation for hepatic and neurological Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, I; Heinemann, K; Rohm, S; Hauss, J; Lamesch, P

    2003-06-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive inherited disorder of copper metabolism characterized by excessive deposition of copper throughout the body. If medical treatment fails in cases of fulminant hepatic failure and progressive hepatic dysfunction due to advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation (OLTx) has been demonstrated to be a valuable treatment option. Between December 1993 and December 2002, 225 OLTxs in 198 patients were performed in our institution. In this consecutive series six patients (three females and three males) were liver grafted for WD. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 7 years. All patients are alive with well-functioning grafts at present. The ceruloplasmin levels increased after transplantation and remained normal. The Kayser-Fleischer ring disappeared in all patients, and urinary copper excretion normalized. The neurological manifestations in the two patients with severe neurological symptoms showed after 2 to 5 years a downward tendency; in one the ataxic movements disappeared completely. The psychiatric disorder in one patient disappeared as well the mild neurological symptoms in the patient with CHILD A cirrhosis. These two patients are fully recovered and returned to work. OLTx should be considered as a treatment option in patients with severe progressive neurological deficits even in cases with stable liver function since liver grafting definitely cures the underlying biochemical defect. In such cases an early decision for liver transplantation is justified because neurological deficits may become irreversible.

  1. Reduced-size liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-Feng Ji; Wei-Lin Wang; Yan Shen; Min Zhang; Ting-Bo Liang; Jian Wu; Xiao Xu; Sheng Yan; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glycogen storage disease (GSD) is an inherited metabolic disorder in which the concentration and/or structure of glycogen in tissues is abnormal. Essentially, abnormalities in all known enzymes involved in the synthesis or degradation of glycogen and glucose have been found to cause some type of GSD. Liver and muscle have abundant quantities of glycogen and are the most common and seriously affected tissues. This study was to assess reduced-size liver transplantation for the treatment of GSD. METHODS: The clinical data from one case of GSD typeⅠ with hepatic adenoma was retrospectively analyzed. The clinical manifestations were hepatomegaly, delayed puberty, growth retardation, sexual immaturity, hypoglycemia, and lactic acidosis, which made the young female patient eligible for reduced-size liver transplantation. RESULTS: The patient recovered uneventfully with satisfactory outcome, including 12 cm growth in height and 5 kg increase in weight during 16 months after successful reduced-size liver transplantation. She has been living a normal life for 4 years so far. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced-size liver transplantation is an effective treatment for GSD with hepatomegaly and hepatic adenoma. Delayed puberty, growth retardation, hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis can be cured by surgery.

  2. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Disease in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsoo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  3. The spectrum of renal changes in patients with liver diseases: an immunofluorescent and light microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gireesh K. Bhasin

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: There is a wide spectrum of morphological lesions in the kidney in patients with liver diseases. These were mainly glomerular lesions and were directly related to the severity and chronicity of liver diseases. Immune deposits were commonly present in patients with chronic liver disease. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(3.000: 722-733

  4. Fibronectin: Functional character and role in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Razia S Aziz-Seible; Carol A Casey

    2011-01-01

    Fibronectins are adhesive glycoproteins that can be found in tissue matrices and circulating in various fluids of the body. The variable composition of fibronectin molecules facilitates a diversity of interactions with cell surface receptors that suggest a role for these proteins beyond the structural considerations of the extracellular matrix. These interactions implicate fibronectin in the regulation of mechanisms that also determine cell behavior and activity. The two major forms, plasma fibronectin (pFn) and cellular fibronectin (cFn), exist as balanced amounts under normal physiological conditions. However, during injury and/or disease, tissue and circulating levels of cFn become disproportionately elevated. The accumulating cFn, in addition to being a consequence of prolonged tissue damage, may in fact stimulate cellular events that promote further damage. In this review, we summarize what is known regarding such interactions between fibronectin and cells that may influence the biological response to injury. We elaborate on the effects of cFn in the liver, specifically under a condition of chronic alcohol-induced injury. Studies have revealed that chronic alcohol consumption stimulates excess production of cFn by sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatic stellate cells while impairing its clearance by other cell types resulting in the build up of this glycoprotein throughout the liver and its consequent increased availability to influence cellular activity that could promote the development of alcoholic liver disease. We describe recent findings by our laboratory that support a plausible role for cFn in the promotion of liver injury under a condition of chronic alcohol abuse and the implications of cFn stimulation on the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. These findings suggest an effect of cFn in regulating cell behavior in the alcohol-injured liver that is worth further characterizing not only to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the role this

  5. Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Mixed Aortic Valve Disease in Child's Class C Liver Disease Prior to Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Barbara J; Hanson, Ross; Reece, T Brett; Forman, Lisa; Burton, James R; Messenger, John C; Kim, Michael S; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fiegel, Matt J; Nydam, Trevor L; Mandell, M Susan

    2016-06-01

    The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases practice guidelines list severe cardiac disease as a contraindication to liver transplantation. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has been shown to decrease all-cause mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not considered candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. We report our experience of liver transplantation in a patient with severe aortic stenosis and moderate aortic insufficiency who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with Child-Pugh Class C disease at a Model For End-Stage Liver Disease score of 29. The patient had a difficult post procedure course that was successfully medically managed. After liver transplantation the patient was discharged to home on postoperative day 11. The combination of cardiac disease and end stage liver disease is challenging but these patients can have a successful outcome despite very severe illness.

  6. Alcohol, psoriasis, liver disease, and anti-psoriasis drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Nicoletta; Vestita, Michelangelo; Apruzzi, Doriana; Vena, Gino A

    2011-11-01

    Over the last years, data have been accumulating regarding a possible association between alcohol and psoriasis. While it is still unclear whether alcohol misuse represents a true risk factor or merely an epiphenomenon of the cutaneous disease, a number of studies support the role of ethanol and its metabolites as triggering factors of psoriasis. A drinking habit also appears to exacerbate a preexisting psoriasis, and the magnitude of alcohol consumption may be related to both a higher incidence and severity of psoriasis. Evidence also shows that deaths from alcohol-related causes are significantly more frequent in patients with psoriasis than in normal controls. Alcohol consumption may adversely affect psoriasis through multiple mechanisms, such as increased susceptibility to infections, stimulation of lymphocyte and keratinocyte proliferation, and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, alcohol misuse can predispose to a greater risk of liver disease and potential drug interactions. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver diseases have both been found to be common in psoriatic patients. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, a key cytokine in psoriasis pathogenesis, has been found to have a crucial role in alcoholic hepatitis, and small preliminary studies have evaluated the effect of anti-TNF therapy in this condition. However, the use of anti-TNF-α drugs in alcoholic hepatitis is still controversial and needs to be further investigated. In this review, the relationship between alcohol and psoriasis will be reviewed and discussed, taking also into account recent findings related to liver disease and therapeutic implications.

  7. Current status in the therapy of liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Philipp; Fricker, Gert; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic diseases, like viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and Wilson's disease, play an important role in the development of liver cirrhosis and, hence, hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, the current treatment options and the molecular mechanisms of action of the drugs are summarized. Unfortunately, the treatment options for most of these hepatic diseases are limited. Since hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) infections are the most common causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, they are the focus of the development of new drugs. The current treatment of choice for HBV/HCV infection is an interferon-based combination therapy with oral antiviral drugs, like nucleos(t)ide analogues, which is associated with improving the therapeutic success and also preventing the development of resistances. Currently, two new protease inhibitors for HCV treatment are expected (deleobuvir, faldaprevir) and together with the promising drug, daclatasvir (NS5A-inhibitor, currently in clinical trials), adequate therapy is to be expected in due course (circumventing the requirement of interferon with its side-effects), while in contrast, efficient HBV therapeutics are still lacking. In this respect, entry inhibitors, like Myrcludex B, the lead substance of the first entry inhibitor for HBV/HDV (hepatitis D) infection, provide immense potential. The pharmacokinetics and the mechanism of action of Myrcludex B are described in detail.

  8. Autophagy and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa J. Lavallard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, or cellular self-digestion, is a catabolic process that targets cell constituents including damaged organelles, unfolded proteins, and intracellular pathogens to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy is crucial for development, differentiation, survival, and homeostasis. Important links between the regulation of autophagy and liver complications associated with obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, have been reported. The spectrum of these hepatic abnormalities extends from isolated steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, steatofibrosis, which sometimes leads to cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is one of the three main causes of cirrhosis and increases the risk of liver-related death and hepatocellular carcinoma. The pathophysiological mechanisms of the progression of a normal liver to steatosis and then more severe disease are complex and still unclear. The regulation of the autophagic flux, a dynamic response, and the knowledge of the role of autophagy in specific cells including hepatocytes, hepatic stellate cells, immune cells, and hepatic cancer cells have been extensively studied these last years. This review will provide insight into the current understanding of autophagy and its role in the evolution of the hepatic complications associated with obesity, from steatosis to hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Dietary Anthocyanins as Nutritional Therapy for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Valenti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, defined by excessive lipid accumulation in the liver, is the hepatic manifestation of insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Due to the epidemics of obesity, NAFLD is rapidly becoming the leading cause of altered liver enzymes in Western countries. NAFLD encompasses a wide spectrum of liver disease ranging from simple uncomplicated steatosis, to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Diet may affect the development of NAFLD either by increasing risk or by providing protective factors. Therefore, it is important to investigate the role of foods and/or food bioactives on the metabolic processes involved in steatohepatitis for preventive strategies. It has been reported that anthocyanins (ACNs decrease hepatic lipid accumulation and may counteract oxidative stress and hepatic inflammation, but their impact on NAFLD has yet to be fully determined. ACNs are water-soluble bioactive compounds of the polyphenol class present in many vegetable products. Here, we summarize the evidence evaluating the mechanisms of action of ACNs on hepatic lipid metabolism in different experimental setting: in vitro, in vivo, and in human trials. Finally, a working model depicting the possible mechanisms underpinning the beneficial effects of ACNs in NAFLD is proposed, based on the available literature.

  10. Serum Lp(a)levels in patients with liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharanabasappa M; Sudhakar Nayak

    2008-01-01

    Objective:The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of liver diseases on serum Lp(a)levels and also to study the relationship between Lp(a)levels with other lipid parameters and liver function tests in 32 hyperbil-irubinemia patients with total bilirubin >3mg/dL.The results were compared with 20 healthy age matched in-dividuals.Methods:Serum obtained from venous blood sample are used for estimating total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride(TG),high density lipoprotein cholesterol(HDL-c),low density lipoprotein cholesterol(LDL-c), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol(VLDL-c),total protein(TP),albumin(ALB),total bilirubin,direct bilirubin,aspartate amino tranferase(AST),alanine amino transferase(ALT),alkaline phosphatase(ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT),lipoprotein (a)[Lp(a)],serum phospholipids.Results:There was significant decrease in serum Lp(a)levels in liver disease patients and the decrease was directly correlated with reduced serum albumin levels and inversely with liver function parameters.Conclusion:Thus the present study indicates hepatic synthetic damage has possible biochemical basis for the reduction of serum Lp(a)lev-els.

  11. Gut-liver axis and probiotics: Their role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Paolella, Giulia; Mandato, Claudia; Pierri, Luca; Poeta, Marco; Di Stasi, Martina; Vajro, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and its related conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), has dramatically increased in all age groups worldwide. Given the health consequences of these conditions, and the subsequent economic burden on healthcare systems, their prevention and treatment have become major priorities. Because standard dietary and lifestyle changes and pathogenically-oriented therapies (e.g., antioxidants, oral hypoglycemic agents, and lipid-lowering agents) often ...

