WorldWideScience

Sample records for chloroplast protease sppa

  1. Dissection of the roles of FtsH protease in chloroplast biogenesis and stability at moderately high temperature: a quantitative proteomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chloroplast-targeted FtsH11 protease has been identified as essential for Arabidopsis survival at moderately high temperatures. The ftsh11 plants display a host of dramatic changes in photosynthetic parameters, cessation of growth and development, and eventual death if temperature exceeds 30ºC a...

  2. THE ESCHERICHIA COLI SIGNAL PEPTIDE PEPTIDASE A IS A SERINE-LYSINE PROTEASE WITH A LYSINE RECRUITED TO THE NON-CONSERVED AMINO-TERMINAL DOMAIN IN THE S49 PROTEASE FAMILY

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Peng; Shim, Eunjung; Cravatt, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Richard; Schoeniger, Joe; Kim, Apollos C.; Paetzel, Mark; Dalbey, Ross E.

    2008-01-01

    The E. coli signal peptide peptidase A (SppA) is a serine protease which cleaves signal peptides after they have been proteolytically removed from exported proteins by signal peptidase processing. We present here results of site-directed mutagenesis studies of all the conserved serines of SppA in the carboxyl-terminal domain showing that only Ser 409 is essential for enzymatic activity. Also, we show that the serine hydrolase inhibitor FP-biotin inhibits SppA and modifies the protein, but doe...

  3. The hetero-hexameric nature of a chloroplast AAA+ FtsH protease contributes to its thermodynamic stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofer Moldavski

    Full Text Available FtsH is an evolutionary conserved membrane-bound metalloprotease complex. While in most prokaryotes FtsH is encoded by a single gene, multiple FtsH genes are found in eukaryotes. Genetic and biochemical data suggest that the Arabidopsis chloroplast FtsH is a hetero-hexamer. This raises the question why photosynthetic organisms require a heteromeric complex, whereas in most bacteria a homomeric one is sufficient. To gain structural information of the possible complexes, the Arabidopsis FtsH2 (type B and FtsH5 (type A were modeled. An in silico study with mixed models of FtsH2/5 suggests that heteromeric hexamer structure with ratio of 4:2 is more likely to exists. Specifically, calculation of the buried surface area at the interfaces between neighboring subunits revealed that a hetero-complex should be thermodynamically more stable than a homo-hexamer, due to the presence of additional hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. To biochemically assess this model, we generated Arabidopsis transgenic plants, expressing epitope-tagged FtsH2 and immuno-purified the protein. Mass-spectrometry analysis showed that FtsH2 is associated with FtsH1, FtsH5 and FtsH8. Interestingly, we found that 'type B' subunits (FtsH2 and FtsH8 were 2-3 fold more abundant than 'type A' (FtsH1 and FtsH5. The biochemical data corroborate the in silico model and suggest that the thylakoid FtsH hexamer is composed of two 'type A' and four 'type B' subunits.

  4. The Hetero-Hexameric Nature of a Chloroplast AAA+ FtsH Protease Contributes to Its Thermodynamic Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Tamar; Adam, Zach; Prag, Gali

    2012-01-01

    FtsH is an evolutionary conserved membrane-bound metalloprotease complex. While in most prokaryotes FtsH is encoded by a single gene, multiple FtsH genes are found in eukaryotes. Genetic and biochemical data suggest that the Arabidopsis chloroplast FtsH is a hetero-hexamer. This raises the question why photosynthetic organisms require a heteromeric complex, whereas in most bacteria a homomeric one is sufficient. To gain structural information of the possible complexes, the Arabidopsis FtsH2 (type B) and FtsH5 (type A) were modeled. An in silico study with mixed models of FtsH2/5 suggests that heteromeric hexamer structure with ratio of 4∶2 is more likely to exists. Specifically, calculation of the buried surface area at the interfaces between neighboring subunits revealed that a hetero-complex should be thermodynamically more stable than a homo-hexamer, due to the presence of additional hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. To biochemically assess this model, we generated Arabidopsis transgenic plants, expressing epitope-tagged FtsH2 and immuno-purified the protein. Mass-spectrometry analysis showed that FtsH2 is associated with FtsH1, FtsH5 and FtsH8. Interestingly, we found that ‘type B’ subunits (FtsH2 and FtsH8) were 2–3 fold more abundant than ‘type A’ (FtsH1 and FtsH5). The biochemical data corroborate the in silico model and suggest that the thylakoid FtsH hexamer is composed of two ‘type A’ and four ‘type B’ subunits. PMID:22558304

  5. Three-Dimensional Segmented Poincaré Plot Analyses SPPA3 Investigates Cardiovascular and Cardiorespiratory Couplings in Hypertensive Pregnancy Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Claudia; Voss, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive pregnancy disorders affect 6-8% of gestations representing the most common complication of pregnancy for both mother and fetus. The aim of this study was to introduce a new three-dimensional coupling analysis methods - the three-dimensional segmented Poincaré plot analyses (SPPA3) - to establish an effective approach for the detection of hypertensive pregnancy disorders and especially pre-eclampsia (PE). A cubic box model representing the three-dimensional phase space is subdivided into 12 × 12 × 12 equal predefined cubelets according to the range of the SD of each investigated signal. Additionally, we investigated the influence of rotating the cloud of points and the size of the cubelets (adapted or predefined). All single probabilities of occurring points in a specific cubelet related to the total number of points are calculated. In this study, 10 healthy non-pregnant women, 66 healthy pregnant women, and 56 hypertensive pregnant women (chronic hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and PE) were investigated. From all subjects, 30 min of beat-to-beat intervals (BBI), respiration (RESP), non-invasive systolic (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were continuously recorded and analyzed. Non-rotated adapted SPPA3 discriminated best between hypertensive pregnancy disorders and PE concerning coupling analysis of two or three different systems (BBI, DBP, RESP and BBI, SBP, DBP) reaching an accuracy of up to 82.9%. This could be increased to an accuracy of up to 91.2% applying multivariate analysis differentiating between all pregnant women and PE. In conclusion, SPPA3 could be a useful method for enhanced risk stratification in pregnant women.

  6. Fungal protease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buxton, F.; Jarai, G.; Visser, J.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a novel DNA sequence coding for an Aspergillus aspartic protease, an Aspergillus aspartic protease per se and a method for the preparation thereof. The invention further concerns a novel Aspergillus mutant strain defective in a protease of the aspartic proteinase-type,

  7. Processing Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Anders Sebastian Rosenkrans

    Processing proteases are proteases which proteolytically activate proteins and peptides into their biologically active form. Processing proteases play an important role in biotechnology as tools in protein fusion technology. Fusion strategies where helper proteins or peptide tags are fused...... to the protein of interest are an elaborate method to optimize expression or purification systems. It is however critical that fusion proteins can be removed and processing proteases can facilitate this in a highly specific manner. The commonly used proteases all have substrate specificities to the N...... of few known proteases to have substrate specificity for the C-terminal side of the scissile bond. LysN exhibits specificity for lysine, and has primarily been used to complement trypsin in to proteomic studies. A working hypothesis during this study was the potential of LysN as a processing protease...

  8. Protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a polypeptide exhibiting a protease inhibitory activity and uses of said polypeptide in methods for inhibiting, directly or indirectly, one or more proteases of the blood clotting cascade. The invention also relates to use of said polypeptide as a pharmaceutical e...

  9. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... metabolic pathways and for optimizing chloroplast functions. The redox poise of photosynthetic electron transport components like plastoquinone is crucial to initiate signaling cascades and might also be involved in key biosynthetic pathways such as chlorophyll biosynthesis. We, therefore, explored...

  10. Supermarket Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  11. Genetic Analysis of Chloroplast Translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, Alice

    2005-08-15

    The assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus requires the concerted action of hundreds of genes distributed between the two physically separate genomes in the nucleus and chloroplast. Nuclear genes coordinate this process by controlling the expression of chloroplast genes in response to developmental and environmental cues. However, few regulatory factors have been identified. We used mutant phenotypes to identify nuclear genes in maize that modulate chloroplast translation, a key control point in chloroplast gene expression. This project focused on the nuclear gene crp1, required for the translation of two chloroplast mRNAs. CRP1 is related to fungal proteins involved in the translation of mitochondrial mRNAs, and is the founding member of a large gene family in plants, with {approx}450 members. Members of the CRP1 family are defined by a repeated 35 amino acid motif called a ''PPR'' motif. The PPR motif is closely related to the TPR motif, which mediates protein-protein interactions. We and others have speculated that PPR tracts adopt a structure similar to that of TPR tracts, but with a substrate binding surface adapted to bind RNA instead of protein. To understand how CRP1 influences the translation of specific chloroplast mRNAs, we sought proteins that interact with CRP1, and identified the RNAs associated with CRP1 in vivo. We showed that CRP1 is associated in vivo with the mRNAs whose translation it activates. To explore the functions of PPR proteins more generally, we sought mutations in other PPR-encoding genes: mutations in the maize PPR2 and PPR4 were shown to disrupt chloroplast ribosome biogenesis and chloroplast trans-splicing, respectively. These and other results suggest that the nuclear-encoded PPR family plays a major role in modulating the expression of the chloroplast genome in higher plants.

  12. Dynamics of Chloroplast Translation during Chloroplast Differentiation in Maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakitchai Chotewutmontri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplast genomes in land plants contain approximately 100 genes, the majority of which reside in polycistronic transcription units derived from cyanobacterial operons. The expression of chloroplast genes is integrated into developmental programs underlying the differentiation of photosynthetic cells from non-photosynthetic progenitors. In C4 plants, the partitioning of photosynthesis between two cell types, bundle sheath and mesophyll, adds an additional layer of complexity. We used ribosome profiling and RNA-seq to generate a comprehensive description of chloroplast gene expression at four stages of chloroplast differentiation, as displayed along the maize seedling leaf blade. The rate of protein output of most genes increases early in development and declines once the photosynthetic apparatus is mature. The developmental dynamics of protein output fall into several patterns. Programmed changes in mRNA abundance make a strong contribution to the developmental shifts in protein output, but output is further adjusted by changes in translational efficiency. RNAs with prioritized translation early in development are largely involved in chloroplast gene expression, whereas those with prioritized translation in photosynthetic tissues are generally involved in photosynthesis. Differential gene expression in bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts results primarily from differences in mRNA abundance, but differences in translational efficiency amplify mRNA-level effects in some instances. In most cases, rates of protein output approximate steady-state protein stoichiometries, implying a limited role for proteolysis in eliminating unassembled or damaged proteins under non-stress conditions. Tuned protein output results from gene-specific trade-offs between translational efficiency and mRNA abundance, both of which span a large dynamic range. Analysis of ribosome footprints at sites of RNA editing showed that the chloroplast translation machinery

  13. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, E. H.; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles i...

  14. Investigations with Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  15. Sorting signals, N-terminal modifications and abundance of the chloroplast proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zybailov

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chloroplast proteome is needed to understand the essential contribution of the chloroplast to plant growth and development. Here we present a large scale analysis by nanoLC-Q-TOF and nanoLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS of ten independent chloroplast preparations from Arabidopsis thaliana which unambiguously identified 1325 proteins. Novel proteins include various kinases and putative nucleotide binding proteins. Based on repeated and independent MS based protein identifications requiring multiple matched peptide sequences, as well as literature, 916 nuclear-encoded proteins were assigned with high confidence to the plastid, of which 86% had a predicted chloroplast transit peptide (cTP. The protein abundance of soluble stromal proteins was calculated from normalized spectral counts from LTQ-Obitrap analysis and was found to cover four orders of magnitude. Comparison to gel-based quantification demonstrates that 'spectral counting' can provide large scale protein quantification for Arabidopsis. This quantitative information was used to determine possible biases for protein targeting prediction by TargetP and also to understand the significance of protein contaminants. The abundance data for 550 stromal proteins was used to understand abundance of metabolic pathways and chloroplast processes. We highlight the abundance of 48 stromal proteins involved in post-translational proteome homeostasis (including aminopeptidases, proteases, deformylases, chaperones, protein sorting components and discuss the biological implications. N-terminal modifications were identified for a subset of nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded proteins and a novel N-terminal acetylation motif was discovered. Analysis of cTPs and their cleavage sites of Arabidopsis chloroplast proteins, as well as their predicted rice homologues, identified new species-dependent features, which will facilitate improved subcellular localization prediction. No evidence

  16. Chloroplast in Plant-Virus Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinping; Zhang, Xian; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the chloroplast is the organelle that conducts photosynthesis. It has been known that chloroplast is involved in virus infection of plants for approximate 70 years. Recently, the subject of chloroplast-virus interplay is getting more and more attention. In this article we discuss the different aspects of chloroplast-virus interaction into three sections: the effect of virus infection on the structure and function of chloroplast, the role of chloroplast in virus infection cycle, and the function of chloroplast in host defense against viruses. In particular, we focus on the characterization of chloroplast protein-viral protein interactions that underlie the interplay between chloroplast and virus. It can be summarized that chloroplast is a common target of plant viruses for viral pathogenesis or propagation; and conversely, chloroplast and its components also can play active roles in plant defense against viruses. Chloroplast photosynthesis-related genes/proteins (CPRGs/CPRPs) are suggested to play a central role during the complex chloroplast-virus interaction. PMID:27757106

  17. Biosynthesis of starch in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, T; Nakayama, N; Murata, T; Akazawa, T

    1967-03-01

    The enzymic synthesis of ADP-glucose and UDP-glucose by chloroplastic pyrophosphorylase of bean and rice leaves has been demonstrated by paper chromatographic techniques. In both tissues, the activity of UDP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase was much higher than ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase. Glycerate-3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate and fructose-1,6-diphosphate did not stimulate ADP-glucose formation by a pyrophosphorylation reaction. The major metabolic pathway for UDP-glucose utilization appears to be the synthesis of either sucrose or sucrose-P. On the other hand, a specific precursor role of ADP-glucose for synthesizing chloroplast starch by the ADP-glucose-starch transglucosylase reaction is supported by the coupled enzyme system of ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase and transglucosylase, isolated from chloroplasts. None of the glycolytic intermediates stimulated the glucose transfer in the enzyme sequence of reaction system employed. PMID:4292567

  18. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  19. Evolution of chloroplast vesicle transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Sabine; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2003-02-01

    Vesicle traffic plays a central role in eukaryotic transport. The presence of a vesicle transport system inside chloroplasts of spermatophytes raises the question of its phylogenetic origin. To elucidate the evolution of this transport system we analyzed organisms belonging to different lineages that arose from the first photosynthetic eukaryote, i.e. glaucocystophytes, chlorophytes, rhodophytes, and charophytes/embryophytes. Intriguingly, vesicle transport is not apparent in any group other than embryophytes. The transfer of this eukaryotic-type vesicle transport system from the cytosol into the chloroplast thus seems a late evolutionary development that was acquired by land plants in order to adapt to new environmental challenges.

  20. Mutational dynamics of aroid chloroplast genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Biggs, Patrick J; Matthews, Peter J; Collins, Lesley J; Hendy, Michael D; Lockhart, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of eukaryote and prokaryote genomes is the co-occurrence of nucleotide substitution and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. Although similar observations have also been made for chloroplast DNA, genome-wide associations have not been reported. We determined the chloroplast genome sequences for two morphotypes of taro (Colocasia esculenta; family Araceae) and compared these with four publicly available aroid chloroplast genomes. Here, we report the extent of genome-wide association between direct and inverted repeats, indels, and substitutions in these aroid chloroplast genomes. We suggest that alternative but not mutually exclusive hypotheses explain the mutational dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:23204304

  1. Novel fungal protease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buxton, F.; Jarai, G.; Visser, J.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a novel DNA sequence coding for an Aspergillus serine protease of the subtilisin-type, an Aspergillus serine protease of the subtilisin-type per se and a method for the preparation thereof. The invention further concerns a novel Aspergillus mutant strain defective in a

  2. Mechanisms of Protein Synthesis in Chloroplasts: How to Design Translatable mRNAs in Chloroplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Sugiura

    2007-01-01

    @@ Chloroplast transformation provides a powerful tool to produce useful proteins in plants. After completion of the chloroplast genome sequencing from tobacco plants (Shinozaki et al., 1986, Yukawa et al., 2005), Pal Maliga group developed the high-frequency chloroplast transformation system in tobacco (Svab and Maliga, 1993).

  3. Isolation of Chloroplasts from Plant Protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Smith, Matthew D; Chuong, Simon D X

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts can be isolated from higher plants directly following homogenization; however, the resulting yield, purity, and intactness are often low, necessitating a large amount of starting material. This protocol is optimized to produce a high yield of pure chloroplasts from isolated Arabidopsis protoplasts. The two-part method is a simple, scaled-down, and low-cost procedure that readily provides healthy mesophyll protoplasts, which are then ruptured to release intact chloroplasts. Chloroplasts isolated using this method are competent for use in biochemical, cellular, and molecular analyses.

  4. Clp chaperones and proteases are central in stress survival, virulence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Gerth, Ulf; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular proteolysis carried out by energy-dependent proteases is one of the most conserved biological processes. In all cells proteolysis maintains and shapes the cellular proteome by ridding the cell of damaged proteins and by regulating abundance of functional proteins such as regulatory...... proteins. The ATP-dependent ClpP protease is highly conserved among eubacteria and in the chloroplasts and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. In the serious human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus inactivation of clpP rendered the bacterium avirulent emphasizing the central role of proteolysis in virulence....... The contribution of the Clp proteins to virulence is likely to occur at multiple levels. First of all, both Clp ATPases and the Clp protease are central players in stress responses required to cope with the adverse conditions met in the host. The ClpP protease has a dual role herein, as it both eliminates stress...

  5. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing...... tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell...... signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated...

  6. On the structure of the spinach chloroplast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, J.B.; Bustraan, M.; Paris, C.H.

    1952-01-01

    The structure of spinach chloroplasts was investigated with the aid of the electron microscope. It has been established that: 1. 1. the outer membrane of the chloroplasts is composed of both proteins and lipoids. 2. 2. the stroma is also built up by these components. 3. 3. within the stroma memb

  7. Chloroplasts as functional organelles in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trench, R K; Greene, R W; Bystrom, B G

    1969-08-01

    The marine gastropod molluscs Tridachia crispata, Tridachiella diomedea, and Placobranchus ianthobapsus (Sacoglossa, Opisthobranchia) possess free functional chloroplasts within the cells of the digestive diverticula, as determined by observations on ultrastructure, pigment analyses, and experiments on photosynthetic capacity. In the light, the chloroplasts incorporate H(14)CO(3) (-)in situ. Reduced radiocarbon is translocated to various chloroplast-free tissues in the animals. The slugs feed on siphonaceous algae from which the chloroplasts are derived. Pigments from the slugs and from known siphonaceous algae, when separated chromatographically and compared, showed similar components. Absorption spectra of extracts of slugs and algae were very similar. The larvae of the slugs are pigment-free up to the post-veliger stage, suggesting that chloroplasts are acquired de novo. with each new generation. PMID:5792329

  8. Chloroplast protein targeting involves localized translation in Chlamydomonas

    OpenAIRE

    Uniacke, James; Zerges, William

    2009-01-01

    The compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells requires that newly synthesized proteins be targeted to the compartments in which they function. In chloroplasts, a few thousand proteins function in photosynthesis, expression of the chloroplast genome, and other processes. Most chloroplast proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm, imported, and then targeted to a specific chloroplast compartment. The remainder are encoded by the chloroplast genome, synthesized within the organelle, and targeted ...

  9. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø; Andreasen, P A

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing small molecule protease inhibitors of sufficient specificity has proved a daunting task. Aptamers seem to represent a promising alternative. In our review, we concentrate on biochemical mechanisms of...

  10. Death proteases come alive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death in plants exhibits morphological features comparable to caspase-mediated apoptosis in animals, suggesting that plant cell death is executed by (caspase-like) proteases. However, to date, no caspase homologues have been identified in plants and therefore the existence and nature of these p

  11. Proteases in Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Sokolonski ANTON

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The caries and the periodontal disease (PD are the most frequent alterations in the oral cavity. The PD presents two stages: gengivitis and periodontitis. The destruction of collagenous fibers which encases the tooth onto the alveolar bone is characteristic of the pariodontitis. The inclusion loss caused by this pathology is due to the presence of bacteria and their products, besides the tissue destruction. This process is caused by excessive discharge of cells of the organism defence which reach the damaged area, and among these cells are neutrophils. These cells free lysosomal granule, where enzymes known as proteases (elastase, colagenasis and catepsin G are present. When excessively delivered, they cause extensive tissue destruction. The organism innate defence respond to this process activating anti-proteases, such as alfa-1-antitripsin e alfa-2-macrogoblulin, and, as consequence, the inflammatory process is subdued. Objective: Revision of the literature on periodontitis and its markers. In periodontitis, the balance between protease and anti-protese seems to be altered and lead to the appearance of these ones. There is an increase of prevalence of PD in the world population. In recent times, it has been associated to systemic conditions that lead to tissue destruction. Perhaps, the cause is based on an exacerbated tissue reaction, more than on the bacterial aggression. Conclusion: The predisposition of the organism is an important factor for the disease development. At reading different studies, it was observed that the discharged protease during the neutrophils degranulation process has internal, not bacterial, origin.

  12. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø;

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing......-specifically, for instance with vastly different affinities to zymogen and active enzyme forms. Furthermore, aptamers can be selected to inhibit the enzyme activity of the target proteases, but also to inhibit functionally important exosite interactions, for instance cofactor binding. Several protease-inhibiting aptamers...... strategies and of new principles for regulating the activity of the inhibitory action of aptamers of general interest to researchers working with nucleic acid aptamers...

  13. Inheritance of chloroplast DNA in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, David M; Nicholas W. Gillham; Boynton, John E.

    1980-01-01

    Two symmetrically located deletions of approximately 100 base pairs each have been identified in chloroplast DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Although present in a mutant strain that requires acetate for growth, both deletions have been shown to be distinct from the nonphotosynthetic phenotype of this strain. These physical markers in the chloroplast genome and maternally inherited genetic markers showed strict cotransmission in reciprocal crosses. Thus, our results are consistent with the l...

  14. Evolution of the chloroplast division machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo GAO; Fuli GAO

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts are photosynthetic organelles derived from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria during evolution.Dramatic changes occurred during the process of the formation and evolution of chloroplasts,including the large-scale gene transfer from chloroplast to nucleus.However,there are still many essential characters remaining.For the chloroplast division machinery,FtsZ proteins,Ftn2,SulA and part of the division site positioning system- MinD and MinE are still conserved.New or at least partially new proteins,such as FtsZ family proteins FtsZl and ARC3,ARC6H,ARC5,PDV1,PDV2 and MCD1,were introduced for the division of chloroplasts during evolution.Some bacterial cell division proteins,such as FtsA,MreB,Ftn6,FtsW and Ftsl,probably lost their function or were gradually lost.Thus,the chloroplast division machinery is a dynamically evolving structure with both conservation and innovation.

  15. From proteases to proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, H

    2001-04-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950-2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments).

  16. Complete chloroplast genome of Sedum sarmentosum and chloroplast genome evolution in Saxifragales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenpan Dong

    Full Text Available Comparative chloroplast genome analyses are mostly carried out at lower taxonomic levels, such as the family and genus levels. At higher taxonomic levels, chloroplast genomes are generally used to reconstruct phylogenies. However, little attention has been paid to chloroplast genome evolution within orders. Here, we present the chloroplast genome of Sedum sarmentosum and take advantage of several available (or elucidated chloroplast genomes to examine the evolution of chloroplast genomes in Saxifragales. The chloroplast genome of S. sarmentosum is 150,448 bp long and includes 82,212 bp of a large single-copy (LSC region, 16.670 bp of a small single-copy (SSC region, and a pair of 25,783 bp sequences of inverted repeats (IRs.The genome contains 131 unique genes, 18 of which are duplicated within the IRs. Based on a comparative analysis of chloroplast genomes from four representative Saxifragales families, we observed two gene losses and two pseudogenes in Paeonia obovata, and the loss of an intron was detected in the rps16 gene of Penthorum chinense. Comparisons among the 72 common protein-coding genes confirmed that the chloroplast genomes of S. sarmentosum and Paeonia obovata exhibit accelerated sequence evolution. Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between the rates of genome evolution and genome size. The detected genome size variations are predominantly caused by the length of intergenic spacers, rather than losses of genes and introns, gene pseudogenization or IR expansion or contraction. The genome sizes of these species are negatively correlated with nucleotide substitution rates. Species with shorter duration of the life cycle tend to exhibit shorter chloroplast genomes than those with longer life cycles.

  17. Translocation of the potato 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase into isolated spinach chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jianmin; Weaver, L.M.; Herrmann, K.M. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A cDNA for potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase, the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, encodes a 56 KD polypeptide whose amino terminus resembles a chloroplast transit sequence. The cDNA was placed downstream of the phage T7 polymerase recognition sequence in plasmid pGEM-3Z. DNA of the resulting plasmid pGEM-DWZ directed T7 polymerase to synthesize potato DAHP synthase mRNA in vitro. The mRNA was used in wheat germ and rabbit reticulocyte lysates for the synthesis of {sup 35}S-labeled pro-DAHP synthase. The predominant translation product is a 59 KD polypeptide that can be immunoprecipitated by rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against the 53 KD DAHP synthase purified from potato tubers. Isolated spinach chloroplasts process the 59 KD pro-DAHP synthase to a 50 KD polypeptide. The processed polypeptide is protected from protease degradation, suggesting uptake of the enzyme into the cell organelle. Fractionation of reisolated chloroplasts after import of pro-DAHP synthase showed mature enzyme in the stroma. The uptake and processing of DAHP synthase is inhibited by antibodies raised against the mature enzyme. Our results are consistent with the assumption that potato contains a nuclear DNA encoded DAHP synthase that is synthesized as a proenzyme and whose mature form resides in the chloroplasts. Our data provide further evidence that green plants synthesize aromatic amino acids in plastids.

  18. Nitrogen control of chloroplast development: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A manifestation of nitrogen deficiency in vascular plants and algae is chlorosis, indicating that chloroplast biogenesis can be strongly restricted by direct or indirect effects of nitrogen assimilation products. To define the molecular basis of nitrogen responses we are using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Depending on the levels of ammonium, steady-state deficiency conditions are established such that the cellular levels of chlorophylls and xanthophylls are depressed. Chloroplasts in nitrogen-deficient cells contain appreciable levels of carbon assimilation enzyme and thylakoids with high electron transport activities. However, the light harvesting complexes are nearly absent and Photosystem I exhibits unusual characteristics. Studies of rates of protein synthesis by in vivo pulse-chase labeling and levels of RNAs encoded by the chloroplast and nuclear genomes have been initiated: the accumulation of transcripts for the nuclear light-harvesting apoproteins is dramatically altered qualitatively and quantitatively; there is no major effect on chloroplast RNAs but, in general, these are inefficiently utilized for protein synthesis until nitrogen is provided to the cultures. Supplying nitrogen results in an almost immediate release of chloroplast mRNAs from a translational arrest but the stimulation of the accumulation of nuclear transcripts for light-harvesting apoproteins does not occur until after a 1-2 hour lag

  19. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  20. Chloroplasts in seeds and dark-grown seedlings of lotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushimaru, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takahiro; Amano, Toyoki; Katayama, Masao; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Tsuji, Hideo

    2003-03-01

    In most higher plants, mature dry seeds have no chloroplasts but etioplasts. Here we show that in a hydrophyte, lotus (Nelumbo nucifera), young chloroplasts already exist in shoots of mature dry seeds and that they give rise to mature chloroplasts during germination, even in darkness. These shoots contain chlorophyll and chlorophyll-binding proteins CP1 and LHCP. The unique features of chloroplast formation in N. nucifera suggest a unique adaptive strategy for seedling development correlated with the plant's habitat.

  1. A comparison of rice chloroplast genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiabin; Xia, Hong'ai; Cao, Mengliang;

    2004-01-01

    Using high quality sequence reads extracted from our whole genome shotgun repository, we assembled two chloroplast genome sequences from two rice (Oryza sativa) varieties, one from 93-11 (a typical indica variety) and the other from PA64S (an indica-like variety with maternal origin of japonica......), which are both parental varieties of the super-hybrid rice, LYP9. Based on the patterns of high sequence coverage, we partitioned chloroplast sequence variations into two classes, intravarietal and intersubspecific polymorphisms. Intravarietal polymorphisms refer to variations within 93-11 or PA64S...... to intersubspecific polymorphisms. In our study, we found that the intersubspecific variations of 93-11 (indica) and PA64S (japonica) chloroplast genomes consisted of 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 27 insertions or deletions. The intersubspecific polymorphism rates between 93-11 and PA64S were 0...

  2. Genomics and chloroplast evolution: what did cyanobacteria do for plants?

    OpenAIRE

    Raven, J.A.; Allen, John

    2003-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of cyanobacteria and of the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana leave no doubt that the plant chloroplast originated, through endosymbiosis, from a cyanobacterium. But the genomic legacy of cyanobacterial ancestry extends far beyond the chloroplast itself, and persists in organisms that have lost chloroplasts completely.

