WorldWideScience

Sample records for chloroplast protease sppa

  1. AtDeg2 – a chloroplast protein with dual protease/chaperone activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Jagodzik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplast protease AtDeg2 (an ATP-independent serine endopeptidase is cytosolically synthesized as a precursor, which is imported into the chloroplast stroma and deprived of its transit peptide. Then the mature protein undergoes routing to its functional location at the stromal side of thylakoid membrane. In its linear structure AtDeg2 molecule contains the protease domain with catalytic triad (HDS and two PDZ domains (PDZ1 and PDZ2. In vivo AtDeg2 most probably exists as a supposedly inactive haxamer, which may change its oligomeric stage to form active 12-mer, or 24-mer. AtDeg2 has recently been demonstrated to exhibit dual protease/chaperone function. This review is focused on the current awareness with regard to AtDeg2 structure and functional significance.

  2. Dissection of the roles of FtsH protease in chloroplast biogenesis and stability at moderately high temperature: a quantitative proteomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chloroplast-targeted FtsH11 protease has been identified as essential for Arabidopsis survival at moderately high temperatures. The ftsh11 plants display a host of dramatic changes in photosynthetic parameters, cessation of growth and development, and eventual death if temperature exceeds 30ºC a...

  3. THE ESCHERICHIA COLI SIGNAL PEPTIDE PEPTIDASE A IS A SERINE-LYSINE PROTEASE WITH A LYSINE RECRUITED TO THE NON-CONSERVED AMINO-TERMINAL DOMAIN IN THE S49 PROTEASE FAMILY

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Peng; Shim, Eunjung; Cravatt, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Richard; Schoeniger, Joe; Kim, Apollos C.; Paetzel, Mark; Dalbey, Ross E.

    2008-01-01

    The E. coli signal peptide peptidase A (SppA) is a serine protease which cleaves signal peptides after they have been proteolytically removed from exported proteins by signal peptidase processing. We present here results of site-directed mutagenesis studies of all the conserved serines of SppA in the carboxyl-terminal domain showing that only Ser 409 is essential for enzymatic activity. Also, we show that the serine hydrolase inhibitor FP-biotin inhibits SppA and modifies the protein, but doe...

  4. The Hetero-Hexameric Nature of a Chloroplast AAA+ FtsH Protease Contributes to Its Thermodynamic Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Tamar; Adam, Zach; Prag, Gali

    2012-01-01

    FtsH is an evolutionary conserved membrane-bound metalloprotease complex. While in most prokaryotes FtsH is encoded by a single gene, multiple FtsH genes are found in eukaryotes. Genetic and biochemical data suggest that the Arabidopsis chloroplast FtsH is a hetero-hexamer. This raises the question why photosynthetic organisms require a heteromeric complex, whereas in most bacteria a homomeric one is sufficient. To gain structural information of the possible complexes, the Arabidopsis FtsH2 (type B) and FtsH5 (type A) were modeled. An in silico study with mixed models of FtsH2/5 suggests that heteromeric hexamer structure with ratio of 4∶2 is more likely to exists. Specifically, calculation of the buried surface area at the interfaces between neighboring subunits revealed that a hetero-complex should be thermodynamically more stable than a homo-hexamer, due to the presence of additional hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. To biochemically assess this model, we generated Arabidopsis transgenic plants, expressing epitope-tagged FtsH2 and immuno-purified the protein. Mass-spectrometry analysis showed that FtsH2 is associated with FtsH1, FtsH5 and FtsH8. Interestingly, we found that ‘type B’ subunits (FtsH2 and FtsH8) were 2–3 fold more abundant than ‘type A’ (FtsH1 and FtsH5). The biochemical data corroborate the in silico model and suggest that the thylakoid FtsH hexamer is composed of two ‘type A’ and four ‘type B’ subunits. PMID:22558304

  5. The hetero-hexameric nature of a chloroplast AAA+ FtsH protease contributes to its thermodynamic stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofer Moldavski

    Full Text Available FtsH is an evolutionary conserved membrane-bound metalloprotease complex. While in most prokaryotes FtsH is encoded by a single gene, multiple FtsH genes are found in eukaryotes. Genetic and biochemical data suggest that the Arabidopsis chloroplast FtsH is a hetero-hexamer. This raises the question why photosynthetic organisms require a heteromeric complex, whereas in most bacteria a homomeric one is sufficient. To gain structural information of the possible complexes, the Arabidopsis FtsH2 (type B and FtsH5 (type A were modeled. An in silico study with mixed models of FtsH2/5 suggests that heteromeric hexamer structure with ratio of 4:2 is more likely to exists. Specifically, calculation of the buried surface area at the interfaces between neighboring subunits revealed that a hetero-complex should be thermodynamically more stable than a homo-hexamer, due to the presence of additional hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. To biochemically assess this model, we generated Arabidopsis transgenic plants, expressing epitope-tagged FtsH2 and immuno-purified the protein. Mass-spectrometry analysis showed that FtsH2 is associated with FtsH1, FtsH5 and FtsH8. Interestingly, we found that 'type B' subunits (FtsH2 and FtsH8 were 2-3 fold more abundant than 'type A' (FtsH1 and FtsH5. The biochemical data corroborate the in silico model and suggest that the thylakoid FtsH hexamer is composed of two 'type A' and four 'type B' subunits.

  6. Update on chloroplast research

    OpenAIRE

    Armbruster, Ute; Pesaresi, Paolo; Pribil, Mathias; Hertle, Alexander; Leister, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Chloroplasts, the green differentiation form of plastids, are the sites of photosynthesis and other important plant functions. Genetic and genomic technologies have greatly boosted the rate of discovery and functional characterization of chloroplast proteins during the past decade. Indeed, data obtained using high-throughput methodologies, in particular proteomics and transcriptomics, are now routinely used to assign functions to chloroplast proteins. Our knowledge of many chloroplast process...

  7. Protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a polypeptide exhibiting a protease inhibitory activity and uses of said polypeptide in methods for inhibiting, directly or indirectly, one or more proteases of the blood clotting cascade. The invention also relates to use of said polypeptide as a pharmaceutical e...

  8. Processing Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Anders Sebastian Rosenkrans

    Processing proteases are proteases which proteolytically activate proteins and peptides into their biologically active form. Processing proteases play an important role in biotechnology as tools in protein fusion technology. Fusion strategies where helper proteins or peptide tags are fused to the...... protein of interest are an elaborate method to optimize expression or purification systems. It is however critical that fusion proteins can be removed and processing proteases can facilitate this in a highly specific manner. The commonly used proteases all have substrate specificities to the N-terminal of...... the scissile bond, leaving C-terminal fusions to have non-native C-termini after processing. A solution yielding native C-termini would allow novel expression and purification systems for therapeutic proteins and peptides.The peptidyl-Lys metallopeptidase (LysN) of the fungus Armillaria mellea (Am) is...

  9. Supermarket Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  10. Earthworm Protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alimentary tract of earthworm secretes a group of proteases with a relative wide substrate specificity. In 1983, six isozymes were isolated from earthworm with fibrinolytic activities and called fibrinolytic enzymes. So far, more isozymes have been found from different earthworm species such as Lumbricus rubellus and Eisenia fetida. For convenience, the proteases are named on the basis of the earthworm species and the protein function, for instance, Eisenia fetida protease (EfP). The proteases have the abilities not only to hydrolyze fibrin and other protein, but also activate pro enzymes such as plasminogen and prothrombin. In the light of recent studies, eight of the EfPs contain oligosaccharides chains which are thought to support the enzyme structure. Interestingly, EfP-II has a broader substrate specificity presenting alkaline trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase activities, but EfP-III-1 has a stricter specificity. The protein crystal structures show the characteristics in their specificities. Earthworm proteases have been applied in several areas such as clinical treatment of clotting diseases, anti-tumor study, environmental protection and nutritional production. The current clinical utilizations and some potential new applications of the earthworm protease will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Genetic Analysis of Chloroplast Translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, Alice

    2005-08-15

    The assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus requires the concerted action of hundreds of genes distributed between the two physically separate genomes in the nucleus and chloroplast. Nuclear genes coordinate this process by controlling the expression of chloroplast genes in response to developmental and environmental cues. However, few regulatory factors have been identified. We used mutant phenotypes to identify nuclear genes in maize that modulate chloroplast translation, a key control point in chloroplast gene expression. This project focused on the nuclear gene crp1, required for the translation of two chloroplast mRNAs. CRP1 is related to fungal proteins involved in the translation of mitochondrial mRNAs, and is the founding member of a large gene family in plants, with {approx}450 members. Members of the CRP1 family are defined by a repeated 35 amino acid motif called a ''PPR'' motif. The PPR motif is closely related to the TPR motif, which mediates protein-protein interactions. We and others have speculated that PPR tracts adopt a structure similar to that of TPR tracts, but with a substrate binding surface adapted to bind RNA instead of protein. To understand how CRP1 influences the translation of specific chloroplast mRNAs, we sought proteins that interact with CRP1, and identified the RNAs associated with CRP1 in vivo. We showed that CRP1 is associated in vivo with the mRNAs whose translation it activates. To explore the functions of PPR proteins more generally, we sought mutations in other PPR-encoding genes: mutations in the maize PPR2 and PPR4 were shown to disrupt chloroplast ribosome biogenesis and chloroplast trans-splicing, respectively. These and other results suggest that the nuclear-encoded PPR family plays a major role in modulating the expression of the chloroplast genome in higher plants.

  12. Chloroplast phosphoproteins: distribution of phosphoproteins within spinach chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of phosphoproteins within spinach chloroplasts was studied. Intact chloroplasts with good rates of CO2-dependent oxygen evolution were fed (γ-32P)ATP and then separated into stroma and membrane fractions. Only one major labelled stroma protein was identified by gel electrophoresis/autoradiography, with a mol. wt. of 66000. The membranes were separated into envelopes and thylakoid fractions. Three labelled proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis in the envelope with mol. wt. of 50500, 29000 and 13000. (author)

  13. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, E. H.; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles i...

  14. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic...

  15. Sorting signals, N-terminal modifications and abundance of the chloroplast proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zybailov

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chloroplast proteome is needed to understand the essential contribution of the chloroplast to plant growth and development. Here we present a large scale analysis by nanoLC-Q-TOF and nanoLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS of ten independent chloroplast preparations from Arabidopsis thaliana which unambiguously identified 1325 proteins. Novel proteins include various kinases and putative nucleotide binding proteins. Based on repeated and independent MS based protein identifications requiring multiple matched peptide sequences, as well as literature, 916 nuclear-encoded proteins were assigned with high confidence to the plastid, of which 86% had a predicted chloroplast transit peptide (cTP. The protein abundance of soluble stromal proteins was calculated from normalized spectral counts from LTQ-Obitrap analysis and was found to cover four orders of magnitude. Comparison to gel-based quantification demonstrates that 'spectral counting' can provide large scale protein quantification for Arabidopsis. This quantitative information was used to determine possible biases for protein targeting prediction by TargetP and also to understand the significance of protein contaminants. The abundance data for 550 stromal proteins was used to understand abundance of metabolic pathways and chloroplast processes. We highlight the abundance of 48 stromal proteins involved in post-translational proteome homeostasis (including aminopeptidases, proteases, deformylases, chaperones, protein sorting components and discuss the biological implications. N-terminal modifications were identified for a subset of nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded proteins and a novel N-terminal acetylation motif was discovered. Analysis of cTPs and their cleavage sites of Arabidopsis chloroplast proteins, as well as their predicted rice homologues, identified new species-dependent features, which will facilitate improved subcellular localization prediction. No evidence

  16. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA)); Anderson, J.B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA))

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  17. Biosynthesis of starch in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, T; Nakayama, N; Murata, T; Akazawa, T

    1967-03-01

    The enzymic synthesis of ADP-glucose and UDP-glucose by chloroplastic pyrophosphorylase of bean and rice leaves has been demonstrated by paper chromatographic techniques. In both tissues, the activity of UDP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase was much higher than ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase. Glycerate-3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate and fructose-1,6-diphosphate did not stimulate ADP-glucose formation by a pyrophosphorylation reaction. The major metabolic pathway for UDP-glucose utilization appears to be the synthesis of either sucrose or sucrose-P. On the other hand, a specific precursor role of ADP-glucose for synthesizing chloroplast starch by the ADP-glucose-starch transglucosylase reaction is supported by the coupled enzyme system of ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase and transglucosylase, isolated from chloroplasts. None of the glycolytic intermediates stimulated the glucose transfer in the enzyme sequence of reaction system employed. PMID:4292567

  18. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  19. Proteases of neutrophilic granulocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesława Roszkowska-Jakimiec

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature referring to proteolytic enzymes of neutrophilic granulocytes was surveyed. Biosynthesis, subcellular distribution, division according to the catalytic site structure, inhibitors and methods used to determine the activity of these enzymes were discussed. The survey included metaloproteases (granulocytic collagenase, gelatinase B, serine proteases (granulocytic elastase, cathepsin G, protease 3, membraneous proteases (aminopeptidase N, aminopeptidase P, neprilisine, cysteine and aspartic cathepsins. The role of these proteases in the pathology and diagnostics of certain diseases was considered.

  20. Proteases of neutrophilic granulocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wiesława Roszkowska-Jakimiec; Anna Worowska; Marek Gacko; Tomasz Maksimowicz

    2002-01-01

    The literature referring to proteolytic enzymes of neutrophilic granulocytes was surveyed. Biosynthesis, subcellular distribution, division according to the catalytic site structure, inhibitors and methods used to determine the activity of these enzymes were discussed. The survey included metaloproteases (granulocytic collagenase, gelatinase B), serine proteases (granulocytic elastase, cathepsin G, protease 3), membraneous proteases (aminopeptidase N, aminopeptidase P, neprilisine), cysteine ...

  1. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with [14C]-5-aminolevulinic acid [14C]-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H2O2 stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with [14C]-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed

  2. Protein methylation in pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with [3H-methyl]-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methylinkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile [3H]methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the [3H]methyl group

  3. Clp chaperones and proteases are central in stress survival, virulence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Gerth, Ulf; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    proteins. The ATP-dependent ClpP protease is highly conserved among eubacteria and in the chloroplasts and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. In the serious human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus inactivation of clpP rendered the bacterium avirulent emphasizing the central role of proteolysis in virulence...

  4. On the structure of the spinach chloroplast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, J.B.; Bustraan, M.; Paris, C.H.

    1952-01-01

    The structure of spinach chloroplasts was investigated with the aid of the electron microscope. It has been established that: 1. 1. the outer membrane of the chloroplasts is composed of both proteins and lipoids. 2. 2. the stroma is also built up by these components. 3. 3. within the stroma memb

  5. Chloroplasts as functional organelles in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trench, R K; Greene, R W; Bystrom, B G

    1969-08-01

    The marine gastropod molluscs Tridachia crispata, Tridachiella diomedea, and Placobranchus ianthobapsus (Sacoglossa, Opisthobranchia) possess free functional chloroplasts within the cells of the digestive diverticula, as determined by observations on ultrastructure, pigment analyses, and experiments on photosynthetic capacity. In the light, the chloroplasts incorporate H(14)CO(3) (-)in situ. Reduced radiocarbon is translocated to various chloroplast-free tissues in the animals. The slugs feed on siphonaceous algae from which the chloroplasts are derived. Pigments from the slugs and from known siphonaceous algae, when separated chromatographically and compared, showed similar components. Absorption spectra of extracts of slugs and algae were very similar. The larvae of the slugs are pigment-free up to the post-veliger stage, suggesting that chloroplasts are acquired de novo. with each new generation. PMID:5792329

  6. Commercial proteases: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Yi, Li; Marek, Peter; Iverson, Brent L

    2013-04-17

    This review presents a brief overview of the general categories of commercially used proteases, and critically surveys the successful strategies currently being used to improve the properties of proteases for various commercial purposes. We describe the broad application of proteases in laundry detergents, food processing, and the leather industry. The review also introduces the expanding development of proteases as a class of therapeutic agents, as well as highlighting recent progress in the field of protease engineering. The potential commercial applications of proteases are rapidly growing as recent technological advances are producing proteases with novel properties and substrate specificities. PMID:23318711

  7. Chloroplast protein targeting involves localized translation in Chlamydomonas

    OpenAIRE

    Uniacke, James; Zerges, William

    2009-01-01

    The compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells requires that newly synthesized proteins be targeted to the compartments in which they function. In chloroplasts, a few thousand proteins function in photosynthesis, expression of the chloroplast genome, and other processes. Most chloroplast proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm, imported, and then targeted to a specific chloroplast compartment. The remainder are encoded by the chloroplast genome, synthesized within the organelle, and targeted ...

  8. The structure of cell chloroplasts of spring cereals

    OpenAIRE

    Vladislav V. Zhuk; Mykola M. Musyenko

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that in wheat chloroplasts thylakoids are localized on the periphery and in the central part are strong starch grains. In the chloroplasts of barley found small stack of thylakoids. Unlike wheat, the number of starch grains in chloroplasts of barley is more, but they are smaller. Oat chloroplasts were significantly smaller than the other studied cereals. Thus, cell chloroplasts of leaves of wheat, barley and oats differed significantly in size and structure, but had have clearly o...

  9. The complexity of chloroplast chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-12-01

    Type I chaperonins are large oligomeric protein ensembles that are involved in the folding and assembly of other proteins. Chloroplast chaperonins and co-chaperonins exist in multiple copies of two distinct isoforms that can combine to form a range of labile oligomeric structures. This complex system increases the potential number of chaperonin substrates and possibilities for regulation. The incorporation of unique subunits into the oligomer can modify substrate specificity. Some subunits are upregulated in response to heat shock and some show organ-specific expression, whereas others possess additional functions that are unrelated to their role in protein folding. Accumulating evidence suggests that specific subunits have distinct roles in biogenesis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco). PMID:24035661

  10. CURE-Chloroplast: A chloroplast C-to-U RNA editing predictor for seed plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yanda

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA editing is a type of post-transcriptional modification of RNA and belongs to the class of mechanisms that contribute to the complexity of transcriptomes. C-to-U RNA editing is commonly observed in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts. The in vivo mechanism of recognizing C-to-U RNA editing sites is still unknown. In recent years, many efforts have been made to computationally predict C-to-U RNA editing sites in the mitochondria of seed plants, but there is still no algorithm available for C-to-U RNA editing site prediction in the chloroplasts of seed plants. Results In this paper, we extend our algorithm CURE, which can accurately predict the C-to-U RNA editing sites in mitochondria, to predict C-to-U RNA editing sites in the chloroplasts of seed plants. The algorithm achieves over 80% sensitivity and over 99% specificity. We implement the algorithm as an online service called CURE-Chloroplast http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/pure. Conclusion CURE-Chloroplast is an online service for predicting the C-to-U RNA editing sites in the chloroplasts of seed plants. The online service allows the processing of entire chloroplast genome sequences. Since CURE-Chloroplast performs very well, it could be a helpful tool in the study of C-to-U RNA editing in the chloroplasts of seed plants.

  11. Solar energy conversion by chloroplast photoelectrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, R.; Pan, R. L.; Gross, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    A photoelectrochemical cell based on chloroplasts which generates large photovoltages and photocurrents from solar energy is presented. The cell contains broken Type C chloroplasts placed on a filter separating compartments containing an electron acceptor and electron donor with platinum electrodes in each. Photovoltages were observed across a load resistance of 3000 ohms with either flavin mononucleotide or anthroquinone 2-sulphonate as the electron acceptor and dichlorophenol indophenol as the donor, and persisted for 1-2 hr after the light was turned off. The powers and short circuit currents obtained in the chloroplast cells are nearly equal to those obtained in cells based on isolated photosystem I particles. Finally, an efficiency of 2.3% has been measured for the chloroplast contribution to the total power in flavin mononucleotide cells.

  12. Chloroplasts in tissues of some herbaceous stems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Maksymowych

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Serial sections of mature stems of ten species of herbaceous dicotyledonous plants were examined by light microscopy and the number of chloroplasts per cell was estimated in epidermis, collenchyma and cortex. Chloroplast identification was made by both light and transmission electron microscopy. Chloroplasts were present in epidermis, collenchyma and cortex tissues of all stems examined. The smallest number of chloroplasts was observed in the epidermis. Collenchyma cells had the largest number of plastids in four of the genera and cortex cells had the largest number in the remaining six genera. The stem epidermis of all genera contained stomates as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and aceto-orcein stained epidermal peels.

  13. A comparison of rice chloroplast genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiabin; Xia, Hong'ai; Cao, Mengliang; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zeng, Wanyong; Hu, Songnian; Tong, Wei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Yu, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Zhu, Lihuang

    2004-01-01

    ), which are both parental varieties of the super-hybrid rice, LYP9. Based on the patterns of high sequence coverage, we partitioned chloroplast sequence variations into two classes, intravarietal and intersubspecific polymorphisms. Intravarietal polymorphisms refer to variations within 93-11 or PA64S...... intersubspecific polymorphisms. In our study, we found that the intersubspecific variations of 93-11 (indica) and PA64S (japonica) chloroplast genomes consisted of 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 27 insertions or deletions. The intersubspecific polymorphism rates between 93-11 and PA64S were 0.05% for...... single nucleotide polymorphisms and 0.02% for insertions or deletions, nearly 8 and 10 times lower than their respective nuclear genomes. Based on the total number of nucleotide substitutions between the two chloroplast genomes, we dated the divergence of indica and japonica chloroplast genomes as...

  14. Inheritance of chloroplast DNA in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, David M; Nicholas W. Gillham; Boynton, John E.

    1980-01-01

    Two symmetrically located deletions of approximately 100 base pairs each have been identified in chloroplast DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Although present in a mutant strain that requires acetate for growth, both deletions have been shown to be distinct from the nonphotosynthetic phenotype of this strain. These physical markers in the chloroplast genome and maternally inherited genetic markers showed strict cotransmission in reciprocal crosses. Thus, our results are consistent with the l...

  15. Export of carbon from chloroplasts at night

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleucher, J.; Vanderveer, P.J.; Sharkey, T.D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Hexose export from chloroplasts at night has been inferred in previous studies of mutant and transgenic plants. The authors have tested whether hexose export is the normal route of carbon export from chloroplasts at night. The authors used nuclear magnetic resonance to distinguish glucose (Glc) made from hexose export and Glc made from triose export. Glc synthesized in vitro from fructose-6-phosphate in the presence of deuterium-labeled water had deuterium incorporated at C-2, whereas synthesis from triose phosphates caused C-2 through C-5 to become deuterated. In both tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) and bean (phaseolus vulgaris L.), Glc from sucrose made at night in the presence of deuterium-enriched water was deuterated only in the C-2 position, indicating that >75% of carbon is exported as hexoses at night. In darkness the phosphate in the cytosol was 28 mM, whereas that in the chloroplasts was 5 mW, but hexose phosphates were 10-fold higher in the cytosol than in the chloroplasts. Therefore, hexose phosphates would not move out of chloroplasts without the input of energy. The authors conclude that most carbon leaves chloroplasts at night as Glc, maltose, or higher maltodextrins under normal conditions.

  16. Evolution of the chloroplast division machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo GAO; Fuli GAO

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts are photosynthetic organelles derived from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria during evolution.Dramatic changes occurred during the process of the formation and evolution of chloroplasts,including the large-scale gene transfer from chloroplast to nucleus.However,there are still many essential characters remaining.For the chloroplast division machinery,FtsZ proteins,Ftn2,SulA and part of the division site positioning system- MinD and MinE are still conserved.New or at least partially new proteins,such as FtsZ family proteins FtsZl and ARC3,ARC6H,ARC5,PDV1,PDV2 and MCD1,were introduced for the division of chloroplasts during evolution.Some bacterial cell division proteins,such as FtsA,MreB,Ftn6,FtsW and Ftsl,probably lost their function or were gradually lost.Thus,the chloroplast division machinery is a dynamically evolving structure with both conservation and innovation.

  17. A Genomic Analysis of Rat Proteases and Protease Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Proteases perform important roles in multiple biological and pathological processes. The availability of the rat genome sequence has facilitated the analysis of the complete protease repertoire or degradome of this model organism. The rat degradome consists of at least 626 proteases and homologs, which are distributed into 24 aspartic, 160 cysteine, 192 metallo, 221 serine, and 29 threonine proteases. This distribution is similar to that of the mouse degradome but is more complex than that of...

  18. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell...... cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  19. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø; Andreasen, P A

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing small molecule protease inhibitors of sufficient specificity has proved a daunting task. Aptamers seem to represent a promising alternative. In our review, we concentrate on biochemical mechanisms of...

  20. Translocation of the potato 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase into isolated spinach chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cDNA for potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase, the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, encodes a 56 KD polypeptide whose amino terminus resembles a chloroplast transit sequence. The cDNA was placed downstream of the phage T7 polymerase recognition sequence in plasmid pGEM-3Z. DNA of the resulting plasmid pGEM-DWZ directed T7 polymerase to synthesize potato DAHP synthase mRNA in vitro. The mRNA was used in wheat germ and rabbit reticulocyte lysates for the synthesis of 35S-labeled pro-DAHP synthase. The predominant translation product is a 59 KD polypeptide that can be immunoprecipitated by rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against the 53 KD DAHP synthase purified from potato tubers. Isolated spinach chloroplasts process the 59 KD pro-DAHP synthase to a 50 KD polypeptide. The processed polypeptide is protected from protease degradation, suggesting uptake of the enzyme into the cell organelle. Fractionation of reisolated chloroplasts after import of pro-DAHP synthase showed mature enzyme in the stroma. The uptake and processing of DAHP synthase is inhibited by antibodies raised against the mature enzyme. Our results are consistent with the assumption that potato contains a nuclear DNA encoded DAHP synthase that is synthesized as a proenzyme and whose mature form resides in the chloroplasts. Our data provide further evidence that green plants synthesize aromatic amino acids in plastids

  1. Translocation of the potato 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase into isolated spinach chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jianmin; Weaver, L.M.; Herrmann, K.M. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A cDNA for potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase, the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, encodes a 56 KD polypeptide whose amino terminus resembles a chloroplast transit sequence. The cDNA was placed downstream of the phage T7 polymerase recognition sequence in plasmid pGEM-3Z. DNA of the resulting plasmid pGEM-DWZ directed T7 polymerase to synthesize potato DAHP synthase mRNA in vitro. The mRNA was used in wheat germ and rabbit reticulocyte lysates for the synthesis of {sup 35}S-labeled pro-DAHP synthase. The predominant translation product is a 59 KD polypeptide that can be immunoprecipitated by rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against the 53 KD DAHP synthase purified from potato tubers. Isolated spinach chloroplasts process the 59 KD pro-DAHP synthase to a 50 KD polypeptide. The processed polypeptide is protected from protease degradation, suggesting uptake of the enzyme into the cell organelle. Fractionation of reisolated chloroplasts after import of pro-DAHP synthase showed mature enzyme in the stroma. The uptake and processing of DAHP synthase is inhibited by antibodies raised against the mature enzyme. Our results are consistent with the assumption that potato contains a nuclear DNA encoded DAHP synthase that is synthesized as a proenzyme and whose mature form resides in the chloroplasts. Our data provide further evidence that green plants synthesize aromatic amino acids in plastids.

  2. Death proteases come alive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death in plants exhibits morphological features comparable to caspase-mediated apoptosis in animals, suggesting that plant cell death is executed by (caspase-like) proteases. However, to date, no caspase homologues have been identified in plants and therefore the existence and nature of these p

  3. Proteases in Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Sokolonski ANTON

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The caries and the periodontal disease (PD are the most frequent alterations in the oral cavity. The PD presents two stages: gengivitis and periodontitis. The destruction of collagenous fibers which encases the tooth onto the alveolar bone is characteristic of the pariodontitis. The inclusion loss caused by this pathology is due to the presence of bacteria and their products, besides the tissue destruction. This process is caused by excessive discharge of cells of the organism defence which reach the damaged area, and among these cells are neutrophils. These cells free lysosomal granule, where enzymes known as proteases (elastase, colagenasis and catepsin G are present. When excessively delivered, they cause extensive tissue destruction. The organism innate defence respond to this process activating anti-proteases, such as alfa-1-antitripsin e alfa-2-macrogoblulin, and, as consequence, the inflammatory process is subdued. Objective: Revision of the literature on periodontitis and its markers. In periodontitis, the balance between protease and anti-protese seems to be altered and lead to the appearance of these ones. There is an increase of prevalence of PD in the world population. In recent times, it has been associated to systemic conditions that lead to tissue destruction. Perhaps, the cause is based on an exacerbated tissue reaction, more than on the bacterial aggression. Conclusion: The predisposition of the organism is an important factor for the disease development. At reading different studies, it was observed that the discharged protease during the neutrophils degranulation process has internal, not bacterial, origin.

  4. Nitrogen control of chloroplast development: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A manifestation of nitrogen deficiency in vascular plants and algae is chlorosis, indicating that chloroplast biogenesis can be strongly restricted by direct or indirect effects of nitrogen assimilation products. To define the molecular basis of nitrogen responses we are using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Depending on the levels of ammonium, steady-state deficiency conditions are established such that the cellular levels of chlorophylls and xanthophylls are depressed. Chloroplasts in nitrogen-deficient cells contain appreciable levels of carbon assimilation enzyme and thylakoids with high electron transport activities. However, the light harvesting complexes are nearly absent and Photosystem I exhibits unusual characteristics. Studies of rates of protein synthesis by in vivo pulse-chase labeling and levels of RNAs encoded by the chloroplast and nuclear genomes have been initiated: the accumulation of transcripts for the nuclear light-harvesting apoproteins is dramatically altered qualitatively and quantitatively; there is no major effect on chloroplast RNAs but, in general, these are inefficiently utilized for protein synthesis until nitrogen is provided to the cultures. Supplying nitrogen results in an almost immediate release of chloroplast mRNAs from a translational arrest but the stimulation of the accumulation of nuclear transcripts for light-harvesting apoproteins does not occur until after a 1-2 hour lag

  5. Glycolate transporter of the pea chloroplast envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of a glycolate transporter in the pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast envelope is described. Several novel silicone oil centrifugation methods were developed to resolve the initial rate kinetics of [14C]glycolate transport by isolated, intact pea chloroplasts. Chloroplast glycolate transport was found to be carrier mediated. Transport rates saturated with increasing glycolate concentration. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment of chloroplasts inhibited transport, an inhibition prevented by glycolate. Glycolate distributed across the envelope in a way which equalized stromal and medium glycolic acid concentrations, limiting possible transport mechanisms to facilitated glycolic acid diffusion, proton symport or hydroxyl antiport. The effects of stomal and medium pH's on the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ fit the predictions of mobile carrier kinetic models of hydroxyl antiport or proton symport (H+ binds first). The carrier mediated transport was fast enough to be consistent with in vivo rates of photorespiration. The 2-hydroxymonocarboxylates, glycerate, lactate and glyoxylate are competitive inhibitors of chloroplast glycolate uptake. Glyoxylate, D-lactate and D-glycerate cause glycolate counterflow, indicating that they are also substrates of the glycolate carrier. This finding was confirmed for D-glycerate by studies on glycolate effects on [1-14C]D-glycerate transport

  6. Proteomic Insight into the Response of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts to Darkness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Qingbo; Xiong, Haibo; Wang, Jun; Chen, Sixue; Yang, Zhongnan; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast function in photosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. It is well-known that chloroplasts respond to various light conditions. However, it remains poorly understood about how chloroplasts respond to darkness. In this study, we found 81 darkness-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplasts under 8 h darkness treatment. Most of the proteins are nucleus-encoded, indicating that chloroplast darkness response is closely regulated by the nucleus. Among them, 17 ribosome proteins were obviously reduced after darkness treatment. The protein expressional patterns and physiological changes revealed the mechanisms in chloroplasts in response to darkness, e.g., (1) inhibition of photosystem II resulted in preferential cyclic electron flow around PSI; (2) promotion of starch degradation; (3) inhibition of chloroplastic translation; and (4) regulation by redox and jasmonate signaling. The results have improved our understanding of molecular regulatory mechanisms in chloroplasts under darkness. PMID:27137770

  7. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with (3H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented

  8. Genomics and chloroplast evolution: what did cyanobacteria do for plants?

    OpenAIRE

    Raven, J.A.; Allen, John

    2003-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of cyanobacteria and of the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana leave no doubt that the plant chloroplast originated, through endosymbiosis, from a cyanobacterium. But the genomic legacy of cyanobacterial ancestry extends far beyond the chloroplast itself, and persists in organisms that have lost chloroplasts completely.

  9. Direct Chloroplast Sequencing: Comparison of Sequencing Platforms and Analysis Tools for Whole Chloroplast Barcoding

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Brozynska; Agnelo Furtado; Robert James Henry

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genom...

  10. From extracellular to intracellular: the establishment of mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, J M; John, P; Whatley, F R

    1979-04-11

    Paracoccus and Rhodopseudomonas are unusual among bacteria in having a majority of the biochemical features of mitochondria; blue-green algae have many of the features of chloroplasts. The theory of serial endosymbiosis proposes that a primitive eukaryote successively took up bacteria and blue-green algae to yield mitochondria and chloroplasts respectively. Possible characteristics of transitional forms are indicated both by the primitive amoeba, Pelomyxa, which lacks mitochondria but contains a permanent population of endosymbiotic bacteria, and by several anomalous eukaryotic algae, e.g. Cyanophora, which contain cyanelles instead of chloroplasts. Blue-green algae appear to be obvious precursors of red algal chloroplasts but the ancestry of other chloroplasts is less certain, though the epizoic symbiont, Prochloron, may resemble the ancestral green algal chloroplast. We speculate that the chloroplasts of the remaining algae may have been a eukaryotic origin. The evolution or organelles from endosymbiotic precursors would involve their integration with the host cell biochemically, structurally and numerically. PMID:36620

  11. Cathepsin proteases in Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are important for the growth and survival of apicomplexan parasites that infect humans. The apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii expresses five members of the C1 family of cysteine proteases, including one cathepsin L-like (TgCPL), one cathepsin B-like (TgCPB), and three cathepsin C-like (TgCPC1, 2 and 3) proteases. Recent genetic, biochemical and structural studies reveal that cathepsins function in microneme and rhoptry protein maturation, host cell invasion, replication, and n...

  12. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø;

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing...... strategies and of new principles for regulating the activity of the inhibitory action of aptamers of general interest to researchers working with nucleic acid aptamers...

  13. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  14. A novel chloroplast-localized protein EMB1303 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaozhen Huang; Xiaoyan Zhang; Shuhua Yang

    2009-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized the albino mutant emb1303-1 in Arabidopsis. The mutant displayed a severe dwarf phenotype with small albino rosette leaves and short roots on a synthetic medium containing sucrose. It is pigment-deficient and seedling lethal when grown in soil. Embryo development was delayed in the mutant, although seed germination was not significantly im-paired. The plastids of emb1303-1 were arrested in early developmental stages without the classical stack of thylakoid membrane. Genetic and molecular analyses uncovered that the EMB1303 gene encodes a novel chloroplast-localized protein. Mieroarray and RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of nuclear-and plastid-encoded genes involved in photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis were substantially downregulated in the mutant. Moreover, the accu-mulation of several major chloroplast proteins was severely compromised in emb1303-1. These results suggest that EMBI303 is essential for chloroplast development.

  15. Direct chloroplast sequencing: comparison of sequencing platforms and analysis tools for whole chloroplast barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Brozynska

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina and Ion Torrent (Life Technology sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare. Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis.

  16. Posttranslational Modifications of Chloroplast Proteins: An Emerging Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M; Mulo, Paula

    2015-07-01

    Posttranslational modifications of proteins are key effectors of enzyme activity, protein interactions, targeting, and turnover rate, but despite their importance, they are still poorly understood in plants. Although numerous reports have revealed the regulatory role of protein phosphorylation in photosynthesis, various other protein modifications have been identified in chloroplasts only recently. It is known that posttranslational N(α)-acetylation occurs in both nuclear- and plastid-encoded chloroplast proteins, but the physiological significance of this acetylation is not yet understood. Lysine acetylation affects the localization and activity of key metabolic enzymes, and it may work antagonistically or cooperatively with lysine methylation, which also occurs in chloroplasts. In addition, tyrosine nitration may help regulate the repair cycle of photosystem II, while N-glycosylation determines enzyme activity of chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase. This review summarizes the progress in the research field of posttranslational modifications of chloroplast proteins and points out the importance of these modifications in the regulation of chloroplast metabolism. PMID:25911530

  17. Origin of a chloroplast protein importer

    OpenAIRE

    Bölter, Bettina; Soll, Jürgen; Schulz, Alexander; Hinnah, Silke; Wagner, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During evolution, chloroplasts have relinquished the majority of their genes to the nucleus. The products of transferred genes are imported into the organelle with the help of an import machinery that is distributed across the inner and outer plastid membranes. The evolutionary origin of this machinery is puzzling because, in the putative predecessors, the cyanobacteria, the outer two membranes, the plasma membrane, and the lipopolysaccharide layer lack a functionally similar protein import s...

  18. Evidence for a respiratory chain in the chloroplast

    OpenAIRE

    Bennoun, Pierre

    1982-01-01

    Evidence is given for the existence of an electron transport pathway to oxygen in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts (chlororespiration). Plastoquinone is shown to be a redox carrier common to both photosynthetic and chlororespiratory pathways. It is shown that, in dark-adapted chloroplasts, an electrochemical gradient is built up across the thylakoid membrane by transfer of electrons through the chlororespiratory chain as well as by reverse functioning of the chloroplast ATPases. It is ...

  19. Expressing PHB synthetic genes through chloroplast genetic engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Chloroplast integration and expression vector containing expression cassettes for phbB, phbA, phbC and aadA genes was constructed and bombarded into the tobacco chloroplast genome. Transplastomic plants were analyzed with PCR and Southern blot. Their homoplastomy was also judged. Northern dot and RT-PCR analysis were employed to investigate transgene expression at transcriptional level. The results indicate that the chloroplast transformation system is compatible for poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production.

  20. Complex chloroplast RNA metabolism: just debugging the genetic programme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz-Linneweber Christian

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene expression system of chloroplasts is far more complex than that of their cyanobacterial progenitor. This gain in complexity affects in particular RNA metabolism, specifically the transcription and maturation of RNA. Mature chloroplast RNA is generated by a plethora of nuclear-encoded proteins acquired or recruited during plant evolution, comprising additional RNA polymerases and sigma factors, and sequence-specific RNA maturation factors promoting RNA splicing, editing, end formation and translatability. Despite years of intensive research, we still lack a comprehensive explanation for this complexity. Results We inspected the available literature and genome databases for information on components of RNA metabolism in land plant chloroplasts. In particular, new inventions of chloroplast-specific mechanisms and the expansion of some gene/protein families detected in land plants lead us to suggest that the primary function of the additional nuclear-encoded components found in chloroplasts is the transgenomic suppression of point mutations, fixation of which occurred due to an enhanced genetic drift exhibited by chloroplast genomes. We further speculate that a fast evolution of transgenomic suppressors occurred after the water-to-land transition of plants. Conclusion Our inspections indicate that several chloroplast-specific mechanisms evolved in land plants to remedy point mutations that occurred after the water-to-land transition. Thus, the complexity of chloroplast gene expression evolved to guarantee the functionality of chloroplast genetic information and may not, with some exceptions, be involved in regulatory functions.

  1. Nanophotonics of Chloroplasts for Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Cheryl R.

    2011-03-01

    In the search for new energy sources, lessons can be learned from chloroplast photonics. The nano-architecture of chloroplasts is remarkably well-adapted to mediate sunlight interactions for efficient energy conversion. We carried out experiments with chloroplasts isolated from spinach and leaf lettuce to elucidate the relationship between nano-architecture, biomolecular composition and photonic properties. We obtained high-resolution microscopic images of single chloroplasts to identify geometries of chloroplasts and interior grana. We performed micro-spectroscopy to identify strengths of absorption and fluorescence transitions and related them to broadband reflectance and transmittance spectra of whole leaf structures. Finally, the nonlinear optical properties were investigated with nanolaser spectroscopy by placing chloroplasts into micro-resonators and optically pumping. These spectra reveal chloroplast photonic modes and allow measurement of single chloroplast light scattering cross section, polarizability, and refractive index. The nanolaser spectra recorded at increasing pump powers enabled us to observe non-linear optics, photon dynamics, and stimulated emission from single chloroplasts. All of these experiments provide insight into plant photonics and inspiration of paradigms for synthetic biomaterials to harness sunlight in new ways.

  2. Protease-Sensitive Synthetic Prions

    OpenAIRE

    Colby, David W; Rachel Wain; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Giuseppe Legname; Palmer, Christina G.; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Azucena Lemus; Cohen, Fred E.; Stephen J DeArmond; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2010-01-01

    Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc). Frequently, PrP(Sc) is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s) prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec) PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, ...

  3. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  4. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    OpenAIRE

    Yong YANG; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we...

  5. Tools for regulated gene expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochaix, Jean-David; Surzycki, Raymond; Ramundo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a very attractive model system for chloroplast genetic engineering. Algae can be transformed readily at the chloroplast level through bombardment of cells with a gene gun, and transformants can be selected using antibiotic resistance or phototrophic growth. An inducible chloroplast gene expression system could be very useful for several reasons. First, it could be used to elucidate the function of essential chloroplast genes required for cell growth and survival. Second, it could be very helpful for expressing proteins which are toxic to the algal cells. Third, it would allow for the reversible depletion of photosynthetic complexes thus making it possible to study their biogenesis in a controlled fashion. Fourth, it opens promising possibilities for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas. Here we describe an inducible/repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas in which the copper-regulated Cyc6 promoter drives the expression of the nuclear Nac2 gene encoding a protein which is targeted to the chloroplast where it acts specifically on the chloroplast psbD 5'-untranslated region and is required for the stable accumulation of the psbD mRNA and photosystem II. The system can be used for any chloroplast gene or transgene by placing it under the control of the psbD 5'-untranslated region. PMID:24599871

  6. Chloroplast division during leaf development of Xanthium pensylvanicum Wallr. (Compositae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Maksymowych

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Division and growth of chloroplasts was studied during leaf development of Xanthium pensylvanicum at various stages of development represented by the leaf plastochron index.Between leaf plastochron indices -1.00 and 2.56 chloroplast division was observed with little enlargement. Between 2.50 and 5.00 chloroplasts enlarged in diameter with an average rate of 0.21 µm per day. At leaf plastochron index 5.00 chloroplasts attained their mature size of 6.12 µm. No chloroplast division was found after leaf plastochron index 2.50. A change in shape of plastids from spherical proplastids to discoidal accompanied their growth during stages 2.50 and 5.00.

  7. The complete chloroplast genome of the Dendrobium strongylanthum (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Complete chloroplast genome sequence is very useful for studying the phylogenetic and evolution of species. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum was constructed from whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The chloroplast genome is 153 058 bp in length with 37.6% GC content and consists of two inverted repeats (IRs) of 26 316 bp. The IR regions are separated by large single-copy region (LSC, 85 836 bp) and small single-copy (SSC, 14 590 bp) region. A total of 130 chloroplast genes were successfully annotated, including 84 protein coding genes, 38 tRNA genes, and eight rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum is related to that of the Dendrobium officinal. PMID:26153739

  8. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M El Bakkouri; A Pow; A Mulichak; K Cheung; J Artz; M Amani; S Fell; T de Koning-Ward; C Goodman; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The Clpchaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clpchaperones and proteases in the humanmalariaparasitePlasmodiumfalciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clpchaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  9. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A. (McMaster U.); (Melbourne); (Toronto); (Deakin); (HWMRI)

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  10. The structures of Arabidopsis Deg5 and Deg8 reveal new insights into HtrA proteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structures of Arabidopsis Deg5 and Deg8 have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 and 2.0 Å, respectively, revealing novel structural features of HtrA proteases. Plant Deg5 and Deg8 are two members of the HtrA proteases, a family of oligomeric serine endopeptidases that are involved in a variety of protein quality-control processes. These two HtrA proteases are located in the thylakoid lumen and participate in high-light stress responses by collaborating with other chloroplast proteins. Deg5 and Deg8 degrade photodamaged D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction centre, allowing its in situ replacement. Here, the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana Deg5 (S266A) and Deg8 (S292A) are reported at 2.6 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. The Deg5 trimer contains two calcium ions in a central channel, suggesting a link between photodamage control and calcium ions in chloroplasts. Previous structures of HtrA proteases have indicated that their regulation usually requires C-terminal PDZ domain(s). Deg5 is unique in that it contains no PDZ domain and the trimeric structure of Deg5 (S266A) reveals a novel catalytic triad conformation. A similar triad conformation is observed in the hexameric structure of the single PDZ-domain-containing Deg8 (S292A). These findings suggest a novel activation mechanism for plant HtrA proteases and provide structural clues to their function in light-stress response

  11. The structures of Arabidopsis Deg5 and Deg8 reveal new insights into HtrA proteases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao, Feng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Fan, Haitian; Shan, Xiaoyue [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Renhua [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 Nanxincun, Haidian District, Beijing 100093 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Lin, E-mail: liulin@ibcas.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 Nanxincun, Haidian District, Beijing 100093 (China); Gong, Weimin, E-mail: liulin@ibcas.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-05-01

    The crystal structures of Arabidopsis Deg5 and Deg8 have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 and 2.0 Å, respectively, revealing novel structural features of HtrA proteases. Plant Deg5 and Deg8 are two members of the HtrA proteases, a family of oligomeric serine endopeptidases that are involved in a variety of protein quality-control processes. These two HtrA proteases are located in the thylakoid lumen and participate in high-light stress responses by collaborating with other chloroplast proteins. Deg5 and Deg8 degrade photodamaged D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction centre, allowing its in situ replacement. Here, the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana Deg5 (S266A) and Deg8 (S292A) are reported at 2.6 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. The Deg5 trimer contains two calcium ions in a central channel, suggesting a link between photodamage control and calcium ions in chloroplasts. Previous structures of HtrA proteases have indicated that their regulation usually requires C-terminal PDZ domain(s). Deg5 is unique in that it contains no PDZ domain and the trimeric structure of Deg5 (S266A) reveals a novel catalytic triad conformation. A similar triad conformation is observed in the hexameric structure of the single PDZ-domain-containing Deg8 (S292A). These findings suggest a novel activation mechanism for plant HtrA proteases and provide structural clues to their function in light-stress response.

  12. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  13. Gibberellin metabolism in chloroplasts of Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known about the metabolic control of gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis in higher plants. Recent studies have implicated chloroplasts in the metabolic control of GA metabolism in leaves. Thus chloroplasts from several higher plants have been shown to possess high levels of GA-like activity and appear to be able to localize certain GAs selectivity whilst allowing others to migrate into the cytoplasm. This paper evaluates the ability of chloroplasts to synthesize and interconvert GAs, in an in vitro system developed from plastids of Pisum sativum. The results of detailed analysis of the products are reported

  14. The complete chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae) 1

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Donghwan; Raveendar, Sebastin; Lee, Jung-Ro; Lee, Gi-An; Ro, Na-Young; Jeon, Young-Ah; Cho, Gyu-Taek; Lee, Ho-Sun; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We report the complete sequence of the chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae), a species of chili pepper. Methods and Results: Using an Illumina platform, we sequenced the chloroplast genome of C. frutescens. The total length of the genome is 156,817 bp, and the overall GC content is 37.7%. A pair of 25,792-bp inverted repeats is separated by small (17,853 bp) and large (87,380 bp) single-copy regions. The C. frutescens chloroplast genome encodes 132 uniq...