  12. Prognostic factors for late mortality after liver transplantation for benign end-stage liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-cai; LU Min-qiang; YANG Yang; CHEN Gui-hua; ZHANG Qi; LI Hua; ZHANG Jian; WANG Gen-shu; XU Chi; YI Shu-hong; YI Hui-min; CAI Chang-jie

    2011-01-01

    Background There are increasing numbers of patients who survive more than one year after liver transplantation.Many studies have focused on the early mortality of these patients.However,the factors affecting long-term survival are not fully understood.This study aims to evaluate prognostic factors predicting long-term survival and to explore measures for improving the survival outcomes of patients who underwent liver transplantation for benign end-stage liver diseases.Methods The causes of late death after liver transplantation and potential prognostic factors were retrospectively analyzed for 221 consecutive patients who underwent liver transplantation from October 2003 to June 2008.Twenty-seven variables were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method,and those variables found to be univariately significant at P <0.10 were entered into a backward step-down Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to identify the independent prognostic factors influencing the recipients' long-term survival.Results Twenty-eight recipients died one year after liver transplantation.The major causes of late mortality were infectious complications,biliary complications,and Hepatitis B virus recurrence/reinfection.After Cox analysis,the five remaining co-variables were:age,ABO blood group,cold ischemia time,post-infection region,and biliary complications.Conclusions The major causes of late mortality were infection,biliary complications and Hepatitis B virus recurrence/reinfection.Five variables (Age,ABO blood group,cold ischemia time,infection,and biliary complications) had significant impacts on patient survival.

  13. Disseminated Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting as Cholestatic Jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Rohit; Loizides, Anthony M; Sachdeva, Soumya; Paul, Premila

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disorder associated with proliferation of Langerhans cells in various organs. LCH secondary to multisystem involvement can present in a variety of ways. Because of its infiltrative nature, LCH can involve the skin, lymph nodes, the lung or the liver. Jaundice in LCH is a manifestation of liver disease; biliary dilatation secondary to lithiasis or may be due to coexistent Niemann-Pick disease. However, a case of cholestasis has been very rarely describe...

  14. Investigating Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Liver-on-a-Chip Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, Maria Chiara; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Businaro, Luca; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis, eventually leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC ranks as the third highest cause of cancer-related death globally, requiring an early diagnosis of NAFLD as a potential risk factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NAFLD are still under investigation. So far, many in vitro studies on NAFLD have been hampered by the limitations of 2D culture systems, in which cells rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. The present liver-on-a-chip approach aims at filling the gap between conventional in vitro models, often scarcely predictive of in vivo conditions, and animal models, potentially biased by their xenogeneic nature. Methods HepG2 cells were cultured into a microfluidically perfused device under free fatty acid (FFA) supplementation, namely palmitic and oleic acid, for 24h and 48h. The device mimicked the endothelial-parenchymal interface of a liver sinusoid, allowing the diffusion of nutrients and removal of waste products similar to the hepatic microvasculature. Assessment of intracellular lipid accumulation, cell viability/cytotoxicity and oxidative stress due to the FFA overload, was performed by high-content analysis methodologies using fluorescence-based functional probes. Results The chip enables gradual and lower intracellular lipid accumulation, higher hepatic cell viability and minimal oxidative stress in microfluidic dynamic vs. 2D static cultures, thus mimicking the chronic condition of steatosis observed in vivo more closely. Conclusions Overall, the liver-on-a-chip system provides a suitable culture microenvironment, representing a more reliable model compared to 2D cultures for investigating NAFLD pathogenesis. Hence, our system is amongst the first in vitro models of human NAFLD developed within a microfluidic device in a sinusoid

  15. Liver hemangioma and vascular liver diseases in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annalisa Berzigotti; Marco Zoli; Marilena Frigato; Elena Manfredini; Lucia Pierpaoli; Rita Mulè; Carolina Tiani; Paola Zappoli; Donatella Magalotti; Nazzarena Malavolta

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with benign focal liver lesions and vascular liver diseases, since these have been occasionally reported in SLE patients. METHODS: Thirty-five consecutive adult patients with SLE and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated. Hepatic and portal vein patency and presence of focal liver lesions were studied by colour- Doppler ultrasound, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance were used to refine the diagnosis, clinical data of SLE patients were reviewed. RESULTS: Benign hepatic lesions were common in SLE patients (54% vs 14% controls, P < 0.0001), with hemangioma being the most commonly observed lesion in the two groups. SLE was associated with the presence of single hemangioma [odds ratios (OR) 5.05; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.91-13.38] and multiple hemangiomas (OR 4.13; 95% CI 1.03-16.55). Multiple hemangiomas were associated with a longer duration of SLE (9.9 ± 6.5 vs 5.5 ± 6.4 years; P = 0.04). Imaging prior to SLE onset was available in 9 patients with SLE and hemangioma, showing absence of lesions in 7/9. The clinical data of our patients suggest that SLE possibly plays a role in the development of hemangioma. In addition, a Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH), and a NRH associated with hepatic hemangioma were observed, both in patients hospitalized for abdominal symptoms, suggesting that vascular liver diseases should be specifically investigated in this population. CONCLUSION: SLE is associated with 5-fold increased odds of liver hemangiomas, suggesting that these might be considered among the hepatic manifestations of SLE.

  16. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids.

  17. Prevalence of psoriasis in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, A M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Excessive alcohol use has been implicated as a risk factor in the development of psoriasis, particularly in men. Despite this, little is known of the incidence or prevalence of psoriasis in patients who misuse alcohol. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of psoriasis in patients with alcoholic liver disease. METHODS: In total, 100 patients with proven alcoholic liver disease were surveyed for a history of psoriasis and a full skin examination was performed if relevant. RESULTS: Of the 100 patients, 15 reported a history of psoriasis and another 8 had evidence of current activity, suggesting a prevalence (past or present) of 15% in this group of patients. CONCLUSION: It would appear that the prevalence of psoriasis in patients who misuse alcohol is much higher than the 1-3% variously quoted in the general population.

  18. Polyarthritis associated with hydatid disease of the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawdha Tekaya

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical presentation of hydatid disease is depending on immunological background of the patient. Articular site of the parasite can give rise either to a veritable echinococcal arthritis or to a synovial affection that do not depend on living larva. A 77-year old man who had hydatid disease of the liver since two years, presented with progressive onset arthritis. Laboratory studies showed inflammatory changes but no evidence of immunological disorders was noticed. Abdominal imaging revealed multiple hydatid cysts of the liver. Ankle synovial fluid evaluation was positive of antibodies for hydatid antigen and negative of echinococcal larva. Excision of the hydatid cyst was accompanied by full remission of the arthritis with no recurrence. A reactive immune mechanism triggered by a parasite located at a distant side appears to be responsible for this type of arthritis. This data support the potential of echinococcosis granulosus in inducing a veritable aseptic arthritis as a response to intense immunological disorders.

  19. Vitamin-Dependent Methionine Metabolism and Alcoholic Liver Disease1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that ethanol-induced alterations in hepatic methionine metabolism play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Because malnutrition is a universal clinical finding in this disease and hepatic methionine metabolism is dependent upon dietary folate and vitamins B-6 and B-12, ALD can be considered an induced nutritional disorder that is conditioned by alcohol abuse. The present review describes the etiologies of these 3 vitamin deficiencies in ALD and how they interact with chronic ethanol exposure to alter hepatic methionine metabolism. Subsequent sections focus on molecular mechanisms for the interactions of aberrant methionine metabolism with ethanol in the pathogenesis of ALD, in particular the role of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) in regulating the epigenetic expressions of genes relevant to pathways of liver injury. The review will conclude with descriptions of studies on the efficacy of SAM in the treatment of ALD and with discussion of potentially fruitful future avenues of research. PMID:22332083

  20. Treatment of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Antonia; Dufour, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of conditions from steatosis to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Steatosis is a benign reversible condition, which does not need treatment. Cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are the end stages of any chronic liver disease and do not have etiology-specific treatments. In this chapter, we will review treatment options for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, which is the progressive form of NAFLD. Basically there are 2 strategies, the first of which is to address lifestyle and the second to use medication. The first approach is the most physiologic, the least expensive, but is also the most difficult to implement. The second approach, which should help patients who failed the first approach, is at the advanced clinical research stage. PMID:27548081

  1. Prolonged Cholestatic Jaundice Associated With Flurbiprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Serkan; Celikbilek, Mehmet; Demirkan, Kutay; Yilmaz, Semih; Deniz, Kemal; Gursoy, Sebnem; Yucesoy, Mehmet

    2014-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed drugs throughout the world for pain relief. Although the adverse effects of NSAIDs to the liver are well known, flurbiprofen-induced liver cholestasis is extremely rare. Herein, we present a patient with prolonged icterus that is associated with the use of flurbiprofen without causing ductopenia.

  2. Effect of tea polyphenols on alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-rongHE; Guan-huaDU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the scavenging effects of tea polyphenols on aldehyde in vitro and searching for the preliminary mechanism of tea polyphenols (TP) on alcoholic liver disease.METHODS: The effect of aldehyde absorption is tested at gaseous and liquid phases. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, HPll00Series) and UV-visible Detector(Wavelength: 235 nm) are used to analyze the components of the outcome of solution reaction. RESULTS: In vitro study showed

  3. Liver hydatid disease: Morphological changes of protoscoleces after albendazole therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Nebojša; Ignjatović Mile; Nožić Darko; Hajduković Zoran

    2005-01-01

    Background. Postoperative recurrence of the liver hydatid disease befalls approximately 10−30% of patients. Preoperative or postoperative therapy with albendazole in single therapeutic protocol (800 mg/d, within 28 days) indicated the need to evaluate the hydatid cyst liquid protoscoleces viability. Morphological changes of protoscoleces following the treatment with drugs are not well known. Aim. To estimate the viability of protoscoleces after preoperative or postoperative albendazole therap...

  4. Pleiotropic effects of statins in the diseases of the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicko, Martin; Drazilova, Sylvia; Pella, Daniel; Fedacko, Jan; Jarcuska, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Statins are a class of molecules that inhibit HMG CoA reductase. They are usually prescribed as a lipid lowering medication. However, there is accumulating evidence that statins have multiple secondary effects both related and unrelated to their lipid-lowering effect. This narrative review of the literature aims to provide the reader with information from clinical studies related to the effect of statin and statins’ potential use in patients with liver diseases. In patients with advanced liver disease due to any etiology, statins exhibit an antifibrotic effect possibly through the prevention of hepatic sinusoidal microthrombosis. Two randomized controlled trials confirmed that statins decrease hepatic vein pressure gradient in patients with portal hypertension and improve the survival of patients after variceal bleeding. Lower rates of infections were observed in patients with cirrhosis who received statin treatment. Statins decrease the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with advanced liver disease in general but particularly in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. Statins in patients with chronic hepatitis C likely increase the virological response to the treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin and have the potential to decrease the rate of fibrosis. Finally, data from randomized controlled trials also confirmed that the addition of statin prolongs the survival of patients with advanced HCC even more than sorafenib. Statins are a very promising group of drugs especially in patients with liver disease, where therapeutic options can often be limited. Some indications, such as the prevention of re-bleeding from esophageal varices and the palliative treatment of HCC have been proven through randomized controlled trials, while additional indications still need to be confirmed through prospective studies.