  3. Chloroplast signaling within, between and beyond cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof eBobik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The most conspicuous function of the plastid is oxygenic photosynthesis of chloroplasts, yet plastids are super-factories that produce a plethora of compounds that are indispensable for proper plant physiology and development. Given their origins as free-living prokaryotes, it is not surprising that the plastid possesses its own genome whose expression is essential to plastid function. This semi-autonomous character of plastids requires the existence of sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that provide reliable communication between them and other cellular compartments. Such intracellular signaling is necessary for coordinating whole-cell responses to constantly varying environmental cues and cellular metabolic needs. This is achieved by plastids acting as receivers and transmitters of specific signals that coordinate expression of the nuclear and plastid genomes according to particular needs. In this review we will consider the so-called retrograde signaling occurring between plastids and nucleus, and between plastids and other organelles. Another important role of the plastid we will discuss is the involvement of plastid signaling in biotic and abiotic stress that, in addition to influencing retrograde signaling has direct effects on several cellular compartments including the cell wall. We will also review recent evidence pointing to an intriguing function of chloroplasts in regulating intercellular symplasmic transport. Finally, we consider an intriguing yet neglected aspect of plant biology, chloroplast signaling from the perspective of the entire plant. Thus, accumulating evidence highlights that chloroplasts, with their complex signaling pathways, provide a mechanism for exquisite regulation of plant development, metabolism and responses to the environment. As chloroplast processes are targeted for engineering for improved productivity the effect of such modifications on chloroplast signaling will have to be carefully considered in order

  4. Direct Chloroplast Sequencing: Comparison of Sequencing Platforms and Analysis Tools for Whole Chloroplast Barcoding

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Brozynska; Agnelo Furtado; Robert James Henry

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genom...

  5. Protease-Sensitive Synthetic Prions

    OpenAIRE

    Colby, David W; Rachel Wain; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Giuseppe Legname; Palmer, Christina G.; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Azucena Lemus; Cohen, Fred E.; Stephen J DeArmond; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2010-01-01

    Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc). Frequently, PrP(Sc) is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s) prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec) PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, ...

  6. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  7. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    OpenAIRE

    Yong YANG; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we...

  8. A novel chloroplast-localized protein EMB1303 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaozhen Huang; Xiaoyan Zhang; Shuhua Yang

    2009-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized the albino mutant emb1303-1 in Arabidopsis. The mutant displayed a severe dwarf phenotype with small albino rosette leaves and short roots on a synthetic medium containing sucrose. It is pigment-deficient and seedling lethal when grown in soil. Embryo development was delayed in the mutant, although seed germination was not significantly im-paired. The plastids of emb1303-1 were arrested in early developmental stages without the classical stack of thylakoid membrane. Genetic and molecular analyses uncovered that the EMB1303 gene encodes a novel chloroplast-localized protein. Mieroarray and RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of nuclear-and plastid-encoded genes involved in photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis were substantially downregulated in the mutant. Moreover, the accu-mulation of several major chloroplast proteins was severely compromised in emb1303-1. These results suggest that EMBI303 is essential for chloroplast development.

  9. Direct chloroplast sequencing: comparison of sequencing platforms and analysis tools for whole chloroplast barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Brozynska

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina and Ion Torrent (Life Technology sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare. Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis.

  10. Origin of a chloroplast protein importer

    OpenAIRE

    Bölter, Bettina; Soll, Jürgen; Schulz, Alexander; Hinnah, Silke; Wagner, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During evolution, chloroplasts have relinquished the majority of their genes to the nucleus. The products of transferred genes are imported into the organelle with the help of an import machinery that is distributed across the inner and outer plastid membranes. The evolutionary origin of this machinery is puzzling because, in the putative predecessors, the cyanobacteria, the outer two membranes, the plasma membrane, and the lipopolysaccharide layer lack a functionally similar protein import s...

  11. Expressing PHB synthetic genes through chloroplast genetic engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Chloroplast integration and expression vector containing expression cassettes for phbB, phbA, phbC and aadA genes was constructed and bombarded into the tobacco chloroplast genome. Transplastomic plants were analyzed with PCR and Southern blot. Their homoplastomy was also judged. Northern dot and RT-PCR analysis were employed to investigate transgene expression at transcriptional level. The results indicate that the chloroplast transformation system is compatible for poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production.

  12. Nanophotonics of Chloroplasts for Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Cheryl R.

    2011-03-01

    In the search for new energy sources, lessons can be learned from chloroplast photonics. The nano-architecture of chloroplasts is remarkably well-adapted to mediate sunlight interactions for efficient energy conversion. We carried out experiments with chloroplasts isolated from spinach and leaf lettuce to elucidate the relationship between nano-architecture, biomolecular composition and photonic properties. We obtained high-resolution microscopic images of single chloroplasts to identify geometries of chloroplasts and interior grana. We performed micro-spectroscopy to identify strengths of absorption and fluorescence transitions and related them to broadband reflectance and transmittance spectra of whole leaf structures. Finally, the nonlinear optical properties were investigated with nanolaser spectroscopy by placing chloroplasts into micro-resonators and optically pumping. These spectra reveal chloroplast photonic modes and allow measurement of single chloroplast light scattering cross section, polarizability, and refractive index. The nanolaser spectra recorded at increasing pump powers enabled us to observe non-linear optics, photon dynamics, and stimulated emission from single chloroplasts. All of these experiments provide insight into plant photonics and inspiration of paradigms for synthetic biomaterials to harness sunlight in new ways.

  13. Complex chloroplast RNA metabolism: just debugging the genetic programme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz-Linneweber Christian

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene expression system of chloroplasts is far more complex than that of their cyanobacterial progenitor. This gain in complexity affects in particular RNA metabolism, specifically the transcription and maturation of RNA. Mature chloroplast RNA is generated by a plethora of nuclear-encoded proteins acquired or recruited during plant evolution, comprising additional RNA polymerases and sigma factors, and sequence-specific RNA maturation factors promoting RNA splicing, editing, end formation and translatability. Despite years of intensive research, we still lack a comprehensive explanation for this complexity. Results We inspected the available literature and genome databases for information on components of RNA metabolism in land plant chloroplasts. In particular, new inventions of chloroplast-specific mechanisms and the expansion of some gene/protein families detected in land plants lead us to suggest that the primary function of the additional nuclear-encoded components found in chloroplasts is the transgenomic suppression of point mutations, fixation of which occurred due to an enhanced genetic drift exhibited by chloroplast genomes. We further speculate that a fast evolution of transgenomic suppressors occurred after the water-to-land transition of plants. Conclusion Our inspections indicate that several chloroplast-specific mechanisms evolved in land plants to remedy point mutations that occurred after the water-to-land transition. Thus, the complexity of chloroplast gene expression evolved to guarantee the functionality of chloroplast genetic information and may not, with some exceptions, be involved in regulatory functions.

  14. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M El Bakkouri; A Pow; A Mulichak; K Cheung; J Artz; M Amani; S Fell; T de Koning-Ward; C Goodman; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The Clpchaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clpchaperones and proteases in the humanmalariaparasitePlasmodiumfalciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clpchaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  15. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A. (McMaster U.); (Melbourne); (Toronto); (Deakin); (HWMRI)

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  16. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  17. Photochemical properties of mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzaz, M B; Govindjee

    1973-09-01

    Several photochemical and spectral properties of maize (Zea mays) bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts are reported that provide a better understanding of the photosynthetic apparatus of C(4) plants. The difference absorption spectrum at 298 K and the fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of chlorophyll at 298 K and 77 K provide new information on the different forms of chlorophyll a in bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts: the former contain, relative to short wavelength chlorophyll a forms, more long wavelength chlorophyll a form (e.g. chlorophyll a 693 and chlorophyll a 705) and less chlorophyll b than the latter. The degree of polarization of chlorophyll a fluorescence is 6% in bundle sheath and 4% in mesophyll chloroplasts. This result is consistent with the presence of relatively high amounts of oriented long wavelength forms of chlorophyll a in bundle sheath compared to mesophyll chloroplasts. The relative yield of variable, with respect to constant, chorophyll a fluorescence in mesophyll chloroplasts is more than twice that in bundle sheath chloroplast. Furthermore, the relative yield of total chlorophyll a fluorescence is 40% lower in bundle sheath compared to that in mesophyll chloroplasts. This is in agreement with the presence of the higher ratio of the weakly fluorescent pigment system I to pigment system II in bundle sheath than in mesophyll chloroplast. The efficiency of energy transfer from chlorophyll b and carotenoids to chlorophyll a are calculated to be 100 and 50%, respectively, in both types of chloroplasts. Fluorescence quenching of atebrin, reflecting high energy state of chloroplasts, is 10 times higher in mesophyll chloroplasts than in bundle sheath chloroplasts during noncyclic electron flow but is equal during cyclic flow. The entire electron transport chain is shown to be present in both types of chloroplasts, as inferred from the antagonistic effect of red (650 nm) and far red (710 nm) lights on the absorbance changes at

  18. Orientation of the pigment molecules in the chloroplast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.

    1955-01-01

    Dichroism, absorption anisotropy, and anomal dispersion of birefringence were measured in the big lamellate chloroplasts of Mougeotia. The results of these measurements indicate a certain orientation of the chlorophyll molecules, and to a smaller extent, of the carotenoids in the chloroplast. In sp

  19. Tools for regulated gene expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochaix, Jean-David; Surzycki, Raymond; Ramundo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a very attractive model system for chloroplast genetic engineering. Algae can be transformed readily at the chloroplast level through bombardment of cells with a gene gun, and transformants can be selected using antibiotic resistance or phototrophic growth. An inducible chloroplast gene expression system could be very useful for several reasons. First, it could be used to elucidate the function of essential chloroplast genes required for cell growth and survival. Second, it could be very helpful for expressing proteins which are toxic to the algal cells. Third, it would allow for the reversible depletion of photosynthetic complexes thus making it possible to study their biogenesis in a controlled fashion. Fourth, it opens promising possibilities for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas. Here we describe an inducible/repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas in which the copper-regulated Cyc6 promoter drives the expression of the nuclear Nac2 gene encoding a protein which is targeted to the chloroplast where it acts specifically on the chloroplast psbD 5'-untranslated region and is required for the stable accumulation of the psbD mRNA and photosystem II. The system can be used for any chloroplast gene or transgene by placing it under the control of the psbD 5'-untranslated region. PMID:24599871

  20. Origin and evolution of the chloroplast division machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, Shin-Ya

    2005-10-01

    Chloroplasts were originally established in eukaryotes by the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium; they then spread through diversification of the eukaryotic hosts and subsequent engulfment of eukaryotic algae by previously nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes. The continuity of chloroplasts is maintained by division of preexisting chloroplasts. Like their ancestors, chloroplasts use a bacterial division system based on the FtsZ ring and some associated factors, all of which are now encoded in the host nuclear genome. The majority of bacterial division factors are absent from chloroplasts and several new factors have been added by the eukaryotic host. For example, the ftsZ gene has been duplicated and modified, plastid-dividing (PD) rings were most likely added by the eukaryotic host, and a member of the dynamin family of proteins evolved to regulate chloroplast division. The identification of several additional proteins involved in the division process, along with data from diverse lineages of organisms, our current knowledge of mitochondrial division, and the mining of genomic sequence data have enabled us to begin to understand the universality and evolution of the division system. The principal features of the chloroplast division system thus far identified are conserved across several lineages, including those with secondary chloroplasts, and may reflect primeval features of mitochondrial division. PMID:16143878

  1. The structures of Arabidopsis Deg5 and Deg8 reveal new insights into HtrA proteases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao, Feng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Fan, Haitian; Shan, Xiaoyue [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Renhua [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 Nanxincun, Haidian District, Beijing 100093 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Lin, E-mail: liulin@ibcas.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 Nanxincun, Haidian District, Beijing 100093 (China); Gong, Weimin, E-mail: liulin@ibcas.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-05-01

    The crystal structures of Arabidopsis Deg5 and Deg8 have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 and 2.0 Å, respectively, revealing novel structural features of HtrA proteases. Plant Deg5 and Deg8 are two members of the HtrA proteases, a family of oligomeric serine endopeptidases that are involved in a variety of protein quality-control processes. These two HtrA proteases are located in the thylakoid lumen and participate in high-light stress responses by collaborating with other chloroplast proteins. Deg5 and Deg8 degrade photodamaged D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction centre, allowing its in situ replacement. Here, the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana Deg5 (S266A) and Deg8 (S292A) are reported at 2.6 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. The Deg5 trimer contains two calcium ions in a central channel, suggesting a link between photodamage control and calcium ions in chloroplasts. Previous structures of HtrA proteases have indicated that their regulation usually requires C-terminal PDZ domain(s). Deg5 is unique in that it contains no PDZ domain and the trimeric structure of Deg5 (S266A) reveals a novel catalytic triad conformation. A similar triad conformation is observed in the hexameric structure of the single PDZ-domain-containing Deg8 (S292A). These findings suggest a novel activation mechanism for plant HtrA proteases and provide structural clues to their function in light-stress response.

  2. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  3. Enzymatic Degradation of Ovalbumin by Various Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Yoshimaru, Tetsuro; Matsui, Toshiro; Osajima, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was made of the enzymatic hydrolysis of ovalbumin (OVA), a major allergen in egg white, by various acid and alkaline proteases. Protease YP-SS (acid protease) from Aspergillus niger and alcalase (alkaline protease) from BacilLus licheniformis were found to be useful for the degradation of OVA, respectively. OVA was almost totally hydrolyzed within 15 hr at 37℃ by alcalase. Alcalase acted rapidly to hydrolyze OVA, with about 90% of OVA being hydrolyzed within 30min., the react...

  4. Chloroplast division during leaf development of Xanthium pensylvanicum Wallr. (Compositae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Maksymowych

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Division and growth of chloroplasts was studied during leaf development of Xanthium pensylvanicum at various stages of development represented by the leaf plastochron index.Between leaf plastochron indices -1.00 and 2.56 chloroplast division was observed with little enlargement. Between 2.50 and 5.00 chloroplasts enlarged in diameter with an average rate of 0.21 µm per day. At leaf plastochron index 5.00 chloroplasts attained their mature size of 6.12 µm. No chloroplast division was found after leaf plastochron index 2.50. A change in shape of plastids from spherical proplastids to discoidal accompanied their growth during stages 2.50 and 5.00.

  5. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  6. Exogenous proteases for meat tenderization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhit, Alaa A; Hopkins, David L; Geesink, Geert; Bekhit, Adnan A; Franks, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The use of exogenous proteases to improve meat tenderness has attracted much interest recently, with a view to consistent production of tender meat and added value to lower grade meat cuts. This review discusses the sources, characteristics, and use of exogenous proteases in meat tenderization to highlight the specificity of the proteases toward meat proteins and their impact on meat quality. Plant enzymes (such as papain, bromelain, and ficin) have been extensively investigated as meat tenderizers. New plant proteases (actinidin and zingibain) and microbial enzyme preparations have been of recent interest due to controlled meat tenderization and other advantages. Successful use of these enzymes in fresh meat requires their enzymatic kinetics and characteristics to be determined, together with an understanding of the impact of the surrounding environmental conditions of the meat (pH, temperature) on enzyme function. This enables the optimal conditions for tenderizing fresh meat to be established, and the elimination or reduction of any negative impacts on other quality attributes. PMID:24499119

  7. ATP-dependent protease in maize mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATP-dependent protease was identified in the matrix of Zea mays L. Sachara mitochondria. 14C-methylated casein has been used as a substrate, and the matrix ATP-dependent protease exhibited similar sensitivity towards specific inhibitors as the Lon protease from E. coli nd analogues from rat liver and yeast mitochondria. Here we report the existence of Lon like ATP-dependent protease in intact mitochondria prepared from 4-days-old epicotyls of Zea mays L. seedling. Enzyme has been purified from Lubrol treated mitochondria using ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The enzyme activity has been estimated using 14C-methylated casein as a substrate and sensitivity of the protease towards the specific inhibitors has been tested. ATP-dependent protease from the mitochondrial matrix of maize exhibit similar sensitivity to the above mentioned inhibitors like Lon protease from yeast and rat liver mitochondria as well as from E. coli. (authors)

  8. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulasi Satyanarayana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review.

  9. Reactive Nitrogen Species-Dependent Effects on Soybean Chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Puntarulo, Susana; Jasid, Sebastián; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generation by soybean (Glycine max, var ADM 4800) chloroplasts was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique.1 Both nitrite and L-arginine (arg) are the required substrates for enzymatic activities considered as possible sources of NO in plants. Soybean chloroplasts showed a NO production of 3.2 ± 0.2 nmol min−1 mg−1 protein in the presence of 1 mM NaNO2. Chloroplasts incubated with 1 mM arg showed a NO production of 0.76 ± 0.04 nmol min−1 mg−1...

  10. Origins of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    A computer branching model is used to analyze cellular evolution. Attention is given to certain key amino acids and nucleotide residues (ferredoxin, 5s ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochromes) because of their commonality over a wide variety of cell types. Each amino acid or nucleotide residue is a sequence in an inherited biological trait; and the branching method is employed to align sequences so that changes reflect substitution of one residue for another. Based on the computer analysis, the symbiotic theory of cellular evolution is considered the most probable. This theory holds that organelles, e.g., mitochondria and chloroplasts invaded larger bodies, e.g., bacteria, and combined functions to form eucaryotic cells.

  11. Protease-sensitive synthetic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Colby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc. Frequently, PrP(Sc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but not recPrP monomers or oligomers, transmitted disease to transgenic mice (n = 164, denoted Tg9949 mice, that overexpress N-terminally truncated PrP. Tg9949 control mice (n = 174 did not spontaneously generate prions although they were prone to late-onset spontaneous neurological dysfunction. When synthetic prion isolates from infected Tg9949 mice were serially transmitted in the same line of mice, they exhibited sPrP(Sc and caused neurodegeneration. Interestingly, these protease-sensitive prions did not shorten the life span of Tg9949 mice despite causing extensive neurodegeneration. We inoculated three synthetic prion isolates into Tg4053 mice that overexpress full-length PrP; Tg4053 mice are not prone to developing spontaneous neurological dysfunction. The synthetic prion isolates caused disease in 600-750 days in Tg4053 mice, which exhibited sPrP(Sc. These novel synthetic prions demonstrate that conformational changes in wild-type PrP can produce mouse prions composed exclusively of sPrP(Sc.

  12. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  13. Protease gene families in Populus and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteases play key roles in plants, maintaining strict protein quality control and degrading specific sets of proteins in response to diverse environmental and developmental stimuli. Similarities and differences between the proteases expressed in different species may give valuable insights into their physiological roles and evolution. Results We have performed a comparative analysis of protease genes in the two sequenced dicot genomes, Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa by using genes coding for proteases in the MEROPS database 1 for Arabidopsis to identify homologous sequences in Populus. A multigene-based phylogenetic analysis was performed. Most protease families were found to be larger in Populus than in Arabidopsis, reflecting recent genome duplication. Detailed studies on e.g. the DegP, Clp, FtsH, Lon, rhomboid and papain-Like protease families showed the pattern of gene family expansion and gene loss was complex. We finally show that different Populus tissues express unique suites of protease genes and that the mRNA levels of different classes of proteases change along a developmental gradient. Conclusion Recent gene family expansion and contractions have made the Arabidopsis and Populus complements of proteases different and this, together with expression patterns, gives indications about the roles of the individual gene products or groups of proteases.

  14. Chloroplast genome variation in upland and lowland switchgrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) exists at multiple ploidies and two phenotypically distinct ecotypes. To facilitate interploidal comparisons and to understand the extent of sequence variation within existing breeding pools, two complete switchgrass chloroplast genomes were sequenced from individu...

  15. New Insights into Dynamic Actin-Based Chloroplast Photorelocation Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam-Geun Kong; Masamitsu Wada

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplast movement is essential for plants to survive under various environmental light conditions.Phototropins-plant-specific blue-light-activated receptor kinases-mediate the response by perceiving light intensity and direction.Recently,novel chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments have been identified as playing a pivotal role in the directional chloroplast photorelocation movement.Encouraging progress has recently been made in this field of research through molecular genetics and cell biological analyses.This review describes factors that have been identified as being involved in chloroplast movement and their roles in the regulation of cp-actin filaments,thus providing a basis for reflection on their biochemical activities and functions.

  16. Separation of Chloroplast Pigments Using Reverse Phase Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, R. Neil

    1997-01-01

    Presents a protocol that uses reverse phase chromatography for the separation of chloroplast pigments. Provides a simple and relatively safe procedure for use in teaching laboratories. Discusses pigment extraction, chromatography, results, and advantages of the process. (JRH)

  17. Full transcription of the chloroplast genome in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Wang, Shuo; Xia, En-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes possess a simple genome transcription system that is different from that of eukaryotes. In chloroplasts (plastids), it is believed that the prokaryotic gene transcription features govern genome transcription. However, the polycistronic operon transcription model cannot account for all the chloroplast genome (plastome) transcription products at whole-genome level, especially regarding various RNA isoforms. By systematically analyzing transcriptomes of plastids of algae and higher plants, and cyanobacteria, we find that the entire plastome is transcribed in photosynthetic green plants, and that this pattern originated from prokaryotic cyanobacteria - ancestor of the chloroplast genomes that diverged about 1 billion years ago. We propose a multiple arrangement transcription model that multiple transcription initiations and terminations combine haphazardly to accomplish the genome transcription followed by subsequent RNA processing events, which explains the full chloroplast genome transcription phenomenon and numerous functional and/or aberrant pre-RNAs. Our findings indicate a complex prokaryotic genome regulation when processing primary transcripts. PMID:27456469

  18. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Lee, Hyeon Ju; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant species with useful aromatic oils in family Rutaceae, was generated in this study by de novo assembly with whole-genome sequence data. The chloroplast genome was 158 154 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure containing a pair of inverted repeats of 27 644 bp, separated by large single copy and small single copy of 85 340 bp and 17 526 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome harbored 112 genes consisting of 78 protein-coding genes 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete chloroplast genome sequences with those of known relatives revealed that Z. piperitum is most closely related to the Citrus species. PMID:26260183

  20. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-09-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit.

  1. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Tanaecium tetragonolobum: The First Bignoniaceae Plastome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Gonçalves Nazareno

    Full Text Available Bignoniaceae is a Pantropical plant family that is especially abundant in the Neotropics. Members of the Bignoniaceae are diverse in many ecosystems and represent key components of the Tropical flora. Despite the ecological importance of the Bignoniaceae and all the efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of this group, whole chloroplast genome information has not yet been reported for any members of the family. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Tanaecium tetragonolobum (Jacq. L.G. Lohmann, which was reconstructed using de novo and referenced-based assembly of single-end reads generated by shotgun sequencing of total genomic DNA in an Illumina platform. The gene order and organization of the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum exhibits the general structure of flowering plants, and is similar to other Lamiales chloroplast genomes. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum is a circular molecule of 153,776 base pairs (bp with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a large single copy region (LSC, 84,612 bp and a small single copy region (SSC, 17,586 bp separated by inverted repeat regions (IRs, 25,789 bp. In addition, the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum has 38.3% GC content and includes 121 genes, of which 86 are protein-coding, 31 are transfer RNA, and four are ribosomal RNA. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum presents a total of 47 tandem repeats and 347 simple sequence repeats (SSRs with mononucleotides being the most common and di-, tri-, tetra-, and hexanucleotides occurring with less frequency. The results obtained here were compared to other chloroplast genomes of Lamiales available to date, providing new insight into the evolution of chloroplast genomes within Lamiales. Overall, the evolutionary rates of genes in Lamiales are lineage-, locus-, and region-specific, indicating that the evolutionary pattern of nucleotide substitution in chloroplast genomes of flowering

  2. Sequence evidence for the symbiotic origins of chloroplasts and mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. G.; Hunt, L. T.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    The origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts is investigated on the basis of prokaryotic and early-eukaryotic evolutionary trees derived from protein and nucleic-acid sequences by the method of Dayhoff (1979). Trees for bacterial ferrodoxins, 5S ribosomal RNA, c-type cytochromes, the lipid-binding subunit of ATPase, and dihydrofolate reductase are presented and discussed. Good agreement among the trees is found, and it is argued that the mitochondria and chloroplasts evolved by multiple symbiotic events.

  3. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B

    2009-08-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addition to directly blocking the activity of a targeted protease, one can take advantage of differential expression in disease states to selectively deliver therapeutic or imaging agents. Recent studies in targeted drug development for the metalloproteases (matrix metalloproteinases, adamalysins, pappalysins, neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, metallocarboxypeptidases, and glutamate carboxypeptidase II), serine proteases (elastase, coagulation factors, tissue/urokinase plasminogen activator system, kallikreins, tryptase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV) and cysteine proteases (cathepsin B) are discussed herein. PMID:19689354

  4. Expression of human soluble TRAIL in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zongqi; LI yinü; CHEN Feng; LI Dong; ZHANG Zhifang; LIU Yanxin; ZHENG Dexian; WANG Yong; SHEN Guifang

    2006-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces selectively apoptosis in various tumor cells and virus-infected cells, but rarely in normal cells. A chloroplast expression vector, p64TRAIL, containing the cDNA coding for the soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL), was constructed with clpP-trnL-petB-chlL-rpl23-rpl2 as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii plastid homologous recombinant fragments and spectinomycin-resistant aadA gene as a select marker. The plasmid p64TRAIL was transferred into the chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii by the biolistic method. Three independently transformed lines were obtained by 100 mg/L spectinomycin selection. PCR amplification, Southern blot analysis of the sTRAIL coding region DNA and cultivation cells in the dark all showed that the exogenous DNA had been integrated into chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii. Western blot analysis showed that human soluble TRAIL was expressed in C. reinhardtii chloroplast. The densitometric analysis of Western blot indicated that the expressed human sTRAIL protein in the chloroplasts of C. reinhardtii accounted for about 0.43%-0.67% of the total soluble proteins.These experimental results demonstrated the possibility of using transgenic chloroplasts of green alga as bioreactors for production of biopharmaceuticals.

  5. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addit...

  6. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Monteiro Souza; Mona Lisa de Assis Bittencourt; Carolina Canielles Caprara; Marcela de Freitas; Renata Paula Coppini de Almeida; Dâmaris Silveira; Yris Maria Fonseca; Edivaldo Ximenes Ferreira Filho; Adalberto Pessoa Junior; Pérola Oliveira Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy...

  7. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  8. Flip-flop of phospholipids in proteoliposomes reconstituted from detergent extract of chloroplast membranes: kinetics and phospholipid specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archita Rajasekharan

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells are compartmentalized into distinct sub-cellular organelles by lipid bilayers, which are known to be involved in numerous cellular processes. The wide repertoire of lipids, synthesized in the biogenic membranes like the endoplasmic reticulum and bacterial cytoplasmic membranes are initially localized in the cytosolic leaflet and some of these lipids have to be translocated to the exoplasmic leaflet for membrane biogenesis and uniform growth. It is known that phospholipid (PL translocation in biogenic membranes is mediated by specific membrane proteins which occur in a rapid, bi-directional fashion without metabolic energy requirement and with no specificity to PL head group. A recent study reported the existence of biogenic membrane flippases in plants and that the mechanism of plant membrane biogenesis was similar to that found in animals. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time ATP independent and ATP dependent flippase activity in chloroplast membranes of plants. For this, we generated proteoliposomes from Triton X-100 extract of intact chloroplast, envelope membrane and thylakoid isolated from spinach leaves and assayed for flippase activity using fluorescent labeled phospholipids. Half-life time of flipping was found to be 6 ± 1 min. We also show that: (a intact chloroplast and envelope membrane reconstituted proteoliposomes can flip fluorescent labeled analogs of phosphatidylcholine in ATP independent manner, (b envelope membrane and thylakoid reconstituted proteoliposomes can flip phosphatidylglycerol in ATP dependent manner, (c Biogenic membrane ATP independent PC flipping activity is protein mediated and (d the kinetics of PC translocation gets affected differently upon treatment with protease and protein modifying reagents.

  9. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  10. The puzzle of chloroplast vesicle transport – involvement of GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazzad eKarim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the cytosol of plant cells vesicle transport occurs via secretory pathways among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER network, Golgi bodies, secretory granules, endosome and plasma membrane. Three systems transfer lipids, proteins and other important molecules through aqueous spaces to membrane-enclosed compartments, via vesicles that bud from donor membranes, being coated and uncoated before tethered and fused with acceptor membranes. In addition, molecular, biochemical and ultrastructural evidence indicates presence of a vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. Little is known about the protein components of this system. However, as chloroplasts harbour the photosynthetic apparatus that ultimately supports most organisms on the planet, close attention to their pathways is warranted. This may also reveal novel diversification and/or distinct solutions to the problems posed by the targeted intra-cellular trafficking of important molecules. To date two homologues to well-known yeast cytosolic vesicle transport proteins, CPSAR1 and CPRabA5e, have been shown to have roles in chloroplast vesicle transport, both being GTPases. Bioinformatic data indicate that several homologues of cytosolic vesicle transport system components are putatively chloroplast-localized and in addition other proteins have been implicated to participate in chloroplast vesicle transport, including vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 (VIPP1, thylakoid formation 1 (THF1, snowy cotyledon 2/cotyledon chloroplast biogenesis factor (SCO2/CYO1, curvature thylakoid 1 (CURT1 proteins, and a dynamin like GTPase FZO-like (FZL protein. Several putative potential cargo proteins have also been identified, including building blocks of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we discuss details of the largely unknown putative chloroplast vesicle transport system, focusing on GTPase-related components.

