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Sample records for cholecystostomy

  1. Percutaneous cholecystostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhan, Okan; Akinci, Devrim; Oezmen, Mustafa N.

    2002-01-01

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC), a technique that consists of percutaneous catheter placement in the gallbladder lumen under imaging guidance, has become an alternative to surgical cholecystostomy in recent years. Indications of PC include calculous or acalculous cholecystitis, cholangitis, biliary obstruction and opacification of biliary ducts. It also provides a potential route for stone dissolution therapy and stone extraction. Under aseptic conditions and ultrasound guidance, using local anesthesia, the procedure is carried out by using either modified Seldinger technique or trocar technique. Transhepatic or transperitoneal puncture can be performed as an access route. Several days after the procedure transcatheter cholangiography is performed to assess the patency of cystic duct, presence of gallstones and catheter position. The tract is considered mature in the absence of leakage to the peritoneal cavity, subhepatic, subcapsular, or subdiaphragmatic spaces. Response rates to PC in the literature are between the range of 56-100% as the variation of different patient population. Complications associated with PC usually occur immediately or within days and include haemorrhage, vagal reactions, sepsis, bile peritonitis, pneumothorax, perforation of the intestinal loop, secondary infection or colonisation of the gallbladder and catheter dislodgment. Late complications have been reported as catheter dislodgment and recurrent cholecystitis. PC under ultrasonographic guidance is a cost-effective, easy to perform and reliable procedure with low complication and high success rates for critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis. It is generally followed by elective cholecystectomy, if possible. However, it may be definitive treatment, especially in acalculous cholecystitis

  2. Percutaneous cholecystostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan E-mail: akhano@tr.net; Akinci, Devrim; Oezmen, Mustafa N

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC), a technique that consists of percutaneous catheter placement in the gallbladder lumen under imaging guidance, has become an alternative to surgical cholecystostomy in recent years. Indications of PC include calculous or acalculous cholecystitis, cholangitis, biliary obstruction and opacification of biliary ducts. It also provides a potential route for stone dissolution therapy and stone extraction. Under aseptic conditions and ultrasound guidance, using local anesthesia, the procedure is carried out by using either modified Seldinger technique or trocar technique. Transhepatic or transperitoneal puncture can be performed as an access route. Several days after the procedure transcatheter cholangiography is performed to assess the patency of cystic duct, presence of gallstones and catheter position. The tract is considered mature in the absence of leakage to the peritoneal cavity, subhepatic, subcapsular, or subdiaphragmatic spaces. Response rates to PC in the literature are between the range of 56-100% as the variation of different patient population. Complications associated with PC usually occur immediately or within days and include haemorrhage, vagal reactions, sepsis, bile peritonitis, pneumothorax, perforation of the intestinal loop, secondary infection or colonisation of the gallbladder and catheter dislodgment. Late complications have been reported as catheter dislodgment and recurrent cholecystitis. PC under ultrasonographic guidance is a cost-effective, easy to perform and reliable procedure with low complication and high success rates for critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis. It is generally followed by elective cholecystectomy, if possible. However, it may be definitive treatment, especially in acalculous cholecystitis.

  3. Removal of a Trapped Endoscopic Catheter from the Gallbladder via Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholecystostomy: Technical Innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stay, Rourke M.; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Goodacre, Brian W.; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Wittich, Gerhard R.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is used for a variety of clinical problems. Methods. Percutaneous cholecystostomy was utilized in a novel setting to resolve a problematic endoscopic situation. Observations. Percutaneous cholecystostomy permitted successful removal of a broken and trapped endoscopic biliary catheter, in addition to helping treat cholecystitis. Conclusion. Another valuable use of percutaneous cholecystostomy is demonstrated, as well as emphasizing the importance of the interplay between endoscopists and interventional radiologists

  4. Percutaneous cholecystostomy at the community hospital: value evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Lee, Jin Hee; Ym, Seong Hee; Yoon, Young Gun; Sohn, Myung Hee; Kim, Chong Soo; Han, Young Min; Choi, Ki Chul

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of percutaneous cholecystostomy as a therapeutic maneuver in patients critically ill with acute cholecystitis in community hospitals. Eighteen patients, 11 with suspected acute calculous cholecystits and seven with acute acalulous cholecystitis underwent emergency percutaneous cholecystostomy. All demonstrated a variety of high risk factors for cholecystectomy:liver cirrhosis(n=3D2), diabetes mellitus(n=3D3), cardiac disease(n=3D3), underlying malignancy(n=3D2), pulmonary dysfunction(n=3D1), septic cholangitis(n=3D5), and old age(n=3D2). All percutaneous cholecystostomies were performed with ultrasound guidance and preferably using the transhepatic route. All procedures but one were successful, and most cholecystostomies were performed within 5-20 minutes. Technical problems were as follows: guide-wire buckling during catheter insertion(n=3D2) and procedure failure(n=3D1). The only major problem was a case of localized bile peritonitis due to procedural failure, but a few minor complications were encountered:catheter dislodgment(n=3D3), and significant abdominal pain during the procedure(2). After successful cholecystostomy, a dramatic improvement in clinical condition was observed in 16 of 17 patients(94%) within 48 hours. Ten of 16 patients who responded to percutaneous cholecystostomy underwent elective cholecystectomy after the improvement of clinical symptoms, and the remaining six patients improved without other gallbladder interventions. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is not only an effective procedure for acute cholecystitis, but also has a definite role in the management of these high-risk patients in community hospitals.=20

  5. Percutaneous cholecystostomy at the community hospital: value evaluation

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    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Lee, Jin Hee; Ym, Seong Hee; Yoon, Young Gun [Namwon Medical Center, Namwon (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Myung Hee; Kim, Chong Soo; Han, Young Min; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-10-01

    To assess the role of percutaneous cholecystostomy as a therapeutic maneuver in patients critically ill with acute cholecystitis in community hospitals. Eighteen patients, 11 with suspected acute calculous cholecystits and seven with acute acalulous cholecystitis underwent emergency percutaneous cholecystostomy. All demonstrated a variety of high risk factors for cholecystectomy:liver cirrhosis(n=3D2), diabetes mellitus(n=3D3), cardiac disease(n=3D3), underlying malignancy(n=3D2), pulmonary dysfunction(n=3D1), septic cholangitis(n=3D5), and old age(n=3D2). All percutaneous cholecystostomies were performed with ultrasound guidance and preferably using the transhepatic route. All procedures but one were successful, and most cholecystostomies were performed within 5-20 minutes. Technical problems were as follows: guide-wire buckling during catheter insertion(n=3D2) and procedure failure(n=3D1). The only major problem was a case of localized bile peritonitis due to procedural failure, but a few minor complications were encountered:catheter dislodgment(n=3D3), and significant abdominal pain during the procedure(2). After successful cholecystostomy, a dramatic improvement in clinical condition was observed in 16 of 17 patients(94%) within 48 hours. Ten of 16 patients who responded to percutaneous cholecystostomy underwent elective cholecystectomy after the improvement of clinical symptoms, and the remaining six patients improved without other gallbladder interventions. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is not only an effective procedure for acute cholecystitis, but also has a definite role in the management of these high-risk patients in community hospitals.=20.