  5. Dyslipidemia in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chatrath, Hemant; Vuppalanchi, Raj; Chalasani, Naga

    2012-01-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) often have dyslipidemia along with other features of metabolic syndrome such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. The dyslipidemia in NAFLD is characterized by increased serum triglycerides, increased small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL nontype A) particles, and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in NAFLD is not well understood, but it is likely related to hepatic overproduct...

  6. Accuracy of ultrasound to identify chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard; Allan; Kerry; Thoirs; Maureen; Phillips

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To identify and assess studies reporting the diagnostic performance of ultrasound imaging for identifying chronic liver disease(CLD)in a high risk population. METHODS:A search was performed to identify studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound imaging for CLD.Two authors independently used the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies(QUADAS)checklist to assess the methodological quality of the selected studies.Inter-observer reliability of the QUADAS tool was assessed by measu...

  7. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  8. Pathophysiology and Mechanisms of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Joel T; Francque, Sven; Staels, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of liver disorders characterized by abnormal hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation, and hepatocyte dysfunction. Importantly, it is also closely linked to obesity and the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD predisposes susceptible individuals to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and cardiovascular disease. Although the precise signals remain poorly understood, NAFLD pathogenesis likely involves actions of the different hepatic cell types and multiple extrahepatic signals. The complexity of this disease has been a major impediment to the development of appropriate metrics of its progression and effective therapies. Recent clinical data place increasing importance on identifying fibrosis, as it is a strong indicator of hepatic disease-related mortality. Preclinical modeling of the fibrotic process remains challenging, particularly in the contexts of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Future studies are needed to define the molecular pathways determining the natural progression of NAFLD, including key determinants of fibrosis and disease-related outcomes. This review covers the evolving concepts of NAFLD from both human and animal studies. We discuss recent clinical and diagnostic methods assessing NAFLD diagnosis, progression, and outcomes; compare the features of genetic and dietary animal models of NAFLD; and highlight pharmacological approaches for disease treatment. PMID:26667070

  9. Nutritional recommendations for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nimer Assy

    2011-01-01

    Fatty liver is the most common liver disease worldwide.Patients with fatty liver disease die primarily from cardiovascular disease and not from chronic liver diseases. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia induce lipogenesis, thereby increasing the hepatic pool of fatty acids. This pool is also increased by increased delivery of fatty acids through the diet or lipolysis in adipose tissue. Nutritional consultations and lifestyle modification are important in the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Among the dietary constituents, combination of vitamin D, vitamin E, and omega-3 fatty acids shows promise for the treatment of NAFLD.

  10. Severe acute cholestatic hepatitis of unknown etiology successfully treated with the Chinese herbal medicine Inchinko-to (TJ-135)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susumu Ohwada; Isao Kobayashi; Nobuo Harasawa; Kyoichiro Tsuda; Yosikatsu Inui

    2009-01-01

    Severe acute hepatitis of unknown etiology is difficult to treat and often progresses to subacute fulminant hepatitis or late-onset hepatic failure. A 45-year-old wellnourished, healthy man had progressive fatigue and his liver function tests showed severe liver dysfunction. The etiology of sever acute cholestatic hepatitis was unknown. The liver function tests normalized gradually, which excluded high persistent total bilirubin after starting on predonine. A liver biopsy showed chronic active hepatitis with mild fibrosis (A2, F1). Oral Inchinko-to, a Chinese herbal medicine, at 7.5 g daily was prescribed. The treatment was effective with no adverse effects. We present a successfully treated case and discuss hepatoprotective and choleretic effects of Inchinko-to.

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma complicating cystic fibrosis related liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, D H

    2012-02-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of the respiratory and gastrointestinal complications of cystic fibrosis (CF) have led to improved survival with many patients living beyond the fourth decade. Along with this increased life expectancy is the risk of further disease associated with the chronic manifestations of their condition. We report a patient with documented CF related liver disease for which he was under routine surveillance that presented with histologically proven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is important that physicians are aware of this association as increased vigilance may lead to earlier diagnosis and perhaps, a better outcome.

  12. The heart-liver metabolic axis: defective communication exacerbates disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Kedryn K; Bookout, Angie L; Olson, Eric N

    2014-04-01

    The heart has been recognized as an endocrine organ for over 30 years (de Bold, 2011); however, little is known about how the heart communicates with other organs in the body, and even less is known about this process in the diseased heart. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Magida and Leinwand (2014) introduce the concept that a primary genetic defect in the heart results in aberrant hepatic lipid metabolism, which consequently exacerbates hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This study provides evidence in support of the hypothesis that crosstalk occurs between the heart and liver, and that this becomes disrupted in the diseased state.

  13. Microbiota-based treatments in alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hotaik; Kim, Seung Woo; Hong, Meegun; Suk, Ki Tae

    2016-08-01

    Gut microbiota plays a key role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Consumption of alcohol leads to increased gut permeability, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and enteric dysbiosis. These factors contribute to the increased translocation of microbial products to the liver via the portal tract. Subsequently, bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide, in association with the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway, induce a gamut of damaging immune responses in the hepatic milieu. Because of the close association between deleterious inflammation and ALD-induced microbiota imbalance, therapeutic approaches that seek to reestablish gut homeostasis should be considered in the treatment of alcoholic patients. To this end, a number of preliminary studies on probiotics have confirmed their effectiveness in suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and improving liver function in the context of ALD. In addition, there have been few studies linking the administration of prebiotics and antibiotics with reduction of alcohol-induced liver damage. Because these preliminary results are promising, large-scale randomized studies are warranted to elucidate the impact of these microbiota-based treatments on the gut flora and associated immune responses, in addition to exploring questions about optimal delivery. Finally, fecal microbiota transplant has been shown to be an effective method of modulating gut microbiota and deserve further investigation as a potential therapeutic option for ALD. PMID:27547010

  14. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Noninvasive methods of diagnosing hepatic steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha AlShaalan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic steatosis is the buildup of lipids within hepatocytes. It is the simplest stage in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. It occurs in approximately 30% of the general population and as much as 90% of the obese population in the United States. It may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which is a state of hepatocellular inflammation and damage in response to the accumulated fat. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard tool to diagnose and stage NAFLD. However, it comes with the risk of complications ranging from simple pain to life-threatening bleeding. It is also associated with sampling error. For these reasons, a variety of noninvasive radiological markers, including ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the controlled attenuation parameter using transient elastography and Xenon-133 scan have been proposed to increase our ability to diagnose NAFLD, hence avoiding liver biopsy. The aim of this review is to discuss the utility and accuracy of using available noninvasive diagnostic modalities for fatty liver in NAFLD.

  15. Non-alcohol fatty liver disease in Asia: Prevention andplanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AIM To review all of epidemiological aspects of nonalcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD) and also preventthis disease is examined.METHODS: We conducted a systematic reviewaccording to the PRISMA guidelines. All searches forwriting this review is based on the papers was foundin PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane database and Scopusin August and September 2014 for topic of NAFLD inAsia and the way of prevention of this disease, with nolanguage limitations. All relevant articles were accessedin full text and all relevant materials was evaluated andreviewed.RESULTS: NAFLD is the most common liver disorder inworldwide, with an estimated with 20%-30% prevalencein Western countries and 2%-4% worldwide. Theprevalence of NAFLD in Asia, depending on location(urban vs rural), gender, ethnicity, and age is variablebetween 15%-20%. According to the many studies inthe world, the relationship between NAFLD, obesity,diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome (MS) isquiet obvious. Prevalence of NAFLD in Asian countriesseems to be lower than the Western countries but, ithas increased recently due to the rise of obesity, type 2diabetes and MS in this region. One of the main reasonsfor the increase in obesity, diabetes and MS in Asia isa lifestyle change and industrialization. Today, NAFLDis recognized as a major chronic liver disease in Asia.Therefore, prevention of this disease in Asian countriesis very important and the best strategy for preventionand control of NAFLD is lifestyle modifications. Lifestylemodification programs are typically designed to changebad eating habits and increase physical activity that isassociated with clinically significant improvements inobesity, type 2 diabetes and MS.CONCLUSION: Prevention of NAFLD is very important in Asian countries particularly in Arab countries becauseof high prevalence of obesity, diabetes and MS.

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with cardiovascular disease risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edens, M. A.; Kuipers, F.; Stolk, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of the link between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has boosted research in this area. The main objective of this paper is to review the literature on NAFLD in the context of CVD, focussing on underlying mechanisms and treatment. Besides excessi

  17. Correlation between liver morphology and portal pressure in alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl;

    1984-01-01

    destruction and both wedged hepatic vein pressure (r = 0.72, p less than 0.01) and wedged-to-free hepatic vein pressure (r = 0.67, p less than 0.02). Degree of fatty change, fibrosis, inflammation, necrosis and occurrence of Mallory bodies showed no correlation with portal pressure. After morphometrical...... evaluation of liver biopsies, no significant correlation was found between mean hepatocyte volume or relative sinusoidal vascular volume and portal pressure. To test whether an increase in hepatocyte volume compresses the vascular structures and causes portal hypertension, the ratio of relative sinusoidal...... volume. The present findings are in accordance with the hypothesis that elevated hepatic vascular resistance and portal pressure in alcoholic liver disease are in part determined by the severity of the hepatic architectural destruction and subsequent distorsion and compression of the efferent vein system...

  18. Compensation for work-related hematologic, liver, and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Won; Kang, Dong-Mug

    2014-06-01

    Occupational diseases may be defined only medically or scientifically, and even then, their definition is not simple. However, compensable occupational diseases involve the additional layer of legal systems and social welfare policies as well. Their multifaceted nature makes determining the work-relatedness of these diseases more complex. Korea has established standards for the recognition of occupational diseases in Schedule 5 of the Enforcement Decree of the Labor Standards Act, and specific criteria for the recognition of occupational diseases are listed in Schedule 3 of the Enforcement Decree of the Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance Act. The new list of compensable occupational diseases comprises 13 articles as an open-ended system. The newly added articles pertain to lymphohematopoietic (Article 5) and infectious diseases (Article 9), as well as diseases of other target organs. Furthermore, the article on liver diseases (Article 8) has been partially revised. The new act has been changed to clarify the meaning as it has been presented in recent research. It is necessary to achieve agreement among concerned parties, including experts from the legal, medical, and social domains to resolve the issues of work-relatedness, causation, notion of aggravation, and so on for preparing a list and a process that are more reasonable.

  19. ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE IMPULSE IS EQUIVALENT TO LIVER BIOPSY TO EVALUATE LIVER FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C AND NONALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ayres de Alencar Arrais GUERRA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLiver biopsy is recommended as the gold standard method for assessing the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. However, it is invasive, with potential risks and complications. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that provides information of changes in the liver tissue, evaluating tissue elasticity and acoustic radiation force impulse is one of the available techniques.ObjectiveThe main objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of acoustic radiation force impulse comparing to liver biopsy to evaluate fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.MethodsTwenty four patients were included, everyone underwent liver biopsy and acoustic radiation force impulse, and the results were compared with values described in the literature by several authors.ResultsIn the population of patients with chronic hepatitis C, our data were better correlated with data published by Carmen Fierbinteanu-Braticevici et al., with an accuracy of 82.4%, sensitivity of 71.4% and specificity of 90%. For nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, our data were better correlated with data published by Masato Yoneda et al., with an accuracy of 85.7%, sensitivity 80% and specificity of 100%.ConclusionAcoustic radiation force impulse is a method with good accuracy to distinguish initial fibrosis from advanced fibrosis in hepatitis C virus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and can replace biopsy in most cases.