  11. Analysis of protein interactions at native chloroplast membranes by ellipsometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Kriechbaumer

    Full Text Available Membrane bound receptors play vital roles in cell signaling, and are the target for many drugs, yet their interactions with ligands are difficult to study by conventional techniques due to the technical difficulty of monitoring these interactions in lipid environments. In particular, the ability to analyse the behaviour of membrane proteins in their native membrane environment is limited. Here, we have developed a quantitative approach to detect specific interactions between low-abundance chaperone receptors within native chloroplast membranes and their soluble chaperone partners. Langmuir-Schaefer film deposition was used to deposit native chloroplasts onto gold-coated glass slides, and interactions between the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 and their receptors in the chloroplast membranes were detected and quantified by total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE. We show that native chloroplast membranes deposited on gold-coated glass slides using Langmuir-Schaefer films retain functional receptors capable of binding chaperones with high specificity and affinity. Taking into account the low chaperone receptor abundance in native membranes, these binding properties are consistent with data generated using soluble forms of the chloroplast chaperone receptors, OEP61 and Toc64. Therefore, we conclude that chloroplasts have the capacity to selectively bind chaperones, consistent with the notion that chaperones play an important role in protein targeting to chloroplasts. Importantly, this method of monitoring by TIRE does not require any protein labelling. This novel combination of techniques should be applicable to a wide variety of membranes and membrane protein receptors, thus presenting the opportunity to quantify protein interactions involved in fundamental cellular processes, and to screen for drugs that target membrane proteins.

  12. Chloroplast genome structure in Ilex (Aquifoliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Tan, Yun-Hong; Liu, Ying-Ying; Song, Yu; Yang, Jun-Bo; Corlett, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Aquifoliaceae is the largest family in the campanulid order Aquifoliales. It consists of a single genus, Ilex, the hollies, which is the largest woody dioecious genus in the angiosperms. Most species are in East Asia or South America. The taxonomy and evolutionary history remain unclear due to the lack of a robust species-level phylogeny. We produced the first complete chloroplast genomes in this family, including seven Ilex species, by Illumina sequencing of long-range PCR products and subsequent reference-guided de novo assembly. These genomes have a typical bicyclic structure with a conserved genome arrangement and moderate divergence. The total length is 157,741 bp and there is one large single-copy region (LSC) with 87,109 bp, one small single-copy with 18,436 bp, and a pair of inverted repeat regions (IR) with 52,196 bp. A total of 144 genes were identified, including 96 protein-coding genes, 40 tRNA and 8 rRNA. Thirty-four repetitive sequences were identified in Ilex pubescens, with lengths >14 bp and identity >90%, and 11 divergence hotspot regions that could be targeted for phylogenetic markers. This study will contribute to improved resolution of deep branches of the Ilex phylogeny and facilitate identification of Ilex species. PMID:27378489

  13. Immobilization to prevent enzyme incompatibility with proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme incompatibility is a problem in multi-enzyme processes that involve a non-specific protease, such as Alcalase. An example is the one-pot enzymatic synthesis of peptides catalyzed by a lipase and a protease. The incompatibility between lipase B from Candida antarctica (CalB) and Alcalase was s

  14. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  15. Progress and prospects on DENV protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timiri, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-07-19

    New treatments are desperately required to combat increasing rate of dengue fever cases reported in tropical and sub-tropical parts of the world. Among the ten proteins (structural and non-structural) encoded by dengue viral genome, NS2B-NS3 protease is an ideal target for drug discovery. It is responsible for the processing of poly protein that is required for genome replication of the virus. Moreover, inhibitors designed against proteases were found successful in Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Complete molecular mechanism and a survey of inhibitors reported against dengue protease will be helpful in designing effective and potent inhibitors. This review provides an insight on molecular mechanism of dengue virus protease and covers up-to-date information on different inhibitors reported against dengue proteases with medicinal chemistry perspective. PMID:27092412

  16. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  17. Sycamore amyloplasts can import and process precursors of nuclear encoded chloroplast proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzalka, K; Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Watanabe, A; Akazawa, T

    1987-12-16

    Amyloplasts isolated from white-wild suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) are found to import and process the precursor of the small subunit (pS) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach, but they lack the ability to form its holoenzyme due to the absence of both the large subunit and its binding-protein. They also import the precursor of the 33-kDa extrinsic protein (p33-kDa) of the O2-evolving complex of Photosystem II from spinach, but process is only to an intermediate form (i33-kDa). Chloroplasts from green-mutant cells of sycamore process p33-kDa to its mature form in this heterologous system. These results suggest that the thylakoid-associated protease responsible for the second processing step of p33-kDa is missing in amyloplasts, possibly due to the absence of thylakoid-membranes. In contrast, the apparent import of the precursor of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding apoprotein (pLHCP) from spinach was not detected. Sycamore amyloplasts may lack the ability to import this particular thylakoid-protein, or rapidly degrade the imported molecules in the absence of thylakoid-membranes for their proper insertion.

  18. Comparison of intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric chloroplast diversity in Cycads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Hinsinger, Damien Daniel; Strijk, Joeri Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Cycads are among the most threatened plant species. Increasing the availability of genomic information by adding whole chloroplast data is a fundamental step in supporting phylogenetic studies and conservation efforts. Here, we assemble a dataset encompassing three taxonomic levels in cycads, including ten genera, three species in the genus Cycas and two individuals of C. debaoensis. Repeated sequences, SSRs and variations of the chloroplast were analyzed at the intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric scale, and using our sequence data, we reconstruct a phylogenomic tree for cycads. The chloroplast was 162,094 bp in length, with 133 genes annotated, including 87 protein-coding, 37 tRNA and 8 rRNA genes. We found 7 repeated sequences and 39 SSRs. Seven loci showed promising levels of variations for application in DNA-barcoding. The chloroplast phylogeny confirmed the division of Cycadales in two suborders, each of them being monophyletic, revealing a contradiction with the current family circumscription and its evolution. Finally, 10 intraspecific SNPs were found. Our results showed that despite the extremely restricted distribution range of C. debaoensis, using complete chloroplast data is useful not only in intraspecific studies, but also to improve our understanding of cycad evolution and in defining conservation strategies for this emblematic group. PMID:27558458

  19. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Glucose respiration in the intact chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chloroplastic respiration was monitored by measuring 14CO2 from 14C glucose in the darkened Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 chloroplast, The patterns of 14CO2 evolution from labeled glucose in the absence and presence of the inhibitors iodoacetamide, glycolate-2-phosphate, and phosphoenolypyruvate were those expected from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle and glycolysis. The Km for glucose was 56 micromolar and for MgATP was 200 micromolar. Release of 14CO2 was inhibited by phloretin and inorganic phosphate. Comparing the inhibition of CO2 evolution generated by pH 7.5 with respect to pH 8.2 (optimum) in chloroplasts given C-1, C-2, and C-6 labeled glucose indicated that a suboptimum pH affects the recycling of the pentose phosphate intermediates to a greater extent than CO2 evolution from C-1 of glucose. Respiratory inhibition by pH 7.5 in the darkened chloroplast was alleviated by NH4Cl and KCl (stromal alkalating agents), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase), or phosphoenolypyruvate (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiration in the darkened Chlamydomonas chloroplast is the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction. The respiratory pathways described here can account for the total oxidation of a hexose to Co2 and for interactions between carbohydrate metabolism and the oxyhydrogen reaction in algal cells adapted to a hydrogen metabolism

  1. Chloroplast DNA Diversity of Oak Species in Eastern Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Calin MOLDOVAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The chloroplast DNA of 34 sessile oak (Quercus petraea and 27 pedunculate oak (Q. robur populations covering the entire natural distribution of the two oak species in Eastern Romania was investigated using four large regions of the chloroplast genome by PCR and RFLP technique. A total of seven chloroplast DNA haplotypes sensu lato have been observed by analysing 305 mature trees. However, due to the high resolution of the electrophoresis method a total of 22 chloroplast variants could have been detected, with new mutations and fragment combinations in two of the amplified regions: psbC/trnD and trnT/trnF. All of the haplotypes belong to the phylogenetic lineages A and E, which originate from the Balkan Peninsula. Most of genetic diversity is distributed among populations (GST=0.779. The chloroplast DNA haplotypes are shared by the two oak species. Different dispersal abilities may explain the higher value of genetic differentiation among populations in sessile oak than in pedunculate oak.

  2. The complete chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Donghwan; Raveendar, Sebastin; Lee, Jung-Ro; Lee, Gi-An; Ro, Na-Young; Jeon, Young-Ah; Cho, Gyu-Taek; Lee, Ho-Sun; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We report the complete sequence of the chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae), a species of chili pepper. Methods and Results: Using an Illumina platform, we sequenced the chloroplast genome of C. frutescens. The total length of the genome is 156,817 bp, and the overall GC content is 37.7%. A pair of 25,792-bp inverted repeats is separated by small (17,853 bp) and large (87,380 bp) single-copy regions. The C. frutescens chloroplast genome encodes 132 unique genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, 37 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and eight ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Of these, seven genes are duplicated in the inverted repeats and 12 genes contain one or two introns. Comparative analysis with the reference chloroplast genome revealed 125 simple sequence repeat motifs and 34 variants, mostly located in the noncoding regions. Conclusions: The complete chloroplast genome sequence of C. frutescens reported here is a valuable genetic resource for Capsicum species. PMID:27213127

  3. PROTEASES AND PROTEASE INHIBITORS INTERACTION: DEFENCE STRATEGY AGAINST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S.DHANDE 1 N.J.CHIKHALE 2

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: An increase in crop yield, its management and preservation are among the main challenges standing before the human population that exceed 10 billion by the mid of 21 st  century.  Every year, considerable agricultural losses occur due to repeated practices of cultivation of large genetically similar populations.  Such cultivation practices favors incidence of more insect pests (Hilder and Boulter, 1999;  Oerke  et  al.,  1994;  Smith,  1999.  To  solve  these  problems,  current approaches  rely  on  use  of  synthetic  chemicals  like  fertilizers,  insecticides, herbicides,  fungicides  etc.  But  this  exerts  excessively  high  pressure  on environment  and  destabilizes  the  ecological  balance.  The  traditional  pest control method involves the use of conventional pesticides, most of which are non-specific and wipe out the entire community, pollutes the agro-ecosystem, and  increases  the  cost  of  production.  The  emergence  of  gene  transfer technology  has  solved  some  problems  regarding  overuse  of  chemical pesticides.  The  delta  endotoxin  encoding  gene  from  Bacillus  thuringiensis,  a gram positive soil borne bacteria transferred in crops has given little relief from coleopterans and lepidopterans attack.  Whereas, the insects belonging to these orders like Helicoverpa Sps. have developed resistance against Bt toxins. The other approach takes advantage of use of plant genes encoding defense proteins like protease inhibitors which is more appealing, simpler and safer (Dunaevsky et.  al.,  2005.  Proteinase  inhibitors  (PIs  are  naturally  occurring  proteins  in living organisms and are able to inhibit & control the activity of proteases. PIs act  on  an  active  site  of  digestive  proteolytic  enzymes  and  form  a  stable complex  unlike  enzyme-substrate  or  enzyme-product  weak  complexes  which

  4. Molecular biology and physiology of isolated chloroplasts from the algae Vaucheria

    OpenAIRE

    Didriksen, Alena

    2010-01-01

    Sea slugs of the genus Elysia (e.g. E. chlorotica) are known for their ability to incorporate chloroplasts from the yellow-green alga Vaucheria litorea. These “kleptoplasts” stay active in the digestive tract of the sea slug for several months. Chloroplasts from Vaucheria litorea are also reported to be significantly more stable after in vitro isolation than chloroplasts of other algae or of higher plants. In organello assays with isolated chloroplasts are used in studies on photosynthetical ...

  5. Chloroplast degeneration and its inhibition by kinetin in detached leaves of Cichorium intybus L.

    OpenAIRE

    F. Młodzianowski; L. Młodzanowska

    2015-01-01

    In the chicory (Cichorium intybus L. var. sativum cv. Polanowicka) leaves two types of chloroplasts are present differing by their degree of osmiophility of the thylakoid inside. This type of differentiation of chloroplasts has so far been found only in several plant species. The process of chloroplast degeneration in darkness is described. In osmiophilic chloroplasts at certain stage of degeneration minutely layered giant grana were found. Kinetin markedly inhibited the process of chloroplas...

  6. Oryza sativa Chloroplast Signal Recognition Particle 43 (OscpSRP43 Is Required for Chloroplast Development and Photosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-guang Lv

    Full Text Available A rice chlorophyll-deficient mutant w67 was isolated from an ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS-induced IR64 (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica mutant bank. The mutant exhibited a distinct yellow-green leaf phenotype in the whole plant growth duration with significantly reduced levels of chlorophyll and carotenoid, impaired chloroplast development and lowered capacity of photosynthesis compared with the wild-type IR64. Expression of a number of genes associated with chlorophyll metabolism, chloroplast biogenesis and photosynthesis was significantly altered in the mutant. Genetic analysis indicated that the yellow-green phenotype was controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene located on the short arm of chromosome 3. Using map-based strategy, the mutation was isolated and predicted to encode a chloroplast signal recognition particle 43 KD protein (cpSRP43 with 388 amino acid residuals. A single base substitution from A to T at position 160 resulted in a premature stop codon. OscpSRP43 was constitutively expressed in various organs with the highest level in the leaf. Functional complementation could rescue the mutant phenotype and subcellular localization showed that the cpSRP43:GFP fusion protein was targeted to the chloroplast. The data suggested that Oryza sativa cpSRP43 (OscpSRP43 was required for the normal development of chloroplasts and photosynthesis in rice.

  7. Oryza sativa Chloroplast Signal Recognition Particle 43 (OscpSRP43) Is Required for Chloroplast Development and Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiang-guang; Shi, Yong-feng; Xu, Xia; Wei, Yan-lin; Wang, Hui-mei; Zhang, Xiao-bo; Wu, Jian-li

    2015-01-01

    A rice chlorophyll-deficient mutant w67 was isolated from an ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS)-induced IR64 (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica) mutant bank. The mutant exhibited a distinct yellow-green leaf phenotype in the whole plant growth duration with significantly reduced levels of chlorophyll and carotenoid, impaired chloroplast development and lowered capacity of photosynthesis compared with the wild-type IR64. Expression of a number of genes associated with chlorophyll metabolism, chloroplast biogenesis and photosynthesis was significantly altered in the mutant. Genetic analysis indicated that the yellow-green phenotype was controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene located on the short arm of chromosome 3. Using map-based strategy, the mutation was isolated and predicted to encode a chloroplast signal recognition particle 43 KD protein (cpSRP43) with 388 amino acid residuals. A single base substitution from A to T at position 160 resulted in a premature stop codon. OscpSRP43 was constitutively expressed in various organs with the highest level in the leaf. Functional complementation could rescue the mutant phenotype and subcellular localization showed that the cpSRP43:GFP fusion protein was targeted to the chloroplast. The data suggested that Oryza sativa cpSRP43 (OscpSRP43) was required for the normal development of chloroplasts and photosynthesis in rice.

  8. Factors affecting the stability of chloroplast membranes in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoki, T.; Torres-Pereira, J.; Packer, L.

    1974-01-01

    Factors which affect the stability of light-induced atebrin fluorescence quenching activity in chloroplast membranes, a measure of the electron transport dependent formation of energy-linked H/sup +/ gradients, were investigated in vitro. Class II spinach chloroplast membranes were isolated and stored at 0 to 4/sup 0/C and aliquots were subsequently tested for their retention of energizing capacity. The main factors which increase the stability of this activity were found to be (a) isolation in a potassium-containing medium but storage in a sucrose medium containing a low concentration of electrolytes; (b) the presence of butylated hydroxytoluene (an antioxidant), and a protein such as bovine serum albumin to remove free fatty acids in the medium during storage. Under these conditions, the energization capacity of chloroplasts is retained for more than 40 days.

  9. Fractionation and Analysis of Polypeptides of Euglena gracilis Chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, A C; Mendiola-Morgenthaler, L R; Floyd, G L; Salisbury, J L

    1976-07-01

    Intact Euglena gracilis chloroplasts, purified on gradients of silica sol, were lysed osmotically and fractionated by centrifugation on discontinuous gradients of sucrose into their soluble, envelope membrane, and thylakoid membrane components. The proteins of the different subchloroplast fractions, as well as those of whole chloroplasts, were analyzed by electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. The polypeptide profile of each fraction was distinctive and was in general similar to the profile obtained for analogous fractions of the chloroplasts of higher plants.The envelope membranes were separated into two fractions in the gradients according to their banding densities. Electron micrographs showed that the light envelope fraction consisted mostly of single-membrane vesicles, whereas the heavy envelope fraction consisted of multiple layers of folded membranes. Both envelope fractions were ultrastructurally distinct from the thylakoid membranes. PMID:16659627

  10. Caspase Family Proteases and Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Jun FAN; Li-Hui HAN; Ri-Shan CONG; Jin LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential physiological process that plays a critical role in development and tissue homeostasis. The progress of apoptosis is regulated in an orderly way by a series of signal cascades under certain circumstances. The caspase-cascade system plays vital roles in the induction, transduction and amplification of intracellular apoptotic signals. Caspases, closely associated with apoptosis, are aspartate-specific cysteine proteases and members of the interleukin-1β-converting enzyme family. The activation and function of caspases, involved in the delicate caspase-cascade system, are regulated by various kinds of molecules, such as the inhibitor of apoptosis protein, Bcl-2 family proteins, calpain,and Ca2+. Based on the latest research, the members of the caspase family, caspase-cascade system and caspase-regulating molecules involved in apoptosis are reviewed.

  11. Possible association of actin filaments with chloroplasts of spinach mesophyll cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumatani, T; Sakurai-Ozato, N; Miyawaki, N; Yokota, E; Shimmen, T; Terashima, I; Takagi, S

    2006-11-01

    In palisade mesophyll cells of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) kept under low-intensity white light, chloroplasts were apparently immobile and seemed to be surrounded by fine bundles of actin filaments. High-intensity blue light induced actin-dependent chloroplast movement concomitant with the appearance of a couple of long, straight bundles of actin filaments in each cell, whereas high-intensity red light was essentially ineffective in inducing these responses. The actin organization observed under low-intensity white light has been postulated to function in anchoring chloroplasts at proper intracellular positions through direct interaction with the chloroplasts. Intact chloroplasts, which retained their outer envelopes, were isolated after homogenization of leaves and Percoll centrifugation. No endogenous actin was detected by immunoblotting in the final intact-chloroplast fraction prepared from the leaves kept under low-intensity white light or in darkness. In cosedimentation assays with exogenously added skeletal muscle filamentous actin, however, actin was detected in the intact-chloroplast fraction precipitated after low-speed centrifugation. The association of actin with chloroplasts was apparently dependent on incubation time and chloroplast density. After partial disruption of the outer envelope of isolated chloroplasts by treatment with trypsin, actin was no longer coprecipitated. The results suggest that chloroplasts in spinach leaves can directly interact with actin, and that this interaction may be involved in the regulation of intracellular positioning of chloroplasts.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of ectopic chloroplast development in green curd cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloroplasts are the green plastids where photosynthesis takes place. The biogenesis of chloroplasts requires the coordinate expression of both nuclear and chloroplast genes and is regulated by developmental and environmental signals. Despite extensive studies of this process, the genetic basis and ...

  13. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  14. Nucleotide sequence of a spinach chloroplast valine tRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Sprouse, H M; Kashdan, M; Otis, L; Dudock, B

    1981-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a spinach chloroplast valine tRNA (sp. chl. tRNA Val) has been determined. This tRNA shows essentially equal homology to prokaryotic valine tRNAs (58-65% homology) and to the mitochondrial valine tRNAs of lower eukaryotes (yeast and N. crassa, 61-62% homology). Sp. chl. tRNA Val shows distinctly lower homology to mouse mitochondrial valine tRNA (53% homology) and to eukaryotic cytoplasmic valine tRNAs (47-53% homology). Sp. chl. tRNA Val, like all other chloroplast ...

  15. The action spectrum in chloroplast translocation in multilayer leaf cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Lechowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available By measurement of light transmittance through a leaf as criterion of chloroplast translocation, the action spectrum of Ajuga reptans was established. In the spectrum obtained, a correction was introduced for leaf autoabsorption calculated on the basis of the Beer-Lambert law. The action spectrum has two maxima: at λ= 375 nm and λ= 481 nm. The range above 502 nm has no significant effect on chloroplast translocation. Comparison with other objects examined demonstrated that in multilayer leaf cells riboflavin seems also to be a photoreceptor active in this process.

  16. Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Protein in Barley Chloroplast Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannangara, C. G.; Jense, C J

    1975-01-01

    Biotin localized in barley chloroplast lamellae is covalently bound to a single protein with an approximate molecular weight of 21000. It contains one mole of biotin per mole of protein and functions as a carboxyl carrier in the acetyl-CoA carboxylase reaction. The protein was obtained by solubil......Biotin localized in barley chloroplast lamellae is covalently bound to a single protein with an approximate molecular weight of 21000. It contains one mole of biotin per mole of protein and functions as a carboxyl carrier in the acetyl-CoA carboxylase reaction. The protein was obtained...

  17. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  18. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  19. Arabidopsis VARIEGATED 3 encodes a chloroplast-targeted, zinc-finger protein required for chloroplast and palisade cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Holm, Agnethe; Jenkins, Tom;

    2004-01-01

    The stable, recessive Arabidopsis variegated 3 (var3) mutant exhibits a variegated phenotype due to somatic areas lacking or containing developmentally retarded chloroplasts and greatly reduced numbers of palisade cells. The VAR3 gene, isolated by transposon tagging, encodes the 85.9 kDa VAR3...... protein containing novel repeats and zinc fingers described as protein interaction domains. VAR3 interacts specifically in yeast and in vitro with NCED4, a putative polyene chain or carotenoid dioxygenase, and both VAR3 and NCED4 accumulate in the chloroplast stroma. Metabolic profiling demonstrates...... that pigment profiles are qualitatively similar in wild type and var3, although var3 accumulates lower levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. These results indicate that VAR3 is a part of a protein complex required for normal chloroplast and palisade cell development....

  20. Dysregulation of Protease and Protease Inhibitors in a Mouse Model of Human Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudhan Budatha; Simone Silva; Teodoro Ignacio Montoya; Ayako Suzuki; Sheena Shah-Simpson; Cecilia Karin Wieslander; Masashi Yanagisawa; Ruth Ann Word; Hiromi Yanagisawa

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/-)) develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP) due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/-) mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa). V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS) 3, a major extrapancreatic tryp...

  1. Isolation of dimorphic chloroplasts from the single-cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung Shiu-Cheung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three terrestrial plants are known to perform C4 photosynthesis without the dual-cell system by partitioning two distinct types of chloroplasts in separate cytoplasmic compartments. We report herein a protocol for isolating the dimorphic chloroplasts from Bienertia sinuspersici. Hypo-osmotically lysed protoplasts under our defined conditions released intact compartments containing the central chloroplasts and intact vacuoles with adhering peripheral chloroplasts. Following Percoll step gradient purification both chloroplast preparations demonstrated high homogeneities as evaluated from the relative abundance of respective protein markers. This protocol will open novel research directions toward understanding the mechanism of single-cell C4 photosynthesis.

  2. Chloroplast degeneration and its inhibition by kinetin in detached leaves of Cichorium intybus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Młodzianowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the chicory (Cichorium intybus L. var. sativum cv. Polanowicka leaves two types of chloroplasts are present differing by their degree of osmiophility of the thylakoid inside. This type of differentiation of chloroplasts has so far been found only in several plant species. The process of chloroplast degeneration in darkness is described. In osmiophilic chloroplasts at certain stage of degeneration minutely layered giant grana were found. Kinetin markedly inhibited the process of chloroplast degeneration, and after prolonged treatment even stimulated the stacking. process of grana thylakoids.

  3. Lung protease/anti-protease network and modulation of mucus production and surfactant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Descamps, Delphyne; Chignard, Michel; Touqui, Lhousseine; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2010-11-01

    Lung epithelium guarantees gas-exchange (performed in the alveoli) and protects from external insults (pathogens, pollutants…) present within inhaled air. Both functions are facilitated by secretions lining airway surface liquid, mucus (in the upper airways) and pulmonary surfactant (in the alveoli). Mucins, the main glycoproteins present within the mucus, are responsible for its rheologic properties and participate in lung defense mechanisms. In parallel, lung collectins are pattern recognition molecules present in pulmonary surfactant that also modulate lung defense. During chronic airways diseases, excessive protease activity can promote mucus hypersecretion and degradation of lung collectins and therefore contribute to the pathophysiology of these diseases. Importantly, secretion of local and systemic anti-proteases might be crucial to equilibrate the protease/anti-protease unbalance and therefore preserve the function of lung host defense compounds and airway surface liquid homeostasis. In this review we will present information relative to proteases able to modulate mucin production and lung collectin integrity, two important compounds of innate immune defense. One strategy to preserve physiological mucus production and collectin integrity during chronic airways diseases might be the over-expression of local 'alarm' anti-proteases such as SLPI and elafin. Interestingly, a cross-talk between lung collectins and anti-protease activity has recently been described, implicating the presence within the lung of a complex network between proteases, anti-proteases and pattern recognition molecules, which aims to keep or restore homeostasis in resting or inflamed lungs. PMID:20493919

  4. Production of Protease Enzyme from Wheat Straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Atiya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease enzyme production was studied and optimized as a first step to collect information about solid state fermenter to produce protease enzyme. A local isolated Aspergillus niger was used for this study with constant spores feeding in every experiment at (105/g. Experiments carried out in conical flasks with (250 ml containing (10 g of wheat straw as a substrate with different conditions included temperature, pH, hydration ratio, and fermentation time, the results comprised by measuring protease activity (u. The results showed that the best activity can be obtained at (T = 32°C, t= 100 hrs, pH= 2.5 and hydration ratio is 1:3. On the other hand the results is courage to proceed to design a solid state protease fermenter from wheat straw.

  5. Vanadium inhibition of serine and cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, N; Cerletti, P; De Vincentiis, M; Salvati, A; Scippa, S

    1999-03-01

    A study was made on the effect of vanadium, in both the tetravalent state in vanadyl sulphate and in the pentavalent state in sodium meta-vanadate, and ortho-vanadate, on the proteolysis of azocasein by two serine proteases, trypsin and subtilisin and two cysteine proteases bromelain and papain. Also the proteolysis of bovine azoalbumin by serine proteases was considered. An inhibitory effect was present in all cases, except meta-vanadate with subtilisin. The oxidation level of vanadium by itself did not determine the inhibition kinetics, which also depended on the type and composition of the vanadium containing molecule and on the enzyme assayed. The pattern of inhibition was similar for proteases belonging to the same class. The highest inhibition was obtained with meta-vanadate on papain and with vanadyl sulphate on bromelain.

  6. Activation of ADAM 12 protease by copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency: elimina......Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency......: elimination of the ADAM 12 cysteine switch by a point mutation in the propeptide had no effect on copper activation, whereas mutation of an unpaired cysteine residue in the catalytic domain resulted in a mutant form of ADAM 12-S that was insensitive to copper. This suggests a multi-step activation mechanism...... for ADAM 12 involving both furin cleavage and copper binding....

  7. Lipase and protease extraction from activated sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessesse, Amare; Dueholm, Thomas; Petersen, Steffen B.;

    2003-01-01

    of gentle and efficient enzyme extraction methods from environmental samples is very important. In this study we present a method for the extraction of lipases and proteases from activated sludge using the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100, EDTA, and cation exchange resin (CER), alone or in combination...... for the extraction of lipases and proteases from activated sludge. The sludge was continuously stirred in the presence of either buffer alone or in the presence of detergent and/or chelating agents. In all cases, a marked reduction in floc size was observed upon continuous stirring. However, no lipase activity...... and negligible protease activity was extracted in the presence of buffer alone, indicating that enzyme extraction was not due to shear force alone. The highest lipase activity was extracted using 0.1% Triton X-100 above which the activity was gradually decreasing. For proteases, the highest activity was obtained...

  8. Transcript profiling reveals that cysteine protease inhibitors are up-regulated in tuber sprouts after extended darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandellis, Carolina; Giammaria, Veronica; Fantino, Elisa; Cerrudo, Ignacio; Bachmann, Sandra; Santin, Franco; Ulloa, Rita M

    2016-07-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers are an excellent staple food due to its high nutritional value. When the tuber reaches physiological competence, sprouting proceeds accompanied by changes at mRNA and protein levels. Potato tubers become a source of carbon and energy until sprouts are capable of independent growth. Transcript profiling of sprouts grown under continuous light or dark conditions was performed using the TIGR 10K EST Solanaceae microarray. The profiles analyzed show a core of highly expressed transcripts that are associated to the reactivation of growth. Under light conditions, the photosynthetic machinery was fully activated; the highest up-regulation was observed for the Rubisco activase (RCA), the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and the Photosystem II 22 kDa protein (CP22) genes, among others. On the other hand, sprouts exposed to continuous darkness elongate longer, and after extended darkness, synthesis of chloroplast components was repressed, the expression of proteases was reduced while genes encoding cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs) and metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors (MPIs) were strongly induced. Northern blot and RT-PCR analysis confirmed that MPI levels correlated with the length of the dark period; however, CPI expression was strong only after longer periods of darkness, suggesting a feedback loop (regulation mechanism) in response to dark-induced senescence. Prevention of cysteine protease activity in etiolated sprouts exposed to extended darkness could delay senescence until they emerge to light. PMID:27075731

  9. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Wlodarczyk, Artur Jacek; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Perestrello Ramos H de Jesus, Maria; King, Brian Christopher; Bakowski, Kamil; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-07-01

    Chloroplasts in plants and algae and photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria are emerging hosts for sustainable production of valuable biochemicals, using only inorganic nutrients, water, CO2 and light as inputs. In the past decade, many bioengineering efforts have focused on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals and complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression of the appropriate pathways, but this requires optimization of carbon flux and reducing power, and a thorough understanding of regulatory pathways. Secretion or storage of the compounds produced can be exploited for the isolation or confinement of the desired compounds. In this review, we explore the use of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria as biosynthetic compartments and hosts, and we estimate the levels of production to be expected from photosynthetic hosts in light of the fraction of electrons and carbon that can potentially be diverted from photosynthesis. The supply of reducing power, in the form of electrons derived from the photosynthetic light reactions, appears to be non-limiting, but redirection of the fixed carbon via precursor molecules presents a challenge. We also discuss the available synthetic biology tools and the need to expand the molecular toolbox to facilitate cellular reprogramming for increased production yields in both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. PMID:27005523

  10. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos;

    2016-01-01

    on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals, as well as complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression...