  15. Reactive Nitrogen Species-Dependent Effects on Soybean Chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Puntarulo, Susana; Jasid, Sebastián; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generation by soybean (Glycine max, var ADM 4800) chloroplasts was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique.1 Both nitrite and L-arginine (arg) are the required substrates for enzymatic activities considered as possible sources of NO in plants. Soybean chloroplasts showed a NO production of 3.2 ± 0.2 nmol min−1 mg−1 protein in the presence of 1 mM NaNO2. Chloroplasts incubated with 1 mM arg showed a NO production of 0.76 ± 0.04 nmol min−1 mg−1...

  16. Cytomegalovirus protease targeted prodrug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabit, Hairat; Dahan, Arik; Sun, Jing; Provoda, Chester J; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Hilfinger, John H; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a prevalent virus that infects up to 90% of the population. The goal of this research is to determine if small molecular prodrug substrates can be developed for a specific HCMV encoded protease and thus achieve site-specific activation. HCMV encodes a 256 amino acid serine protease that is responsible for capsid assembly, an essential process for herpes virus production. The esterase activity of the more stable HCMV A143T/A144T protease mutant was evaluated with model p-nitrophenol (ONp) esters, Boc-Xaa-ONp (Ala, Leu, Ile, Val, Gln, Phe at the Xaa position). We demonstrate that the A143T/A144T mutant has esterase activity toward specific small ester compounds, e.g., Boc-L-Ala-ONp. Mono amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of ganciclovir (GCV) were also synthesized and evaluated for hydrolysis by the A143T/A144T protease mutant in solution. Hydrolysis of these prodrugs was also evaluated in Caco-2 cell homogenates, human liver microsomes (HLMs), and rat and human plasma. For the selectivity potential of the prodrugs, the hydrolysis ratio was evaluated as a percentage of prodrug hydrolyzed by the HCMV protease over the percentages of prodrug hydrolyses by Caco-2 cell homogenates, HLMs, and human/rat plasma. A dipeptide prodrug of ganciclovir, Ac-l-Gln-l-Ala-GCV, emerged as a potential selective prodrug candidate. The results of this research demonstrate that targeting prodrugs for activation by a specific protease encoded by the infectious HCMV pathogen may be achievable. PMID:23485093

  17. Origins of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    A computer branching model is used to analyze cellular evolution. Attention is given to certain key amino acids and nucleotide residues (ferredoxin, 5s ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochromes) because of their commonality over a wide variety of cell types. Each amino acid or nucleotide residue is a sequence in an inherited biological trait; and the branching method is employed to align sequences so that changes reflect substitution of one residue for another. Based on the computer analysis, the symbiotic theory of cellular evolution is considered the most probable. This theory holds that organelles, e.g., mitochondria and chloroplasts invaded larger bodies, e.g., bacteria, and combined functions to form eucaryotic cells.

  18. Dynamics of chloroplast genomes in green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Hong; Liu, Qiuxiang; Hu, Wangxiong; Wang, Tingzhang; Xue, Qingzhong; Messing, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts are essential organelles, in which genes have widely been used in the phylogenetic analysis of green plants. Here, we took advantage of the breadth of plastid genomes (cpDNAs) sequenced species to investigate their dynamic changes. Our study showed that gene rearrangements occurred more frequently in the cpDNAs of green algae than in land plants. Phylogenetic trees were generated using 55 conserved protein-coding genes including 33 genes for photosynthesis, 16 ribosomal protein genes and 6 other genes, which supported the monophyletic evolution of vascular plants, land plants, seed plants, and angiosperms. Moreover, we could show that seed plants were more closely related to bryophytes rather than pteridophytes. Furthermore, the substitution rate for cpDNA genes was calculated to be 3.3×10(-10), which was almost 10 times lower than genes of nuclear genomes, probably because of the plastid homologous recombination machinery. PMID:26206079

  19. Enzymatic Degradation of Ovalbumin by Various Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Yoshimaru, Tetsuro; Matsui, Toshiro; Osajima, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was made of the enzymatic hydrolysis of ovalbumin (OVA), a major allergen in egg white, by various acid and alkaline proteases. Protease YP-SS (acid protease) from Aspergillus niger and alcalase (alkaline protease) from BacilLus licheniformis were found to be useful for the degradation of OVA, respectively. OVA was almost totally hydrolyzed within 15 hr at 37℃ by alcalase. Alcalase acted rapidly to hydrolyze OVA, with about 90% of OVA being hydrolyzed within 30min., the react...

  20. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  1. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied

  2. Chloroplast genome variation in upland and lowland switchgrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) exists at multiple ploidies and two phenotypically distinct ecotypes. To facilitate interploidal comparisons and to understand the extent of sequence variation within existing breeding pools, two complete switchgrass chloroplast genomes were sequenced from individu...

  3. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  4. Separation of Chloroplast Pigments Using Reverse Phase Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, R. Neil

    1997-01-01

    Presents a protocol that uses reverse phase chromatography for the separation of chloroplast pigments. Provides a simple and relatively safe procedure for use in teaching laboratories. Discusses pigment extraction, chromatography, results, and advantages of the process. (JRH)

  5. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Lee, Hyeon Ju; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant species with useful aromatic oils in family Rutaceae, was generated in this study by de novo assembly with whole-genome sequence data. The chloroplast genome was 158 154 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure containing a pair of inverted repeats of 27 644 bp, separated by large single copy and small single copy of 85 340 bp and 17 526 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome harbored 112 genes consisting of 78 protein-coding genes 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete chloroplast genome sequences with those of known relatives revealed that Z. piperitum is most closely related to the Citrus species. PMID:26260183

  6. Exogenous proteases for meat tenderization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhit, Alaa A; Hopkins, David L; Geesink, Geert; Bekhit, Adnan A; Franks, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The use of exogenous proteases to improve meat tenderness has attracted much interest recently, with a view to consistent production of tender meat and added value to lower grade meat cuts. This review discusses the sources, characteristics, and use of exogenous proteases in meat tenderization to highlight the specificity of the proteases toward meat proteins and their impact on meat quality. Plant enzymes (such as papain, bromelain, and ficin) have been extensively investigated as meat tenderizers. New plant proteases (actinidin and zingibain) and microbial enzyme preparations have been of recent interest due to controlled meat tenderization and other advantages. Successful use of these enzymes in fresh meat requires their enzymatic kinetics and characteristics to be determined, together with an understanding of the impact of the surrounding environmental conditions of the meat (pH, temperature) on enzyme function. This enables the optimal conditions for tenderizing fresh meat to be established, and the elimination or reduction of any negative impacts on other quality attributes. PMID:24499119

  7. Sequence evidence for the symbiotic origins of chloroplasts and mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. G.; Hunt, L. T.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    The origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts is investigated on the basis of prokaryotic and early-eukaryotic evolutionary trees derived from protein and nucleic-acid sequences by the method of Dayhoff (1979). Trees for bacterial ferrodoxins, 5S ribosomal RNA, c-type cytochromes, the lipid-binding subunit of ATPase, and dihydrofolate reductase are presented and discussed. Good agreement among the trees is found, and it is argued that the mitochondria and chloroplasts evolved by multiple symbiotic events.

  8. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2016-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloropl...

  9. Inhibition of chloroplast protein synthesis following light chilling of tomato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study we looked at the effects of a high light chill on the pulsed incorporation of 35S methionine into total, stromal, and thylakoid proteins of lightly abraded leaflets of 18-21 day old tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill ca. Floramerica) seedlings. Based on gel fluorographic patterns of marker proteins that are indicative of the net rates of chloroplast and cytoplasmic protein synthesis, there appears to be a nearly complete cessation of chloroplastic protein synthesis. No labeling is observed for either the stromal large subunit of Rubisco or the thylakoid-bound alpha and beta subunits of the coupling factor. One notable exception, however, appears to be the 32 kd, D1 protein. Its net synthetic rate remains high despite the inhibition of other chloroplastically synthesized proteins. The small subunit of Rubicso, LHCP-II, as well as several other proteins of known cytoplasmic origin, were still synthesized, albeit, at lower than control rates. Light chilling of chill-insensitive spinach produced a similar, but less dramatic differential behavior between chloroplastic and cytoplasmic protein synthesis. It appears, in chilling-sensitive plants, that chloroplast protein synthesis exhibits a greater sensitivity to low temperature inhibition than does cytoplasmic protein synthesis and that recovery of chloroplast protein synthesis may play an important role in recovery of photosynthetic activity following chilling

  10. Role of mitochondria in sulfolipid biosynthesis by Euglena chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfate activation occurs in Euglena mitochondria the authors now find that the sulfate activating enzymes are absent from Euglena chloroplasts. Cells of mutant W10BSmL lacking plastids also lack detectable sulfolipid (SL) when grown on 35SO42- indicating that SL is absent from the mitochondria and is exclusively in the plastids. Plastids alone will convert 35S-cysteine to 35SL in the presence of ATP and Mg2+; light is stimulatory. Under similar conditions, chloroplasts and mitochondria incubated together convert 35SO42- to plastid-localized 35SL but either organelle incubated alone fails to effect this conversion. Unlabeled cysteine blocks SL labeling from sulfate in the mixed incubation; since cysteine is formed from sulfate by Euglena mitochrondria, cysteine (and other compounds) may move from the mitochondrion to the chloroplast to provide the sulfo group for SL formation. Although mitochondria form labeled protein from 35SO42- via cysteine, chloroplasts alone do not form labeled protein from 35SO42-, ATP and Mg2+ in light or darkness; incubation of chloroplasts plus mitochondria under these conditions labels chloroplast protein

  11. Expression of human soluble TRAIL in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zongqi; LI yinü; CHEN Feng; LI Dong; ZHANG Zhifang; LIU Yanxin; ZHENG Dexian; WANG Yong; SHEN Guifang

    2006-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces selectively apoptosis in various tumor cells and virus-infected cells, but rarely in normal cells. A chloroplast expression vector, p64TRAIL, containing the cDNA coding for the soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL), was constructed with clpP-trnL-petB-chlL-rpl23-rpl2 as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii plastid homologous recombinant fragments and spectinomycin-resistant aadA gene as a select marker. The plasmid p64TRAIL was transferred into the chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii by the biolistic method. Three independently transformed lines were obtained by 100 mg/L spectinomycin selection. PCR amplification, Southern blot analysis of the sTRAIL coding region DNA and cultivation cells in the dark all showed that the exogenous DNA had been integrated into chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii. Western blot analysis showed that human soluble TRAIL was expressed in C. reinhardtii chloroplast. The densitometric analysis of Western blot indicated that the expressed human sTRAIL protein in the chloroplasts of C. reinhardtii accounted for about 0.43%-0.67% of the total soluble proteins.These experimental results demonstrated the possibility of using transgenic chloroplasts of green alga as bioreactors for production of biopharmaceuticals.

  12. Comparative Studies on Retroviral Proteases: Substrate Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Tözsér

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous retroviruses are subclassified into seven genera and include viruses that cause diseases in humans. The viral Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol polyproteins are processed by the retroviral protease in the last stage of replication and inhibitors of the HIV-1 protease are widely used in AIDS therapy. Resistant mutations occur in response to the drug therapy introducing residues that are frequently found in the equivalent position of other retroviral proteases. Therefore, besides helping to understand the general and specific features of these enzymes, comparative studies of retroviral proteases may help to understand the mutational capacity of the HIV-1 protease.

  13. ATP-dependent protease in maize mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATP-dependent protease was identified in the matrix of Zea mays L. Sachara mitochondria. 14C-methylated casein has been used as a substrate, and the matrix ATP-dependent protease exhibited similar sensitivity towards specific inhibitors as the Lon protease from E. coli nd analogues from rat liver and yeast mitochondria. Here we report the existence of Lon like ATP-dependent protease in intact mitochondria prepared from 4-days-old epicotyls of Zea mays L. seedling. Enzyme has been purified from Lubrol treated mitochondria using ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The enzyme activity has been estimated using 14C-methylated casein as a substrate and sensitivity of the protease towards the specific inhibitors has been tested. ATP-dependent protease from the mitochondrial matrix of maize exhibit similar sensitivity to the above mentioned inhibitors like Lon protease from yeast and rat liver mitochondria as well as from E. coli. (authors)

  14. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulasi Satyanarayana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review.

  15. Flip-flop of phospholipids in proteoliposomes reconstituted from detergent extract of chloroplast membranes: kinetics and phospholipid specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archita Rajasekharan

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells are compartmentalized into distinct sub-cellular organelles by lipid bilayers, which are known to be involved in numerous cellular processes. The wide repertoire of lipids, synthesized in the biogenic membranes like the endoplasmic reticulum and bacterial cytoplasmic membranes are initially localized in the cytosolic leaflet and some of these lipids have to be translocated to the exoplasmic leaflet for membrane biogenesis and uniform growth. It is known that phospholipid (PL translocation in biogenic membranes is mediated by specific membrane proteins which occur in a rapid, bi-directional fashion without metabolic energy requirement and with no specificity to PL head group. A recent study reported the existence of biogenic membrane flippases in plants and that the mechanism of plant membrane biogenesis was similar to that found in animals. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time ATP independent and ATP dependent flippase activity in chloroplast membranes of plants. For this, we generated proteoliposomes from Triton X-100 extract of intact chloroplast, envelope membrane and thylakoid isolated from spinach leaves and assayed for flippase activity using fluorescent labeled phospholipids. Half-life time of flipping was found to be 6 ± 1 min. We also show that: (a intact chloroplast and envelope membrane reconstituted proteoliposomes can flip fluorescent labeled analogs of phosphatidylcholine in ATP independent manner, (b envelope membrane and thylakoid reconstituted proteoliposomes can flip phosphatidylglycerol in ATP dependent manner, (c Biogenic membrane ATP independent PC flipping activity is protein mediated and (d the kinetics of PC translocation gets affected differently upon treatment with protease and protein modifying reagents.

  16. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YX

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Yi Xia Zhang1, Jun Zheng2, Guo Gao1, Yi Fei Kong1, Xiao Zhi1, Kan Wang1, Xue Qing Zhang1, Da Xiang Cui11Department of Bio-Nano-Science and Engineering, National Key Laboratory of Nano/Micro Fabrication Technology, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of Ministry of Education, Institute of Micro-Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 2Wheat Research Institute, Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Linfen, Shan Xi, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this paper, a new method of one-pot biosynthesizing of gold nanoparticles (GNPs, using chloroplasts as reductants and stabilizers is reported. The as-prepared GNPs were characterized by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The cytotoxicity of the GNPs was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT method against gastric mucous cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. Rhodamine 6G as a Raman probe was used for investigating surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS enhancement of GNPs. The transmission electron microscopy results indicated that the GNPs were spherical in structure and almost 20 nm in diameter. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy exhibited an absorption peak at 545 nm. The GNPs exhibited high crystallinity, with the (111 plane as the predominant orientation, clarified by X-ray powder diffraction. In addition, a potential mechanism was proposed to interpret the formation process of GNPs, mainly based on the analysis of FTIR results. The FTIR spectrum confirmed that the GNPs were carried with N–H groups. Toxicological assays of as-prepared GNPs revealed that the green GNPs were nontoxic. SERS analysis revealed that the GNPs without any treatment could substantially enhance the Raman signals of rhodamine 6G. The Raman enhancement factor was calculated to be nearly 1010 orders of magnitude

  17. Fatty acid synthesis by spinach chloroplasts, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modes of actions of photosynthetic inhibitors on photosynthesis and fatty acid synthesis were examined. DCMU, an electron transport inhibitor, inhibited fatty acid synthesis and photophosphorylation to the same extent, suggesting dependence of fatty acid synthesis on photosynthesis. The same was also the case with FCCP, a photophosphorylation uncoupler. In contrast, NH4Cl and phlorizin at concentrations completely suppressing ATP formation, only partially inhibited the fatty acid synthesis. These facts suggest that a certain level of high-energy intermediate (state) is responsible for the light enhancement of fatty acid synthesis. This idea is further supported by the fact that the partial inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by NH4Cl was relieved by addition of DCCD at low concentrations suppressing the ATP formation but not completely destroying the high energy intermediate. The lag period in the initial period of fatty acid synthesis was shortened by preillumination of chloroplasts, even in the absence of ADP. This indicates that the light dependent fatty acid synthesis is closely associated with the high-energy intermediate (state), but not directly with ATP formation by photophosphorylation. (author)

  18. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1998-05-01

    This project was directed toward understanding at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels of how photosynthetic organisms adapt to long-term nitrogen-deficiency conditions is quite incomplete even though limitation of this nutrient is the most commonly restricts plant growth and development. For our work on this problem, the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was grown in continuous cultures in which steady-state levels of nitrogen can be precisely controlled. N-limited cells exhibit the classical symptoms of deficiency of this nutrient, chlorosis and slow growth rates, and respond to nitrogen provision by rapid greening and chloroplast differentiation. We have addressed three aspects of this problem: (1) the regulation of pigment synthesis; (2) control of expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins; (3) changes in metabolic and electron transport pathways that enable sustained CO{sub 2} fixation even though they cannot be readily converted into amino and nucleic acids. For the last, principle components are: (a) enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity intimately associated with photosynthates, and (b) the occurrence in thylakoids of a supplemental electron transport pathway that facilitates reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Together, these distinguishing features of N-limited cells are likely to enable cell survival, especially under conditions of high irradiance stress.

  19. Protease gene families in Populus and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteases play key roles in plants, maintaining strict protein quality control and degrading specific sets of proteins in response to diverse environmental and developmental stimuli. Similarities and differences between the proteases expressed in different species may give valuable insights into their physiological roles and evolution. Results We have performed a comparative analysis of protease genes in the two sequenced dicot genomes, Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa by using genes coding for proteases in the MEROPS database 1 for Arabidopsis to identify homologous sequences in Populus. A multigene-based phylogenetic analysis was performed. Most protease families were found to be larger in Populus than in Arabidopsis, reflecting recent genome duplication. Detailed studies on e.g. the DegP, Clp, FtsH, Lon, rhomboid and papain-Like protease families showed the pattern of gene family expansion and gene loss was complex. We finally show that different Populus tissues express unique suites of protease genes and that the mRNA levels of different classes of proteases change along a developmental gradient. Conclusion Recent gene family expansion and contractions have made the Arabidopsis and Populus complements of proteases different and this, together with expression patterns, gives indications about the roles of the individual gene products or groups of proteases.

  20. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Lyanna O. L.; Chorna V. I.

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic anal...

  1. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  2. Protease-sensitive synthetic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Colby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc. Frequently, PrP(Sc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but not recPrP monomers or oligomers, transmitted disease to transgenic mice (n = 164, denoted Tg9949 mice, that overexpress N-terminally truncated PrP. Tg9949 control mice (n = 174 did not spontaneously generate prions although they were prone to late-onset spontaneous neurological dysfunction. When synthetic prion isolates from infected Tg9949 mice were serially transmitted in the same line of mice, they exhibited sPrP(Sc and caused neurodegeneration. Interestingly, these protease-sensitive prions did not shorten the life span of Tg9949 mice despite causing extensive neurodegeneration. We inoculated three synthetic prion isolates into Tg4053 mice that overexpress full-length PrP; Tg4053 mice are not prone to developing spontaneous neurological dysfunction. The synthetic prion isolates caused disease in 600-750 days in Tg4053 mice, which exhibited sPrP(Sc. These novel synthetic prions demonstrate that conformational changes in wild-type PrP can produce mouse prions composed exclusively of sPrP(Sc.

  3. Glucose respiration in the intact chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chloroplastic respiration was monitored by measuring 14CO2 from 14C glucose in the darkened Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 chloroplast, The patterns of 14CO2 evolution from labeled glucose in the absence and presence of the inhibitors iodoacetamide, glycolate-2-phosphate, and phosphoenolypyruvate were those expected from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle and glycolysis. The Km for glucose was 56 micromolar and for MgATP was 200 micromolar. Release of 14CO2 was inhibited by phloretin and inorganic phosphate. Comparing the inhibition of CO2 evolution generated by pH 7.5 with respect to pH 8.2 (optimum) in chloroplasts given C-1, C-2, and C-6 labeled glucose indicated that a suboptimum pH affects the recycling of the pentose phosphate intermediates to a greater extent than CO2 evolution from C-1 of glucose. Respiratory inhibition by pH 7.5 in the darkened chloroplast was alleviated by NH4Cl and KCl (stromal alkalating agents), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase), or phosphoenolypyruvate (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiration in the darkened Chlamydomonas chloroplast is the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction. The respiratory pathways described here can account for the total oxidation of a hexose to Co2 and for interactions between carbohydrate metabolism and the oxyhydrogen reaction in algal cells adapted to a hydrogen metabolism

  4. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Comparison of intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric chloroplast diversity in Cycads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Hinsinger, Damien Daniel; Strijk, Joeri Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Cycads are among the most threatened plant species. Increasing the availability of genomic information by adding whole chloroplast data is a fundamental step in supporting phylogenetic studies and conservation efforts. Here, we assemble a dataset encompassing three taxonomic levels in cycads, including ten genera, three species in the genus Cycas and two individuals of C. debaoensis. Repeated sequences, SSRs and variations of the chloroplast were analyzed at the intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric scale, and using our sequence data, we reconstruct a phylogenomic tree for cycads. The chloroplast was 162,094 bp in length, with 133 genes annotated, including 87 protein-coding, 37 tRNA and 8 rRNA genes. We found 7 repeated sequences and 39 SSRs. Seven loci showed promising levels of variations for application in DNA-barcoding. The chloroplast phylogeny confirmed the division of Cycadales in two suborders, each of them being monophyletic, revealing a contradiction with the current family circumscription and its evolution. Finally, 10 intraspecific SNPs were found. Our results showed that despite the extremely restricted distribution range of C. debaoensis, using complete chloroplast data is useful not only in intraspecific studies, but also to improve our understanding of cycad evolution and in defining conservation strategies for this emblematic group. PMID:27558458

  6. The complete chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Donghwan; Raveendar, Sebastin; Lee, Jung-Ro; Lee, Gi-An; Ro, Na-Young; Jeon, Young-Ah; Cho, Gyu-Taek; Lee, Ho-Sun; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We report the complete sequence of the chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae), a species of chili pepper. Methods and Results: Using an Illumina platform, we sequenced the chloroplast genome of C. frutescens. The total length of the genome is 156,817 bp, and the overall GC content is 37.7%. A pair of 25,792-bp inverted repeats is separated by small (17,853 bp) and large (87,380 bp) single-copy regions. The C. frutescens chloroplast genome encodes 132 unique genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, 37 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and eight ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Of these, seven genes are duplicated in the inverted repeats and 12 genes contain one or two introns. Comparative analysis with the reference chloroplast genome revealed 125 simple sequence repeat motifs and 34 variants, mostly located in the noncoding regions. Conclusions: The complete chloroplast genome sequence of C. frutescens reported here is a valuable genetic resource for Capsicum species. PMID:27213127

  7. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents. PMID:25579194

  8. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B

    2009-08-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addition to directly blocking the activity of a targeted protease, one can take advantage of differential expression in disease states to selectively deliver therapeutic or imaging agents. Recent studies in targeted drug development for the metalloproteases (matrix metalloproteinases, adamalysins, pappalysins, neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, metallocarboxypeptidases, and glutamate carboxypeptidase II), serine proteases (elastase, coagulation factors, tissue/urokinase plasminogen activator system, kallikreins, tryptase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV) and cysteine proteases (cathepsin B) are discussed herein. PMID:19689354

  9. Synthesis of macrocyclic trypanosomal cysteine protease inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yen Ting; Lira, Ricardo; Hansell, Elizabeth; McKerrow, James H.; Roush, William R.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of cysteine proteases in parasites, compounded with the lack of redundancy compared to their mammalian hosts makes proteases attractive targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. The binding mode of K11002 to cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi was used in the design of conformationally constrained inhibitors. Vinyl sulfone-containing macrocycles were synthesized via olefin ring-closing metathesis and evaluated against cruzain and the closely r...

  10. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Monteiro Souza; Mona Lisa de Assis Bittencourt; Carolina Canielles Caprara; Marcela de Freitas; Renata Paula Coppini de Almeida; Dâmaris Silveira; Yris Maria Fonseca; Edivaldo Ximenes Ferreira Filho; Adalberto Pessoa Junior; Pérola Oliveira Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy...

  11. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addit...

  12. Thioamide-Based Fluorescent Protease Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Jacob M.; Chen, Xing; Meinhardt, Nataline; Greenbaum, Doron C.; Petersson, E. James

    2014-01-01

    Thioamide quenchers can be paired with compact fluorophores to design “turn-on” fluorescent protease substrates. We have used this method to study a variety of serine-, cysteine-, carboxyl-, and metallo-proteases, including trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, papain, and calpain. Since thioamides quench some fluorophores red-shifted from those naturally occurring in proteins, this technique can be used for real time monitoring of protease activity in crude preparations of virtually an...

  13. Biased Signaling of Protease-activated Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    PeishenZhao; NigelWilliamBunnett

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their role in protein degradation and digestion, proteases can also function as hormone-like signaling molecules that regulate vital patho-physiological processes, including inflammation, hemostasis, pain and repair mechanisms. Certain proteases can signal to cells by cleaving protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of four G protein-coupled receptors. PARs are expressed by almost all cell types, control important physiological and disease-relevant processes, and are an e...

  14. Protein targeting to ATP-dependent proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Inobe, Tomonao; Matouschek, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    ATP-dependent proteases control diverse cellular processes by degrading specific regulatory proteins. Understanding how these regulatory proteins are targeted to ATP-dependent proteases is of central importance to understanding their biological role as regulators. Recent work has shown that protein substrates are specifically transferred to ATP-dependent proteases through different routes. These routes can function in parallel or independently. In all of these targeting mechanisms it can be u...

  15. Molecular biology and physiology of isolated chloroplasts from the algae Vaucheria

    OpenAIRE

    Didriksen, Alena

    2010-01-01

    Sea slugs of the genus Elysia (e.g. E. chlorotica) are known for their ability to incorporate chloroplasts from the yellow-green alga Vaucheria litorea. These “kleptoplasts” stay active in the digestive tract of the sea slug for several months. Chloroplasts from Vaucheria litorea are also reported to be significantly more stable after in vitro isolation than chloroplasts of other algae or of higher plants. In organello assays with isolated chloroplasts are used in studies on photosynthetical ...

  16. Chloroplast degeneration and its inhibition by kinetin in detached leaves of Cichorium intybus L.

    OpenAIRE

    F. Młodzianowski; L. Młodzanowska

    2015-01-01

    In the chicory (Cichorium intybus L. var. sativum cv. Polanowicka) leaves two types of chloroplasts are present differing by their degree of osmiophility of the thylakoid inside. This type of differentiation of chloroplasts has so far been found only in several plant species. The process of chloroplast degeneration in darkness is described. In osmiophilic chloroplasts at certain stage of degeneration minutely layered giant grana were found. Kinetin markedly inhibited the process of chloroplas...

  17. Development of chloroplast genomic resources for Cynara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curci, Pasquale L; De Paola, Domenico; Sonnante, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    In this study, new chloroplast (cp) resources were developed for the genus Cynara, using whole cp genomes from 20 genotypes, by means of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Our target species included seven globe artichokes, two cultivated cardoons, eight wild artichokes, and three other wild Cynara species (C. baetica, C. cornigera and C. syriaca). One complete cp genome was isolated using short reads from a whole-genome sequencing project, while the others were obtained by means of long-range PCR, for which primer pairs are provided here. A de novo assembly strategy combined with a reference-based assembly allowed us to reconstruct each cp genome. Comparative analyses among the newly sequenced genotypes and two additional Cynara cp genomes ('Brindisino' artichoke and C. humilis) retrieved from public databases revealed 126 parsimony informative characters and 258 singletons in Cynara, for a total of 384 variable characters. Thirty-nine SSR loci and 34 other INDEL events were detected. After data analysis, 37 primer pairs for SSR amplification were designed, and these molecular markers were subsequently validated in our Cynara genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis based on all cp variable characters provided the best resolution when compared to what was observed using only parsimony informative characters, or only short 'variable' cp regions. The evaluation of the molecular resources obtained from this study led us to support the 'super-barcode' theory and consider the total cp sequence of Cynara as a reliable and valuable molecular marker for exploring species diversity and examining variation below the species level. PMID:26354522

  18. Evolutionary divergence of chloroplast FAD synthetase proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arilla-Luna Sonia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetases (FADSs - a group of bifunctional enzymes that carry out the dual functions of riboflavin phosphorylation to produce flavin mononucleotide (FMN and its subsequent adenylation to generate FAD in most prokaryotes - were studied in plants in terms of sequence, structure and evolutionary history. Results Using a variety of bioinformatics methods we have found that FADS enzymes localized to the chloroplasts, which we term as plant-like FADS proteins, are distributed across a variety of green plant lineages and constitute a divergent protein family clearly of cyanobacterial origin. The C-terminal module of these enzymes does not contain the typical riboflavin kinase active site sequence, while the N-terminal module is broadly conserved. These results agree with a previous work reported by Sandoval et al. in 2008. Furthermore, our observations and preliminary experimental results indicate that the C-terminus of plant-like FADS proteins may contain a catalytic activity, but different to that of their prokaryotic counterparts. In fact, homology models predict that plant-specific conserved residues constitute a distinct active site in the C-terminus. Conclusions A structure-based sequence alignment and an in-depth evolutionary survey of FADS proteins, thought to be crucial in plant metabolism, are reported, which will be essential for the correct annotation of plant genomes and further structural and functional studies. This work is a contribution to our understanding of the evolutionary history of plant-like FADS enzymes, which constitute a new family of FADS proteins whose C-terminal module might be involved in a distinct catalytic activity.

  19. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  20. Factors affecting the stability of chloroplast membranes in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoki, T.; Torres-Pereira, J.; Packer, L.

    1974-01-01

    Factors which affect the stability of light-induced atebrin fluorescence quenching activity in chloroplast membranes, a measure of the electron transport dependent formation of energy-linked H/sup +/ gradients, were investigated in vitro. Class II spinach chloroplast membranes were isolated and stored at 0 to 4/sup 0/C and aliquots were subsequently tested for their retention of energizing capacity. The main factors which increase the stability of this activity were found to be (a) isolation in a potassium-containing medium but storage in a sucrose medium containing a low concentration of electrolytes; (b) the presence of butylated hydroxytoluene (an antioxidant), and a protein such as bovine serum albumin to remove free fatty acids in the medium during storage. Under these conditions, the energization capacity of chloroplasts is retained for more than 40 days.

  1. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos;

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplasts found in plants and algae, and photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria, are emerging hosts for sustainable production of valuable biochemicals, using only inorganic nutrients, water, CO2 and light as inputs. In the past decade, many bioengineering efforts have focused...... on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals, as well as complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression...... of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria as biosynthetic compartments and hosts, and we estimate the production levels to be expected from photosynthetic hosts in light of the fraction of electrons and carbon that can potentially be diverted from photosynthesis. The supply of reducing power, in the form of electrons...

  2. Identification of the 64 kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein as phosphoglucomutase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorylation of the 64 kilodalton stromal phosphoprotein by incubation of pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast extracts with [γ-32P]ATP decreased in the presence of Glc-6-P and Glc-1,6-P2, but was stimulated by glucose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis following incubation of intact chloroplasts and stromal extracts with [γ-32P]ATP, or incubation of stromal extracts and partially purified phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) with [32P]Glc-1-P showed that the identical 64 kilodalton polypeptide was labeled. A 62 kilodalton polypeptide was phosphorylated by incubation of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) stromal extracts with either [γ-32P]ATP or [32P]Glc-1-P. In contrast, an analogous polypeptide was not phosphorylated in extracts from a tobacco mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase activity. The results indicate that the 64 (or 62) kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein is phosphoglucomutase

  3. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Alocasia macrorrhizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Han, Limin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of Alocasia macrorrhizos is 154 995 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats of 25 944 bp separated by a large single-copy (LSC) region and a small single-copy (SSC) region of 87 366 bp and 15 741 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 132 predicted functional genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, four ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 transfer RNA genes, 18 of which are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions. In these genes, 16 genes contained single intron and two genes comprising double introns. A maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis using complete chloroplast genome revealed that A. macrorrhizos does not belong to Araceae family, which infers that the A. macrorrhizos is distant from the species in Araceae family. PMID:26258514

  4. IM30 triggers membrane fusion in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Raoul; Heidrich, Jennifer; Saur, Michael; Schmüser, Lars; Roeters, Steven J; Hellmann, Nadja; Woutersen, Sander; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias; Markl, Jürgen; Schneider, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria is a unique internal membrane system harbouring the complexes of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain. Despite their apparent importance, little is known about the biogenesis and maintenance of thylakoid membranes. Although membrane fusion events are essential for the formation of thylakoid membranes, proteins involved in membrane fusion have yet to be identified in photosynthetic cells or organelles. Here we show that IM30, a conserved chloroplast and cyanobacterial protein of approximately 30 kDa binds as an oligomeric ring in a well-defined geometry specifically to membranes containing anionic lipids. Triggered by Mg(2+), membrane binding causes destabilization and eventually results in membrane fusion. We propose that IM30 establishes contacts between internal membrane sites and promotes fusion to enable regulated exchange of proteins and/or lipids in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. PMID:25952141

  5. Transcriptome analysis of ectopic chloroplast development in green curd cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloroplasts are the green plastids where photosynthesis takes place. The biogenesis of chloroplasts requires the coordinate expression of both nuclear and chloroplast genes and is regulated by developmental and environmental signals. Despite extensive studies of this process, the genetic basis and ...

  6. Manipulating the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas: Present realities and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boynton, J.; Gillham, N.; Hauser, C.; Heifetz, P.; Lers, A.; Newman, S.; Osmond, B.

    1992-12-31

    Biotechnology is being applied in vitro modification and stable reintroduction of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nicotiana tabacum by homologous recombination. We are attempting the function analyses of plastid encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis, characterization of sequences which regulate expression of plastid genes at the transcriptional and translational levels, targeted disruption of chloroplast genes and molecular analysis of processes involved in chloroplast recombination.

  7. Salinity induces membrane structure and lipid changes in maize mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoto, Eiji; Iwasaki, Yugo; Miyake, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2016-05-01

    The membranes of Zea mays (maize) mesophyll cell (MC) chloroplasts are more vulnerable to salinity stress than are those of bundle sheath cell (BSC) chloroplasts. To clarify the mechanism underlying this difference in salt sensitivity, we monitored changes in the glycerolipid and fatty acid compositions of both types of chloroplast upon exposure to salinity stress. The monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) contents were higher in MC chloroplasts than in BSC chloroplasts, in both the presence and absence of salt treatment. Under salt conditions, the MGDG level in MC chloroplasts was significantly lower than under normal conditions, while it was unchanged in BSC chloroplasts. In both types of chloroplast, the contents of DGDG, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol remained at the same levels in control and salt-treated plants, whereas sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine were significantly lower and higher, respectively, upon salt treatment. In addition, the fatty acid composition and double bond index of individual lipid classes were changed by salt treatment in both BSC and MC chloroplasts, although these factors had no effect on glycerolipid content. These findings suggest that the difference in salt sensitivity of MC and BSC chloroplast membranes is related to differences in MGDG responses to salinity. Thus, we propose that the low MGDG content and the low sensitivity of MGDG to salinity in BSC chloroplasts render them more tolerant than MC chloroplasts to salinity stress. PMID:26555406

  8. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  9. Chloroplast Iron Transport Proteins - Function and Impact on Plant Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Millán, Ana F; Duy, Daniela; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated about three billion years ago by endosymbiosis of an ancestor of today's cyanobacteria with a mitochondria-containing host cell. During evolution chloroplasts of higher plants established as the site for photosynthesis and thus became the basis for all life dependent on oxygen and carbohydrate supply. To fulfill this task, plastid organelles are loaded with the transition metals iron, copper, and manganese, which due to their redox properties are essential for photosynthetic electron transport. In consequence, chloroplasts for example represent the iron-richest system in plant cells. However, improvement of oxygenic photosynthesis in turn required adaptation of metal transport and homeostasis since metal-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes oxidative damage. This is most acute in chloroplasts, where radicals and transition metals are side by side and ROS-production is a usual feature of photosynthetic electron transport. Thus, on the one hand when bound by proteins, chloroplast-intrinsic metals are a prerequisite for photoautotrophic life, but on the other hand become toxic when present in their highly reactive, radical generating, free ionic forms. In consequence, transport, storage and cofactor-assembly of metal ions in plastids have to be tightly controlled and are crucial throughout plant growth and development. In the recent years, proteins for iron transport have been isolated from chloroplast envelope membranes. Here, we discuss their putative functions and impact on cellular metal homeostasis as well as photosynthetic performance and plant metabolism. We further consider the potential of proteomic analyses to identify new players in the field. PMID:27014281

  10. The action spectrum in chloroplast translocation in multilayer leaf cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Lechowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available By measurement of light transmittance through a leaf as criterion of chloroplast translocation, the action spectrum of Ajuga reptans was established. In the spectrum obtained, a correction was introduced for leaf autoabsorption calculated on the basis of the Beer-Lambert law. The action spectrum has two maxima: at λ= 375 nm and λ= 481 nm. The range above 502 nm has no significant effect on chloroplast translocation. Comparison with other objects examined demonstrated that in multilayer leaf cells riboflavin seems also to be a photoreceptor active in this process.

  11. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  12. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  13. The complete chloroplast genome of Schrenkiella parvula (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qi; Hao, Guoqian; Wang, Xiaojuan; Bi, Hao; Li, Yuanshuo; Guo, Xinyi; Ma, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Schrenkiella parvula is an Arabidopsis-related model species used here for studying plant stress tolerance. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome sequence of S. parvula has been reported for the first time. The total length of the chloroplast genome was 153 979 bp, which had a typical quadripartite structure. The annotated plastid genome includes 87 protein-coding genes, 39 tRNA genes and 8 ribosomal RNA genes. The evolutionary relationships revealed by our phylogenetic analysis indicated that S. parvula is closer to the Brassiceae species when compared with Eutrema salsugineum. PMID:26260181

  14. Nucleotide sequence of a spinach chloroplast valine tRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Sprouse, H M; Kashdan, M; Otis, L; Dudock, B

    1981-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a spinach chloroplast valine tRNA (sp. chl. tRNA Val) has been determined. This tRNA shows essentially equal homology to prokaryotic valine tRNAs (58-65% homology) and to the mitochondrial valine tRNAs of lower eukaryotes (yeast and N. crassa, 61-62% homology). Sp. chl. tRNA Val shows distinctly lower homology to mouse mitochondrial valine tRNA (53% homology) and to eukaryotic cytoplasmic valine tRNAs (47-53% homology). Sp. chl. tRNA Val, like all other chloroplast ...

  15. Characterization of elemental sulfur in isolated intact spinach chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubation of intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts in the presence of 35SO42- resulted in the light-dependent formation of a chloroform-soluble sulfur-containing compound distinct from sulfolipid. The authors have identified this compound as the most stable form (S8) of elemental sulfur (S0, valence state for S = O) by mass spectrometry. It is possible that elemental sulfur (S0) was formed by oxidation of bound sulfide, i.e. after the photoreduction of sulfate to sulfide by intact chloroplasts, and released as S8 under the experimental conditions used for analysis

  16. Extracellular and membrane-bound proteases from Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mäntsälä, P; Zalkin, H

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis YY88 synthesizes increased amounts of extracellular and membrane-bound proteases. More than 99% of the extracellular protease activity is accounted for by an alkaline serine protease and a neutral metalloprotease. An esterase having low protease activity accounts for less than 1% of the secreted protease. These enzymes were purified to homogeneity. Molecular weights of approximately 28,500 and 39,500 were determined for the alkaline and neutral proteases, respectively. The e...

  17. Chloroplast degeneration and its inhibition by kinetin in detached leaves of Cichorium intybus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Młodzianowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the chicory (Cichorium intybus L. var. sativum cv. Polanowicka leaves two types of chloroplasts are present differing by their degree of osmiophility of the thylakoid inside. This type of differentiation of chloroplasts has so far been found only in several plant species. The process of chloroplast degeneration in darkness is described. In osmiophilic chloroplasts at certain stage of degeneration minutely layered giant grana were found. Kinetin markedly inhibited the process of chloroplast degeneration, and after prolonged treatment even stimulated the stacking. process of grana thylakoids.

  18. Isolation of dimorphic chloroplasts from the single-cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung Shiu-Cheung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three terrestrial plants are known to perform C4 photosynthesis without the dual-cell system by partitioning two distinct types of chloroplasts in separate cytoplasmic compartments. We report herein a protocol for isolating the dimorphic chloroplasts from Bienertia sinuspersici. Hypo-osmotically lysed protoplasts under our defined conditions released intact compartments containing the central chloroplasts and intact vacuoles with adhering peripheral chloroplasts. Following Percoll step gradient purification both chloroplast preparations demonstrated high homogeneities as evaluated from the relative abundance of respective protein markers. This protocol will open novel research directions toward understanding the mechanism of single-cell C4 photosynthesis.

  19. Immobilization to prevent enzyme incompatibility with proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme incompatibility is a problem in multi-enzyme processes that involve a non-specific protease, such as Alcalase. An example is the one-pot enzymatic synthesis of peptides catalyzed by a lipase and a protease. The incompatibility between lipase B from Candida antarctica (CalB) and Alcalase was s

  20. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Ferracini-Santos; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p

  1. Progress and prospects on DENV protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timiri, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-07-19

    New treatments are desperately required to combat increasing rate of dengue fever cases reported in tropical and sub-tropical parts of the world. Among the ten proteins (structural and non-structural) encoded by dengue viral genome, NS2B-NS3 protease is an ideal target for drug discovery. It is responsible for the processing of poly protein that is required for genome replication of the virus. Moreover, inhibitors designed against proteases were found successful in Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Complete molecular mechanism and a survey of inhibitors reported against dengue protease will be helpful in designing effective and potent inhibitors. This review provides an insight on molecular mechanism of dengue virus protease and covers up-to-date information on different inhibitors reported against dengue proteases with medicinal chemistry perspective. PMID:27092412

  2. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Wlodarczyk, Artur Jacek; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Perestrello Ramos H de Jesus, Maria; King, Brian Christopher; Bakowski, Kamil; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-07-01

    Chloroplasts in plants and algae and photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria are emerging hosts for sustainable production of valuable biochemicals, using only inorganic nutrients, water, CO2 and light as inputs. In the past decade, many bioengineering efforts have focused on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals and complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression of the appropriate pathways, but this requires optimization of carbon flux and reducing power, and a thorough understanding of regulatory pathways. Secretion or storage of the compounds produced can be exploited for the isolation or confinement of the desired compounds. In this review, we explore the use of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria as biosynthetic compartments and hosts, and we estimate the levels of production to be expected from photosynthetic hosts in light of the fraction of electrons and carbon that can potentially be diverted from photosynthesis. The supply of reducing power, in the form of electrons derived from the photosynthetic light reactions, appears to be non-limiting, but redirection of the fixed carbon via precursor molecules presents a challenge. We also discuss the available synthetic biology tools and the need to expand the molecular toolbox to facilitate cellular reprogramming for increased production yields in both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. PMID:27005523

  3. Chloroplast genetics of chlamydomonas. I. Allelic segregation ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents allelic segregation data from a series of 16 crosses segregated for nuclear and chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast markers occurring in the zygote have been distinguished from those occurring in zoospore clones. The genes ac1, ac2, and tm1 showed little if any deviation from 1:1 either in zygotic segregation or in zoospore clones. The genes sm2, ery, and spc showed a significant excess of the allele from the mt+ parent in zygotes. However, in zoospores, mt+ excess was seen only when the allele was the mutant (resistant) form but not when it was wild type (sensitive). These results show that the extent of preferential segregation differs in zygotes and in zoospores, and that preferential segregation is influenced by map location and by allele specificity. A comparison of progeny from zygotes mated after 0, 15'', 30'', and 50'' uv irradiation of the mt+ gametes demonstrated the lack of an effect of uv upon allelic segregation ratios. In total, these results exclude the multi-copy model of chloroplast genome segregation suggested by Gillham. Boynton and Lee (1974) and support the diploid model we have previously proposed

  4. Chloroplast genetics of chlamydomonas. I. Allelic segregation ratios. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, R.; Ramanis, Z.

    1976-06-01

    This paper presents allelic segregation data from a series of 16 crosses segregated for nuclear and chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast markers occurring in the zygote have been distinguished from those occurring in zoospore clones. The genes ac1, ac2, and tm1 showed little if any deviation from 1:1 either in zygotic segregation or in zoospore clones. The genes sm2, ery, and spc showed a significant excess of the allele from the mt+ parent in zygotes. However, in zoospores, mt+ excess was seen only when the allele was the mutant (resistant) form but not when it was wild type (sensitive). These results show that the extent of preferential segregation differs in zygotes and in zoospores, and that preferential segregation is influenced by map location and by allele specificity. A comparison of progeny from zygotes mated after 0, 15'', 30'', and 50'' uv irradiation of the mt+ gametes demonstrated the lack of an effect of uv upon allelic segregation ratios. In total, these results exclude the multi-copy model of chloroplast genome segregation suggested by Gillham. Boynton and Lee (1974) and support the diploid model we have previously proposed.

  5. Chloroplast heterogeneity and historical admixture within the genus Malus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premise of the study: We examined chloroplast DNA sequence variation in 412 samples representing 30 Malus species (including Malus x domestica Borkh.). Malus wild species are of particular interest for providing novel alleles and traits in apple breeding programs, yet the taxonomic status of these s...