  20. Spur cell anaemia and hepatic iron stores in patients with alcoholic liver disease undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Pascoe, A; Kerlin, P; Steadman, C; Clouston, A; Jones, D.; Powell, L; Jazwinska, E; Lynch, S; Strong, R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) histological examination of explant livers from patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) sometimes shows extensive iron deposits in a distribution suggestive of homozygous haemochromatosis.
AIMS—To use haemochromatosis gene (HFE) assays to distinguish between ALD with notable siderosis and hereditary haemochromatosis. To evaluate the possible influence of spur cell haemolytic anaemia on hepatic iron loading.
PATIENTS—Thirty seven ...

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Liver Transplant Strategies for End-Stage Liver Disease Patients on Renal Replacement Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yaojen; Gallon, Lorenzo; Jay, Colleen; Shetty, Kirti; Ho, Bing; Levitsky, Josh; Baker, Talia; Ladner, Daniela; Friedewald, John; Abecassis, Michael; Hazen, Gordon; Skaro, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    There are complex risk-benefit trade-offs of different transplantation strategies for end-stage liver disease patients on renal support. Using a Markov discrete-time state transition model, we compare survival for this group under 3 strategies: simultaneous liver-kidney transplant, liver transplant alone followed by immediate kidney transplant if renal function does not recover or placement on the kidney wait list. Patients are followed for 30 years from age 50. Probabilities of events were s...

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Proven by Transient Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Mikolasevic

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Preliminary data suggest an association between chronic kidney disease (CKD and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. The aim of this study was to further investigate the association between NAFLD and decreased kidney function. Methods: A total of 62 patients with CKD were enrolled in the study. Liver stiffness was used to detect liver fibrosis and CAP (controlled attenuation parameter was used to detect and quantify liver steatosis (Fibroscan®. NAFLD was defined by CAP values ≥238 dB.m-1. Results: CKD stage III was present in 29 patients (46.8% and CKD stage IV in 33 patients (53.2%. Out of 62 CKD patients 53 (85.5% had NAFLD and of these 14/53 patients (26.4% had also liver stiffness >7 kPa. The severity of liver steatosis was positively correlated with serum creatinine (r=0.399;pConclusion: The results suggest a high prevalence of NAFLD in CKD patients. The severity of liver steatosis is negatively correlated with kidney function. The study documents the value of ultrasonographic elastography as an effective non-invasive screening method for the diagnosis of NAFLD.

  3. Multidisciplinary Pharmacotherapeutic Options for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Nakajima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH are multidisciplinary liver diseases that often accompany type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome, which are characterized by insulin resistance. Therefore, effective treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome should target not only the cardiometabolic abnormalities, but also the associated liver disorders. In the last decade, it has been shown that metformin, thiazolidinediones, vitamin E, ezetimibe, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, renin-angiotensin system (RAS blockers, and antiobesity drugs may improve hepatic pathophysiological disorders as well as clinical parameters. Accordingly, insulin sensitizers, antioxidative agents, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1 inhibitors, RAS blockers, and drugs that target the central nervous system may represent candidate pharmacotherapies for NAFLD and possibly NASH. However, the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of long-term treatment (potentially for many years with these drugs have not been fully established. Furthermore, clinical trials have not comprehensively examined the efficacy of lipid-lowering drugs (i.e., statins, fibrates, and NPC1L1 inhibitors for the treatment of NAFLD. Although clinical evidence for RAS blockers and incretin-based agents (GLP-1 analogs and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors is also lacking, these agents are promising in terms of their insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory effects without causing weight gain.

  4. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in 2015

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    There is worldwide epidemic of non-alcoholic fatty liverdisease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a clinical entity related tometabolic syndrome. Majority of the patients are obesebut the disease can affect non-obese individuals aswell. Metabolic factors and genetics play important rolesin the pathogenesis of this disorder. The spectrum ofdisorders included in NAFLD are benign macrovesicularhepatic steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, hepaticfibrosis, cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma.Although the disease remains asymptomatic mostof the time, it can slowly progress to end stage liverdisease. It will be the most common indication of livertransplantation in the future. It is diagnosed by abnormalliver chemistry, imaging studies and liver biopsy. Asthere are risks of potential complications during liverbiopsy, many patients do not opt for liver biopsy. Thereare some noninvasive scoring systems to find outwhether patients have advanced hepatic fibrosis. At thepresent time, there are limited treatment options whichinclude lifestyle modification to loose weight, vitaminE and thioglitazones. Different therapeutic agents arebeing investigated for optimal management of thisentity. There are some studies done on incretin basedtherapies in patients with NAFLD. Other potential agentswill be silent information regulator protein Sirtuin andantifibrotic monoclonal antibody Simtuzumab againstlysyl oxidase like molecule 2. But they are still in theinvestigational phase.

  5. Probiotics as a complementary therapeutic approach innonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Marinho Ferolla; Geyza Nogueira de Almeida Armiliato; Cláudia Alves Couto; Teresa Cristina Abreu Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currentlyrecognized as one of the most common causes ofchronic liver disease. It involves a spectrum of conditionsthat include pure steatosis without inflammation,steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. The key factorin the pathophysiology of NAFLD is insulin resistancethat determines lipid accumulation in the hepatocytesand, thus, oxidative stress, which is followed byinflammatory response. However, NAFLD pathogenesisis still largely unknown and has been extensivelyinvestigated. Although life style modification with theaim of losing weight has been advocated to treat thisdisorder, its effectiveness is limited; additionally, thereis no specific pharmacologic treatment until nowadays.Recent evidence suggests that the gut microbiota mayplay a role in the development of insulin resistance,hepatic steatosis, necroinflammation and fibrosis.Differences in gut microbiota between NAFLD patientsand lean individuals as well as presence of smallintestinal bacterial overgrowth in NAFLD subjects havebeen demonstrated. Furthermore, some data indicatethat the immunoregulatory effects of probiotics maybe beneficial in NAFLD treatment as they modulatethe intestinal microbiota; improve epithelial barrierfunction and strengthen the intestinal wall decreasingits permeability; reduce bacterial translocation andendotoxemia; improve intestinal inflammation; andreduce oxidative and inflammatory liver damage. Inthis article, we review the clinical trials on the useof probiotics in the treatment of NAFLD and discussthe effects of these agents and their efficacy as anemerging therapeutic resource to treat NAFLD patients.

  6. 'Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease' bij kinderen : een nieuwe complicatie van obesitas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bocca, Gianni; Stolk, R.P.; Scheenstra, R.; Sauer, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a range of chronic liver diseases from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis with liver failure. In children, NAFLD is mainly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, the results of an unhealthy lifestyle. Insulin resistance and

  7. Cholestatic jaundice by malignant lesions: pictorial essay;Ictericia colestatica por lesoes de natureza maligna: ensaio iconografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Anna, Tatiana Kelly Brasileiro de; Santana, Alex Menezes; Rizzuto, Mauricio Soares; Chagas, Alessandro Rosa Rodrigues; Zuppani, Aguinaldo Cunha, E-mail: tatianakelly@hotmail.co [Hospital Santa Marcelina, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem; Rezende, Marcelo Bruno; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo [Hospital Santa Marcelina, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Cirurgia do Figado e Hipertensao Portal

    2009-12-15

    Malignant obstructive jaundice is most commonly caused by cancer of pancreatic head, papilla tumor, cholangiocarcinoma and biliary obstruction induced by secondary lesions of the liver or lymph nodes. Patients usually present with weight loss, abdominal pain, jaundice and progressive increase of direct bilirubin, being essential the evaluation by imaging methods for the proper diagnosis, staging and therapeutic planning. This essay illustrates the imaging aspects of ultrasound and computed tomography - and in specific situations magnetic resonance cholangiography - of the major malignancies that lead to cholestatic jaundice. (author)

  8. Cerebral blood flow and liver function in patients with encephalopathy due to acute and chronic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T; Schroeder, T; Ranek, L

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in hepatic encephalopathy, to ascertain whether this was related to the changes in liver function and whether these changes gave any prognostic information. CBF, determined by the intravenous xenon-133 method......, and liver functions, assessed by the prothrombin index, bilirubin concentration, and the galactose elimination capacity, were studied in patients with acute fulminant liver failure and in patients with encephalopathy due to chronic liver diseases--that is, cirrhosis of various etiologies. The CBF range...... any differences between patients with acute or chronic liver diseases or the different degrees of hepatic encephalopathy. In conclusion, a marked reduction of the CBF was seen in hepatic encephalopathy, irrespective of the etiology of the disease....

  9. Diagnostic criteria for acute liver failure due to Wilson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Eisenbach; Olivia Sieg; Wolfgang Stremmel; Jens Encke; Uta Merle

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To describe the diagnostic criteria for acute liver failure due to Wilson disease (WD), which is an uncommon cause of acute liver failure (ALF).METHODS: We compared findings of patients presenting with ALF due to WD to those with ALF of other etiologies.RESULTS: Previously described criteria, such as low alkaline phosphatase activity, ratio of low alkaline phosphatase to total bilirubin or ratio of high aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT), failed to identify patients with ALF due to WD. There were significant differences in low ALT and AST activities (53 ± 43 vs 1982 ± 938, P < 0.0001 and 87 ± 44 vs 2756 ± 2941, P = 0.037, respectively), low choline esterase activity (1.79 ± 1.2 vs 4.30 ± 1.2, P = 0.009), high urine copper concentrations (93.4 ± 144.0 vs 3.5 ± 1.8, P = 0.001) and low hemoglobin (7.0 ± 2.2 vs 12.6 ± 1.8, P < 0.0001) in patients with ALF caused by WD as compared with other etiologies. Interestingly, 4 of 7 patients with ALF due to WD survived without liver transplantation.CONCLUSION: In ALF, these criteria can help establish a diagnosis of WD. Where applicable, slit-lamp examination for presence of Kayser-Fleischer rings and liver biopsy for determination of hepatic copper concentration still remain important for the diagnosis of ALF due to WD. The need for liver transplantation should be evaluated carefully as the prognosis is not necessarily fatal.

  10. Fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis following cytotoxic chemotherapy for small-cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime Ceballos-Viro; José M López-Picazo; José L Pérez-Gracia; Jesús J Sola; Gregorio Aisa; Ignacio Gil-Bazo

    2009-01-01

    Fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis (FCH) is a variant of viral hepatitis reported in hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus infected liver, renal or bone transplantation recipients and in leukemia and lymphoma patients after conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. FCH constitutes a well-described form of fulminant hepatitis having extensive fibrosis and severe cholestasis as its most characteristic pathological findings. Here, we report a case of a 49-year-old patient diagnosed with small-cell lung cancer who developed this condition following conventional chemotherapy-induced immunosuppression. This is the first reported case in the literature of FCH after conventional chemotherapy for a solid tumor. In addition to a detailed report of the case, a physiopathological examination of this potentially life-threatening condition and its treatment options are discussed.

  11. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-08-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  12. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  13. Serious drug-induced liver disease secondary to ezetimibe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José Castellote; Javier Adza; Rosa Rota; Anna Girbau; Xavier Xiol

    2008-01-01

    Ezetimibe is the first member of a new family of lipidlowering drugs that inhibits uptake of dietary and biliary cholesterol. It was approved by the FDA in 2002for hypercholesterolemia alone or in combination with statins. Its use has been spreading over the last years.Ezetimibe was considered a safe drug. We report a case of a woman who developed a serious hepatocellular drug-induced liver disease after 4 mo therapy with 10 mg daily of ezetimibe. After withdrawal of the drug, the patient recovered slowly. Ezetimibe may produce serious toxic hepatitis and prompt withdrawal is mandatory in case of a significant abnormality in liver testing after beginning or during treatment with ezetimibe.