  11. Role of the chloroplast in the predatory dinoflagellate Karlodinium armiger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berge, Terje; Hansen, Per Juel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Karlodinium armiger is a phagotrophic dinoflagellate that synthesizes several small chloroplasts of haptophyte origin. It depends on light, but it grows very poorly in standard nutrient growth media (f/2) without food. When fed prey in the light, growth rates increase dramatically (µ=0...

  12. Functional characterization of the chloroplast ferric chelate oxidoreductase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solti, Adám; Müller, Brigitta; Czech, Viktória; Sárvári, Éva; Fodor, Ferenc

    2014-05-01

    Iron (Fe) has an essential role in the biosynthesis of chlorophylls and redox cofactors, and thus chloroplast iron uptake is a process of special importance. The chloroplast ferric chelate oxidoreductase (cFRO) has a crucial role in this process but it is poorly characterized. To study the localization and mechanism of action of cFRO, sugar beet (Beta vulgaris cv Orbis) chloroplast envelope fractions were isolated by gradient ultracentrifugation, and their purity was tested by western blotting against different marker proteins. The ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity of envelope fractions was studied in the presence of NAD(P)H (reductants) and FAD coenzymes. Reduction of Fe(III)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was monitored spectrophotometrically by the Fe(II)-bathophenanthroline disulfonate complex formation. FCR activity, that is production of free Fe(II) for Fe uptake, showed biphasic saturation kinetics, and was clearly associated only to chloroplast inner envelope (cIE) vesicles. The reaction rate was > 2.5 times higher with NADPH than with NADH, which indicates the natural coenzyme preference of cFRO activity and its dependence on photosynthesis. FCR activity of cIE vesicles isolated from Fe-deficient plants also showed clear biphasic kinetics, where the KM of the low affinity component was elevated, and thus this component was down-regulated.

  13. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Dendrobium nobile from Northeastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Sriram; Sundar, Durai

    2016-01-01

    The orchid species Dendrobium nobile belonging to the family Orchidaceae and genus Dendrobium (a vast genus that encompasses nearly 1,200 species) has an herbal medicinal history of about 2000 years in east and south Asian countries. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of D. nobile from northeastern India for the first time.

  14. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Limin; Chen, Chen; Wang, Bin; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Pinellia ternata is an important medicinal plant used in the treatment of cough, to dispel phlegm, to calm vomiting and to terminate early pregnancy, as an anti-ulcer and anti-tumor medicine. In this study, we found that the complete chloroplast genome of Pinellia ternata was 164 013 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats of 25 625 bp separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 89 783 bp and 22 980 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 132 predicted functional genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 transfer RNA genes. The chloroplast DNA is GC-rich (36.7%). The phylogenetic analysis showed a strong sister relationship with Colocasia esculenta, which also strongly supports the position of Pinellia ternata. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pinellia ternata reported here has the potential to advance population and phylogenetic studies of this medicinal plant. PMID:26153849

  15. Mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA based phylogeny of Pelargonium (Geraniaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F.T.; Culham, A.; Pankhurst, C.E.; Gibby, M.

    2000-01-01

    Overall phylogenetic relationships within the genus Pelargonium (Geraniaceae) were inferred based on DNA sequences from mitochondrial(mt)-encoded nad1 b/c exons and from chloroplast(cp)-encoded trnL (UAA) 5' exon-trnF (GAA) exon regions using two species of Geranium and Sarcocaulon vanderetiae as ou

  16. Global Chloroplast Phylogeny and Biogeography of Bracken (Pteridium: Dennstaedtiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    J.P.;; Thomson, J. A.; Stratford, J. K.; Paul G Wolf

    2009-01-01

    Bracken ferns (genus Pteridium) represent an ancient species complex with a natural worldwide distribution. Pteridium has historically been treated as comprising a single species, but recent treatments have recognized several related species. Phenotypic plasticity, geographically structured morphological variation, and geographically biased sampling have all contributed to taxonomic confusion in the genus. We sampled bracken specimens worldwide and used variable regions of the chloroplast gen...

  17. Selenocystamine improves protein accumulation in chloroplasts of eukaryotic green algae

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira-Camargo, Livia S; Tran, Miller; Beld, Joris; Burkart, Michael D.; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic green algae have become an increasingly popular platform for recombinant proteins production. In particular, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, has garnered increased attention for having the necessary biochemical machinery to produce vaccines, human antibodies and next generation cancer targeting immunotoxins. While it has been shown that chloroplasts contain chaperones, peptidyl prolylisomerases and protein disulfide isomerases that facilitate these complex proteins folding and assembly,...

  18. Structure of "Arabidopsis" chloroplastic monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) play important roles in maintaining redox homeostasis in living cells and are conserved across species. "Arabidopsis thaliana" monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp, is critical for protection from oxidative stress in chloroplasts. The crystal structure of AtGRXcp has been de...

  19. Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    The enzymatic activity of a protease was electrically detected using nanopore recordings. A peptide substrate was tethered to microscale beads, and cleavage by the enzyme trypsin released a soluble fragment that was electrophoretically driven through the α-hemolysin protein pore, leading to detectable blockades in the ionic current. Owing to its simplicity, this approach to sense enzymatic activity may be applied to other proteases.

  20. Production of Protease Enzyme from Wheat Straw

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed A. Atiya

    2008-01-01

    Protease enzyme production was studied and optimized as a first step to collect information about solid state fermenter) to produce protease enzyme. A local isolated Aspergillus niger was used for this study with constant spores feeding in every experiment at (105/g). Experiments carried out in conical flasks with (250 ml) containing (10 g) of wheat straw as a substrate with different conditions included temperature, pH, hydration ratio, and fermentation time, the results comprised by measuri...

  1. Senescence-Associated Vacuoles, a Specific Lytic Compartment for Degradation of Chloroplast Proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian A. Carrión

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of chloroplasts and chloroplast components is a distinctive feature of leaf senescence. In spite of its importance in the nutrient economy of plants, knowledge about the mechanism(s involved in the breakdown of chloroplast proteins is incomplete. A novel class of vacuoles, “senescence-associated vacuoles” (SAVs, characterized by intense proteolytic activity appear during senescence in chloroplast-containing cells of leaves. Since SAVs contain some chloroplast proteins, they are candidate organelles to participate in chloroplast breakdown. In this review we discuss the characteristics of SAVs, and their possible involvement in the degradation of Rubisco, the most abundant chloroplast protein. Finally, SAVs are compared with other extra-plastidial protein degradation pathways operating in senescing leaves.

  2. Photosynthetic activity of spinach chloroplasts after isopycnic centrifugation in gradients of silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, J J; Price, C A

    1974-10-01

    Chloroplast suspensions from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) were clearly resolved into intact and stripped chloroplasts by isopycnic centrifugation in density gradients of silica sol ("Ludox") and polyethlene glycol. The intact chloroplasts fixed CO(2) and evolved O(2) more rapidly than the crude suspensions; the stripped chloroplasts were inactive. During the photosynthetic fixation of (14)CO(2) in the intact chloroplasts recovered from the gradient, the (14)C label was observed to spread through the photosynthetic intermediate pools, as well as into starch, which indicates that the purified chloroplasts are metabolically competent. This appears to be the first report of the retention of photosynthetic activity following the purification of chloroplasts in density gradients. PMID:16658922

  3. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  4. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis.

  5. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  6. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  7. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  8. Chloroplast Genome Sequence of the Moss Tortula ruralis: Gene Content and Structural Arrangement Relative to Other Green Plant Chloroplast Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed moss species in the family Pottiaceae, is increasingly being used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of Tortula ruralis, only the second publishe...

  9. Three monoclonal antibodies against the serpin protease nexin-1 prevent protease translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousted, Tina Mostrup; Skjoedt, K; Petersen, S V;

    2013-01-01

    abolish the protease inhibitory activity of PN-1. In the presence of the antibodies, PN-1 does not form a complex with its target proteases, but is recovered in a reactive centre cleaved form. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we mapped the three overlapping epitopes to an area spanning the gap between...

  10. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence reveals stage specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells during Arabidopsis embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo I; Mercado, Ana V; Meisel, Lee A

    2010-01-01

    The basic body plan of a plant is established early in embryogenesis when cells differentiate, giving rise to the apical and basal regions of the embryo. Using chlorophyll fluorescence as a marker for chloroplasts, we have detected specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells at specific stages of embryogenesis. Non-randomly distributed chloroplast-containing cells are seen as early as the globular stage of embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. In the heart stage of embryogenesis, chloroplast containing cells are detected in epidermal cells as well as a central region of the heart stage embryo, forming a triangular septum of chloroplast-containing cells that divides the embryo into three equal sectors. Torpedo stage embryos have chloroplast-containing epidermal cells and a central band of chloroplast-containing cells in the cortex layer, just below the shoot apical meristem. In the walking-stick stage of embryogenesis, chloroplasts are present in the epidermal, cortex and endodermal cells. The chloroplasts appear reduced or absent from the provascular and columella cells of walking-stick stage embryos. These results suggest that there is a tight regulation of plastid differentiation during embryogenesis that generates specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells in specific cell layers at specific stages of embryogenesis.

  11. Pb-induced avoidance-like chloroplast movements in fronds of Lemna trisulca L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Samardakiewicz

    Full Text Available Lead ions are particularly dangerous to the photosynthetic apparatus, but little is known about the effects of trace metals, including Pb, on regulation of chloroplast redistribution. In this study a new effect of lead on chloroplast distribution patterns and movements was demonstrated in mesophyll cells of a small-sized aquatic angiosperm Lemna trisulca L. (star duckweed. An analysis of confocal microscopy images of L. trisulca fronds treated with lead (15 μM Pb2+, 24 h in darkness or in weak white light revealed an enhanced accumulation of chloroplasts in the profile position along the anticlinal cell walls, in comparison to untreated plants. The rearrangement of chloroplasts in their response to lead ions in darkness was similar to the avoidance response of chloroplasts in plants treated with strong white light. Transmission electron microscopy X-ray microanalysis showed that intracellular chloroplast arrangement was independent of the location of Pb deposits, suggesting that lead causes redistribution of chloroplasts, which looks like a light-induced avoidance response, but is not a real avoidance response to the metal. Furthermore, a similar redistribution of chloroplasts in L. trisulca cells in darkness was observed also under the influence of exogenously applied hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. In addition, we detected an enhanced accumulation of endogenous H2O2 after treatment of plants with lead. Interestingly, H2O2-specific scavenger catalase partly abolished the Pb-induced chloroplast response. These results suggest that H2O2 can be involved in the avoidance-like movement of chloroplasts induced by lead. Analysis of photometric measurements revealed also strong inhibition (but not complete of blue-light-induced chloroplast movements by lead. This inhibition may result from disturbances in the actin cytoskeleton, as we observed fragmentation and disappearance of actin filaments around chloroplasts. Results of this study show that the

  12. Cleavage entropy as quantitative measure of protease specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian E Fuchs

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity.

  13. Learning the Languages of the Chloroplast: Retrograde Signaling and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Crisp, Peter; McQuinn, Ryan; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-04-29

    The chloroplast can act as an environmental sensor, communicating with the cell during biogenesis and operation to change the expression of thousands of proteins. This process, termed retrograde signaling, regulates expression in response to developmental cues and stresses that affect photosynthesis and yield. Recent advances have identified many signals and pathways-including carotenoid derivatives, isoprenes, phosphoadenosines, tetrapyrroles, and heme, together with reactive oxygen species and proteins-that build a communication network to regulate gene expression, RNA turnover, and splicing. However, retrograde signaling pathways have been viewed largely as a means of bilateral communication between organelles and nuclei, ignoring their potential to interact with hormone signaling and the cell as a whole to regulate plant form and function. Here, we discuss new findings on the processes by which organelle communication is initiated, transmitted, and perceived, not only to regulate chloroplastic processes but also to intersect with cellular signaling and alter physiological responses. PMID:26735063

  14. The complete chloroplast genome of North American ginseng, Panax quinquefolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zeng-Jie; Li, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    We report complete nucleotide sequence of the Panax quinquefolius chloroplast genome using next-generation sequencing technology. The genome size is 156 359 bp, including two inverted repeats (IRs) of 52 153 bp, separated by the large single-copy (LSC 86 184 bp) and small single-copy (SSC 18 081 bp) regions. This cp genome encodes 114 unigenes (80 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 30 tRNA genes), in which 18 are duplicated in the IR regions. Overall GC content of the genome is 38.08%. A phylogenomic analysis of the 10 complete chloroplast genomes from Araliaceae using Daucus carota from Apiaceae as outgroup showed that P. quinquefolius is closely related to the other two members of the genus Panax, P. ginseng and P. notoginseng. PMID:27158867

  15. The complete chloroplast genome of Torreya fargesii (Taxaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ke; Gao, Lei; Li, Jia; Chen, Shanshan; Su, Yingjuan; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Torreya fargesii (Taxaceae), a relic plant endemic to China, is presented in this study. The genome is 137 075 bp in length, with 35.47% average GC content. One copy of the large inverted repeats is lost from this genome. The T. fargesii chloroplast genome encodes 118 unique genes, in which trnI-CAU, trnQ-UUG, trnN-GUU are duplicated. Protein-coding, tRNA and rRNA genes represent 54.7%, 1.9% and 3.4% of the genome, respectively. There are 17 intron-containing genes, of which 6 are tRNA genes. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed a strong sister relationship between Torreya and Amentotaxus. PMID:27158868

  16. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Fagopyrum cymosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Lu, Chaolong; Shen, Qi; Yan, Yuying; Xu, Changjiang; Song, Chi

    2016-07-01

    Fagopyrum cymosum is a traditional medicinal plant. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Fagopyrum cymosum is presented. The total genome size is 160,546 bp in length, containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 32,598 bp, separated by large single copy (LSC) and small single copy (SSC) of 84,237 bp and 11,014 bp, respectively. Overall GC contents of the genome were 36.9%. The chloroplast genome harbors 126 annotated genes, including 91 protein coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and six rRNA genes. Eighteen genes contain one or two introns. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a clear evolutionary relationship among species of Caryophyllales. PMID:26119127

  17. Signal integration by chloroplast phosphorylation networks: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eSchoenberg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Forty years after the initial discovery of light-dependent protein phosphorylation at the thylakoid membrane system, we are now beginning to understand the roles of chloroplast phosphorylation networks in their function to decode and mediate information on the metabolic status of the organelle to long-term adaptations in plastid and nuclear gene expression. With the help of genetics and functional genomics tools, chloroplast kinases and several hundred phosphoproteins were identified that now await detailed functional characterization. The regulation and the target protein spectrum of some kinases are understood, but this information is fragmentary with respect to kinase and target protein crosstalk in a changing environment. In this review we will highlight the most recent advances in the field and discuss approaches that might lead to a comprehensive understanding of plastid signal integration by protein phosphorylation.

  18. Subtilisin-like proteases in nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Catherine B; Jin, Jingmin; McReynolds, Larry A

    2007-09-01

    Cleavage by subtilisin-like proteases (subtilases) is an essential step in post-translational processing of proteins found in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Our knowledge of the diversity of this protease family in nematodes is aided by the rapid increase in sequence information, especially from the Brugia malayi genome project. Genetic studies of the subtilases in Caenorhabitis elegans give valuable insight into the biological function of these proteases in other nematode species. In this review, we focus on the subtilases in filarial nematodes as well as other parasitic and free-living nematodes in comparison to what is known in C. elegans. Topics to be addressed include expansion and diversity of the subtilase gene family during evolution, enhanced complexity created by alternative RNA splicing, molecular and biochemical characterization of the different subtilases and the challenges of designing subtilase-specific inhibitors for parasitic nematodes. PMID:17570539

  19. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  20. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Janek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data provide information in support of the research article, “The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors” (Janek et al., 2016 [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans.

  1. Localized hypermutation and associated gene losses in legume chloroplast genomes

    OpenAIRE

    KAVANAGH, THOMAS; WOLFE, KENNETH; POWELL, ANTOINETTE

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Point mutations result from errors made during DNA replication or repair, so they are usually expected to be homogeneous across all regions of a genome. However, we have found a region of chloroplast DNA in plants related to sweetpea (Lathyrus) whose local point mutation rate is at least 20 times higher than elsewhere in the same molecule. There are very few precedents for such heterogeneity in any genome, and we suspect that the hypermutable region may be subject to an unusual p...

  2. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  3. Study on Chloroplast Ultrastructure in Different Color Period of Euphorbia pulcherrima

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jia; NIU De; WANG Lijuan

    2008-01-01

    By the observation of chloroplast ultrastructure in different period of bract colors of Euphorbia pulcherrima,the paper studied the change of chloroplast ultrastructrural in the transition process of bract colors, identified the rehtionship between E.pulcherrima color change and the chloroplast ultrastructure to provide theorical bases for the cultivation management and further study of E.pulcherrima.Ultrastructural study showed that in the process of change from green to red,the chloroplast of bracts disintegrated gradually,lamellar structure was destroyed gradually,and the content of chloroplasts in mesophyll cells was also reduced gradually. When bracts color resumed to turn green gradually,the content of chloroplasts in mesophyll cells was also increased gradually.

  4. Enteroviral proteases: structure, host interactions and pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Olli H; Svedin, Emma; Kapell, Sebastian; Nurminen, Anssi; Hytönen, Vesa P; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin

    2016-07-01

    Enteroviruses are common human pathogens, and infections are particularly frequent in children. Severe infections can lead to a variety of diseases, including poliomyelitis, aseptic meningitis, myocarditis and neonatal sepsis. Enterovirus infections have also been implicated in asthmatic exacerbations and type 1 diabetes. The large disease spectrum of the closely related enteroviruses may be partially, but not fully, explained by differences in tissue tropism. The molecular mechanisms by which enteroviruses cause disease are poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence that the two enteroviral proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) , are important mediators of pathology. These proteases perform the post-translational proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein, but they also cleave several host-cell proteins in order to promote the production of new virus particles, as well as to evade the cellular antiviral immune responses. Enterovirus-associated processing of cellular proteins may also contribute to pathology, as elegantly demonstrated by the 2A(pro) -mediated cleavage of dystrophin in cardiomyocytes contributing to Coxsackievirus-induced cardiomyopathy. It is likely that improved tools to identify targets for these proteases will reveal additional host protein substrates that can be linked to specific enterovirus-associated diseases. Here, we discuss the function of the enteroviral proteases in the virus replication cycle and review the current knowledge regarding how these proteases modulate the infected cell in order to favour virus replication, including ways to avoid detection by the immune system. We also highlight new possibilities for the identification of protease-specific cellular targets and thereby a way to discover novel mechanisms contributing to disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27145174

  5. Chloroplast quality control - balancing energy production and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, Jesse D

    2016-10-01

    Contents 36 I. 36 II. 37 III. 37 IV. 38 V. 39 VI. 40 VII. 40 40 References 40 SUMMARY: All organisms require the ability to sense their surroundings and adapt. Such capabilities allow them to thrive in a wide range of habitats. This is especially true for plants, which are sessile and have to be genetically equipped to withstand every change in their environment. Plants and other eukaryotes use their energy-producing organelles (i.e. mitochondria and chloroplasts) as such sensors. In response to a changing cellular or external environment, these organelles can emit 'retrograde' signals that alter gene expression and/or cell physiology. This signaling is important in plants, fungi, and animals and impacts diverse cellular functions including photosynthesis, energy production/storage, stress responses, growth, cell death, ageing, and tumor progression. Originally, chloroplast retrograde signals in plants were known to lead to the reprogramming of nuclear transcription. New research, however, has pointed to additional posttranslational mechanisms that lead to chloroplast regulation and turnover in response to stress. Such mechanisms involve singlet oxygen, ubiquitination, the 26S proteasome, and cellular degradation machinery. PMID:27533783

  6. Chloroplast ultrastructure in leaves of Cucumis sativus chlorophyll mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Palczewska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The developing and young leaves of Cucumis sativus chlorophyll mutants are yellow, when mature they become green and do not differ in their colour from those of control plants. The mesophyll of yellow leaves contains a diversiform plastid population with a varying degree of defectiveness, which is mainly manifested in the reduction or disorganization of the typical thylakoid system. DNA areas, ribosome-like particles and aggregates of electron-dense material are preserved in the stroma of mutated plastids. Starch grains are deficient. Apart from mutated plastids, chloroplasts with a normal structure, as in control plants, were also observed.The leaf greening process is accompanied by a reconstruction and rearrangement of the inner chloroplast lamellar system and an ability to accumulate starch. However, in the mutant chloroplasts as compared with control-plant ones, an irregular arrangement of grana and reduced number of inter-grana thylakoids can be seen. An osmiophilic substance stored in the stroma of mutated plastids and the vesicles formed from an internal plastid membrane take part in restoration of the membrane system.

  7. Carbonic anhydrase activity in isolated chloroplasts of chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a new assay of carbonic anhydrase, NaH14CO3 solution at the bottom of a sealed vessel releases 14CO3 which diffuses to the top of the vessel to be assimilated by actively photosynthesizing Chlamydomonas cells. The assay is initiated by illuminating cells and stopped by turning the light off and killing the cells with acid. Enzyme activity was estimated from acid stable radioactivity above the uncatalyzed background level. With bovine carbonic anhydrase, 1.5 Wilbur Anderson Unit (WAU) can be consistantly measured at 5-6 fold above background. Sonicated whole cells of air adapted wild type (+)gave 741.1 ± 12.4 WAU/mg chl. Intact washed cells of mixotrophically grown wall-less mutant CWD(-) and a high CO2 requiring wall-less double mutant CIA-3/CW15 (-) gave 7.1 ± 1.9 and 2.8 ± 7.8 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplasts isolated from CWD and CIA-3/CW15 and subsequently disrupted gave 64.0 ± 14.7 and 2.8 ± 3.2 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplast sonicate from another wall-less mutant CW15(-) gave activity comparable to CWD. Thus on a chlorophyll basis, enzyme activity in chloroplasts from mixotrophically grown cells is about 1/10th of the level found in air adapted wild type cells. CIA-3 seems to lack this activity

  8. Chloroplast retrograde regulation of heat stress responses in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Zhen eSun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the primary susceptible targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. In recent years several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS and organellar gene expression (OGE in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation and cellular coordination in plants.

  9. Pea amyloplast DNA is qualitatively similar to pea chloroplast DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloplast DNA (apDNA), when subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases, yields patterns nearly identical to that of DNA from mature pea chloroplasts (ctDNA). Southern transfers of apDNA and ctDNA, probed with the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), shows hybridization to the expected restriction fragments for both apDNA and ctDNA. However, Northern transfers of total RNA from chloroplasts and amyloplasts, probed again with the LS gene of Rubisco, shows that no detectable LS meggage is found in amyloplasts although LS expression in mature chloroplasts is high. Likewise, two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of etiolated gravisensitive pea tissue shows that both large and small subunits of Rubisco are conspicuously absent; however, in greening tissue these two constitute the major soluble proteins. These findings suggest that although the informational content of these two organelle types is equivalent, gene expression is quite different and is presumably under nuclear control.

  10. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  11. Hydrolysis of Fish Protein by Analkaline Protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cod muscle protein was hydrolyzed by an alkaline protease in our study. The influences of hydrolysis temperature,fish protein concentration,and ratio of protease addition to protein amount on its degree of hy drolysis (DH) of protein were studied in details by applying dual quadratic rotary combinational design. The final results showed that more than 84% cod muscle protein could be hydrolyzed and recovered. Cod protein hydrolysate thus obtained had a balanced amino acid composition and mainly consisted of small peptides with molecule weight less than 6900 dalton.

  12. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly...... increased. Finally, the effect of multivalent display of upain-2 was investigated. Several dimers of upain-2 were made and the attachment of upain-2 via the Copper-catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) onto an alkyne functionalized carbohydrate scaffold was investigated. Besides the synthesis...

  13. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...... pocket, its carbonyl group aligning improperly relative to Ser195 and the oxyanion hole, explaining why the peptide is an inhibitor rather than a substrate. Substitution of the P1 Arg with novel unnatural Arg analogues with aliphatic or aromatic ring structures led to an increased affinity, depending...... of this peptidic inhibitor, a concept different from conventional attempts at improving inhibitor affinity by reducing the entropic burden....

  14. CDP1, a novel component of chloroplast division site positioning system in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhang; Yong Hu; Jingjing Jia; Dapeng Li; Runjie Zhang; Hongbo Gao; Yikun He

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts are plant-specific organelles that evolved from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria. They divide through binary fission. Selection of the chloroplast division site is pivotal for the symmetric chloroplast division. In E. coli, positioning of the division site at the midpoint of the cell is regulated by dynamic oscillation of the Min system, which includes MinC, MinD and MinE. Homologs of Mind and MinE in plants are involved in chloroplast division. The homolog of MinC still has not been identified in higher plants. However, an FtsZ-like protein, ARC3, was found to be involved in chloroplast division site positioning. Here, we report that chloroplast division site positioning 1 (AtCDP1) is a novel chloroplast division protein involved in chloroplast division site placement in Arabidopsis. AtCDP1 was dis-covered by screening an Arabidopsis cDNA expression library in bacteria for colonies with a cell division phenotype. AtCDP1 is exclusively expressed in young green tissues in Arabidopsis. Elongated chloroplasts with multiple division sites were observed in the loss-of-function cdpl mutant. Overexpression of AtCDPI caused a chloroplast division phe-notype too. Protein interaction assays suggested that AtCDP1 may mediate the chloroplast division site positioning through the interaction with ARC3. Overall, our results indicate that AtCDP1 is a novel component of the chloroplast division site positioning system, and the working mechanism of this system is different from that of the traditional MinCDE system in prokaryotic cells.

  15. Combined effects of light and water stress on chloroplast volume regulation.

    OpenAIRE

    McCain, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance technique was used to measure changes in the water content of Acer platanoides chloroplasts in leaf discs that had reached osmotic equilibrium with external solutions either in the dark or under exposure to light. Results showed that chloroplast volume regulation (CVR) maintained constant water content in the chloroplasts over a range of water potentials in the dark, but CVR failed when the water potential fell below a critical value. The critical potential was lo...

  16. Blocking the Metabolism of Starch Breakdown Products in Arabidopsis Leaves Triggers Chloroplast Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Stettler, Michaela; Eicke, Simona; Mettler, Tabea; Messerli, Gaëlle; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2009-01-01

    In most plants, a large fraction of photo-assimilated carbon is stored in the chloroplasts during the day as starch and remobilized during the subsequent night to support metabolism. Mutations blocking either starch synthesis or starch breakdown in Arabidopsis thaliana reduce plant growth. Maltose is the major product of starch breakdown exported from the chloroplast at night. The maltose excess 1 mutant (mex1), which lacks the chloroplast envelope maltose transporter, accumulates high levels...

  17. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  18. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  19. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  20. Sonication-based isolation and enrichment of Chlorella protothecoides chloroplasts for illumina genome sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelova, Angelina [University of Arizona; Park, Sang-Hycuk [University of Arizona; Kyndt, John [Bellevue University; Fitzsimmons, Kevin [University of Arizona; Brown, Judith K [University of Arizona

    2013-09-01

    With the increasing world demand for biofuel, a number of oleaginous algal species are being considered as renewable sources of oil. Chlorella protothecoides Krüger synthesizes triacylglycerols (TAGs) as storage compounds that can be converted into renewable fuel utilizing an anabolic pathway that is poorly understood. The paucity of algal chloroplast genome sequences has been an important constraint to chloroplast transformation and for studying gene expression in TAGs pathways. In this study, the intact chloroplasts were released from algal cells using sonication followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, resulting in a 2.36-fold enrichment of chloroplasts from C. protothecoides, based on qPCR analysis. The C. protothecoides chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform and found to be 84,576 Kb in size (8.57 Kb) in size, with a GC content of 30.8 %. This is the first report of an optimized protocol that uses a sonication step, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, to release and enrich intact chloroplasts from a microalga (C. prototheocoides) of sufficient quality to permit chloroplast genome sequencing with high coverage, while minimizing nuclear genome contamination. The approach is expected to guide chloroplast isolation from other oleaginous algal species for a variety of uses that benefit from enrichment of chloroplasts, ranging from biochemical analysis to genomics studies.