  6. Nonoperative options for management of residual stones after cholecystostomy in high-risk patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, David M.; Daye, S. S.; Lincer, R. M.

    1993-05-01

    Cholecystostomy is frequently performed to obtain control of sepsis in high risk patients with acute cholecystitis. Retained stones in the gallbladder may cause future clinical problems. We present two patients with cholecystostomy tubes managed non-operatively. A review of other reported methods for stone extraction or destruction is also presented. Knowledge of safe and effective techniques for removal of these stones, using minimally invasive techniques is useful to the general surgeon.

  7. Ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy in high-risk patients for surgical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkaloglu, Huseyin; Yanar, Hakan; Guloglu, Recep; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tunca, Fatih; Aksoy, Murat; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Poyanli, Arzu

    2006-11-28

    To assess the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) in the treatment of acute cholecystitis in a well-defined high risk patients under general anesthesia. The data of 27 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy for the management of acute cholecystitis from January 1999 to June 2003 was retrospectively evaluated. All of the patients had both clinical and sonographic signs of acute cholecystitis and had comorbid diseases. Ultrasound revealed gallbladder stones in 25 patients and acalculous cholecystitis in two patients. Cholecystostomy catheters were removed 14-32 d (mean 23 d) after the procedure in cases where complete regression of all symptoms was achieved. There were statistically significant reductions in leukocytosis, (13.7 x 10(3)+/-1.3 x 10(3) microg/L vs 13 x 10(3)+/-1 x 10(3) microg/L, P extraction was performed successfully with endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) in three patients. After cholecystostomy, 5 (18%) patients underwent delayed cholecystectomy without any complications. Three out of 22 patients were admitted with recurrent acute cholecystitis during the follow-up and recovered with medical treatment. Catheter dislodgement occurred in three patients spontaneously, and two of them were managed by reinsertion of the catheter. As an alternative to surgery, percutaneous cholecystostomy seems to be a safe method in critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis and can be performed with low mortality and morbidity. Delayed cholecystectomy and ERCP, if needed, can be performed after the acute period has been resolved by percutaneous cholecystostomy.

  8. Clinical application of percutaneous cholecystostomy in the treatment of high-risk patients with acute cholecystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qoap Delin; ZZhou Bing; Chen Shiwei; Dong Jiangnan; Hua Yingxue; Chen Bo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the therapeutic strategy and the clinical efficacy of percutaneous cholecystostomy in treating high-risk patients with acute cholecystitis. Methods: During the period of Jan. 2006-June 2008, percutaneous cholecystostomy was performed in 27 high-risk patients with acute cholecystitis, consisting of lithic cholecystitis (n = 21) and non-lithic cholecystitis (n = 6). Of 27 patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy via transhepatic approach was performed in 22 and via transperitoneal approach in 5. The 7 F drainage catheter was used. Cholecystography was conducted before the drainage catheter was extracted. Results: Percutaneous cholecystostomy was successfully accomplished in all 27 cases, with a technical success rate of 100%. Postoperative patency of gallbladder drainage was obtained in 25 patients, with the relieving or subsiding of abdominal pain and the restoring of temperature and leukocyte account to normal range within 72 hours. In one patient, as the abdominal pain relief was not obvious 72 hours after the procedure, cholecystography was employed and it revealed the obstruction of the drainage catheter. After reopening of the drainage catheter, the abdominal pain was relieved. In another case, cholecystography was carried out because the abdominal pain became worse after the procedure, and minor bile leak was demonstrated. After powerful anti-infective and symptomatic medication, the abdominal pain was alleviated. The drainage catheter was extracted in 25 patients 6-7 weeks after the treatment. Of these 25 patients, 12 accepted selective cholecystectomy, 7 received percutaneous cholecystolithotomy and 6 with non-lithic cholecystitis did not get any additional surgery. The remaining two patients were living with long-term retention of the indwelling drainage-catheter. Conclusion: Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a simple, safe and effective treatment for acute cholecystitis in high-risk patients. This technique is of great value in clinical

  9. Ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy in high-risk patients for surgical intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkaloglu, Huseyin; Yanar, Hakan; Guloglu, Recep; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tunca, Fatih; Aksoy, Murat; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Poyanli, Arzu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) in the treatment of acute cholecystitis in a well-defined high risk patients under general anesthesia. METHODS: The data of 27 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy for the management of acute cholecystitis from January 1999 to June 2003 was retrospectively evaluated. All of the patients had both clinical and sonographic signs of acute cholecystitis and had comorbid diseases. RESULTS: Ultrasound revealed gallbladder stones in 25 patients and acalculous cholecystitis in two patients. Cholecystostomy catheters were removed 14-32 d (mean 23 d) after the procedure in cases where complete regression of all symptoms was achieved. There were statistically significant reductions in leukocytosis, (13.7 × 103 ± 1.3 × 103 μg/L vs 13 × 103 ± 1 × 103 μg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 13.7 × 103 ± 1.3 × 103 μg/L vs 8.3 × 103 ± 1.2 × 103 μg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), C -reactive protein (51.2 ± 18.5 mg/L vs 27.3 ± 10.4 mg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 51.2 ± 18.5 mg/L vs 5.4 ± 1.5 mg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), and fever (38 ± 0.35°C vs 37.3 ± 0.32°C, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 38 ± 0.35°C vs 36.9 ± 0.15°C, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC). Sphincterotomy and stone extraction was performed successfully with endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) in three patients. After cholecystostomy, 5 (18%) patients underwent delayed cholecystectomy without any complications. Three out of 22 patients were admitted with recurrent acute cholecystitis during the follow-up and recovered with medical treatment. Catheter dislodgement occurred in three patients spontaneously, and two of them were managed by reinsertion of the catheter. CONCLUSION: As an alternative to surgery, percutan-eous cholecystostomy seems to be a safe method in critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis and can be performed with low

  10. A novel technique of percutaneous stone extraction in choledocholithiasis after cholecystostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Yong Joo

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous common bile duct stone extraction via cystic duct after percutaneous cholecystostomy. Twenty-five consecutive patients with choledocholithiasis underwent percutaneous stone extraction under conscious sedation. The stones were extracted through the 12-Fr sheath using Wittich nitinol stone basket under fluoroscopic guidance via cystic duct after percutaneous trnas-hepatic cholecystostomy. Common bile duct stones were successfully removed in 22 of the 25 patients (88%) by this new technique. The causes of failure in three patients were bile leakage, hematoma of the gallbladder and failure of cystic duct cannulation. Cystic duct injury during this procedure did not occur and there was no post-procedure mortality. The mean period of indwelling catheter was 8.7±4.6 days and the mean duration of hospitalization was 13.4±5.9 days. Percutaneous commmon bile duct stone extraction via the cystic duct through percutaneous cholecystostomy route is effective and feasible for treating choledocholithiasis.