  6. Transport Across Chloroplast Membranes: Optimizing Photosynthesis for Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplasts are central to solar light harvesting and photosynthesis. Optimal chloroplast functioning is vitally dependent on a very intensive traffic of metabolites and ions between the cytosol and stroma, and should be attuned for adverse environmental conditions. This is achieved by an orchestrated regulation of a variety of transport systems located at chloroplast membranes such as porines, solute channels, ion-specific cation and anion channels, and various primary and secondary active transport systems. In this review we describe the molecular nature and functional properties of the inner and outer envelope and thylakoid membrane channels and transporters. We then discuss how their orchestrated regulation affects thylakoid structure, electron transport and excitation energy transfer, proton-motive force partition, ion homeostasis, stromal pH regulation, and volume regulation. We link the activity of key cation and anion transport systems with stress-specific signaling processes in chloroplasts, and discuss how these signals interact with the signals generated in other organelles to optimize the cell performance, with a special emphasis on Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species signaling. PMID:26597501

  7. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Phagomixotrophic Green Alga Cymbomonas tetramitiformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasch, Amber E.; Graham, Linda E.; Kim, Eunsoo

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Cymbomonas tetramitiformis strain PLY262, which is a prasinophycean green alga that retains a phagomixotrophic mode of nutrition. The genome is 84,524 bp in length, with a G+C content of 37%, and contains 3 rRNAs, 26 tRNAs, and 76 protein-coding genes. PMID:27313295

  8. Selenocystamine improves protein accumulation in chloroplasts of eukaryotic green algae

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira-Camargo, Livia S; Tran, Miller; Beld, Joris; Burkart, Michael D.; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic green algae have become an increasingly popular platform for recombinant proteins production. In particular, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, has garnered increased attention for having the necessary biochemical machinery to produce vaccines, human antibodies and next generation cancer targeting immunotoxins. While it has been shown that chloroplasts contain chaperones, peptidyl prolylisomerases and protein disulfide isomerases that facilitate these complex proteins folding and assembly,...

  9. Global Chloroplast Phylogeny and Biogeography of Bracken (Pteridium: Dennstaedtiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    J.P.;; Thomson, J. A.; Stratford, J. K.; Paul G Wolf

    2009-01-01

    Bracken ferns (genus Pteridium) represent an ancient species complex with a natural worldwide distribution. Pteridium has historically been treated as comprising a single species, but recent treatments have recognized several related species. Phenotypic plasticity, geographically structured morphological variation, and geographically biased sampling have all contributed to taxonomic confusion in the genus. We sampled bracken specimens worldwide and used variable regions of the chloroplast gen...

  10. Structure of "Arabidopsis" chloroplastic monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) play important roles in maintaining redox homeostasis in living cells and are conserved across species. "Arabidopsis thaliana" monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp, is critical for protection from oxidative stress in chloroplasts. The crystal structure of AtGRXcp has been de...

  11. Evolution of the Cp-Actin-based Motility System of Chloroplasts in Green Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    During the course of green plant evolution, numerous light responses have arisen that optimize their growth under fluctuating light conditions. The blue light receptor phototropin mediates several photomovement responses at the tissue, cellular and organelle levels. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is one such photomovement response, and is found not only in most green plants, but also in some red algae and photosynthetic stramenopiles. In general, chloroplasts move toward weak light to maximally capture photosynthetically active radiation (the chloroplast accumulation response), and they move away from strong light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). In land plants, chloroplast movement is dependent on specialized actin filaments, chloroplast-actin filaments (cp-actin filaments). Through molecular genetic analysis using Arabidopsis thaliana, many molecular factors that regulate chloroplast photorelocation were identified. In this Perspective, we discuss the evolutionary history of the molecular mechanism for chloroplast photorelocation movement in green plants in view of cp-actin filaments. PMID:27200035

  12. Senescence-Associated Vacuoles, a Specific Lytic Compartment for Degradation of Chloroplast Proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian A. Carrión

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of chloroplasts and chloroplast components is a distinctive feature of leaf senescence. In spite of its importance in the nutrient economy of plants, knowledge about the mechanism(s involved in the breakdown of chloroplast proteins is incomplete. A novel class of vacuoles, “senescence-associated vacuoles” (SAVs, characterized by intense proteolytic activity appear during senescence in chloroplast-containing cells of leaves. Since SAVs contain some chloroplast proteins, they are candidate organelles to participate in chloroplast breakdown. In this review we discuss the characteristics of SAVs, and their possible involvement in the degradation of Rubisco, the most abundant chloroplast protein. Finally, SAVs are compared with other extra-plastidial protein degradation pathways operating in senescing leaves.

  13. HIV-1 protease mutations and protease inhibitor cross-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Ruane, Peter; Hellinger, James; Shirvani, Vivian; Zolopa, Andrew; Shafer, Robert W

    2010-10-01

    The effects of many protease inhibitor (PI)-selected mutations on the susceptibility to individual PIs are unknown. We analyzed in vitro susceptibility test results on 2,725 HIV-1 protease isolates. More than 2,400 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and saquinavir; 2,130 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to lopinavir; 1,644 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to atazanavir; 1,265 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to tipranavir; and 642 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to darunavir. We applied least-angle regression (LARS) to the 200 most common mutations in the data set and identified a set of 46 mutations associated with decreased PI susceptibility of which 40 were not polymorphic in the eight most common HIV-1 group M subtypes. We then used least-squares regression to ascertain the relative contribution of each of these 46 mutations. The median number of mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to each PI was 28 (range, 19 to 32), and the median number of mutations associated with increased susceptibility to each PI was 2.5 (range, 1 to 8). Of the mutations with the greatest effect on PI susceptibility, I84AV was associated with decreased susceptibility to eight PIs; V32I, G48V, I54ALMSTV, V82F, and L90M were associated with decreased susceptibility to six to seven PIs; I47A, G48M, I50V, L76V, V82ST, and N88S were associated with decreased susceptibility to four to five PIs; and D30N, I50L, and V82AL were associated with decreased susceptibility to fewer than four PIs. This study underscores the greater impact of nonpolymorphic mutations compared with polymorphic mutations on decreased PI susceptibility and provides a comprehensive quantitative assessment of the effects of individual mutations on susceptibility to the eight clinically available PIs. PMID:20660676

  14. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are rich in proteases, which are the major proteins of intracellular granules and are released with histamine and heparin by activated cells. Most of these proteases are active in the granule as well as outside of the mast cell when secreted, and can cleave targets near degranulating mast cells and in adjoining tissue compartments. Some proteases released from mast cells reach the bloodstream and may have far-reaching actions. In terms of relative amounts, the major mast cell proteases include the tryptases, chymases, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A3, dipeptidylpeptidase I/cathepsin C, and cathepsins L and S. Some mast cells also produce granzyme B, plasminogen activators, and matrix metalloproteinases. Tryptases and chymases are almost entirely mast cell-specific, whereas other proteases, such as cathepsins G, C, and L are expressed by a variety of inflammatory cells. Carboxypeptidase A3 expression is a property shared by basophils and mast cells. Other proteases, such as mastins, are largely basophil-specific, although human basophils are protease-deficient compared with their murine counterparts. The major classes of mast cell proteases have been targeted for development of therapeutic inhibitors. Also, a human β-tryptase has been proposed as a potential drug itself, to inactivate of snake venins. Diseases linked to mast cell proteases include allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and anaphylaxis, but also include non-allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and scarring diseases of lungs and other organs. In some cases, studies performed in mouse models suggest protective or homeostatic roles for specific proteases (or groups of proteases) in infections by bacteria, worms and other parasites, and even in allergic inflammation. At the same time, a clearer picture has emerged of differences in the

  15. Chloroplast Genome Sequence of the Moss Tortula ruralis: Gene Content and Structural Arrangement Relative to Other Green Plant Chloroplast Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed moss species in the family Pottiaceae, is increasingly being used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of Tortula ruralis, only the second publishe...

  16. Caspase Family Proteases and Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Jun FAN; Li-Hui HAN; Ri-Shan CONG; Jin LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential physiological process that plays a critical role in development and tissue homeostasis. The progress of apoptosis is regulated in an orderly way by a series of signal cascades under certain circumstances. The caspase-cascade system plays vital roles in the induction, transduction and amplification of intracellular apoptotic signals. Caspases, closely associated with apoptosis, are aspartate-specific cysteine proteases and members of the interleukin-1β-converting enzyme family. The activation and function of caspases, involved in the delicate caspase-cascade system, are regulated by various kinds of molecules, such as the inhibitor of apoptosis protein, Bcl-2 family proteins, calpain,and Ca2+. Based on the latest research, the members of the caspase family, caspase-cascade system and caspase-regulating molecules involved in apoptosis are reviewed.

  17. Natural inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The turnover and remodelling of extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential part of many normal biological processes including development, morphogenesis, and wound healing. ECM turnover also occurs in severe pathological situations like artherosclerosis, fibrosis, tumor invasion and metastasis. The major proteases involved in this turnover are serine proteases (especially the urokinase-type plasminogen activator/plasmin system), matrix metalloproteases (a family of about 20 zinc-dependent endopeptidases including collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, and membrane-type metalloproteases), and cysteine proteases. In vivo, the activity of these proteases is tightly regulated in the extracellular space by zymogen activation and/or controlled inhibition. In the present review, we give an overview on the structure and biochemical properties of important tumor-associated protease inhibitors such as plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and type 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1, -2, -3, and -4), and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C. Interestingly, some of these inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases display multiple functions which rather promote than inhibit tumor progression, when the presence of inhibitors in the tumor tissue is not balanced. (author)

  18. Transcript profiling reveals that cysteine protease inhibitors are up-regulated in tuber sprouts after extended darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandellis, Carolina; Giammaria, Veronica; Fantino, Elisa; Cerrudo, Ignacio; Bachmann, Sandra; Santin, Franco; Ulloa, Rita M

    2016-07-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers are an excellent staple food due to its high nutritional value. When the tuber reaches physiological competence, sprouting proceeds accompanied by changes at mRNA and protein levels. Potato tubers become a source of carbon and energy until sprouts are capable of independent growth. Transcript profiling of sprouts grown under continuous light or dark conditions was performed using the TIGR 10K EST Solanaceae microarray. The profiles analyzed show a core of highly expressed transcripts that are associated to the reactivation of growth. Under light conditions, the photosynthetic machinery was fully activated; the highest up-regulation was observed for the Rubisco activase (RCA), the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and the Photosystem II 22 kDa protein (CP22) genes, among others. On the other hand, sprouts exposed to continuous darkness elongate longer, and after extended darkness, synthesis of chloroplast components was repressed, the expression of proteases was reduced while genes encoding cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs) and metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors (MPIs) were strongly induced. Northern blot and RT-PCR analysis confirmed that MPI levels correlated with the length of the dark period; however, CPI expression was strong only after longer periods of darkness, suggesting a feedback loop (regulation mechanism) in response to dark-induced senescence. Prevention of cysteine protease activity in etiolated sprouts exposed to extended darkness could delay senescence until they emerge to light. PMID:27075731

  19. Dysregulation of Protease and Protease Inhibitors in a Mouse Model of Human Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudhan Budatha; Simone Silva; Teodoro Ignacio Montoya; Ayako Suzuki; Sheena Shah-Simpson; Cecilia Karin Wieslander; Masashi Yanagisawa; Ruth Ann Word; Hiromi Yanagisawa

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/-)) develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP) due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/-) mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa). V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS) 3, a major extrapancreatic tryp...

  20. Nidovirus papain-like proteases: multifunctional enzymes with protease, deubiquitinating and deISGylating activities

    OpenAIRE

    Mielech, Anna M.; Chen, Yafang; MESECAR, Andrew D.; Baker, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses and arteriviruses, members of the order Nidovirales, are positive strand RNA viruses that encode large replicase polyproteins that are processed by viral proteases to generate the nonstructural proteins which mediate viral RNA synthesis. The viral papain-like proteases (PLPs) are critical for processing the amino-terminal end of the replicase and are attractive targets for antiviral therapies. With the analysis of the papain-like protease of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome cor...

  1. Lung protease/anti-protease network and modulation of mucus production and surfactant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Descamps, Delphyne; Chignard, Michel; Touqui, Lhousseine; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2010-11-01

    Lung epithelium guarantees gas-exchange (performed in the alveoli) and protects from external insults (pathogens, pollutants…) present within inhaled air. Both functions are facilitated by secretions lining airway surface liquid, mucus (in the upper airways) and pulmonary surfactant (in the alveoli). Mucins, the main glycoproteins present within the mucus, are responsible for its rheologic properties and participate in lung defense mechanisms. In parallel, lung collectins are pattern recognition molecules present in pulmonary surfactant that also modulate lung defense. During chronic airways diseases, excessive protease activity can promote mucus hypersecretion and degradation of lung collectins and therefore contribute to the pathophysiology of these diseases. Importantly, secretion of local and systemic anti-proteases might be crucial to equilibrate the protease/anti-protease unbalance and therefore preserve the function of lung host defense compounds and airway surface liquid homeostasis. In this review we will present information relative to proteases able to modulate mucin production and lung collectin integrity, two important compounds of innate immune defense. One strategy to preserve physiological mucus production and collectin integrity during chronic airways diseases might be the over-expression of local 'alarm' anti-proteases such as SLPI and elafin. Interestingly, a cross-talk between lung collectins and anti-protease activity has recently been described, implicating the presence within the lung of a complex network between proteases, anti-proteases and pattern recognition molecules, which aims to keep or restore homeostasis in resting or inflamed lungs. PMID:20493919

  2. Antimalarial Synergy of Cysteine and Aspartic Protease Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Semenov, Andrey; Olson, Jed E.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that the Plasmodium falciparum cysteine protease falcipain and aspartic proteases plasmepsin I and plasmepsin II act cooperatively to hydrolyze hemoglobin as a source of amino acids for erythrocytic parasites. Inhibitors of each of these proteases have potent antimalarial effects. We have now evaluated the antimalarial effects of combinations of cysteine and aspartic protease inhibitors. When incubated with cultured P. falciparum parasites, cysteine and aspartic protease ...

  3. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Kailash C.; Rajnikant Dixit

    2012-01-01

    Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. ...

  4. Synthesis of amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Rachel K; Khan, Tanweer A; Olsen, David B; Sleebs, Brad E

    2016-06-14

    Aspartyl proteases are important pharmacological targets. Historically aspartyl proteases have been commonly targeted with transition state derived peptidomimetics. The strategy to develop aspartyl protease inhibitors has undertaken a dramatic paradigm shift in the last 10 years. The pharmaceutical industry in 2005 disclosed several scaffolds or "head groups" that prompted the field to move beyond peptidomimetic derived inhibitors. Since the discovery of the first amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitor, the amino hydantoin, industry and academia have positioned themselves for a foothold on the new molecular space, designing a variety of related "head groups". Both the design and synthetic efforts involved in constructing these scaffolds are varied and complex. Here we highlight the synthetic strategies used to access these amino heterocycle scaffolds. PMID:27143279

  5. Cysteine Proteases from Bloodfeeding Arthropod Ectoparasites

    OpenAIRE

    Sojka, Daniel; FRANCISCHETTI, IVO M. B.; Calvo, Eric; KOTSYFAKIS, MICHALIS

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been discovered in various bloodfeeding ectoparasites. Here, we assemble the available information about the function of these peptidases and reveal their role in hematophagy and parasite development. While most of the data shed light on key proteolytic events that play a role in arthropod physiology, we also report on the association of cysteine proteases with arthropod vectorial capacity. With emphasis on ticks, specifically Ixodes ricinus, we finally propose a model...

  6. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R; Simmons, Graham

    2015-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coron...

  7. Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    The enzymatic activity of a protease was electrically detected using nanopore recordings. A peptide substrate was tethered to microscale beads, and cleavage by the enzyme trypsin released a soluble fragment that was electrophoretically driven through the α-hemolysin protein pore, leading to detectable blockades in the ionic current. Owing to its simplicity, this approach to sense enzymatic activity may be applied to other proteases.

  8. Extracellular acid proteases produced by Saccharomycopsis lipolytica.

    OpenAIRE

    T. Yamada; Ogrydziak, D M

    1983-01-01

    Saccharomycopsis lipolytica CX161-1B produced at least three extracellular acid proteases during exponential growth in medium containing glycerol, Difco Proteose Peptone, and mineral salts at pH 3.4 (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.). Little extracellular acid protease activity was produced with glutamic acid as the sole nitrogen source, somewhat higher levels were obtained with peptone, and much higher levels were obtained with Difco Proteose Peptone. The relative amounts of the three prot...

  9. Learning the Languages of the Chloroplast: Retrograde Signaling and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Crisp, Peter; McQuinn, Ryan; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-04-29

    The chloroplast can act as an environmental sensor, communicating with the cell during biogenesis and operation to change the expression of thousands of proteins. This process, termed retrograde signaling, regulates expression in response to developmental cues and stresses that affect photosynthesis and yield. Recent advances have identified many signals and pathways-including carotenoid derivatives, isoprenes, phosphoadenosines, tetrapyrroles, and heme, together with reactive oxygen species and proteins-that build a communication network to regulate gene expression, RNA turnover, and splicing. However, retrograde signaling pathways have been viewed largely as a means of bilateral communication between organelles and nuclei, ignoring their potential to interact with hormone signaling and the cell as a whole to regulate plant form and function. Here, we discuss new findings on the processes by which organelle communication is initiated, transmitted, and perceived, not only to regulate chloroplastic processes but also to intersect with cellular signaling and alter physiological responses. PMID:26735063

  10. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Fagopyrum cymosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Lu, Chaolong; Shen, Qi; Yan, Yuying; Xu, Changjiang; Song, Chi

    2016-07-01

    Fagopyrum cymosum is a traditional medicinal plant. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Fagopyrum cymosum is presented. The total genome size is 160,546 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 32,598 bp, separated by large single copy (LSC) and small single copy (SSC) of 84,237 bp and 11,014 bp, respectively. Overall GC contents of the genome were 36.9%. The chloroplast genome harbors 126 annotated genes, including 91 protein coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and six rRNA genes. Eighteen genes contain one or two introns. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a clear evolutionary relationship among species of Caryophyllales. PMID:26119127

  11. The complete chloroplast genome of Torreya fargesii (Taxaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ke; Gao, Lei; Li, Jia; Chen, Shanshan; Su, Yingjuan; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Torreya fargesii (Taxaceae), a relic plant endemic to China, is presented in this study. The genome is 137 075 bp in length, with 35.47% average GC content. One copy of the large inverted repeats is lost from this genome. The T. fargesii chloroplast genome encodes 118 unique genes, in which trnI-CAU, trnQ-UUG, trnN-GUU are duplicated. Protein-coding, tRNA and rRNA genes represent 54.7%, 1.9% and 3.4% of the genome, respectively. There are 17 intron-containing genes, of which 6 are tRNA genes. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed a strong sister relationship between Torreya and Amentotaxus. PMID:27158868

  12. The complete chloroplast genome of North American ginseng, Panax quinquefolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zeng-Jie; Li, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    We report complete nucleotide sequence of the Panax quinquefolius chloroplast genome using next-generation sequencing technology. The genome size is 156 359 bp, including two inverted repeats (IRs) of 52 153 bp, separated by the large single-copy (LSC 86 184 bp) and small single-copy (SSC 18 081 bp) regions. This cp genome encodes 114 unigenes (80 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 30 tRNA genes), in which 18 are duplicated in the IR regions. Overall GC content of the genome is 38.08%. A phylogenomic analysis of the 10 complete chloroplast genomes from Araliaceae using Daucus carota from Apiaceae as outgroup showed that P. quinquefolius is closely related to the other two members of the genus Panax, P. ginseng and P. notoginseng. PMID:27158867

  13. Chloroplast engineering: boon for third - world countries as therapeutic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kumari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts are the site of photosynthesis in plants mostly seen in leaves and some eukaryotic algae that provides the primary sources of the world’s food productivity. Plastids of higher plants are generally semiautonomous with 120–150 kb genome. Chloroplast transformation has become an attractive alternative to nuclear gene transformation due to its advantages, high protein levels, the feasibility of expressing multiple proteins from polycistronic mRNAs, and gene containment through the lack of pollen transmission. The review presents the recent trends and methods for plastid genome engineering and transgene expression and summarizes the potential of plastid transformation in various fields of biotechnology and also as a source of therapeutic proteins.

  14. A radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid, high-throughput radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease has been developed using ion-exchange chromatography performed in 96-well filtration plates. The assay monitors the activity of the HIV-1 protease on the radiolabeled form of a heptapeptide substrate, [tyrosyl-3,5-3H]Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2, which is based on the p17-p24 cleavage site found in the viral polyprotein substrate Pr55gag. Specific cleavage of this uncharged heptapeptide substrate by HIV-1 protease releases the anionic product [tyrosyl-3,5-3H]Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr, which is retained upon minicolumns of the anion-exchange resin AG1-X8. Protease activity is determined from the recovery of this radiolabeled product following elution with formic acid. This facile and highly sensitive assay may be utilized for steady-state kinetic analysis of the protease, for measurements of enzyme activity during its purification, and as a routine assay for the evaluation of protease inhibitors from natural product or synthetic sources

  15. Localized hypermutation and associated gene losses in legume chloroplast genomes

    OpenAIRE

    KAVANAGH, THOMAS; WOLFE, KENNETH; POWELL, ANTOINETTE

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Point mutations result from errors made during DNA replication or repair, so they are usually expected to be homogeneous across all regions of a genome. However, we have found a region of chloroplast DNA in plants related to sweetpea (Lathyrus) whose local point mutation rate is at least 20 times higher than elsewhere in the same molecule. There are very few precedents for such heterogeneity in any genome, and we suspect that the hypermutable region may be subject to an unusual p...

  16. Protein-Induced Modulation of Chloroplast Membrane Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Machettira, Anu B.; Groß, Lucia E.; Tillmann, Bodo; Weis, Benjamin L.; Englich, Gisela; Sommer, Maik S.; Königer, Martina; Schleiff, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Organelles are surrounded by membranes with a distinct lipid and protein composition. While it is well established that lipids affect protein functioning and vice versa, it has been only recently suggested that elevated membrane protein concentrations may affect the shape and organization of membranes. We therefore analyzed the effects of high chloroplast envelope protein concentrations on membrane structures using an in vivo approach with protoplasts. Transient expression of outer envelope p...

  17. Chloroplast gene sequences and the study of plant evolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Clegg, M T

    1993-01-01

    A large body of sequence data has accumulated for the chloroplast-encoded gene ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcL) as the result of a cooperative effort involving many laboratories. The data span all seed plants, including most major lineages from the angiosperms, and as such they provide an unprecedented opportunity to study plant evolutionary history. The full analysis of this large data set poses many problems and opportunities for plant evolutionary biologists and for bi...

  18. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  19. Chloroplast Phylogenomics Indicates that Ginkgo biloba Is Sister to Cycads

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Huang, Ya-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic studies have not yet reached a consensus on the placement of Ginkgoales, which is represented by the only living species, Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo). At least six discrepant placements of ginkgo have been proposed. This study aimed to use the chloroplast phylogenomic approach to examine possible factors that lead to such disagreeing placements. We found the sequence types used in the analyses as the most critical factor in the conflicting placements of ginkgo. ...

  20. Non-canonical transit peptide for import into the chloroplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras, Stéphane; Salvi, Daniel; Ferro, Myriam; Grunwald, Didier; Garin, Jérôme; Joyard, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert

    2002-12-01

    The large majority of plastid proteins are nuclear-encoded and, thus, must be imported within these organelles. Unlike most of the outer envelope proteins, targeting of proteins to all other plastid compartments (inner envelope membrane, stroma, and thylakoid) is strictly dependent on the presence of a cleavable transit sequence in the precursor N-terminal region. In this paper, we describe the identification of a new envelope protein component (ceQORH) and demonstrate that its subcellular localization is limited to the inner membrane of the chloroplast envelope. Immunopurification, microsequencing of the natural envelope protein and cloning of the corresponding full-length cDNA demonstrated that this protein is not processed in the N-terminal region during its targeting to the inner envelope membrane. Transient expression experiments in plant cells were performed with truncated forms of the ceQORH protein fused to the green fluorescent protein. These experiments suggest that neither the N-terminal nor the C-terminal are essential for chloroplastic localization of the ceQORH protein. These observations are discussed in the frame of the endosymbiotic theory of chloroplast evolution and suggest that a domain of the ceQORH bacterial ancestor may have evolved so as to exclude the general requirement of an N-terminal plastid transit sequence. PMID:12368288

  1. Posttranslational modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M; Dahlström, Käthe M; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A; Mulo, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants' survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP(+) OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research. PMID:25301888

  2. Chloroplast quality control - balancing energy production and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, Jesse D

    2016-10-01

    Contents 36 I. 36 II. 37 III. 37 IV. 38 V. 39 VI. 40 VII. 40 40 References 40 SUMMARY: All organisms require the ability to sense their surroundings and adapt. Such capabilities allow them to thrive in a wide range of habitats. This is especially true for plants, which are sessile and have to be genetically equipped to withstand every change in their environment. Plants and other eukaryotes use their energy-producing organelles (i.e. mitochondria and chloroplasts) as such sensors. In response to a changing cellular or external environment, these organelles can emit 'retrograde' signals that alter gene expression and/or cell physiology. This signaling is important in plants, fungi, and animals and impacts diverse cellular functions including photosynthesis, energy production/storage, stress responses, growth, cell death, ageing, and tumor progression. Originally, chloroplast retrograde signals in plants were known to lead to the reprogramming of nuclear transcription. New research, however, has pointed to additional posttranslational mechanisms that lead to chloroplast regulation and turnover in response to stress. Such mechanisms involve singlet oxygen, ubiquitination, the 26S proteasome, and cellular degradation machinery. PMID:27533783

  3. Carbonic anhydrase activity in isolated chloroplasts of chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a new assay of carbonic anhydrase, NaH14CO3 solution at the bottom of a sealed vessel releases 14CO3 which diffuses to the top of the vessel to be assimilated by actively photosynthesizing Chlamydomonas cells. The assay is initiated by illuminating cells and stopped by turning the light off and killing the cells with acid. Enzyme activity was estimated from acid stable radioactivity above the uncatalyzed background level. With bovine carbonic anhydrase, 1.5 Wilbur Anderson Unit (WAU) can be consistantly measured at 5-6 fold above background. Sonicated whole cells of air adapted wild type (+)gave 741.1 ± 12.4 WAU/mg chl. Intact washed cells of mixotrophically grown wall-less mutant CWD(-) and a high CO2 requiring wall-less double mutant CIA-3/CW15 (-) gave 7.1 ± 1.9 and 2.8 ± 7.8 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplasts isolated from CWD and CIA-3/CW15 and subsequently disrupted gave 64.0 ± 14.7 and 2.8 ± 3.2 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplast sonicate from another wall-less mutant CW15(-) gave activity comparable to CWD. Thus on a chlorophyll basis, enzyme activity in chloroplasts from mixotrophically grown cells is about 1/10th of the level found in air adapted wild type cells. CIA-3 seems to lack this activity

  4. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  5. Chloroplast ultrastructure in leaves of Cucumis sativus chlorophyll mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Palczewska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The developing and young leaves of Cucumis sativus chlorophyll mutants are yellow, when mature they become green and do not differ in their colour from those of control plants. The mesophyll of yellow leaves contains a diversiform plastid population with a varying degree of defectiveness, which is mainly manifested in the reduction or disorganization of the typical thylakoid system. DNA areas, ribosome-like particles and aggregates of electron-dense material are preserved in the stroma of mutated plastids. Starch grains are deficient. Apart from mutated plastids, chloroplasts with a normal structure, as in control plants, were also observed.The leaf greening process is accompanied by a reconstruction and rearrangement of the inner chloroplast lamellar system and an ability to accumulate starch. However, in the mutant chloroplasts as compared with control-plant ones, an irregular arrangement of grana and reduced number of inter-grana thylakoids can be seen. An osmiophilic substance stored in the stroma of mutated plastids and the vesicles formed from an internal plastid membrane take part in restoration of the membrane system.

  6. Combined effects of light and water stress on chloroplast volume regulation.

    OpenAIRE

    McCain, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance technique was used to measure changes in the water content of Acer platanoides chloroplasts in leaf discs that had reached osmotic equilibrium with external solutions either in the dark or under exposure to light. Results showed that chloroplast volume regulation (CVR) maintained constant water content in the chloroplasts over a range of water potentials in the dark, but CVR failed when the water potential fell below a critical value. The critical potential was lo...

  7. Exploring photosynthesis evolution by comparative analysis of metabolic networks between chloroplasts and photosynthetic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Jing

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplasts descended from cyanobacteria and have a drastically reduced genome following an endosymbiotic event. Many genes of the ancestral cyanobacterial genome have been transferred to the plant nuclear genome by horizontal gene transfer. However, a selective set of metabolism pathways is maintained in chloroplasts using both chloroplast genome encoded and nuclear genome encoded enzymes. As an organelle specialized for carrying out photosynthesis, does the chloroplast metabolic network have properties adapted for higher efficiency of photosynthesis? We compared metabolic network properties of chloroplasts and prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms, mostly cyanobacteria, based on metabolic maps derived from genome data to identify features of chloroplast network properties that are different from cyanobacteria and to analyze possible functional significance of those features. Results The properties of the entire metabolic network and the sub-network that consists of reactions directly connected to the Calvin Cycle have been analyzed using hypergraph representation. Results showed that the whole metabolic networks in chloroplast and cyanobacteria both possess small-world network properties. Although the number of compounds and reactions in chloroplasts is less than that in cyanobacteria, the chloroplast's metabolic network has longer average path length, a larger diameter, and is Calvin Cycle -centered, indicating an overall less-dense network structure with specific and local high density areas in chloroplasts. Moreover, chloroplast metabolic network exhibits a better modular organization than cyanobacterial ones. Enzymes involved in the same metabolic processes tend to cluster into the same module in chloroplasts. Conclusion In summary, the differences in metabolic network properties may reflect the evolutionary changes during endosymbiosis that led to the improvement of the photosynthesis efficiency in higher plants. Our

  8. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  9. Blocking the Metabolism of Starch Breakdown Products in Arabidopsis Leaves Triggers Chloroplast Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Stettler, Michaela; Eicke, Simona; Mettler, Tabea; Messerli, Gaëlle; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2009-01-01

    In most plants, a large fraction of photo-assimilated carbon is stored in the chloroplasts during the day as starch and remobilized during the subsequent night to support metabolism. Mutations blocking either starch synthesis or starch breakdown in Arabidopsis thaliana reduce plant growth. Maltose is the major product of starch breakdown exported from the chloroplast at night. The maltose excess 1 mutant (mex1), which lacks the chloroplast envelope maltose transporter, accumulates high levels...

  10. Development of the first chloroplast microsatellite loci in Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae) 1

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Xiang Xie; Ming-Shui Zhao; Cheng-Xin Fu; Yun-Peng Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study: To investigate population genetics, phylogeography, and cultivar origin of Ginkgo biloba, chloroplast microsatellite primers were developed. Methods and Results: Twenty-one chloroplast microsatellite markers were identified referring to the two published chloroplast genomes of G. biloba. Polymorphisms were assessed on four natural populations from the two refugia in China. Eight loci were detected to be polymorphic in these populations. The number of alleles per locus...

  11. CDP1, a novel component of chloroplast division site positioning system in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhang; Yong Hu; Jingjing Jia; Dapeng Li; Runjie Zhang; Hongbo Gao; Yikun He

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts are plant-specific organelles that evolved from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria. They divide through binary fission. Selection of the chloroplast division site is pivotal for the symmetric chloroplast division. In E. coli, positioning of the division site at the midpoint of the cell is regulated by dynamic oscillation of the Min system, which includes MinC, MinD and MinE. Homologs of Mind and MinE in plants are involved in chloroplast division. The homolog of MinC still has not been identified in higher plants. However, an FtsZ-like protein, ARC3, was found to be involved in chloroplast division site positioning. Here, we report that chloroplast division site positioning 1 (AtCDP1) is a novel chloroplast division protein involved in chloroplast division site placement in Arabidopsis. AtCDP1 was dis-covered by screening an Arabidopsis cDNA expression library in bacteria for colonies with a cell division phenotype. AtCDP1 is exclusively expressed in young green tissues in Arabidopsis. Elongated chloroplasts with multiple division sites were observed in the loss-of-function cdpl mutant. Overexpression of AtCDPI caused a chloroplast division phe-notype too. Protein interaction assays suggested that AtCDP1 may mediate the chloroplast division site positioning through the interaction with ARC3. Overall, our results indicate that AtCDP1 is a novel component of the chloroplast division site positioning system, and the working mechanism of this system is different from that of the traditional MinCDE system in prokaryotic cells.

  12. High-Throughput Sequencing of Three Lemnoideae (Duckweeds) Chloroplast Genomes from Total DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenqin; Messing, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Background Chloroplast genomes provide a wealth of information for evolutionary and population genetic studies. Chloroplasts play a particularly important role in the adaption for aquatic plants because they float on water and their major surface is exposed continuously to sunlight. The subfamily of Lemnoideae represents such a collection of aquatic species that because of photosynthesis represents one of the fastest growing plant species on earth. Methods We sequenced the chloroplast genomes...

  13. Effect of growth temperature on chloroplast structure and activity in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, R M; Critchley, C; Bain, J M; Nott, R

    1978-08-01

    Seedlings of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Abyssinian) were grown at constant temperature and light intensity and the properties and structure of chloroplasts in the primary leaf were examined. Seventeen growth temperatures ranging from 2 to 37 C were employed. Three major effects of the growth temperature were seen. (a) At very low and high growth temperatures chloroplast biogenesis was inhibited. This occurred in plants grown at temperatures above 32 C while growth at 2 C resulted in a mixed population of pale yellow, pale green, and green plants. (b) Chloroplasts were produced at all other temperatures tested but growth temperatures within a few degrees of those inhibitory to chloroplast development resulted in chloroplasts with abnormal properties and structure. Chloroplasts in the green plants grown at 2 and 5 C showed a number of structural peculiarities, including a characteristic crimping of granal thylakoids. Photoreductive activity, measured using ferricyanide as the Hill oxidant in the presence of gramicidin D, was high, but this activity in chloroplasts isolated from plants grown at 2 C showed thermal inactivation at temperatures 5 degrees lower than was the case with plants grown at higher temperatures. High growth temperatures (30 to 32 C) yielded chloroplasts with reduced photoreductive activity and a tendency toward the formation of large grana and disorientation of the lamellar systems with respect to one another. Chloroplasts of the most affected plants (grown at 32 C) frequently contained a very large elongated granum, with narrow intrathylakoid spaces. (c) Photoreductive activity was not constant at intermediate growth temperatures but steadily declined with decreasing growth temperatures between 27 and 11 C. Some alterations in chloroplast structure were also observed.The changes in chloroplast activity and structure indicate that acclimation to temperature takes place over the entire temperature range in which chloroplast development is

  14. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  15. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  16. Protease inhibitors targeting coronavirus and filovirus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H; Renslo, Adam R; Simmons, Graham

    2015-04-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  17. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report, August 1995--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1997-06-17

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focused on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The research focused on the isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  18. Sonication-based isolation and enrichment of Chlorella protothecoides chloroplasts for illumina genome sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelova, Angelina [University of Arizona; Park, Sang-Hycuk [University of Arizona; Kyndt, John [Bellevue University; Fitzsimmons, Kevin [University of Arizona; Brown, Judith K [University of Arizona

    2013-09-01

    With the increasing world demand for biofuel, a number of oleaginous algal species are being considered as renewable sources of oil. Chlorella protothecoides Krüger synthesizes triacylglycerols (TAGs) as storage compounds that can be converted into renewable fuel utilizing an anabolic pathway that is poorly understood. The paucity of algal chloroplast genome sequences has been an important constraint to chloroplast transformation and for studying gene expression in TAGs pathways. In this study, the intact chloroplasts were released from algal cells using sonication followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, resulting in a 2.36-fold enrichment of chloroplasts from C. protothecoides, based on qPCR analysis. The C. protothecoides chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform and found to be 84,576 Kb in size (8.57 Kb) in size, with a GC content of 30.8 %. This is the first report of an optimized protocol that uses a sonication step, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, to release and enrich intact chloroplasts from a microalga (C. prototheocoides) of sufficient quality to permit chloroplast genome sequencing with high coverage, while minimizing nuclear genome contamination. The approach is expected to guide chloroplast isolation from other oleaginous algal species for a variety of uses that benefit from enrichment of chloroplasts, ranging from biochemical analysis to genomics studies.

  19. Phosphorus compounds, proteins, nuclease and acid phosphatase activities in isolated spinach chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mikulska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with attempts to elaborate a simple method of spinach chloroplast isolation ensuring a high proportion of intact chloroplasts. We obtained 3 preparations of isolated chloroplasts. Several preliminary analyses of the obtained chloroplast fraction were also performed. Phosphorus compounds, total protein and the enzyme activities of RNase, DNase and GPase were determined. We found: 0,36-0,59% of RNA, 0,19-0,24% of DNA, 2,1-2,9% of phospholipids and 26-28% of protein. RNase activity was very high.

  20. New soluble ATP-dependent protease, Ti, in Escherichia coli that is distinct from protease La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. coli must contain other ATP-requiring proteolytic systems in addition to protease La (the lon gene product). A new ATP-dependent protease was purified from lon cells which lack protease La, as shown by immuno-blotting. This enzyme hydrolyzes [3H]casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP (or dATP) and Mg2+. Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs, other nucleoside triphosphates and AMP can not replace ATP. Therefore, ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolysis. The enzyme appears to be a serine protease, but also contains essential thiol residues. Unlike protease La, it is not inhibited by vanadate, heparin, or the defective R9 subunit of protease La. On gel filtration, this enzyme has an apparent Mr of 340,000 and is comprised of two components of 190,000D and 130,000D, which can be separated by phosphocellulose chromatography. By themselves, these components do not show ATP-dependent proteolysis, but when mixed, full activity is restored. These finding and similar ones of Maurizi and Gottesman indicate that E. coli contain two soluble ATP-dependent proteases, which function by different mechanisms. This new enzyme may contribute to the rapid breakdown of abnormal polypeptides or of normal proteins during starvation. The authors propose to name it protease Ti

  1. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon- cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes [3H]methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg2+. ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles

  2. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  3. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  4. Whole genome sequencing of enriched chloroplast DNA using the Illumina GAII platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Lara D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete chloroplast genome sequences provide a valuable source of molecular markers for studies in molecular ecology and evolution of plants. To obtain complete genome sequences, recent studies have made use of the polymerase chain reaction to amplify overlapping fragments from conserved gene loci. However, this approach is time consuming and can be more difficult to implement where gene organisation differs among plants. An alternative approach is to first isolate chloroplasts and then use the capacity of high-throughput sequencing to obtain complete genome sequences. We report our findings from studies of the latter approach, which used a simple chloroplast isolation procedure, multiply-primed rolling circle amplification of chloroplast DNA, Illumina Genome Analyzer II sequencing, and de novo assembly of paired-end sequence reads. Results A modified rapid chloroplast isolation protocol was used to obtain plant DNA that was enriched for chloroplast DNA, but nevertheless contained nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Multiply-primed rolling circle amplification of this mixed template produced sufficient quantities of chloroplast DNA, even when the amount of starting material was small, and improved the template quality for Illumina Genome Analyzer II (hereafter Illumina GAII sequencing. We demonstrate, using independent samples of karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus, that there is high fidelity in the sequence obtained from this template. Although less than 20% of our sequenced reads could be mapped to chloroplast genome, it was relatively easy to assemble complete chloroplast genome sequences from the mixture of nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast reads. Conclusions We report successful whole genome sequencing of chloroplast DNA from karaka, obtained efficiently and with high fidelity.

  5. Two interacting coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 and PMI2, maintain the chloroplast photorelocation movement velocity in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-01-01

    Chloroplasts move toward weak light (accumulation response) and away from strong light (avoidance response). The fast and accurate movement of chloroplasts in response to ambient light conditions is essential for efficient photosynthesis and photodamage prevention in chloroplasts. Here, we report that two Arabidopsis mutants, weak chloroplast movement under blue light 1 (web1) and web2, are defective in both the avoidance and the accumulation responses. Map-based cloning revealed that both ge...

  6. Subtilisin-like proteases in nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Catherine B; Jin, Jingmin; McReynolds, Larry A

    2007-09-01

    Cleavage by subtilisin-like proteases (subtilases) is an essential step in post-translational processing of proteins found in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Our knowledge of the diversity of this protease family in nematodes is aided by the rapid increase in sequence information, especially from the Brugia malayi genome project. Genetic studies of the subtilases in Caenorhabitis elegans give valuable insight into the biological function of these proteases in other nematode species. In this review, we focus on the subtilases in filarial nematodes as well as other parasitic and free-living nematodes in comparison to what is known in C. elegans. Topics to be addressed include expansion and diversity of the subtilase gene family during evolution, enhanced complexity created by alternative RNA splicing, molecular and biochemical characterization of the different subtilases and the challenges of designing subtilase-specific inhibitors for parasitic nematodes. PMID:17570539

  7. Effect of alkyl-N-phenylcarbamates on photochemical activity of spinach chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is aimed to investigate the effect of alkyl-N-phenylcarbamates on photosynthetic electron transport in spinach chloroplasts, to determine site of action in the photosynthetic apparatus of spinach chloroplasts and to find correlations between their structure and biological activity. (authors)

  8. Treatment with antibiotics that interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis inhibits chloroplast division in the desmid Closterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Charophytes is a green algal group closely related to land plants. We investigated the effects of antibiotics that interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis on chloroplast division in the desmid Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex. To detect cells just after division, we used colchicine, which inhibits Closterium cell elongation after division. Although normal Closterium cells had two chloroplasts before and after cell division, cells treated with ampicillin, D-cycloserine, or fosfomycin had only one chloroplast after cell division, suggesting that the cells divided without chloroplast division. The antibiotics bacitracin and vancomycin showed no obvious effect. Electron microscopic observation showed that irregular-shaped chloroplasts existed in ampicillin-treated Closterium cells. Because antibiotic treatments resulted in the appearance of long cells with irregular chloroplasts and cell death, we counted cell types in the culture. The results suggested that cells with one chloroplast appeared first and then a huge chloroplast was generated that inhibited cell division, causing elongation followed by cell death.

  9. The Unicellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an Experimental System to Study Chloroplast RNA Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelsen, J.; Kück, U.

    Chloroplasts are typical organelles of photoautotrophic eukaryotic cells which drive a variety of functions, including photosynthesis. For many years the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as an experimental organism for studying photosynthetic processes. The recent development of molecular tools for this organism together with efficient methods of genetic analysis and the availability of many photosynthesis mutants has now made this alga a powerful model system for the analysis of chloroplast biogenesis. For example, techniques have been developed to transfer recombinant DNA into both the nuclear and the chloroplast genome. This allows both complementation tests and analyses of gene functions in vivo. Moreover, site-specific DNA recombinations in the chloroplast allow targeted gene disruption experiments which enable a "reverse genetics" to be performed. The potential of the algal system for the study of chloroplast biogenesis is illustrated in this review by the description of regulatory systems of gene expression involved in organelle biogenesis. One example concerns the regulation of trans-splicing of chloroplast mRNAs, a process which is controlled by both multiple nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded factors. The second example involves the stabilization of chloroplast mRNAs. The available data lead us predict distinct RNA elements, which interact with trans-acting factors to protect the RNA against nucleolytic attacks.

  10. Enteroviral proteases: structure, host interactions and pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Olli H; Svedin, Emma; Kapell, Sebastian; Nurminen, Anssi; Hytönen, Vesa P; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin

    2016-07-01

    Enteroviruses are common human pathogens, and infections are particularly frequent in children. Severe infections can lead to a variety of diseases, including poliomyelitis, aseptic meningitis, myocarditis and neonatal sepsis. Enterovirus infections have also been implicated in asthmatic exacerbations and type 1 diabetes. The large disease spectrum of the closely related enteroviruses may be partially, but not fully, explained by differences in tissue tropism. The molecular mechanisms by which enteroviruses cause disease are poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence that the two enteroviral proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) , are important mediators of pathology. These proteases perform the post-translational proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein, but they also cleave several host-cell proteins in order to promote the production of new virus particles, as well as to evade the cellular antiviral immune responses. Enterovirus-associated processing of cellular proteins may also contribute to pathology, as elegantly demonstrated by the 2A(pro) -mediated cleavage of dystrophin in cardiomyocytes contributing to Coxsackievirus-induced cardiomyopathy. It is likely that improved tools to identify targets for these proteases will reveal additional host protein substrates that can be linked to specific enterovirus-associated diseases. Here, we discuss the function of the enteroviral proteases in the virus replication cycle and review the current knowledge regarding how these proteases modulate the infected cell in order to favour virus replication, including ways to avoid detection by the immune system. We also highlight new possibilities for the identification of protease-specific cellular targets and thereby a way to discover novel mechanisms contributing to disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27145174

  11. Chloroplast genetics of chlamydomonas. II. Mapping by cosegregation frequency analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents segregation and cosegregation data for a set of 15 chloroplast genes of Chlamydomonas, and uses these data to generate a linear map of the chloroplast genome. The data were derived from pedigree analysis of a total of 1596 zoospore clones resulting from 12 crosses in each of which 4 to 7 pairs of chloroplast alleles were segregating. The crosses are a subset of those previously described. By means of pedigree analysis, Type III segregations (nonreciprocal conversion-like events) were distinguished from Type III segregations (reciprocal events). The average frequency of Type II segregation was found to be the same for all 15 genes, indicating randomness of this event with respect to map location. Type III segregations occurred with a different and characteristic frequency for each gene, and were interpreted as a measure of the distance of each gene from the postulated centromere-like attachment point. Cosegregations, involving two or more genes, occurred with frequencies characteristic of the particular genes and much lower than expected for the product of single-gene events, indicating strong positive interference. Pairwise cosegregation frequencies provided unambiguous data for the gene order, confirmed by cosegregation runs of three or more genes. Apparent lengths of cosegregation runs, as fractions of the total map, indicate much longer stretches of gene conversion-like events than have been reported for other genetic systems. Comparisons of cosegregation frequencies in cross 20 after 15'', 30'', and 15'' uv irradiation of the mt+ before mating, indicate little if any consistent effect of this irradiation on segregation events

  12. Chloroplasts Are Central Players in Sugar-Induced Leaf Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dingenen, Judith; De Milde, Liesbeth; Vermeersch, Mattias; Maleux, Katrien; De Rycke, Riet; De Bruyne, Michiel; Storme, Véronique; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Dhondt, Stijn; Inzé, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Leaves are the plant's powerhouses, providing energy for all organs through sugar production during photosynthesis. However, sugars serve not only as a metabolic energy source for sink tissues but also as signaling molecules, affecting gene expression through conserved signaling pathways to regulate plant growth and development. Here, we describe an in vitro experimental assay, allowing one to alter the sucrose (Suc) availability during early Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development, with the aim to identify the affected cellular and molecular processes. The transfer of seedlings to Suc-containing medium showed a profound effect on leaf growth by stimulating cell proliferation and postponing the transition to cell expansion. Furthermore, rapidly after transfer to Suc, mesophyll cells contained fewer and smaller plastids, which are irregular in shape and contain fewer starch granules compared with control mesophyll cells. Short-term transcriptional responses after transfer to Suc revealed the repression of well-known sugar-responsive genes and multiple genes encoded by the plastid, on the one hand, and up-regulation of a GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER (GPT2), on the other hand. Mutant gpt2 seedlings showed no stimulation of cell proliferation and no repression of chloroplast-encoded transcripts when transferred to Suc, suggesting that GPT2 plays a critical role in the Suc-mediated effects on early leaf growth. Our findings, therefore, suggest that induction of GPT2 expression by Suc increases the import of glucose-6-phosphate into the plastids that would repress chloroplast-encoded transcripts, restricting chloroplast differentiation. Retrograde signaling from the plastids would then delay the transition to cell expansion and stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:26932234

  13. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  14. Activation of ADAM 12 protease by copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency......: elimination of the ADAM 12 cysteine switch by a point mutation in the propeptide had no effect on copper activation, whereas mutation of an unpaired cysteine residue in the catalytic domain resulted in a mutant form of ADAM 12-S that was insensitive to copper. This suggests a multi-step activation mechanism...