  1. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report, August 1995--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1997-06-17

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focused on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The research focused on the isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  2. Use of Silica Sol Step Gradients to Prepare Bundle Sheath and Mesophyll Chloroplasts from Panicum maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walbot, V

    1977-07-01

    The first method for the direct separation of mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts from whole tissue homogenates of a C(4) plant is described. Centrifugation of mixed chloroplast preparations from Panicum maximum through low viscosity silica sol gradients effectively separates large, starch-containing chloroplasts from smaller plastids. The large chloroplasts are judged to be bundle sheath chloroplasts on the basis of microscopic appearance, the presence of starch grains, the protein complement displayed on sodium dodecyl sulfate acrylamide gels, and the exclusive localization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity in these plastids. As a measure of intactness both the large (bundle sheath) and small (mesophyll) chloroplasts contain glyceralde-hyde-3-phosphate NADP-dependent dehydrogenase activity that is greatly enhanced by plastid lysis and both chloroplast preparations are impermeable to deoxyribonuclease. Chloroplast enzyme activities are inhibited by silica sol due to the Mg(2+) chelating activity of this reagent. However, well washed chloroplasts separated on silica gradients had enzyme activities similar to reported values in which silica sol gradients were not used. PMID:16660019

  3. ppGpp inhibits peptide elongation cycle of chloroplast translation system in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yuhta; Takabayashi, Taito; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Yasushi; Sattasuk, Kwanchanok; Akita, Mitsuru; Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts possess common biosynthetic pathways for generating guanosine 3',5'-(bis)pyrophosphate (ppGpp) from GDP and ATP by RelA-SpoT homolog enzymes. To date, several hypothetical targets of ppGpp in chloroplasts have been suggested, but they remain largely unverified. In this study, we have investigated effects of ppGpp on translation apparatus in chloroplasts by developing in vitro protein synthesis system based on an extract of chloroplasts isolated from pea (Pisum sativum). The chloroplast extracts showed stable protein synthesis activity in vitro, and the activity was sensitive to various types of antibiotics. We have demonstrated that ppGpp inhibits the activity of chloroplast translation in dose-effective manner, as does the toxic nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate (GDPNP). We further examined polyuridylic acid-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis as a measure of peptide elongation activity in the pea chloroplast extract. Both ppGpp and GDPNP as well as antibiotics, fusidic acid and thiostrepton, inhibited the peptide elongation cycle of the translation system, but GDP in the similar range of the tested ppGpp concentration did not affect the activity. Our results thus show that ppGpp directly affect the translation system of chloroplasts, as they do that of bacteria. We suggest that the role of the ppGpp signaling system in translation in bacteria is conserved in the translation system of chloroplasts.

  4. Overexpression of Elastin Affects the Protease to Anti-Protease Balance and Protects Mice from Colitis. : Elafin protects from colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Motta*, Jean-Paul; Magne, Laurent; Descamps, Delphyne; Rolland, Corinne; Squarzoni-Dale, Camila; Rousset, Perrine; Balloy, Viviane; Huerre, Michel; Jenne, Dieter; Wartelle, Julien; Belaaouaj, Azzaq; Mas, Emmanuel; Vinel, Jean-Pierre; Alric, Laurent; Chignard, Michel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS:: Colon tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been reported to have increased proteolytic activity, but no studies have clearly addressed the protease to anti-protease balance in the pathogenesis of colitis. We investigated the role of Elafin, a serine protease inhibitor expressed by skin and mucosal surfaces in human inflammatory conditions, and the proteases neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase-3 (PR-3), in mice with colitis. METHODS:: We studie...

  5. MICROSPHERE-BASED FLOW CYTOMETRY PROTEASE ASSAYS FOR USE IN PROTEASE ACTIVITY DETECTION AND HIGH-THROUGHPUT SCREENING

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Zhu, Jingshu; Sklar, Larry A.; Graves, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes microsphere-based protease assays for use in flow cytometry and high-throughput screening. This platform measures a loss of fluorescence from the surface of a microsphere due to the cleavage of an attached fluorescent protease substrate by a suitable protease enzyme. The assay format can be adapted to any site or protein specific protease of interest and results can be measured in both real time and as end point fluorescence assays on a flow cytometer. End point assays...

  6. Bacterial proteases: targets for diagnostics and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. Kaman; J.P. Hays; H.P. Endtz; F.J. Bikker

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are essential for the proliferation and growth of bacteria, and are also known to contribute to bacterial virulence. This makes them interesting candidates as diagnostic and therapeutic targets for infectious diseases. In this review, the authors discuss the most recent developments and po

  7. Characterization of a secreted Chlamydia protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Allan C; Vandahl, Brian; Larsen, Martin Røssel;

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydia. Several secretion candidates from Chlamydia trachomatis D and Chlamydia pneumoniae were detected by this method. Two protein spots were identified among the candidates. These represent fragments of the 'chlamydial protease- or proteasome-like activity factor' (CPAF) and were clearly present in 2D...... fragments of CPAF exist in C. pneumoniae as well as in C. trachomatis....

  8. Proteases and Protease Inhibitors of Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Diabetic Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Musante; Dorota Tataruch; Dongfeng Gu; Xinyu Liu; Carol Forsblom; Per-Henrik Groop; Harry Holthofer

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and, ultimately, is the main cause for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Beyond urinary albumin, no reliable biomarkers are available for accurate early diagnostics. Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) have recently emerged as an interesting source of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers. Here we used a protease and respective protease inhibitor array to profi...

  9. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs: Biogenesis and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Dautin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins.

  10. Bacterial retropepsin-like proteases : the evidence from Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Paulo Alexandre Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    A familia A2 de proteases aspárticas é constituida maioritariamente por proteases encontradas em retrovírus – as retropepsinas. As teorias evolutivas inerentes a estas proteases normalmente referem que estarão relacionadas com proteases do tipo pepsina pertencentes à familia A1 de proteases aspárticas. Pela primeira teoria (geralmente a mais aceite), durante a infeção de uma célula eucariota por um retrovírus, o gene da retropepsina terá sofrido duplicação e fusão dando orig...

  11. Comparative Study on the Protease Inhibitors from Fish Eggs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ustadi; K.Y.Kim; S.M.Kim

    2005-01-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and 16.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 U mg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50 - 65 ℃ and pH 8,which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant (Ki) of 4.44 nmol L-1.

  12. New directions for protease inhibitors directed drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yoshio; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2016-11-01

    Proteases play crucial roles in various biological processes, and their activities are essential for all living organisms-from viruses to humans. Since their functions are closely associated with many pathogenic mechanisms, their inhibitors or activators are important molecular targets for developing treatments for various diseases. Here, we describe drugs/drug candidates that target proteases, such as malarial plasmepsins, β-secretase, virus proteases, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Previously, we reported inhibitors of aspartic proteases, such as renin, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease, human T-lymphotropic virus type I protease, plasmepsins, and β-secretase, as drug candidates for hypertension, adult T-cell leukaemia, human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy, malaria, and Alzheimer's disease. Our inhibitors are also described in this review article as examples of drugs that target proteases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 563-579, 2016. PMID:26584340

  13. Two interacting coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 and PMI2, maintain the chloroplast photorelocation movement velocity in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-01-01

    Chloroplasts move toward weak light (accumulation response) and away from strong light (avoidance response). The fast and accurate movement of chloroplasts in response to ambient light conditions is essential for efficient photosynthesis and photodamage prevention in chloroplasts. Here, we report that two Arabidopsis mutants, weak chloroplast movement under blue light 1 (web1) and web2, are defective in both the avoidance and the accumulation responses. Map-based cloning revealed that both ge...

  14. A comparative approach to elucidate chloroplast genome replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Neeraja M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electron microscopy analyses of replicating chloroplast molecules earlier predicted bidirectional Cairns replication as the prevalent mechanism, perhaps followed by rounds of a rolling circle mechanism. This standard model is being challenged by the recent proposition of homologous recombination-mediated replication in chloroplasts. Results We address this issue in our current study by analyzing nucleotide composition in genome regions between known replication origins, with an aim to reveal any adenine to guanine deamination gradients. These gradual linear gradients typically result from the accumulation of deaminations over the time spent single-stranded by one of the strands of the circular molecule during replication and can, therefore, be used to model the course of replication. Our linear regression analyses on the nucleotide compositions of the non-coding regions and the synonymous third codon position of coding regions, between pairs of replication origins, reveal the existence of significant adenine to guanine deamination gradients in portions overlapping the Small Single Copy (SSC and the Large Single Copy (LSC regions between inverted repeats. These gradients increase bi-directionally from the center of each region towards the respective ends, suggesting that both the strands were left single-stranded during replication. Conclusion Single-stranded regions of the genome and gradients in time that these regions are left single-stranded, as revealed by our nucleotide composition analyses, appear to converge with the original bi-directional dual displacement loop model and restore evidence for its existence as the primary mechanism. Other proposed faster modes such as homologous recombination and rolling circle initiation could exist in addition to this primary mechanism to facilitate homoplasmy among the intra-cellular chloroplast population

  15. Analysis of Acorus calamus chloroplast genome and its phylogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Holland, Barbara; Hirsch-Ernst, Karen I; Hellwig, Frank H

    2005-09-01

    Determining the phylogenetic relationships among the major lines of angiosperms is a long-standing problem, yet the uncertainty as to the phylogenetic affinity of these lines persists. While a number of studies have suggested that the ANITA (Amborella-Nymphaeales-Illiciales-Trimeniales-Aristolochiales) grade is basal within angiosperms, studies of complete chloroplast genome sequences also suggested an alternative tree, wherein the line leading to the grasses branches first among the angiosperms. To improve taxon sampling in the existing chloroplast genome data, we sequenced the chloroplast genome of the monocot Acorus calamus. We generated a concatenated alignment (89,436 positions for 15 taxa), encompassing almost all sequences usable for phylogeny reconstruction within spermatophytes. The data still contain support for both the ANITA-basal and grasses-basal hypotheses. Using simulations we can show that were the ANITA-basal hypothesis true, parsimony (and distance-based methods with many models) would be expected to fail to recover it. The self-evident explanation for this failure appears to be a long-branch attraction (LBA) between the clade of grasses and the out-group. However, this LBA cannot explain the discrepancies observed between tree topology recovered using the maximum likelihood (ML) method and the topologies recovered using the parsimony and distance-based methods when grasses are deleted. Furthermore, the fact that neither maximum parsimony nor distance methods consistently recover the ML tree, when according to the simulations they would be expected to, when the out-group (Pinus) is deleted, suggests that either the generating tree is not correct or the best symmetric model is misspecified (or both). We demonstrate that the tree recovered under ML is extremely sensitive to model specification and that the best symmetric model is misspecified. Hence, we remain agnostic regarding phylogenetic relationships among basal angiosperm lineages.

  16. Functional proteomics of barley and barley chloroplasts – strategies, methods and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jørgen; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    tolerance, micronutrient utilization, and photosynthesis in barley. In the present review we present the current state of proteomics research for investigations of barley chloroplasts, i.e., the organelle that contain the photosynthetic apparatus in the plant. We describe several different proteomics...... strategies and discuss their applications in characterization of the barley chloroplast as well as future perspectives for functional proteomics in barley research....

  17. The Unicellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an Experimental System to Study Chloroplast RNA Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelsen, J.; Kück, U.

    Chloroplasts are typical organelles of photoautotrophic eukaryotic cells which drive a variety of functions, including photosynthesis. For many years the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as an experimental organism for studying photosynthetic processes. The recent development of molecular tools for this organism together with efficient methods of genetic analysis and the availability of many photosynthesis mutants has now made this alga a powerful model system for the analysis of chloroplast biogenesis. For example, techniques have been developed to transfer recombinant DNA into both the nuclear and the chloroplast genome. This allows both complementation tests and analyses of gene functions in vivo. Moreover, site-specific DNA recombinations in the chloroplast allow targeted gene disruption experiments which enable a "reverse genetics" to be performed. The potential of the algal system for the study of chloroplast biogenesis is illustrated in this review by the description of regulatory systems of gene expression involved in organelle biogenesis. One example concerns the regulation of trans-splicing of chloroplast mRNAs, a process which is controlled by both multiple nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded factors. The second example involves the stabilization of chloroplast mRNAs. The available data lead us predict distinct RNA elements, which interact with trans-acting factors to protect the RNA against nucleolytic attacks.

  18. Treatment with antibiotics that interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis inhibits chloroplast division in the desmid Closterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Charophytes is a green algal group closely related to land plants. We investigated the effects of antibiotics that interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis on chloroplast division in the desmid Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex. To detect cells just after division, we used colchicine, which inhibits Closterium cell elongation after division. Although normal Closterium cells had two chloroplasts before and after cell division, cells treated with ampicillin, D-cycloserine, or fosfomycin had only one chloroplast after cell division, suggesting that the cells divided without chloroplast division. The antibiotics bacitracin and vancomycin showed no obvious effect. Electron microscopic observation showed that irregular-shaped chloroplasts existed in ampicillin-treated Closterium cells. Because antibiotic treatments resulted in the appearance of long cells with irregular chloroplasts and cell death, we counted cell types in the culture. The results suggested that cells with one chloroplast appeared first and then a huge chloroplast was generated that inhibited cell division, causing elongation followed by cell death.

  19. Evolution from the prokaryotic to the higher plant chloroplast signal recognition particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Träger, Chantal; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Ziehe, Dominik;

    2012-01-01

    The protein targeting signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway in chloroplasts of higher plants has undergone dramatic evolutionary changes. It disposed of its RNA, which is an essential SRP component in bacteria, and uses a unique chloroplast-specific protein cpSRP43. Nevertheless, homologs of ...

  20. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Curcuma flaviflora (Curcuma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Deng, Jiabin; Li, Yangyi; Gao, Gang; Ding, Chunbang; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Yonghong; Yang, Ruiwu

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome of Curcuma flaviflora, a medicinal plant in Southeast Asia, was sequenced. The genome size was 160 478 bp in length, with 36.3% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 26 946 bp were separated by a large single copy (LSC) of 88 008 bp and a small single copy (SSC) of 18 578 bp, respectively. The cp genome contained 132 annotated genes, including 79 protein coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. And 19 of these genes were duplicated in inverted repeat regions. PMID:26367332

  1. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Cameron D; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J; Wall, Daniel M; Burchmore, Richard J S; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  2. Chloroplast transformation of Platymonas (Tetraselmis subcordiformis with the bar gene as selectable marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Cui

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to establish a chloroplast transformation technique for Platymonas (Tetraselmis subcordiformis. Employing the gfp gene as a reporter and the bar gene as a selectable marker, transformation vectors of P. subcordiformis chloroplast were constructed with endogenous fragments rrn16S-trnI (left and trnA-rrn23S (right as a recombination site of the chloroplast genome. The plasmids were transferred into P. subcordiformis via particle bombardment. Confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated that the green fluorescence protein was localized in the chloroplast of P. subcordiformis, confirming the activity of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii promoter. Cells transformed with the bar gene were selected using the herbicide Basta. Resistant colonies were analyzed by PCR and Southern blotting, and the results indicated that the bar gene was successfully integrated into the chloroplast genome via homologous recombination. The technique will improve genetic engineering of this alga.

  3. Update on Chloroplast Research: New Tools, New Topics, and New Trends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ute Armbruster; Paolo Pesaresi; Mathias Pribil; Alexander Hertle; Dario Leister

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts, the green differentiation form of plastids, are the sites of photosynthesis and other important plant functions. Genetic and genomic technologies have greatly boosted the rate of discovery and functional characterization of chloroplast proteins during the past decade. Indeed, data obtained using high-throughput methodologies, in particular proteomics and transcriptomics, are now routinely used to assign functions to chloroplast proteins. Our knowledge of many chloroplast processes, notably photosynthesis and photorespiration, has reached such an advanced state that biotechnological approaches to crop improvement now seem feasible. Meanwhile, efforts to identify the entire complement of chloroplast proteins and their interactions are progressing rapidly, making the organelle a prime target for systems biology research in plants.

  4. YGL9, encoding the putative chloroplast signal recognition particle 43 kDa protein in rice, is involved in chloroplast development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-wei; LI Yun-feng; LING Ying-hua; SANG Xian-chun; HE Guang-hua; ZHANG Tian-quan; XING Ya-di; ZENG Xiao-qin; WANG Ling; LIU Zhong-xian; SHI Jun-qiong; ZHU Xiao-yan; MA Ling

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear-encoded light-harvesting chlorophyla/b-binding proteins (LHCPs) are speciifcaly translocated from the stroma into the thylakoid membrane through the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) pathway. The cpSRP is composed of a cpSRP43 protein and a cpSRP54 protein, and it forms a soluble transit complex with LHCP in the chloroplast stroma. Here, we identiifed theYGL9gene that is predicted to encode the probable rice cpSRP43 protein from a rice yelow-green leaf mutant. A phylogenetic tree showed that an important conserved protein family, cpSRP43, is present in almost al green photosynthetic organisms such as higher plants and green algae. Sequence analysis showed that YGL9 comprises a chloroplast transit peptide, three chromodomains and four ankyrin repeats, and the chromodomains and ankyrin repeats are probably involved in protein-protein interactions. Subcelular localization showed that YGL9 is localized in the chloroplast. Expression pattern analysis indicated thatYGL9is mainly expressed in green leaf sheaths and leaves. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of genes associated with pigment metabolism, chloroplast development and photosynthesis were distinctly affected in theygl9mutant. These results indicated thatYGL9 is possibly involved in pigment metabolism, chloroplast development and photosynthesis in rice.

  5. Chloroplast genome sequence of the moss Tortula ruralis: gene content, polymorphism, and structural arrangement relative to other green plant chloroplast genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Paul G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed species in the moss family Pottiaceae, is increasingly used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of T. ruralis, only the second published chloroplast genome for a moss, and the first for a vegetatively desiccation-tolerant plant. Results The Tortula chloroplast genome is ~123,500 bp, and differs in a number of ways from that of Physcomitrella patens, the first published moss chloroplast genome. For example, Tortula lacks the ~71 kb inversion found in the large single copy region of the Physcomitrella genome and other members of the Funariales. Also, the Tortula chloroplast genome lacks petN, a gene found in all known land plant plastid genomes. In addition, an unusual case of nucleotide polymorphism was discovered. Conclusions Although the chloroplast genome of Tortula ruralis differs from that of the only other sequenced moss, Physcomitrella patens, we have yet to determine the biological significance of the differences. The polymorphisms we have uncovered in the sequencing of the genome offer a rare possibility (for mosses of the generation of DNA markers for fine-level phylogenetic studies, or to investigate individual variation within populations.

  6. Mesophyll Chloroplast Investment in C3, C4 and C2 Species of the Genus Flaveria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Hoffmann, Natalie; Covshoff, Sarah; Ka-Shu Wong, Gane; Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    The mesophyll (M) cells of C4 plants contain fewer chloroplasts than observed in related C3 plants; however, it is uncertain where along the evolutionary transition from C3 to C4 that the reduction in M chloroplast number occurs. Using 18 species in the genus Flaveria, which contains C3, C4 and a range of C3-C4 intermediate species, we examined changes in chloroplast number and size per M cell, and positioning of chloroplasts relative to the M cell periphery. Chloroplast number and coverage of the M cell periphery declined in proportion to increasing strength of C4 metabolism in Flaveria, while chloroplast size increased with increasing C4 cycle strength. These changes increase cytosolic exposure to the cell periphery which could enhance diffusion of inorganic carbon to phosphenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a cytosolic enzyme. Analysis of the transcriptome from juvenile leaves of nine Flaveria species showed that the transcript abundance of four genes involved in plastid biogenesis-FtsZ1, FtsZ2, DRP5B and PARC6-was negatively correlated with variation in C4 cycle strength and positively correlated with M chloroplast number per planar cell area. Chloroplast size was negatively correlated with abundance of FtsZ1, FtsZ2 and PARC6 transcripts. These results indicate that natural selection targeted the proteins of the contractile ring assembly to effect the reduction in chloroplast numbers in the M cells of C4 Flaveria species. If so, efforts to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 plants might evaluate whether inducing transcriptome changes similar to those observed in Flaveria could reduce M chloroplast numbers, and thus introduce a trait that appears essential for efficient C4 function.

  7. The complete chloroplast genome provides insight into the evolution and polymorphism of Panax ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbing eZhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (P. ginseng is an important medicinal plant and is often used in traditional Chinese medicine. With next generation sequencing (NGS technology, we determined the complete chloroplast genome sequences for four Chinese P. ginseng strains, which are Damaya (DMY, Ermaya (EMY, Gaolishen (GLS and Yeshanshen (YSS. The total chloroplast genome sequence length for DMY, EMY and GLS was 156,354 bp, while that for YSS was 156,355 bp. Comparative genomic analysis of the chloroplast genome sequences indicate that gene content, GC content, and gene order in DMY are quite similar to its relative species, and nucleotide sequence diversity of inverted repeat region (IR is lower than that of its counterparts, large single copy region (LSC and small single copy region (SSC. A comparison among these four P. ginseng strains revealed that the chloroplast genome sequences of DMY, EMY, and GLS were identical and YSS had a 1-bp insertion at base 5472. To further study the heterogeneity in chloroplast genome during domestication, high-resolution reads were mapped to the genome sequences to investigate the differences at the minor allele level; 208 minor allele sites with minor allele frequencies (MAF of ≥ 0.05 were identified. The polymorphism site numbers per kb of chloroplast genome sequence for DMY, EMY, GLS, and YSS were 0.74, 0.59, 0.97, and 1.23, respectively. All the minor allele sites located in LSC and IR regions, and the four strains showed the same variation types (substitution base or indel at all identified polymorphism sites. Comparison results of heterogeneity in the chloroplast genome sequences showed that the minor allele sites on the chloroplast genome were undergoing purifying selection to adapt to changing environment during domestication process. A study of P. ginseng chloroplast genome with particular focus on minor allele sites would aid in investigating the dynamics on the chloroplast genomes and different P. ginseng

  8. The complete chloroplast genome of banana (Musa acuminata, Zingiberales: insight into plastid monocotyledon evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Banana (genus Musa is a crop of major economic importance worldwide. It is a monocotyledonous member of the Zingiberales, a sister group of the widely studied Poales. Most cultivated bananas are natural Musa inter-(sub-specific triploid hybrids. A Musa acuminata reference nuclear genome sequence was recently produced based on sequencing of genomic DNA enriched in nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Musa acuminata chloroplast genome was assembled with chloroplast reads extracted from whole-genome-shotgun sequence data. The Musa chloroplast genome is a circular molecule of 169,972 bp with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a Large Single Copy region (LSC, 88,338 bp and a Small Single Copy region (SSC, 10,768 bp separated by Inverted Repeat regions (IRs, 35,433 bp. Two forms of the chloroplast genome relative to the orientation of SSC versus LSC were found. The Musa chloroplast genome shows an extreme IR expansion at the IR/SSC boundary relative to the most common structures found in angiosperms. This expansion consists of the integration of three additional complete genes (rps15, ndhH and ycf1 and part of the ndhA gene. No such expansion has been observed in monocots so far. Simple Sequence Repeats were identified in the Musa chloroplast genome and a new set of Musa chloroplastic markers was designed. CONCLUSION: The complete sequence of M. acuminata ssp malaccensis chloroplast we reported here is the first one for the Zingiberales order. As such it provides new insight in the evolution of the chloroplast of monocotyledons. In particular, it reinforces that IR/SSC expansion has occurred independently several times within monocotyledons. The discovery of new polymorphic markers within Musa chloroplast opens new perspectives to better understand the origin of cultivated triploid bananas.

  9. Protease Activation and Inflammation in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Regnér, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 10—20 % of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) develop a severe disease with high mortality and morbidity. Activation of pancreatic proteases, the inflammatory response and impaired pancreatic circulation are pathophysiological events that are important in order for the disease to develop. There is no specific treatment for severe AP, and no useful marker for predicting the severity of the disease upon admission to the hospital. In this thesis, markers of early pathophysio...

  10. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budatha, Madhusudhan; Silva, Simone; Montoya, Teodoro Ignacio; Suzuki, Ayako; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Wieslander, Cecilia Karin; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Word, Ruth Ann; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/-)) develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP) due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/-) mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa). V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS) 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/-) mice. PRSS3 was (a) localized in epithelial secretions, (b) detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/-) and wild type mice, and (c) cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin) and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/-) epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice. PMID:23437119

  11. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhan Budatha

    Full Text Available Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/- develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/- mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa. V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/- mice. PRSS3 was (a localized in epithelial secretions, (b detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/- and wild type mice, and (c cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/- epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice.

  12. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyung Park

    Full Text Available Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25 in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  13. PARTIAL PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ALKALOPHILIC PROTEASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Satheeskumar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial purification and characterization of alkalophilic protease production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the gut of marine and coastal waters shrimp Penaeus monodon. The protease production was assayed in submerged fermentation to produce maximum protease activity (423 ± 0.09 U/ml. The enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulphate and partially purified by ion exchange chromatography through DEAE Sephadex A-50 column. In 10th fraction showed maximum protease activity (734 ± 0.18 U/ml with increase in purification fold. The molecular weight of protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was recorded as 60 kDa. The stability of protease was tested at various pH and temperature; it showed maximum protease activity at pH-9 and temperature 50ºC. Among the various surfactants tested for enzyme stability, maximum activity was retained in poly ethylene glycol. The compatibility of protease enzyme with various commercial detergents; the enzyme retained maximum protease activity in tide. The results are indicated that all these properties make the bacterial proteases are most suitable for wide industrial applications.

  14. Protease gene shuffling and expression in Pichia pastoris

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    Gang Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Four kinds of neutral and alkaline protease genes from Aspergillus oryzae and Bacillus subtilis were isolated and shuffled. The shuffled genes were selected, inserted into pGAPZαA plasmid and transformed into Escherichia coli. The gene which could express high-activity protease was selected by screening the sizes of transparent zones around the colonies on casein plates. After an ideal protease gene was selected, it was sequenced and then transformed into Pichia pastoris X33. The result showed that the base in 1022th position of shuffled protease gene was changed from thymine to cytosine, inferring that cysteine was changed to arginine in the mutant protease. After 48 h incubation for the transformed P. pastoris with the mutant or native protease genes, the mutant protease activity was 36.4% higher than the native protease (P<0.05. The optimal pH and temperature of the mutant protease were 6.5-8.0 and 30-70°C, respectively, which indicated better stability than the native protease (P<0.05.

  15. Mitochondrial Proteases as Emerging Pharmacological Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibellini, Lara; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of mitochondrial function and integrity is critical for cell viability. Under stress conditions, unfolded, misfolded or damaged proteins accumulate in a certain compartment of the organelle, interfering with oxidative phosphorylation and normal mitochondrial functions. In stress conditions, several mechanisms, including mitochondrial unfolded protease response (UPRmt), fusion and fission, and mitophagy are engaged to restore normal proteostasis of the organelle. Mitochondrial proteases are a family of more than 20 enzymes that not only are involved in the UPRmt, but actively participate at multiple levels in the stress-response system. Alterations in their expression levels, or mutations that determine loss or gain of function of these proteases deeply impair mitochondrial functionality and can be associated with the onset of inherited diseases, with the development of neurodegenerative disorders and with the process of carcinogenesis. In this review, we focus our attention on six of them, namely CLPP, HTRA2 and LONP1, by analysing the current knowledge about their functions, their involvement in the pathogenesis of human diseases, and the compounds currently available for inhibiting their functions. PMID:26831646

  16. Metal-based antimicrobial protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, A; Prisecaru, A; Slator, C; Molphy, Z; McCann, M

    2013-01-01

    Limitations associated with the production cost, metabolic instability, side-effects, resistance and poor pharmacokinetics of organic protease inhibitors (PIs), which form an essential component of the front line HAART treatment for HIV, have fuelled efforts into finding novel, transition metal-based alternatives. Some of the attractive features of metalbased therapeutics include synthetic simplicity, solubility control, redox capability, expansion of coordination number and topography matching of the complex to the protein's active site. Building asymmetry into the complex, which may offer better discrimination between host and rogue cell, can readily be achieved through coordination of chiral ligands to the metal centre. Although the scope of this review has been limited to metal-based agents that have been reported to bind/inhibit HIV-1 and parasitic proteases, some desirables, such as high activity, low dosage, minimal toxicity, crossinhibition, unique binding modes and selectivity, have already been delivered. The variability of the d-block metals, coupled with the availability of designer organic ligands, augers well for the future development of clinical metallo-drugs for deployment against protease-associated, fatal diseases.

  17. The molecular architecture of the chloroplast thylakoid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefansson, H.