  14. Metabolic liver disease of obesity and role of adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamran Qureshi; Gary A Abrams

    2007-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly recognized cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality.It can develop secondary to numerous causes but a great majority of NAFLD cases occur in patients who are obese or present with other components of metabolic syndrome (hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes). This is called primary NAFLD and insulin resistance plays a key role in its pathogenesis. Obesity is characterized by expanded adipose tissue, which is under a state of chronic inflammation. This disturbs the normal storage and endocrine functions of adipose tissue. In obesity, the secretome (adipokines, cytokines, free fatty acids and other lipid moieties) of fatty tissue is amplified, which through its autocrine, paracrine actions in fat tissue and systemic effects especially in the liver leads to an altered metabolic state with insulin resistance (IR). IR leads to hyperglycemia and reactive hyperinsulinemia, which stimulates lipid-accumulating processes and impairs hepatic lipid metabolism. IR enhances free fatty acid delivery to liver from the adipose tissue storage due to uninhibited lipolysis. These changes result in hepatic abnormal fat accumulation, which may initiate the hepatic IR and further aggravate the altered metabolic state of whole body. Hepatic steatosis can also be explained by the fact that there is enhanced dietary fat delivery and physical inactivity. IR and NAFLD are also seen in various lipodystrophic states in contrary to popular belief that these problems only occur due to excessive adiposity in obesity. Hence, altered physiology of adipose tissue is central to development of IR,metabolic syndrome and NAFLD.

  15. C-reactive protein level as a predictor of mortality in liver disease patients with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Sine H; Søvsø, Morten; Gradel, Kim O;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective. C-reactive protein (CRP) is synthesized in the liver in response to inflammation, and CRP is a widely used marker of sepsis. In bacteremia the initial CRP level is an independent predictor of mortality. Since the CRP response in patients with chronic liver disease...... was observed. Conclusion. Mortality associated with bacteremia is increased in patients with chronic liver disease and it is correlated with Child-Turcotte-Pugh score. The prognostic information of initial CRP levels in patients with chronic liver disease is weak. The clinical management of patients...... is lower than in patients without liver disease the objective was to assess whether CRP levels in chronic liver disease and bacteremia was associated with case fatality. Patients. The study enrolled 105 patients with chronic liver disease and bacteremia as well as 202 patients with bacteremia...

  16. Impact of liver diseases on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Po-Shiuan Hsieh; Yen-Ju Hsieh

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is higher in patients who have liver diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic viral hepatitis, hemochromatosis, alcoholic liver disease and cirrhosis. It is suggested that there is a pathogenic link between the presence of T2DM and the severity of liver injury. However, evidence related to the impact of hepatic inflammation on the development of T2DM has not yet emerged. This article provides an overview of the evidence for an increased prevalence of diabetes in a range of liver diseases, the impact of liver diseases on insulin resistance and β cell dysfunction, and the potential mechanisms whereby coexistent liver diseases exacerbate the development of T2DM.

  17. Circulating lipocalin 2 is neither related to liver steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease nor to residual liver function in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Elisabeth M; Pohl, Rebekka; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Schacherer, Doris; Eisinger, Kristina; Wiest, Reiner; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa

    2016-09-01

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is induced in the injured liver and associated with inflammation. Aim of the present study was to evaluate whether serum LCN2 is a non-invasive marker to assess hepatic steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or residual liver function in patients with liver cirrhosis. Therefore, LCN2 was measured by ELISA in serum of 32 randomly selected patients without fatty liver (controls), 24 patients with ultrasound diagnosed NAFLD and 42 patients with liver cirrhosis mainly due to alcohol. Systemic LCN2 was comparable in patients with liver steatosis, those with liver cirrhosis and controls. LCN2 negatively correlated with bilirubin in both cohorts. In cirrhosis, LCN2 was not associated with more advanced liver injury defined by the CHILD-PUGH score and model for end-stage liver disease score. Resistin but not C-reactive protein or chemerin positively correlated with LCN2. LCN2 levels were not increased in patients with ascites or patients with esophageal varices. Consequently, reduction of portal pressure by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt did not affect LCN2 levels. Hepatic venous blood (HVS), portal venous blood and systemic venous blood levels of LCN2 were similar. HVS LCN2 was unchanged in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis compared to those with well-compensated disease arguing against increased hepatic release. Current data exclude that serum LCN2 is of any value as steatosis marker in patients with NAFLD and indicator of liver function in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. PMID:27288631

  18. Von Meyenburg complex associated with adult polycystic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalošević Dušan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The von Meyenburg complex (bile duct hamartoma is a rare developmental disorder, manifested by multiple bile ducts. The polycystic liver disease is a rare congenital anomaly which may remain undiscovered until adult life, occurring more frequently in women. It is mostly asymptomatic, but sometimes surgical intervention is necessary. In the majority of cases, it is combined with cysts in the kidney and, rarely, in other organs as well. The cysts may vary in diameter from I mm to 20 cm, or even more. Case report A 55-year-old woman underwent surgery based on clinical diagnosis: suspected Echinococcus liver cyst. Liver biopsy was performed, and a parenchymal tissue of 6.5x4x3 cm, with a cyst with a diameter of 2.5 cm, was resected. Within the cyst lumen there was a necrotic, mushy, yellow contents. Microscopically examined, it showed plenty of cholesterol crystals. The wall of the cyst consisted of hypocellular connective tissue. In the surrounding liver parenchyma, there were cystical formations of the same structure, measuring 1-2 mm. Also, there were some multiple bile duct hamartomas. The ducts were encircled by a delicate connective tissue. Discussion and conclusion These changes correspond to von Meyenburg complex, i.e. biliary microhamartoma combined with adult polycystic disease. In our case, in the wall of the cyst there were numerous cholesterol crystals, pointing to its retention character and, probably, to the mechanism of its origin. After degeneration of biliary epithelium, the cyst wall grew very thick, due to proliferation of the connective tissue evoked by the aggressive chemical contents of the bile. Frequent development of cholangiocarcinoma within the cyst wall also points to long-term chemical irritation. .

  19. Prediction of non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease and liver fat content by serum molecular lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orešic, Matej; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Kotronen, Anna;

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether analysis of lipids by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to MS allows the development of a laboratory test for non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD), and how a lipid-profile biomarker compares with the prediction of NAFLD and liver-fat content based...

  20. Free Fatty Acids Differentially Downregulate Chemokines in Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells: Insights into Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Rachel H.; Porsche, Cara E.; Edwards, Michael G.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a prevalent problem throughout the western world. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) have been shown to play important roles in liver injury and repair, but their role in the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease remains undefined. Here, we evaluated the effects of steatosis on LSEC gene expression in a murine model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and an immortalized LSEC line. Using microarray we identified distinct gene expression profiles following exposure to free fatty acids. Gene pathway analysis showed a number of differentially expressed genes including those involved in lipid metabolism and signaling and inflammation. Interestingly, in contrast to hepatocytes, fatty acids led to decreased expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines including CCL2 (MCP-1), CXCL10 and CXCL16 in both primary and LSEC cell lines. Chemokine downregulation translated into a significant inhibition of monocyte migration and LSECs isolated from steatotic livers demonstrated a similar shift towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Overall, these pathways may represent a compensatory mechanism to reverse the liver damage associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27454769

  1. CEUS and Fibroscan in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Cocciolillo, Sila; Parruti, Giustino; Marzio, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine intra-hepatic blood flow and liver stiffness in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) using contrast-enhanced ultrasound and fibroscan.

  2. Fructose, high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, and non-alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), formerly called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, is characterized by hepatic steatosis and abnormal triglyceride accumulation in liver cells. Its etiology, pathophysiology, and pathogenesis are still poorly understood. Some have suggested that the increased in...

  3. Comparing Effects of Medication Therapy and Exercise Training with Diet on Liver enzyme Levels and Liver Sonography in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Nabizadeh Haghighi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, characterized by the deposition of fat in liver cells, can cause fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cell damage if not controlled. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of medication therapy and exercise training with diet on liver enzyme levels and liver sonography in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Materials & Methods :In this quasi-experimental study, female patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver were randomly divided into two groups: medication therapy (n = 10 and exercise therapy (n = 10 for 8 weeks. During this period, the exercise group performed exercise training three days a week for 90 minutes per session. The drug was given to the medication group. In both groups, the diet was 500 calories less than their daily energy. Before and after intervention, blood tests and liver sonography were executed. All statistical analyses were done using SPSS for Windows version 20. Comparisons between and within groups were performed by Student's t-test and Wilcoxon test on paired and unpaired data. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results :In both groups, liver enzyme levels and disease severity in sonography reduced significantly (p<0.05. Conclusion: The findings of the present research showed that both methods of therapy have the same effect on reducing the severity of NAFLD.

  4. Study on Antibodies to Liver Antigens in Chinese Patients with Different Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫惠平; 孔淑玲; WinfriedStoecker; 贺立香; 张世斌; 刘燕敏; 黄德庄; 赵春惠

    2003-01-01

    In order to observe several antibodies to liver antigens in Chinese patients with different fiver diseases and to discuss the characteristics of the autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases, from 1412 patients, detected by indirect immumofluoreseence (IIF) initially, 230 patients with abnormal ALT were chosen and divided into 5 groups: ① autoimmune diseases group, 42 cases: 18 with autoimmtme hepatitis (AIH), 21 with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), 3 with primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC). ② HAV group, 23 cases; ③ HBV group, 70 cases; ④ HCV group, 35 cases and ⑤ Non A-Egroup, 60 cases. First, ANA, AMA, SMA, liver-kidney microsomal antibody (LKM) and so on were tested by 1/F.Then,LKM-1, fiver cytosofic-1 (LC-1), soluble liver antigen/fiver pancreas (SLA/LP) and subtype of AMA (M2) as well as ANA profile such as SS-A, SS-B and dsDNA were tested by Western blot and immtmoblot strips assay, respectively. The results were that among 1412 cases, those diagnosed as AIH, PBC and PSC accotmted for 12.7‰, 14.9‰ and 2.1‰, respectively, of the samples being tested. 2/230 with LKM-1 and 2/230 with SLA/LP were seen in individuals infected withAIH and HCV, respectively. All patients with PBC showed AMA and M2 antibodies. No specific ANA pattern was seen in AIH by 1/F but anti-actin was only found in patients with AIH. In Non A-E group, four cases were positive of AMA andM2; three had high titer of SMA and other 4 had SS-A, SS-B or dsDNA antibodies, etc. It was concluded that the detection of anti-fiver antigens, ANA profile and AMA subtypes were helpful for the diagnosis of autoimmune fiver diseases and overlap syndromes. In patients with Non A-E hepatitis, the diagnosis of PBC or AIH should be taken into consideration.