  11. An ultrasound-driven needle-insertion robot for percutaneous cholecystostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J; Dohi, T; Hashizume, M; Konishi, K; Hata, N

    2004-01-01

    A real-time ultrasound-guided needle-insertion medical robot for percutaneous cholecystostomy has been developed. Image-guided interventions have become widely accepted because they are consistent with minimal invasiveness. However, organ or abnormality displacement due to involuntary patient motion may undesirably affect the intervention. The proposed instrument uses intraoperative images and modifies the needle path in real time by using a novel ultrasonic image segmentation technique. In phantom and volunteer experiments, the needle path updating time was 130 and 301 ms per cycle, respectively. In animal experiments, the needle could be placed accurately in the target

  12. Interval biliary stent placement via percutaneous ultrasound guided cholecystostomy: another approach to palliative treatment in malignant biliary tract obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, James; Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-12-01

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  13. Interval Biliary Stent Placement Via Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Cholecystostomy: Another Approach to Palliative Treatment in Malignant Biliary Tract Obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, James; Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  14. Cholecystectomy vs. percutaneous cholecystostomy for the management of critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis: a protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambe, Peter C; Kaptanis, Sarantos; Papadakis, Marios; Weber, Sebastian A; Zirngibl, Hubert

    2015-05-30

    Acute cholecystitis is a common diagnosis. However, the heterogeneity of presentation makes it difficult to standardize management. Although surgery is the mainstay of treatment, critically ill patients have been managed via percutaneous cholecystostomy. However, the role of percutaneous cholecystostomy in the management of such patients has not been clearly established. This systematic review will compare the outcomes of critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis managed with percutaneous cholecystostomy to those of similar patients managed with cholecystectomy. Systematic searches will be conducted across relevant health databases including the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus using the following keywords: (acute cholecystitis OR severe cholecystitis OR cholecystitis) AND (cholecystectomy OR laparoscopic cholecystectomy OR open cholecystectomy) AND (Cholecystostomy OR percutaneous cholecystectomy OR gallbladder drain OR gallbladder tube OR transhepatic gallbladder drain OR transhepatic gallbladder tube OR cholecystostomy tube). The reference lists of eligible articles will be hand searched. Articles from 2000-2014 will be identified using the key terms "acute cholecystitis, cholecystectomy, and percutaneous cholecystostomy". Studies including both interventions will be included. Relevant data will be extracted from eligible studies using a specially designed data extraction sheet. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale will be used to assess the quality of non-randomized studies. Central tendencies will be reported in terms of means and standard deviations where necessary, and risk ratios will be calculated where possible. All calculations will be performed with a 95 % confidence interval. Furthermore, the Fisher's exact test will be used for the calculation of significance, which will be set at p < 0.05. Pooled estimates will be presented after consideration of both clinical and

  15. Conversion of Percutaneous Cholecystostomy to Endoscopic Gallbladder Stenting by Using the Rendezvous Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kwangwoo; Choi, Jun-Ho

    2017-05-01

    We report the successful conversion of percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) to endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder stenting (ETGS) with insertion of an antegrade guidewire into the duodenum. An 84-year-old man presented with severe acute cholecystitis and septic shock. He had significant comorbidities, and emergent PC was successfully performed. Subsequent ETGS was attempted but unsuccessful owing to difficulties with cystic duct cannulation. However, via the PC tract, the guidewire was passed antegradely into the duodenum, and ETGS with a double-pigtail plastic stent was successfully performed with the rendezvous technique. The PC tube was removed, and no recurrence was reported during the 17-month follow-up period. Conversion of PC to ETGS is a viable option in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not candidates for surgery. Antegrade guidewire insertion via the PC tract may increase the success rate of conversion and decrease the risk of procedure-related complications.

  16. Conversion of Percutaneous Cholecystostomy to Endoscopic Gallbladder Stenting by Using the Rendezvous Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangwoo Nam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful conversion of percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC to endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder stenting (ETGS with insertion of an antegrade guidewire into the duodenum. An 84-year-old man presented with severe acute cholecystitis and septic shock. He had significant comorbidities, and emergent PC was successfully performed. Subsequent ETGS was attempted but unsuccessful owing to difficulties with cystic duct cannulation. However, via the PC tract, the guidewire was passed antegradely into the duodenum, and ETGS with a double-pigtail plastic stent was successfully performed with the rendezvous technique. The PC tube was removed, and no recurrence was reported during the 17-month follow-up period. Conversion of PC to ETGS is a viable option in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not candidates for surgery. Antegrade guidewire insertion via the PC tract may increase the success rate of conversion and decrease the risk of procedure-related complications.

  17. Percutaneous cholecystostomy for gallbladder perforation : early response and final outcome in 10 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Lee, Mi Suk [Namwon Medical Center, Namwon (Korea, Republic of ); Kim, Jin; Kowk, Hyo Seong; Lee, Sang Young; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo [Chonbuk Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Han, Hyeun Young; Chung, Jin Young [Eulgi Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) as a therapeutic maneuver for patients with spontaneous gallbladder (GB) perforation. All procedures were technically successful, and no major procedure-related complications occurred. Eight patients (80%) responded favorably to PC. One, who did not respond, underwent emergency cholecystectomy next day due to worsening peritonitis, and the other who failed to respond within 72hr showed delayed response after drainage of a coexistent liver abscess at seven days after the procedure. A patient who responded to PC experience catheter dislodgement four days after the procedure but reinsertion was not required. Five of eight patients who responded positively underwent elective cholecystecomy after the improvement of clinical symptoms, and the three remaining patients improved without further surgery. (author). 23 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Percutaneous cholecystostomy in critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis: Complications and late outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atar, E.; Bachar, G.N.; Berlin, S.; Neiman, C.; Bleich-Belenky, E.; Litvin, S.; Knihznik, M.; Belenky, A.; Ram, E.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the outcome of percutaneous cholecystostomy in critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis. Materials and methods: The study group included critically ill patients who underwent percutaneous cholecystostomy for acute cholecystitis at a tertiary medical centre in 2007–2011. Data on complications, morbidities, surgical outcome, and imaging findings were collected from the medical files and radiology information system. Results: There were 48 women (59.3%) and 33 men (40.7%), with a median age of 82 years (range 47–99 years). Seventy-one (88%) had calculous cholecystitis and 10 (12%), acalculous cholecystitis. The drain was successfully inserted in all cases with no immediate major procedural complications. Fifteen patients (18.5%) died in-hospital within 30 days, mainly (93%) due to septic shock (14/15), another 20 patients (24.7%) died during the study period of unrelated co-morbidities. Of the remaining 46 patients, 36 (78.2%) had surgical cholecystectomies. In patients with acalculous cholecystitis, the drain was removed after cessation of symptoms. Transcystic cholangiography identified five patients with additional stones in the common bile duct. They were managed by pushing the stones into the duodenum via the cystostomy access, sparing them the need for surgical exploration. Conclusions: Early percutaneous gallbladder drainage is safe and effective in critically ill patients in the acute phase of cholecystitis, with a high technical success rate. Surgical results in survivors are better than reported in patients treated surgically without drainage. Bile duct stones can be eliminated without creating an additional access