    1996-08-01

    Non-detergent procedure for isolation of sub-thylakoid vesicle populations derived from different structural domains of the chloroplast thylakoid membrane has been developed. Sub-thylakoid vesicles representing the grana, grana core, stroma lamellae, and the grana margins have been isolated and their protein composition has been investigated. Furthermore a novel non-detergent procedure for investigating the pigment composition of photosynthetic complexes located in the different structural domains has been developed. This procedure circumvents selective extractions, an perturbing effect often combined with detergent isolations of membrane bound protein complexes. The fractionation experiments show that the NADPH dehydrogenase, suggested to operate as NADPH or ferredoxin-plastoquinone oxidoreductase in cyclic electron transport around photosystem I, is stoichiometrically depleted on photosystem I basis in the grana domain. The fractionation studies are consistent with the model of the thylakoid membrane where the photosystems in the grana are operating in a linear electron transport whereas the site of cyclic electron transport is in the stroma lamellae. It is suggested that partial destacking of grana, as a result of light-induced protein phosphorylation, may promote the exposure of the granal photosystem I centers to the chloroplast stroma and thereby enhance their participation in cyclic electron transport activity. 146 refs, 18 figs

  18. The complete chloroplast genome of Cinnamomum kanehirae Hayata (Lauraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Ho, Cheng-Kuen; Chang, Shu-Hwa

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of Cinnamomum kanehirae (Hayata), the first to be completely sequenced of Lauraceae family, is presented in this study. The total genome size is 152,700 bp, with a typical circular structure including a pair of inverted repeats (IRa/b) of 20,107 bp of length separated by a large single-copy region (LSC) and a small single-copy region (SSC) of 93,642 bp and 18,844 bp of length, respectively. The overall GC content of the genome is 39.1%. The nucleotide sequence shows 91% identities with Liriodendron tulipifera in the Magnoliaceae. In total, 123 annotated genes consisted of 79 coding genes, eight rRNA genes, and 36 tRNA genes. Among all 79 coding genes, seven genes (rpoC1, atpF, rpl2, ndhB, ndhA, rps16, and rpl2) contain one intron, while two genes (ycf3 and clpP) contain two introns. The maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed that C. kanehirae chloroplast genome is closely related to Calycanthus fertilis within Laurales order. PMID:26053940

  19. Chloroplast parameters differ in wild type and transgenic poplars overexpressing gsh1 in the cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, L A; Ronzhina, D A; Ivanov, L A; Stroukova, L V; Peuke, A D; Rennenberg, H

    2009-07-01

    Poplar mutants overexpressing the bacterial genes gsh1 or gsh2 encoding the enzymes of glutathione biosynthesis are among the best-characterised transgenic plants. However, this characterisation originates exclusively from laboratory studies, and the performance of these mutants under field conditions is largely unknown. Here, we report a field experiment in which the wild-type poplar hybrid Populus tremula x P. alba and a transgenic line overexpressing the bacterial gene gsh1 encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol were grown for 3 years at a relatively clean (control) field site and a field site contaminated with heavy metals. Aboveground biomass accumulation was slightly smaller in transgenic compared to wild-type plants; soil contamination significantly decreased biomass accumulation in both wild-type and transgenic plants by more than 40%. Chloroplasts parameters, i.e., maximal diameter, projection area and perimeter, surface area and volume, surface/volume ratio and a two-dimensional form coefficient, were found to depend on plant type, leaf tissue and soil contamination. The greatest differences between wild and transgenic poplars were observed at the control site. Under these conditions, chloroplast sizes in palisade tissue of transgenic poplar significantly exceeded those of the wild type. In contrast to the wild type, palisade chloroplast volume exceeded that of spongy chloroplasts in transgenic poplars at both field sites. Chlorophyll content per chloroplast was the same in wild and transgenic poplars. Apparently, the increase in chloroplast volume was not connected to changes in the photosynthetic centres. Chloroplasts of transgenic poplar at the control site were more elongated in palisade cells and close to spherical in spongy mesophyll chloroplasts. At the contaminated site, palisade and spongy cell chloroplasts of leaves from transgenic trees and the wild type were the same shape. Transgenic poplars also had a smaller chloroplast

  20. [Effects of exogenous silicon on active oxygen scavenging systems in chloroplasts of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings under salt stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qiong-Qiu; Zai, Wen-San; Zhu, Zhu-Jun; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2006-02-01

    With K(2)SiO(4) (1.0 mmol/L) treatment, the effects of Si on the distribution of Na(+), K(+) to chloroplasts and antioxidant system of cucumber leaves under 50 mmol/L NaCl stress were studied. The results showed that there was a selective transport of K(+) into the chloroplasts so that Na(+) content of chloroplasts was lower under Si treatment (Table 1); H(2)O(2) and MDA contents in chloroplasts were significantly decreased (Fig.1), and the activities of SOD, APX, GR and DHAR were increased simultaneity (Fig.2), and AsA, GSH contents were also increased in chloroplasts of salt-stressed cucumber by additional Si treatment (Fig.3). It may be concluded that Si could decrease absorption of Na(+) and increase ability of active oxygen scavenging in chloroplasts, therefore the injury of chloroplast membrane under salinity stress in cucumber was alleviated. PMID:16477139

  1. A high-throughput method for detection of DNA in chloroplasts using flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldenburg Delene J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of DNA in the chloroplasts of some plant species has been shown recently to decline dramatically during leaf development. A high-throughput method of DNA detection in chloroplasts is now needed in order to facilitate the further investigation of this process using large numbers of tissue samples. Results The DNA-binding fluorophores 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI, SYBR Green I (SG, SYTO 42, and SYTO 45 were assessed for their utility in flow cytometric analysis of DNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Fluorescence microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR were used to validate flow cytometry data. We found neither DAPI nor SYTO 45 suitable for flow cytometric analysis of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA content, but did find changes in cpDNA content during development by flow cytometry using SG and SYTO 42. The latter dye provided more sensitive detection, and the results were similar to those from the fluorescence microscopic analysis. Differences in SYTO 42 fluorescence were found to correlate with differences in cpDNA content as determined by qPCR using three primer sets widely spaced across the chloroplast genome, suggesting that the whole genome undergoes copy number reduction during development, rather than selective reduction/degradation of subgenomic regions. Conclusion Flow cytometric analysis of chloroplasts stained with SYTO 42 is a high-throughput method suitable for determining changes in cpDNA content during development and for sorting chloroplasts on the basis of DNA content.

  2. Is Chloroplast Movement in Tobacco Plants Influenced Systemically after Local Illumination or Burning Stress?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Naus; Monika Rolencova; Vladimira Hlavackova

    2008-01-01

    Chloroplast movement has been studied In many plants mainly in relation to the local light, mechanical or stress effects. Here we investigated possible systemic responses of chloroplast movement to local light or burning stress in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun). Chloroplast movement was measured using two independent methods: one with a SPAD 502 Chlorophyll meter and another by collimated transmittance at a selected wavelength (676 nm). A sensitive pedodic movement of chloroplasts was used in high or low (2 000 or 50 μmol/m2 per s photosynthetically active radiation, respectively) cold white light with periods of 50 or 130 min. Measurements were carried out in the irradiated area, in the non-irradiated area of the same leaf or in the leaf located on the stem below the irradiated or burned one. No significant changes in systemic chloroplast movement in non-irradiated parts of the leaf and in the non-treated leaf were detected. Our data indicate that chloroplast movement in tobacco is dependent dominantly on the intensity and spectral composition of the incident light and on the local stimulation and state of the target tissue. No systemic signal was strong enough tovoke a detectable systemic response in chloroplast movement in distant untreated tissues of tobacco plants.

  3. Abscisic acid and blue light signaling pathways in chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis mesophyll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Janowiak, Franciszek; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and phototropins act antagonistically to control stomatal movements. Here, we investigated the role of ABA in phototropin-directed chloroplast movements in mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. We analyzed the expression of phototropins at mRNA and protein level under the influence of ABA. PHOT1 mRNA level was decreased by ABA in the dark while it was insensitive to ABA in light. PHOT2 mRNA level was independent of the hormone treatment. The levels of phototropin proteins were down-regulated by ABA, both in darkness and light. No impact of exogenous ABA on amplitudes and kinetics of chloroplast movements was detected. Chloroplast responses in wild type Arabidopsis and three mutants, abi4, abi2 (abscisic acid insensitive4, 2) and aba1 (abscisic acid1), were measured to account for endogenous ABA signaling. The chloroplast responses were slightly reduced in abi2 and aba1 mutants in strong light. To further investigate the effect, abi2 and aba1 mutants were supplemented with exogenous ABA. In the aba1 mutant, the reaction was rescued but in abi2 it was unaffected. Our results show that ABA is not directly involved in phototropin-controlled chloroplast responses in mature leaves of Arabidopsis. However, the disturbance of ABA biosynthesis and signaling in mutants affects some elements of the chloroplast movement mechanism. In line with its role as a stress hormone, ABA appears to enhance plant sensitivity to light and promote the chloroplast avoidance response.

  4. A plant mitochondrial sequence transcribed in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts is not edited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, C.A.; Hanson, M.R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Zoubenko, O.V.; Maliga, P. [State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    RNA editing occurs in two higher-plant organelles, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Because chloroplasts and mitochondria exhibit some similarity in editing site selection, we investigated whether mitochondrial RNA sequences could be edited in chloroplasts. We produced transgenic tobacco plants that contained chimeric genes in which the second exon of a Petunia hybrida mitochondrial coxII gene was under the control of chloroplast gene regulatory sequences. coxII transcripts accumulated to low or high levels in transgenic chloroplasts containing chimeric genes with the plastid ribosomal protein gene rps16 or the rRNA operon promoter, respectively. Exon 2 of coxII was chosen because it carries seven editing sites and is edited in petunia mitochondria even when located in an abnormal context in an aberrant recombined gene. When editing of the coxII transcripts in transgenic chloroplasts was examined, no RNA editing at any of the usual sites was detected, nor was there any novel editing at any other sites. These results indicate that the RNA editing mechanisms of chloroplasts and mitochondria are not identical but must have at least some organelle-specific components. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  5. The Chloroplast Outer Envelope Membrane: The Edge of Light and Excitement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The chloroplast is surrounded by a double-membrane envelope at which proteins, ions, and numerous metabolites Including nucleotides, amino acids, fatty acids, and carbohydrates are exchanged between the two aqueous phases, the cytoplasm and the chloroplast stroma. The chloroplast envelope is also the location where the biosynthesis and accumulation of various lipids take place. By contrast to the inner membrane, which contains a number of specific transporters and acts as the permeability barrier, the chloroplast outer membrane has often been considered a passive compartment derived from the phagosomal membrane. However, the presence of galactoglycerolipids and β-barrel membrane proteins support the common origin of the outer membranes of the chloroplast envelope and extant cyanobacteria. Furthermore, recent progress in the field underlines that the chloroplast outer envelope plays important roles not only for translocation of various molecules, but also for regulation of metabolic activities and signaling processes. The chloroplast outer envelope membrane offers various interesting and challenging questions that are relevant to the understanding of organelle biogenesis, plant growth and development, and also membrane biology in general.

  6. The chloroplast genome of a symbiodinium sp. clade C3 isolate

    KAUST Repository

    Barbrook, Adrian C.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium form important symbioses within corals and other benthic marine animals. Dinoflagellates possess an extremely reduced plastid genome relative to those examined in plants and other algae. In dinoflagellates the plastid genes are located on small plasmids, commonly referred to as \\'minicircles\\'. However, the chloroplast genomes of dinoflagellates have only been extensively characterised from a handful of species. There is also evidence of considerable variation in the chloroplast genome organisation across those species that have been examined. We therefore characterised the chloroplast genome from an environmental coral isolate, in this case containing a symbiont belonging to the Symbiodinium sp. clade C3. The gene content of the genome is well conserved with respect to previously characterised genomes. However, unlike previously characterised dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes we did not identify any \\'empty\\' minicircles. The sequences of this chloroplast genome show a high rate of evolution relative to other algal species. Particularly notable was a surprisingly high level of sequence divergence within the core polypeptides of photosystem I, the reasons for which are currently unknown. This chloroplast genome also possesses distinctive codon usage and GC content. These features suggest that chloroplast genomes in Symbiodinium are highly plastic. © 2013 Adrian C. Barbrook.

  7. A preliminary neutron diffraction analysis of Achromobacter protease I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Yuki; Masaki, Takeharu; Yamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2010-11-01

    Achromobacter protease I (API, E.C. 3.4.21.50) is one of the serine proteases produced by Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. API is distinct from the other tripsin type protease in its lysine specificity. The neutron structure analysis of catalytic triad with Trp169 and His210 was presented. His57 was double protonated and formed hydrogen bonds to Ser194Oγ and Asp113Oδ1, Oδ2.

  8. Hydrophobic core flexibility modulates enzyme activity in HIV-1 protease

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Di...

  9. Enhanced Thermostability of a Fungal Alkaline Protease by Different Additives

    OpenAIRE

    Nilesh P. Nirmal; R. Seeta Laxman

    2014-01-01

    A fungal strain (Conidiobolus brefeldianus MTCC 5184) isolated from plant detritus secreted a high activity alkaline protease. Thermostability studies of the fungal alkaline protease (FAP) revealed that the protease is stable up to 50°C with 40% residual activity after one hour. Effect of various additives such as sugars, sugar alcohols, polyols, and salts, on the thermostability of FAP was evaluated. Among the additives tested, glycerol, mannitol, xylitol, sorbitol, and trehalose were found ...

  10. Heighten the Study on Factor Seven Activating Protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺石林; 陈方平; 张广森; 文志斌

    2008-01-01

    @@ Recent studies have showed that factor seven activating protease (FSAP) is a novel serine protease in human plasma. Immunoreactivity for FSAP has been observed in vascular endothelial cells,epithelial cells and macrophages but FSAP-specific mRNA expression only exists in the former two cells. FSAP has three epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains,a kringle domain and a serine protease domain.

  11. Free radical generation and antioxidant content in chloroplasts from soybean leaves expsoed to ultraviolet-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galatro, A.; Simontacchi, M.; Puntarulo, S. [Univ. of Buenos Aires, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Physical Chemistry, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure on oxidative status in chloroplasts isolated from soybean (Glycine max cv. Hood). Chloroplasts were isolated from soybean leaves excised from either control seedlings or those exposed to 30 and 60 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1} of UV-B radiation for 4 days. Chloroplastic oxidative conditions were assessed as carbon-centered radical, carbonyl groups and ascorbyl radical content. Treatment with UV-B increased the carbon-centered radical-dependent EPR signal significantly by 55 and 100% in chloroplasts from leaves exposed to 30 and 60 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1} UV-B, respectively, compared to radical content in chloroplasts from control leaves. The content of carbonyl groups increased by 37 and 62% in chloroplasts isolated from soybean leaves irradiated for 4 days with 30 and 60 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1} UV-B, respectively. The content of soluble metabolites in isolated chloroplasts should not be taken as absolute in vivo values; however, these data are valuable for comparative studies. UV-B exposure did not significantly affect ascorbyl radical content compared to controls. The content of ascorbic acid and thiols in chloroplasts isolated from leaves exposed to 60 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1} UV-B was increased by 117 and 20.8%, respectively, compared to controls. Neither the content of total carotene nor that of {beta}-carotene or {alpha}-tocopherol was affected by the irradiation. The results: presented here suggest that the increased content of lipid radicals and oxidized proteins in the chloroplasts isolated from leaves exposed to UV-B could be ascribed to both the lack of antioxidant response in the lipid soluble fraction and the modest increase in the soluble antioxidant content. (au)

  12. Investigating cytoskeletal function in chloroplast protrusion formation in the arctic-alpine plant Oxyria digyna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, A; Wasteneys, G O; Lütz, C

    2007-05-01

    Arctic and alpine plants like Oxyria digyna have to face enhanced environmental stress. This study compared leaves from Oxyria digyna collected in the Arctic at Svalbard (78 degrees N) and in the Austrian Alps (47 degrees N) at cellular, subcellular, and ultrastructural levels. Oxyria digyna plants collected in Svalbard had significantly thicker leaves than the samples collected in the Austrian Alps. This difference was generated by increased thickness of the palisade and spongy mesophyll layers in the arctic plants, while epidermal cells had no significant size differences between the two habitats. A characteristic feature of arctic, alpine, and cultivated samples was the occurrence of broad stroma-filled chloroplast protrusions, 2 - 5 microm broad and up to 5 microm long. Chloroplast protrusions were in close spatial contact with other organelles including mitochondria and microbodies. Mitochondria were also present in invaginations of the chloroplasts. A dense network of cortical microtubules found in the mesophyll cells suggested a potential role for microtubules in the formation and function of chloroplast protrusions. No direct interactions between microtubules and chloroplasts, however, were observed and disruption of the microtubule arrays with the anti-microtubule agent oryzalin at 5 - 10 microM did not alter the appearance or dynamics of chloroplast protrusions. These observations suggest that, in contrast to studies on stromule formation in Nicotiana, microtubules are not involved in the formation and morphology of chloroplast protrusions in Oxyria digyna. The actin microfilament-disrupting drug latrunculin B (5 - 10 microM for 2 h) arrested cytoplasmic streaming and altered the cytoplasmic integrity of mesophyll cells. However, at the ultrastructural level, stroma-containing, thylakoid-free areas were still visible, mostly at the concave sides of the chloroplasts. As chloroplast protrusions were frequently found to be mitochondria-associated in Oxyria

  13. Complete sequencing of five araliaceae chloroplast genomes and the phylogenetic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ginseng family (Araliaceae includes a number of economically important plant species. Previously phylogenetic studies circumscribed three major clades within the core ginseng plant family, yet the internal relationships of each major group have been poorly resolved perhaps due to rapid radiation of these lineages. Recent studies have shown that phyogenomics based on chloroplast genomes provides a viable way to resolve complex relationships. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the complete nucleotide sequences of five Araliaceae chloroplast genomes using next-generation sequencing technology. The five chloroplast genomes are 156,333-156,459 bp in length including a pair of inverted repeats (25,551-26,108 bp separated by the large single-copy (86,028-86,566 bp and small single-copy (18,021-19,117 bp regions. Each chloroplast genome contains the same 114 unique genes consisting of 30 transfer RNA genes, four ribosomal RNA genes, and 80 protein coding genes. Gene size, content, and order, AT content, and IR/SC boundary structure are similar among all Araliaceae chloroplast genomes. A total of 140 repeats were identified in the five chloroplast genomes with palindromic repeat as the most common type. Phylogenomic analyses using parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian inference based on the complete chloroplast genomes strongly supported the monophyly of the Asian Palmate group and the Aralia-Panax group. Furthermore, the relationships among the sampled taxa within the Asian Palmate group were well resolved. Twenty-six DNA markers with the percentage of variable sites higher than 5% were identified, which may be useful for phylogenetic studies of Araliaceae. CONCLUSION: The chloroplast genomes of Araliaceae are highly conserved in all aspects of genome features. The large-scale phylogenomic data based on the complete chloroplast DNA sequences is shown to be effective for the phylogenetic reconstruction of Araliaceae.

  14. Photosynthesis of root chloroplasts developed in Arabidopsis lines overexpressing GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Sasaki, Daichi; Noguchi, Ko; Fujinuma, Daiki; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Masami; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sugimoto, Keiko; Niyogi, Krishna K; Wada, Hajime; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2013-08-01

    In plants, genes involved in photosynthesis are encoded separately in nuclei and plastids, and tight cooperation between these two genomes is therefore required for the development of functional chloroplasts. Golden2-like (GLK) transcription factors are involved in chloroplast development, directly targeting photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes for up-regulation. Although overexpression of GLKs leads to chloroplast development in non-photosynthetic organs, the mechanisms of coordination between the nuclear gene expression influenced by GLKs and the photosynthetic processes inside chloroplasts are largely unknown. To elucidate the impact of GLK-induced expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes on the construction of photosynthetic systems, chloroplast morphology and photosynthetic characteristics in greenish roots of Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing GLKs were compared with those in wild-type roots and leaves. Overexpression of GLKs caused up-regulation of not only their direct targets but also non-target nuclear and plastid genes, leading to global induction of chloroplast biogenesis in the root. Large antennae relative to reaction centers were observed in wild-type roots and were further enhanced by GLK overexpression due to the increased expression of target genes associated with peripheral light-harvesting antennae. Photochemical efficiency was lower in the root chloroplasts than in leaf chloroplasts, suggesting that the imbalance in the photosynthetic machinery decreases the efficiency of light utilization in root chloroplasts. Despite the low photochemical efficiency, root photosynthesis contributed to carbon assimilation in Arabidopsis. Moreover, GLK overexpression increased CO₂ fixation and promoted phototrophic performance of the root, showing the potential of root photosynthesis to improve effective carbon utilization in plants.

  15. Transcriptome analysis of ectopic chloroplast development in green curd cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiangjun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplasts are the green plastids where photosynthesis takes place. The biogenesis of chloroplasts requires the coordinate expression of both nuclear and chloroplast genes and is regulated by developmental and environmental signals. Despite extensive studies of this process, the genetic basis and the regulatory control of chloroplast biogenesis and development remain to be elucidated. Results Green cauliflower mutant causes ectopic development of chloroplasts in the curd tissue of the plant, turning the otherwise white curd green. To investigate the transcriptional control of chloroplast development, we compared gene expression between green and white curds using the RNA-seq approach. Deep sequencing produced over 15 million reads with lengths of 86 base pairs from each cDNA library. A total of 7,155 genes were found to exhibit at least 3-fold changes in expression between green and white curds. These included light-regulated genes, genes encoding chloroplast constituents, and genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Moreover, we discovered that the cauliflower ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (BoHY5 was expressed higher in green curds than white curds and that 2616 HY5-targeted genes, including 1600 up-regulated genes and 1016 down-regulated genes, were differently expressed in green in comparison to white curd tissue. All these 1600 up-regulated genes were HY5-targeted genes in the light. Conclusions The genome-wide profiling of gene expression by RNA-seq in green curds led to the identification of large numbers of genes associated with chloroplast development, and suggested the role of regulatory genes in the high hierarchy of light signaling pathways in mediating the ectopic chloroplast development in the green curd cauliflower mutant.

  16. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B;

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned with and w......Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned...

  17. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models. PMID:25493637

  18. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Pescosolido

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI, metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP, maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI, and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models.

  19. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. → Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. → Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. → Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  20. Characterization of Fibrinolytic Proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Ho Choi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was undertaken to identify fibrinolytic proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom and to characterize a major fibrinolytic protease purified from the venom. Methods: The venom was subjected to chromatography using columns of Q-Sepharose and Sephadex G-75. The molecular weights of fibrinolytic proteases showing fibrinolytic zone in fibrin plate assay were determined in SDS-PAGE (Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis The effects of inhibitors and metal ions on fibrinolytic protease and the proteolysis patterns of fibrinogen, gelatin, and bovine serum albumin were investigated. Results : 1 The fibrinolytic fractions of the three peaks isolated from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained two polypeptides of 46 and 59 kDa and three polypeptides of 32, 18, and 15 kDa and a major polypeptide of 54 kDa, respectively. 2 The fibrinolytic activity of the purified protease of 54 kDA was inhibited by metal chelators, such as EDTA, EGTA, and 1,10-phenanthroline, and disulfhydryl-reducing compounds, such as dithiothreitol and cysteine. 3 Calcium chloride promoted the fibrinolytic activity of the protease, but mercuric chloride and cobalt(II chloride inhibited it. 4 The fibrinolytic protease cleaved preferentially A-chain and slowly B-chain of fibrinogen. It also hydrolyzed gelatin but not bovine serum albumin. Conclusions: The Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained more than three fibrinolytic proteases. The major fibrinolytic protease was a metalloprotease which hydrolyzed both fibrinogen and gelatin, but not bovine serum albumin.

  1. Increasing tomato fruit quality by enhancing fruit chloroplast function. A double-edged sword?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocaliadis, Maria Florencia; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Pons, Clara; Orzaez, Diego; Granell, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    Fruits are generally regarded as photosynthate sinks as they rely on energy provided by sugars transported from leaves to carry out the highly demanding processes of development and ripening; eventually these imported photosynthates also contribute to the fruit organoleptic properties. Three recent reports have revealed, however, that transcriptional factors enhancing chloroplast development in fruit may result in higher contents not only of tomato fruit-specialized metabolites but also of sugars. In addition to suggesting new ways to improve fruit quality by fortifying fruit chloroplasts and plastids, these results prompted us to re-evaluate the importance of the contribution of chloroplasts/photosynthesis to fruit development and ripening.

  2. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Anoectochilus emeiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuying; Niu, Zhitao; Yan, Wenjin; Xue, Qingyun; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Anoectochilus emeiensis, an extremely endangered medical plant with important economic value, was determined and characterized. The genome size was 152 650 bp, containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) (26 319 bp) which were separated by a large single copy (LSC) (82 670 bp) and a small single copy (SSC) (17 342 bp). The cpDNA of A. emeiensis contained 113 unique genes, including 79 protein coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Among them, 18 genes contained one or two introns. The overall AT content of the genome was 63.1%. PMID:26403535

  3. Development of novel chloroplast microsatellite markers for Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M; Xu, L A; Cao, F L; Zhang, H J; Yu, F X

    2015-07-13

    Ginkgo biloba is considered to be a living fossil that can be used to understand the ancient evolutionary history of gymnosperms, but little attention has been given to the study of its population genetics, molecular phylogeography, and genetic resources assessment. Chloroplast simple sequence repeat (cpSSR) markers are powerful tools for genetic studies of plants. In this study, a total of 30 perfect cpSSRs of Ginkgo were identified and characterized, including di-, tri, tetra-, penta-, and hexanucleotide repeats. Fifteen of 21 designed primer pairs were successfully amplified to yield specific polymerase chain reaction products from 16 Ginkgo cultivars. Polymorphic cpSSRs were further applied to determine the genetic variation of 116 individuals in 5 populations of G. biloba. The results showed that 24 and 76% genetic variation existed within and among populations of this species, respectively. These polymorphic and monomorphic cpSSR markers can be used to trace the origin and evolutionary history of Ginkgo.

  4. Functional analysis of chloroplast early light inducible proteins (ELIPs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, Carolyn M

    2005-02-22

    The objectives of this project were to characterize gene expression patterns of early light inducible protein (ELIP) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lycopersicon esculentum, to identify knock mutants of the 2 ELIP genes in Arabidopsis, and to characterize the effects of the knockouts. Expression in Arabidopsis was studied in response to thylakoid electron transport chain (PETC) capacity, where it was found that there is a signal for expression associated with reduction of the PETC. Expression in response to salt was also studied, with different responses of the two gene copies. Knockout lines for ELIP1 and ELIP2 have been identified and are being characterized. In tomato, it was found that the single-copy ELIP gene is highly expressed in ripening fruit during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. Studies of expression in tomato ripening mutants are ongoing.

  5. The complete chloroplast genomes of Cannabis sativa and Humulus lupulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Daniela; White, Kristin H; Keepers, Kyle G; Kane, Nolan C

    2016-09-01

    Cannabis and Humulus are sister genera comprising the entirety of the Cannabaceae sensu stricto, including C. sativa L. (marijuana, hemp), and H. lupulus L. (hops) as two economically important crops. These two plants have been used by humans for many purposes including as a fiber, food, medicine, or inebriant in the case of C. sativa, and as a flavoring component in beer brewing in the case of H. lupulus. In this study, we report the complete chloroplast genomes for two distinct hemp varieties of C. sativa, Italian "Carmagnola" and Russian "Dagestani", and one Czech variety of H. lupulus "Saazer". Both C. sativa genomes are 153 871 bp in length, while the H. lupulus genome is 153 751 bp. The genomes from the two C. sativa varieties differ in 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), while the H. lupulus genome differs in 1722 SNPs from both C. sativa cultivars. PMID:26329384

  6. The complete chloroplast genomes of Cannabis sativa and Humulus lupulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Daniela; White, Kristin H; Keepers, Kyle G; Kane, Nolan C

    2016-09-01

    Cannabis and Humulus are sister genera comprising the entirety of the Cannabaceae sensu stricto, including C. sativa L. (marijuana, hemp), and H. lupulus L. (hops) as two economically important crops. These two plants have been used by humans for many purposes including as a fiber, food, medicine, or inebriant in the case of C. sativa, and as a flavoring component in beer brewing in the case of H. lupulus. In this study, we report the complete chloroplast genomes for two distinct hemp varieties of C. sativa, Italian "Carmagnola" and Russian "Dagestani", and one Czech variety of H. lupulus "Saazer". Both C. sativa genomes are 153 871 bp in length, while the H. lupulus genome is 153 751 bp. The genomes from the two C. sativa varieties differ in 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), while the H. lupulus genome differs in 1722 SNPs from both C. sativa cultivars.

  7. Protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts - a survey of phosphorylation targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginsky, Sacha

    2016-06-01

    The development of new software tools, improved mass spectrometry equipment, a suite of optimized scan types, and better-quality phosphopeptide affinity capture have paved the way for an explosion of mass spectrometry data on phosphopeptides. Because phosphoproteomics achieves good sensitivity, most studies use complete cell extracts for phosphopeptide enrichment and identification without prior enrichment of proteins or subcellular compartments. As a consequence, the phosphoproteome of cell organelles often comes as a by-product from large-scale studies and is commonly assembled from these in meta-analyses. This review aims at providing some guidance on the limitations of meta-analyses that combine data from analyses with different scopes, reports on the current status of knowledge on chloroplast phosphorylation targets, provides initial insights into phosphorylation site conservation in different plant species, and highlights emerging information on the integration of gene expression with metabolism and photosynthesis by means of protein phosphorylation. PMID:26969742

  8. The whole chloroplast genome of wild rice (Oryza australiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Ge, Song

    2016-01-01

    The whole chloroplast genome of wild rice (Oryza australiensis) is characterized in this study. The genome size is 135,224  bp, exhibiting a typical circular structure including a pair of 25,776  bp inverted repeats (IRa,b) separated by a large single-copy region (LSC) of 82,212  bp and a small single-copy region (SSC) of 12,470  bp. The overall GC content of the genome is 38.95%. 110 unique genes were annotated, including 76 protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA genes, and 30t RNA genes. Among these, 18 are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions, 13 genes contain one intron, and 2 genes (rps12 and ycf3) have two introns.

  9. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Raman; Lee, Do-Hyung; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-05-01

    The complete chloroplast genome (cpDNA) sequence of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicine was reported and characterized. The cpDNA of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is 149,539 bp, with 36.3% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 24,803 bp is separated by a large single-copy region (LSC, 82,805 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 17,128 bp). It encodes 85 protein-coding genes, 36 tRNA genes and 8 rRNA genes. Of 129 individual genes, 13 genes encoded one intron and three genes have two introns.