  15. Hydrolysis of Fish Protein by Analkaline Protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cod muscle protein was hydrolyzed by an alkaline protease in our study. The influences of hydrolysis temperature,fish protein concentration,and ratio of protease addition to protein amount on its degree of hy drolysis (DH) of protein were studied in details by applying dual quadratic rotary combinational design. The final results showed that more than 84% cod muscle protein could be hydrolyzed and recovered. Cod protein hydrolysate thus obtained had a balanced amino acid composition and mainly consisted of small peptides with molecule weight less than 6900 dalton.

  16. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Curcuma flaviflora (Curcuma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Deng, Jiabin; Li, Yangyi; Gao, Gang; Ding, Chunbang; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Yonghong; Yang, Ruiwu

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome of Curcuma flaviflora, a medicinal plant in Southeast Asia, was sequenced. The genome size was 160 478 bp in length, with 36.3% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 26 946 bp were separated by a large single copy (LSC) of 88 008 bp and a small single copy (SSC) of 18 578 bp, respectively. The cp genome contained 132 annotated genes, including 79 protein coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. And 19 of these genes were duplicated in inverted repeat regions. PMID:26367332

  17. Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Protein in Barley Chloroplast Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannangara, C. G.; Jense, C J

    1975-01-01

    Biotin localized in barley chloroplast lamellae is covalently bound to a single protein with an approximate molecular weight of 21000. It contains one mole of biotin per mole of protein and functions as a carboxyl carrier in the acetyl-CoA carboxylase reaction. The protein was obtained by...... solubilization of the lamellae in phenol/acetic acid/8 M urea. Feeding barley seedlings with [14C]-biotin revealed that the vitamin is not degraded into respiratory substrates by the plant, but is specifically incorporated into biotin carboxyl carrier protein....

  18. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Hibiscus syriacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hae-Yun; Kim, Joon-Hyeok; Kim, Sea-Hyun; Park, Ji-Min; Lee, Hyoshin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Hibiscus syriacus L. is presented in this study. The genome is composed of 161 019 bp in length, with a typical circular structure containing a pair of inverted repeats of 25 745 bp of length separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 89 698 bp and 19 831 bp of length, respectively. The overall GC content is 36.8%. One hundred and fourteen genes were annotated, including 81 protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA genes and 29 transfer RNA genes. PMID:26357910

  19. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  20. Chloroplast transformation of Platymonas (Tetraselmis subcordiformis with the bar gene as selectable marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Cui

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to establish a chloroplast transformation technique for Platymonas (Tetraselmis subcordiformis. Employing the gfp gene as a reporter and the bar gene as a selectable marker, transformation vectors of P. subcordiformis chloroplast were constructed with endogenous fragments rrn16S-trnI (left and trnA-rrn23S (right as a recombination site of the chloroplast genome. The plasmids were transferred into P. subcordiformis via particle bombardment. Confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated that the green fluorescence protein was localized in the chloroplast of P. subcordiformis, confirming the activity of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii promoter. Cells transformed with the bar gene were selected using the herbicide Basta. Resistant colonies were analyzed by PCR and Southern blotting, and the results indicated that the bar gene was successfully integrated into the chloroplast genome via homologous recombination. The technique will improve genetic engineering of this alga.

  1. Update on Chloroplast Research: New Tools, New Topics, and New Trends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ute Armbruster; Paolo Pesaresi; Mathias Pribil; Alexander Hertle; Dario Leister

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts, the green differentiation form of plastids, are the sites of photosynthesis and other important plant functions. Genetic and genomic technologies have greatly boosted the rate of discovery and functional characterization of chloroplast proteins during the past decade. Indeed, data obtained using high-throughput methodologies, in particular proteomics and transcriptomics, are now routinely used to assign functions to chloroplast proteins. Our knowledge of many chloroplast processes, notably photosynthesis and photorespiration, has reached such an advanced state that biotechnological approaches to crop improvement now seem feasible. Meanwhile, efforts to identify the entire complement of chloroplast proteins and their interactions are progressing rapidly, making the organelle a prime target for systems biology research in plants.

  2. Importance of lysosomal cysteine proteases in lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman Harold A; Wolters Paul J

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The human lysosomal cysteine proteases are a family of 11 proteases whose members include cathepsins B, C, H, L, and S. The biology of these proteases was largely ignored for decades because of their lysosomal location and the belief that their function was limited to the terminal degradation of proteins. In the past 10 years, this view has changed as these proteases have been found to have specific functions within cells. This review highlights some of these functions, specifically ...

  3. Centenary celebrations article: Cysteine proteases of human malaria parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Kailash C.

    2011-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new drugs against malaria, which takes millions of lives annually. Cysteine proteases are potential new drug targets, especially when current drugs are showing resistance. Falcipains and vivapains are well characterized cysteine proteases of P. falciparum and P. vivax, respectively. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases specific genes have suggested their roles in hemoglobin hydrolysis. In P. falciparum, falcipain-2 and falci...

  4. A Novel Bioluminescent Protease Assay Using Engineered Firefly Luciferase

    OpenAIRE

    Wigdal, Susan S.; Anderson, Jessica L; Vidugiris, Gediminas J; Shultz, John; Wood, Keith V.; Fan, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of disease processes. Understanding their biological functions underpins the efforts of drug discovery. We have developed a bioluminescent protease assay using a circularly permuted form of firefly luciferase, wherein the native enzyme termini were joined by a peptide containing a protease site of interest. Protease cleavage of these mutant luciferases greatly activates the enzyme, typically over 100 fold. The mutant luciferase substrates are easily...

  5. High Throughput Substrate Phage Display for Protease Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnikov, Boris; Cieplak, Piotr; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    The interplay between a protease and its substrates is controlled at many different levels, including coexpression, colocalization, binding driven by ancillary contacts, and the presence of natural inhibitors. Here we focus on the most basic parameter that guides substrate recognition by a protease, the recognition specificity at the catalytic cleft. An understanding of this substrate specificity can be used to predict the putative substrates of a protease, to design protease activated imagin...

  6. The Role of Protease Activity in ErbB Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Blobel, Carl P; Carpenter, Graham; Freeman, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Proteases are now recognized as having an active role in a variety of processes aside from their recognized metabolic role in protein degradation. Within the ErbB system of ligands and receptors proteases are known to be necessary for the generation of soluble ligands from transmembrane precursers and for the processing of the ErbB4 receptor, such that its intracellular domain is translocated to the nucleus. There are two protease activities involved in the events: proteases that cleave withi...

  7. Comparative Study of Dermatophytic Fungi for Extra Cellular Proteases Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchita Chaturvedi; Sonal Pathak; Ruchi Upadhyay; Shweta Dubey

    2013-01-01

    Fungi are known to produce proteases of different kind. The dermatphytic fungal strains were isolated from human skin tissues for extra cellular proteases efficacy. The present study deals with purification, estimation and comparison of extracellular proteases from five fungal species. (Fusarium sp., Curvularia sp. , Fumigatus Sp. , Aspergillus Sp. and Mucor Sp.). All the five fungal strains showed good amount of extra cellular protease activity in terms of unit total protein content. By test...

  8. Predicting protein function from structure: Unique structural features of proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Stawiski, Eric W.; Baucom, Albion E.; Lohr, Scott C.; Gregoret, Lydia M.

    2000-01-01

    We have noted consistent structural similarities among unrelated proteases. In comparison with other proteins of similar size, proteases have smaller than average surface areas, smaller radii of gyration, and higher Cα densities. These findings imply that proteases are, as a group, more tightly packed than other proteins. There are also notable differences in secondary structure content between these two groups of proteins: proteases have fewer helices and more loops. We speculate that both h...

  9. YGL9, encoding the putative chloroplast signal recognition particle 43 kDa protein in rice, is involved in chloroplast development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-wei; LI Yun-feng; LING Ying-hua; SANG Xian-chun; HE Guang-hua; ZHANG Tian-quan; XING Ya-di; ZENG Xiao-qin; WANG Ling; LIU Zhong-xian; SHI Jun-qiong; ZHU Xiao-yan; MA Ling

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear-encoded light-harvesting chlorophyla/b-binding proteins (LHCPs) are speciifcaly translocated from the stroma into the thylakoid membrane through the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) pathway. The cpSRP is composed of a cpSRP43 protein and a cpSRP54 protein, and it forms a soluble transit complex with LHCP in the chloroplast stroma. Here, we identiifed theYGL9gene that is predicted to encode the probable rice cpSRP43 protein from a rice yelow-green leaf mutant. A phylogenetic tree showed that an important conserved protein family, cpSRP43, is present in almost al green photosynthetic organisms such as higher plants and green algae. Sequence analysis showed that YGL9 comprises a chloroplast transit peptide, three chromodomains and four ankyrin repeats, and the chromodomains and ankyrin repeats are probably involved in protein-protein interactions. Subcelular localization showed that YGL9 is localized in the chloroplast. Expression pattern analysis indicated thatYGL9is mainly expressed in green leaf sheaths and leaves. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of genes associated with pigment metabolism, chloroplast development and photosynthesis were distinctly affected in theygl9mutant. These results indicated thatYGL9 is possibly involved in pigment metabolism, chloroplast development and photosynthesis in rice.

  10. Chloroplast genome sequence of the moss Tortula ruralis: gene content, polymorphism, and structural arrangement relative to other green plant chloroplast genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Paul G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed species in the moss family Pottiaceae, is increasingly used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of T. ruralis, only the second published chloroplast genome for a moss, and the first for a vegetatively desiccation-tolerant plant. Results The Tortula chloroplast genome is ~123,500 bp, and differs in a number of ways from that of Physcomitrella patens, the first published moss chloroplast genome. For example, Tortula lacks the ~71 kb inversion found in the large single copy region of the Physcomitrella genome and other members of the Funariales. Also, the Tortula chloroplast genome lacks petN, a gene found in all known land plant plastid genomes. In addition, an unusual case of nucleotide polymorphism was discovered. Conclusions Although the chloroplast genome of Tortula ruralis differs from that of the only other sequenced moss, Physcomitrella patens, we have yet to determine the biological significance of the differences. The polymorphisms we have uncovered in the sequencing of the genome offer a rare possibility (for mosses of the generation of DNA markers for fine-level phylogenetic studies, or to investigate individual variation within populations.

  11. The complete chloroplast genome of banana (Musa acuminata, Zingiberales: insight into plastid monocotyledon evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Banana (genus Musa is a crop of major economic importance worldwide. It is a monocotyledonous member of the Zingiberales, a sister group of the widely studied Poales. Most cultivated bananas are natural Musa inter-(sub-specific triploid hybrids. A Musa acuminata reference nuclear genome sequence was recently produced based on sequencing of genomic DNA enriched in nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Musa acuminata chloroplast genome was assembled with chloroplast reads extracted from whole-genome-shotgun sequence data. The Musa chloroplast genome is a circular molecule of 169,972 bp with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a Large Single Copy region (LSC, 88,338 bp and a Small Single Copy region (SSC, 10,768 bp separated by Inverted Repeat regions (IRs, 35,433 bp. Two forms of the chloroplast genome relative to the orientation of SSC versus LSC were found. The Musa chloroplast genome shows an extreme IR expansion at the IR/SSC boundary relative to the most common structures found in angiosperms. This expansion consists of the integration of three additional complete genes (rps15, ndhH and ycf1 and part of the ndhA gene. No such expansion has been observed in monocots so far. Simple Sequence Repeats were identified in the Musa chloroplast genome and a new set of Musa chloroplastic markers was designed. CONCLUSION: The complete sequence of M. acuminata ssp malaccensis chloroplast we reported here is the first one for the Zingiberales order. As such it provides new insight in the evolution of the chloroplast of monocotyledons. In particular, it reinforces that IR/SSC expansion has occurred independently several times within monocotyledons. The discovery of new polymorphic markers within Musa chloroplast opens new perspectives to better understand the origin of cultivated triploid bananas.

  12. Altered cytokinin metabolism affects cytokinin, auxin, and abscisic acid contents in leaves and chloroplasts, and chloroplast ultrastructure in transgenic tobacco

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polanská, Lenka; Vičánková, Anna; Nováková, Marie; Malbeck, Jiří; Dobrev, Petre; Brzobohatý, Břetislav; Vaňková, Radomíra; Macháčková, Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2007), s. 637-649. ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/03/0369; GA ČR GA206/06/1306; GA AV ČR IAA600040612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : abscisic acid * auxin * chloroplast ultrastructure Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.917, year: 2007

  13. Overexpression of Elastin Affects the Protease to Anti-Protease Balance and Protects Mice from Colitis. : Elafin protects from colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Motta*, Jean-Paul; Magne, Laurent; Descamps, Delphyne; Rolland, Corinne; Squarzoni-Dale, Camila; Rousset, Perrine; Balloy, Viviane; Huerre, Michel; Jenne, Dieter; Wartelle, Julien; Belaaouaj, Azzaq; Mas, Emmanuel; Vinel, Jean-Pierre; Alric, Laurent; Chignard, Michel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS:: Colon tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been reported to have increased proteolytic activity, but no studies have clearly addressed the protease to anti-protease balance in the pathogenesis of colitis. We investigated the role of Elafin, a serine protease inhibitor expressed by skin and mucosal surfaces in human inflammatory conditions, and the proteases neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase-3 (PR-3), in mice with colitis. METHODS:: We studie...

  14. MICROSPHERE-BASED FLOW CYTOMETRY PROTEASE ASSAYS FOR USE IN PROTEASE ACTIVITY DETECTION AND HIGH-THROUGHPUT SCREENING

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Zhu, Jingshu; Sklar, Larry A.; Graves, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes microsphere-based protease assays for use in flow cytometry and high-throughput screening. This platform measures a loss of fluorescence from the surface of a microsphere due to the cleavage of an attached fluorescent protease substrate by a suitable protease enzyme. The assay format can be adapted to any site or protein specific protease of interest and results can be measured in both real time and as end point fluorescence assays on a flow cytometer. End point assays...

  15. Three monoclonal antibodies against the serpin protease nexin-1 prevent protease translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousted, Tina M; Skjødt, Karsten; Petersen, Steen V;

    2014-01-01

    , conversion to an inactive conformation or induction of serpin substrate behaviour. Until now, no inhibitory antibodies against PN-1 have been thoroughly characterised. Here we report the development of three monoclonal antibodies binding specifically and with high affinity to human PN-1. The antibodies all...... serpin presenting its so-called reactive centre loop as a substrate to its target protease, resulting in a covalent complex with the inactivated enzyme. Previously, three mechanisms have been proposed for the inactivation of serpins by monoclonal antibodies: steric blockage of protease recognition...... abolish the protease inhibitory activity of PN-1. In the presence of the antibodies, PN-1 does not form a complex with its target proteases, but is recovered in a reactive centre cleaved form. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we mapped the three overlapping epitopes to an area spanning the gap between the...

  16. The complete chloroplast genome of Cinnamomum kanehirae Hayata (Lauraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Ho, Cheng-Kuen; Chang, Shu-Hwa

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of Cinnamomum kanehirae (Hayata), the first to be completely sequenced of Lauraceae family, is presented in this study. The total genome size is 152,700 bp, with a typical circular structure including a pair of inverted repeats (IRa/b) of 20,107 bp of length separated by a large single-copy region (LSC) and a small single-copy region (SSC) of 93,642 bp and 18,844 bp of length, respectively. The overall GC content of the genome is 39.1%. The nucleotide sequence shows 91% identities with Liriodendron tulipifera in the Magnoliaceae. In total, 123 annotated genes consisted of 79 coding genes, eight rRNA genes, and 36 tRNA genes. Among all 79 coding genes, seven genes (rpoC1, atpF, rpl2, ndhB, ndhA, rps16, and rpl2) contain one intron, while two genes (ycf3 and clpP) contain two introns. The maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed that C. kanehirae chloroplast genome is closely related to Calycanthus fertilis within Laurales order. PMID:26053940

  17. Chloroplast protein synthesis: thylakoid bound polysomes synthesize thylakoid proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work indicated more polysomes bound to pea thylakoids in light than in the dark, in vivo. With isolated intact chloroplasts incubated in darkness, 24 to 74% more RNA was thylakoid-bound at pH 8.3 than at pH 7. Thus the major effect of light in vivo may be due to higher stroma pH. In isolated pea chloroplasts, initiation inhibitors (pactamycin and kanamycin) decreased the extent of RNA binding, and elongation inhibitors (lincomycin and streptomycin) increased it. Thus translation initiation and termination probably control the cycling of bound ribosomes. While only 3 to 6% of total RNA is in bound polysomes the incorporation of 3H-Leu into thylakoids was proportional to the amount of this bound RNA. When Micrococcal nuclease-treated thylakoids were added to labeled runoff translation products of stroma ribosomes, less than 1% of the label adhered to the added membranes; but 37% of the labeled products made by thylakoid polysomes were bound. These data support the concept that stroma ribosomes are recruited into thylakoid proteins

  18. The molecular architecture of the chloroplast thylakoid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefansson, H.

    1996-08-01

    Non-detergent procedure for isolation of sub-thylakoid vesicle populations derived from different structural domains of the chloroplast thylakoid membrane has been developed. Sub-thylakoid vesicles representing the grana, grana core, stroma lamellae, and the grana margins have been isolated and their protein composition has been investigated. Furthermore a novel non-detergent procedure for investigating the pigment composition of photosynthetic complexes located in the different structural domains has been developed. This procedure circumvents selective extractions, an perturbing effect often combined with detergent isolations of membrane bound protein complexes. The fractionation experiments show that the NADPH dehydrogenase, suggested to operate as NADPH or ferredoxin-plastoquinone oxidoreductase in cyclic electron transport around photosystem I, is stoichiometrically depleted on photosystem I basis in the grana domain. The fractionation studies are consistent with the model of the thylakoid membrane where the photosystems in the grana are operating in a linear electron transport whereas the site of cyclic electron transport is in the stroma lamellae. It is suggested that partial destacking of grana, as a result of light-induced protein phosphorylation, may promote the exposure of the granal photosystem I centers to the chloroplast stroma and thereby enhance their participation in cyclic electron transport activity. 146 refs, 18 figs

  19. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rumlová, Michaela; Křížová, Ivana; Keprová, Alena; Hadravová, Romana; Doležal, Michal; Strohalmová, Karolína; Pichová, Iva; Hájek, Miroslav; Ruml, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, May 20 (2014), 37/1-37/15. ISSN 1742-4690 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1388 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV protease * BCA3 * AKIP-1 * apoptosis * mitochondria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.185, year: 2014 http://www.retrovirology.com/content/11/1/37

  20. Proteases decode the extracellular matrix cryptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D

    2016-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is comprised of 1100 core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins and of glycosaminoglycans. This structural scaffold contributes to the organization and mechanical properties of tissues and modulates cell behavior. The extracellular matrix is dynamic and undergoes constant remodeling, which leads to diseases if uncontrolled. Bioactive fragments, called matricryptins, are released from the extracellular proteins by limited proteolysis and have biological activities on their own. They regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer, diabetes, wound healing, fibrosis and infectious diseases and either improve or worsen the course of diseases depending on the matricryptins and on the molecular and biological contexts. Several protease families release matricryptins from core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins both in vitro and in vivo. The major proteases, which decrypt the extracellular matrix, are zinc metalloproteinases of the metzincin superfamily (matrixins, adamalysins and astacins), cysteine proteinases and serine proteases. Some matricryptins act as enzyme inhibitors, further connecting protease and matricryptin fates and providing intricate regulation of major physiopathological processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. They strengthen the role of the extracellular matrix as a key player in tissue failure and core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins as important therapeutic targets. PMID:26382969

  1. Intracellular aspartic protease of Candida albicans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bauerová, Václava; Pichová, Iva; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga

    Mátraháza : -, 2007. s. 43. [Alexander Von Humboldt Workshop on Structure Based Approaches Towards Disease Control. 22.05.2007-27.05.2007, Mátraháza] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis * intracellular * aspartic protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. A new class of SUMO proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Gillies, Jennifer; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A new class of SUMO protease, DeSUMOylating enzyme (DeSI)—that has different substrates and localization to SENP SUMO proteases—is characterized in this issue of EMBO reports. The implications for the field are discussed here.

  3. Proteases and Protease Inhibitors of Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Diabetic Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Musante; Dorota Tataruch; Dongfeng Gu; Xinyu Liu; Carol Forsblom; Per-Henrik Groop; Harry Holthofer

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and, ultimately, is the main cause for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Beyond urinary albumin, no reliable biomarkers are available for accurate early diagnostics. Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) have recently emerged as an interesting source of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers. Here we used a protease and respective protease inhibitor array to profi...

  4. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  5. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs: Biogenesis and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Dautin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins.

  6. Bacterial retropepsin-like proteases : the evidence from Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Paulo Alexandre Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    A familia A2 de proteases aspárticas é constituida maioritariamente por proteases encontradas em retrovírus – as retropepsinas. As teorias evolutivas inerentes a estas proteases normalmente referem que estarão relacionadas com proteases do tipo pepsina pertencentes à familia A1 de proteases aspárticas. Pela primeira teoria (geralmente a mais aceite), durante a infeção de uma célula eucariota por um retrovírus, o gene da retropepsina terá sofrido duplicação e fusão dando orig...

  7. A high-throughput method for detection of DNA in chloroplasts using flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldenburg Delene J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of DNA in the chloroplasts of some plant species has been shown recently to decline dramatically during leaf development. A high-throughput method of DNA detection in chloroplasts is now needed in order to facilitate the further investigation of this process using large numbers of tissue samples. Results The DNA-binding fluorophores 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI, SYBR Green I (SG, SYTO 42, and SYTO 45 were assessed for their utility in flow cytometric analysis of DNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Fluorescence microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR were used to validate flow cytometry data. We found neither DAPI nor SYTO 45 suitable for flow cytometric analysis of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA content, but did find changes in cpDNA content during development by flow cytometry using SG and SYTO 42. The latter dye provided more sensitive detection, and the results were similar to those from the fluorescence microscopic analysis. Differences in SYTO 42 fluorescence were found to correlate with differences in cpDNA content as determined by qPCR using three primer sets widely spaced across the chloroplast genome, suggesting that the whole genome undergoes copy number reduction during development, rather than selective reduction/degradation of subgenomic regions. Conclusion Flow cytometric analysis of chloroplasts stained with SYTO 42 is a high-throughput method suitable for determining changes in cpDNA content during development and for sorting chloroplasts on the basis of DNA content.

  8. A multiple-method approach reveals a declining amount of chloroplast DNA during development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldenburg Delene J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A decline in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA during leaf maturity has been reported previously for eight plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. Recent studies, however, concluded that the amount of cpDNA during leaf development in Arabidopsis remained constant. Results To evaluate alternative hypotheses for these two contradictory observations, we examined cpDNA in Arabidopsis shoot tissues at different times during development using several methods: staining leaf sections as well as individual isolated chloroplasts with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI, real-time quantitative PCR with DNA prepared from total tissue as well as from isolated chloroplasts, fluorescence microscopy of ethidium-stained DNA molecules prepared in gel from isolated plastids, and blot-hybridization of restriction-digested total tissue DNA. We observed a developmental decline of about two- to three-fold in mean DNA per chloroplast and two- to five-fold in the fraction of cellular DNA represented by chloroplast DNA. Conclusion Since the two- to five-fold reduction in cpDNA content could not be attributed to an artifact of chloroplast isolation, we conclude that DNA within Arabidopsis chloroplasts is degraded in vivo as leaves mature.

  9. The Chloroplast Outer Envelope Membrane: The Edge of Light and Excitement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The chloroplast is surrounded by a double-membrane envelope at which proteins, ions, and numerous metabolites Including nucleotides, amino acids, fatty acids, and carbohydrates are exchanged between the two aqueous phases, the cytoplasm and the chloroplast stroma. The chloroplast envelope is also the location where the biosynthesis and accumulation of various lipids take place. By contrast to the inner membrane, which contains a number of specific transporters and acts as the permeability barrier, the chloroplast outer membrane has often been considered a passive compartment derived from the phagosomal membrane. However, the presence of galactoglycerolipids and β-barrel membrane proteins support the common origin of the outer membranes of the chloroplast envelope and extant cyanobacteria. Furthermore, recent progress in the field underlines that the chloroplast outer envelope plays important roles not only for translocation of various molecules, but also for regulation of metabolic activities and signaling processes. The chloroplast outer envelope membrane offers various interesting and challenging questions that are relevant to the understanding of organelle biogenesis, plant growth and development, and also membrane biology in general.

  10. Is Chloroplast Movement in Tobacco Plants Influenced Systemically after Local Illumination or Burning Stress?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Naus; Monika Rolencova; Vladimira Hlavackova

    2008-01-01

    Chloroplast movement has been studied In many plants mainly in relation to the local light, mechanical or stress effects. Here we investigated possible systemic responses of chloroplast movement to local light or burning stress in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun). Chloroplast movement was measured using two independent methods: one with a SPAD 502 Chlorophyll meter and another by collimated transmittance at a selected wavelength (676 nm). A sensitive pedodic movement of chloroplasts was used in high or low (2 000 or 50 μmol/m2 per s photosynthetically active radiation, respectively) cold white light with periods of 50 or 130 min. Measurements were carried out in the irradiated area, in the non-irradiated area of the same leaf or in the leaf located on the stem below the irradiated or burned one. No significant changes in systemic chloroplast movement in non-irradiated parts of the leaf and in the non-treated leaf were detected. Our data indicate that chloroplast movement in tobacco is dependent dominantly on the intensity and spectral composition of the incident light and on the local stimulation and state of the target tissue. No systemic signal was strong enough tovoke a detectable systemic response in chloroplast movement in distant untreated tissues of tobacco plants.

  11. The chloroplast genome of a symbiodinium sp. clade C3 isolate

    KAUST Repository

    Barbrook, Adrian C.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium form important symbioses within corals and other benthic marine animals. Dinoflagellates possess an extremely reduced plastid genome relative to those examined in plants and other algae. In dinoflagellates the plastid genes are located on small plasmids, commonly referred to as \\'minicircles\\'. However, the chloroplast genomes of dinoflagellates have only been extensively characterised from a handful of species. There is also evidence of considerable variation in the chloroplast genome organisation across those species that have been examined. We therefore characterised the chloroplast genome from an environmental coral isolate, in this case containing a symbiont belonging to the Symbiodinium sp. clade C3. The gene content of the genome is well conserved with respect to previously characterised genomes. However, unlike previously characterised dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes we did not identify any \\'empty\\' minicircles. The sequences of this chloroplast genome show a high rate of evolution relative to other algal species. Particularly notable was a surprisingly high level of sequence divergence within the core polypeptides of photosystem I, the reasons for which are currently unknown. This chloroplast genome also possesses distinctive codon usage and GC content. These features suggest that chloroplast genomes in Symbiodinium are highly plastic. © 2013 Adrian C. Barbrook.

  12. New directions for protease inhibitors directed drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yoshio; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2016-11-01

    Proteases play crucial roles in various biological processes, and their activities are essential for all living organisms-from viruses to humans. Since their functions are closely associated with many pathogenic mechanisms, their inhibitors or activators are important molecular targets for developing treatments for various diseases. Here, we describe drugs/drug candidates that target proteases, such as malarial plasmepsins, β-secretase, virus proteases, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Previously, we reported inhibitors of aspartic proteases, such as renin, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease, human T-lymphotropic virus type I protease, plasmepsins, and β-secretase, as drug candidates for hypertension, adult T-cell leukaemia, human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy, malaria, and Alzheimer's disease. Our inhibitors are also described in this review article as examples of drugs that target proteases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 563-579, 2016. PMID:26584340

  13. Free radical generation and antioxidant content in chloroplasts from soybean leaves expsoed to ultraviolet-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galatro, A.; Simontacchi, M.; Puntarulo, S. [Univ. of Buenos Aires, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Physical Chemistry, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure on oxidative status in chloroplasts isolated from soybean (Glycine max cv. Hood). Chloroplasts were isolated from soybean leaves excised from either control seedlings or those exposed to 30 and 60 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1} of UV-B radiation for 4 days. Chloroplastic oxidative conditions were assessed as carbon-centered radical, carbonyl groups and ascorbyl radical content. Treatment with UV-B increased the carbon-centered radical-dependent EPR signal significantly by 55 and 100% in chloroplasts from leaves exposed to 30 and 60 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1} UV-B, respectively, compared to radical content in chloroplasts from control leaves. The content of carbonyl groups increased by 37 and 62% in chloroplasts isolated from soybean leaves irradiated for 4 days with 30 and 60 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1} UV-B, respectively. The content of soluble metabolites in isolated chloroplasts should not be taken as absolute in vivo values; however, these data are valuable for comparative studies. UV-B exposure did not significantly affect ascorbyl radical content compared to controls. The content of ascorbic acid and thiols in chloroplasts isolated from leaves exposed to 60 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1} UV-B was increased by 117 and 20.8%, respectively, compared to controls. Neither the content of total carotene nor that of {beta}-carotene or {alpha}-tocopherol was affected by the irradiation. The results: presented here suggest that the increased content of lipid radicals and oxidized proteins in the chloroplasts isolated from leaves exposed to UV-B could be ascribed to both the lack of antioxidant response in the lipid soluble fraction and the modest increase in the soluble antioxidant content. (au)

  14. Transcriptome analysis of ectopic chloroplast development in green curd cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiangjun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplasts are the green plastids where photosynthesis takes place. The biogenesis of chloroplasts requires the coordinate expression of both nuclear and chloroplast genes and is regulated by developmental and environmental signals. Despite extensive studies of this process, the genetic basis and the regulatory control of chloroplast biogenesis and development remain to be elucidated. Results Green cauliflower mutant causes ectopic development of chloroplasts in the curd tissue of the plant, turning the otherwise white curd green. To investigate the transcriptional control of chloroplast development, we compared gene expression between green and white curds using the RNA-seq approach. Deep sequencing produced over 15 million reads with lengths of 86 base pairs from each cDNA library. A total of 7,155 genes were found to exhibit at least 3-fold changes in expression between green and white curds. These included light-regulated genes, genes encoding chloroplast constituents, and genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Moreover, we discovered that the cauliflower ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (BoHY5 was expressed higher in green curds than white curds and that 2616 HY5-targeted genes, including 1600 up-regulated genes and 1016 down-regulated genes, were differently expressed in green in comparison to white curd tissue. All these 1600 up-regulated genes were HY5-targeted genes in the light. Conclusions The genome-wide profiling of gene expression by RNA-seq in green curds led to the identification of large numbers of genes associated with chloroplast development, and suggested the role of regulatory genes in the high hierarchy of light signaling pathways in mediating the ectopic chloroplast development in the green curd cauliflower mutant.

  15. Identification of Genotypic Changes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease That Correlate with Reduced Susceptibility to the Protease Inhibitor Lopinavir among Viral Isolates from Protease Inhibitor-Experienced Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kempf, Dale J.; Isaacson, Jeffrey D.; King, Martin S.; Brun, Scott C.; Xu, Yi; Real, Kathryn; Bernstein, Barry M.; Japour, Anthony J.; Sun, Eugene; Rode, Richard A

    2001-01-01

    The association of genotypic changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease with reduced in vitro susceptibility to the new protease inhibitor lopinavir (previously ABT-378) was explored using a panel of viral isolates from subjects failing therapy with other protease inhibitors. Two statistical tests showed that specific mutations at 11 amino acid positions in protease (L10F/I/R/V, K20M/R, L24I, M46I/L, F53L, I54L/T/V, L63P, A71I/L/T/V, V82A/F/T, I84V, and L90M) were associated with ...

  16. Structure and transcription of the spinach chloroplast rDNA leader region.

    OpenAIRE

    Briat, J F; Dron, M; Loiseaux, S; Mache, R

    1982-01-01

    A cloned fragment of spinach chloroplast DNA carrying 140 bp of the 16S rRNA gene and 691 bp upstream this gene has been analysed by DNA sequencing, by in vitro transcription, by S1 mapping with chloroplast RNAs and purified 16S rRNA from 30S ribosomal subunits. A tRNAVal gene has been located between the position 394 and 465. Crude chloroplast RNA polymerase has been purified by heparin sepharose chromatography of a 80 000 g supernatant from pure lysed spinach plastids and used to transcribe...

  17. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Anoectochilus emeiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuying; Niu, Zhitao; Yan, Wenjin; Xue, Qingyun; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Anoectochilus emeiensis, an extremely endangered medical plant with important economic value, was determined and characterized. The genome size was 152 650 bp, containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) (26 319 bp) which were separated by a large single copy (LSC) (82 670 bp) and a small single copy (SSC) (17 342 bp). The cpDNA of A. emeiensis contained 113 unique genes, including 79 protein coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Among them, 18 genes contained one or two introns. The overall AT content of the genome was 63.1%. PMID:26403535

  18. Functional analysis of chloroplast early light inducible proteins (ELIPs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, Carolyn M

    2005-02-22

    The objectives of this project were to characterize gene expression patterns of early light inducible protein (ELIP) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lycopersicon esculentum, to identify knock mutants of the 2 ELIP genes in Arabidopsis, and to characterize the effects of the knockouts. Expression in Arabidopsis was studied in response to thylakoid electron transport chain (PETC) capacity, where it was found that there is a signal for expression associated with reduction of the PETC. Expression in response to salt was also studied, with different responses of the two gene copies. Knockout lines for ELIP1 and ELIP2 have been identified and are being characterized. In tomato, it was found that the single-copy ELIP gene is highly expressed in ripening fruit during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. Studies of expression in tomato ripening mutants are ongoing.

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Euonymus japonicus (Celastraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of the Euonymus japonicus, the first sequenced of the genus Euonymus, was reported in this study. The total length was 157 637 bp, containing a pair of 26 678 bp inverted repeat region (IR), which were separated by small single copy (SSC) region and large single copy (LSC) region of 18 340 bp and 85 941 bp, respectively. This genome contains 107 unique genes, including 74 coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 29 tRNA genes. Seventeen genes contain intron of E. japonicus, of which three genes (clpP, ycf3, and rps12) include two introns. The maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analysis revealed that E. japonicus was closely related to Manihot and Populus. PMID:26407184

  20. The complete chloroplast genomes of Cannabis sativa and Humulus lupulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Daniela; White, Kristin H; Keepers, Kyle G; Kane, Nolan C

    2016-09-01

    Cannabis and Humulus are sister genera comprising the entirety of the Cannabaceae sensu stricto, including C. sativa L. (marijuana, hemp), and H. lupulus L. (hops) as two economically important crops. These two plants have been used by humans for many purposes including as a fiber, food, medicine, or inebriant in the case of C. sativa, and as a flavoring component in beer brewing in the case of H. lupulus. In this study, we report the complete chloroplast genomes for two distinct hemp varieties of C. sativa, Italian "Carmagnola" and Russian "Dagestani", and one Czech variety of H. lupulus "Saazer". Both C. sativa genomes are 153 871 bp in length, while the H. lupulus genome is 153 751 bp. The genomes from the two C. sativa varieties differ in 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), while the H. lupulus genome differs in 1722 SNPs from both C. sativa cultivars. PMID:26329384

  1. The whole chloroplast genomes of two Eutrema species (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guoqian; Bi, Hao; Li, Yuanshuo; He, Qi; Ma, Yazhen; Guo, Xinyi; Ma, Tao

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we determined the complete chloroplast genomes from two crucifer species of the Eutrema genus. The sizes of the two cp genomes were 153 948 bp (E. yunnanense) and 153 876 bp (E. heterophyllum). Both genomes have the typical quadripartite structure consisting of a large single copy region, a small single copy region and two inverted repeats. Gene contents and their relative positions of the 132 individual genes (87 protein-coding genes, eight rRNA, and 37 tRNA genes) of either genome were identical to each other. Phylogenetic analysis supports the idea that the currently recognized Eutrema genus is monophyletic and that E. salsugineum and Schrenkiella parvula evolved salt tolerance independently. PMID:26329763

  2. Protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts - a survey of phosphorylation targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginsky, Sacha

    2016-06-01

    The development of new software tools, improved mass spectrometry equipment, a suite of optimized scan types, and better-quality phosphopeptide affinity capture have paved the way for an explosion of mass spectrometry data on phosphopeptides. Because phosphoproteomics achieves good sensitivity, most studies use complete cell extracts for phosphopeptide enrichment and identification without prior enrichment of proteins or subcellular compartments. As a consequence, the phosphoproteome of cell organelles often comes as a by-product from large-scale studies and is commonly assembled from these in meta-analyses. This review aims at providing some guidance on the limitations of meta-analyses that combine data from analyses with different scopes, reports on the current status of knowledge on chloroplast phosphorylation targets, provides initial insights into phosphorylation site conservation in different plant species, and highlights emerging information on the integration of gene expression with metabolism and photosynthesis by means of protein phosphorylation. PMID:26969742

  3. [Study of Chloroplast DNA Polymorphism in the Sunflower (Helianthus L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markina, N V; Usatov, A V; Logacheva, M D; Azarin, K V; Gorbachenko, C F; Kornienko, I V; Gavrilova, V A; Tihobaeva, V E

    2015-08-01

    The polymorphism of microsatellite loci of chloroplast genome in six Helianthus species and 46 lines of cultivated sunflower H. annuus (17 CMS lines and 29 Rf-lines) were studied. The differences between species are confined to four SSR loci. Within cultivated forms of the sunflower H. annuus, the polymorphism is absent. A comparative analysis was performed on sequences of the cpDNA inbred line 3629, line 398941 of the wild sunflower, and the American line HA383 H. annuus. As a result, 52 polymorphic loci represented by 27 SSR and 25 SNP were found; they can be used for genotyping of H. annuus samples, including cultural varieties: twelve polymorphic positions, of which eight are SSR and four are SNP. PMID:26601486

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana DNA gyrase is targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Melisa K.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    DNA gyrase is the bacterial DNA topoisomerase (topo) that supercoils DNA by using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. The enzyme, an A2B2 tetramer encoded by the gyrA and gyrB genes, catalyses topological changes in DNA during replication and transcription, and is the only topo that is able to introduce negative supercoils. Gyrase is essential in bacteria and apparently absent from eukaryotes and is, consequently, an important target for antibacterial agents (e.g., quinolones and coumarins). We have identified four putative gyrase genes in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana; one gyrA and three gyrB homologues. DNA gyrase protein A (GyrA) has a dual translational initiation site targeting the mature protein to both chloroplasts and mitochondria, and there are individual targeting sequences for two of the DNA gyrase protein B (GyrB) homologues. N-terminal fusions of the organellar targeting sequences to GFPs support the hypothesis that one enzyme is targeted to the chloroplast and another to the mitochondrion, which correlates with supercoiling activity in isolated organelles. Treatment of seedlings and cultured cells with gyrase-specific drugs leads to growth inhibition. Knockout of A. thaliana gyrA is embryo-lethal whereas knockouts in the gyrB genes lead to seedling-lethal phenotypes or severely stunted growth and development. The A. thaliana genes have been cloned in Escherichia coli and found to complement gyrase temperature-sensitive strains. This report confirms the existence of DNA gyrase in eukaryotes and has important implications for drug targeting, organelle replication, and the evolution of topos in plants. PMID:15136745

  5. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly...... specific inhibitor of uPA. With the aim of creating better inhibitors based on the upain-2 scaffold, the following three strategies were explored: First, it was attempted to predefine the structure of upain-2 in solution by incorporating turn-inducing sequences and peptidomimetics. Additionally...... bond across the ring. The second bridge was made by a disulfide bridge, amide bond formation or via ring-closing metathesis. A, with upain-2 equipotent, bicyclic inhibitor was obtained and its binding to uPA was studied by ITC, NMR and X-ray. The knowledge of how selective inhibitors bind uPA has been...

  6. Lipase and protease extraction from activated sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessesse, Amare; Dueholm, Thomas; Petersen, Steffen B.;

    2003-01-01

    gentle and efficient enzyme extraction methods from environmental samples is very important. In this study we present a method for the extraction of lipases and proteases from activated sludge using the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100, EDTA, and cation exchange resin (CER), alone or in combination for......In the process of wastewater treatment hydrolysis of polymeric substances is the first and rate-limiting step. A closer study of the enzymes catalysing these reactions is essential for a better understanding of the microbial activity in the wastewater treatment process. Therefore, development of...... the extraction of lipases and proteases from activated sludge. The sludge was continuously stirred in the presence of either buffer alone or in the presence of detergent and/or chelating agents. In all cases, a marked reduction in floc size was observed upon continuous stirring. However, no lipase...

  7. Protease gene shuffling and expression in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Four kinds of neutral and alkaline protease genes from Aspergillus oryzae and Bacillus subtilis were isolated and shuffled. The shuffled genes were selected, inserted into pGAPZαA plasmid and transformed into Escherichia coli. The gene which could express high-activity protease was selected by screening the sizes of transparent zones around the colonies on casein plates. After an ideal protease gene was selected, it was sequenced and then transformed into Pichia pastoris X33. The result showed that the base in 1022th position of shuffled protease gene was changed from thymine to cytosine, inferring that cysteine was changed to arginine in the mutant protease. After 48 h incubation for the transformed P. pastoris with the mutant or native protease genes, the mutant protease activity was 36.4% higher than the native protease (P<0.05. The optimal pH and temperature of the mutant protease were 6.5-8.0 and 30-70°C, respectively, which indicated better stability than the native protease (P<0.05.

  8. PARTIAL PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ALKALOPHILIC PROTEASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Satheeskumar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial purification and characterization of alkalophilic protease production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the gut of marine and coastal waters shrimp Penaeus monodon. The protease production was assayed in submerged fermentation to produce maximum protease activity (423 ± 0.09 U/ml. The enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulphate and partially purified by ion exchange chromatography through DEAE Sephadex A-50 column. In 10th fraction showed maximum protease activity (734 ± 0.18 U/ml with increase in purification fold. The molecular weight of protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was recorded as 60 kDa. The stability of protease was tested at various pH and temperature; it showed maximum protease activity at pH-9 and temperature 50ºC. Among the various surfactants tested for enzyme stability, maximum activity was retained in poly ethylene glycol. The compatibility of protease enzyme with various commercial detergents; the enzyme retained maximum protease activity in tide. The results are indicated that all these properties make the bacterial proteases are most suitable for wide industrial applications.

  9. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budatha, Madhusudhan; Silva, Simone; Montoya, Teodoro Ignacio; Suzuki, Ayako; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Wieslander, Cecilia Karin; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Word, Ruth Ann; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/-)) develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP) due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/-) mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa). V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS) 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/-) mice. PRSS3 was (a) localized in epithelial secretions, (b) detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/-) and wild type mice, and (c) cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin) and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/-) epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice. PMID:23437119

  10. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhan Budatha

    Full Text Available Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/- develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/- mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa. V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/- mice. PRSS3 was (a localized in epithelial secretions, (b detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/- and wild type mice, and (c cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/- epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice.

  11. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyung Park

    Full Text Available Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25 in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  12. Protease Activation and Inflammation in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Regnér, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 10—20 % of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) develop a severe disease with high mortality and morbidity. Activation of pancreatic proteases, the inflammatory response and impaired pancreatic circulation are pathophysiological events that are important in order for the disease to develop. There is no specific treatment for severe AP, and no useful marker for predicting the severity of the disease upon admission to the hospital. In this thesis, markers of early pathophysio...

  13. Targeting exosites on blood coagulation proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2005-01-01

    The high specificity of blood coagulation proteases has been attributed not only to residues surrounding the active site but also to other surface domains that are involved in recognizing and interacting with macromolecular substrates and inhibitors. Specific blood coagulation inhibitors obtained from exogenous sources such as blood sucking salivary glands and snake venoms have been identified. Some of these inhibitors interact with exosites on coagulation enzymes. Two examples are discussed ...

  14. Luminometric method for screening retroviral protease inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková, D.; Rumlová, Michaela; Pichová, Iva; Ruml, Tomáš

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 345, č. 1 (2005), s. 96-101. ISSN 0003-2697 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4055304; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0508; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : retroviral protease * inhibitors * luminescent assay Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.670, year: 2005

  15. Corruption of Innate Immunity by Bacterial Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host’s innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections. PMID:19756242

  16. Mitochondrial Proteases as Emerging Pharmacological Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibellini, Lara; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of mitochondrial function and integrity is critical for cell viability. Under stress conditions, unfolded, misfolded or damaged proteins accumulate in a certain compartment of the organelle, interfering with oxidative phosphorylation and normal mitochondrial functions. In stress conditions, several mechanisms, including mitochondrial unfolded protease response (UPRmt), fusion and fission, and mitophagy are engaged to restore normal proteostasis of the organelle. Mitochondrial proteases are a family of more than 20 enzymes that not only are involved in the UPRmt, but actively participate at multiple levels in the stress-response system. Alterations in their expression levels, or mutations that determine loss or gain of function of these proteases deeply impair mitochondrial functionality and can be associated with the onset of inherited diseases, with the development of neurodegenerative disorders and with the process of carcinogenesis. In this review, we focus our attention on six of them, namely CLPP, HTRA2 and LONP1, by analysing the current knowledge about their functions, their involvement in the pathogenesis of human diseases, and the compounds currently available for inhibiting their functions. PMID:26831646

  17. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A; Lewis, Paul O

    2016-06-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophyceae with fully sequenced chloroplast genomes. Further analyses and interpretation of the data can be found in "Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution" (Fučíková et al., In review) [1]. PMID:27054159

  18. Programmed chloroplast destruction during leaf senescence involves 13-lipoxygenase (13-LOX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Armin; Kang, ChulHee; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Christiane; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen

    2016-03-22

    Leaf senescence is the terminal stage in the development of perennial plants. Massive physiological changes occur that lead to the shut down of photosynthesis and a cessation of growth. Leaf senescence involves the selective destruction of the chloroplast as the site of photosynthesis. Here, we show that 13-lipoxygenase (13-LOX) accomplishes a key role in the destruction of chloroplasts in senescing plants and propose a critical role of its NH2-terminal chloroplast transit peptide. The 13-LOX enzyme identified here accumulated in the plastid envelope and catalyzed the dioxygenation of unsaturated membrane fatty acids, leading to a selective destruction of the chloroplast and the release of stromal constituents. Because 13-LOX pathway products comprise compounds involved in insect deterrence and pathogen defense (volatile aldehydes and oxylipins), a mechanism of unmolested nitrogen and carbon relocation is suggested that occurs from leaves to seeds and roots during fall. PMID:26969728

  19. Running a little late: chloroplast Fe status and the circadian clock

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Grandon T; Erin L Connolly

    2013-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is essential for plant growth and survival. Two papers now report that chloroplast Iron levels also regulate the period of the circadian clock, which might confer fitness advantage by linking iron status to daily changes in environmental conditions.