  19. Cholecystostomy as Bridge to Surgery and as Definitive Treatment or Acute Cholecystectomy in Patients with Acute Cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Popowicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC has increasingly been used as bridge to surgery as well as sole treatment for patients with acute cholecystitis (AC. The aim of the study was to assess the outcome after PC compared to acute cholecystectomy in patients with AC. Methods. A review of medical records was performed on all patients residing in Stockholm County treated for AC in the years 2003 and 2008. Results. In 2003 and 2008 altogether 799 and 833 patients were admitted for AC. The number of patients treated with PC was 21/799 (2.6% in 2003 and 50/833 (6.0% in 2008. The complication rate (Clavien-Dindo ≥ 2 was 4/71 (5.6% after PC and 135/736 (18.3% after acute cholecystectomy. Mean (standard deviation hospital stay was 11.4 (10.5 days for patients treated with PC and 5.1 (4.3 days for patients undergoing acute cholecystectomy. After adjusting for age, gender, Charlson comorbidity index, and degree of cholecystitis, the hospital stay was significantly longer for patients treated with PC than for those undergoing acute cholecystectomy (P<0.001 but the risk for intervention-related complications was found to be significantly lower (P=0.001 in the PC group. Conclusion. PC can be performed with few serious complications, albeit with a longer hospital stay.

  20. Cholangiography and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cholangiography and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the management of severe acute gallstone pancreatitis discovered at diag~osticlaparotomy. ... in these cases Included cholecystectomy and Ttube drainage (2 patients) cholecystostomy drainage (3 patients), and closure of the abdomen without drainage (2 patients).

  1. Percutaneous cholecystostome; 60 cases of experience

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    Kang, Sung Gwon; Song, Ho Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Lee, Young Suk; Ki, Won Woo; Sung, Gyu Bo [Ulsan Univ College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To review the effectiveness and complication of percutaneous cholecystostomy (PCCS). We performed PCCS in 60 patient who presented with acute cholecystitis. The causes of acute cholecystitis were as follows; acalculous cholecystitis(n=8), calculous cholecystitis(n=23), GB hydrops (n=3), GB empyema(n=15), septic cholangitis(n=11). Of 60 patients, 36 patients had high risk factor for cholecystectomy; underlying malignancy(n=13), severe trauma(n=6). Cholecystostomy was done under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guide. The cholecystostomy was successfully in 59 patients, and failed in 1 patient. 15 patients improved without other procedure. 16 patients underwent cholecystectomy after improvement of their general condition. Severe complications of PCCS are as follows; bile peritonitis(n=6), hemoperitoneum(n=1), subphrenic abscess(n=1). Mild complication, such as pain, occurred in most patients. Emergency operation was done in one patient who developed bile peritonitis. Cholecystostomy is effective and safe, especially in cases of inoperable patients who represent acute cholecystitis. Percutaneous cholecystostomy may substitute surgical cholecystostomy.

  2. Combined surgical and radiological intervention for complicated cholelithiasis in high-risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibney, R.G.; Fache, J.S.; Becker, C.D.; Nichols, D.M.; Cooperberg, P.L.; Stoller, J.L.; Burhenne, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Surgical cholecystostomy under local infiltration anesthesia was combined with radiologic removal of gallstones in 36 high-risk patients with acute calculous gallbladder disease. At cholecystostomy, the fundus of the gallbladder was sutured to the anterior abdominal wall, permitting early percutaneous stone removal through the short surgical tract. All gallstones were removed in 31 of 36 patients, for an overall success rate of 86%. The success rate was 97% for gallbladder stones, 86% for cystic duct stones, and 63% for common bile duct stones which were removed by traversing the cystic duct. There were no deaths or serious complications

  3. Interventional ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSonnenberg, E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters and several case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: The Interplay of Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in the Planning and Execution of Interventional Procedures: Ulltrasound Guided Biopsy; Interventioal Genitourinary Sonography; Diagnosis and Treatment of Pericardial Effusion Using Ultrasonic Guidance; and New Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures--Cholecystostomy, Pancreatography, Gastrostomy

  4. ISSN 2073 ISSN 2073-9990 East Cent. Afr. J. surg. (Online) 9990 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    Difficult Gallbladder Surgery, Improving Patient Outcomes Through Appropriate Surgical. Decisions. ... If the position is too close to the common bile duct, an aberrant ... M.M, a 65-years old female had a bile duct injury post open cholecystectomy. She had .... With radiologic advances, cholecystostomy can be performed as a.

  5. Transcystic duct treatment of common bile duct stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberg, J.R.; Chun, G.

    1981-01-01

    Successful removal of 2 retained common bile duct stones following cholecystostomy is described. With the use of the steerable catheter and the wire basket, one stone was crushed and the second was extracted in retrograde fashion through the cystic duct and gallbladder. (orig.)

  6. Úlcera corneal bilateral como consecuencia de malnutrición calórico-protéica y déficit de vitamina A en un paciente con alcoholismo crónico, pancreatitis crónica y colecistostomía Bilateral corneal ulceration as a result of energy-protein hyponutrition and vitamin A deficit in a patient with chronic alcoholism, chronic pancreatitis and cholecystostomy

    OpenAIRE

    S. Benítez Cruz; C. Gómez Candela; M. Ruiz Martín; A. I. Cos Blanco

    2005-01-01

    Desde el descubrimiento de las vitaminas ha existido un creciente interés por relacionar las vitaminas con ciertas enfermedades. Para la vitamina A en particular se ha determinado su singular importancia en múltiples funciones vitales y su relación con enfermedades tanto por déficit como por exceso esta ahora completamente demostrada. En países desarrollados las enfermedades por déficit vitamínicos han disminuido de manera importante; sin embargo en pacientes con características particulares ...