  10. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Euonymus japonicus (Celastraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of the Euonymus japonicus, the first sequenced of the genus Euonymus, was reported in this study. The total length was 157 637 bp, containing a pair of 26 678 bp inverted repeat region (IR), which were separated by small single copy (SSC) region and large single copy (LSC) region of 18 340 bp and 85 941 bp, respectively. This genome contains 107 unique genes, including 74 coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 29 tRNA genes. Seventeen genes contain intron of E. japonicus, of which three genes (clpP, ycf3, and rps12) include two introns. The maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analysis revealed that E. japonicus was closely related to Manihot and Populus. PMID:26407184

  11. [Study of Chloroplast DNA Polymorphism in the Sunflower (Helianthus L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markina, N V; Usatov, A V; Logacheva, M D; Azarin, K V; Gorbachenko, C F; Kornienko, I V; Gavrilova, V A; Tihobaeva, V E

    2015-08-01

    The polymorphism of microsatellite loci of chloroplast genome in six Helianthus species and 46 lines of cultivated sunflower H. annuus (17 CMS lines and 29 Rf-lines) were studied. The differences between species are confined to four SSR loci. Within cultivated forms of the sunflower H. annuus, the polymorphism is absent. A comparative analysis was performed on sequences of the cpDNA inbred line 3629, line 398941 of the wild sunflower, and the American line HA383 H. annuus. As a result, 52 polymorphic loci represented by 27 SSR and 25 SNP were found; they can be used for genotyping of H. annuus samples, including cultural varieties: twelve polymorphic positions, of which eight are SSR and four are SNP. PMID:26601486

  12. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Roszak, Aleksander W. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.walker@glasgow.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  13. Rigidity analysis of HIV-1 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heal, J W [MOAC Doctoral Training Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Wells, S A; Jimenez-Roldan, E; Roemer, R A [Department of Physics and Centre for Scientific Computing, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Freedman, R F, E-mail: jack.heal@warwick.ac.uk [School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    We present a rigidity analysis on a large number of X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme HIV-1 protease using the 'pebble game' algorithm of the software FIRST. We find that although the rigidity profile remains similar across a comprehensive set of high resolution structures, the profile changes significantly in the presence of an inhibitor. Our study shows that the action of the inhibitors is to restrict the flexibility of the {beta}-hairpin flaps which allow access to the active site. The results are discussed in the context of full molecular dynamics simulations as well as data from NMR experiments.

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana DNA gyrase is targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Melisa K.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    DNA gyrase is the bacterial DNA topoisomerase (topo) that supercoils DNA by using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. The enzyme, an A2B2 tetramer encoded by the gyrA and gyrB genes, catalyses topological changes in DNA during replication and transcription, and is the only topo that is able to introduce negative supercoils. Gyrase is essential in bacteria and apparently absent from eukaryotes and is, consequently, an important target for antibacterial agents (e.g., quinolones and coumarins). We have identified four putative gyrase genes in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana; one gyrA and three gyrB homologues. DNA gyrase protein A (GyrA) has a dual translational initiation site targeting the mature protein to both chloroplasts and mitochondria, and there are individual targeting sequences for two of the DNA gyrase protein B (GyrB) homologues. N-terminal fusions of the organellar targeting sequences to GFPs support the hypothesis that one enzyme is targeted to the chloroplast and another to the mitochondrion, which correlates with supercoiling activity in isolated organelles. Treatment of seedlings and cultured cells with gyrase-specific drugs leads to growth inhibition. Knockout of A. thaliana gyrA is embryo-lethal whereas knockouts in the gyrB genes lead to seedling-lethal phenotypes or severely stunted growth and development. The A. thaliana genes have been cloned in Escherichia coli and found to complement gyrase temperature-sensitive strains. This report confirms the existence of DNA gyrase in eukaryotes and has important implications for drug targeting, organelle replication, and the evolution of topos in plants. PMID:15136745

  15. Proteolysis in Plastids of Arabidopsis Thaliana: Functional Analysis of ClpS1,2,T and their Physical and Genetic Interactions with the ClpPR Protease Core Complex and Clp Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Wijk, Klaas

    2009-01-12

    Chloroplasts are essential organelles required for plant growth and biomass production. They synthesize many essential secondary metabolites (e.g. hormones, isoprenoids, amino acids, etc.) and house the photosynthetic apparatus needed for conversion of light energy and CO2 into chemical energy [in the form of reduced carbohydrates, ATP and NADPH]. Thus chloroplasts are essential for life on earth and essential for production of bioenergy. Formation and maintenance of a functional chloroplast requires an extensive investment in the biogenesis and homeostasis apparatus. Protease and proteolysis play a critical role in these processes, with the Clp gene family being particularly central. Proteolysis of proteins and protein complexes in plastids is poorly understood, and is not only critical for biogenesis, adaptation and maintenance but is also important for plant development. Several years ago, the vanWijk lab identified a large and relatively abundant ClpP/R/S complex, along with ClpC1,C2 and ClpD chaperones and a putative Clp affinity modulator in plastids. So far, no substrate recognition mechanism has been determined for any Clp complex in plants. The purpose of this grant was to initiate functional analysis of three members of the Clp family.

  16. A review on production of serine alkaline protease by Bacillus spp

    OpenAIRE

    Biswanath Bhunia; Bikram Basak; Apurba Dey

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, protease has gained considerable importance in the world market. Proteases are groups of proteins included in the subclass hydrolases, within the main class enzymes. Serine alkaline proteases (SAP) are one of the most important groups of industrial enzymes. They account for approximately 35% of the total microbial enzyme sales. Serine protease is produced by various types of fermentation techniques using microorganism. Among the proteases, bacterial proteases are more signifi...

  17. Establishment of a Gene Expression System in Rice Chloroplast and Obtainment of PPT-Resistant Rice Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi-nü; SUN Bing-yao; SU Ning; MENG Xiang-xun; ZHANG Zhi-fang; SHEN Gui-fang

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to the situation of random integration of foreign genes in nuclear transformation,the introduction of genes via chloroplast genetic engineering is characterized by site-specific pattern via homologous recombination.To establish an expression system for alien genes in rice chloroplast,the intergenic region of ndhF and trnL was selected as target for sitespecific integration of PPT-resistant bar gene in this study.Two DNA fragments suitable for homologous recombination were cloned from rice chloroplast genome DNA using PCR technique,and the chloroplast-specific expression vector pRB was constructed by fusing a modified 16S rRNA gene promoter to bar gene together with terminator of psbA gene 3'sequence.Chloroplast transformation was carried out by biolistic bombardment of sterile rice calli with the pRB construct.Subsequently,the regenerated plantlets and seeds of progeny arising from reciprocal cross to the wild-type lines were obtained.Molecular analysis suggested that the bar gene has been integrated into rice chloroplast genome.Genetic analysis revealed that bar gene could be transmitted and expressed normally in chloroplast genome.Thus,the bar gene conferred not only selection pressure for the transformation of rice chloroplast genome,but PPT-resistant trait for rice plants as well.It is suggested that an efficient gene expression system in the rice chloroplast has been established by chloroplast transformation technique.

  18. Development of the First Chloroplast Microsatellite Loci in Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Xiang Xie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: To investigate population genetics, phylogeography, and cultivar origin of Ginkgo biloba, chloroplast microsatellite primers were developed. Methods and Results: Twenty-one chloroplast microsatellite markers were identified referring to the two published chloroplast genomes of G. biloba. Polymorphisms were assessed on four natural populations from the two refugia in China. Eight loci were detected to be polymorphic in these populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven, and the unbiased haploid diversity per locus varied from 0.441 to 0.807. Conclusions: For the first time, we developed 21 chloroplast microsatellite markers for G. biloba, including 13 monomorphic and eight polymorphic ones within the assessed natural populations. These markers should provide a powerful tool for the study of genetic variation of both natural and cultivated populations of G. biloba, as well as cultivars.

  19. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  20. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  1. Running a little late: chloroplast Fe status and the circadian clock

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Grandon T; Erin L Connolly

    2013-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is essential for plant growth and survival. Two papers now report that chloroplast Iron levels also regulate the period of the circadian clock, which might confer fitness advantage by linking iron status to daily changes in environmental conditions.

  2. The toxic dinoflagellate Dinophysis acuminata harbors permanent chloroplasts of cryptomomad prigin, not kleptochloroplasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Lydia; Moestrup, Øjvind; Hansen, Per Juel;

    2010-01-01

    Most species belonging to the toxigenic genus Dinophysis have chloroplasts of cryptophyte origin. Whether these chloroplasts are temporarily sequestered from the prey, or permanently established under the control of the dinoflagellate is currently disputed. To investigate this, a culture...... of Dinophysis acuminata was established by feeding it the phototrophic ciliate Mesodinium rubrum (= Myrionecta rubra), which again was fed the cryptophyte Teleaulax amphioxeia. Molecular analysis comprising the nucleomorph LSU and two chloroplast markers (tufA gene and a fragment from the end of 16S r......DNA to the beginning of 23S rDNA) resulted in identical sequences for the three organisms. Yet, transmission electron microscopy of the three organisms revealed that several chloroplast features separated D. acuminata from both T. amphioxeia and M. rubrum. The thylakoid arrangement, the number of membranes around...

  3. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A; Lewis, Paul O

    2016-06-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophyceae with fully sequenced chloroplast genomes. Further analyses and interpretation of the data can be found in "Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution" (Fučíková et al., In review) [1]. PMID:27054159

  4. Programmed chloroplast destruction during leaf senescence involves 13-lipoxygenase (13-LOX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Armin; Kang, ChulHee; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Christiane; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen

    2016-03-22

    Leaf senescence is the terminal stage in the development of perennial plants. Massive physiological changes occur that lead to the shut down of photosynthesis and a cessation of growth. Leaf senescence involves the selective destruction of the chloroplast as the site of photosynthesis. Here, we show that 13-lipoxygenase (13-LOX) accomplishes a key role in the destruction of chloroplasts in senescing plants and propose a critical role of its NH2-terminal chloroplast transit peptide. The 13-LOX enzyme identified here accumulated in the plastid envelope and catalyzed the dioxygenation of unsaturated membrane fatty acids, leading to a selective destruction of the chloroplast and the release of stromal constituents. Because 13-LOX pathway products comprise compounds involved in insect deterrence and pathogen defense (volatile aldehydes and oxylipins), a mechanism of unmolested nitrogen and carbon relocation is suggested that occurs from leaves to seeds and roots during fall.

  5. Frataxin Is Localized to Both the Chloroplast and Mitochondrion and Is Involved in Chloroplast Fe-S Protein Function in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria R Turowski

    Full Text Available Frataxin plays a key role in eukaryotic cellular iron metabolism, particularly in mitochondrial heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. However, its precise role has yet to be elucidated. In this work, we studied the subcellular localization of Arabidopsis frataxin, AtFH, using confocal microscopy, and found a novel dual localization for this protein. We demonstrate that plant frataxin is targeted to both the mitochondria and the chloroplast, where it may play a role in Fe-S cluster metabolism as suggested by functional studies on nitrite reductase (NIR and ferredoxin (Fd, two Fe-S containing chloroplast proteins, in AtFH deficient plants. Our results indicate that frataxin deficiency alters the normal functioning of chloroplasts by affecting the levels of Fe, chlorophyll, and the photosynthetic electron transport chain in this organelle.

  6. Characterizing proteases in an Antarctic Janthinobacterium sp. isolate:Evidence of a protease horizontal gene transfer event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cecilia Martinez-Rosales; Juan Jos Marizcurrena; Andrs Iriarte; Natalia Fullana; Hctor Musto; Susana Castro-Sowinski

    2015-01-01

    We report the isolation of a cold-adapted bacterium belonging to the genus Janthinobacterium (named AU11), from a water sample collected in Lake Uruguay (King George Island, South Shetlands). AU11 (growth between 4°C and 30°C) produces a single cold-active extracellular protease (ExPAU11), differentially expressed at low temperature. ExPAU11 was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) as an alkaline metallo-protease (70% coverage with an extracellular protease of Janthinobacterium sp. PI12), and by protease-inhibitor screening identified as a serine-protease. To the best of our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence of a cold-active extracellular protease produced by Janthinobacterium. Furthermore, we identified a serine-protease gene (named JSP8A) showing 60% identity (98%query coverage) to subtilisin peptidases belonging to the S8 family (S8A subfamily) of many cyanobacteria. A phylogenetic analysis of the JSP8A protease, along with related bacterial protein sequences, confirms that JSP8A clusters with S8A subtilisin sequences from different cyanobacteria, and is clearly separated from S8A bacterial sequences of other phyla (including its own). An analysis of the genomic organization around JSP8A suggests that this protease gene was acquired in an event that duplicated a racemase gene involved in transforming L- to D-amino acids. Our results suggest that AU11 probably acquired this subtilisin-like protease gene by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from a cyanobacterium. We discuss the relevance of a bacterial protease-HGT in the Antarctic environment in light of this hypothesis.

  7. Control of exocellular proteases in dermatophytes and especially Trichophyton rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meevootisom, V; Niederpruem, D J

    1979-06-01

    The production of proteases was investigated during growth of dermatophytic fungi with special emphasis on Trichophyton rubrum. Exogenous glucose suppressed elastase production in all dermatophytes examined. The production of protease active guinea pig hair in keratin-salts broth by Microsporum gypseum. Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum was also suppressed by glucose. Various carbohydrates added to keratin-salts broth curtailed protease production by T. rubrum as did individual amino acids but ammonium phosphate did not. Enzyme activities against guinea pig hair were compared in twenty-one diverse clinical isolates of T. rubrum cultured in keratin-salts broth. Activity also occurred towards casein, bovine serum albumin, keratin, collagen and elastin after keratin-growth. Studies concerning the properties of enzyme activities in culture filtrates of T. rubrum after keratin-growth suggested that multiple proteases occurred here. Hydrolysis of guinea pig hair and elastin were optimal at pH7 while keratinase was most active at alkaline pH. Divalent cations stimulated protease(s). Ferric ion and mercuric ion stimulated keratinase but were inhibitory to guinea pig hair hydrolysis and elastase. Chelating agents inhibited elastase and the hydrolysis of guinea pig hair more severely than keratinase and all of those effects were reversed by excess calcium. A serine-protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF), curtailed keratinase but was less inhibitory to elastase and guinea pig hair hydrolysis. Soybean trypsin inhibitor arrested each protease.

  8. Isolation and characterization of proteases from Bacteroides melaninogenicus.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimura, S.; Nakamura, T.(International Center for Elementary Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan)

    1981-01-01

    We isolated two types of intracellular proteases from a strain of Bacteroides melaninogenicus. These enzymes were extracted from cells by ultrasonic treatment and were partially purified. These two enzymes (proteases I and II) differed in molecular weight, heat stability, sensitivity to reducing agents, Km value, and optimum pH for activity.

  9. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  10. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the

  11. Milestones in chloroplast genetic engineering: an environmentally friendly era in biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Daniell, Henry; Khan, Muhammad S.; Allison, Lori

    2002-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes defied the laws of Mendelian inheritance at the dawn of plant genetics, and continue to defy the mainstream approach to biotechnology, leading the field in an environmentally friendly direction. Recent success in engineering the chloroplast genome for resistance to herbicides, insects, disease and drought, and for production of biopharmaceuticals, has opened the door to a new era in biotechnology. The successful engineering of tomato chromoplasts for high-level transgene e...

  12. Release of proteins from intact chloroplasts induced by reactive oxygen species during biotic and abiotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Chul Kwon

    Full Text Available Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress or paraquat (abiotic stress, GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide, which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These

  13. The conserved endoribonuclease YbeY is required for chloroplast ribosomal RNA processing in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinwen; Zhou, Wenbin; Liu, Guifeng; Yang, Chuanping; Sun, Yi; Wu, Wenjuan; Cao, Shenquan; Wang, Chong; Hai, Guanghui; Wang, Zhifeng; Bock, Ralph; Huang, Jirong; Cheng, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    Maturation of chloroplast ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) comprises several endoribonucleolytic and exoribonucleolytic processing steps. However, little is known about the specific enzymes involved and the cleavage steps they catalyze. Here, we report the functional characterization of the single Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene encoding a putative YbeY endoribonuclease. AtYbeY null mutants are seedling lethal, indicating that AtYbeY function is essential for plant growth. Knockdown plants display slow growth and show pale-green leaves. Physiological and ultrastructural analyses of atybeY mutants revealed impaired photosynthesis and defective chloroplast development. Fluorescent microcopy analysis showed that, when fused with the green fluorescence protein, AtYbeY is localized in chloroplasts. Immunoblot and RNA gel-blot assays revealed that the levels of chloroplast-encoded subunits of photosynthetic complexes are reduced in atybeY mutants, but the corresponding transcripts accumulate normally. In addition, atybeY mutants display defective maturation of both the 5' and 3' ends of 16S, 23S, and 4.5S rRNAs as well as decreased accumulation of mature transcripts from the transfer RNA genes contained in the chloroplast rRNA operon. Consequently, mutant plants show a severe deficiency in ribosome biogenesis, which, in turn, results in impaired plastid translational activity. Furthermore, biochemical assays show that recombinant AtYbeY is able to cleave chloroplast rRNAs as well as messenger RNAs and transfer RNAs in vitro. Taken together, our findings indicate that AtYbeY is a chloroplast-localized endoribonuclease that is required for chloroplast rRNA processing and thus for normal growth and development.

  14. Diversity in biosynthetic pathways of galactolipids in the light of endosymbiotic origin of chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eSato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and chloroplasts perform oxygenic photosynthesis, and share a common origin. Galactolipids are present in the photosynthetic membranes of both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts, but the biosynthetic pathways of the galactolipids are significantly different in the two systems. In this minireview, we explain the history of the discovery of the cyanobacterial pathway, and present a probable scenario of the evolution of the two pathways.

  15. Chloroplast-Derived Vaccine Antigens and Biopharmaceuticals: Expression, Folding, Assembly and Functionality

    OpenAIRE

    Chebolu, S.; Daniell, H

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgene expression, transgene containment via maternal inheritance, and multi-gene expression in a single transformation event. Oral delivery is facilitated by hyperexpression of vaccine antigens against cholera, tetanus, anthrax, plague, or canine parvovirus (4%–31% of total soluble protein, TSP) in transgenic chloroplasts (leaves) or non-green plastids (carrots, tomato) as well as the availability of antib...

  16. THE OCCURRENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ENDOSYMBIOTIC CHLOROPLASTS IN THE DIGESTIVE GLANDS OF HERBIVOROUS OPISTHOBRANCHS(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D L

    1967-12-01

    Intact algal chloroplasts have been found in the digestive glands of 5 species of Opisthobranchia belonging to the order Saccoglossa. Preliminary studies on 3 of these confirm their endosymbiotic nature. It is suggested that the occurrence of these endosymbiotic organelles may be widespread among related species of Saccoglossa. Their independent functional existence supports the view that chloroplasts possess a system of nonchromosomal inheritance. PMID:27065036

  17. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Omani Lime (Citrus aurantiifolia) and Comparative Analysis within the Rosids

    OpenAIRE

    Huei-Jiun Su; Hogenhout, Saskia A.; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M.; Chih-Horng Kuo

    2014-01-01

    The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C....

  18. Diversification and genetic differentiation of cultivated melon inferred from sequence polymorphism in the chloroplast genome

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Akashi, Yukari; FUKUNAGA, Kenji; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Aierken, Yasheng; Nishida, Hidetaka; Long, Chun Lin; Yoshino, Hiromichi; Sato, Yo-Ichiro; KATO, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Molecular analysis encouraged discovery of genetic diversity and relationships of cultivated melon (Cucumis melo L.). We sequenced nine inter- and intra-genic regions of the chloroplast genome, about 5500 bp, using 60 melon accessions and six reference accessions of wild species of Cucumis to show intra-specific variation of the chloroplast genome. Sequence polymorphisms were detected among melon accessions and other Cucumis species, indicating intra-specific diversification of the chloroplas...

  19. Time Gating of Chloroplast Autofluorescence Allows Clearer Fluorescence Imaging In Planta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Kodama

    Full Text Available Chloroplast, an organelle facilitating photosynthesis, exhibits strong autofluorescence, which is an undesired background signal that restricts imaging experiments with exogenous fluorophore in plants. In this study, the autofluorescence was characterized in planta under confocal laser microscopy, and it was found that the time-gated imaging technique completely eliminates the autofluorescence. As a demonstration of the technique, a clearer signal of fluorescent protein-tagged phototropin, a blue-light photoreceptor localized at the chloroplast periphery, was visualized in planta.

  20. Stress induces the assembly of RNA granules in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Uniacke, James; Zerges, William

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells under stress repress translation and localize these messenger RNAs (mRNAs) to cytoplasmic RNA granules. We show that specific stress stimuli induce the assembly of RNA granules in an organelle with bacterial ancestry, the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These chloroplast stress granules (cpSGs) form during oxidative stress and disassemble during recovery from stress. Like mammalian stress granules, cpSGs contain poly(A)-binding protein and the small, but not the lar...

  1. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta)

    OpenAIRE

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A.; Lewis, Paul O.

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophy...

  2. PAPP5 is involved in the tetrapyrrole mediated plastid signalling during chloroplast development

    OpenAIRE

    Juan de Dios Barajas-López; Dmitry Kremnev; Jehad Shaikhali; Aurora Piñas-Fernández; Asa Strand

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of chloroplast development in the light is dependent on nuclear encoded components. The nuclear genes encoding key components in the photosynthetic machinery are regulated by signals originating in the plastids. These plastid signals play an essential role in the regulation of photosynthesis associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) when proplastids develop into chloroplasts. One of the plastid signals is linked to the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and accumulation of the intermediates the...

  3. Uncovering the protein lysine and arginine methylation network in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Alban

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification of proteins by the addition of methyl groups to the side chains of Lys and Arg residues is proposed to play important roles in many cellular processes. In plants, identification of non-histone methylproteins at a cellular or subcellular scale is still missing. To gain insights into the extent of this modification in chloroplasts we used a bioinformatics approach to identify protein methyltransferases targeted to plastids and set up a workflow to specifically identify Lys and Arg methylated proteins from proteomic data used to produce the Arabidopsis chloroplast proteome. With this approach we could identify 31 high-confidence Lys and Arg methylation sites from 23 chloroplastic proteins, of which only two were previously known to be methylated. These methylproteins are split between the stroma, thylakoids and envelope sub-compartments. They belong to essential metabolic processes, including photosynthesis, and to the chloroplast biogenesis and maintenance machinery (translation, protein import, division. Also, the in silico identification of nine protein methyltransferases that are known or predicted to be targeted to plastids provided a foundation to build the enzymes/substrates relationships that govern methylation in chloroplasts. Thereby, using in vitro methylation assays with chloroplast stroma as a source of methyltransferases we confirmed the methylation sites of two targets, plastid ribosomal protein L11 and the β-subunit of ATP synthase. Furthermore, a biochemical screening of recombinant chloroplastic protein Lys methyltransferases allowed us to identify the enzymes involved in the modification of these substrates. The present study provides a useful resource to build the methyltransferases/methylproteins network and to elucidate the role of protein methylation in chloroplast biology.

  4. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Banana (Musa acuminata, Zingiberales): Insight into Plastid Monocotyledon Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Martin; Franc-Christophe Baurens; Céline Cardi; Jean-Marc Aury; Angélique D'Hont

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Banana (genus Musa) is a crop of major economic importance worldwide. It is a monocotyledonous member of the Zingiberales, a sister group of the widely studied Poales. Most cultivated bananas are natural Musa inter-(sub-)specific triploid hybrids. A Musa acuminata reference nuclear genome sequence was recently produced based on sequencing of genomic DNA enriched in nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Musa acuminata chloroplast genome was assembled with chloroplast reads e...

  5. Comparative proteomics of chloroplasts envelopes from bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts reveals novel membrane proteins with a possible role in C4-related metabolite fluxes and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana eManandhar-Shrestha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As the world population grows, our need for food increases drastically. Limited amounts of arable land lead to a competition between food and fuel crops, while changes in the global climate may impact future crop yields. Thus, a second green revolution will need a better understanding of the processes essential for plant growth and development. One approach toward the solution of this problem is to better understand regulatory and transport processes in C4 plants. C4 plants display an up to 10-fold higher apparent CO2 assimilation and higher yields while maintaining high water use efficiency. This requires differential regulation of mesophyll (M and bundle sheath (BS chloroplast development as well as higher metabolic fluxes of photosynthetic intermediates between cells and across chloroplast envelopes. While previous analyses of overall chloroplast membranes have yielded significant insight, our comparative proteomics approach using enriched BS and M chloroplast envelopes of Zea mays allowed us to identify 37 proteins of unknown function that have not been seen in these earlier studies. We identified 280 proteins, 84% of which are known/predicted to be present in chloroplasts (cp. 74% have a known or predicted membrane association. 21 membrane proteins were 2-15 times more abundant in BS cells, while 36 proteins were more abundant in M cp envelopes. These proteins could represent additional candidates of proteins essential for development or metabolite transport processes in C4 plants. RT-PCR confirmed differential expression of thirteen candidate genes. Cp association was confirmed using GFP labeling. Genes for a PIC-like protein and an ER-AP-like protein show an early transient increase in gene expression during the transition to light. In addition, PIC gene expression is increased in the immature part of the leaf and was lower in the fully developed parts of the leaf, suggesting a need for/incorporation of the protein during chloroplast

  6. The Chloroplast Function Database II: a comprehensive collection of homozygous mutants and their phenotypic/genotypic traits for nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Akiyama, Kenji; Tomonaga, Yumi; Kato, Aya; Sato, Yuka; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nagata, Noriko; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    The Chloroplast Function Database has so far offered phenotype information on mutants of the nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins in Arabidopsis that pertains to >200 phenotypic data sets that were obtained from 1,722 transposon- or T-DNA-tagged lines. Here, we present the development of the second version of the database, which is named the Chloroplast Function Database II and was redesigned to increase the number of mutant characters and new user-friendly tools for data mining and integration. The upgraded database offers information on genome-wide mutant screens for any visible phenotype against 2,495 tagged lines to create a comprehensive homozygous mutant collection. The collection consists of 147 lines with seedling phenotypes and 185 lines for which we could not obtain homozygotes, as well as 1,740 homozygotes with wild-type phenotypes. Besides providing basic information about primer lists that were used for the PCR genotyping of T-DNA-tagged lines and explanations about the preparation of homozygous mutants and phenotype screening, the database includes access to a link between the gene locus and existing publicly available databases. This gives users access to a combined pool of data, enabling them to gain valuable insights into biological processes. In addition, high-resolution images of plastid morphologies of mutants with seedling-specific chloroplast defects as observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are available in the current database. This database is used to compare the phenotypes of visually identifiable mutants with their plastid ultrastructures and to evaluate their potential significance from characteristic patterns of plastid morphology in vivo. Thus, the Chloroplast Function Database II is a useful and comprehensive information resource that can help researchers to connect individual Arabidopsis genes to plastid functions on the basis of phenotype analysis of our tagged mutant collection. It can be freely accessed at http://rarge.psc.riken.jp/chloroplast/.

  7. Immunoglobulin A1 protease activity in Gemella haemolysans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, JA; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    that cleaves the Pro(227)-Thr(228) peptide bond in the hinge region of the alpha1 chain like that of several Streptococcus species. Phenotypic characterization of the isolates demonstrates that screening for IgA1 protease activity provides a valuable means for species differentiation in this group of bacteria.......The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence and nature of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease activity in members of the genus Gemella and related taxa. Among a total of 22 Gemella strains belonging to the four species Gemella haemolysans, Gemella morbillorum, Gemella sanguinis......, and Gemella bergeriae and four reference strains of the species Helcococcus kunzii, Facklamia hominis, and Globicatella sanguinis, IgA1 protease activity was an exclusive character of all nine isolates of G. haemolysans. The IgA1 protease of G. haemolysans appears to be a metallo-type IgA1 protease...

  8. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. falciparum. Structural and functional analysis of falcipains showed that they have unique domains including a refolding domain and a hemoglobin binding domain. Overall, the complexes of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 with small and macromolecular inhibitors provide structural insight to facilitate the design or modification of effective drug treatment against malaria. Drug development targeting falcipains should be aided by a strong foundation of biochemical and structural studies.

  9. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation.

  10. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-11-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signaling including PR-gene expression. Therefore the inhibition of apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases by CC9 is essential to suppress host immunity during U. maydis infection. Here were present new experimental data on the cysteine protease-cystatin interaction and provide an in silco analysis of plant cystatins and the identified apoplastic cysteine proteases.

  11. Purification and Characterization of An Alkaline Protease from Acetes chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiachao; LIU Xin; LI Zhaojie; XU Jie; XUE Changhu; GAO Xin

    2005-01-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55 ℃ and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+ , EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  12. Intervention with Serine Protease Activity with Small Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases perform proteolytic reactions in many physiological and metabolic processes and have been certified as targets for therapeutics. Small peptides can be used as potent antagonists to target serine proteases and intervene with their activities. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u...... before, we elucidated the binding and inhibitory mechanism by using multiple techniques, like X-ray crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance analysis. By studying the peptide-enzyme interaction, we discovered an unusual inhibitor-protease...... discovered that the mupain-1 scaffold is highly versatile, based on which mupain-1 is potentially able to be retargeted to other serine proteases in the trypsin-like clan. With the scaffold of mupain-1, we rationally designed three inhibitors with high affinity and specificity for another serine protease...