  20. Development of the First Chloroplast Microsatellite Loci in Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Xiang Xie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: To investigate population genetics, phylogeography, and cultivar origin of Ginkgo biloba, chloroplast microsatellite primers were developed. Methods and Results: Twenty-one chloroplast microsatellite markers were identified referring to the two published chloroplast genomes of G. biloba. Polymorphisms were assessed on four natural populations from the two refugia in China. Eight loci were detected to be polymorphic in these populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven, and the unbiased haploid diversity per locus varied from 0.441 to 0.807. Conclusions: For the first time, we developed 21 chloroplast microsatellite markers for G. biloba, including 13 monomorphic and eight polymorphic ones within the assessed natural populations. These markers should provide a powerful tool for the study of genetic variation of both natural and cultivated populations of G. biloba, as well as cultivars.

  1. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an important medicinal plant Cynanchum wilfordii (Maxim.) Hemsl. (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Kyu-Yeob; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Lee, Junki; Seong, Rack Seon; Shim, Young Hun; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Cynanchum wilfordii (Maxim.) Hemsl. is a traditional medicinal herb belonging to the Asclepiadoideae subfamily, whose dried roots have been used as traditional medicine in Asia. The complete chloroplast genome of C. wilfordii was generated by de novo assembly using the small amount of whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of C. wilfordii was 161 241 bp long, composed of large single copy region (91 995 bp), small single copy region (19 930 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (24 658 bp). The overall GC contents of the chloroplast genome was 37.8%. A total of 114 genes were annotated, which included 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that C. wilfordii is most closely related to Asclepias nivea (Caribbean milkweed) and Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed) within the Asclepiadoideae subfamily. PMID:26358391

  2. The complete chloroplast genome of Eleutherococcus gracilistylus (W.W.Sm.) S.Y.Hu (Araliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Junki; Lee, Sang-Choon; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Jang, Woojong; Kim, Soonok; Sung, Sangmin; Lee, Jungho; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Eleutherococcus gracilistylus is a plant species that is close to E. senticosus, a famous medicinal plant called Siberian ginseng. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the E. gracilistylus was determined by de novo assembly using whole genome next generation sequences. The chloroplast genome of E. gracilistylus was 156 770 bp long and showed distinct four partite structures such as a large single copy region of 86 729 bp, a small single copy region of 18 175 bp, and a pair of inverted repeat regions of 25 933 bp. The overall GC contents of the genome sequence were 36.8%. The chloroplast genome of E. gracilistylus contains 79 protein-coding sequences, 30 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. The phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes confirmed close taxonomical relationship of E. gracilistylus with E. senticosus. PMID:26358682

  3. In Vivo Quantification of Peroxisome Tethering to Chloroplasts in Tobacco Epidermal Cells Using Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongbo; Metz, Jeremy; Teanby, Nick A; Ward, Andy D; Botchway, Stanley W; Coles, Benjamin; Pollard, Mark R; Sparkes, Imogen

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are highly motile organelles that display a range of motions within a short time frame. In static snapshots, they can be juxtaposed to chloroplasts, which has led to the hypothesis that they are physically interacting. Here, using optical tweezers, we tested the dynamic physical interaction in vivo. Using near-infrared optical tweezers combined with TIRF microscopy, we were able to trap peroxisomes and approximate the forces involved in chloroplast association in vivo in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and observed weaker tethering to additional unknown structures within the cell. We show that chloroplasts and peroxisomes are physically tethered through peroxules, a poorly described structure in plant cells. We suggest that peroxules have a novel role in maintaining peroxisome-organelle interactions in the dynamic environment. This could be important for fatty acid mobilization and photorespiration through the interaction with oil bodies and chloroplasts, highlighting a fundamentally important role for organelle interactions for essential biochemistry and physiological processes. PMID:26518344

  4. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  5. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  6. Arabidopsis VARIEGATED 3 encodes a chloroplast-targeted, zinc-finger protein required for chloroplast and palisade cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Holm, Agnethe; Jenkins, Tom; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Harris, Cassandra A.; Beale, Michael H.; Andersen, Mathias; Mant, Alexandra; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Camara, Bilal; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2004-01-01

    The stable, recessive Arabidopsis variegated 3 (var3) mutant exhibits a variegated phenotype due to somatic areas lacking or containing developmentally retarded chloroplasts and greatly reduced numbers of palisade cells. The VAR3 gene, isolated by transposon tagging, encodes the 85.9 kDa VAR3 pro...... pigment profiles are qualitatively similar in wild type and var3, although var3 accumulates lower levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. These results indicate that VAR3 is a part of a protein complex required for normal chloroplast and palisade cell development....... protein containing novel repeats and zinc fingers described as protein interaction domains. VAR3 interacts specifically in yeast and in vitro with NCED4, a putative polyene chain or carotenoid dioxygenase, and both VAR3 and NCED4 accumulate in the chloroplast stroma. Metabolic profiling demonstrates that...

  7. PAPP5 is involved in the tetrapyrrole mediated plastid signalling during chloroplast development

    OpenAIRE

    Juan de Dios Barajas-López; Dmitry Kremnev; Jehad Shaikhali; Aurora Piñas-Fernández; Asa Strand

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of chloroplast development in the light is dependent on nuclear encoded components. The nuclear genes encoding key components in the photosynthetic machinery are regulated by signals originating in the plastids. These plastid signals play an essential role in the regulation of photosynthesis associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) when proplastids develop into chloroplasts. One of the plastid signals is linked to the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and accumulation of the intermediates the...

  8. Milestones in chloroplast genetic engineering: an environmentally friendly era in biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Daniell, Henry; Khan, Muhammad S.; Allison, Lori

    2002-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes defied the laws of Mendelian inheritance at the dawn of plant genetics, and continue to defy the mainstream approach to biotechnology, leading the field in an environmentally friendly direction. Recent success in engineering the chloroplast genome for resistance to herbicides, insects, disease and drought, and for production of biopharmaceuticals, has opened the door to a new era in biotechnology. The successful engineering of tomato chromoplasts for high-level transgene e...

  9. Chloroplast-Derived Vaccine Antigens and Biopharmaceuticals: Expression, Folding, Assembly and Functionality

    OpenAIRE

    Chebolu, S.; Daniell, H

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgene expression, transgene containment via maternal inheritance, and multi-gene expression in a single transformation event. Oral delivery is facilitated by hyperexpression of vaccine antigens against cholera, tetanus, anthrax, plague, or canine parvovirus (4%–31% of total soluble protein, TSP) in transgenic chloroplasts (leaves) or non-green plastids (carrots, tomato) as well as the availability of antib...

  10. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta)

    OpenAIRE

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A.; Lewis, Paul O.

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophy...

  11. Large-scale Arabidopsis phosphoproteome profiling reveals novel chloroplast kinase substrates and phosphorylation networks

    OpenAIRE

    Reiland, S; Messerli, G.; Baerenfaller, K.; Gerrits, B.; Endler, A; Grossmann, J.; Gruissem, W; Baginsky, S

    2009-01-01

    We have characterized the phosphoproteome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings using high-accuracy mass spectrometry and report the identification of 1,429 phosphoproteins and 3,029 unique phosphopeptides. Among these, 174 proteins were chloroplast phosphoproteins. Motif-X (motif extractor) analysis of the phosphorylation sites in chloroplast proteins identified four significantly enriched kinase motifs, which include casein kinase II (CKII) and proline-directed kinase motifs, as w...

  12. Increased resistance to oxidative stress in transgenic plants that overexpress chloroplastic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, A. S.; Heinen, J L; Holaday, A S; Burke, J. J.; Allen, R D

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants that express a chimeric gene that encodes chloroplast-localized Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) from pea have been developed. To investigate whether increased expression of chloroplast-targeted SOD could alter the resistance of photosynthesis to environmental stress, these plants were subjected to chilling temperatures and moderate (500 mumol of quanta per m2 per s) or high (1500 mumol of quanta per m2 per s) light intensity. During exposure to moderate stress, tran...

  13. Chloroplast envelope membranes: a dynamic interface between plastids and the cytosol

    OpenAIRE

    Block, Maryse A.; Douce, Roland; Joyard, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Chloroplasts are bounded by a pair of outer membranes, the envelope, that is the only permanent membrane structure of the different types of plastids. Chloroplasts have had a long and complex evolutionary past and integration of the envelope membranes in cellular functions is the result of this evolution. Plastid envelope membranes contain a wide diversity of lipids and terpenoid compounds serving numerous biochemical functions and the flexibility of their biosynthetic pathways allow plants t...

  14. Stress induces the assembly of RNA granules in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Uniacke, James; Zerges, William

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells under stress repress translation and localize these messenger RNAs (mRNAs) to cytoplasmic RNA granules. We show that specific stress stimuli induce the assembly of RNA granules in an organelle with bacterial ancestry, the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These chloroplast stress granules (cpSGs) form during oxidative stress and disassemble during recovery from stress. Like mammalian stress granules, cpSGs contain poly(A)-binding protein and the small, but not the lar...

  15. An Improved Protocol for Intact Chloroplasts and cpDNA Isolation in Conifers

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Rogalski, Marcelo; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Performing chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) isolation is considered a major challenge among different plant groups, especially conifers. Isolating chloroplasts in conifers by such conventional methods as sucrose gradient and high salt has not been successful. So far, plastid genome sequencing protocols for conifer species have been based mainly on long-range PCR, which is known to be time-consuming and difficult to implement. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a protocol for cpDNA ...

  16. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Banana (Musa acuminata, Zingiberales): Insight into Plastid Monocotyledon Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Martin; Franc-Christophe Baurens; Céline Cardi; Jean-Marc Aury; Angélique D'Hont

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Banana (genus Musa) is a crop of major economic importance worldwide. It is a monocotyledonous member of the Zingiberales, a sister group of the widely studied Poales. Most cultivated bananas are natural Musa inter-(sub-)specific triploid hybrids. A Musa acuminata reference nuclear genome sequence was recently produced based on sequencing of genomic DNA enriched in nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Musa acuminata chloroplast genome was assembled with chloroplast reads e...

  17. Uncovering the protein lysine and arginine methylation network in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alban, Claude; Tardif, Marianne; Mininno, Morgane; Brugière, Sabine; Gilgen, Annabelle; Ma, Sheng; Mazzoleni, Meryl; Gigarel, Océane; Martin-Laffon, Jacqueline; Ferro, Myriam; Ravanel, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by the addition of methyl groups to the side chains of Lys and Arg residues is proposed to play important roles in many cellular processes. In plants, identification of non-histone methylproteins at a cellular or subcellular scale is still missing. To gain insights into the extent of this modification in chloroplasts we used a bioinformatics approach to identify protein methyltransferases targeted to plastids and set up a workflow to specifically identify Lys and Arg methylated proteins from proteomic data used to produce the Arabidopsis chloroplast proteome. With this approach we could identify 31 high-confidence Lys and Arg methylation sites from 23 chloroplastic proteins, of which only two were previously known to be methylated. These methylproteins are split between the stroma, thylakoids and envelope sub-compartments. They belong to essential metabolic processes, including photosynthesis, and to the chloroplast biogenesis and maintenance machinery (translation, protein import, division). Also, the in silico identification of nine protein methyltransferases that are known or predicted to be targeted to plastids provided a foundation to build the enzymes/substrates relationships that govern methylation in chloroplasts. Thereby, using in vitro methylation assays with chloroplast stroma as a source of methyltransferases we confirmed the methylation sites of two targets, plastid ribosomal protein L11 and the β-subunit of ATP synthase. Furthermore, a biochemical screening of recombinant chloroplastic protein Lys methyltransferases allowed us to identify the enzymes involved in the modification of these substrates. The present study provides a useful resource to build the methyltransferases/methylproteins network and to elucidate the role of protein methylation in chloroplast biology. PMID:24748391

  18. THE OCCURRENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ENDOSYMBIOTIC CHLOROPLASTS IN THE DIGESTIVE GLANDS OF HERBIVOROUS OPISTHOBRANCHS(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D L

    1967-12-01

    Intact algal chloroplasts have been found in the digestive glands of 5 species of Opisthobranchia belonging to the order Saccoglossa. Preliminary studies on 3 of these confirm their endosymbiotic nature. It is suggested that the occurrence of these endosymbiotic organelles may be widespread among related species of Saccoglossa. Their independent functional existence supports the view that chloroplasts possess a system of nonchromosomal inheritance. PMID:27065036

  19. Molecular and biochemical analyses of transgenic nicotiana tabacum plants metabolizing glycolate in the chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Thiruveedhi, Krishnaveni

    2006-01-01

    The photorespiratory pathway in C3 plants consumes not only ATP and reducing equivalents but also results in loss of ~ 25% carbon that has been fixed during the process of photosynthesis. In the present study, an alternative biochemical pathway for the metabolism of glycolate was established in the chloroplasts of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The new pathway aims at increasing the refixation of CO2 inside the chloroplasts and thereby at suppressing photorespiration in C3 plants. The pa...

  20. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Omani Lime (Citrus aurantiifolia) and Comparative Analysis within the Rosids

    OpenAIRE

    Huei-Jiun Su; Hogenhout, Saskia A.; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M.; Chih-Horng Kuo

    2014-01-01

    The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C....

  1. Comparative proteomics of chloroplasts envelopes from bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts reveals novel membrane proteins with a possible role in C4-related metabolite fluxes and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana eManandhar-Shrestha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As the world population grows, our need for food increases drastically. Limited amounts of arable land lead to a competition between food and fuel crops, while changes in the global climate may impact future crop yields. Thus, a second green revolution will need a better understanding of the processes essential for plant growth and development. One approach toward the solution of this problem is to better understand regulatory and transport processes in C4 plants. C4 plants display an up to 10-fold higher apparent CO2 assimilation and higher yields while maintaining high water use efficiency. This requires differential regulation of mesophyll (M and bundle sheath (BS chloroplast development as well as higher metabolic fluxes of photosynthetic intermediates between cells and across chloroplast envelopes. While previous analyses of overall chloroplast membranes have yielded significant insight, our comparative proteomics approach using enriched BS and M chloroplast envelopes of Zea mays allowed us to identify 37 proteins of unknown function that have not been seen in these earlier studies. We identified 280 proteins, 84% of which are known/predicted to be present in chloroplasts (cp. 74% have a known or predicted membrane association. 21 membrane proteins were 2-15 times more abundant in BS cells, while 36 proteins were more abundant in M cp envelopes. These proteins could represent additional candidates of proteins essential for development or metabolite transport processes in C4 plants. RT-PCR confirmed differential expression of thirteen candidate genes. Cp association was confirmed using GFP labeling. Genes for a PIC-like protein and an ER-AP-like protein show an early transient increase in gene expression during the transition to light. In addition, PIC gene expression is increased in the immature part of the leaf and was lower in the fully developed parts of the leaf, suggesting a need for/incorporation of the protein during chloroplast

  2. High throughput substrate phage display for protease profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnikov, Boris; Cieplak, Piotr; Smith, Jeffrey W

    2009-01-01

    The interplay between a protease and its substrates is controlled at many different levels, including coexpression, colocalization, binding driven by ancillary contacts, and the presence of natural inhibitors. Here we focus on the most basic parameter that guides substrate recognition by a protease, the recognition specificity at the catalytic cleft. An understanding of this substrate specificity can be used to predict the putative substrates of a protease, to design protease activated imaging agents, and to initiate the design of active site inhibitors. Our group has characterized protease specificities of several matrix metalloproteinases using substrate phage display. Recently, we have adapted this method to a semiautomated platform that includes several high-throughput steps. The semiautomated platform allows one to obtain an order of magnitude more data, thus permitting precise comparisons among related proteases to define their functional distinctions. PMID:19377968

  3. Structural basis for HTLV-1 protease inhibition by the HIV-1 protease inhibitor indinavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Maren; Steuber, Holger; Diederich, Wibke E

    2014-07-24

    HTLV-1 protease (HTLV-1 PR) is an aspartic protease which represents a promising drug target for the discovery of novel anti-HTLV-1 drugs. The X-ray structure of HTLV-1 PR in complex with the well-known and approved HIV-1 PR inhibitor Indinavir was determined at 2.40 Å resolution. In this contribution, we describe the first crystal structure in complex with a nonpeptidic inhibitor that accounts for rationalizing the rather moderate affinity of Indinavir against HTLV-1 PR and provides the basis for further structure-guided optimization strategies. PMID:25006983

  4. Temporal dependence of cysteine protease activation following excitotoxic hippocampal injury

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Jennifer N.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda; Butler, Tracy R.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Excitotoxic insults can lead to intracellular signaling cascades that contribute to cell death, in part by activation of proteases, phospholipases, and endonucleases. Cysteine proteases, such as calpains, are calcium-activated enzymes which degrade cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule-associated proteins, tubulin, and spectrin, among others. The current study used the organotypic hippocampal slice culture model to examine whether pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine protease activity ...

  5. Cold-Adapted Proteases as an Emerging Class of Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments—cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases—generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible...

  6. Autocatalytic Processing of m-AAA Protease Subunits in Mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Koppen, Mirko; Bonn, Florian; Ehses, Sarah; Langer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    m-AAA proteases are ATP-dependent proteolytic machines in the inner membrane of mitochondria which are crucial for the maintenance of mitochondrial activities. Conserved nuclear-encoded subunits, termed paraplegin, Afg3l1, and Afg3l2, form various isoenzymes differing in their subunit composition in mammalian mitochondria. Mutations in different m-AAA protease subunits are associated with distinct neuronal disorders in human. However, the biogenesis of m-AAA protease complexes or of individua...

  7. Enhanced Thermostability of a Fungal Alkaline Protease by Different Additives

    OpenAIRE

    Nilesh P. Nirmal; R. Seeta Laxman

    2014-01-01

    A fungal strain (Conidiobolus brefeldianus MTCC 5184) isolated from plant detritus secreted a high activity alkaline protease. Thermostability studies of the fungal alkaline protease (FAP) revealed that the protease is stable up to 50°C with 40% residual activity after one hour. Effect of various additives such as sugars, sugar alcohols, polyols, and salts, on the thermostability of FAP was evaluated. Among the additives tested, glycerol, mannitol, xylitol, sorbitol, and trehalose were found ...

  8. Erwinia carotovora extracellular proteases : characterization and role in soft rot

    OpenAIRE

    Kyöstiö, Sirkka R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) strain EC14, a Gram-negative bacterium, causes soft rot on several crops, including potato. Maceration of potato tuber tissue is caused by secreted pectolytic enzymes. Other cell-degrading enzymes may also have roles in pathogenesis, including cellulases, phospholipases, and protease(s). The objectives of this research were to (1) characterize Ecc extracellular protease (Prt) and (2) elucidate its role in potato soft rot. A gene enc...

  9. Hydrophobic core flexibility modulates enzyme activity in HIV-1 protease

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Di...

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of HIV-1 protease complexed with saquinavir

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibition of the Human Immunode�ficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease enzyme blocks HIV-1 replication. Protease inhibitor drugs have successfully been used as a therapy for HIV-infected individuals to reduce their viral loads and slow the progression to Acquired Immune Defi�ciency Syndrome (AIDS). However, mutations readily and rapidly accrue in the protease gene resulting in a reduced sensitivity of the protein to the inhibitor. In this thesis, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS)...

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Sequence Database

    OpenAIRE

    Shafer, Robert W.; Jung, Duane R.; Betts, Bradley J.; Xi, Yinong; Gonzales, Matthew J.

    2000-01-01

    The HIV RT and Protease Sequence Database is an online relational database that catalogs evolutionary and drug-related human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease sequence variation (http://hivdb.stanford.edu ). The database contains a compilation of nearly all published HIV RT and protease sequences including International Collaboration database submissions (e.g., GenBank) and sequences published in journal articles. Sequences are linked to data about the sourc...

  12. Protein protease inhibitors in insects and comparison with mammalian inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Studies on insect protein protease inhibitors are summarized. Biochemical, genetic and physiological investigations of the silkworm are performed. 2. In addition, the properties and characteristics of fungal protease inhibitors from the silkworm (Bombyx mori) are described and their importance as defensive functions is emphasized. 3. This review also concerns comparative and evolutionary studies of protease inhibitors from various sources. 4. The biological significance of inhibitors is discussed in view of the extensive experimental results. PMID:8365101

  13. Characterization of Fibrinolytic Proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Suk Ho Choi

    2011-01-01

    Objectives : This study was undertaken to identify fibrinolytic proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom and to characterize a major fibrinolytic protease purified from the venom. Methods: The venom was subjected to chromatography using columns of Q-Sepharose and Sephadex G-75. The molecular weights of fibrinolytic proteases showing fibrinolytic zone in fibrin plate assay were determined in SDS-PAGE (Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) The effects of inh...

  14. A preliminary neutron diffraction analysis of Achromobacter protease I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Yuki; Masaki, Takeharu; Yamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2010-11-01

    Achromobacter protease I (API, E.C. 3.4.21.50) is one of the serine proteases produced by Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. API is distinct from the other tripsin type protease in its lysine specificity. The neutron structure analysis of catalytic triad with Trp169 and His210 was presented. His57 was double protonated and formed hydrogen bonds to Ser194Oγ and Asp113Oδ1, Oδ2.

  15. A preliminary neutron diffraction analysis of Achromobacter protease I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achromobacter protease I (API, E.C. 3.4.21.50) is one of the serine proteases produced by Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. API is distinct from the other tripsin type protease in its lysine specificity. The neutron structure analysis of catalytic triad with Trp169 and His210 was presented. His57 was double protonated and formed hydrogen bonds to Ser194Oγ and Asp113Oδ1, Oδ2.

  16. A functional proteomics screen of proteases in colorectal carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    McKerrow, J H; Bhargava, V.; Hansell, E.; Huling, S.; Kuwahara, T.; Matley, M.; Coussens, L; Warren, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteases facilitate several steps in cancer progression. To identify proteases most suitable for drug targeting, actual enzyme activity and not messenger RNA levels or immunoassay of protein is the ideal assay readout. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An automated microtiter plate assay format was modified to allow detection of all four major classes of proteases in tissue samples. Fifteen sets of colorectal carcinoma biopsies representing primary tumor, adjacent normal colon, and liver me...

  17. Self and non-self discrimination by "restriction proteases".

    OpenAIRE

    Lefkovits, I

    1986-01-01

    I propose that an organism possesses a set of specific enzymes ("restriction proteases") that cleave self proteins at defined amino acid sequences unless these sequences are rendered inaccessible by glycosylation. Intracellular proteins are degraded by restriction proteases when cells die. In this way, intracellular proteins remain undetected by the immune system. I propose that some autoimmune diseases are caused by the absence of a specific restriction protease.

  18. Proteolysis in Plastids of Arabidopsis Thaliana: Functional Analysis of ClpS1,2,T and their Physical and Genetic Interactions with the ClpPR Protease Core Complex and Clp Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Wijk, Klaas

    2009-01-12

    Chloroplasts are essential organelles required for plant growth and biomass production. They synthesize many essential secondary metabolites (e.g. hormones, isoprenoids, amino acids, etc.) and house the photosynthetic apparatus needed for conversion of light energy and CO2 into chemical energy [in the form of reduced carbohydrates, ATP and NADPH]. Thus chloroplasts are essential for life on earth and essential for production of bioenergy. Formation and maintenance of a functional chloroplast requires an extensive investment in the biogenesis and homeostasis apparatus. Protease and proteolysis play a critical role in these processes, with the Clp gene family being particularly central. Proteolysis of proteins and protein complexes in plastids is poorly understood, and is not only critical for biogenesis, adaptation and maintenance but is also important for plant development. Several years ago, the vanWijk lab identified a large and relatively abundant ClpP/R/S complex, along with ClpC1,C2 and ClpD chaperones and a putative Clp affinity modulator in plastids. So far, no substrate recognition mechanism has been determined for any Clp complex in plants. The purpose of this grant was to initiate functional analysis of three members of the Clp family.

  19. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Pescosolido

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI, metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP, maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI, and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models.

  20. Induction of Protease Activity in Vibrio anguillarum by Gastrointestinal Mucus

    OpenAIRE

    Denkin, Steven M.; Nelson, David R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of gastrointestinal mucus on protease activity in Vibrio anguillarum was investigated. Protease activity was measured by using an azocasein hydrolysis assay. Cells grown to stationary phase in mucus (200 μg of mucus protein/ml) exhibited ninefold-greater protease activity than cells grown in Luria-Bertani broth plus 2% NaCl (LB20). Protease induction was examined with cells grown in LB20 and resuspended in mucus, LB20, nine-salts solution (NSS [a carbon-, nitrogen-, and phosphorus-...

  1. Characterization of Fibrinolytic Proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Ho Choi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was undertaken to identify fibrinolytic proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom and to characterize a major fibrinolytic protease purified from the venom. Methods: The venom was subjected to chromatography using columns of Q-Sepharose and Sephadex G-75. The molecular weights of fibrinolytic proteases showing fibrinolytic zone in fibrin plate assay were determined in SDS-PAGE (Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis The effects of inhibitors and metal ions on fibrinolytic protease and the proteolysis patterns of fibrinogen, gelatin, and bovine serum albumin were investigated. Results : 1 The fibrinolytic fractions of the three peaks isolated from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained two polypeptides of 46 and 59 kDa and three polypeptides of 32, 18, and 15 kDa and a major polypeptide of 54 kDa, respectively. 2 The fibrinolytic activity of the purified protease of 54 kDA was inhibited by metal chelators, such as EDTA, EGTA, and 1,10-phenanthroline, and disulfhydryl-reducing compounds, such as dithiothreitol and cysteine. 3 Calcium chloride promoted the fibrinolytic activity of the protease, but mercuric chloride and cobalt(II chloride inhibited it. 4 The fibrinolytic protease cleaved preferentially A-chain and slowly B-chain of fibrinogen. It also hydrolyzed gelatin but not bovine serum albumin. Conclusions: The Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained more than three fibrinolytic proteases. The major fibrinolytic protease was a metalloprotease which hydrolyzed both fibrinogen and gelatin, but not bovine serum albumin.

  2. Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease heterologous expressed in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach;

    During germination of barley seeds, the mobilization of protein is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction of the...... active site cysteines and via removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. One of the key cysteine proteases in Barley...

  3. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. → Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. → Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. → Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  4. Different fates of the chloroplast tufA gene following its transfer to the nucleus in green algae.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldauf, S L; Manhart, J R; J.D. Palmer

    1990-01-01

    Previous work suggested that the tufA gene, encoding protein synthesis elongation factor Tu, was transferred from the chloroplast to the nucleus within the green algal lineage giving rise to land plants. In this report we investigate the timing and mode of transfer by examining chloroplast and nuclear DNA from the three major classes of green algae, with emphasis on the class Charophyceae, the proposed sister group to land plants. Filter hybridizations reveal a chloroplast tufA gene in all Ul...

  5. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Roszak, Aleksander W. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.walker@glasgow.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  6. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group

  7. Series of HIV-1 protease nanomolar inhibitors; binding to WT and mutant protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Dohnálek, Jan; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Vondráčková, Eva; Hašek, Jindřich

    Florence : International Union of Crystallography, 2005. C243. [Congress of the International Union of Crystallography /20./. 23.8.2005-31.8.2005, Florence] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB4050312 Keywords : HIV retroviral proteases * HIV drug design * macromolecular crystal structure Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Reversible Unfolding of Rhomboid Intramembrane Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2016-03-29

    Denaturant-induced unfolding of helical membrane proteins provides insights into their mechanism of folding and domain organization, which take place in the chemically heterogeneous, anisotropic environment of a lipid membrane. Rhomboid proteases are intramembrane proteases that play key roles in various diseases. Crystal structures have revealed a compact helical bundle with a buried active site, which requires conformational changes for the cleavage of transmembrane substrates. A dimeric form of the rhomboid protease has been shown to be important for activity. In this study, we examine the mechanism of refolding for two distinct rhomboids to gain insight into their secondary structure-activity relationships. Although helicity is largely abolished in the unfolded states of both proteins, unfolding is completely reversible for HiGlpG but only partially reversible for PsAarA. Refolding of both proteins results in reassociation of the dimer, with a 90% regain of catalytic activity for HiGlpG but only a 70% regain for PsAarA. For both proteins, a broad, gradual transition from the native, folded state to the denatured, partly unfolded state was revealed with the aid of circular dichroism spectroscopy as a function of denaturant concentration, thus arguing against a classical two-state model as found for many globular soluble proteins. Thermal denaturation has irreversible destabilizing effects on both proteins, yet reveals important functional details regarding substrate accessibility to the buried active site. This concerted biophysical and functional analysis demonstrates that HiGlpG, with a simple six-transmembrane-segment organization, is more robust than PsAarA, which has seven predicted transmembrane segments, thus rendering HiGlpG amenable to in vitro studies of membrane-protein folding. PMID:27028647

  9. Genetic interactions reveal that specific defects of chloroplast translation are associated with the suppression of var2-mediated leaf variegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiayan; Zheng, Mengdi; Wang, Rui; Wang, Ruijuan; An, Lijun; Rodermel, Steve R; Yu, Fei

    2013-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development. PMID:23721655

  10. RNA transcription in isolated chloroplasts during senescence and rejuvenation of intact cotyledons of CUCURBITA PEPO L. (ZUCCHINI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA transcription was studied in intact chloroplasts isolated from cotyledons of Cucurbita pepoL. (zucchini) during their growth and development including natural senescence and rejuvenation. Rejuvenation of cotyledons was studied after decapitation of the epicotyl above the senescing yellow cotyledons. Maximal incorporation of [32P] UTP into overall chloroplast RNA was measured two days after exposure of seedlings to light (day 6 th after the onset of germination), followed by a gradual decrease reaching minimal values at the age of 25-28 days when cotyledons began to yellow and eventually die. Rejuvenation of cotyledons completely restored chloroplast RNA synthesis and fifteen days after decapitation (at the age of 40 days), the values of chloroplast transcription even exceeded that of the maximal transcriptional activity in young cotyledons. Inhibitory analysis with tagetitoxin (a specific inhibitor of plastid encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase (PEP)) showed that in young and rejuvenated cotyledons about 85% of chloroplast RNA polymerase activity was due to PEP and only 15% corresponded to the nuclear encoded plastid RNA polymerase (NEP). Definite regions of two chloroplast encoded genes were amplified by means of PCR technique using specific DNA primers for Rubisco large subunit gene (rbcL) and the housekeeping gene for chloroplast 16S rRNA as well as chloroplast DNA as a template. The appropriate lengths of the amplified DNA fragments were checked by restriction analysis

  11. The novel protein DELAYED PALE-GREENING1 is required for early chloroplast biogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Li, Weichun; Cheng, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is one of the most important subjects in plant biology. In this study, an Arabidopsis early chloroplast biogenesis mutant with a delayed pale-greening phenotype (dpg1) was isolated from a T-DNA insertion mutant collection. Both cotyledons and true leaves of dpg1 mutants were initially albino but gradually became pale green as the plant matured. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed a delayed proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. Sequence and transcription analyses showed that AtDPG1 encodes a putatively chloroplast-localized protein containing three predicted transmembrane helices and that its expression depends on both light and developmental status. GUS staining for AtDPG1::GUS transgenic lines showed that this gene was widely expressed throughout the plant and that higher expression levels were predominantly found in green tissues during the early stages of Arabidopsis seedling development. Furthermore, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis and chloroplast development were substantially down-regulated in the dpg1 mutant. These data indicate that AtDPG1 plays an essential role in early chloroplast biogenesis, and its absence triggers chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde signalling, which ultimately down-regulates the expression of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. PMID:27160321

  12. Genetic Interactions Reveal that Specific Defects of Chloroplast Translation are Associated with the Suppression of var2-Mediated Leaf Variegation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiayan Liu; Mengdi Zheng; Rui Wang; Ruijuan Wang; Lijun An; Steve R. Rodermel; Fei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development.

  13. Production and cleavage specificity determination of serine proteases mMCP-4, mMCP-5, rMCP-2 and two platypus serine proteases of the chymase locus.

    OpenAIRE

    Sidibeh, Cherno Omar

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteases are a family of enzymes with a wide array of functions across both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Here we have attempted to produce the serine proteases rat mast cell protease 2 and mouse mast cell protease 5 in a culture of HEK 293 cells; and mouse mast cell protease 4, platypus granzyme B-like protease and platypus hypothetical protease in a baculovirus expression system. Following production we wanted to analyse these serine proteases using a phage display assay and a battery...

  14. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain fam...

  15. A review on production of serine alkaline protease by Bacillus spp

    OpenAIRE

    Biswanath Bhunia; Bikram Basak; Apurba Dey

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, protease has gained considerable importance in the world market. Proteases are groups of proteins included in the subclass hydrolases, within the main class enzymes. Serine alkaline proteases (SAP) are one of the most important groups of industrial enzymes. They account for approximately 35% of the total microbial enzyme sales. Serine protease is produced by various types of fermentation techniques using microorganism. Among the proteases, bacterial proteases are more signifi...

  16. Intramembrane Proteolysis by Signal Peptide Peptidases: A Comparative Discussion of GXGD-type Aspartyl Proteases*

    OpenAIRE

    Fluhrer, Regina; Steiner, Harald; Haass, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Intramembrane-cleaving proteases are required for reverse signaling and membrane protein degradation. A major class of these proteases is represented by the GXGD-type aspartyl proteases. GXGD describes a novel signature sequence that distinguishes these proteases from conventional aspartyl proteases. Members of the family of the GXGD-type aspartyl proteases are the Alzheimer disease-related γ-secretase, the signal peptide peptidases and their homologs, and the bacteria...

  17. Insights from the complete chloroplast genome into the evolution of Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Zhang

    Full Text Available Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. is one of the oldest oilseed crops. In order to investigate the evolutionary characters according to the Sesame Genome Project, apart from sequencing its nuclear genome, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of S. indicum cv. Yuzhi 11 (white seeded using Illumina and 454 sequencing. Comparisons of chloroplast genomes between S. indicum and the 18 other higher plants were then analyzed. The chloroplast genome of cv. Yuzhi 11 contains 153,338 bp and a total of 114 unique genes (KC569603. The number of chloroplast genes in sesame is the same as that in Nicotiana tabacum, Vitis vinifera and Platanus occidentalis. The variation in the length of the large single-copy (LSC regions and inverted repeats (IR in sesame compared to 18 other higher plant species was the main contributor to size variation in the cp genome in these species. The 77 functional chloroplast genes, except for ycf1 and ycf2, were highly conserved. The deletion of the cp ycf1 gene sequence in cp genomes may be due either to its transfer to the nuclear genome, as has occurred in sesame, or direct deletion, as has occurred in Panax ginseng and Cucumis sativus. The sesame ycf2 gene is only 5,721 bp in length and has lost about 1,179 bp. Nucleotides 1-585 of ycf2 when queried in BLAST had hits in the sesame draft genome. Five repeats (R10, R12, R13, R14 and R17 were unique to the sesame chloroplast genome. We also found that IR contraction/expansion in the cp genome alters its rate of evolution. Chloroplast genes and repeats display the signature of convergent evolution in sesame and other species. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Sesamum and other higher plants.

  18. Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Mongolia medicine Artemisia frigida and phylogenetic relationships with other plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artemisia frigida Willd. is an important Mongolian traditional medicinal plant with pharmacological functions of stanch and detumescence. However, there is little sequence and genomic information available for Artemisia frigida, which makes phylogenetic identification, evolutionary studies, and genetic improvement of its value very difficult. We report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida based on 454 pyrosequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The complete chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida is 151,076 bp including a large single copy (LSC region of 82,740 bp, a small single copy (SSC region of 18,394 bp and a pair of inverted repeats (IRs of 24,971 bp. The genome contains 114 unique genes and 18 duplicated genes. The chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida contains a small 3.4 kb inversion within a large 23 kb inversion in the LSC region, a unique feature in Asteraceae. The gene order in the SSC region of Artemisia frigida is inverted compared with the other 6 Asteraceae species with the chloroplast genomes sequenced. This inversion is likely caused by an intramolecular recombination event only occurred in Artemisia frigida. The existence of rich SSR loci in the Artemisia frigida chloroplast genome provides a rare opportunity to study population genetics of this Mongolian medicinal plant. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates a sister relationship between Artemisia frigida and four other species in Asteraceae, including Ageratina adenophora, Helianthus annuus, Guizotia abyssinica and Lactuca sativa, based on 61 protein-coding sequences. Furthermore, Artemisia frigida was placed in the tribe Anthemideae in the subfamily Asteroideae (Asteraceae based on ndhF and trnL-F sequence comparisons. CONCLUSION: The chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida was assembled and analyzed in this study, representing the first plastid genome sequenced in the Anthemideae tribe. This complete chloroplast genome

  19. Preferential translation of chloroplast ribosomal proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear cr-1 mutant of C. reinhardtii is deficient in the 30S subunit of the chloroplast (cp) ribosome and in cp protein synthesis. The cp spectinomycin resistant mutant, spr-u-1-27-3, has a normal level of 70S ribosomes but only a low rate of cp protein synthesis with spectinomycin present. In both mutants there is little accumulation of the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco LSU), but near wild-type levels of cp synthesized r-proteins. In cells pulse-labelled with 35SO4 and immunoprecipitated with specific antisera, the ratio of the rate of synthesis of cp r-proteins to that of Rubisco LSU is 7 times greater in both mutants than in wild-type. No difference in the rate of turnover between r-proteins and Rubisco LSU in mutant and wild-type cells was observed during a one hour chase. The mRNA levels for r-protein L1 and Rubisco LSU actually increase slightly in the mutants. These data suggest that C. reinhardtii has a translation mechanism for preferential synthesis of cp r-proteins that operates under conditions of reduced total cp protein synthesis

  20. Identification of the Elusive Pyruvate Reductase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Steven J; Taha, Hussein; Yeoman, Justin A; Iamshanova, Oksana; Chan, Kher Xing; Boehm, Marko; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G; Bialek, Wojciech; Murray, James W; Nixon, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Under anoxic conditions the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates various fermentation pathways leading to the creation of formate, acetate, ethanol and small amounts of other metabolites including d-lactate and hydrogen. Progress has been made in identifying the enzymes involved in these pathways and their subcellular locations; however, the identity of the enzyme involved in reducing pyruvate to d-lactate has remained unclear. Based on sequence comparisons, enzyme activity measurements, X-ray crystallography, biochemical fractionation and analysis of knock-down mutants, we conclude that pyruvate reduction in the chloroplast is catalyzed by a tetrameric NAD(+)-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase encoded by Cre07.g324550. Its expression during aerobic growth supports a possible function as a 'lactate valve' for the export of lactate to the mitochondrion for oxidation by cytochrome-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenases and by glycolate dehydrogenase. We also present a revised spatial model of fermentation based on our immunochemical detection of the likely pyruvate decarboxylase, PDC3, in the cytoplasm. PMID:26574578

  1. Wood identification with PCR targeting noncoding chloroplast DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Guangjie; Ping, Liyan

    2011-12-01

    Wood identification is extremely important in the modern forest industry. It also has significant applications in forensics, as well as in archeology and ecological research. In this study, five universal primer pairs amplifying chloroplast noncoding sequences of 300-1,200 bp were designed. Sequencing these amplicons in combination can lead to reliable identification of logs and wood products to cultivar, ecotype, or even the falling population. These primer pairs work on both gymnosperms and angiosperm trees. They also are potentially applicable to accurately identify shrubs and herbaceous species. In addition, a wood DNA purification method is proposed in which N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) is used to increase the quality and quantity of extracted DNA. This method was first validated using air-dried timber disks from three different tree species that were felled 4 years ago. The sapwood and outer heartwood provided the best locations for DNA extraction. The method was also successfully applied to extract DNA from the recalcitrant processed white oak wood, randomly selected staves of wine barrels. The single nucleotide polymorphism detected on the oak DNA sequences showed correlation to their geographical origins. PMID:22038094

  2. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  3. Two complete chloroplast genome sequences of Cannabis sativa varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyehyun; Seo, Boyoung; Lee, Seunghwan; Ahn, Dong-Ha; Jo, Euna; Park, Jin-Kyoung; Min, Gi-Sik

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we determined the complete chloroplast (cp) genomes from two varieties of Cannabis sativa. The genome sizes were 153,848 bp (the Korean non-drug variety, Cheungsam) and 153,854 bp (the African variety, Yoruba Nigeria). The genome structures were identical with 131 individual genes [86 protein-coding genes (PCGs), eight rRNA, and 37 tRNA genes]. Further, except for the presence of an intron in the rps3 genes of two C. sativa varieties, the cp genomes of C. sativa had conservative features similar to that of all known species in the order Rosales. To verify the position of C. sativa within the order Rosales, we conducted phylogenetic analysis by using concatenated sequences of all PCGs from 17 complete cp genomes. The resulting tree strongly supported monophyly of Rosales. Further, the family Cannabaceae, represented by C. sativa, showed close relationship with the family Moraceae. The phylogenetic relationship outlined in our study is well congruent with those previously shown for the order Rosales. PMID:26104156

  4. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Abies nephrolepis (Pinaceae: Abietoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Keun Yi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant chloroplast (cp genome has maintained a relatively conserved structure and gene content throughout evolution. Cp genome sequences have been used widely for resolving evolutionary and phylogenetic issues at various taxonomic levels of plants. Here, we report the complete cp genome of Abies nephrolepis. The A. nephrolepis cp genome is 121,336 base pairs (bp in length including a pair of short inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb of 139 bp each separated by a small single copy (SSC region of 54,323 bp (SSC and a large single copy region of 66,735 bp (LSC. It contains 114 genes, 68 of which are protein coding genes, 35 tRNA and four rRNA genes, six open reading frames, and one pseudogene. Seventeen repeat units and 64 simple sequence repeats (SSR have been detected in A. nephrolepis cp genome. Large IR sequences locate in 42-kb inversion points (1186 bp. The A. nephrolepis cp genome is identical to Abies koreana’s which is closely related to taxa. Pairwise comparison between two cp genomes revealed 140 polymorphic sites in each. Complete cp genome sequence of A. nephrolepis has a significant potential to provide information on the evolutionary pattern of Abietoideae and valuable data for development of DNA markers for easy identification and classification.

  5. Characterizing proteases in an Antarctic Janthinobacterium sp. isolate:Evidence of a protease horizontal gene transfer event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cecilia Martinez-Rosales; Juan Jos Marizcurrena; Andrs Iriarte; Natalia Fullana; Hctor Musto; Susana Castro-Sowinski

    2015-01-01

    We report the isolation of a cold-adapted bacterium belonging to the genus Janthinobacterium (named AU11), from a water sample collected in Lake Uruguay (King George Island, South Shetlands). AU11 (growth between 4°C and 30°C) produces a single cold-active extracellular protease (ExPAU11), differentially expressed at low temperature. ExPAU11 was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) as an alkaline metallo-protease (70% coverage with an extracellular protease of Janthinobacterium sp. PI12), and by protease-inhibitor screening identified as a serine-protease. To the best of our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence of a cold-active extracellular protease produced by Janthinobacterium. Furthermore, we identified a serine-protease gene (named JSP8A) showing 60% identity (98%query coverage) to subtilisin peptidases belonging to the S8 family (S8A subfamily) of many cyanobacteria. A phylogenetic analysis of the JSP8A protease, along with related bacterial protein sequences, confirms that JSP8A clusters with S8A subtilisin sequences from different cyanobacteria, and is clearly separated from S8A bacterial sequences of other phyla (including its own). An analysis of the genomic organization around JSP8A suggests that this protease gene was acquired in an event that duplicated a racemase gene involved in transforming L- to D-amino acids. Our results suggest that AU11 probably acquired this subtilisin-like protease gene by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from a cyanobacterium. We discuss the relevance of a bacterial protease-HGT in the Antarctic environment in light of this hypothesis.

  6. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  7. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B;

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned with and...

  8. Effect of proteases on the β-thromboglobulin radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat peritoneal mast cells and mast cell granules were evaluated by radioimmunoassay for the presence of β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4. The initial assays indicated that a β-thromboglobulin cross reacting material was released from mast cells by compound 48/80 in a similar dose-dependent manner as histamine release. The material was also found to be associated with purified granules. However, the use of protease inhibitors in the buffers completely abolished the positive assays. Further evaluation of the effects of various proteases on the β-thromboglobulin assay indicated that elastase would also generate a false positive assay which could then be neutralized by the use of α1-antitrypsin as a protease inhibitor. There was no protease effect on the platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay which always showed no detectable amounts with mast cells, granules or proteases. These results clearly indicate the artifactual positive assays which can arise when using certain radioimmunoassay tests in the presence of cell proteases. The use of protease inhibitors is a necessary control when applying a radioimmunoassay to a system with potentially active proteases. 24 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  9. A NOVEL APPROACH TO REGULATE NITROGEN MINERALIZATION USING PROTEASE INHIBITORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineralization of organic N sources by extracellular proteases affects both the availability of inorganic N to plants and losses of N to the environment. We hypothesized that (i) application of purified protease inhibitors would slow down soil N mineralization, and (ii) elevated concentrations of pr...

  10. Isolation and characterization of proteases from Bacteroides melaninogenicus.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimura, S.; Nakamura, T.(International Center for Elementary Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan)

    1981-01-01

    We isolated two types of intracellular proteases from a strain of Bacteroides melaninogenicus. These enzymes were extracted from cells by ultrasonic treatment and were partially purified. These two enzymes (proteases I and II) differed in molecular weight, heat stability, sensitivity to reducing agents, Km value, and optimum pH for activity.

  11. Cathepsin Protease Inhibition Reduces Endometriosis Lesion Establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kristi M; Wieser, Friedrich A; Wilder, Catera L; Sidell, Neil; Platt, Manu O

    2016-05-01

    Endometriosis is a gynecologic disease characterized by the ectopic presence of endometrial tissue on organs within the peritoneal cavity, causing debilitating abdominal pain and infertility. Current treatments alleviate moderate pain symptoms associated with the disorder but exhibit limited ability to prevent new or recurring lesion establishment and growth. Retrograde menstruation has been implicated for introducing endometrial tissue into the peritoneal cavity, but molecular mechanisms underlying attachment and invasion are not fully understood. We hypothesize that cysteine cathepsins, a group of powerful extracellular matrix proteases, facilitate endometrial tissue invasion and endometriosis lesion establishment in the peritoneal wall and inhibiting this activity would decrease endometriosis lesion implantation. To test this, we used an immunocompetent endometriosis mouse model and found that endometriotic lesions exhibited a greater than 5-fold increase in active cathepsins compared to tissue from peritoneal wall or eutopic endometrium, with cathepsins L and K specifically implicated. Human endometriosis lesions also exhibited greater cathepsin activity than adjacent peritoneum tissue, supporting the mouse results. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that inhibiting cathepsin activity could block endometriosis lesion attachment and implantation in vivo. Intraperitoneal injection of the broad cysteine cathepsin inhibitor, E-64, significantly reduced the number of attached endometriosis lesions in our murine model compared to vehicle-treated controls demonstrating that cathepsin proteases contribute to endometriosis lesion establishment, and their inhibition may provide a novel, nonhormonal therapy for endometriosis. PMID:26482207

  12. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. falciparum. Structural and functional analysis of falcipains showed that they have unique domains including a refolding domain and a hemoglobin binding domain. Overall, the complexes of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 with small and macromolecular inhibitors provide structural insight to facilitate the design or modification of effective drug treatment against malaria. Drug development targeting falcipains should be aided by a strong foundation of biochemical and structural studies.