  7. A case of severe acute pancreatitis with near total pancreatic necrosis diagnosed by dynamic CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kazunori; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Amikura, Katsumi; Miyagawa, Kikuo; Matsuno, Seiki; Sato, Toshio

    1987-01-01

    A 42 year-old woman with severe acute pancreatitis had drainage of the pancreatic bed, cholecystostomy and jejunostomy on admission, but symptoms were not improved. Fourteen days after admission, clinical sepsis and septisemia were recognized. Dynamic CT scanning of the pancreas showed near total pancreatic necrosis. Symptoms were improved after necrosectomy of the pancreas and debridement of the peripancreatic necrotic tissue were performed. Our experience suggests the usefulness of dynamic CT scanning for detection of pancreatic necrosis in severe acute pancreatitis. (author)

  8. Occlusion of the cystic duct by electrocoagulation: A radiologic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, C.D.; Quenville, W.F.; Burhenne, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical dissolution and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy are promising new methods for the treatment of cholelithiasis without cholecystectomy. Nonsurgical defunctionalization of the gallbladder is now required to prevent recurrent stone formation. The authors consider cystic duct occlusion to be the first step. Ten domestic pigs underwent transcatheter electrocoagulation of the cystic duct via a cholecystostomy under fluoroscopic control. Stricture formation was followed by complete cystic duct occlusion in all ten cases. After a follow-up period ranging from 2 to 17 weeks (mean, 13 weeks), the animals were killed. Histologic studies demonstrated that complete obliteration of the cystic duct lumen was due to fibrous scar formation

  9. Perfuração espontânea da via biliar principal na infância

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. A. Aratanha

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of spontaneous perforation of the biliary tract (S.P.B.T in a three-month-old infant. The diagnosis was suspected before the operation by clinical signs and diagnostic tests. The importance of paracentesis and scintigraphy is stressed. A surgical approach was chosen and drainage procedure of the area around the perforation and a cholecystostomy were done. S.P.B.T. is rare and its etiology is controversial, but cannot be forgotten in association between biliary ascites and cholestatic jaundice during the first months of life.

  10. Management of empyema of gallbladder with percutaneous cholecysto-duodenal stenting in a case of hilar cholangiocarcinoma treated with common bile duct metallic stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheo Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Empyema of the gallbladder develops when the gallbladder neck is obstructed in the presence of infection, preventing pus from draining via the cystic duct. Treatment options include cholecystectomy or, in patients with comorbidities, drainage via percutaneous cholecystostomy, later followed by cholecystectomy. Here, we describe a 59-year-old man who presented with complaints of recurrent hiccups and was found to have cholangiocarcinoma causing obstruction to cystic duct drainage. The patient was managed successfully by percutaneous transhepatic cholecysto-duodenal self-expandable covered metal stent.

  11. Management of biliary perforation in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Bilal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study the aetiology, management and outcome of biliary perforations in paediatric age group. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study, the records of patients presented with biliary peritonitis due to biliary perforations, managed from March 2006 to July 2009, are reviewed. Results: Eight male patients with biliary peritonitis due to biliary perforation were managed. These patients were divided in two groups, A and B. Group A, (n = 3 patients, had common bile duct (CBD perforation, and Group B (n=5 patients had gallbladder perforation. The presenting features were abdominal pain, fever, abdominal distension, vomiting, constipation, jaundice and signs of peritonism. The management of CBD perforations in Group A was by draining the site of perforation and biliary diversion (tube cholecystostomy. In Group B, the gallbladder perforations were managed by tube cholecystostomy in four patients and cholecystectomy in one patient, however, one patient had to be re-explored and cholecystectomy performed due to complete necrosis of gall bladder. There was no mortality in our series. All patients were asymptomatic on regular follow-up. Conclusion: Early optimal management of biliary perforations remarkably improved the very high mortality and morbidity that characterised this condition in the past.

  12. Six years' experience of minicholecystostomy for acute calculous gallbladder disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.H.; Stoller, J.L.; Fache, J.S.; Gibney, R.G.; Burhenne, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper assesses the value and outcome of combined surgical (mini-cholecystostomy) and radiologic stone extraction in high-risk patients with acute calculous gallbladder disease. Sixty-seven patients were treated over a 6-year period. Three were 37 women and 30 men (age range, 33-98 years; mean, 73 years). Fifty (74%) surgical procedures were performed under local anesthesia. Radiologic gallstone extraction was achieved in 49 patients (73%). Extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy was required in six patients to fragment large stones. Twelve patients (18%) also had bile duct stones, of which 8 (67%) were successfully cleared. There were 4 deaths (6%) within 30 days. Twelve cholecystectomies (18%) were performed between 3 and 19 weeks (mean, 9 weeks) after minicholecystostomy as a result of failed stone clearance. The long-term outcome for those patients whose gallstones were cleared are discussed

  13. Percutaneous trans-papillary elimination of common bile duct stones using an existing gallbladder drain for access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Eli; Neiman, Chaim; Ram, Eduard; Almog, Mazal; Gadiel, Itai; Belenky, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The presence of stones in the common bile duct (CBD) may cause complications such as obstructing jaundice or ascending cholangitis, and the stones should be removed. To assess the efficacy of percutaneous elimination of CBD stones from the gallbladder through the papilla. During a 4 year period, six patients (five men and one woman, mean age 71.5 years) who had CBD stones and an existing gallbladder drain underwent percutaneous stone push into the duodenum after balloon dilatation of the papilla, with a diameter equal to that of the largest stone. Access into the CBD was from the gallbladder, using an already existing percutaneous gallbladder drain (cholecystostomy tube). Each patient had one to three CBD stones measuring 7-14 mm. Successful CBD stone elimination into the duodenum was achieved in five of the six patients. The single failure occurred in a patient with choledochal diverticulum, who was operated successfully. There were no major or minor complications during or after the procedures. Trans-cholecystic CBD stone elimination is a safe and feasible percutaneous technique that utilizes existing tracts, thus obviating the need to create new percutaneous access. This procedure can replace endoscopic or surgical CBD exploration.

  14. Active instrumental guidance in interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildermuth, S.; Erhart, P.; Leung, D.A.; Goehde, S.; Schoenenberger, A.; Debatin, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: An active MR-based guidance system for visualisation of invasive instruments is described. Methods: The principle of MR tracking is based on the integration of a miniaturised coil into the tip of the instrument itself. A phantom experiment was designed to demonstrate the localising accuracy of this technique. In [dition, bicompatibility and warming effects were evaluated. Preliminary intravascular applications that were performed in animal experiments under MR guidance included embolisation, vascular occlusion as well as transjugular intrahepatic punctures. Percutaneous biopsies, cholecystostomies and laparoscopic applications were also evaluated with MR tracking. Results: Phantom experiments confirmed an excellent localisation accuracy of MR tracking compared to conventional r[iography. At a field strength of 0.5 T, the temperature increase remained below 2 C. Results of phantom experiments revealed a potential of significant heating dependent on the sequence parameters employed. MR tracking allowed a robust, simultaneously biplanar visualisation of the instrument tips in real time. Based on MR 'ro[ map' images, various intravascular and percutaneous interventions were successfully performed in vivo under MR guidance. Conclusions: MR tracking is a flexible concept permitting monitoring in the guidance of instruments in an MR environment. Various preliminary in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate safety, localisation accuracy and feasibility of this biplanar localisation technique in real time. (orig.) [de