  5. Naturally Occurring Stilbenoid TSG Reverses Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseases via Gut-Liver Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei; Lu, Jianmei; Wang, Yanfang; Gu, Wen; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Ronghua

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis is largely involved in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated whether 2, 3, 5, 4'-tetrahydroxy-stilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG) could reverse NAFLD induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) and whether it did so via the gut-liver axis. Results showed that TSG could reduce the accumulation of FFA and it did so by reducing the expression of L-FABP and FATP4. TSG regulated gut microbiota balanced and increased the protein expression of ZO-1 and occludin, which could improve the function of the intestinal mucosal barrier and reduce serum LPS content by about 25%. TSG reduced TL4 levels by 56% and NF-κB expression by 23% relative to the NAFLD model group. This suggests that prevention of NAFLD by TSG in HFD-fed rats is mediated by modulation of the gut microbiota and TLR4/NF-κB pathway, which may alleviate chronic low-grade inflammation by reducing the exogenous antigen load on the host. PMID:26474417

  6. Naturally Occurring Stilbenoid TSG Reverses Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseases via Gut-Liver Axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Lin

    Full Text Available The gut-liver axis is largely involved in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. We investigated whether 2, 3, 5, 4'-tetrahydroxy-stilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG could reverse NAFLD induced by a high-fat diet (HFD and whether it did so via the gut-liver axis. Results showed that TSG could reduce the accumulation of FFA and it did so by reducing the expression of L-FABP and FATP4. TSG regulated gut microbiota balanced and increased the protein expression of ZO-1 and occludin, which could improve the function of the intestinal mucosal barrier and reduce serum LPS content by about 25%. TSG reduced TL4 levels by 56% and NF-κB expression by 23% relative to the NAFLD model group. This suggests that prevention of NAFLD by TSG in HFD-fed rats is mediated by modulation of the gut microbiota and TLR4/NF-κB pathway, which may alleviate chronic low-grade inflammation by reducing the exogenous antigen load on the host.

  7. [Enteral Nutritional Support in Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ran

    2015-06-01

    Nutritional support is important because malnutrition is a major contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, decreased quality of life, increased length of hospital stay, and higher healthcare costs. Patients with gastrointestinal disease are at an increased risk of nutritional deterioration due to therapeutic dietary restriction, fasting for the diagnostic tests, loss of appetite due to anorexia or altered nutritional requirement caused by the disease itself. Therefore, it is important that gastroenterologists are aware of the nutritional status of patients and plan a treatment strategy considering patient's nutritional status. Enteral nutrition is preferred to parenteral nutrition as it is more physiologic, has fewer complications, help to prevent mucosal atrophy and maintain gut barrier function, which decrease intestinal bacterial translocation. Hence, enteral nutrition has been considered to be the most effective route for nutritional support. In this article, we will review enteral nutrition (oral nutritional supplements, enteral tube feeding) as a treatment for the patients with gastrointestinal, liver and pancreatic disease at risk of malnutrition.

  8. Current pharmacological therapies for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; INUI, Hiroshi; Fukusato, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is considered to be a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and its incidence is rapidly increasing worldwide. It is currently the most common chronic liver disease. NASH can progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and may result in liver-related death. Currently, the principal treatment for NAFLD/NASH is lifestyle modification by diet and exercise. However, pharmacological therapy is indispe...

  9. Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Recent Advances on the Path to New Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Rountree, C Bart; Mishra, Lopa; Willenbring, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells have potential for therapy of liver diseases, but may also be involved in the formation of liver cancer. Recently, the AASLD Henry M. and Lillian Stratton Basic Research Single Topic Conference “Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Discovery and Promise” brought together a diverse group of investigators to define the status of research on stem cells and cancer stem cells in the liver and identify problems and solutions on the path to clinical translation. This report summarizes...

  10. Circulating extracellular vesicles with specific proteome and liver microRNAs are potential biomarkers for liver injury in experimental fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Povero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIM: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease in both adult and children. Currently there are no reliable methods to determine disease severity, monitor disease progression, or efficacy of therapy, other than an invasive liver biopsy. DESIGN: Choline Deficient L-Amino Acid (CDAA and high fat diets were used as physiologically relevant mouse models of NAFLD. Circulating extracellular vesicles were isolated, fully characterized by proteomics and molecular analyses and compared to control groups. Liver-related microRNAs were isolated from purified extracellular vesicles and liver specimens. RESULTS: We observed statistically significant differences in the level of extracellular vesicles (EVs in liver and blood between two control groups and NAFLD animals. Time-course studies showed that EV levels increase early during disease development and reflect changes in liver histolopathology. EV levels correlated with hepatocyte cell death (r2 = 0.64, p<0.05, fibrosis (r2 = 0.66, p<0.05 and pathological angiogenesis (r2 = 0.71, p<0.05. Extensive characterization of blood EVs identified both microparticles (MPs and exosomes (EXO present in blood of NAFLD animals. Proteomic analysis of blood EVs detected various differentially expressed proteins in NAFLD versus control animals. Moreover, unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified a signature that allowed for discrimination between NAFLD and controls. Finally, the liver appears to be an important source of circulating EVs in NAFLD animals as evidenced by the enrichment in blood with miR-122 and 192--two microRNAs previously described in chronic liver diseases, coupled with a corresponding decrease in expression of these microRNAs in the liver. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest a potential for using specific circulating EVs as sensitive and specific biomarkers for the noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD.

  11. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diet and gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelli, Carmine; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a severe liver disease that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity and its related insulin-resistance state. Evidence for the role of the gut microbiota in energy storage and the subsequent development of obesity and some of its related diseases is now well established. More recently, a new role of gut microbiota has emerged in NAFLD. The gut microbiota is involved in gut permeability, low-grade inflammation and immune balance, it modulates dietary choline metabolism, regulates bile acid metabolism and produces endogenous ethanol. All of these factors are molecular mechanisms by which the microbiota can induce NAFLD or its progression toward overt non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Modification of the gut microbiota composition and/or its biochemical capacity by specific dietary or pharmacological interventions may advantageously affect host metabolism. Large-scale intervention trials, investigating the potential benefit of prebiotics and probiotics in improving cardiometabolic health in high-risk populations, are fervently awaited.

  12. Interleukin-34 as a fibroblast-derived marker of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hirotaka; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Mano, Yohei; Kumagai, Erina; Sugiyama, Masaya; Korenaga, Masaaki; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Atsukawa, Masanori; Aikata, Hiroshi; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Ito, Kiyoaki; Yoneda, Masashi; Nozaki, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Torimura, Takuji; Abe, Masanori; Hiasa, Yoichi; Fukai, Moto; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Taketomi, Akinobu; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic non-viral liver disease. Activation of macrophages and hepatic stellate cells is a critical step that promotes liver fibrosis. We aimed to explore the feasibility of interleukin-34 (IL-34), a key regulator of macrophages, as a fibrosis marker in patients with NAFLD. We enrolled 197 liver biopsy-proven NAFLD patients. We evaluated the serum levels of IL-34, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), soluble CD163 (sCD163), 40 cytokines/chemokines, hyaluronic acid, type IV collagen 7s, and clinically-approved fibrosis scores. IL-34 increased with the progression of fibrosis and was an independent marker for liver fibrosis. Immunostaining experiments, using resected liver specimens from NAFLD patients, revealed that IL-34 was mainly expressed on liver fibroblasts. IL-34 based fibrosis score (0.0387*IL-34 (pg/ml) + 0.3623*type IV collagen 7s (ng/ml) + 0.0184*age (year)–1.1850) was a practical predictive model of liver fibrosis. Using receiver-operating characteristic analyses, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of IL-34 based fibrosis score were superior or comparable to the other fibrosis biomarkers and scores. In conclusion, the IL-34 based fibrosis score, including serum IL-34, type IV collagen 7s and age, is a feasible diagnostic marker of liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:27363523

  13. Serious drug-induced liver disease secondary to ezetimibe

    OpenAIRE

    Castellote, José; Ariza, Javier; Rota, Rosa; Girbau, Anna; Xiol, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    Ezetimibe is the first member of a new family of lipid-lowering drugs that inhibits uptake of dietary and biliary cholesterol. It was approved by the FDA in 2002 for hypercholesterolemia alone or in combination with statins. Its use has been spreading over the last years. Ezetimibe was considered a safe drug. We report a case of a woman who developed a serious hepatocellular drug-induced liver disease after 4 mo therapy with 10 mg daily of ezetimibe. After withdrawal of the drug, the patient ...

  14. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Lipids and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Paul D; Verna, Elizabeth C

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and its major comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), obesity cardiomyopathy, and certain cancers, have caused life expectancy in the United States to decline in recent years. Obesity is the increased accumulation of triglycerides (TG), which are synthesized from glycerol and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) throughout the body. LCFA enter adipocytes, hepatocytes, and cardiomyocytes via specific, facilitated transport processes. Metabolism of increased cellular TG content in obesity may lead to comorbidities such as NAFLD and cardiomyopathy. Better understanding of LCFA transport processes may lead to successful treatment of obesity and NAFLD. PMID:27063267

  15. Current Pharmacologic Therapy for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Swaytha; Rustgi, Vinod K

    2016-05-01

    Weight loss, regular exercise, and diet composition modification seem to improve biochemical and histologic abnormalities. Other therapies directed at insulin resistance, oxidative stress, cytoprotection, and fibrosis may also offer benefits. Insulin sensitizers and vitamin E seem to be the most promising; however, they cause side effects. A multifaceted approach of lifestyle modifications, weight loss, and pharmacotherapy can be used in combination, but no single treatment approach has proved universally applicable to the general population with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Continuous clinical and preclinical studies on existing and potential drugs are needed to improve treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/NASH. PMID:27063274

  16. The association of coffee intake with liver cancer incidence and chronic liver disease mortality in male smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, G.Y.; Weinstein, S J; Albanes, D; Taylor, P R; McGlynn, K A; Virtamo, J; R. Sinha; Freedman, N D

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coffee intake is associated with reduced risk of liver cancer and chronic liver disease as reported in previous studies, including prospective ones conducted in Asian populations where hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) and hepatitis C viruses (HCVs) are the dominant risk factors. Yet, prospective studies in Western populations with lower HBV and HCV prevalence are sparse. Also, although preparation methods affect coffee constituents, it is unknown whether different methods affect disease...

  17. Management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in 2015

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    There is no single pharmacologic therapy that hasbeen approved to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver diseasein the general population. The backbone of therapycurrently includes intensive lifestyle modification withestablished targets for diet and weight loss. The useof unsweetened, unfiltered coffee along with limitinghigh fructose corn syrup have emerged as beneficialdietary recommendations. The use of empiric oralhypoglycemic agents and vitamin E, however, has notbeen widely accepted. Developing bariatric surgicaltechniques are promising, but additional studies withlong-term follow up are needed before it can be widelyrecommended. Finally, liver transplantation is an increasinglyfrequent consideration once complications of endstagedisease have developed. The future treatmentof those with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease will likelyinvolve a personalized approach. The importance of thegut microbiome in mediating hepatocyte inflammationand intestinal permeability is emerging and may offeravenues for novel treatment. The study of anti-fibroticagents such as pentoxifylline and FXR agonists holdpromise and new pathways, such as hepatocyte cannabinoidreceptor antagonists are being studied. Withthe incidence of obesity and the metabolic syndromeincreasing throughout the developed world, the futurewill continue to focus on finding novel agents and newapplications of existing therapies to help prevent andto mediate the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liverdisease.