  13. Purification and Characterization of An Alkaline Protease from Acetes chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiachao; LIU Xin; LI Zhaojie; XU Jie; XUE Changhu; GAO Xin

    2005-01-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55 ℃ and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+ , EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  14. Alkaline Protease Production by a Strain of Marine Yeasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; CHI Zhenming; MA Chunling

    2006-01-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China.The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45 ℃.The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5 g soluble starch and 2.0 g NaNO3 in 100 mL seawater with initial pH6.0.The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5 ℃, aeration rate 8.0 L min -1 and agitation speed 150 r min-1.Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 Umg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30 h of fermentation.

  15. Comparative Study of Dermatophytic Fungi for Extra Cellular Proteases Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchita Chaturvedi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are known to produce proteases of different kind. The dermatphytic fungal strains were isolated from human skin tissues for extra cellular proteases efficacy. The present study deals with purification, estimation and comparison of extracellular proteases from five fungal species. (Fusarium sp., Curvularia sp. , Fumigatus Sp. , Aspergillus Sp. and Mucor Sp.. All the five fungal strains showed good amount of extra cellular protease activity in terms of unit total protein content. By testing all the crude extracts for enzyme activity, Fusarium sp. was found to show the highest activity whereas Mucor sp. showed the lowest. The study supports the notion that fungi can be a good source of extracellular enzymes especially proteases.

  16. Chloroplast genome sequencing analysis of Heterosigma akashiwo CCMP452 (West Atlantic and NIES293 (West Pacific strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lybrand Terry

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterokont algae form a monophyletic group within the stramenopile branch of the tree of life. These organisms display wide morphological diversity, ranging from minute unicells to massive, bladed forms. Surprisingly, chloroplast genome sequences are available only for diatoms, representing two (Coscinodiscophyceae and Bacillariophyceae of approximately 18 classes of algae that comprise this taxonomic cluster. A universal challenge to chloroplast genome sequencing studies is the retrieval of highly purified DNA in quantities sufficient for analytical processing. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a simplified method for sequencing chloroplast genomes, using fosmids selected from a total cellular DNA library. The technique has been used to sequence chloroplast DNA of two Heterosigma akashiwo strains. This raphidophyte has served as a model system for studies of stramenopile chloroplast biogenesis and evolution. Results H. akashiwo strain CCMP452 (West Atlantic chloroplast DNA is 160,149 bp in size with a 21,822-bp inverted repeat, whereas NIES293 (West Pacific chloroplast DNA is 159,370 bp in size and has an inverted repeat of 21,665 bp. The fosmid cloning technique reveals that both strains contain an isomeric chloroplast DNA population resulting from an inversion of their single copy domains. Both strains contain multiple small inverted and tandem repeats, non-randomly distributed within the genomes. Although both CCMP452 and NIES293 chloroplast DNAs contains 197 genes, multiple nucleotide polymorphisms are present in both coding and intergenic regions. Several protein-coding genes contain large, in-frame inserts relative to orthologous genes in other plastids. These inserts are maintained in mRNA products. Two genes of interest in H. akashiwo, not previously reported in any chloroplast genome, include tyrC, a tyrosine recombinase, which we hypothesize may be a result of a lateral gene transfer event, and an

  17. Combined analysis of the chloroplast genome and transcriptome of the Antarctic vascular plant Deschampsia antarctica Desv.

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    Jungeun Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antarctic hairgrass (Deschampsia antarctica Desv. is the only natural grass species in the maritime Antarctic. It has been researched as an important ecological marker and as an extremophile plant for studies on stress tolerance. Despite its importance, little genomic information is available for D. antarctica. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome, transcriptome profiles of the coding/noncoding genes, and the posttranscriptional processing by RNA editing in the chloroplast system. RESULTS: The complete chloroplast genome of D. antarctica is 135,362 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure, including the large (LSC: 79,881 bp and small (SSC: 12,519 bp single-copy regions, separated by a pair of identical inverted repeats (IR: 21,481 bp. It contains 114 unique genes, including 81 unique protein-coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Sequence divergence analysis with other plastomes from the BEP clade of the grass family suggests a sister relationship between D. antarctica, Festuca arundinacea and Lolium perenne of the Poeae tribe, based on the whole plastome. In addition, we conducted high-resolution mapping of the chloroplast-derived transcripts. Thus, we created an expression profile for 81 protein-coding genes and identified ndhC, psbJ, rps19, psaJ, and psbA as the most highly expressed chloroplast genes. Small RNA-seq analysis identified 27 small noncoding RNAs of chloroplast origin that were preferentially located near the 5'- or 3'-ends of genes. We also found >30 RNA-editing sites in the D. antarctica chloroplast genome, with a dominance of C-to-U conversions. CONCLUSIONS: We assembled and characterized the complete chloroplast genome sequence of D. antarctica and investigated the features of the plastid transcriptome. These data may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of D. antarctica within the Poaceae family for use in molecular phylogenetic studies and may also help researchers

  18. Discrete redox signaling pathways regulate photosynthetic light-harvesting and chloroplast gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Allen

    Full Text Available In photosynthesis in chloroplasts, two related regulatory processes balance the actions of photosystems I and II. These processes are short-term, post-translational redistribution of light-harvesting capacity, and long-term adjustment of photosystem stoichiometry initiated by control of chloroplast DNA transcription. Both responses are initiated by changes in the redox state of the electron carrier, plastoquinone, which connects the two photosystems. Chloroplast Sensor Kinase (CSK is a regulator of transcription of chloroplast genes for reaction centres of the two photosystems, and a sensor of plastoquinone redox state. We asked whether CSK is also involved in regulation of absorbed light energy distribution by phosphorylation of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II. Chloroplast thylakoid membranes isolated from a CSK T-DNA insertion mutant and from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit similar light- and redox-induced (32P-labelling of LHC II and changes in 77 K chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra, while room-temperature chlorophyll fluorescence emission transients from Arabidopsis leaves are perturbed by inactivation of CSK. The results indicate indirect, pleiotropic effects of reaction centre gene transcription on regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting in vivo. A single, direct redox signal is transmitted separately to discrete transcriptional and post-translational branches of an integrated cytoplasmic regulatory system.

  19. Insights into the subunit in-teractions of the chloroplast ATP synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Subunit interactions of the chloroplast F0F1- ATP synthase were studied using the yeast two-hybrid system. The coding sequences of all the nine subunits of spinach chloroplast ATP synthase were cloned in two-hybrid vectors. The vectors were transformed into the yeast strains HF7c and SFY526 by various pairwise combinations, and the protein interactions were analyzed by measuring the yeast growth on minimal SD medium without serine, lucine and histidine. Interactions of γ Subunit with wild type or two truncated mutants of γ sununit, △εN21 and △εC45, which lose their abilities to inhibit the ATP hydrolysis, were also detected by in vitro and in vivo binding assay. The present results are largely accordant to the common structure model of F0F1-ATP synthase. Different from that in the E. Coli F0F1-ATP synthase, the δ subunit of chloroplast ATP syn- thase could interact with β,γ,ε and all the CF0 subunits in the two-hybrid system. These results suggested that though the chloroplast ATP synthase shares the similar structure and composition of subunits with the enzyme from E. Coli, it may be different in the subunit interactions and con- formational change during catalysis between these two sources of ATP synthase. Based on the present results and our knowledge of structure model of E. Coli ATP synthase, a deduced structure model of chloroplast ATP synthase was proposed.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Codon Usage Patterns Among Mitochondrion, Chloroplast and Nuclear Genes in Triticum aestivum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Juan Zhang; Jie Zhou; Zuo-Feng Li; Li Wang; Xun Gu; Yang Zhong

    2007-01-01

    In many organisms, the difference in codon usage patterns among genes reflects variation in local base compositional biases and the intensity of natural selection. In this study, a comparative analysis was performed to investigate the characteristics of codon bias and factors in shaping the codon usage patterns among mitochondrion,chloroplast and nuclear genes in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). GC contents in nuclear genes were higher than that in mitochondrion and chloroplast genes. The neutrality and correspondence analyses indicated that the codon usage in nuclear genes would be a result of relative strong mutational bias, while the codon usage patterns of rnitochondrion and chloroplast genes were more conserved in GC content and influenced by translation level.The Parity Rule 2 (PR2) plot analysis showed that pyrimidines were used more frequently than purines at the third codon position in the three genomes. In addition, using a new alterative strategy, 11, 12, and 24 triplets were defined as preferred codons in the mitochondrion, chloroplast and nuclear genes, respectively. These findings suggested that the mitochondrion, chloroplast and nuclear genes shared particularly different features of codon usage and evolutionary constraints.

  1. The effect of UV-B radiation on chloroplast translation in Pisum sativum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV-B radiation has previously been reported to reduce growth, flowering, and net photosynthesis. The present study examines the effect of UV-B radiation on isolated chloroplast of 7-10 day old pea seedlings. Amount of (3H)-Leu incorporated into isolated chloroplasts was measured in the presence or absence of UV-B exposure. Preliminary experiments show a 30% inhibition of protein synthesis in isolated chloroplasts after only 20 mins of UV-B exposure (6.9 J/m2/30 min). Percent inhibition of chloroplast translation is directly correlated with UV-B exposure over a 60 min time span. Preliminary studies also show no change in both cold and radiolabeled protein profiles as expressed on 1-D PAGE and autofluorography. Comparative studies on the sensitivity of e- flow vs protein synthesis following UV-B exposure are underway. Further work on the role of oxygen free radicals and the specific site of action of UV-B damage to the translation machinery of chloroplasts will be discussed

  2. A Cyan Fluorescent Reporter Expressed from the Chloroplast Genome of Marchantia polymorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R.; Ueda, Minoru; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Haseloff, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha has received increasing attention as a basal plant model for multicellular studies. Its ease of handling, well-characterized plastome and proven protocols for biolistic plastid transformation qualify M. polymorpha as an attractive platform to study the evolution of chloroplasts during the transition from water to land. In addition, chloroplasts of M. polymorpha provide a convenient test-bed for the characterization of genetic elements involved in plastid gene expression due to the absence of mechanisms for RNA editing. While reporter genes have proven valuable to the qualitative and quantitative study of gene expression in chloroplasts, expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in chloroplasts of M. polymorpha has proven problematic. We report the design of a codon-optimized gfp varian, mturq2cp, which allowed successful expression of a cyan fluorescent protein under control of the tobacco psbA promoter from the chloroplast genome of M. polymorpha. We demonstrate the utility of mturq2cp in (i) early screening for transplastomic events following biolistic transformation of M. polymorpha spores; (ii) visualization of stromules as elements of plastid structure in Marchantia; and (iii) quantitative microscopy for the analysis of promoter activity. PMID:26634291

  3. Proteomic comparison reveals the contribution of chloroplast to salt tolerance of a wheat introgression line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjing; Lv, Hongjun; Zhao, Mingming; Li, Yongchao; Qi, Yueying; Peng, Zhenying; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously bred a salt tolerant wheat cv. SR3 with bread wheat cv. JN177 as the parent via asymmetric somatic hybridization, and found that the tolerance is partially attributed to the superior photosynthesis capacity. Here, we compared the proteomes of two cultivars to unravel the basis of superior photosynthesis capacity. In the maps of two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), there were 26 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), including 18 cultivar-based and 8 stress-responsive ones. 21 of 26 DEPs were identified and classified into four categories, including photosynthesis, photosynthesis system stability, linolenic acid metabolism, and protein synthesis in chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of some DEPs confirmed that the identified DEPs function in the chloroplast. The overexpression of a DEP enhanced salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In line with these data, it is concluded that the contribution of chloroplast to high salinity tolerance of wheat cv. SR3 appears to include higher photosynthesis efficiency by promoting system protection and ROS clearance, stronger production of phytohormone JA by enhancing metabolism activity, and modulating the in chloroplast synthesis of proteins. PMID:27562633

  4. Homologous Comparisons of Photosynthetic System 1 Genes among Cyanobacteria and Chloroplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yu; Pei-Jun Ma; Ding-Ji Shi; Shi-Ming Li; Chang-Lu Wang

    2008-01-01

    It has now believed that chloroplasts arose from cyanobacteria,however,during endosymbiosis,the photosynthetic genes in chloroplasts have been reduced.How these changes occurred during plant evolution was the focus of the present study.Beginning with photosystem Ⅰ (PSI) genes,a homologous comparison of amino acid sequences of 18 subunits of PSI from 10 species of cyanobacteria,chloroplasts in 12 species of eucaryotic algae,and 28 species of plants (including bryophytes,pteridophytes,gymnospermae,dicotyledon and monocotyledon) was undertaken.The data showed that 18 genes of PSIcan be divided into two groups: Part Ⅰ including seven genes (psaA,psaB,psaC,psaI,psaJ,yct3 and ycf4) shared both by cyanobacteria and plant chloroplasts;Part Ⅱ containing another 11 genes (psaD,psaE,psaF,psaK,psaL,psaM,btpA,ycf37,psaG,psaH and psaN) appeared to have diversified in different plant groups.Among Part I genes,psaC,psaA and psaB had higher homology in all species of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.Among Part II genes,only psaG,psaH and psaN emerged in seed plants.

  5. Recombination and Heterologous Expression of Allophycocyanin Gene in the Chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Liang SU; Kai-Xian QIAN; Cong-Ping TAN; Chun-Xiao MENG; Song QIN

    2005-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of multiple genes in the nucleus of transgenic plants requires the introduction of an individual gene and the subsequent backcross to reconstitute multi-subunit proteins or metabolic pathways. In order to accomplish the expression of multiple genes in a single transformation event, we inserted both large and small subunits of allophycocyanin gene (apcA and apcB) into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast expression vector, resulting in papc-S. The constructed vector was then introduced into the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii by micro-particle bombardment. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis revealed that the two genes had integrated into the chloroplast genome. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the two genes from the prokaryotic cyanobacteria could be correctly expressed in the chloroplasts of C. reinhardtii. The expressed foreign protein in transformants accounted for about 2%-3% of total soluble proteins. These findings pave the way to the reconstitution of multi-subunit proteins or metabolic pathways in transgenic C. reinhardtii chloroplasts in a single transformation event.

  6. Construction of a chloroplast protein interaction network and functional mining of photosynthetic proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Bo Yu; Yong-Lan Cui; Kang Chong; Yi-Xue Li; Yu-Hua Li; Zhongming Zhao; Tie-Liu Shi; Zhong-Nan Yang; Guang Li; Guan Wang; Jing-Chun Sun; Peng-Cheng Wang; Chen Wang; Hua-Ling Mi; Wei-Min Ma; Jian Cui

    2008-01-01

    Chloroplast is a typical plant cell organeUe where photosynthesis takes place.In this study,a total of 1 808 chloroplast core proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana were reliably identified by combining the results of previously published studies and our own predictions.We then constructed a chloroplast protein interaction network primarily based on these core protein interactions.The network had 22 925 protein interaction pairs which involved 2 214 proteins.A total of 160 previously uncharacterized proteins were annotated in this network.The subunits of the photosynthetic complexes were modularized,and the functional relationships among photosystem Ⅰ (PSI),photosystem Ⅱ (PSII),light harvesting complex of photosystem Ⅰ (LHC Ⅰ) and light harvesting complex of photosystem Ⅰ (LHC Ⅱ) could be deduced from the predicted protein interactions in this network.We further confirmed an interaction between an unknown protein AT1G52220 and a photosynthetic subunit PSI-D2 by yeast two-hybrid analysis.Our chloroplast protein interaction network should be useful for functional mining of photosynthetic proteins and investigation of chloroplast-related functions at the systems biology level in Arabidopsis.

  7. Chloroplast lipid transfer processes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii involving a TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL 2 (TGD2) orthologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warakanont, Jaruswan; Tsai, Chia-Hong; Michel, Elena J S; Murphy, George R; Hsueh, Peter Y; Roston, Rebecca L; Sears, Barbara B; Benning, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    In plants, lipids of the photosynthetic membrane are synthesized by parallel pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the chloroplast envelope membranes. Lipids derived from the two pathways are distinguished by their acyl-constituents. Following this plant paradigm, the prevalent acyl composition of chloroplast lipids suggests that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas) does not use the ER pathway; however, the Chlamydomonas genome encodes presumed plant orthologues of a chloroplast lipid transporter consisting of TGD (TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL) proteins that are required for ER-to-chloroplast lipid trafficking in plants. To resolve this conundrum, we identified a mutant of Chlamydomonas deleted in the TGD2 gene and characterized the respective protein, CrTGD2. Notably, the viability of the mutant was reduced, showing the importance of CrTGD2. Galactoglycerolipid metabolism was altered in the tgd2 mutant with monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) synthase activity being strongly stimulated. We hypothesize this to be a result of phosphatidic acid accumulation in the chloroplast outer envelope membrane, the location of MGDG synthase in Chlamydomonas. Concomitantly, increased conversion of MGDG into triacylglycerol (TAG) was observed. This TAG accumulated in lipid droplets in the tgd2 mutant under normal growth conditions. Labeling kinetics indicate that Chlamydomonas can import lipid precursors from the ER, a process that is impaired in the tgd2 mutant. PMID:26496373

  8. A Cyan Fluorescent Reporter Expressed from the Chloroplast Genome of Marchantia polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R; Ueda, Minoru; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Haseloff, Jim

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha has received increasing attention as a basal plant model for multicellular studies. Its ease of handling, well-characterized plastome and proven protocols for biolistic plastid transformation qualify M. polymorpha as an attractive platform to study the evolution of chloroplasts during the transition from water to land. In addition, chloroplasts of M. polymorpha provide a convenient test-bed for the characterization of genetic elements involved in plastid gene expression due to the absence of mechanisms for RNA editing. While reporter genes have proven valuable to the qualitative and quantitative study of gene expression in chloroplasts, expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in chloroplasts of M. polymorpha has proven problematic. We report the design of a codon-optimized gfp varian, mturq2cp, which allowed successful expression of a cyan fluorescent protein under control of the tobacco psbA promoter from the chloroplast genome of M. polymorpha. We demonstrate the utility of mturq2cp in (i) early screening for transplastomic events following biolistic transformation of M. polymorpha spores; (ii) visualization of stromules as elements of plastid structure in Marchantia; and (iii) quantitative microscopy for the analysis of promoter activity. PMID:26634291

  9. Blue-light induced development of chloroplasts in isolated seedling roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excised roots of pea seedlings (Pisum sativum var. 'Alaska') cultured in a synthetic medium under sterile conditions exhibited differentiation of functional chloroplasts from leucoplasts when irradiated with blue light (350 to 550 nm). This transition was a relatively slow process; nevertheless, the chloroplasts formed in blue light compared very well to leaf chloroplasts as far as micro-structure and photosynthetic activities are concerned. Apparently certain activities of the apical meristem are mandatory in bringing about a transition from leucoplasts to chloroplasts in blue light. After short-time labelling with [3H]uridine the synthesis of plastid ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was studied either during irradiation with blue and red light (600 to 700 nm), respectively, or in darkness. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that in blue light the synthesis of specific chloroplast rRNA species with molecular weights of 1.1 x 106 and 0.56 x 106 daltons was markedly stimulated. In contrast, in dark cultured roots these RNA species were synthesized to a limited extent only whereas the cytoplasmic rRNA species of 1.3 x 106 and 0.7 x 106 daltons molecular weight were preferentially formed. The same held true for roots irradiated with red light. (author)

  10. Polyuridylylation and processing of transcripts from multiple gene minicircles in chloroplasts of the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    KAUST Repository

    Barbrook, Adrian C.

    2012-05-05

    Although transcription and transcript processing in the chloroplasts of plants have been extensively characterised, the RNA metabolism of other chloroplast lineages across the eukaryotes remains poorly understood. In this paper, we use RT-PCR to study transcription and transcript processing in the chloroplasts of Amphidinium carterae, a model peridinin-containing dinoflagellate. These organisms have a highly unusual chloroplast genome, with genes located on multiple small \\'minicircle\\' elements, and a number of idiosyncratic features of RNA metabolism including transcription via a rolling circle mechanism, and 3′ terminal polyuridylylation of transcripts. We demonstrate that transcription occurs in A. carterae via a rolling circle mechanism, as previously shown in the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa, and present evidence for the production of both polycistronic and monocistronic transcripts from A. carterae minicircles, including several regions containing ORFs previously not known to be expressed. We demonstrate the presence of both polyuridylylated and non-polyuridylylated transcripts in A. carterae, and show that polycistronic transcripts can be terminally polyuridylylated. We present a model for RNA metabolism in dinoflagellate chloroplasts where long polycistronic precursors are processed to form mature transcripts. Terminal polyuridylylation may mark transcripts with the correct 3′ end. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  11. CHLOROPLAST GENETIC TOOL FOR THE GREEN MICROALGAE HAEMATOCOCCUS PLUVIALIS (CHLOROPHYCEAE, VOLVOCALES)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Carla L; Gimpel, Javier; Escobar, Carolina; Marshall, Sergio H; Henríquez, Vitalia

    2012-08-01

    At present, there is strong commercial demand for recombinant proteins, such as antigens, antibodies, biopharmaceuticals, and industrial enzymes, which cannot be fulfilled by existing procedures. Thus, an intensive search for alternative models that may provide efficiency, safety, and quality control is being undertaken by a number of laboratories around the world. The chloroplast of the eukaryotic microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow has arisen as a candidate for a novel expression platform for recombinant protein production. However, there are important drawbacks that need to be resolved before it can become such a system. The most significant of these are chloroplast genome characterizations, and the development of chloroplast transformation vectors based upon specific endogenous promoters and on homologous targeting regions. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of endogenous chloroplast sequences for use as genetic tools for the construction of H. pluvialis specific expression vectors to efficiently transform the chloroplast of this microalga via microprojectile bombardment. As a consequence, H. pluvialis shows promise as a platform for expressing recombinant proteins for biotechnological applications, for instance, the development of oral vaccines for aquaculture. PMID:27009007

  12. Influence of lanthanum on chloroplast ultrastructure of soybean leaves under ultraviolet-B stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Qian; ZHOU Qing

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of lanthanum(Ⅲ) on cell ultrastructure of soybean leaves under elevated ultraviolet-B irradiation (UV-B, 280-320 rim), the chloroplast ultrastructure of soybean seedlings was studied by hydroponics under laboratory conditions. The re-sults showed that the thylakoid in chloroplast was orderly and clearly as soybean leaves were pretreated by La(Ⅲ). The thylakoid was indis-tinctly disordered, expanded and even indiscoverable in the chloroplast under UV-B stress. The impact on the thylakoid by the high in-tensity UV-B irradiation (T2) was bigger than that by the low intensity UV-B irradiation (T1). However, the destruction of the chloroplast structure caused by UV-B stress was alleviated by La(Ⅲ), and the arrangement of the thylakoid in the chloroplast became orderly and clearly. The effect of the alleviation by La(Ⅲ) under the low intensity UV-B irradiation (T1) was better than that under the high intensity UV-B irradiation (T2).

  13. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Omani lime (Citrus aurantiifolia and comparative analysis within the rosids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Jiun Su

    Full Text Available The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C. aurantiifolia. The complete C. aurantiifolia chloroplast genome is 159,893 bp in length; the organization and gene content are similar to most of the rosids lineages characterized to date. Through comparison with the sweet orange (C. sinensis chloroplast genome, we identified three intergenic regions and 94 simple sequence repeats (SSRs that are potentially informative markers with resolution for interspecific relationships. These markers can be utilized to better understand the origin of cultivated Citrus. A comparison among 72 species belonging to 10 families of representative rosids lineages also provides new insights into their chloroplast genome evolution.

  14. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of the Medicinal Plant Pogostemon cablin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Xiao, Hongtao; Deng, Cao; Xiong, Liang; Yang, Jian; Peng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pogostemon cablin, the natural source of patchouli alcohol, is an important herb in the Lamiaceae family. Here, we present the entire chloroplast genome of P. cablin. This genome, with 38.24% GC content, is 152,460 bp in length. The genome presents a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (each 25,417 bp in length), separated by one small and one large single-copy region (17,652 and 83,974 bp in length, respectively). The chloroplast genome encodes 127 genes, of which 107 genes are single-copy, including 79 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 24 tRNA genes. The genome structure, GC content, and codon usage of this chloroplast genome are similar to those of other species in the family, except that it encodes less protein-coding genes and tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that P. cablin diverged from the Scutellarioideae clade about 29.45 million years ago (Mya). Furthermore, most of the simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are short polyadenine or polythymine repeats that contribute to high AT content in the chloroplast genome. Complete sequences and annotation of P. cablin chloroplast genome will facilitate phylogenic, population and genetic engineering research investigations involving this particular species. PMID:27275817

  15. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of the Medicinal Plant Pogostemon cablin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang He

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pogostemon cablin, the natural source of patchouli alcohol, is an important herb in the Lamiaceae family. Here, we present the entire chloroplast genome of P. cablin. This genome, with 38.24% GC content, is 152,460 bp in length. The genome presents a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (each 25,417 bp in length, separated by one small and one large single-copy region (17,652 and 83,974 bp in length, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 127 genes, of which 107 genes are single-copy, including 79 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 24 tRNA genes. The genome structure, GC content, and codon usage of this chloroplast genome are similar to those of other species in the family, except that it encodes less protein-coding genes and tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that P. cablin diverged from the Scutellarioideae clade about 29.45 million years ago (Mya. Furthermore, most of the simple sequence repeats (SSRs are short polyadenine or polythymine repeats that contribute to high AT content in the chloroplast genome. Complete sequences and annotation of P. cablin chloroplast genome will facilitate phylogenic, population and genetic engineering research investigations involving this particular species.

  16. Cross genome comparisons of serine proteases in Arabidopsis and rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowdhamini R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases are one of the largest groups of proteolytic enzymes found across all kingdoms of life and are associated with several essential physiological pathways. The availability of Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa genome sequences has permitted the identification and comparison of the repertoire of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species. Results Despite the differences in genome sizes between Arabidopsis and rice, we identified a very similar number of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species (206 and 222, respectively. Nearly 40% of the above sequences were identified as potential orthologues. Atypical members could be identified in the plant genomes for Deg, Clp, Lon, rhomboid proteases and species-specific members were observed for the highly populated subtilisin and serine carboxypeptidase families suggesting multiple lateral gene transfers. DegP proteases, prolyl oligopeptidases, Clp proteases and rhomboids share a significantly higher percentage orthology between the two genomes indicating substantial evolutionary divergence was set prior to speciation. Single domain architectures and paralogues for several putative subtilisins, serine carboxypeptidases and rhomboids suggest they may have been recruited for additional roles in secondary metabolism with spatial and temporal regulation. The analysis reveals some domain architectures unique to either or both of the plant species and some inactive proteases, like in rhomboids and Clp proteases, which could be involved in chaperone function. Conclusion The systematic analysis of the serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species has provided some insight into the possible functional associations of previously uncharacterised serine protease-like proteins. Further investigation of these aspects may prove beneficial in our understanding of similar processes in commercially significant crop plant species.

  17. The family of Deg/HtrA proteases in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuhmann Holger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Deg/HtrA family of ATP-independent serine endopeptidases is present in nearly all organisms from bacteria to human and vascular plants. In recent years, multiple deg/htrA protease genes were identified in various plant genomes. During genome annotations most proteases were named according to the order of discovery, hence the same names were sometimes given to different types of Deg/HtrA enzymes in different plant species. This can easily lead to false inference of individual protease functions based solely on a shared name. Therefore, the existing names and classification of these proteolytic enzymes does not meet our current needs and a phylogeny-based standardized nomenclature is required. Results Using phylogenetic and domain arrangement analysis, we improved the nomenclature of the Deg/HtrA protease family, standardized protease names based on their well-established nomenclature in Arabidopsis thaliana, and clarified the evolutionary relationship between orthologous enzymes from various photosynthetic organisms across several divergent systematic groups, including dicots, a monocot, a moss and a green alga. Furthermore, we identified a “core set” of eight proteases shared by all organisms examined here that might provide all the proteolytic potential of Deg/HtrA proteases necessary for a hypothetical plant cell. Conclusions In our proposed nomenclature, the evolutionarily closest orthologs have the same protease name, simplifying scientific communication when comparing different plant species and allowing for more reliable inference of protease functions. Further, we proposed that the high number of Deg/HtrA proteases in plants is mainly due to gene duplications unique to the respective organism.

  18. Phase-Variable Expression of an Operon Encoding Extracellular Alkaline Protease, a Serine Protease Homolog, and Lipase in Pseudomonas brassicacearum

    OpenAIRE

    Chabeaud, Philippe; de Groot, Arjan; Bitter, Wilbert; Tommassen, Jan; Heulin, Thierry; Achouak, Wafa

    2001-01-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas brassicacearum forms phenotypic variants which do not show extracellular protease and lipase activity. The operon encoding these enzymes, a serine protease homolog, and a type I secretion machinery was characterized. Transcriptional lacZ gene fusions revealed that the expression of the operon is under the control of phase variation.

  19. Towards resolving Lamiales relationships: insights from rapidly evolving chloroplast sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heubl Günther

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the large angiosperm order Lamiales, a diverse array of highly specialized life strategies such as carnivory, parasitism, epiphytism, and desiccation tolerance occur, and some lineages possess drastically accelerated DNA substitutional rates or miniaturized genomes. However, understanding the evolution of these phenomena in the order, and clarifying borders of and relationships among lamialean families, has been hindered by largely unresolved trees in the past. Results Our analysis of the rapidly evolving trnK/matK, trnL-F and rps16 chloroplast regions enabled us to infer more precise phylogenetic hypotheses for the Lamiales. Relationships among the nine first-branching families in the Lamiales tree are now resolved with very strong support. Subsequent to Plocospermataceae, a clade consisting of Carlemanniaceae plus Oleaceae branches, followed by Tetrachondraceae and a newly inferred clade composed of Gesneriaceae plus Calceolariaceae, which is also supported by morphological characters. Plantaginaceae (incl. Gratioleae and Scrophulariaceae are well separated in the backbone grade; Lamiaceae and Verbenaceae appear in distant clades, while the recently described Linderniaceae are confirmed to be monophyletic and in an isolated position. Conclusions Confidence about deep nodes of the Lamiales tree is an important step towards understanding the evolutionary diversification of a major clade of flowering plants. The degree of resolution obtained here now provides a first opportunity to discuss the evolution of morphological and biochemical traits in Lamiales. The multiple independent evolution of the carnivorous syndrome, once in Lentibulariaceae and a second time in Byblidaceae, is strongly supported by all analyses and topological tests. The evolution of selected morphological characters such as flower symmetry is discussed. The addition of further sequence data from introns and spacers holds promise to eventually obtain a

  20. Geographic variation of chloroplast DNA in Platycarya strobilacea (Juglandaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Chao CHEN; Li ZHANG; Jie ZENG; Fei SHI; Hong YANG; Yun-Rui MAO; Cheng-Xin FU

    2012-01-01

    The monotypic genus Platycarya (Juglandaceae) is one of the most widespread temperate tree species in East Asia.In this research,we implemented a phylogeographical study using chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) (psbA-trnH and atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer) sequences on Platycarya strobilacea,in order to identify the locations of the species' main refugia and migration routes.A total of 180 individuals of P.stobilacea from 27 populations from China and Jeju Island (Korea) were collected.The results revealed that P.strobilacea had 35 haplotypes for the two intergenic spacers and high genetic diversity (hT =0.926).This surprisingly high diversity ofhaplotypes indicates its long evolutionary history,which is in agreement with previous phylogenetic analyses and fossil records.Significant cpDNA population subdivision was detected (GST =0.720; NST =0.862),suggesting low levels of recurrent gene flow through seeds among populations and significant phylogeographical structure (NST > GST,P < 0.05).The construction of phylogenetic relationships of the 35 chlorotypes detected four major cpDNA clades.Divergence dating analyses using BEAST suggest that the divergence of the major cpDNA clades occurred before the Miocene.Demographic analysis indicated that the Eastern clade underwent localized demographic expansions.The molecular phylogenetic data,together with the geographic distribution of the haplotypes,suggest the existence of multiple glacial refugia in most of its current range in China through Quaternary climatic oscillations.

  1. Comparative studies on codon usage pattern of chloroplasts and their host nuclear genes in four plant species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qingpo Liu; Qingzhong Xue

    2005-04-01

    A detailed comparison was made of codon usage of chloroplast genes with their host (nuclear) genes in the four angiosperm species Oryza sativa, Zea mays, Triticum aestivum and Arabidopsis thaliana. The average GC content of the entire genes, and at the three codon positions individually, was higher in nuclear than in chloroplast genes, suggesting different genomic organization and mutation pressures in nuclear and chloroplast genes. The results of Nc-plots and neutrality plots suggested that nucleotide compositional constraint had a large contribution to codon usage bias of nuclear genes in O. sativa, Z. mays, and T. aestivum, whereas natural selection was likely to be playing a large role in codon usage bias in chloroplast genomes. Correspondence analysis and chi-test showed that regardless of the genomic environment (species) of the host, the codon usage pattern of chloroplast genes differed from nuclear genes of their host species by their AU-richness. All the chloroplast genomes have predominantly A- and/or U-ending codons, whereas nuclear genomes have G-, C- or U-ending codons as their optimal codons. These findings suggest that the chloroplast genome might display particular characteristics of codon usage that are different from its host nuclear genome. However, one feature common to both chloroplast and nuclear genomes in this study was that pyrimidines were found more frequently than purines at the synonymous codon position of optimal codons.

  2. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Lilium hansonii Leichtlin ex D.D.T.Moore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Hwang, Yoon-Jung; Lee, Sang-Choon; Yang, Tae-Jin; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2016-09-01

    Lilium hansonii is a lily species native to Korea and an important wild species for lily breeding. The chloroplast genome of L. hansonii was completed by de novo assembly using the small amount of whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of L. hansonii was 152 655 bp long and consisted of large single copy region (82 051 bp), small single copy region (17 620 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (26 492 bp). A total of 115 genes were annotated, which included 81 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that L. hansonii is most closely related to L. superbum (Turk's-cap lily) and L. longiflorum (Easter lily). PMID:26404645

  3. Identification of CP12 as a Novel Calcium-Binding Protein in Chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Gomes Rocha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays an important role in the regulation of several chloroplast processes. However, very little is still understood about the calcium fluxes or calcium-binding proteins present in plastids. Indeed, classical EF-hand containing calcium-binding proteins appears to be mostly absent from plastids. In the present study we analyzed the stroma fraction of Arabidopsis chloroplasts for the presence of novel calcium-binding proteins using 2D-PAGE separation followed by calcium overlay assay. A small acidic protein was identified by mass spectrometry analyses as the chloroplast protein CP12 and the ability of CP12 to bind calcium was confirmed with recombinant proteins. CP12 plays an important role in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle participating in the assembly of a supramolecular complex between phosphoribulokinase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, indicating that calcium signaling could play a role in regulating carbon fixation.

  4. In vitro chloroplast protein synthesis by the chromophytic alga Olisthodiscus luteus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chloroplasts of chlorophytic and chromophytic plants exhibit significant morphological and biochemical differences. Presently, it is impossible to compare the influence of ctDNA on the structure and function of organelles within these two phylogenetic groups for no data exist in the literature on the profile of protein products synthesized by a chromophytic plastid. In this paper, the chloroplast DNA coded proteins of the chromophytic plant Olisthodiscus luteus are investigated by labeling isolated chloroplasts in vitro. Isolated plastids of excellent morphological condition are pulse labeled with [35S]methionine. Approximately 100 proteins are detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and fluorography. However, these isolated plastids have a number of unusual characteristics: (1) they are photosynthetically inactive; (2) in vitro protein synthesis is light independent; (3) all proteins synthesized in vitro are membrane associated

  5. Induction events and short-term regulation of electron transport in chloroplasts: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic electron transport at different levels of structural and functional organization of photosynthetic apparatus provides efficient performance of oxygenic photosynthesis in plants. This review begins with a brief overview of the chloroplast electron transport chain. Then two noninvasive biophysical methods (measurements of slow induction of chlorophyll a fluorescence and EPR signals of oxidized P700 centers) are exemplified to illustrate the possibility of monitoring induction events in chloroplasts in vivo and in situ. Induction events in chloroplasts are considered and briefly discussed in the context of short-term mechanisms of the following regulatory processes: (i) pH-dependent control of the intersystem electron transport; (ii) the light-induced activation of the Calvin-Benson cycle; (iii) optimization of electron transport due to fitting alternative pathways of electron flow and partitioning light energy between photosystems I and II; and (iv) the light-induced remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus and thylakoid membranes. PMID:25680580

  6. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum L. (Polygonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xiao-Jie; Huang, Min; Wang, Xu-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum L. (Polygonaceae) has been reconstructed from the whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The genome is 161 541 bp in length, and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 86 518 bp) and small (SSC, 13 111 bp) single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 30 956 bp each). The chloroplast genome contains 131 genes, including 84 protein-coding genes (78 PCG species), eight ribosomal RNA genes (four rRNA species) and 37 transfer RNA genes (28 tRNA species). Phylogenetic tree based on the maximum parsimony (MP) analysis of 65 chloroplast protein-coding genes for 13 taxa demonstrated a close relationship between R. palmatum and Fagopyrum esculentum subsp. ancestrale in Polygonaceae. PMID:26153751

  7. Metabolic engineering of chloroplasts for artemisinic acid biosynthesis and impact on plant growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhawna Saxena; Mayavan Subramaniyan; Karan Malhotra; Neel Sarovar Bhavesh; Shobha Devi Potlakayala; Shashi Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Chloroplasts offer high-level transgene expression and transgene containment due to maternal inheritance, and are ideal hosts for biopharmaceutical biosynthesis via multigene engineering. To exploit these advantages, we have expressed 12 enzymes in chloroplasts for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid (precursor of artemisinin, antimalarial drug) in an alternative plant system. Integration of transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome via homologous recombination was confirmed by molecular analysis, and biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in plant leaf tissues was detected with the help of 13C NMR and ESI-mass spectrometry. The excess metabolic flux of isopentenyl pyrophosphate generated by an engineered mevalonate pathway was diverted for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid. However, expression of megatransgenes impacted the growth of the transplastomic plantlets. By combining two exogenous pathways, artemisinic acid was produced in transplastomic plants, which can be improved further using better metabolic engineering strategies for commercially viable yield of desirable isoprenoid products.

  8. Identification of the 64 kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein as phosphoglucomutase. [Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvucci, M.E.; Drake, R.R.; Broadbent, K.P.; Haley, B.E. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA)); Hanson, K.R.; McHale, N.A. (Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Phosphorylation of the 64 kilodalton stromal phosphoprotein by incubation of pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast extracts with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP decreased in the presence of Glc-6-P and Glc-1,6-P{sub 2}, but was stimulated by glucose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis following incubation of intact chloroplasts and stromal extracts with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP, or incubation of stromal extracts and partially purified phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) with ({sup 32}P)Glc-1-P showed that the identical 64 kilodalton polypeptide was labeled. A 62 kilodalton polypeptide was phosphorylated by incubation of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) stromal extracts with either ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP or ({sup 32}P)Glc-1-P. In contrast, an analogous polypeptide was not phosphorylated in extracts from a tobacco mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase activity. The results indicate that the 64 (or 62) kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein is phosphoglucomutase.

  9. The complete sequence of the chloroplast genome of the green microalga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourasse, Nicolas J; Barbi, Tommaso; Waterhouse, Janet C; Shtaida, Nastassia; Leu, Stefan; Boussiba, Sammy; Purton, Saul; Vallon, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    We hereby report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of the green unicellular alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa (strain SAG 2468). The genome consists of a circular chromosome of 156,028 bp, which is 72% A-T rich and does not contain a large rRNA-encoding inverted repeat. It is predicted to encode a total of 111 genes including 78 protein-coding, three rRNA, and 30 tRNA genes. The genome sequence also carries a self-splicing group I intron and a group II intron remnant. Overall, the gene and intron content of the L. incisa chloroplast genome is highly similar to that of other species of Trebouxiophyceae. In contrast, the L. incisa chloroplast genome harbors 88 copies of various intergenic dispersed DNA repeat sequences that are all unique to L. incisa. PMID:25423517

  10. Evolution from the prokaryotic to the higher plant chloroplast signal recognition particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Träger, Chantal; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Ziehe, Dominik;

    2012-01-01

    the conserved SRP54 and the SRP receptor, FtsY, are present in higher plant chloroplasts. In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic distribution of SRP components in photosynthetic organisms to elucidate the evolution of the SRP system. We identified conserved plastid SRP RNAs within all...... data lead to the view that the P. patens cpSRP system occupies an intermediate position in the evolution from bacterial-type SRP to higher plant-type cpSRP system.......The protein targeting signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway in chloroplasts of higher plants has undergone dramatic evolutionary changes. It disposed of its RNA, which is an essential SRP component in bacteria, and uses a unique chloroplast-specific protein cpSRP43. Nevertheless, homologs of...

  11. Phylogenomic analysis of transcriptomic sequences of mitochondria and chloroplasts of essential brown algae (Phaeophyceae) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Shangang; LIU Tao; WU Shuangxiu; WANG Xumin; LI Tianyong; QIAN Hao; SUN Jing; WANG Liang; YU Jun; REN Lufeng; YIN Jinlong

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplast and mitochondrion of brown algae (Class Phaeophyceae of Phylum Ochrophyta) may have originated from different endosymbiosis. In this study, we carried out phylogenomic analysis to distinguish their evolutionary lineages by using algal RNA-seq datasets of the 1 000 Plants (1KP) Project and publicly available complete genomes of mitochondria and chloroplasts of Kingdom Chromista. We have found that there is a split between Class Phaeophyceae of Phylum Ochrophyta and the others (Phylum Cryptophyta and Haptophyta) in Kingdom Chromista, and identified more diversity in chloroplast genes than mitochondrial ones in their phylogenetic trees. Taxonomy resolution for Class Phaeophyceae showed that it was divided into Laminariales-Ectocarpales clade and Fucales clade, and phylogenetic positions of Kjellmaniella crassi-folia, Hizikia fusifrome and Ishige okamurai were confirmed. Our analysis provided the basic phylogenetic relationships of Chromista algae, and demonstrated their potential ability to study endosymbiotic events.

  12. Protease-Mediated Maturation of HIV: Inhibitors of Protease and the Maturation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Adamson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease-mediated maturation of HIV-1 virus particles is essential for virus infectivity. Maturation occurs concomitant with immature virus particle release and is mediated by the viral protease (PR, which sequentially cleaves the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into mature protein domains. Maturation triggers a second assembly event that generates a condensed conical capsid core. The capsid core organizes the viral RNA genome and viral proteins to facilitate viral replication in the next round of infection. The fundamental role of proteolytic maturation in the generation of mature infectious particles has made it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Development of small molecules that target the PR active site has been highly successful and nine protease inhibitors (PIs have been approved for clinical use. This paper provides an overview of their development and clinical use together with a discussion of problems associated with drug resistance. The second-half of the paper discusses a novel class of antiretroviral drug termed maturation inhibitors, which target cleavage sites in Gag not PR itself. The paper focuses on bevirimat (BVM the first-in-class maturation inhibitor: its mechanism of action and the implications of naturally occurring polymorphisms that confer reduced susceptibility to BVM in phase II clinical trials.

  13. Reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Shankar; P Kolandaivel

    2007-09-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases has been investigated using ab initio and density functional theory. On the irreversible process, after breakdown of tetrahedral intermediate (INT1), small 1-2 anionotropic has been formed and rearranged to give stable by-products sulfenamide (P1) and thiocarbamate (P2) with considerable energy loss. While, on the reversible part of this reaction mechanism, intermediate (INT2) breaks down on oxidation, to form a stable product (P3). Topological and AIM analyses have been performed for hydrogen bonded complex in this reaction profile. Intrinsic reaction coordinates [IRC, minimum-energy path (MEP)] calculation connects the transition state between R-INT1, INT1-P1 and INT1-P2. The products P1, P2 and P3 are energetically more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic.