  15. Endovascular management for significant iatrogenic portal vein bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Woo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Park, Jonathan K; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2017-11-01

    Background Despite conservative treatment, hemorrhage from an intrahepatic branch of the portal vein can cause hemodynamic instability requiring urgent intervention. Purpose To retrospectively report the outcomes of hemodynamically significant portal vein bleeding after endovascular management. Material and Methods During a period of 15 years, four patients (2 men, 2 women; median age, 70.5 years) underwent angiography and embolization for iatrogenic portal vein bleeding. Causes of hemorrhage, angiographic findings, endovascular treatment, and complications were reported. Results Portal vein bleeding occurred after percutaneous liver biopsy (n = 2), percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (n = 1), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (n = 1). The median time interval between angiography and percutaneous procedure was 5 h (range, 4-240 h). Common hepatic angiograms including indirect mesenteric portograms showed active portal vein bleeding into the peritoneal cavity with (n = 1) or without (n = 2) an arterioportal (AP) fistula, and portal vein pseudoaneurysm alone with an AP fistula (n = 1). Successful transcatheter arterial embolization (n = 2) or percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (n = 2) was performed. Embolic materials were n-butyl cyanoacrylate alone (n = 2) or in combination with gelatin sponge particles and coils (n = 2). There were no major treatment-related complications or patient mortality within 30 days. Conclusion Patients with symptomatic or life-threatening portal vein bleeding following liver-penetrating procedures can successfully be managed with embolization.

  16. A Prototype Educational Model for Hepatobiliary Interventions: Unveiling the Role of Graphic Designers in Medical 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan, Ramin; Zeman, Merissa N

    2018-02-01

    In the context of medical three-dimensional (3D) printing, in addition to 3D reconstruction from cross-sectional imaging, graphic design plays a role in developing and/or enhancing 3D-printed models. A custom prototype modular 3D model of the liver was graphically designed depicting segmental anatomy of the parenchyma containing color-coded hepatic vasculature and biliary tree. Subsequently, 3D printing was performed using transparent resin for the surface of the liver and polyamide material to develop hollow internal structures that allow for passage of catheters and wires. A number of concepts were incorporated into the model. A representative mass with surrounding feeding arterial supply was embedded to demonstrate tumor embolization. A straight narrow hollow tract connecting the mass to the surface of the liver, displaying the path of a biopsy device's needle, and the concept of needle "throw" length was designed. A connection between the middle hepatic and right portal veins was created to demonstrate transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. A hollow amorphous structure representing an abscess was created to allow the demonstration of drainage catheter placement with the formation of pigtail tip. Percutaneous biliary drain and cholecystostomy tube placement were also represented. The skills of graphic designers may be utilized in creating highly customized 3D-printed models. A model was developed for the demonstration and simulation of multiple hepatobiliary interventions, for training purposes, patient counseling and consenting, and as a prototype for future development of a functioning interventional phantom.

  17. Hypertriglyceridemia-associated Acute Pancreatitis with Chylous Ascites in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chang Chuang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Both cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum increase progressively during pregnancy. Hypertrigly-ceridemia is a well-recognized cause of acute pancreatitis, while pancreatitis-associated chylous ascites has rarely been reported. We report a 28-year-old female with coexistence of hypertriglyceridemia, acute pancreatitis, and chylous ascites during pregnancy. After emergency cesarean section, she was treated with nil per os, intravenous hydration, antibiotics, and analgesics as required. Due to the development of positive peritonitis 5 days later, an exploratory laparotomy was performed. Surgical interventions included pancreatic necrosec-tomy, right hemicolectomy and ileostomy, cholecystostomy, gastrostomy, and feeding jejunostomy. Postoperative treatment included antibiotics, total parenteral nutrition, and then low-fat diet with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. She was discharged on the 43rd day after surgery and was free of symptoms during 6 months of follow-up. Ileocolostomy was performed 6 months after discharge. Fasting lipid profile should be regularly monitored during pregnancy due to the association of hypertriglyceridemia with development of acute pancreatitis in the mother.

  18. Percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim; Gumus, Burcak; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Ekinci, Saniye [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Akcoren, Zuhal [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Pathology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Kutluk, Tezer [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-10-15

    There is limited experience of percutaneous biliary interventions in children although they are safe and effective procedures. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. Percutaneous biliary interventions were performed in eight children (six boys, two girls) with a mean age of 10.5 years (range 4-17 years). The interventions included percutaneous biliary drainage (five patients), percutaneous biliary drainage and placement of a self-expanding metallic stent (two patients), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (one patient). All patients had signs of obstructive jaundice and two had cholangitis. All procedures were successful. No procedure-related mortality was observed. Bilirubin levels returned to normal in four of the eight patients. Findings of cholangitis resolved in the two affected patients after the procedure and antibiotic treatment. Two patients underwent surgery after percutaneous biliary drainage procedures. A self-expanding metallic stent was placed in two patients with malignancy and the stents remained patent until death. Percutaneous biliary interventions can be performed safely for the management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. (orig.)

  19. Successful topical dissolution of cholesterol gallbladder stones using ethyl propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A F; Amelsberg, A; Esch, O; Schteingart, C D; Lyche, K; Jinich, H; Vansonnenberg, E; D'Agostino, H B

    1997-06-01

    Topical dissolution of cholesterol gallbladder stones using methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is useful in symptomatic patients judged too ill for surgery. Previous studies showed that ethyl propionate (EP), a C5 ester, dissolves cholesterol gallstones rapidly in vitro, but differs from MTBE in being eliminated so rapidly by the liver that blood levels remain undetectable. Our aim was to test EP as a topical dissolution agent for cholesterol gallbladder stones. Five high-risk patients underwent topical dissolution of gallbladder stones by EP. In three patients, the solvent was instilled via a cholecystostomy tube placed previously to treat acute cholecystitis; in two patients, a percutaneous transhepatic catheter was placed in the gallbladder electively. Gallstone dissolution was assessed by chromatography, by gravimetry, and by catheter cholecystography. Total dissolution of gallstones was obtained in four patients after 6-10 hr of lavage; in the fifth patient, partial gallstone dissolution facilitated basketing of the stones. In two patients, cholesterol dissolution was measured and averaged 30 mg/min. Side effects were limited to one episode of transient hypotension and pain at the infusion site; no patient developed somnolence or nausea. Gallstone elimination was associated with relief of symptoms. EP is an acceptable alternative to MTBE for topical dissolution of cholesterol gallbladder stones in high-risk patients. The lower volatility and rapid hepatic extraction of EP suggest that it may be preferable to MTBE in this investigational procedure.