  18. Iron and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Laurence J; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell HG

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that promote liver injury in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are yet to be thoroughly elucidated. As such, effective treatment strategies are lacking and novel therapeutic targets are required. Iron has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and represents a potential target for treatment. Relationships between serum ferritin concentration and NAFLD are noted in a majority of studies, although serum ferritin is an imprecise measure of iron loading. Numerous mechanisms for a pathogenic role of hepatic iron in NAFLD have been demonstrated in animal and cell culture models. However, the human data linking hepatic iron to liver injury in NAFLD is less clear, with seemingly conflicting evidence, supporting either an effect of iron in hepatocytes or within reticulo-endothelial cells. Adipose tissue has emerged as a key site at which iron may have a pathogenic role in NAFLD. Evidence for this comes indirectly from studies that have evaluated the role of adipose tissue iron with respect to insulin resistance. Adding further complexity, multiple strands of evidence support an effect of NAFLD itself on iron metabolism. In this review, we summarise the human and basic science data that has evaluated the role of iron in NAFLD pathogenesis. PMID:27688653

  19. MicroRNA Signature in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Bala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease (ALD is a major global health problem. Chronic alcohol use results in inflammation and fatty liver, and in some cases, it leads to fibrosis and cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Increased proinflammatory cytokines, particularly TNF alpha, play a central role in the pathogenesis of ALD. TNF alpha is tightly regulated at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to modulate gene functions. The role of miRNAs in ALD is getting attention, and recent studies suggest that alcohol modulates miRNAs. Recently, we showed that alcohol induces miR-155 expression both in vitro (RAW 264.7 macrophage and in vivo (Kupffer cells, KCs of alcohol-fed mice. Induction of miR-155 contributed to increased TNF alpha production and to the sensitization of KCs to produce more TNF alpha in response to LPS. In this paper, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNAs in ALD and also report increased expression of miR-155 and miR-132 in the total liver as well as in isolated hepatocytes and KCs of alcohol-fed mice. Our novel finding of the alcohol-induced increase of miRNAs in hepatocytes and KCs after alcohol feeding provides further insight into the evolving knowledge regarding the role of miRNAs in ALD.

  20. Role of transmethylation reactions in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a major health care problem worldwide. Findings from many laboratories, induding ours,have demonstrated that ethanol feeding impairs several of the many steps involved in methionine metabolism.Ethanol consumption predominantly results in a decrease in the hepatocyte level of S-adenosylmethionine and the increases in two toxic metabolites, homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine. These changes, in turn,result in serious functional consequences which include decreases in essential methylation reactions via inhibition of various methyltransferases. Of particular interest to our laboratory is the inhibition of three important enzymes, phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase,isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase and protein L-isoaspartate methyltransferase. Decreased activity of these enzymes results in increased fat deposition, increased apoptosis and increased accumulation of damaged proteinsall of which are hallmark features of alcoholic liver injury.Of all the therapeutic modalities available, betaine has been shown to be the safest, least expensive and most effective in attenuating ethanol-induced liver injury. Betaine, by virtue of aiding in the remethylation of homocysteine,removes both toxic metabolites (homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine), restores S-adenosylmethionine level, and reverses steatosis, apoptosis and damaged proteins accumulation. In conclusion, betaine appears to be a promising therapeutic agent in relieving the methylation and other defects associated with alcoholic abuse.

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Clement, Karine; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and more importantly its hallmark, chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), are established factors in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This has been clearly demonstrated in rodent models exposed to intermittent hypoxia, and strong evidence now also exists in both paediatric and adult human populations. OSA and CIH induce insulin-resistance and dyslipidemia which are involved in NAFLD physiopathogenesis. CIH increases the expression of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor HIF1α and that of downstream genes involved in lipogenesis, thereby increasing β-oxidation and consequently exacerbating liver oxidative stress. OSA also disrupts the gut liver axis, increasing intestinal permeability and with a possible role of gut microbiota in the link between OSA and NAFLD. OSA patients should be screened for NAFLD and vice versa those with NAFLD for OSA. To date there is no evidence that treating OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) will improve NAFLD but it might at least stabilize and slow its progression. Nevertheless, these multimorbid patients should be efficiently treated for all their metabolic co-morbidities and be encouraged to follow weight stabilization or weight loss programs and physical activity life style interventions. PMID:27324067

  2. Cystic fibrosis-related liver disease: a single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Catarino Costa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Prospective studies concerning liver disease in pediatric cystic fibrosis patients are scarce. The present study aimed to describe the prevalence and clinical expression of cystic fibrosis - related liver disease, in a cohort of 62 pediatric patients. Descriptive study, resulting from the prospective evaluation, between 1994 and 2009, of 62 pediatric patients (age <18 years with cystic fibrosis. The follow-up protocol included a clinical assessment every 2 months, liver function tests every 6 months and annual liver ultrasonography. The cumulative prevalence of liver disease was 11.2% (7/62 cases. All patients had ΔF508 mutation and pancreatic insufficiency, none had meconium ileus. The liver involvement became clinically evident at a mean age of 8 years (3-15 years, revealed by hepatomegaly or hepatosplenomegaly (3 cases and/ or abnormalities of liver function tests (3 cases changes of liver ultrasound (7 cases with evidence of portal hypertension (2 cases. Four patients were submitted to liver biopsy; biliary fibrosis was documented in one case, focal biliary cirrhosis in 2 cases and multilobular cirrhosis in another case. Within a median 11.6 years follow-up period (all patients under UDCA therapy after liver disease diagnosis, progression of liver disease was observed in 2 patients; one patient developed refractory variceal bleeding and progressive hepatic failure, requiring liver transplant. The results of the present study agree with those of previous pediatric studies, further documenting clinical expression of liver disease in CF patients, which is usually detected in the first decade of life and emphasize the contribution of ultrasound to early diagnosis of liver involvement. Moreover, although advanced liver disease is a relatively rare event, early isolated liver transplantation may have to be considered at this age group.

  3. Should nonalcoholic fatty liver disease be regarded as a hepatic illness only?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Tarantino

    2007-01-01

    The highly increasing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in the general population makes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease the most common diagnosis in every-day practices. Lifestyle changes (mainly exercise withdrawal and weight gain) have probably heightened the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Mortality in patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease is significantly higher when compared with that of the same age-gender general population.Hepatologists claim to bear a new burden, being Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease strongly linked to systemic diseases.

  4. Does Vitamin C Deficiency Promote Fatty Liver Disease Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Højland Ipsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the subsequent reprogramming of the white adipose tissue are linked to human disease-complexes including metabolic syndrome and concurrent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The dietary imposed dyslipidemia promotes redox imbalance by the generation of excess levels of reactive oxygen species and induces adipocyte dysfunction and reprogramming, leading to a low grade systemic inflammation and ectopic lipid deposition, e.g., in the liver, hereby promoting a vicious circle in which dietary factors initiate a metabolic change that further exacerbates the negative consequences of an adverse life-style. Large epidemiological studies and findings from controlled in vivo animal studies have provided evidence supporting an association between poor vitamin C (VitC status and propagation of life-style associated diseases. In addition, overweight per se has been shown to result in reduced plasma VitC, and the distribution of body fat in obesity has been shown to have an inverse relationship with VitC plasma levels. Recently, a number of epidemiological studies have indicated a VitC intake below the recommended daily allowance (RDA in NAFLD-patients, suggesting an association between dietary habits, disease and VitC deficiency. In the general population, VitC deficiency (defined as a plasma concentration below 23 μM affects around 10% of adults, however, this prevalence is increased by an adverse life-style, deficiency potentially playing a broader role in disease progression in specific subgroups. This review discusses the currently available data from human surveys and experimental models in search of a putative role of VitC deficiency in the development of NAFLD and NASH.

  5. Determination of glycated hemoglobin in patients with advanced liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theresa Lahousen; Karin Hegenbarth; Rottraut Ille; Rainer W. Lipp; Robert Krause; Randie R. Little; Wolfgang J. Schnedl

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c)determination methods and to determine fructosamine in patients with chronic hepatitis, compensated cirrhosis and in patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin.METHODS: HbA1c values were determined in 15 patients with compensated liver cirrhosis and in 20 patients with chronic hepatitis using the ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography and the immunoassay methods.Fructosamine was determined using nitroblue tetrazolium.RESULTS: Forty percent of patients with liver cirrhosis had HbA1c results below the non-diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method, while fructosamine results were either within the reference range or elevated. Twenty percent of patients with chronic hepatitis (hepatic fibrosis)had HbA1c results below the non-diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method. In patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin, 50% of HbA1c results were below the non-diabetic reference using at least one of the HbA1c methods.CONCLUSION: Only evaluated in context with all liver function parameters as well as a red blood count including reticulocytes, HbA1c results should be used in patients with advanced liver disease. HbA1c and fructosamine measurements should be used with caution when evaluating long-term glucose control in patients with hepatic cirrhosis or in patients with chronic hepatitis and ribavirin treatment.

  6. Insights from Genome-Wide Association Analyses of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahali, Bratati; Halligan, Brian; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by hepatic steatosis, which can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in the absence of excessive alcohol consumption. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease will become the number one cause of liver disease worldwide by 2020. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is correlated albeit imperfectly with obesity and other metabolic diseases such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular disease, but exactly how having one of these diseases contributes to the development of other metabolic diseases is only now being elucidated. Development of NAFLD and related metabolic diseases is genetically influenced in the population, and recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered genetic variants that associate with these diseases. These GWAS-associated variants cannot only help us to identify individuals at high risk of developing NAFLD, but also to better understand its pathophysiology so that we can develop more effective treatments for this disease and related metabolic diseases in the future. PMID:26676813

  7. Peripheral blood lymphocytes DNA in patients with chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasiliy I Reshetnyak; Tatyana I Sharafanova; Ludmila U Ilchenko; Elena V Golovanova; Gennadiy G Poroshenko

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND Viral replication in blood cells with nucleuses may lead to the damage of lymphocytes genetic apparatus and the beginning of immunopathological reactions.AIM Of this investigation is to reveal the damage to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL)DNA in the patients with chronic liver diseases.MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen-ninepatients with chronic liver diseases (37 patients with chronic viral hepatitis, 2 patients with liver cirrhosis of mixed etiology (alcohol + virus G),30 women with primary biliary cirrhosis-PBC)were examined. The condition of DNA structure of PBL-was measured by the fluorescenceanalysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) technique with modification. Changes of fluorescence (in %) reflected the DNA distractions degree (thepresence of DNA single-stranded breaks and alkalinelabile sights).RESULTS AND CONCLUSION . The quantity of DNA single-stranded breaks and alkalinelabile sightsin DNA in all patients with chronic viral hepatitis .didnt differ from the control group,excluding the patients with chronic hepatitis (CH) C + G. Patients with HGV and TTV monoinfection had demonstrated the increase of the DNA single-stranded breaks PBL quantity.This fact may be connected with hypothesisabout the viruses replication in white blood cells discussed in the literature. Tendency to increase quantity of DNA PBL damages in the patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) accordingly to the alkaline phosphatase activity increase was revealed. Significant decrease of the DNA single-stranded breaks and alkalinelabile sights in the PBC patients that were treated with prednison was demonstrated. Probably, the tendency to increase the quantity of DNA singlestranded breaks and alkalinelabile sights in lymphocytes of the PBC patients was depended on the surplus of the blood bile acid content.