  14. Slugs' last meals: molecular identification of sequestered chloroplasts from different algal origins in Sacoglossa (Opisthobranchia, Gastropoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händeler, Katharina; Wägele, Heike; Wahrmund, Ute; Rüdinger, Mareike; Knoop, Volker

    2010-11-01

    Some sacoglossan sea slugs have become famous for their unique capability to extract and incorporate functional chloroplasts from algal food organisms (mainly Ulvophyceae) into their gut cells. The functional incorporation of the so-called kleptoplasts allows the slugs to rely on photosynthetic products for weeks to months, enabling them to survive long periods of food shortage over most of their life-span. The algal food spectrum providing kleptoplasts as temporary, non-inherited endosymbionts appears to vary among sacoglossan slugs, but detailed knowledge is sketchy or unavailable. Accurate identification of algal donor species, which provide the chloroplasts for long-term retention is of primary importance to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms allowing long-term functionality of the captured chloroplast in the foreign animal cell environment. Whereas some sacoglossans forage on a variety of algal species, (e.g. Elysia crispata and E. viridis) others are more selective. Hence, characterizing the range of functional sacoglossan-chloroplast associations in nature is a prerequisite to understand the basis of this enigmatic endosymbiosis. Here, we present a suitable chloroplast gene (tufA) as a marker, which allows identification of the respective algal kleptoplast donor taxa by analysing DNA from whole animals. This novel approach allows identification of donor algae on genus or even species level, thus providing evidence for the taxonomic range of food organisms. We report molecular evidence that chloroplasts from different algal sources are simultaneously incorporated in some species of Elysia. NeigborNet analyses for species assignments are preferred over tree reconstruction methods because the former allow more reliable statements on species identification via barcoding, or rather visualize alternative allocations not to be seen in the latter. PMID:21565106

  15. Endosymbiotic origin and codon bias of the nuclear gene for chloroplast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, H; Martinez, P; Quigley, F; Martin, W; Cerff, R

    1987-01-01

    The nuclei of plant cells harbor genes for two types of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDH) displaying a sequence divergence corresponding to the prokaryote/eukaryote separation. This strongly supports the endosymbiotic theory of chloroplast evolution and in particular the gene transfer hypothesis suggesting that the gene for the chloroplast enzyme, initially located in the genome of the endosymbiotic chloroplast progenitor, was transferred during the course of evolution into the nuclear genome of the endosymbiotic host. Codon usage in the gene for chloroplast GAPDH of maize is radically different from that employed by present-day chloroplasts and from that of the cytosolic (glycolytic) enzyme from the same cell. This reveals the presence of subcellular selective pressures which appear to be involved in the optimization of gene expression in the economically important graminaceous monocots. PMID:3131533

  16. Photoregulation of fructose and glucose respiration in the intact chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 and spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoregulation of chloroplastic respiration was studied by monitoring in darkness and in light the release of 14CO2 from whole chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) supplied externally with [14C]glucose and [14C]fructose, respectively. CO2 release was inhibited more than 90% in both chloroplasts by a light intensity of 4 W m-2. Oxidants, oxaloacetate in Chlamydomonas, nitrite in spinach, and phenazine methosulfate in both chloroplasts, reversed the inhibition. The onset of the photoinhibitory effect on CO2 release was relatively rapid compared to the restoration of CO2 release following illumination. In both darkened chloroplasts, dithiothreitol inhibited release. Of the four enzymes (fructokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase, and gluconate-6-P dehydrogenase) in the pathway catalyzing the release of CO2 from fructose, only glucose-6-P dehydrogenase was deactivated by light and by dithiothreitol. 33 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Spectral characteristics and orientation of native forms of pigment in chloroplasts of barley seedlings under intermittent and continuous irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorophyll (Chl) form at 710-712 nm localized on the small protein simultaneously connected with the reaction centre of photosystem 1 (RC PS1) and the light-harvesting complex I (LHC-I) polypeptides is supposed to be the source of long-wavelength band of low-temperature fluorescence of chloroplasts at 735-740 nm. Chloroplasts of intermittently irradiated seedlings (or chloroplasts of the Chl b-less barley mutant) did not differ from chloroplasts of continuously irradiated seedlings (or chloroplasts of wild type barley) in the set of Chl a and beta-carotene forms and their orientation in the membrane. A competition for the newly synthesized Chl a molecules occurred between the RC PS 2 and LHC-II polypeptides

  18. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  19. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:25135820

  20. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh-Stenta X

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoying Koh-Stenta,1 Joma Joy,1 Si Fang Wang,1 Perlyn Zekui Kwek,1 John Liang Kuan Wee,1 Kah Fei Wan,2 Shovanlal Gayen,1 Angela Shuyi Chen,1 CongBao Kang,1 May Ann Lee,1 Anders Poulsen,1 Subhash G Vasudevan,3 Jeffrey Hill,1 Kassoum Nacro11Experimental Therapeutics Centre, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR, Singapore; 2Novartis Institute for Tropical Diseases, Singapore; 3Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, SingaporeAbstract: Dengue virus (DENV protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described.Keywords: flavivirus protease, small molecule optimization, covalent inhibitor, active site binding, pyrazole ester derivatives

  1. Fluorometric CCHFV OTU protease assay with potent inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Fatih; Aslan, Galip S

    2015-10-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a deadly virus that has been listed in the Category C as a potential bioterror agent. There are no specific therapies against CCHFV, which urges identification of potential therapeutic targets and development of CCHFV therapies. CCHFV OTU protease takes an important role in viral invasion through antagonizing NF-κB signaling. Inhibition of CCHFV OTU protease by small molecules warrants an exciting potential as antiviral therapeutics. Here we report the expression and purification of a C-His-tagged recombinant CCHFV OTU protease in E. coli BL21 (DE3) host strain. Activity of the refolded purified recombinant viral OTU protease has been validated with a UB-AMC fluorescent assay. In addition, we show a dose-dependent inhibition of the viral OTU protease by two small molecules. This study provides a reliable approach for recombinant expression and purification of CCHFV OTU protease, and demonstrates validation of OTU protease activity and its inhibition based on a UB-AMC florescent assay. PMID:26156848

  2. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process. PMID:25577345

  3. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SUBSP. plantarum PROBIOTIC STRAINS AS PROTEASE PRODUCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Маtseliukh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteases from probiotic strains of the genus Bacillus, just like the antibiotics, bacteriocins and other hydrolytic enzymes, are one of the main factors that determine their biological activity. The aim of this work was to study the synthesis and biochemical properties of proteases from two strains Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5139 and UCM B-5140 that included in the probiotic Endosporin. The cultivation of strains was carried out in flasks under rotating for two days. The influence of physico-chemical parameters of the reaction medium on proteolytic activity was studied on partially purified protease preparations. Lytic activity was determined by turbidimetric method. On the second day of cultivation B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM В-5139 and UCM В-5140 synthesized the metal-dependent peptidase and serine protease, respectively. The optimum conditions of their action were the following: temperature 37–40 °C and pH 6.5–7.0. Isolated proteases are able to lyse the living cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Thus we demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5140 and UCM B-5139, included in the probiotic veterinary preparation Endosporin, produced proteolytic enzymes that hydrolyze the native insoluble proteins (elastin, fibrin and collagen. These enzymes belong to the group of neutral metal-dependent and serine proteases. They are active under physiological conditions against gram-positive bacteria and yeasts. The application of these proteases in biotechnology is considered.

  4. Laundry detergent compatibility of the alkaline protease from Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Rathindra Mohan; Prakash, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The endogenous protease activity in various commercially available laundry detergents of international companies was studied. The maximum protease activity was found at 50 degrees C in pH range 10.5-11.0 in all the tested laundry detergents. The endogenous protease activity in the tested detergents retained up to 70% on incubation at 40 degrees C for 1 h, whereas less than 30% activity was only found on incubation at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The alkaline protease from an alkalophilic strain of Bacillus cereus was studied for its compatibility in commercial detergents. The cell free fermented broth from shake flask culture of the organism showed maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 50 degrees C. The protease from B. cereus showed much higher residual activity (more than 80%) on incubation with laundry detergents at 50 degrees C for 1 h or longer. The protease enzyme from B. cereus was found to be superior over the endogenous proteases present in the tested commercial laundry detergents in comparison to the enzyme stability during the washing at higher temperature, e.g., 40-50 degrees C. PMID:15293947

  5. Structure of HIV-1 protease determined by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 protease is an aspartic protease, and plays an essential role in replication of HIV. To develop HIV-1 protease inhibitors through structure-based drug design, it is necessary to understand the catalytic mechanism and inhibitor recognition of HIV-1 protease. We have determined the crystal structure of HIV-1 protease in complex with KNI-272 to 1.9 A resolution by neutron crystallography in combination with 1.4 A resolution X-ray diffraction data. The results show that the carbonyl group of hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) in KNI-272 forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with protonated Asp 25 and the hydrogen atom from the hydroxyl group of HMC forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with the deprotonated Asp125. This is the first neutron report for HIV-1/inhibitor complex and shows directly the locations of key hydrogen atoms in catalysis and in the binding of a transition-state analog. The results confirm key aspect of the presumed catalytic mechanism of HIV-1 protease and will aid in the further development of protease inhibitors. (author)

  6. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid. PMID:26815787

  7. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid. PMID:26815787

  8. Proton Gradients and Proton-Dependent Transport Processes in the Chloroplast

    OpenAIRE

    Höhner, Ricarda; Aboukila, Ali; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Venema, Kees

    2016-01-01

    Proton gradients are fundamental to chloroplast function. Across thylakoid membranes, the light induced -proton gradient is essential for ATP synthesis. As a result of proton pumping into the thylakoid lumen, an alkaline stromal pH develops, which is required for full activation of pH-dependent Calvin Benson cycle enzymes. This implies that a pH gradient between the cytosol (pH 7) and the stroma (pH 8) is established upon illumination. To maintain this pH gradient chloroplasts actively extrud...

  9. Multiple regulatory mechanisms in the chloroplast of green algae: relation to hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Taras K; Krendeleva, Tatyana E; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2015-09-01

    A complex regulatory network in the chloroplast of green algae provides an efficient tool for maintenance of energy and redox balance in the cell under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In this review, we discuss the structural and functional organizations of electron transport pathways in the chloroplast, and regulation of photosynthesis in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The focus is on the regulatory mechanisms induced in response to nutrient deficiency stress and anoxia and especially on the role of a hydrogenase-mediated reaction in adaptation to highly reducing conditions and ATP deficiency in the cell. PMID:25986411

  10. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum Diels at Gilg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengzhu; Chen, Qinyi; Yang, Bingxian; Ma, Ji; Li, Baoguo; Zhang, Lin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum Diels at Gilg, a critical Chinese medicine, is reported here. The complete chloroplast genome of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum Diels at Gilg is 159 914 bp in length with 37.55% overall GC content. A pair of IRs (inverted repeats) of 26 510 bp were separated by LSC (87 927 bp) and SSC (18 967 bp). The phylogenetic analysis of 40 taxa showed a strong sister relationship with all other rosids. However, the placement of Myrtales still needs further verification. PMID:26329851

  11. Evolutionary, Molecular and Genetic Analyses of Tic22 Homologues in Arabidopsis thaliana Chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Kasmati, Ali Reza; Töpel, Mats; Khan, Nadir Zaman; Patel, Ramesh; Ling, Qihua; Karim, Sazzad; Aronsson, Henrik; Jarvis, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Tic22 protein was previously identified in pea as a putative component of the chloroplast protein import apparatus. It is a peripheral protein of the inner envelope membrane, residing in the intermembrane space. In Arabidopsis, there are two Tic22 homologues, termed atTic22-III and atTic22-IV, both of which are predicted to localize in chloroplasts. These two proteins defined clades that are conserved in all land plants, which appear to have evolved at a similar rates since their separati...

  12. Noncoding RNA mediated traffic of foreign mRNA into chloroplasts reveals a novel signaling mechanism in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gómez

    Full Text Available Communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus is one of the milestones of the evolution of plants on earth. Proteins encoded by ancestral chloroplast-endogenous genes were transferred to the nucleus during the endosymbiotic evolution and originated this communication, which is mainly dependent on specific transit-peptides. However, the identification of nuclear-encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast lacking these canonical signals suggests the existence of an alternative cellular pathway tuning this metabolic crosstalk. Non-coding RNAS (NcRNAs are increasingly recognized as regulators of gene expression as they play roles previously believed to correspond to proteins. Avsunviroidae family viroids are the only noncoding functional RNAs that have been reported to traffic inside the chloroplasts. Elucidating mechanisms used by these pathogens to enter this organelle will unearth novel transport pathways in plant cells. Here we show that a viroid-derived NcRNA acting as a 5'UTR-end mediates the functional import of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP mRNA into chloroplast. This claim is supported by the observation at confocal microscopy of a selective accumulation of GFP in the chloroplast of the leaves expressing the chimeric vd-5'UTR/GFP and by the detection of the GFP mRNA in chloroplasts isolated from cells expressing this construct. These results support the existence of an alternative signaling mechanism in plants between the host cell and chloroplasts, where an ncRNA functions as a key regulatory molecule to control the accumulation of nuclear-encoded proteins in this organelle. In addition, our findings provide a conceptual framework to develop new biotechnological tools in systems using plant chloroplast as bioreactors. Finally, viroids of the family Avsunviroidae have probably evolved to subvert this signaling mechanism to regulate their differential traffic into the chloroplast of infected cells.

  13. Optimizing PHB and Protease Production by Box Behnken Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amro Abd al fattah Amara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixed culture is more suitable to adapt more flexible fermentation process and produce different product simultaneously. In this study a mixed Bacillus culture was investigated for their ability to produce the bioplastic "Polyhydroxybutyrate" and both of the mesophilic and the thermophilic proteases in one flask. Box-Behnken experimental design was used. The produced amount of PHB has been increased significantly. Meanwhile there is a competition between PHB and proteases. The maximum produced amount of PHB using Box-Behnken design was 2.82 g/l/48 h with protease activity equal to 41.9 Units/ml/48 h for thermophilic proteases and 99.65 Units/ml/48 h for mesophilic proteases. Excel solver was used for extra-optimization for the optimum conditions obtained from Box-Behnken experiments and its model. The maximum PHB obtained after using Excel solver was 2.88 g/l/48 h. The maximum mesophilic and thermophilic activities obtained at the same PHB production conditions were 175.68 and 243.38 Units/ml respectively. The model accuracy as obtained from Excel solver was 118.8%, which prove the power of the experimental design in optimizing such complicated process. The strategies used in this study are recommended for the production of PHB and different proteases simultaneously using Bacillus mixed culture. ABSTRAK: Kultur campuran adalah lebih sesuai bagi proses penapaian yang fleksibel dan ia boleh menghasilkan produk yang berbeza secara serentak. Dalam kajian ini keupayaan  menghasilkan "Polyhydroxybutyrate" bioplastik serta mesofilik dan termofilik protease dalam satu flask oleh  kultur Bacillus campuran telah disiasat. Eksperimen rekabentuk Box-Behnken telah digunakan. Jumlah PHB yang dikeluarkan meningkat dengan ketara dan terdapat persaingan antara PHB dan protease. Jumlah keluaran PHB maksima menggunakan rekabentuk Box-Behnken adalah 2.82 g/l/48 jam dengan aktiviti protease sama dengan 41.9 Unit/ml/48 jam untuk protease termofilik dan 99.65 Unit

  14. Protease-associated cellular networks in malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilburn Timothy G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria continues to be one of the most severe global infectious diseases, responsible for 1-2 million deaths yearly. The rapid evolution and spread of drug resistance in parasites has led to an urgent need for the development of novel antimalarial targets. Proteases are a group of enzymes that play essential roles in parasite growth and invasion. The possibility of designing specific inhibitors for proteases makes them promising drug targets. Previously, combining a comparative genomics approach and a machine learning approach, we identified the complement of proteases (degradome in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its sibling species 123, providing a catalog of targets for functional characterization and rational inhibitor design. Network analysis represents another route to revealing the role of proteins in the biology of parasites and we use this approach here to expand our understanding of the systems involving the proteases of P. falciparum. Results We investigated the roles of proteases in the parasite life cycle by constructing a network using protein-protein association data from the STRING database 4, and analyzing these data, in conjunction with the data from protein-protein interaction assays using the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H system 5, blood stage microarray experiments 678, proteomics 9101112, literature text mining, and sequence homology analysis. Seventy-seven (77 out of 124 predicted proteases were associated with at least one other protein, constituting 2,431 protein-protein interactions (PPIs. These proteases appear to play diverse roles in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, invasion and infection. Their degrees of connectivity (i.e., connections to other proteins, range from one to 143. The largest protease-associated sub-network is the ubiquitin-proteasome system which is crucial for protein recycling and stress response. Proteases are also implicated in heat shock response, signal peptide

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF PROTEASE PRODUCTION FROM FUNGI ISOLATED FROM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Sethi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fungal strains isolated from soil by serial dilution method were screened for alkaline protease production. Isolate Penicillium chrysogenum the most potent producer of alkaline protease was identified. The isolate showed highest activity in the optimized medium at pH 9.0, temperature 35ºC, with 1% soycake and peptone incubated for 7 days. Proteases represent one of the largest groups of industrial enzymes and find application in detergents, leather industry, food industry, pharmaceutical industry and bioremediation processes.

  16. Hyper production of alkaline protease by mutagenized bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to augment the alkaline protease production from Bacillus subtilis by using chemical mutagen (MMS) and UV mutagenesis. A number of mutants were isolated which produce high levels of extra cellular proteases. Analysis of culture supernatants of these mutants had shown that the total amounts of proteolysis activity were increased from 1 to 2 fold over the wild strain. Clones showing promote response were further characterized by analyzing different parameters; like of Temperature, pH substrate concentration and incubation period, to study the activity of protease enzyme. (author)

  17. The structural basis for catalysis and substrate specificity of a rhomboid protease

    OpenAIRE

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Strisovsky, Kvido; Andreeva, Antonina; Christova, Yonka; Verhelst, Steven; Freeman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    While soluble proteases are some of the best-studied enzymes, this first structure of a rhomboid protease bound to a mechanism-based inhibitor provides unprecedented functional insights into the recently discovered class of intramembrane proteases, illustrating both similarities and differences with classical serine proteases.

  18. Protease inhibitor expression in soybean roots exhibiting susceptible and resistance reactions to soybean cyst nematode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protease inhibitors play a role in regulating proteases during cellular development and in plant defense against insects and nematodes. We identified, cloned and sequenced cDNAs encoding six protease inhibitors expressed in soybean roots infected with soybean cyst nematode. Four of these protease in...

  19. Targeting Proteases in Cardiovascular Diseases by Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Klingler, Diana; Hardt, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze peptide bonds, thereby controlling the function of proteins and peptides on the posttranslational level. In the cardiovascular system, proteases play pivotal roles in the regulation of blood pressure, coagulation and other essential physiological processes. Accordingly, proteases are prime targets for therapeutic interventions and diagnostics. Proteases are part of complex proteolytic networks comprised of enzymes, inhibitors, activators, substrates and cleavage products. ...

  20. Viral cysteine proteases are homologous to the trypsin-like family of serine proteases: structural and functional implications.

    OpenAIRE

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J

    1988-01-01

    Proteases that are encoded by animal picornaviruses and plant como- and potyviruses form a related group of cysteine-active-center enzymes that are essential for virus maturation. We show that these proteins are homologous to the family of trypsin-like serine proteases. In our model, the active-site nucleophile of the trypsin catalytic triad, Ser-195, is changed to a Cys residue in these viral proteases. The other two residues of the triad, His-57 and Asp-102, are otherwise absolutely conserv...

  1. Cysteine protease cathepsins and matrix metalloproteinases in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Yanwen; Cao, Xu; Yang, Yaoguo; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Both cysteine protease cathepsins and matrix metalloproteinases are implicated in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in humans and animals. Blood and aortic tissues from humans or animals with AAAs contain much higher levels of these proteases, and often lower levels of their endogenous inhibitors, than do blood and aortic tissues from healthy subjects. Protease- and protease inhibitor-deficient mice and synthetic protease inhibitors have affirmed that cysteinyl cathepsins ...

  2. Partial Purification and Characterization of a Cysteine Protease Inhibitor from the Plerocercoid of Spirometra erinacei

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Young-Bae; Yang, Hyun-Jong

    2008-01-01

    Helminthic cysteine proteases are well known to play critical roles in tissue invasion, nutrient uptake, and immune evasion of the parasites. In the same manner, the sparganum, the plerocercoid of Spirometra mansoni, is also known to secrete a large amount of cysteine proteases. However, cysteine protease inhibitors regulating the proteolytic activities of the cysteine protease are poorly illustrated. In this regard, we partially purified an endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor from spargan...

  3. The Place of protease inhibitors in antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Tenore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a number of drugs have been developed. The best choice concerning which antiretroviral analogs to start is always under discussion, especially in the choice between non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based therapies and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. Both are proven to control viral replication and lead to immunological gain. The choice between a non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor as a third antiretroviral drug in the therapy should consider factors related to the individual, as well as the inclusion of the best therapy in the patient's daily activities and potential adherence. The protease inhibitor-based therapies showed similar efficacy among the various inhibitors with characteristics concerning the adverse events from each medicine. For the treatment of protease-resistant patients, darunavir and tipranavir showed good efficacy with higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  4. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  5. Effect of Gastrointestinal Protease Digestion on Bioactivity of Marine Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ida-Johanne; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Ossum, Carlo Gunnar; Jakobsen, Greta; De Gobba, Christian; Farvin, Sabeena; Johansson, Inez; Hoffmann, Else; Oddny Elvevoll, Edel; Jessen, Flemming; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    2014-01-01

    executed without concerning subsequent digestion after intake and the aim of this work was hence to investigate how the in vitro antioxidative, antihypertensive and caspase activating activities of peptides are affected by digestion with gastrointestinal (GI) proteases. Five different fish protein...... hydrolysates were chosen to study the effect of in vitro digestion on bioactivity. The protein concentration decreased in all samples during digestion and the molecular weight distribution of the peptides shifted towards lower values. Thus, in vitro digestion with GI proteases resulted in a further degradation...... of the peptides obtained by hydrolysis. The antihypertensive effect increased in all samples after digestion with GI proteases whereas the antioxidative capacity decreased. The effect on the caspase activity depended on the proteases used in the preparation of hydrolysates. In conclusion, the caspase...

  6. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases

    OpenAIRE

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N.; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; Van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-01-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signa...

  7. Substrate modulation of enzyme activity in the herpesvirus protease family

    OpenAIRE

    Lazic, Ana; Goetz, David H.; Nomura, Anson M.; Marnett, Alan B.; Craik, Charles S.

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus proteases are an example in which allosteric regulation of an enzyme activity is achieved through the formation of quaternary structure. Here, we report a 1.7 Å resolution structure of Kaposi’s Sarcoma herpesvirus protease in complex with a hexapeptide transition state analogue that stabilizes the dimeric state of the enzyme. Extended substrate binding sites are induced upon peptide binding. In particular, 104 Å2 of surface are buried in the newly formed S4 pocket when tyrosin...

  8. Salivary protease inhibitors with non anti-hemostatic function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chmelař, Jindřich; Francischetti, I.M.B.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    Dordrecht : Springer Science+Business Media, 2010 - (Kini, R.; Clemetson, K.; Markland, F.; McLane, M.; Morita, T.), s. 153-164 ISBN 978-90-481-9294-6 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600960811 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cysteine protease inhibitors * Serine protease inhibitors * Arthropod saliva * Immunity * Inflammation * Cystatin * Tryptase * Elastase * Kunitz domain Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  9. The non-death role of metacaspase proteases

    OpenAIRE

    AmitShrestha

    2012-01-01

    The activation of caspase proteases and the targeting of protein substrates act as key steps in the engagement and conduct of apoptosis/programmed cell death. However, the discovery of caspase involvement in diverse non-apoptotic cellular functions strongly suggests that these proteins may have evolved from a core behaviour unrelated to the induction of cell death. The presence of similar proteases, termed metacaspases, in single cell organisms supports the contention that such proteins may h...

  10. Purification and characterization of alkaline protease from Lysinibacillus fusiformis

    OpenAIRE

    Suppiah S*; Sendeshkannan K; Prabakaran P; Rajkumar G; Yasothkumar N

    2012-01-01

    A novel alkaline protease producing bacterium was isolated from the gut of an estuarine fish Etroplus suratensis. The strain was identified by sequencing the fragment of their bacterial 16s rRNA and its homology was 97% closest to the Lysinibacillus fusiformis. An extracellular protease from this organism was purified by acetone precipitation, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography methods and the specific activity of the purified enzyme was found to be 20.39 U/mg, 169....

  11. ADAM 12 protease induces adipogenesis in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Xu, Xiufeng; Tajima, Rie; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Sundberg, Christina; Loechel, Frosty; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Wewer, Ulla M

    2002-01-01

    ADAM 12 (meltrin-alpha) is a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. ADAM 12 functions as an active metalloprotease, supports cell adhesion, and has been implicated in myoblast differentiation and fusion. Human ADAM 12 exists in two forms: the prototype membrane-anchored pr...... adipogenic phenotype, suggesting a requirement for ADAM 12 protease activity. This is the first in vivo demonstration that an ADAM protease is involved in adipogenesis....

  12. Amplified detection of protease activity using porous silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Manuel

    This dissertation will focus on harnessing the optical properties of porous silicon to sense protease activity. Electrochemical etching of polished silicon wafers produces porous silicon with unique optical properties such as Fabry-Perot fringes or a dielectric mirror reflecting specific wavelengths. Porous silicon optical transducers are coupled to a biochemical reaction (protease activity) and optically measured in a label-free manner. The first chapter is an introductory chapter discussing the current methods of detecting protease activity. Also discussed is the use of porous silicon for label-free sensing. The second chapter discusses the use of thin protein layers that are spin coated on the surface of a porous silicon film and excluded from the porous matrix based on size. When active proteases are introduced to the protein layer, small peptide fragments are generated, causing a change in refractive index from low to high. This can be used as a tool to monitor protease activity and amplify the signal to the naked eye. To extend on the second chapter, a double layered porous silicon film with the first layer have large pores and the second layer etched below having small pores was used for sensing protease activity. Proteases are adsorbed into the first layer and introduction of whole protein substrate produces small peptide fragments that can enter the second layer (changing the effective optical thickness). The fourth chapter describes a method of using luminescent transducers coupled to protein films. An "on-off" sensor using protein coated luminescent porous silicon was used to detect a decrease in the intensity of luminescence due to degradation of the protein film. An "off-on" sensor involved a fluorescent dye housed in the porous film and capped with a protein coating. The release of the dye is caused by the action of a protease causing an increase in fluorescent intensity from the dye.

  13. Identification of an Archaeal Presenilin-Like Intramembrane Protease

    OpenAIRE

    Torres-Arancivia, Celia; Ross, Carolyn M.; Chavez, Jose; Assur, Zahra; Dolios, Georgia; Mancia, Filippo; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2010-01-01

    Background The GXGD-type diaspartyl intramembrane protease, presenilin, constitutes the catalytic core of the γ-secretase multi-protein complex responsible for activating critical signaling cascades during development and for the production of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) implicated in Alzheimer's disease. The only other known GXGD-type diaspartyl intramembrane proteases are the eukaryotic signal peptide peptidases (SPPs). The presence of presenilin-like enzymes outside eukaryots has not been demo...

  14. A chloroplast genealogy of hordeum (poaceae): Long-term persisting haplotypes, incomplete lineage sorting, regional extinction, and the consequences for phylogenetic inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Sabine S; Blattner, Frank R

    2006-08-01

    To analyze reasons for inconclusive results of earlier chloroplast phylogenies in the grass genus Hordeum, we established a genealogy of chloroplast haplotypes by sequencing the trnL-trnF region in 875 individuals, covering all 31 species of the genus. Although the outcomes of phenetic and parsimony analyses of 88 haplotypes were ambiguous, a network approach showed that in Hordeum ancient chloroplast types co-occur with their descendants. Moreover, we found up to 18 different chloroplast haplotypes within a single species and up to 6 species sharing single haplotypes. Persisting polymorphisms together with incomplete lineage sorting occurred preferentially in the rapidly speciating New World taxa of the genus, where ancient chloroplast types have survived for at least 4 Myr. Lineages-through-time plots and a high number of missing chloroplast haplotypes indicated far-reaching extinction of chloroplast lineages in Europe and particularly the Mediterranean. Survival of these lineages in East Asia and North America resulted in chloroplast relationships that markedly differed from nuclear estimations of species relationships. Thus, even for the deepest splits in the genus, reaching back more than 9 Myr, no safe phylogenetic inference from chloroplast data is possible in Hordeum. The chloroplast genealogy, however, revealed biogeographic patterns and indicated processes involved in speciation in Hordeum. We conclude that the described phenomena are not restricted to Hordeum and that the knowledge of the chloroplast relationships within a genus is indispensable to prevent misinterpretation of phylogeographic data within single species. PMID:16754643

  15. Structure of the ATP synthase from chloroplasts studied by electron microscopy and image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Heel, Marin van; Gräber, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The structure of the hydrophilic part of the ATP synthase from chloroplasts (CF1) has been investigated by electron microscopy of negatively stained samples. The staining conditions, which are generally critical for such small objects as CF1, could be improved by mixing CF1 samples with a much large

  16. Structure of the ATP synthase from chloroplasts studied by electron microscopy. Localization of the small subunits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Xiao, Jianping; McCarty, Richard E.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the hydrophilic part of the ATP synthase from chloroplasts (CF1) has been further investigated by electron microscopy and image analysis of negatively stained samples. The projections of three different types of CF1 were analyzed: the holoenzyme with five different subunits and two

  17. Role of membrane glycerolipids in photosynthesis, thylakoid biogenesis and chloroplast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The lipid bilayer of the thylakoid membrane in plant chloroplasts and cyanobacterial cells is predominantly composed of four unique lipid classes; monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). MGDG and DGDG are uncharged galactolipids that constitute the bulk of thylakoid membrane lipids and provide a lipid bilayer matrix for photosynthetic complexes as the main constituents. The glycolipid SQDG and phospholipid PG are anionic lipids with a negative charge on their head groups. SQDG and PG substitute for each other to maintain the amount of total anionic lipids in the thylakoid membrane, with PG having indispensable functions in photosynthesis. In addition to biochemical studies, extensive analyses of mutants deficient in thylakoid lipids have revealed important roles of these lipids in photosynthesis and thylakoid membrane biogenesis. Moreover, recent studies of Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that thylakoid lipid biosynthesis triggers the expression of photosynthesis-associated genes in both the nucleus and plastids and activates the formation of photosynthetic machineries and chloroplast development. Meanwhile, galactolipid biosynthesis is regulated in response to chloroplast functionality and lipid metabolism at transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review summarizes the roles of thylakoid lipids with their biosynthetic pathways in plants and discusses the coordinated regulation of thylakoid lipid biosynthesis with the development of photosynthetic machinery during chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:27114097

  18. Cowpea chloroplastic ATP synthase is the source of multiple plant defense elicitors during insect herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant responses to damage vary dependant upon the nature of the biotic and abiotic stresses. We recently described an elicitor, from Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) oral secretions (OS) termed inceptin, derived from chloroplastic ATP synthase '-subunit (cATPC) proteins that activate phytohormo...

  19. Chloroplast evolution in the Pinus montezumae complex: a coalescent approach to hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, J A; Schaal, B A

    2000-08-01

    This study addresses the evolutionary history of the chloroplast genomes of two closely related pine species, Pinus hartwegii Lindl. and P. montezumae Lamb (subsect. Ponderosae) using coalescent theory and some of the statistical tools that have been developed from it during the past two decades. Pinus hartwegii and P. montezumae are closely related species in the P. montezumae complex (subsect. Ponderosae) of Mexico and Central America. Pinus hartwegii is a high elevation species, whereas P. montezumae occurs at lower elevations. The two species occur on many of the same mountains throughout Mexico. A total of 350 individuals of P. hartwegii and P. montezumae were collected from Nevado de Colima (Jalisco), Cerro Potosí (Nuevo León), Iztaccihuatl/Popocatepetl (México), and Nevado de Toluca (México). The chloroplast genome of P. hartwegii and P. montezumae was mapped using eight restriction enzymes. Fifty-one different haplotypes were characterized; 38 of 160 restriction sites were polymorphic. Clades of most parsimoniously related chloroplast haplotypes are geographically localized and do not overlap in distribution, and the geographically localized clades of haplotypes include both P. hartwegii and P. montezumae. Some haplotypes in the clades occur in only one of the two species, whereas other haplotypes occur in both species. These data strongly suggest ancient and/or ongoing hybridization between P. hartwegii and P. montezumae and a shared chloroplast genome history within geographic regions of Mexico. PMID:11005290

  20. Energetic cost of protein import across the envelope membranes of chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M

    2013-01-15

    Chloroplasts are the organelles of green plants in which light energy is transduced into chemical energy, forming ATP and reduced carbon compounds upon which all life depends. The expenditure of this energy is one of the central issues of cellular metabolism. Chloroplasts contain ~3,000 proteins, among which less than 100 are typically encoded in the plastid genome. The rest are encoded in the nuclear genome, synthesized in the cytosol, and posttranslationally imported into the organelle in an energy-dependent process. We report here a measurement of the amount of ATP hydrolyzed to import a protein across the chloroplast envelope membranes--only the second complete accounting of the cost in Gibbs free energy of protein transport to be undertaken. Using two different precursors prepared by three distinct techniques, we show that the import of a precursor protein into chloroplasts is accompanied by the hydrolysis of ~650 ATP molecules. This translates to a ΔG(protein) (transport) of some 27,300 kJ/mol protein imported. We estimate that protein import across the plastid envelope membranes consumes ~0.6% of the total light-saturated energy output of the organelle. PMID:23277572

  1. Expression patterns of cotton chloroplast genes during development: implications for development of plastid transformation vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to express genes of interest in plastids, transformation vectors must be developed that include appropriate promoters to drive expression at effective levels in both green and non-green tissues. Typically, chloroplasts are transformed with vectors that contain ribosomal RNA promoters for h...

  2. A tiling microarray for global analysis of chloroplast genome expression in cucumber and other plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pląder Wojciech

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plastids are small organelles equipped with their own genomes (plastomes. Although these organelles are involved in numerous plant metabolic pathways, current knowledge about the transcriptional activity of plastomes is limited. To solve this problem, we constructed a plastid tiling microarray (PlasTi-microarray consisting of 1629 oligonucleotide probes. The oligonucleotides were designed based on the cucumber chloroplast genomic sequence and targeted both strands of the plastome in a non-contiguous arrangement. Up to 4 specific probes were designed for each gene/exon, and the intergenic regions were covered regularly, with 70-nt intervals. We also developed a protocol for direct chemical labeling and hybridization of as little as 2 micrograms of chloroplast RNA. We used this protocol for profiling the expression of the cucumber chloroplast plastome on the PlasTi-microarray. Owing to the high sequence similarity of plant plastomes, the newly constructed microarray can be used to study plants other than cucumber. Comparative hybridization of chloroplast transcriptomes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato and spinach showed that the PlasTi-microarray is highly versatile.

  3. Chloroplast DNA variation of oaks in western Central Europe and genetic consequences of human influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    König, A.O.; Ziegenhagen, B.; Dam, van B.C.; Csaikl, U.M.; Coart, E.; Degen, B.; Burg, K.; Vries, de S.M.G.; Petit, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Oak chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation was studied in a grid-based inventory in western Central Europe, including Belgium, The Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany, the Czech Republic, and the northern parts of Upper and Lower Austria. A total of 2155 trees representing 426 populations of Quercus robur L

  4. Ion Channels in Plant Bioenergetic Organelles, Chloroplasts and Mitochondria: From Molecular Identification to Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraretto, Luca; Teardo, Enrico; Checchetto, Vanessa; Finazzi, Giovanni; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Szabo, Ildiko

    2016-03-01

    Recent technical advances in electrophysiological measurements, organelle-targeted fluorescence imaging, and organelle proteomics have pushed the research of ion transport a step forward in the case of the plant bioenergetic organelles, chloroplasts and mitochondria, leading to the molecular identification and functional characterization of several ion transport systems in recent years. Here we focus on channels that mediate relatively high-rate ion and water flux and summarize the current knowledge in this field, focusing on targeting mechanisms, proteomics, electrophysiology, and physiological function. In addition, since chloroplasts evolved from a cyanobacterial ancestor, we give an overview of the information available about cyanobacterial ion channels and discuss the evolutionary origin of chloroplast channels. The recent molecular identification of some of these ion channels allowed their physiological functions to be studied using genetically modified Arabidopsis plants and cyanobacteria. The view is emerging that alteration of chloroplast and mitochondrial ion homeostasis leads to organelle dysfunction, which in turn significantly affects the energy metabolism of the whole organism. Clear-cut identification of genes encoding for channels in these organelles, however, remains a major challenge in this rapidly developing field. Multiple strategies including bioinformatics, cell biology, electrophysiology, use of organelle-targeted ion-sensitive probes, genetics, and identification of signals eliciting specific ion fluxes across organelle membranes should provide a better understanding of the physiological role of organellar channels and their contribution to signaling pathways in plants in the future. PMID:26751960

  5. Chloroplast β chaperonins from A. thaliana function with endogenous cpn10 homologs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin, Anna; Weiss, Celeste; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Rasouly, Aviram; Levin, Doron; Pisanty-Farchi, Odelia; Breiman, Adina; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-09-01

    The involvement of type I chaperonins in bacterial and organellar protein folding has been well-documented. In E. coli and mitochondria, these ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins form chaperonin oligomers of identical 60 kDa subunits (cpn60), while in chloroplasts, two distinct cpn60 α and β subunit types co-exist together. The primary sequence of α and β subunits is ~50% identical, similar to their respective homologies to the bacterial GroEL. Moreover, the A. thaliana genome contains two α and four β genes. The functional significance of this variability in plant chaperonin proteins has not yet been elucidated. In order to gain insight into the functional variety of the chloroplast chaperonin family members, we reconstituted β homo-oligomers from A. thaliana following their expression in bacteria and subjected them to a structure-function analysis. Our results show for the first time, that A. thaliana β homo-oligomers can function in vitro with authentic chloroplast co-chaperonins (ch-cpn10 and ch-cpn20). We also show that oligomers made up of different β subunit types have unique properties and different preferences for co-chaperonin partners. We propose that chloroplasts may contain active β homo-oligomers in addition to hetero-oligomers, possibly reflecting a variety of cellular roles. PMID:21633907

  6. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Ledebouriella seseloides (Hoffm.) H. Wolff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Oh; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Lee, Junki; Lee, Jonghoon; Kim, Soonok; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Ledebouriella seseloides (Hoffm.) H.Wolff is a traditional medicinal herb belonging to Apiaceae family, whose dried roots and rhizomes have been used as traditional medicine in East Asian countries. The complete chloroplast genome of L. seseloides was obtained by de novo assembly using the small amount of whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of L. seseloides was 147 880 bp in length, which consisted of large single copy region (93 222 bp), small single copy region (17 324 bp), and a pair of inverted repeat regions (18 667 bp). The overall GC contents of the chloroplast genome were 37.5%. A total of 113 genes were annotated, which included 79 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that L. seseloides is most closely related to Petroselinum crispum (parsley), an herb widely used in cooking. PMID:26218226

  7. Heterologous nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite amplification and variation in tea, Camellia sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaundun, Shiv Shankhar; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2002-12-01

    The advantage of the cross transferability of heterologous chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite primers was taken to detect polymorphism among 24 tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) genotypes, including both the assamica and the sinensis varieties. Primer information was obtained from the closely related Camellia japonica species for four nuclear microsatellites, and from Nicotiana tabaccum for seven universal chloroplast microsatellites. All of the nuclear microsatellite loci tested generated an expected DNA fragment in tea, revealing between three and five alleles per locus. Four out of the seven chloroplast microsatellites primers amplified positively, and of these only one was polymorphic with three alleles, which is in agreement with the conserved nature of chloroplast microsatellites at the intraspecific level. A factorial correspondence analysis carried out on all genotypes and nuclear microsatellite alleles separated the assamica and sinensis genotypes into two groups, thus demonstrating the value of these markers in establishing the genetic relationship between tea varieties. Genetic diversity measured with nuclear microsatellites was higher than that measured with other types of molecular markers, offering prospects for their use in fingerprinting, mapping, and population genetic studies, whereas polymorphisms detected at a cpSSR locus will allow the determination of plastid inheritance in the species. PMID:12502248

  8. Chloroplast FtsZ assembles into a contractible ring via tubulin-like heteropolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yamato; Mogi, Yuko; TerBush, Allan D; Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast division is driven by a ring containing FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 proteins, which originated from bacterial FtsZ, a tubulin-like protein; however, mechanistic details of the chloroplast FtsZ ring remain unclear. Here, we report that FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 can heteropolymerize into a contractible ring ex vivo. Fluorescently labelled FtsZ1 and/or FtsZ2 formed single rings in cells of the yeast Pichia pastoris. Photobleaching experiments indicated that co-assembly of FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 imparts polarity to polymerization. Assembly of FtsZ chimaeras revealed that the protofilaments assemble via heteropolymerization of FtsZ2 and FtsZ1. Contraction of the ring was accompanied by an increase in the filament turnover rate. Our findings suggest that the evolutionary duplication of FtsZ in plants may have increased the mobility and kinetics of FtsZ ring dynamics in chloroplast division. Thus, the gene duplication and heteropolymerization of chloroplast FtsZs may represent convergent evolution with eukaryotic tubulin. PMID:27322658

  9. Preparation of intact chloroplasts by chemically induced lysis of the green alga Dunaliella marina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kombrink, E; Wöber, G

    1980-07-01

    A method for the isolation in high yield of intact chloroplasts from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella marina (Volvocales) is described. This procedure uses chemically induced lysis of cells with the polycationic macromolecules, DEAE-dextran (M=500,000) or poly-D,L-lysine (M=30,000-70,000). Reaction conditions were optimized with respect to obtaining a high yield of intact chloroplasts, after isopycnic centrifugation in a linear sucrose density gradient, by varying the concentration of polycation and the temperature and pH of incubation. Broken chloroplasts devoid of the stromal marker enzymes fructosebisphosphate phosphatase and ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase, but containing mitochondrial (fumarase) and microbody (catalase) contamination, were banded at a bouyant density of 1.18 g cm(-3). Intact chloroplasts, as indicated by their retention of alkaline fructosebisphosphate phosphatase and ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase, were found in 30% yield (chlorophyll in intact cells, 100%) at an equilibrium density of 1.24 g cm(-3). Contamination by cytoplasmic material (pyruvate kinase), mitochondria, and microbodies was less than 8% each. PMID:24306242

  10. Sequencing of chloroplast genome using whole cellular DNA and Solexa sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eWu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing of the chloroplast genome using traditional sequencing methods has been difficult because of its size (>120 kb and the complicated procedures required to prepare templates. To explore the feasibility of sequencing the chloroplast genome using DNA extracted from whole cells and Solexa sequencing technology, we sequenced whole cellular DNA isolated from leaves of three Brassica rapa accessions with one lane per accession. In total, 246 Mb, 362Mb, 361 Mb sequence data were generated for the three accessions Chiifu-401-42, Z16 and FT, respectively. Microreads were assembled by reference-guided assembly using the cpDNA sequences of B. rapa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Nicotiana tabacum. We achieved coverage of more than 99.96% of the cp genome in the three tested accessions using the B. rapa sequence as the reference. When A. thaliana or N. tabacum sequences were used as references, 99.7–99.8% or 95.5–99.7% of the B. rapa chloroplast genome was covered, respectively. These results demonstrated that sequencing of whole cellular DNA isolated from young leaves using the Illumina Genome Analyzer is an efficient method for high-throughput sequencing of chloroplast genome.

  11. Guard Cell Chloroplasts Are Essential for Blue Light-Dependent Stomatal Opening in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takami, Tsuneaki; Ebisu, Yuuta; Watanabe, Harutaka; Iiboshi, Chihoko; Doi, Michio; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening through the activation of H+-ATPases with subsequent ion accumulation in guard cells. In most plant species, red light (RL) enhances BL-dependent stomatal opening. This RL effect is attributable to the chloroplasts of guard cell, the only cells in the epidermis possessing this organelle. To clarify the role of chloroplasts in stomatal regulation, we investigated the effects of RL on BL-dependent stomatal opening in isolated epidermis, guard cell protoplasts, and intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. In isolated epidermal tissues and intact leaves, weak BL superimposed on RL enhanced stomatal opening while BL alone was less effective. In guard cell protoplasts, RL enhanced BL-dependent H+-pumping and DCMU, a photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor, eliminated this effect. RL enhanced phosphorylation levels of the H+-ATPase in response to BL, but this RL effect was not suppressed by DCMU. Furthermore, DCMU inhibited both RL-induced and BL-dependent stomatal opening in intact leaves. The photosynthetic rate in leaves correlated positively with BL-dependent stomatal opening in the presence of DCMU. We conclude that guard cell chloroplasts provide ATP and/or reducing equivalents that fuel BL-dependent stomatal opening, and that they indirectly monitor photosynthetic CO2 fixation in mesophyll chloroplasts by absorbing PAR in the epidermis. PMID:25250952

  12. Proteases induce secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werb, Z.; Aggeler, J.

    1978-04-01

    We have observed that treatment of rabbit synovial fibroblasts with proteolytic enzymes can induce secretion of collagenase (EC 3.4.24.7) and plasminogen activator (EC 3.4.21.-). Cells treated for 2 to 24 hr with plasmin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, papain, bromelain, thermolysin, or ..cap alpha..-protease but not with thrombin or neuraminidase secreted detectable amounts of collagenase within 16 to 48 hr. Treatment of fibroblasts with trypsin also induced secretion of plasminogen activator. Proteases initiated secretion of collagenase (up to 20 units per 10/sup 6/ cells per 24 hr) only when treatment produced decreased cell adhesion. Collagenase production did not depend on continued presence of proteolytic activity or on subsequent cell adhesion, spreading, or proliferation. Routine subculturing with crude trypsin also induced collagenase secretion by cells. Secretion of collagenase was prevented and normal spreading was obtained if the trypsinized cells were placed into medium containing fetal calf serum. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, bovine serum albumin, collagen, and fibronectin did not inhibit collagenase production. Although proteases that induced collagenase secretion also removed surface glycoprotein, the kinetics of induction of cell protease secretion were different from those for removal of fibronectin. Physiological inducers of secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by cells have not been identified. These results suggest that extracellular proteases in conjunction with plasma proteins may govern protease secretion by cells.

  13. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schauperl

    Full Text Available Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points. Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4' with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design.

  14. Comparative Detection of Alkaline Protease Production in Exiguobacterium acetylicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkaline protease is one of the most important enzymes in industry, medicine, and research. In the present work, a comparative detection for alkaline protease activity was established for instant detection of enzyme activity. Eight different alkalophilic bacterial isolates were compared based on the clear zone they produced on skim milk agar. One strain gave an absolute clear zone in 16 hours and was used for alkaline protease detection. The result of Phenotypic identification using Biology Microlog 3 identified the isolate as Exiguobacterium acetylicum. The isolate under study showed slightly different characteristics from a known Exiguobacterium acetylicum strain. The isolate tolerated alkaline conditions up to ph 11, while good growth was evident at ph 7, the maximum alkaline protease activity was observed at ph 9 which reached up to 109.01 U/ml. The alkaline activity assay using alkaline protease enzyme assay were coordinating with those obtained by conductivity; there was a relevant decrease in conductivity at the maximum increase in enzyme activity, which proved the cell membrane conductivity has a close relation to alkaline protease production. This isolate has tolerated gamma radiation, the increase in dose (up to 4 Gy) gave wider clear zones in terms of diameter and this was relevant to the conductivity measurements

  15. Effect of protease inhibitors on the sense of taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, S S; Zervakis, J; Heffron, S; Heald, A E

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the taste properties of protease inhibitors which are essential components of drug regimes used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In this study, the taste properties of four protease inhibitors (indinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir, and nelfinavir) were investigated in unmedicated HIV-infected patients and healthy controls. Three of the four protease inhibitors (indinavir, ritonavir, and saquinavir) were found to be predominantly bitter (with additional qualities of medicinal, metallic, astringent, sour, and burning). Nelfinavir was found to be relatively tasteless. HIV-infected and uninfected control subjects detected protease inhibitors at similar concentrations, but HIV-infected subjects perceived suprathreshold concentrations as more bitter than controls. Detection thresholds ranged from 0.0061 mM for saquinavir in HIV-infected patients to 0.0702 mM for ritonavir in uninfected control subjects. Suprathreshold studies indicated that protease inhibitors modified the taste perception of a variety of other taste compounds. These results are consistent with clinical findings that protease inhibitors produce taste complaints that can impact patient compliance. PMID:10501290

  16. Protease inhibitors decrease the resistance of Vitaceae to Plasmopara viticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindro, Katia; Berger, Valentine; Godard, Sophie; Voinesco, Francine; Schnee, Sylvain; Viret, Olivier; Alonso-Villaverde, Virginia

    2012-11-01

    Plasmopara viticola must successfully infect susceptible grapevine cultivars to complete its biological cycle. In resistant grapevine varieties, P. viticola is blocked by the activation of defense mechanisms; these defense mechanisms produce hypersensitive reactions, which are related to programmed cell death. In animals, programmed cell death is dependent on caspase activities. In plants, different caspase-like proteases assume the same functions. To examine the roles of caspase-like proteases in P. viticola-grapevine interactions, three varieties of grapevine with different levels of P. viticola resistance were chosen. These grapevine varieties were treated with either PMSF, a serine protease inhibitor, or E-64, a cysteine protease inhibitor. The development of the pathogen was followed microscopically, and the plant defense reactions were estimated through stilbene quantification. Both protease inhibitor treatments increased the infection rate in the resistant and immune varieties, diminished the production of toxic stilbenes and changed the level of the plants' susceptibility to the pathogen. In particular, after either protease treatment, the cultivar that was originally immune became resistant (hyphae and haustoria were observed), the resistant cultivar reached the level of a susceptible cultivar (sporulation was observed) and the susceptible cultivar became more sensitive (P. viticola colonized the entirety of the leaf mesophyll). PMID:22906813

  17. Origins of the amphiploid species Brassica napus L. investigated by chloroplast and nuclear molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allender Charlotte J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amphiploid species Brassica napus (oilseed rape, Canola is a globally important oil crop yielding food, biofuels and industrial compounds such as lubricants and surfactants. Identification of the likely ancestors of each of the two genomes (designated A and C found in B. napus would facilitate incorporation of novel alleles from the wider Brassica genepool in oilseed rape crop genetic improvement programmes. Knowledge of the closest extant relatives of the genotypes involved in the initial formation of B. napus would also allow further investigation of the genetic factors required for the formation of a stable amphiploid and permit the more efficient creation of fully fertile re-synthesised B. napus. We have used a combination of chloroplast and nuclear genetic markers to investigate the closest extant relatives of the original maternal progenitors of B. napus. This was based on a comprehensive sampling of the relevant genepools, including 83 accessions of A genome B. rapa L. (both wild and cultivated types, 94 accessions of B. napus and 181 accessions of C genome wild and cultivated B. oleracea L. and related species. Results Three chloroplast haplotypes occurred in B. napus. The most prevalent haplotype (found in 79% of accessions was not present within the C genome accessions but was found at low frequencies in B. rapa. Chloroplast haplotypes characteristic of B. napus were found in a small number of wild and weedy B. rapa populations, and also in two accessions of cultivated B. rapa 'brocoletto'. Whilst introgression of the B. napus chloroplast type in the wild and weedy B. rapa populations has been proposed by other studies, the presence of this haplotype within the two brocoletto accessions is unexplained. Conclusions The distribution of chloroplast haplotypes eliminate any of the C genome species as being the maternal ancestor of the majority of the B. napus accessions. The presence of multiple chloroplast

  18. Identification of Cysteine Proteases and Screening of Cysteine Protease Inhibitors in Biological Samples by a Two-Dimensional Gel System of Zymography and Reverse Zymography

    OpenAIRE

    Eiichi Saitoh; Shinya Yamamoto; Eishiro Okamoto; Yoshimi Hayakawa; Takashi Hoshino; Ritsuko Sato; Satoko Isemura; Sadami Ohtsubo; Masayuki Taniguchi

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D-) gel system of zymography and reverse zymography for the detection and characterization of proteases and protease inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) agarose gels with pH gradients were employed for separation in the first-dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel copolymerized with gelatin used for the second dimension. Proteases and protease inhibitors separated by IEF gel were applied on the second gel without trichloroacetic ...