  20. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute biliary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menu, Yves; Vuillerme, Marie-Pierre [Department of Radiology, Hopital Beaujon, 92118 Clichy Cedex (France)

    2002-10-01

    Imaging is the standard method for the evaluation of emergency bile ducts and gallbladder diseases. Imaging may help to treat the patient also. In acute cholecystitis, association of clinical and sonographic data is accurate for the diagnosis, even when the patient is examined by a junior radiologist. Computed tomography may be required for those patients with unusual presentation such as emphysematous cholecystitis, perforation, or abscess. Acalculous cholecystitis is a challenging problem. It sometimes requires percutaneous cholecystostomy for diagnosis or treatment purposes. In patients with acute cholangitis, sonography remains the first step for imaging, but its diagnostic accuracy is disappointing. This is related to low sensitivity, despite a high specificity. Computed tomography carries a slightly better sensitivity, and again a high specificity but overall accuracy is not sufficient. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and endosonography are the best methods for the detection. Both have advantages and limitations, including cost and availability, but endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography remains necessary for therapeutic purposes, especially stone extraction. In conclusion, emergency radiologists should be able to put the patient through multiple imaging modalities in order to make a prompt diagnosis with no delay, and be aware of the therapeutic options, including cooperation between radiologist, endoscopist, and surgeon. (orig.)

  1. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Gallstone Removal Using a 12-Fr Sheath in High-Risk Surgical Patients with Acute Cholecystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Yong Joo; Shin, Tae Beom

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic cholecystolithotomy under fluoroscopic guidance in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis. Sixty-three consecutive patients of high surgical risk with acute calculous cholecystitis underwent percutaneous transhepatic gallstone removal under conscious sedation. The stones were extracted through the 12-Fr sheath using a Wittich nitinol stone basket under fluoroscopic guidance on three days after performing a percutaneous cholecystostomy. Large or hard stones were fragmented using either the snare guide wire technique or the metallic cannula technique. Gallstones were successfully removed from 59 of the 63 patients (94%). Reasons for stone removal failure included the inability to grasp a large stone in two patients, and the loss of tract during the procedure in two patients with a contracted gallbladder. The mean hospitalization duration was 7.3 days for acute cholecystitis patients and 9.4 days for gallbladder empyema patients. Bile peritonitis requiring percutaneous drainage developed in two patients. No symptomatic recurrence occurred during follow-up (mean, 608.3 days). Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gallstone removal using a 12-Fr sheath is technically feasible and clinically effective in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis

  2. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute biliary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menu, Yves; Vuillerme, Marie-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Imaging is the standard method for the evaluation of emergency bile ducts and gallbladder diseases. Imaging may help to treat the patient also. In acute cholecystitis, association of clinical and sonographic data is accurate for the diagnosis, even when the patient is examined by a junior radiologist. Computed tomography may be required for those patients with unusual presentation such as emphysematous cholecystitis, perforation, or abscess. Acalculous cholecystitis is a challenging problem. It sometimes requires percutaneous cholecystostomy for diagnosis or treatment purposes. In patients with acute cholangitis, sonography remains the first step for imaging, but its diagnostic accuracy is disappointing. This is related to low sensitivity, despite a high specificity. Computed tomography carries a slightly better sensitivity, and again a high specificity but overall accuracy is not sufficient. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and endosonography are the best methods for the detection. Both have advantages and limitations, including cost and availability, but endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography remains necessary for therapeutic purposes, especially stone extraction. In conclusion, emergency radiologists should be able to put the patient through multiple imaging modalities in order to make a prompt diagnosis with no delay, and be aware of the therapeutic options, including cooperation between radiologist, endoscopist, and surgeon. (orig.)

  3. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Gallstone Removal Using a 12-Fr Sheath in High-Risk Surgical Patients with Acute Cholecystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Hwan [Keimyung University, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Joo [Andong General Hospital, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Gyeonsang National University, College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic cholecystolithotomy under fluoroscopic guidance in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis. Sixty-three consecutive patients of high surgical risk with acute calculous cholecystitis underwent percutaneous transhepatic gallstone removal under conscious sedation. The stones were extracted through the 12-Fr sheath using a Wittich nitinol stone basket under fluoroscopic guidance on three days after performing a percutaneous cholecystostomy. Large or hard stones were fragmented using either the snare guide wire technique or the metallic cannula technique. Gallstones were successfully removed from 59 of the 63 patients (94%). Reasons for stone removal failure included the inability to grasp a large stone in two patients, and the loss of tract during the procedure in two patients with a contracted gallbladder. The mean hospitalization duration was 7.3 days for acute cholecystitis patients and 9.4 days for gallbladder empyema patients. Bile peritonitis requiring percutaneous drainage developed in two patients. No symptomatic recurrence occurred during follow-up (mean, 608.3 days). Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gallstone removal using a 12-Fr sheath is technically feasible and clinically effective in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis

  4. Percutaneous drainage with ultrasound guidance in the intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Doo Kyung; Won, Je Hwan; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Kim, Ji Hyung

    2004-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of bedside percutaneous drainage procedures with ultrasound guidance in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Sixty five percutaneous drainage procedures performed at the bedside, in 39 ICU patients, were evaluated. All of the procedures were performed with ultrasound guidance alone. The procedures consisted of percutaneous drainage of abdominal (n=35) and pleural (n=27) fluids, percutaneous cholecystostomy (n=2) and percutaneous nephrostomy (n=1). The clinical responses were classified as 'complete response', 'partial response', 'failure' or 'undetermined'. The medical records were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the clinical response. Technical success was achieved in 64 of the 65 procedures (98.5%). The complication rate was 13.8% (9 cases). There was no immediate procedure-related death or worsening of the clinical condition of the patients. The clinical responses after drainage were 'complete response' in 39 cases (60.9%). 'partial response' in 14 (21.9%), 'failure' in 3 (4.7%), and 'undetermined' in 8 (12.5%). Bedside drainage procedures with ultrasound guidance are effective and safe to perform when patients are too critically ill to be moved from the ICU to the angiography room

  5. Gianturco metallic biliary stent in malignant biliary obstruction: results of follow-up in dead patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, Chan Soo; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, See Sung; Won, Jong Jin; Kim, Haak Cheul; Chae, Kwon Mook [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    In order to study the patency, restenosis, efficacy, and complication of the metallic stent in the course of treatment of malignant biliary obstruction, the results of follow up of the dead patients after stent insertion were reviewed. Self-expandable Gianturco metallic stent with 10-mm diameter was successfully inserted in 33 patients: 10 with Klatskin tumor, 7 with common bile duct cancer, 7 with gallbladder cancer, 5 with pancreatic cancer, 2 with recurred stomach cancer, one with periampullary cancer, one with hepatocellular carcinoma. The overall duration of survival and patency of the stents in 33 patients were 5.2 months(1-12 months) and 4.9 months(1-14 months), respectively. Restenosis of metallic stents was found in 9 cases(27%), after 6.1 months in average. Causes of stent occlusion were overgrowing of tumor in 5, overgrowing and ingrowing of tumor in 3, extraductal dislodgement in one case. Two cases of symptomatic cholangitis after stent placement were successfully treated with percutaneous cholecystostomy. Three cases of destruction and migration of metallic stents were found after 6 months. On the basis of our experience, insertion of Gianturco metallic biliary stent is an acceptable treatment method in the malignant biliary obstruction, especially for whom short term survival is expected.