  8. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  9. Strategies, models and biomarkers in experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrords, Joost; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Colle, Isabelle; Van Den Bossche, Bert; Da silva, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Cláudia P; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases, including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is currently the most dominant chronic liver disease in Western countries due to the fact that hepatic steatosis is associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome and drug-induced injury. A variety of chemicals, mainly drugs, and diets is known to cause hepatic steatosis in humans and rodents. Experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models rely on the application of a diet or the administration of drugs to laboratory animals or the exposure of hepatic cell lines to these drugs. More recently, genetically modified rodents or zebrafish have been introduced as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models. Considerable interest now lies in the discovery and development of novel non-invasive biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with specific focus on hepatic steatosis. Experimental diagnostic biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, such as (epi)genetic parameters and ‘-omics’-based read-outs are still in their infancy, but show great promise. . In this paper, the array of tools and models for the study of liver steatosis is discussed. Furthermore, the current state-of-art regarding experimental biomarkers such as epigenetic, genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers will be reviewed. PMID:26073454

  10. Gene therapy: Regulations, ethics and its practicalities in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Jin; Yi-Da Yang; You-Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new and promising approach which opens a new door to the treatment of human diseases.By direct transfer of genetic materials to the target cells, it could exert functions on the level of genes and molecules. It is hoped to be widely used in the treatment of liver disease, especially hepatic tumors by using different vectors encoding the aim gene for anti-tumor activity by activating primary and adaptive immunity,inhibiting oncogene and angiogenesis. Despite the huge curative potential shown in animal models and some pilot clinical trials, gene therapy has been under fierce discussion since its birth in academia and the public domain because of its unexpected side effects and ethical problems. There are other challenges arising from the technique itself like vector design, administration route test and standard protocol exploration. How well we respond will decide the fate of gene therapy clinical medical practice.

  11. A case of Gaucher's disease progressing to liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, C R; Debnath, M R; Nabi, N; Khan, N A; Chakraborty, S

    2013-04-01

    We are going to present a 17 year old female with Gaucher's disease. The patient presented with fever, cough, respiratory distress & abdominal heaviness. There was mild pallor, redness of palm of hands & raised temperature. Liver was hugely enlarged along with splenomegaly. X-ray chest showed non specific bronchiectatic change in both lungs. Ultrasonography of abdomen revealed marked hepatosplenomegaly with no ascites. Bone marrow examination showed cellular marrow with plenty of megakaryocytes. Most of the cells were smear cells & there was histiocytes proliferation & infiltration of bone marrow by small atypical cells. Histologically, lipid was found in hepatocytes in moderate amount. The portal areas showed high lipid contents in macrophages. Different clinical findings & incidental diagnosis of lipid storage disease submerged us in diagnostic dilemma. We give conservative treatment with antibiotic cefuroxime, syrup lactulose & vitamins and this patient was improved. PMID:23715368

  12. Successful treatment of fulminant Wilson's disease without liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Fukuyama, Tetsuhiro; Nakayama, Yoshiko; Sano, Kenji; Noda, Shunsuke; Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Amano, Yoshiro; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Koike, Kenichi; Inaba, Yuji

    2014-06-01

    Fulminant Wilson's disease (WD) is life-threatening. The revised WD prognostic index (RWPI) has been used to predict the severity of the disease, with a score ≥11 indicating fatal outcome without liver transplantation (LTx). We here report the case of a 10-year-old female patient with fulminant WD (RWPI, 16) who recovered fully after plasma exchange and continuous hemodiafiltration, followed by treatment with copper chelate agents. To the best of our knowledge, there have been five fulminant WD patients with RWPI ≥ 11 including the present patient, in whom LTx was not done. Based on the therapeutic modalities in these five cases, non-surgical treatment (blood purification and copper chelate agents) may be able to avoid LTx in fulminant WD even with very high RWPI, although preparation for LTx is necessary.

  13. Dietary approach in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia; Marinho; Ferolla; Luciana; Costa; Silva; Maria; de; Lourdes; Abreu; Ferrari; Aloísio; Sales; da; Cunha; Flaviano; dos; Santos; Martins; Cláudia; Alves; Couto; Teresa; Cristina; Abreu; Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) has been identified as one of the most prevalent chronic liver disease in adults and children populations. NAFLD is usually associated with the metabolic syndrome(MS), which is chiefly related to insulin resistance and its consequences. Insulin resistance has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis and potentially nonalcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH). Because of the contemporary epidemics of MS and obesity, the burden of NAFLD is also expected to rise. Unhealthy diets, such as the so-called western diet, are enriched in fructose, trans-fatty acids and saturated fat and seem to be associated with the development of NAFLD. In human studies, certain dietary sugars, particularly fructose, are used as a substrate for lipogenesis leading to hepatic fatty infiltration, inflammation, and possibly fibrosis. Other investigations have shown that fat consumption especially cholesterol and trans/saturated fatty acids are also steatogenic and seem to increase visceral adiposity. The identification of specific dietary components that favor the development of NASH could be important for the management of this disorder. This review focuses on the effects of different dietary approaches to prevent and treat NAFLD emphasizing the macronutrients and energy composition.

  14. Ethnic Differences in Presentation and Severity of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Background The frequency of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including alcoholic steatosis, hepatitis and cirrhosis, varies significantly by ethnicity. Methods With the goal to assess the role of ethnicity in determining the age of onset and severity of ALD and to compare the risk factors for its progression among ethnic groups, we conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with ALD who were admitted or were followed as outpatients at University of California Davis Medical Center between 2002 and 2010. After excluding HBsAg and HIV positive subjects, we reviewed the charts of 791 ALD patients including 130 with alcoholic fatty liver, 154 with alcoholic hepatitis, and 507 with alcoholic cirrhosis. Results When controlling for all variables in the model, Hispanic patients presented at significantly 4-10 years younger ages than White/Caucasian patients, in each of the three disease severity categories and the results were confirmed after excluding HCV Ab/RNA positive subjects. There were more obese Hispanic patients than White/Caucasian patients, whereas the proportion of patients with hepatitis C was significantly greater in African/American subjects with alcoholic hepatitis and the proportion of patients with diabetes mellitus was significantly lower in White/Caucasian subjects than in Hispanic subjects with cirrhosis. The proportion of subjects with severe alcoholic hepatitis was similar in Hispanic and White/Caucasian patients, but lower in African/American subjects. Conclusion Ethnicity is a major factor affecting the age and severity of presentation of different subtypes of ALD. PMID:25702770

  15. Dietary approach in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferolla, Silvia Marinho; Silva, Luciana Costa; Ferrari, Maria de Lourdes Abreu; da Cunha, Aloísio Sales; Martins, Flaviano Dos Santos; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu

    2015-10-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been identified as one of the most prevalent chronic liver disease in adults and children populations. NAFLD is usually associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is chiefly related to insulin resistance and its consequences. Insulin resistance has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis and potentially nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Because of the contemporary epidemics of MS and obesity, the burden of NAFLD is also expected to rise. Unhealthy diets, such as the so-called western diet, are enriched in fructose, trans-fatty acids and saturated fat and seem to be associated with the development of NAFLD. In human studies, certain dietary sugars, particularly fructose, are used as a substrate for lipogenesis leading to hepatic fatty infiltration, inflammation, and possibly fibrosis. Other investigations have shown that fat consumption especially cholesterol and trans/saturated fatty acids are also steatogenic and seem to increase visceral adiposity. The identification of specific dietary components that favor the development of NASH could be important for the management of this disorder. This review focuses on the effects of different dietary approaches to prevent and treat NAFLD emphasizing the macronutrients and energy composition. PMID:26523205

  16. Herbal Products: Benefits, Limits, and Applications in Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Del Prete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine soughts and encompasses a wide range of approaches; its use begun in ancient China at the time of Xia dynasty and in India during the Vedic period, but thanks to its long-lasting curative effect, easy availability, natural way of healing, and poor side-effects it is gaining importance throughout the world in clinical practice. We conducted a review describing the effects and the limits of using herbal products in chronic liver disease, focusing our attention on those most known, such as quercetin or curcumin. We tried to describe their pharmacokinetics, biological properties, and their beneficial effects (as antioxidant role in metabolic, alcoholic, and viral hepatitis (considering that oxidative stress is the common pathway of chronic liver diseases of different etiology. The main limit of applicability of CAM comes from the lacking of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials giving a real proof of efficacy of those products, so that anecdotal success and personal experience are frequently the driving force for acceptance of CAM in the population.

  17. Still's Disease in a Pediatric Patient after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Carlos Meza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Still's disease (SD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease characterized by persistent arthritis and in many cases with fever of unknown origin. Diagnosis of SD is challenging because of nonspecific characteristics and especially in the case of a patient with solid organ transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy where multiple causes of fever are possible. There is no diagnostic test for SD, even though some useful diagnostic criteria or laboratory findings, such as serum ferritin levels, have been proposed, and useful imaging studies for the diagnosis or followup of SD have not been developed. We report the case of a 9-year-old child who presented with high grade fever associated with joint pain after a history of liver transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy. Laboratory tests showed increased acute phase reactants, elevated ferritin, and leukocytosis. An 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET was performed identifying abnormal hypermetabolic areas localized in spleen, transplanted liver, and bone marrow secondary to inflammatory process. All infectious, autoimmune, and malignant causes were ruled out. A diagnosis of SD was performed and a steroid-based regimen was initiated with adequate response and no evidence of recurrence. To our knowledge this is the first case of SD following a solid organ transplant.

  18. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and otherfeatures of the metabolic syndrome in United States,nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitablybecome a very prevalent chronic liver disease and isnow emerging as one of the leading indications for livertransplantation. Insulin resistance and derangementof lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation ofthe pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, areessential pathways in the development of the moreclinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholicsteatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances inthe functional characterization of bile acid receptors,such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembraneG protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have providedfurther insight in the pathophysiology of NASH andhave led to the development of potential therapeutictargets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bileacid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipidmetabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increaseenergy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation.These intriguing features have been exploitedto develop bile acid analogues to target pathways inNAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review providesa brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD andNASH, and then delves into the biological functions ofbile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASHpathogenesis, with a description of the associatedexperimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospectsof bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD andNASH.

  19. The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Devcic, Edita; Starcevic-Cizmarevic, Nada; Stimac, Davor; Kapovic, Miljenko; Ristic, Smiljana

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a major role in iron homeostasis; thus, in patients with chronic liver disease, iron regulation may be disturbed. Higher iron levels are present not only in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, but also in those with alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatitis C viral infection. Chronic liver disease decreases the synthetic functions of the liver, including the production of hepcidin, a key protein in iron metabolism. Lower levels of hepcidin result in iron overload, which leads to iron deposits in the liver and higher levels of non-transferrin-bound iron in the bloodstream. Iron combined with reactive oxygen species leads to an increase in hydroxyl radicals, which are responsible for phospholipid peroxidation, oxidation of amino acid side chains, DNA strain breaks, and protein fragmentation. Iron-induced cellular damage may be prevented by regulating the production of hepcidin or by administering hepcidin agonists. Both of these methods have yielded successful results in mouse models. PMID:27332079

  20. The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Devcic, Edita; Starcevic-Cizmarevic, Nada; Stimac, Davor; Kapovic, Miljenko; Ristic, Smiljana

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a major role in iron homeostasis; thus, in patients with chronic liver disease, iron regulation may be disturbed. Higher iron levels are present not only in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, but also in those with alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatitis C viral infection. Chronic liver disease decreases the synthetic functions of the liver, including the production of hepcidin, a key protein in iron metabolism. Lower levels of hepcidin result in iron overload, which leads to iron deposits in the liver and higher levels of non-transferrin-bound iron in the bloodstream. Iron combined with reactive oxygen species leads to an increase in hydroxyl radicals, which are responsible for phospholipid peroxidation, oxidation of amino acid side chains, DNA strain breaks, and protein fragmentation. Iron-induced cellular damage may be prevented by regulating the production of hepcidin or by administering hepcidin agonists. Both of these methods have yielded successful results in mouse models. PMID:27332079