  19. Protease encoding microbial communities and protease activity of the rhizosphere and bulk soils of two maize lines with different N uptake efficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Baraniya, Divyashri; Puglisi, Edoardo; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Pietramellara, Giacomo; Giagnoni, Laura; Arenella, Mariarita; Nannipieri, Paolo; Renella, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to understand the interplay of plant Nitrogen Utilizing Efficiency (NEU) with protease activtiy and microbial proteolytic community composition in the rhizosphere and bulk soils. Protease activity, diversity and abundance of protease genes (using DGGE and qPCR respectively of two key bacterial protease encoding genes: alkaline metallo-peptidase (apr) and neutral-metallopeptidases (npr) were monitored in both rhizosphere and bulk soils from two maize in-bred lines L0...

  20. Secretory Granule Proteases in Rat Mast Cells. Cloning of 10 Different Serine Proteases and a Carboxypeptidase A from Various Rat Mast Cell Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Lützelschwab, Claudia; Pejler, Gunnar; Aveskogh, Maria; Hellman, Lars

    1997-01-01

    Two of the major rat mast cell proteases, rat mast cell protease 1 (RMCP-1) and RMCP-2, have for many years served as important phenotypic markers for studies of various aspects of mast cell (MC) biology. However, except for these proteases only fragmentary information has been available on the structure and complexity of proteases expressed by different subpopulations of rat MCs. To address these questions, cDNA libraries were constructed from freshly isolated rat peritoneal MCs and from the...

  1. High-throughput sequencing of three Lemnoideae (duckweeds chloroplast genomes from total DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chloroplast genomes provide a wealth of information for evolutionary and population genetic studies. Chloroplasts play a particularly important role in the adaption for aquatic plants because they float on water and their major surface is exposed continuously to sunlight. The subfamily of Lemnoideae represents such a collection of aquatic species that because of photosynthesis represents one of the fastest growing plant species on earth. METHODS: We sequenced the chloroplast genomes from three different genera of Lemnoideae, Spirodela polyrhiza, Wolffiella lingulata and Wolffia australiana by high-throughput DNA sequencing of genomic DNA using the SOLiD platform. Unfractionated total DNA contains high copies of plastid DNA so that sequences from the nucleus and mitochondria can easily be filtered computationally. Remaining sequence reads were assembled into contiguous sequences (contigs using SOLiD software tools. Contigs were mapped to a reference genome of Lemna minor and gaps, selected by PCR, were sequenced on the ABI3730xl platform. CONCLUSIONS: This combinatorial approach yielded whole genomic contiguous sequences in a cost-effective manner. Over 1,000-time coverage of chloroplast from total DNA were reached by the SOLiD platform in a single spot on a quadrant slide without purification. Comparative analysis indicated that the chloroplast genome was conserved in gene number and organization with respect to the reference genome of L. minor. However, higher nucleotide substitution, abundant deletions and insertions occurred in non-coding regions of these genomes, indicating a greater genomic dynamics than expected from the comparison of other related species in the Pooideae. Noticeably, there was no transition bias over transversion in Lemnoideae. The data should have immediate applications in evolutionary biology and plant taxonomy with increased resolution and statistical power.

  2. Modelling of potentially promising SARS protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Hoffmann, Marcin [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Grotthuss, Marcin von [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Knizewski, Lukasz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Rychewski, Leszek [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Eitner, Krystian [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Ginalski, Krzysztof [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-18

    In many cases, at the beginning of a high throughput screening experiment some information about active molecules is already available. Active compounds (such as substrate analogues, natural products and inhibitors of related proteins) are often identified in low throughput validation studies on a biochemical target. Sometimes the additional structural information is also available from crystallographic studies on protein and ligand complexes. In addition, the structural or sequence similarity of various protein targets yields a novel possibility for drug discovery. Co-crystallized compounds from homologous proteins can be used to design leads for a new target without co-crystallized ligands. In this paper we evaluate how far such an approach can be used in a real drug campaign, with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus providing an example. Our method is able to construct small molecules as plausible inhibitors solely on the basis of the set of ligands from crystallized complexes of a protein target, and other proteins from its structurally homologous family. The accuracy and sensitivity of the method are estimated here by the subsequent use of an electronic high throughput screening flexible docking algorithm. The best performing ligands are then used for a very restrictive similarity search for potential inhibitors of the SARS protease within the million compounds from the Ligand.Info small molecule meta-database. The selected molecules can be passed on for further experimental validation.

  3. Computational analysis of HIV-1 protease protein binding pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gene M; Reddy, A Srinivas; Kumar, Sunil; Bailey, Barbara A; Garg, Rajni

    2010-10-25

    Mutations that arise in HIV-1 protease after exposure to various HIV-1 protease inhibitors have proved to be a difficult aspect in the treatment of HIV. Mutations in the binding pocket of the protease can prevent the protease inhibitor from binding to the protein effectively. In the present study, the crystal structures of 68 HIV-1 proteases complexed with one of the nine FDA approved protease inhibitors from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were analyzed by (a) identifying the mutational changes with the aid of a developed mutation map and (b) correlating the structure of the binding pockets with the complexed inhibitors. The mutations of each crystal structure were identified by comparing the amino acid sequence of each structure against the HIV-1 wild-type strain HXB2. These mutations were visually presented in the form of a mutation map to analyze mutation patterns corresponding to each protease inhibitor. The crystal structure mutation patterns of each inhibitor (in vitro) were compared against the mutation patterns observed in in vivo data. The in vitro mutation patterns were found to be representative of most of the major in vivo mutations. We then performed a data mining analysis of the binding pockets from each crystal structure in terms of their chemical descriptors to identify important structural features of the HIV-1 protease protein with respect to the binding conformation of the HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Data mining analysis is performed using several classification techniques: Random Forest (RF), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and logistic regression (LR). We developed two hybrid models, RF-LDA and RF-LR. Random Forest is used as a feature selection proxy, reducing the descriptor space to a few of the most relevant descriptors determined by the classifier. These descriptors are then used to develop the subsequent LDA, LR, and hierarchical classification models. Clustering analysis of the binding pockets using the selected descriptors used to

  4. Expression, purification and molecular modeling of the NIa protease of Cardamom mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebasingh, T; Pandaranayaka, Eswari P J; Mahalakshmi, A; Kasin Yadunandam, A; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2013-01-01

    The NIa protease of Potyviridae is the major viral protease that processes potyviral polyproteins. The NIa protease coding region of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is amplified from the viral cDNA, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. NIa protease forms inclusion bodies in E.coli. The inclusion bodies are solubilized with 8 M urea, refolded and purified by Nickel-Nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Three-dimensional modeling of the CdMV NIa protease is achieved by threading approach using the homologous X-ray crystallographic structure of Tobacco etch mosaic virus NIa protease. The model gave an insight in to the substrate specificities of the NIa proteases and predicted the complementation of nearby residues in the catalytic triad (H42, D74 and C141) mutants in the cis protease activity of CdMV NIa protease. PMID:22888800

  5. The structure of a universally employed enzyme: V8 protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Lata; Leduc, Yvonne; Hayakawa, Koto; Delbaere, Louis T.J. (Saskatchewan)

    2008-06-27

    V8 protease, an extracellular protease of Staphylococcus aureus, is related to the pancreatic serine proteases. The enzyme cleaves peptide bonds exclusively on the carbonyl side of aspartate and glutamate residues. Unlike the pancreatic serine proteases, V8 protease possesses no disulfide bridges. This is a major evolutionary difference, as all pancreatic proteases have at least two disulfide bridges. The structure of V8 protease shows structural similarity with several other serine proteases, specifically the epidermolytic toxins A and B from S. aureus and trypsin, in which the conformation of the active site is almost identical. V8 protease is also unique in that the positively charged N-terminus is involved in determining the substrate-specificity of the enzyme.

  6. Targeting exosites on blood coagulation proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Q. Monteiro

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The high specificity of blood coagulation proteases has been attributed not only to residues surrounding the active site but also to other surface domains that are involved in recognizing and interacting with macromolecular substrates and inhibitors. Specific blood coagulation inhibitors obtained from exogenous sources such as blood sucking salivary glands and snake venoms have been identified. Some of these inhibitors interact with exosites on coagulation enzymes. Two examples are discussed in this short revision. Bothrojaracin is a snake venom-derived protein that binds to thrombin exosites 1 and 2. Complex formation impairs several exosite-dependent activities of thrombin including fibrinogen cleavage and platelet activation. Bothrojaracin also interacts with proexosite 1 on prothrombin thus decreasing the zymogen activation by the prothrombinase complex (FXa/FVa. Ixolaris is a two Kunitz tick salivary gland inhibitor, that is homologous to tissue factor pathway inhibitor. Recently it was demonstrated that ixolaris binds to heparin-binding exosite of FXa, thus impairing the recognition of prothrombin by the enzyme. In addition, ixolaris interacts with FX possibly through the heparin-binding proexosite. Differently from FX, the ixolaris-FX complex is not recognized as substrate by the intrinsic tenase complex (FIXa/FVIIIa. We conclude that these inhibitors may serve as tools for the study of coagulation exosites as well as prototypes for new anticoagulant drugs.A alta especificidade das proteases da coagulação tem sido atribuída não somente aos resíduos que cercam o sítio ativo, mas também a outros domínios de superfície que estão envolvidos no reconhecimento e interação com substratos macromoleculares e inibidores. Inibidores específicos da coagulação sanguínea obtidos de fontes exógenas como glândulas salivares de animais hematófagos e venenos de serpentes têm sido identificados. Alguns desses inibidores interagem com os

  7. Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O; Lewis, Louise A

    2016-05-01

    Chloroplast sequence data are widely used to infer phylogenies of plants and algae. With the increasing availability of complete chloroplast genome sequences, the opportunity arises to resolve ancient divergences that were heretofore problematic. On the flip side, properly analyzing large multi-gene data sets can be a major challenge, as these data may be riddled with systematic biases and conflicting signals. Our study contributes new data from nine complete and four fragmentary chloroplast genome sequences across the green algal order Sphaeropleales. Our phylogenetic analyses of a 56-gene data set show that analyzing these data on a nucleotide level yields a well-supported phylogeny - yet one that is quite different from a corresponding amino acid analysis. We offer some possible explanations for this conflict through a range of analyses of modified data sets. In addition, we characterize the newly sequenced genomes in terms of their structure and content, thereby further contributing to the knowledge of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:26903036

  8. Ozone-induced changes in the chloroplast structure of conifer needles, and their use in ozone diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozone induces characteristic symptoms in the chloroplasts of the needles of several coniferous species. Chloroplasts are (1) reduced in size and (2) the stroma is electron dense. Moreover (3) these chloroplast alterations are more pronounced in the outer mesophyll cell layers and in the upper side of the needle compared to the inner layers and lower side. The syndrome, including the three symptoms (1)-(3), is found in the green needles of Scots pine and Norway spruce not only in the experimental fumigations, but also in mature trees in the field, and has potential for diagnosis of ozone stress. For sound ozone diagnostics all three symptoms must be present in the samples studied. The symptoms in relation to needle anatomy and physiology is discussed, and recommendations for sampling and analysis are given. - Ozone-induced alterations in chloroplast structure of conifer needles are reviewed, and recommendations for field monitoring given

  9. Spatial location of photosystem pigment-protein complexes in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts of Pisun sativum studied by chlorophyll fluorescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, František; Adamec, František; Valenta, J.; Vácha, M.

    122-123, Spec.iss. (2007), s. 301-303. ISSN 0022-2313 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : chloroplasts * Pisum sativum Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.611, year: 2007

  10. Modeling and structural analysis of PA clan serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laskar Aparna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases account for over a third of all known proteolytic enzymes; they are involved in a variety of physiological processes and are classified into clans sharing structural homology. The PA clan of endopeptidases is the most abundant and over two thirds of this clan is comprised of the S1 family of serine proteases, which bear the archetypal trypsin fold and have a catalytic triad in the order Histidine, Aspartate, Serine. These proteases have been studied in depth and many three dimensional structures have been experimentally determined. However, these structures mostly consist of bacterial and animal proteases, with a small number of plant and fungal proteases and as yet no structures have been determined for protozoa or archaea. The core structure and active site geometry of these proteases is of interest for many applications. This study investigated the structural properties of different S1 family serine proteases from a diverse range of taxa using molecular modeling techniques. Results Our predicted models from protozoa, archaea, fungi and plants were combined with the experimentally determined structures of 16 S1 family members and used for analysis of the catalytic core. Amino acid sequences were submitted to SWISS-MODEL for homology-based structure prediction or the LOOPP server for threading-based structure prediction. Predicted models were refined using INSIGHT II and SCRWL and validated against experimental structures. Investigation of secondary structures and electrostatic surface potential was performed using MOLMOL. The structural geometry of the catalytic core shows clear deviations between taxa, but the relative positions of the catalytic triad residues were conserved. Some highly conserved residues potentially contributing to the stability of the structural core were identified. Evolutionary divergence was also exhibited by large variation in secondary structure features outside the core

  11. A Comparison of the First Two Sequenced Chloroplast Genomes in Asteraceae: Lettuce and Sunflower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timme, Ruth E.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2006-01-20

    Asteraceae is the second largest family of plants, with over 20,000 species. For the past few decades, numerous phylogenetic studies have contributed to our understanding of the evolutionary relationships within this family, including comparisons of the fast evolving chloroplast gene, ndhF, rbcL, as well as non-coding DNA from the trnL intron plus the trnLtrnF intergenic spacer, matK, and, with lesser resolution, psbA-trnH. This culminated in a study by Panero and Funk in 2002 that used over 13,000 bp per taxon for the largest taxonomic revision of Asteraceae in over a hundred years. Still, some uncertainties remain, and it would be very useful to have more information on the relative rates of sequence evolution among various genes and on genome structure as a potential set of phylogenetic characters to help guide future phylogenetic structures. By way of contributing to this, we report the first two complete chloroplast genome sequences from members of the Asteraceae, those of Helianthus annuus and Lactuca sativa. These plants belong to two distantly related subfamilies, Asteroideae and Cichorioideae, respectively. In addition to these, there is only one other published chloroplast genome sequence for any plant within the larger group called Eusterids II, that of Panax ginseng (Araliaceae, 156,318 bps, AY582139). Early chloroplast genome mapping studies demonstrated that H. annuus and L. sativa share a 22 kb inversion relative to members of the subfamily Barnadesioideae. By comparison to outgroups, this inversion was shown to be derived, indicating that the Asteroideae and Cichorioideae are more closely related than either is to the Barnadesioideae. Later sequencing study found that taxa that share this 22 kb inversion also contain within this region a second, smaller, 3.3 kb inversion. These sequences also enable an analysis of patterns of shared repeats in the genomes at fine level and of RNA editing by comparison to available EST sequences. In addition, since

  12. Contribution of Gag and Protease to HIV-1 Phenotypic Drug Resistance in Pediatric Patients Failing Protease Inhibitor-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giandhari, Jennifer; Basson, Adriaan E; Sutherland, Katherine; Parry, Chris M; Cane, Patricia A; Coovadia, Ashraf; Kuhn, Louise; Hunt, Gillian; Morris, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are used as a first-line regimen in HIV-1-infected children. Here we investigated the phenotypic consequences of amino acid changes in Gag and protease on lopinavir (LPV) and ritonavir (RTV) susceptibility among pediatric patients failing PI therapy. The Gag-protease from isolates from 20 HIV-1 subtype C-infected pediatric patients failing an LPV and/or RTV-based regimen was phenotyped using a nonreplicativein vitroassay. Changes in sensitivity to LPV and RTV relative to that of the matched baseline (pretherapy) sample were calculated. Gag and protease amino acid substitutions associated with PI failure were created in a reference clone by site-directed mutagenesis and assessed. Predicted phenotypes were determined using the Stanford drug resistance algorithm. Phenotypic resistance or reduced susceptibility to RTV and/or LPV was observed in isolates from 10 (50%) patients, all of whom had been treated with RTV. In most cases, this was associated with protease resistance mutations, but substitutions at Gag cleavage and noncleavage sites were also detected. Gag amino acid substitutions were also found in isolates from three patients with reduced drug susceptibilities who had wild-type protease. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that some amino acid changes in Gag contributed to PI resistance but only in the presence of major protease resistance-associated substitutions. The isolates from all patients who received LPV exclusively were phenotypically susceptible. Baseline isolates from the 20 patients showed a large (47-fold) range in the 50% effective concentration of LPV, which accounted for most of the discordance seen between the experimentally determined and the predicted phenotypes. Overall, the inclusion of thegaggene and the use of matched baseline samples provided a more comprehensive assessment of the effect of PI-induced amino acid changes on PI resistance. The lack of phenotypic resistance to LPV supports the continued use of

  13. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Nakamura, China; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we determined if CRBN has a protective function against oxidative stress, similar to Lon protease. We report that CRBN partially distributes in mitochondria, suggesting it has a mitochondrial function. To specify the mitochondrial role of CRBN, we mitochondrially expressed CRBN in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The resulting stable SH-SY5Y cell line showed no apparent effect on the mitochondrial functions of fusion, fission, and membrane potential. However, mitochondrially expressed CRBN exhibited protease activity, and was induced by oxidative stress. In addition, stably expressed cells exhibited suppressed neuronal cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that CRBN functions specifically as a Lon-type protease in mitochondria. PMID:27417535

  14. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A. (UMASS, MED)

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  15. Cysteine proteases: mode of action and role in epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Keith; Philpott, Mike P

    2013-02-01

    Desquamation or cell shedding in mammalian skin is known to involve serine proteases, aspartic proteases and glycosidases. In addition, evidence continues to accumulate that papain-like cysteine proteases and an inhibitor cystatin M/E largely confined to the cutaneous epithelia also play key roles in the process. This involves the complete proteolysis of cell adhesive structures of the stratum corneum, the corneodesmosomes and notably of the desmogleins. Continual cell replacement in the epidermis is the result of the balance between the loss of the outer squames and mitosis of the cells in the basal cell layer. This article provides a brief account of the salient features of the characteristics and catalytic mechanism of cysteine proteases, followed by a discussion of the relevant epidermal biology. The proteases include the asparaginyl endopeptidase legumain, which exerts a strict specificity for the hydrolysis of asparaginyl bonds, cathepsin-V and cathepsin-L. The control of these enzymes by cystatin M/E regulates the processing of transglutaminases and is crucial in the biochemical pathway responsible for regulating the cross-linking and desquamation of the stratum corneum. In addition, caspase-14 has now been shown to play a major part in epidermal maturation. Uncontrolled proteolytic activity leads to abnormal hair follicle formation and deleterious effects on the skin barrier function. PMID:23344364

  16. Alkaline protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 mitigates industrial pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Amit; Ansari, Mohammad W; Anwar, Mohmmad S; Agrawal, Ruchi; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Proteases have found a wide application in the several industrial processes, such as laundry detergents, protein recovery or solubilization, prion degradation, meat tenderizations, and in bating of hides and skins in leather industries. But the main hurdle in industrial application of proteases is their economical production on a large scale. The present investigation aimed to exploit the locally available inexpensive agricultural and household wastes for alkaline protease production using Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via solid-state fermentation (SSF) technique. The alkaline enzyme is potentially useful as an additive in commercial detergents to mitigate pollution load due to extensive use of caustic soda-based detergents. Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 showed good protease production under SSF conditions of 55 °C, pH 9, and 50 % moisture content with potato peels as solid substrate. The presented findings revealed that crude alkaline protease produced by Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via SSF is of potential application in silver recovery from used X-ray films. PMID:24122212

  17. Characterization, biomedical and agricultural applications of protease inhibitors: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Tooba Naz; Parveen, Romana; Fatima, Sadaf

    2016-10-01

    This review describes Protease Inhibitors (PIs) which target or inhibit proteases, protein digesting enzymes. These proteases play a crucial task in many biological events including digestion, blood coagulation, apoptosis etc. Regardless of their crucial roles, they need to be checked regularly by PIs as their excess may possibly damage host organism. On basis of amino acid composition of PIs where Protease-PI enzymatic reactions occur i.e. serine, cysteine, and aspartic acid, they are classified. Nowadays, various PIs are being worked upon to fight various parasitic or viral diseases including malaria, schistosomiasis, colds, flu', dengue etc. They prevent an ongoing process begun by carcinogen exposure by keeping a check on metastasis. They also possess potential to reduce carcinogen-induced, increased levels of gene amplification to almost normal levels. Some PIs can principally be used for treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure by blocking conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II for example Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). Also PIs target amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) level in brain which is prime responsible for development of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Also, PIs inhibit enzymatic activity of HIV-1 Protease Receptor (PR) by preventing cleavage events in Gag and Gag-Pol that result in production of non-virulent virus particles. PMID:26955746

  18. Current trends and challenges in proteomic identification of protease substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizovišek, Matej; Vidmar, Robert; Fonović, Marko; Turk, Boris

    2016-03-01

    Proteolytic cleavage is a ubiquitous, irreversible, posttranslational modification that changes protein structure and function and plays an important role in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Over the last decade, proteases have become increasingly important clinical targets because many of their inhibitors are already used in the clinic or in various stages of clinical testing. Therefore, a better understanding of protease action and their repertoires of physiological substrates can not only provide an important insight into their mechanisms of action but also open a path toward novel drug design. Historically, proteases and their substrates were mainly studied on a case-by-case basis, but recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have enabled proteolysis studies on a global scale. Because there are many different types of proteases that can operate in various cellular contexts, multiple experimental approaches for their degradomic characterization had to be developed. The present paper reviews the mass spectrometry-based approaches for determining the proteolytic events in complex biological samples. The methodologies for substrate identification and the determination of protease specificity are discussed, with a special focus on terminomic strategies, which combine peptide labeling and enrichment. PMID:26514758

  19. Expression of ROS-responsive genes and transcription factors after metabolic formation of H2O2 in chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Balazadeh, Salma; Jaspert, Nils; Arif, Muhammad; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Maurino, Veronica G.

    2012-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GO) catalyses the oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate, thereby consuming O(2) and producing H(2)O(2). In this work, Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing GO in the chloroplasts (GO plants) were used to assess the expressional behavior of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive genes and transcription factors (TFs) after metabolic induction of H(2)O(2) formation in chloroplasts. In this organelle, GO uses the glycolate derived from the oxygenase activity of RubisCO. Here,...

  20. Comparative chloroplast genomics and phylogenetics of Fagopyrum esculentum ssp. ancestrale – A wild ancestor of cultivated buckwheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhingra Amit

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplast genome sequences are extremely informative about species-interrelationships owing to its non-meiotic and often uniparental inheritance over generations. The subject of our study, Fagopyrum esculentum, is a member of the family Polygonaceae belonging to the order Caryophyllales. An uncertainty remains regarding the affinity of Caryophyllales and the asterids that could be due to undersampling of the taxa. With that background, having access to the complete chloroplast genome sequence for Fagopyrum becomes quite pertinent. Results We report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of a wild ancestor of cultivated buckwheat, Fagopyrum esculentum ssp. ancestrale. The sequence was rapidly determined using a previously described approach that utilized a PCR-based method and employed universal primers, designed on the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of chloroplast genomes. The gene content and order in buckwheat chloroplast genome is similar to Spinacia oleracea. However, some unique structural differences exist: the presence of an intron in the rpl2 gene, a frameshift mutation in the rpl23 gene and extension of the inverted repeat region to include the ycf1 gene. Phylogenetic analysis of 61 protein-coding gene sequences from 44 complete plastid genomes provided strong support for the sister relationships of Caryophyllales (including Polygonaceae to asterids. Further, our analysis also provided support for Amborella as sister to all other angiosperms, but interestingly, in the bayesian phylogeny inference based on first two codon positions Amborella united with Nymphaeales. Conclusion Comparative genomics analyses revealed that the Fagopyrum chloroplast genome harbors the characteristic gene content and organization as has been described for several other chloroplast genomes. However, it has some unique structural features distinct from previously reported complete chloroplast genome sequences. Phylogenetic

  1. Production of therapeutic proteins in algae, analysis of expression of seven human proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Rasala, Beth A.; Muto, Machiko; Lee, Philip A.; Jager, Michal; Cardoso, Rosa MF; Behnke, Craig A; Kirk, Peter; Hokanson, Craig A.; Crea, Roberto; Mendez, Michael; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are widely used today in many industries, including the biopharmaceutical industry, and can be expressed in bacteria, yeasts, mammalian and insect cell cultures, or in transgenic plants and animals. In addition, transgenic algae have also been shown to support recombinant protein expression, both from the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, to date, there are only a few reports on recombinant proteins expressed in the algal chloroplast. It is unclear if this is due ...

  2. Chloroplast genes are expressed during intracellular symbiotic association of Vaucheria litorea plastids with the sea slug Elysia chlorotica.

    OpenAIRE

    Mujer, C V; Andrews, D L; Manhart, J R; Pierce, S K; Rumpho, M E

    1996-01-01

    The marine slug Elysia chlorotica (Gould) forms an intracellular symbiosis with photosynthetically active chloroplasts from the chromophytic alga Vaucheria litorea (C. Agardh). This symbiotic association was characterized over a period of 8 months during which E. chlorotica was deprived of V. litorea but provided with light and CO2. The fine structure of the symbiotic chloroplasts remained intact in E. chlorotica even after 8 months of starvation as revealed by electron microscopy. Southern b...

  3. Fatores antinutricionais: inibidores de proteases e lectinas Antinutritional factors: protease inhibitors and lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Reis SILVA

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Os fatores antinutricionais presentes em alimentos podem provocar efeitos fisiológicos adversos ou diminuir a biodisponibilidade de nutrientes. A maior questão sobre os riscos à saúde provocados por antinutrientes é o desconhecimento dos níveis de tolerância, do grau de variação do risco individual e da influência de fatores ambientais sobre a capacidade de detoxificação do organismo humano. Dentre os fatores antinutricionais os inibidores de proteases e as lectinas são considerados instáveis ao tratamento térmico. A hipertrofia pancreática causada pelos inibidores de tripsina tem sido relatada em alguns estudos com animais. As alterações da função fisiológica em animais causadas por ação de lectinas no intestino parecem estar relacionadas à especificidade destas substâncias com as células da mucosa intestinal. Os possíveis efeitos adversos dos inibidores de proteases e das lectinas na maioria das vezes são inferidos somente de experimentos com animais de laboratório.The antinutritional factors present in foods can cause adverse physiological effects or decrease the bioavailability of nutrients. Health risk factors associated with antinutrients include: lack of knowledge of the tolerance levels to these compounds in the human organism, little available information on the degree of variation of individual risks and little knowledge with respect to the influence of environmental factors on the detoxification capacity of the human organism. The possible adverse effects of protease inhibitors and lectin on human health are, in most cases, only inferred by way of experiments with laboratory animals. Pancreatic hypertrophy caused by trypsin inhibitors has been shown in some animal experiments. Alterations in physiological functions at the intestinal level shown by animals submitted to lectins containing diets seem to be related to the specificity of these substances with the intestinal mucosa cells. There is no evidence

  4. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  5. Screening of Alkaline Protease-Producing Streptomyces diastaticus and Optimization of Enzyme Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Dawoodi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Alkaline proteases are used in pharmaceutical, film and photography, silk production and food, leather and detergent industries. Actinomycetes are gram positive bacteria that produce different enzymes such as proteases. The aims of this research were isolation of native alkaline protease-producing Actinomycete spp. from different soil samples as well as optimizing the conditions for enzyme production. Materials and Methods: The different soil samples were collected from different locations of the provinces of Khouzestan, Chahar Mahalo Bakhtiari and Isfahan, Iran. After determining of the best alkaline protease producing species using Lowry method, the optimization of alkaline protease was performed. Results: The alkaline protease producing Actinomycete spp. was isolated from soil. The most enzyme activity was measured in S.diastaticus. The best concentration of sucrose as the carbon source for the highest production of alkaline protease was 10 g/l. The optimum pH and temperature for the alkaline protease production by S. diastaticus were 10 and 30°C respectively. The maximum activity of alkaline protease was measured at 200 rpm as the best aeration speed. Conclusions: This is the first report of alkaline protease production by Streptomyces diastaticus in Iran. The accomplished examinations in this research confirmed the previous theories of alkaline protease production by Actinomycetes relatively. Regarding the immense applications of alkaline proteases in several industries and isolation of a native alkaline protease producing Actinomycete, The production potential of this enzyme in our country could be accessible in the near future.

  6. The reduced state of the plastoquinone pool is required for chloroplast-mediated stomatal closure in response to calcium stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Hua; He, En-Ming; Chen, Juan; Guo, Ying; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2016-04-01

    Besides their participation in photosynthesis, leaf chloroplasts function in plant responses to stimuli, yet how they direct stimulus-induced stomatal movement remains elusive. Here, we showed that over-reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool by dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB) was closely associated with stomatal closure in plants which required chloroplastic H2 O2 generation in the mesophyll. External application of H2 O2 reduced the PQ pool, whereas the cell-permeable reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reversed the DBMIB-induced over-reduction of the PQ pool and stomatal closure. Mesophyll chloroplasts are key players of extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+) o )-induced stomatal closure, but when treated with either 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) or NAC they failed to facilitate Ca(2+) o -induced stomatal closure due to the inhibition of chloroplastic H2 O2 synthesis in mesophyll. Similarly, the Arabidopsis electron transfer chain-related mutants npq4-1, stn7 and cas-1 exhibited diverse responses to Ca(2+) o or DBMIB. Transcriptome analysis also demonstrated that the PQ pool signaling pathway shared common responsive genes with the H2 O2 signaling pathway. These results implicated a mechanism for chloroplast-mediated stomatal closure involving the generation of mesophyll chloroplastic H2 O2 based on the reduced state of the PQ pool, which is calcium-sensing receptor (CAS) and LHCII phosphorylation dependent. PMID:26945669

  7. The complete chloroplast genome of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (Rhodophyta) gives new insight into the evolution of family Gracilariaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qingwei; Bi, Guiqi; Mao, Yunxiang; Sui, Zhenghong

    2016-06-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis was recovered from a Next Generation Sequencing data set. Without quadripartite structure, this chloroplast genome (183,013 bp, 27.40% GC content) contains 202 protein-coding genes, 34 tRNA genes, 3 rRNA genes, and 1 tmRNA gene. Synteny analysis showed plasmid incorporation regions in chloroplast genomes of three species of family Gracilariaceae and in Grateloupia taiwanensis of family Halymeniaceae. Combined with reported red algal plasmid sequences in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, we postulated that red algal plasmids may have played an important role in ancient horizontal gene transfer among nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial genomes. Substitution rate analysis showed that purifying selective forces maintaining stability of protein-coding genes of nine red algal chloroplast genomes over long periods must be strong and that the forces acting on gene groups and single genes of nine red algal chloroplast genomes were similar and consistent. The divergence of Gp. lemaneiformis occurred ~447.98 million years ago (Mya), close to the divergence time of genus Pyropia and Porphyra (443.62 Mya). PMID:27273536

  8. Kinetics of /sup 14/C distribution during photosynthesis by chloroplast preparations isolated from the siphonous alga Caulerpa simpliciuscula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, B.R.; Howard, R.J.

    1980-07-01

    The kinetics of /sup 14/C-labeling of compounds produced during photosynthesis by chloroplast preparations isolated from the green alga Caulerpa simpliciuscula were studied. After 10 minutes photosynthesis sucrose contained more /sup 14/C than any other product, and continued to accumulate radioactivity during the whole hour of incubation. Glucose-6-phosphate and alanine also behaved as end products and continued to accumulate label during the period. In these organelles, glucose-6-phosphate replaced triose phosphate as the main compound exported from the chloroplast during shorter periods of photosynthesis. When either glucose-6-phosphate or 3-phosphoglycerate was supplied to the isolated chloroplasts, they were metabolized, but were not converted to either sucrose or alanine. It is proposed that many of the differences in metabolism which distinguish these algal chloroplasts from those isolated from higher plants are due to their isolation in the form of cytoplasts, i.e., chloroplasts surrounded by a thin layer of extrachloroplastic material which is membrane-bound. The restriction of diffusion of intermediates from the chloroplast by this cytoplast membrane appears to be at least as important as the rather small amount of cytoplasm present in determining the properties observed.

  9. Kinetics of 14C distribution during photosynthesis by chloroplast preparations isolated from the siphonous alga Caulerpa simpliciuscula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of 14C-labeling of compounds produced during photosynthesis by chloroplast preparations isolated from the green alga Caulerpa simpliciuscula were studied. After 10 minutes photosynthesis sucrose contained more 14C than any other product, and continued to accumulate radioactivity during the whole hour of incubation. Glucose-6-phosphate and alanine also behaved as end products and continued to accumulate label during the period. In these organelles, glucose-6-phosphate replaced triose phosphate as the main compound exported from the chloroplast during shorter periods of photosynthesis. When either glucose-6-phosphate or 3-phosphoglycerate was supplied to the isolated chloroplasts, they were metabolized, but were not converted to either sucrose or alanine. It is proposed that many of the differences in metabolism which distinguish these algal chloroplasts from those isolated from higher plants are due to their isolation in the form of cytoplasts, i.e., chloroplasts surrounded by a thin layer of extrachloroplastic material which is membrane-bound. The restriction of diffusion of intermediates from the chloroplast by this cytoplast membrane appears to be at least as important as the rather small amount of cytoplasm present in determining the properties observed

  10. Digestive system of the sacoglossan Plakobranchus ocellatus (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia): light- and electron-microscopic observations with remarks on chloroplast retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Euichi

    2005-08-01

    The sacoglossan Plakobranchus ocellatus feeds by sucking the cytoplasmic contents from algae and retains intact algal chloroplasts within the cells of the digestive gland. Morphology of the entire digestive system of this species was firstly described by means of a combination of histology and electron microscopy (both SEM and TEM). The short alimentary canal is confined to the head, and the anus opens at the anterior right corner of the pericardial swelling, as is the case in many non-shelled sacoglossans. The alimentary canal of the specimens examined rarely contained ingesta, suggesting that the retained chloroplasts provide sufficient nourishment to the sacoglossan hosts and that sea slugs with empty stomachs survive well in the field. The digestive gland, with the retained chloroplasts, branches from the stomach and is sparsely distributed throughout the body, including the head region, but is aggregated mainly in the dorsal lamellae. Chloroplasts were occasionally found in the epithelial cells in the transitional region from the stomach wall to the digestive gland, which may be a site at which chloroplasts are incorporated into the animal cells by endocytosis. Numerous microvilli filling the lumen of the digestive gland suggest that molecules are actively transferred within the gland. The sea slug thus apparently provides a favorable environment to support the long-term retention and function of chloroplasts. PMID:16141704

  11. The battle in the apoplast: further insights into the roles of proteases and their inhibitors in plant–pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Mehrabi, Rahim; Collemare, Jérôme; Mesarich, Carl H.; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Upon host penetration, fungal pathogens secrete a plethora of effectors to promote disease, including proteases that degrade plant antimicrobial proteins, and protease inhibitors (PIs) that inhibit plant proteases with antimicrobial activity. Conversely, plants secrete proteases and PIs to protect themselves against pathogens or to mediate recognition of pathogen proteases and PIs, which leads to induction of defense responses. Many examples of proteases and PIs mediating effector-triggered i...

  12. Lvserpin3 is involved in shrimp innate immunity via the inhibition of bacterial proteases and proteases involved in prophenoloxidase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjie; Liu, Tao; Hou, Fujun; Wang, Xianzong; Liu, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitor, represented by serpin, plays an important inhibitory role on proteases involved in the immune responses. To clarify the immune characterizations of serpin, a novel serpin (Lvserpin3) encoding for 410 amino acids with a 23-amino acid signal peptide and a serpin domain was identified from the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. Lvserpin3 expressed strongest in hepatopancreas, and was significantly up-regulated in the early stage upon Vibrio anguillarum, Micrococcus lysodeikticus or White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) infection. Suppression of Lvserpin3 by dsRNA led to a significant increase in the transcripts of LvPPAF, LvproPO and phenoloxidase (PO) activity, and also led to the high cumulative mortality. The recombinant Lvserpin3 protein (rLvserpin3) inhibited the proteases secreted by M. lysodeikticus and Bacillus subtilis, and further exhibited inhibitory role on the growth of B. subtilis and M. lysodeikticu. Moreover, rLvserpin3 was found to be able to block the activation of prophenoloxidase system. Taken together, the results imply that Lvserpin3 may be involved in shrimp innate immunity via the inhibition of bacterial proteases and proteases involved in prophenoloxidase system. PMID:26432049

  13. An Augmented Multiple-Protease-Based Human Phosphopeptide Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Giansanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although mass-spectrometry-based screens enable thousands of protein phosphorylation sites to be monitored simultaneously, they often do not cover important regulatory sites. Here, we hypothesized that this is due to the fact that nearly all large-scale phosphoproteome studies are initiated by trypsin digestion. We tested this hypothesis using multiple proteases for protein digestion prior to Ti4+-IMAC-based enrichment. This approach increases the size of the detectable phosphoproteome substantially and confirms the considerable tryptic bias in public repositories. We define and make available a less biased human phosphopeptide atlas of 37,771 unique phosphopeptides, correlating to 18,430 unique phosphosites, of which fewer than 1/3 were identified in more than one protease data set. We demonstrate that each protein phosphorylation site can be linked to a preferred protease, enhancing its detection by mass spectrometry (MS. For specific sites, this approach increases their detectability by more than 1,000-fold.

  14. Substrate specificity of the ubiquitin and Ubl proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronau, Judith A; Beckmann, John F; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Conjugation and deconjugation of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls) to cellular proteins are highly regulated processes integral to cellular homeostasis. Most often, the C-termini of these small polypeptides are attached to lysine side chains of target proteins by an amide (isopeptide) linkage. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and Ubl-specific proteases (ULPs) comprise a diverse group of proteases that recognize and remove ubiquitin and Ubls from their substrates. How DUBs and ULPs distinguish among different modifiers, or different polymeric forms of these modifiers, remains poorly understood. The specificity of ubiquitin/Ubl-deconjugating enzymes for particular substrates depends on multiple factors, ranging from the topography of specific substrate features, as in different polyubiquitin chain types, to structural elements unique to each enzyme. Here we summarize recent structural and biochemical studies that provide insights into mechanisms of substrate specificity among various DUBs and ULPs. We also discuss the unexpected specificities of non-eukaryotic proteases in these families. PMID:27012468

  15. Protease-specific nanosensors for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Eyk; Rudloff, Franziska; Warmuth, Carsten; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Schnorr, Jörg

    2008-12-01

    Imaging of enzyme activity is a central goal of molecular imaging. With the introduction of fluorescent smart probes, optical imaging has become the modality of choice for experimental in vivo detection of enzyme activity. Here, we present a novel high-relaxivity nanosensor that is suitable for in vivo imaging of protease activity by magnetic resonance imaging. Upon specific protease cleavage, the nanoparticles rapidly switch from a stable low-relaxivity stealth state to become adhesive, aggregating high-relaxivity particles. To demonstrate the principle, we chose a cleavage motif of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), an enzyme important in inflammation, atherosclerosis, tumor progression, and many other diseases with alterations of the extracellular matrix. On the basis of clinically tested very small iron oxide particles (VSOP), the MMP-9-activatable protease-specific iron oxide particles (PSOP) have a hydrodynamic diameter of only 25 nm. PSOP are rapidly activated, resulting in aggregation and increased T2*-relaxivity. PMID:19007261

  16. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna S P; Sørensen, Hans Peter; Jensen, Jan K; Hosseini, Masood; Chen, Zhuo; Weydert, Caroline; Nielsen, Jakob T; Christensen, Anni; Yuan, Cai; Jensen, Knud Jørgen; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Malmendal, Anders; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries......, have attracted considerable attention. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of binding of peptidic inhibitors to serine protease targets. Our model is upain-1 (CSWRGLENHRMC), a disulfide-bond-constrained competitive inhibitor of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a noncanonical...... inhibitory mechanism and an unusually high specificity. Using a number of modified variants of upain-1, we characterised the upain-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex using X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined a model of the peptide in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and analysed binding...

  17. Does Protease-Antiprotease Imbalance Explain Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, David A

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The airflow limitation is usually progressive and is associated with the inhalation of noxious gases, typically cigarette smoke. The protease-antiprotease paradigm suggests that the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema is the result of an imbalance between enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix within the lung and proteins that oppose this proteolytic activity. This review assesses the genetic evidence in support of protease-antiprotease imbalance in the pathogenesis of COPD. It also articulates why suppression of protease activity in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency may be insufficient to prevent the progression of COPD. Rather, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency may be better treated by small-molecules so reads molecules, RNA-silencing, and other strategies that target the protein misfolding and polymerization that cause the disease. PMID:27115947

  18. HIV-1 Protease Mutations and Protease Inhibitor Cross-Resistance▿ † ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Ruane, Peter; Hellinger, James; Shirvani, Vivian; Zolopa, Andrew; Shafer, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of many protease inhibitor (PI)-selected mutations on the susceptibility to individual PIs are unknown. We analyzed in vitro susceptibility test results on 2,725 HIV-1 protease isolates. More than 2,400 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and saquinavir; 2,130 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to lopinavir; 1,644 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to atazanavir; 1,265 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to tipranavir; and 642 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to darunavir. We applied least-angle regression (LARS) to the 200 most common mutations in the data set and identified a set of 46 mutations associated with decreased PI susceptibility of which 40 were not polymorphic in the eight most common HIV-1 group M subtypes. We then used least-squares regression to ascertain the relative contribution of each of these 46 mutations. The median number of mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to each PI was 28 (range, 19 to 32), and the median number of mutations associated with increased susceptibility to each PI was 2.5 (range, 1 to 8). Of the mutations with the greatest effect on PI susceptibility, I84AV was associated with decreased susceptibility to eight PIs; V32I, G48V, I54ALMSTV, V82F, and L90M were associated with decreased susceptibility to six to seven PIs; I47A, G48M, I50V, L76V, V82ST, and N88S were associated with decreased susceptibility to four to five PIs; and D30N, I50L, and V82AL were associated with decreased susceptibility to fewer than four PIs. This study underscores the greater impact of nonpolymorphic mutations compared with polymorphic mutations on decreased PI susceptibility and provides a comprehensive quantitative assessment of the effects of individual mutations on susceptibility to the eight clinically available PIs. PMID:20660676

  19. Coassembly of Photosystem II and ATPase as Artificial Chloroplast for Light-Driven ATP Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiyun; Jia, Yi; Cai, Peng; Fei, Jinbo; Li, Junbai

    2016-01-26

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is one of the most important energy sources in living cells, which can drive serial key biochemical processes. However, generation of a proton gradient for ATP production in an artificial way poses a great challenge. In nature, photophosphorylation occurring in chloroplasts is an ideal prototype of ATP production. In this paper we imitate the light-to-ATP conversion process occurring in the thylakoid membrane by construction of FoF1-ATPase proteoliposome-coated PSII-based microspheres with well-defined core@shell structures using molecular assembly. Under light illumination, PSII can split water into protons, oxygen, and electrons and can generate a proton gradient for ATPase to produce ATP. Thus, an artificially designed chloroplast for PSII-driven ATP synthesis is realized. This biomimetic system will help to understand the photophosphorylation process and may facilitate the development of ATP-driven devices by remote light control. PMID:26615669

  20. A chloroplast pathway for the de novo biosynthesis of triacylglycerol in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.; Andre, C.

    2011-06-23

    Neutral lipid metabolism has been extensively studied in yeast, plants and mammals. In contrast, little information is available regarding the biochemical pathway, enzymes and regulatory factors involved in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in microalgae. In the conventional TAG biosynthetic pathway widely accepted for yeast, plants and mammals, TAG is assembled in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from its immediate precursor diacylglycerol (DAG) made by ER-specific acyltransferases, and is deposited exclusively in lipid droplets in the cytosol. Here, we demonstrated that the unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii employs a distinct pathway that uses DAG derived almost exclusively from the chloroplast to produce TAG. This unique TAG biosynthesis pathway is largely dependent on de novo fatty acid synthesis, and the TAG formed in this pathway is stored in lipid droplets in both the chloroplast and the cytosol. These findings have wide implications for understanding TAG biosynthesis and storage and other areas of lipid metabolism in microalgae and other organisms.