  6. Percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Gumus, Burcak; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan; Ekinci, Saniye; Akcoren, Zuhal; Kutluk, Tezer

    2007-01-01

    There is limited experience of percutaneous biliary interventions in children although they are safe and effective procedures. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. Percutaneous biliary interventions were performed in eight children (six boys, two girls) with a mean age of 10.5 years (range 4-17 years). The interventions included percutaneous biliary drainage (five patients), percutaneous biliary drainage and placement of a self-expanding metallic stent (two patients), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (one patient). All patients had signs of obstructive jaundice and two had cholangitis. All procedures were successful. No procedure-related mortality was observed. Bilirubin levels returned to normal in four of the eight patients. Findings of cholangitis resolved in the two affected patients after the procedure and antibiotic treatment. Two patients underwent surgery after percutaneous biliary drainage procedures. A self-expanding metallic stent was placed in two patients with malignancy and the stents remained patent until death. Percutaneous biliary interventions can be performed safely for the management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. (orig.)

  7. Ligadura del conducto cístico: Colecistotomía y exTracción de cálculos vesiculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emigdio Collado Canto

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó la ligadura del conducto cístico y extracción de cálculos en un paciente operado de urgencia, en el cual habían grandes dificultades técnicas para el abordaje de la vía biliar. Esto dio lugar a un estudio en animales, cuyos resultados fueron satisfactorios. Una vez sacrificados los animales se comprobó atrofia de la vesícula biliar sin complicaciones. El informe anatomopatológico destacó fibrosis. Se escogió un grupo de pacientes sintomáticos, que requerían colecistectomía y presentaban cirrosis hepática. Se les operó con aplicación de esta técnica por vía normal y laparoscópica. Los únicos requisitos técnicos fueron la ligadura del conducto cístico, extracción de cálculos y adecuada aspiración de la vesícula biliar. Se obtuvieron buenos resultados con un mínimo de disección, sin complicaciones, con una anestesia y tiempo quirúrgico mínimo y con una técnica fácil y asequible a cualquier cirujano y en cualquier medio. Este proceder beneficiaría a los pacientes cirróticosThe ligation of the cystic duct and the extraction of gall stones were performed in urgently operated patient with great technical difficulties for the approach of the biliary tract: This led to conduct a study of animals with satisfactory results. Once the animals were sacrified it was observed gall bladder atrophy without complications. Fibrosis was stressed in the anatomopathological report. A group of symptomatic patients who required cholecystostomy and suffered from liver cirrhosis were chosen and operated on by using this technique by normal and laparoscopic pathway. The only technical requirements were the ligation of the cystic duct, the extraction of gall stones and the adequate aspiration of the gall bladder

  8. Tokyo Guidelines 2013 may be too restrictive and patients with moderate and severe acute cholecystitis can be managed by early cholecystectomy too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirthalingam, Vinoban; Low, Jee Keem; Woon, Winston; Shelat, Vishalkumar

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether early laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is safe and feasible for patients diagnosed with moderate (grade 2) and severe (grade 3) acute cholecystitis (AC) according to the Tokyo Guidelines 2013 (TG13). Early cholecystectomy is the current accepted standard of care for patients with mild (grade 1) and selected grade 2 AC based on TG13. For selected grade 2 and grade 3 AC, early percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) followed by delayed cholecystectomy is recommended. Patients diagnosed with AC over a 14-month period were identified and divided into three grades of AC based upon chart review using the grading and severity indicators according to TG13. A total of 149 patients underwent emergency LC. Eighty-two (55 %) patients were male. Eighty-four (56.4 %) patients were classified as grade 1 AC, 49 (32.9 %) as grade 2, and 16 (10.7 %) as grade 3. Eighty-three (98.8 %) patients with grade 1 AC underwent emergency LC, and 1 patient (1.2 %) underwent PC followed by emergency LC. The median length of hospital stay for grade 1 AC patients was 2 (1-11) days. There were 2 (2.4 %) readmissions with fever and no additional complications. Among the 65 patients identified with grade 2 or 3 AC, 6 (9.2 %) underwent PC followed by emergency LC. Fifty-nine (90.8 %) patients underwent emergency cholecystectomy: 58 (98.3 %) LC and one (1.7 %) open cholecystectomy. Among the 58 patients with LC, 3 (5.2 %) patients had open conversion and 10 (17.2 %) patients required subtotal cholecystectomy. One patient was converted to open due to bile duct injury and had hepaticojejunostomy repair. Two other patients were converted due to dense adhesions and inability to safely dissect Calot's triangle. The median length of hospital stay was 4 (1-28) days. There was one readmission for ileus. Severity grading of AC is not the sole determinant of early LC. Patient comorbidity also impacts clinical decision. Confirmation in a larger cohort is

  9. The core competencies of James Marion Sims, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straughn, J Michael; Gandy, Roy E; Rodning, Charles B

    2012-07-01

    The concept of core competencies in graduate medical education was introduced by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education of the American Medical Association to semiquantitatively assess the professional performance of students, residents, practitioners, and faculty. Many aspects of the career of J. Marion Sims, MD, are exemplary of those core competencies: MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE: Author of the first American textbook related to gynecology. MEDICAL CARE: Innovator of the Sims' Vaginal Speculum, Sims' Position, Sims' Test, and vesico-/rectovaginal fistulorrhaphy; advocated abdominal exploration for penetrating wounds; performed the first cholecystostomy. PROFESSIONALISM: Served as President of the New York Academy of Medicine, the American Medical Association, and the American Gynecologic Society. INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS/COMMUNICATION: Cared for the indigent, hearthless, indentured, disenfranchised; served as consulting surgeon to the Empress Eugénie (France), the Duchess of Hamilton (Scotland), the Empress of Austria, and other royalty of the aristocratic Houses of Europe; accorded the National Order of the Legion of Honor. PRACTICE-BASED LEARNING: Introduction of silver wire sutures; adoption of the principles of asepsis/antisepsis; adoption of the principles of general anesthesia. SYSTEMS-BASED PRACTICE: Established the Woman's Hospital, New York City, New York, the predecessor of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Center for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases; organized the Anglo-American Ambulance Corps under the patronage of Napoleon III. What led him to a life of clinical and humanitarian service? First, he was determined to succeed. His formal medical/surgical education was perhaps the best available to North Americans during that era. Second, he was courageous in experimentation and innovation, applying new developments in operative technique, asepsis/antisepsis, and general anesthesia. Third, his curiosity was not burdened by rigid