  13. Alkaline Protease Production by a Strain of Marine Yeasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; CHI Zhenming; MA Chunling

    2006-01-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China.The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45 ℃.The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5 g soluble starch and 2.0 g NaNO3 in 100 mL seawater with initial pH6.0.The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5 ℃, aeration rate 8.0 L min -1 and agitation speed 150 r min-1.Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 Umg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30 h of fermentation.

  14. Identification of a senescence-related protease in coriander leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Senescence-related protease may play an important role in leaf senescence. By improved SDS-Gela- tin-PAGE assay, a 63 ku senescence-related protease (63 SRP) in coriander leaves was identified. Activity of 63 SRP was increased in parallel to the advance of coriander leaf senescence, and inhibited by treating the leaf with gibberellic acid, and enhanced by ethylene treatment. The 63 SRP was suggested to be a serine protease based on the fact that its activity was inhibited by the protease inhibitor PMSF. The optimal temperature for the activity of the 70 ku protease was 50℃. The maximal activity was observed at pH 6-9, some activity could be observed on the gel slices incubated at pH 5 or 11. The 63 SRP was partly purified by the way of ammonium sulfate precipitation and then gel slicing after gel electrophoresis.

  15. Analysis of the Complete Chloroplast Genome of a Medicinal Plant, Dianthus superbus var. longicalyncinus, from a Comparative Genomics Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusamy Raman

    Full Text Available Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicinal plant that is also used for ornamental purposes. In this study, D. superbus was compared to its closely related family of Caryophyllaceae chloroplast (cp genomes such as Lychnis chalcedonica and Spinacia oleracea. D. superbus had the longest large single copy (LSC region (82,805 bp, with some variations in the inverted repeat region A (IRA/LSC regions. The IRs underwent both expansion and constriction during evolution of the Caryophyllaceae family; however, intense variations were not identified. The pseudogene ribosomal protein subunit S19 (rps19 was identified at the IRA/LSC junction, but was not present in the cp genome of other Caryophyllaceae family members. The translation initiation factor IF-1 (infA and ribosomal protein subunit L23 (rpl23 genes were absent from the Dianthus cp genome. When the cp genome of Dianthus was compared with 31 other angiosperm lineages, the infA gene was found to have been lost in most members of rosids, solanales of asterids and Lychnis of Caryophyllales, whereas rpl23 gene loss or pseudogization had occurred exclusively in Caryophyllales. Nevertheless, the cp genome of Dianthus and Spinacia has two introns in the proteolytic subunit of ATP-dependent protease (clpP gene, but Lychnis has lost introns from the clpP gene. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of individual protein-coding genes infA and rpl23 revealed that gene loss or pseudogenization occurred independently in the cp genome of Dianthus. Molecular phylogenetic analysis also demonstrated a sister relationship between Dianthus and Lychnis based on 78 protein-coding sequences. The results presented herein will contribute to studies of the evolution, molecular biology and genetic engineering of the medicinal and ornamental plant, D. superbus var. longicalycinus.

  16. Analysis of the Complete Chloroplast Genome of a Medicinal Plant, Dianthus superbus var. longicalyncinus, from a Comparative Genomics Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Gurusamy; Park, SeonJoo

    2015-01-01

    Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicinal plant that is also used for ornamental purposes. In this study, D. superbus was compared to its closely related family of Caryophyllaceae chloroplast (cp) genomes such as Lychnis chalcedonica and Spinacia oleracea. D. superbus had the longest large single copy (LSC) region (82,805 bp), with some variations in the inverted repeat region A (IRA)/LSC regions. The IRs underwent both expansion and constriction during evolution of the Caryophyllaceae family; however, intense variations were not identified. The pseudogene ribosomal protein subunit S19 (rps19) was identified at the IRA/LSC junction, but was not present in the cp genome of other Caryophyllaceae family members. The translation initiation factor IF-1 (infA) and ribosomal protein subunit L23 (rpl23) genes were absent from the Dianthus cp genome. When the cp genome of Dianthus was compared with 31 other angiosperm lineages, the infA gene was found to have been lost in most members of rosids, solanales of asterids and Lychnis of Caryophyllales, whereas rpl23 gene loss or pseudogization had occurred exclusively in Caryophyllales. Nevertheless, the cp genome of Dianthus and Spinacia has two introns in the proteolytic subunit of ATP-dependent protease (clpP) gene, but Lychnis has lost introns from the clpP gene. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of individual protein-coding genes infA and rpl23 revealed that gene loss or pseudogenization occurred independently in the cp genome of Dianthus. Molecular phylogenetic analysis also demonstrated a sister relationship between Dianthus and Lychnis based on 78 protein-coding sequences. The results presented herein will contribute to studies of the evolution, molecular biology and genetic engineering of the medicinal and ornamental plant, D. superbus var. longicalycinus.

  17. Chloroplasts activity and PAP-signaling regulate programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2016-01-09

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3’-phosphoadenosine 5’-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5’-3’ exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Binding of 16S rRNA to chloroplast 30S ribosomal proteins blotted on nitrocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozier, C; Mache, R

    1984-10-11

    Protein-RNA associations were studied by a method using proteins blotted on a nitrocellulose sheet. This method was assayed with Escherichia Coli 30S ribosomal components. In stringent conditions (300 mM NaCl or 20 degrees C) only 9 E. coli ribosomal proteins strongly bound to the 16S rRNA: S4, S5, S7, S9, S12, S13, S14, S19, S20. 8 of these proteins have been previously found to bind independently to the 16S rRNA. The same method was applied to determine protein-RNA interactions in spinach chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunits. A set of only 7 proteins was bound to chloroplast rRNA in stringent conditions: chloroplast S6, S10, S11, S14, S15, S17 and S22. They also bound to E. coli 16S rRNA. This set includes 4 chloroplast-synthesized proteins: S6, S11, S15 and S22. The core particles obtained after treatment by LiCl of chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit contained 3 proteins (S6, S10 and S14) which are included in the set of 7 binding proteins. This set of proteins probably play a part in the early steps of the assembly of the chloroplast 30S ribosomal subunit.

  19. Rapid mass movement of chloroplasts during segment formation of the calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W D Larkum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba is abundant on coral reefs and is important in the production of calcium carbonate sediments. The process by which new green segments are formed over-night is revealed here for the first time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Growth of new segments was visualised by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy and by pulse amplitude modulation (PAM fluorimetry. Apical colourless proto-segments were initiated on day 1, and formed a loose network of non-calcified, non-septate filaments, containing no chloroplasts. Rapid greening was initiated at dusk by i the mass movement of chloroplasts into these filaments from the parent segment and ii the growth of new filaments containing chloroplasts. Greening was usually complete in 3-5 h and certainly before dawn on day 2 when the first signs of calcification were apparent. Mass chloroplast movement took place at a rate of ∼0.65 µm/s. Photosynthetic yield and rate remained low for a period of 1 to several hours, indicating that the chloroplasts were made de novo. Use of the inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin d indicated that the movement process is dependent on both microtubules and microfilaments. SIGNIFICANCE: This unusual process involves the mass movement of chloroplasts at a high rate into new segments during the night and rapid calcification on the following day and may be an adaptation to minimise the impact of herbivorous activity.

  20. Effects of Ce3+ on Chloroplast Senescence of Spinach under Light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Fan; Ma Zhenni; Liu Chao; Wu Cheng; Zhou Juan; Gao Fengqing; Hong Fashui

    2005-01-01

    The effects of Ce3+ on the chloroplast senescence of spinach under light were studied. The results show that when the chloroplasts are illuminated for 1, 5 and 10 min with 500 μmol·cm-2·min-1 light intensity, the oxygen evolution rate is rapidly increased. When the chloroplasts are treated for 20, 30 and 40 min with 500 μmol·cm-2·min-1 light intensity, the oxygen evolution rate is gradually decreased. While spinach is treated with 16 μmol·L-1 Ce3+, the rate of oxygen evolution of chloroplasts in different illumination time (1,5, 10, 20, 30, 40 min) is higher than that of control, and when illumination time is over 10 min, the reduction of the oxygen evolution rate is lower than that of control. It suggests that Ce3+ treatment can protect chloroplasts from aging for long time illumination. The mechanism research results indicate that Ce3+ treatment can significantly decrease accumulation of active oxygen free radicals such as O2·- and H2O2, and reduce the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), and maintain stability of membrane structure of chloroplast under light. It is shown that the redox took place between cerium and free radicals, which are eliminated in a large number, leading to protect the membrane from peroxidating.

  1. Blue-light-induced rapid chloroplast de-anchoring in Vallisneria epidermal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuuki Sakai; Shin-Ichiro Inoue; Akiko Harada; Ken-Ichiro Shimazaki; Shingo Takagi

    2015-01-01

    In the outer periclinal cytoplasm of leaf epidermal cells of an aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria, blue light induces “chloroplast de‐anchoring”, a rapid decline in the resistance of chloroplasts against centrifugal force. Chloroplast deanchoring is known induced within 1 min of irradiation with high‐fluence‐rate blue light specifically, preceding the commencement of chloroplasts migration toward the anticlinal cytoplasm. However, its regulatory mechanism has remained elusive, although pharmacological analysis suggested that a calcium release from intracellular calcium stores is necessary for the response. In search of the responsible photoreceptors, immunoblotting analysis using antibodies against phototropins demonstrated that cross‐reactive polypeptides of 120‐kDa exist in the plasma‐membrane fraction prepared from the leaves. In vitro phosphorylation analysis revealed that 120‐kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by exposure to blue light in a fluence‐dependent manner. The blue‐light‐induced phosphorylation activity was sensitive to a Ser/Thr kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, and unusually was retained at a high level for a long time in darkness. Furthermore, phototropin gene homologs (Vallisneria PHOTOTROPIN1 and PHOTOTROPIN2) expressed in leaves were isolated. We propose that calciumregulated chloroplast de‐anchoring, possibly mediated by phototropins, is an initial process of the blue‐light‐induced avoidance response of chloroplasts in Vallisneria.

  2. Patterns of synonymous codon usage bias in chloroplast genomes of seed plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Codon usage in chloroplast genome of six seed plants (Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus alba, Zea mays, Triticum aestivum,Pinus koraiensis and Cycas taitungensis) was analyzed to find general patterns of codon usage in chloroplast genomes of seed plants.The results show that chloroplast genomes of the six seed plants had similar codon usage patterns, with a strong bias towards a high representation of NNA and NNT codons. In chloroplast genomes of the six seed plants, the effective number of codons (ENC) for most genes was similar to that of the expected ENC based on the GC content at the third codon position, but several genes with low ENC values were laying below the expected curve. All of these data indicate that codon usage was dominated by a mutational bias in chloroplast genomes of seed plants and that selection appeared to be limited to a subset of genes and to only subtly affect codon us-age. Meantime, four, six, eight, nine, ten and 12 codons were defined as the optimal codons in chloroplast genomes of the six seed plants.

  3. Blue-light-induced rapid chloroplast de-anchoring in Vallisneria epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuuki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Harada, Akiko; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro; Takagi, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    In the outer periclinal cytoplasm of leaf epidermal cells of an aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria, blue light induces "chloroplast de-anchoring", a rapid decline in the resistance of chloroplasts against centrifugal force. Chloroplast de-anchoring is known induced within 1 min of irradiation with high-fluence-rate blue light specifically, preceding the commencement of chloroplasts migration toward the anticlinal cytoplasm. However, its regulatory mechanism has remained elusive, although pharmacological analysis suggested that a calcium release from intracellular calcium stores is necessary for the response. In search of the responsible photoreceptors, immunoblotting analysis using antibodies against phototropins demonstrated that cross-reactive polypeptides of 120-kDa exist in the plasma-membrane fraction prepared from the leaves. In vitro phosphorylation analysis revealed that 120-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by exposure to blue light in a fluence-dependent manner. The blue-light-induced phosphorylation activity was sensitive to a Ser/Thr kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, and unusually was retained at a high level for a long time in darkness. Furthermore, phototropin gene homologs (Vallisneria PHOTOTROPIN1 and PHOTOTROPIN2) expressed in leaves were isolated. We propose that calcium-regulated chloroplast de-anchoring, possibly mediated by phototropins, is an initial process of the blue-light-induced avoidance response of chloroplasts in Vallisneria. PMID:25231366

  4. Gustav Senn (1875-1945):The pioneer of chloroplast movement research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hironao Kataoka

    2015-01-01

    Gustav Senn analyzed for the first time light-induced movement and arrangement of chloroplasts. Using many plant species he performed physiological analyses of chloroplast migration in response to external stimuli, with emphasis on light. He determined light paths within a cel by measuring refractive indices and optical thickness of cel ular compartments and confirmed that chloroplasts migrate towards the region where the light intensity is optimum. After 6 to 7 years’ concentrated study, Senn published the famous monograph “Die Gestalts- und Lageveränderung der Pflanzen-Chromatophoren”(The Changes in Shape and Position of Plant Chloroplasts) in 1908. This book has stimulated many plant physiologists and photobiologists, because Senn not only thoroughly classified and defined various types of light-induced chloroplast migration but also already described possible interaction of different photoreceptor systems in Mougeotia more than 50 years before the discovery of phytochrome. This book also contains stil useful experimental hints and over-looked findings on the interaction between light and other factors, such as temperature, water content, and nourishment. After publishing this book, Senn retreated from the study of chloroplasts and became a researcher of the Greek philoso-pher, Theophrastus. In this review, I introduce his biographical background and then summarize some of his key research accomplishment.

  5. Semi-continuous in situ magnetic separation for enhanced extracellular protease productionmodeling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerff, M.; Scholz, A.; Käppler, T.;

    2013-01-01

    In modern biotechnology proteases play a major role as detergent ingredients. Especially the production of extracellular protease by Bacillus species facilitates downstream processing because the protease can be directly harvested from the biosuspension. In situ magnetic separation (ISMS) constit......In modern biotechnology proteases play a major role as detergent ingredients. Especially the production of extracellular protease by Bacillus species facilitates downstream processing because the protease can be directly harvested from the biosuspension. In situ magnetic separation (ISMS......) constitutes an excellent adsorptive method for efficient extracellular protease removal during cultivation. In this work, the impact of semi‐continuous ISMS on the overall protease yield has been investigated. Results reveal significant removal of the protease from Bacillus licheniformis cultivations....... Bacitracin‐functionalized magnetic particles were successfully applied, regenerated and reused up to 30 times. Immediate reproduction of the protease after ISMS proved the biocompatibility of this integrated approach. Six subsequent ISMS steps significantly increased the overall protease yield up to 98...

  6. Different fates of the chloroplast tufA gene following its transfer to the nucleus in green algae.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldauf, S L; Manhart, J R; J.D. Palmer

    1990-01-01

    Previous work suggested that the tufA gene, encoding protein synthesis elongation factor Tu, was transferred from the chloroplast to the nucleus within the green algal lineage giving rise to land plants. In this report we investigate the timing and mode of transfer by examining chloroplast and nuclear DNA from the three major classes of green algae, with emphasis on the class Charophyceae, the proposed sister group to land plants. Filter hybridizations reveal a chloroplast tufA gene in all Ul...

  7. [Fluorescence used to investigate the sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Gang; Yang, Yun-Jing; Lu, Hong

    2009-07-01

    A system for studying biological effect of radio frequency electromagnetic field was developed. The system can form an area where electromagnetic wave with large frequency range is well distributed. The strength of electromagnetic wave was measured easily. Electromagnetic wave in the system did not have effect on environment. The sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation of 300 MHz under power density of 5 mW x cm(-2) was studied by the spectral analysis method of fluorescence of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS) and the changes in chlorophyll a (Chla) fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane. The result showed that the position of spectrum of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane did not change, but the intensity of ANS fluorescence was obviously increased under the action of electromagnetic radiation with power density of 1-5 mW x cm(-2). There was an increase in the intensity of ANS fluorescence with the increase in electromagnetic radiation. The increase of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane showed that low level electromagnetic field induced the decrease in fluidity of chloroplast membrane compared with control experiment. The cause of the change in the fluidity could be related to the polarization of chloroplast membrane under the electromagnetic field. The analysis of Chla fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane indicated that low level electromagnetic field of 300 MHz made the fluorescence parameters F0 and F(VI/)F(V) decrease, and F(V)/Fo, Fv/F(m) and deltaF(V)/T increase. It was showed that low level electromagnetic field caused the change of non-active center of photosystem II of spinach chloroplast membrane to active center and the increase in potential active and photochemical efficiency of PSII, and promoted the transmit process of electron in photosynthesis of chloroplast membrane of photosynthesis cell in spinach leaf. The study confirmed

  8. PEGylated substrates of NSP4 protease: A tool to study protease specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocka, Magdalena; Gruba, Natalia; Grzywa, Renata; Giełdoń, Artur; Bąchor, Remigiusz; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Dieter, Jenne; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Herein we present the synthesis of a novel type of peptidomimetics composed of repeating diaminopropionic acid residues modified with structurally diverse heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol chains (abbreviated as DAPEG). Based on the developed compounds, a library of fluorogenic substrates was synthesized. Further library deconvolution towards human neutrophil serine protease 4 (NSP4) yielded highly sensitive and selective internally quenched peptidomimetic substrates. In silico analysis of the obtained peptidomimetics revealed the presence of an interaction network with distant subsites located on the enzyme surface.

  9. Reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Shankar; P Kolandaivel

    2007-09-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases has been investigated using ab initio and density functional theory. On the irreversible process, after breakdown of tetrahedral intermediate (INT1), small 1-2 anionotropic has been formed and rearranged to give stable by-products sulfenamide (P1) and thiocarbamate (P2) with considerable energy loss. While, on the reversible part of this reaction mechanism, intermediate (INT2) breaks down on oxidation, to form a stable product (P3). Topological and AIM analyses have been performed for hydrogen bonded complex in this reaction profile. Intrinsic reaction coordinates [IRC, minimum-energy path (MEP)] calculation connects the transition state between R-INT1, INT1-P1 and INT1-P2. The products P1, P2 and P3 are energetically more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic.

  10. Protease-Mediated Maturation of HIV: Inhibitors of Protease and the Maturation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Adamson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease-mediated maturation of HIV-1 virus particles is essential for virus infectivity. Maturation occurs concomitant with immature virus particle release and is mediated by the viral protease (PR, which sequentially cleaves the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into mature protein domains. Maturation triggers a second assembly event that generates a condensed conical capsid core. The capsid core organizes the viral RNA genome and viral proteins to facilitate viral replication in the next round of infection. The fundamental role of proteolytic maturation in the generation of mature infectious particles has made it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Development of small molecules that target the PR active site has been highly successful and nine protease inhibitors (PIs have been approved for clinical use. This paper provides an overview of their development and clinical use together with a discussion of problems associated with drug resistance. The second-half of the paper discusses a novel class of antiretroviral drug termed maturation inhibitors, which target cleavage sites in Gag not PR itself. The paper focuses on bevirimat (BVM the first-in-class maturation inhibitor: its mechanism of action and the implications of naturally occurring polymorphisms that confer reduced susceptibility to BVM in phase II clinical trials.

  11. Mesophyll cells of C4 plants have fewer chloroplasts than those of closely related C3 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Rennie, Troy D; Khoshravesh, Roxana; Sultmanis, Stefanie; Khaikin, Yannay; Ludwig, Martha; Sage, Rowan F

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of C(4) photosynthesis from C(3) ancestors eliminates ribulose bisphosphate carboxylation in the mesophyll (M) cell chloroplast while activating phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation in the cytosol. These changes may lead to fewer chloroplasts and different chloroplast positioning within M cells. To evaluate these possibilities, we compared chloroplast number, size and position in M cells of closely related C(3), C(3) -C(4) intermediate and C(4) species from 12 lineages of C(4) evolution. All C(3) species had more chloroplasts per M cell area than their C(4) relatives in high-light growth conditions. C(3) species also had higher chloroplast coverage of the M cell periphery than C(4) species, particularly opposite intercellular air spaces. In M cells from 10 of the 12 C(4) lineages, a greater fraction of the chloroplast envelope was pulled away from the plasmalemma in the C(4) species than their C(3) relatives. C(3) -C(4) intermediate species generally exhibited similar patterns as their C(3) relatives. We interpret these results to reflect adaptive shifts that facilitate efficient C(4) function by enhancing diffusive access to the site of primary carbon fixation in the cytosol. Fewer chloroplasts in C(4) M cells would also reduce shading of the bundle sheath chloroplasts, which also generate energy required by C(4) photosynthesis.

  12. Genetic Interactions Reveal that Specific Defects of Chloroplast Translation are Associated with the Suppression of var2-Mediated Leaf Variegation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiayan Liu; Mengdi Zheng; Rui Wang; Ruijuan Wang; Lijun An; Steve R. Rodermel; Fei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development.

  13. An optimized chloroplast DNA extraction protocol for grasses (Poaceae proves suitable for whole plastid genome sequencing and SNP detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Diekmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obtaining chloroplast genome sequences is important to increase the knowledge about the fundamental biology of plastids, to understand evolutionary and ecological processes in the evolution of plants, to develop biotechnological applications (e.g. plastid engineering and to improve the efficiency of breeding schemes. Extraction of pure chloroplast DNA is required for efficient sequencing of chloroplast genomes. Unfortunately, most protocols for extracting chloroplast DNA were developed for eudicots and do not produce sufficiently pure yields for a shotgun sequencing approach of whole plastid genomes from the monocot grasses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed a simple and inexpensive method to obtain chloroplast DNA from grass species by modifying and extending protocols optimized for the use in eudicots. Many protocols for extracting chloroplast DNA require an ultracentrifugation step to efficiently separate chloroplast DNA from nuclear DNA. The developed method uses two more centrifugation steps than previously reported protocols and does not require an ultracentrifuge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The described method delivered chloroplast DNA of very high quality from two grass species belonging to highly different taxonomic subfamilies within the grass family (Lolium perenne, Pooideae; Miscanthus x giganteus, Panicoideae. The DNA from Lolium perenne was used for whole chloroplast genome sequencing and detection of SNPs. The sequence is publicly available on EMBL/GenBank.

  14. Genetic interactions reveal that specific defects of chloroplast translation are associated with the suppression of var2-mediated leaf variegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiayan; Zheng, Mengdi; Wang, Rui; Wang, Ruijuan; An, Lijun; Rodermel, Steve R; Yu, Fei

    2013-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development. PMID:23721655

  15. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:25135820

  16. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process. PMID:25577345

  17. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh-Stenta X

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoying Koh-Stenta,1 Joma Joy,1 Si Fang Wang,1 Perlyn Zekui Kwek,1 John Liang Kuan Wee,1 Kah Fei Wan,2 Shovanlal Gayen,1 Angela Shuyi Chen,1 CongBao Kang,1 May Ann Lee,1 Anders Poulsen,1 Subhash G Vasudevan,3 Jeffrey Hill,1 Kassoum Nacro11Experimental Therapeutics Centre, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR, Singapore; 2Novartis Institute for Tropical Diseases, Singapore; 3Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, SingaporeAbstract: Dengue virus (DENV protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described.Keywords: flavivirus protease, small molecule optimization, covalent inhibitor, active site binding, pyrazole ester derivatives

  18. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications.

  19. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SUBSP. plantarum PROBIOTIC STRAINS AS PROTEASE PRODUCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Маtseliukh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteases from probiotic strains of the genus Bacillus, just like the antibiotics, bacteriocins and other hydrolytic enzymes, are one of the main factors that determine their biological activity. The aim of this work was to study the synthesis and biochemical properties of proteases from two strains Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5139 and UCM B-5140 that included in the probiotic Endosporin. The cultivation of strains was carried out in flasks under rotating for two days. The influence of physico-chemical parameters of the reaction medium on proteolytic activity was studied on partially purified protease preparations. Lytic activity was determined by turbidimetric method. On the second day of cultivation B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM В-5139 and UCM В-5140 synthesized the metal-dependent peptidase and serine protease, respectively. The optimum conditions of their action were the following: temperature 37–40 °C and pH 6.5–7.0. Isolated proteases are able to lyse the living cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Thus we demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5140 and UCM B-5139, included in the probiotic veterinary preparation Endosporin, produced proteolytic enzymes that hydrolyze the native insoluble proteins (elastin, fibrin and collagen. These enzymes belong to the group of neutral metal-dependent and serine proteases. They are active under physiological conditions against gram-positive bacteria and yeasts. The application of these proteases in biotechnology is considered.

  20. Laundry detergent compatibility of the alkaline protease from Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Rathindra Mohan; Prakash, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The endogenous protease activity in various commercially available laundry detergents of international companies was studied. The maximum protease activity was found at 50 degrees C in pH range 10.5-11.0 in all the tested laundry detergents. The endogenous protease activity in the tested detergents retained up to 70% on incubation at 40 degrees C for 1 h, whereas less than 30% activity was only found on incubation at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The alkaline protease from an alkalophilic strain of Bacillus cereus was studied for its compatibility in commercial detergents. The cell free fermented broth from shake flask culture of the organism showed maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 50 degrees C. The protease from B. cereus showed much higher residual activity (more than 80%) on incubation with laundry detergents at 50 degrees C for 1 h or longer. The protease enzyme from B. cereus was found to be superior over the endogenous proteases present in the tested commercial laundry detergents in comparison to the enzyme stability during the washing at higher temperature, e.g., 40-50 degrees C. PMID:15293947

  1. A simple low-cost microcontroller-based photometric instrument for monitoring chloroplast movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert; Königer, Martina; Schjeide, Brit-Maren; Dikmak, George; Kohler, Susan; Harris, Gary C

    2006-03-01

    A new microcontroller-based photometric instrument for monitoring blue light dependent changes in leaf transmission (chloroplast movement) was developed based on a modification of the double-beam technique developed by Walzcak and Gabrys [(1980) Photosynthetica 14: 65-72]. A blue and red bicolor light emitting diode (LED) provided both a variable intensity blue actinic light and a low intensity red measuring beam. A phototransistor detected the intensity of the transmitted measuring light. An inexpensive microcontroller independently and precisely controlled the light emission of the bicolor LED. A typical measurement event involved turning off the blue actinic light for 100 mus to create a narrow temporal window for turning on and measuring the transmittance of the red light. The microcontroller was programmed using LogoChip Logo (http://www.wellesley.edu/Physics/Rberg/logochip/) to record fluence rate response curves. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was utilized to correlate the changes in leaf transmission with intercellular chloroplast position. In the dark, the chloroplasts in the spongy mesophyll exhibited no evident asymmetries in their distribution, however, in the palisade layer the cell surface in contact with the overlying epidermis was devoid of chloroplasts. The low light dependent decrease in leaf transmittance in dark acclimated leaves was correlated with the movement of chloroplasts within the palisade layer into the regions previously devoid of chloroplasts. Changes in leaf transmittance were evident within one minute following the onset of illumination. Minimal leaf transmittance was correlated with chloroplasts having retreated from cell surfaces perpendicular to the incident light (avoidance reaction) in both spongy and palisade layers.

  2. Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Mongolia medicine Artemisia frigida and phylogenetic relationships with other plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artemisia frigida Willd. is an important Mongolian traditional medicinal plant with pharmacological functions of stanch and detumescence. However, there is little sequence and genomic information available for Artemisia frigida, which makes phylogenetic identification, evolutionary studies, and genetic improvement of its value very difficult. We report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida based on 454 pyrosequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The complete chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida is 151,076 bp including a large single copy (LSC region of 82,740 bp, a small single copy (SSC region of 18,394 bp and a pair of inverted repeats (IRs of 24,971 bp. The genome contains 114 unique genes and 18 duplicated genes. The chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida contains a small 3.4 kb inversion within a large 23 kb inversion in the LSC region, a unique feature in Asteraceae. The gene order in the SSC region of Artemisia frigida is inverted compared with the other 6 Asteraceae species with the chloroplast genomes sequenced. This inversion is likely caused by an intramolecular recombination event only occurred in Artemisia frigida. The existence of rich SSR loci in the Artemisia frigida chloroplast genome provides a rare opportunity to study population genetics of this Mongolian medicinal plant. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates a sister relationship between Artemisia frigida and four other species in Asteraceae, including Ageratina adenophora, Helianthus annuus, Guizotia abyssinica and Lactuca sativa, based on 61 protein-coding sequences. Furthermore, Artemisia frigida was placed in the tribe Anthemideae in the subfamily Asteroideae (Asteraceae based on ndhF and trnL-F sequence comparisons. CONCLUSION: The chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida was assembled and analyzed in this study, representing the first plastid genome sequenced in the Anthemideae tribe. This complete chloroplast genome

  3. Insights from the complete chloroplast genome into the evolution of Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Zhang

    Full Text Available Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. is one of the oldest oilseed crops. In order to investigate the evolutionary characters according to the Sesame Genome Project, apart from sequencing its nuclear genome, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of S. indicum cv. Yuzhi 11 (white seeded using Illumina and 454 sequencing. Comparisons of chloroplast genomes between S. indicum and the 18 other higher plants were then analyzed. The chloroplast genome of cv. Yuzhi 11 contains 153,338 bp and a total of 114 unique genes (KC569603. The number of chloroplast genes in sesame is the same as that in Nicotiana tabacum, Vitis vinifera and Platanus occidentalis. The variation in the length of the large single-copy (LSC regions and inverted repeats (IR in sesame compared to 18 other higher plant species was the main contributor to size variation in the cp genome in these species. The 77 functional chloroplast genes, except for ycf1 and ycf2, were highly conserved. The deletion of the cp ycf1 gene sequence in cp genomes may be due either to its transfer to the nuclear genome, as has occurred in sesame, or direct deletion, as has occurred in Panax ginseng and Cucumis sativus. The sesame ycf2 gene is only 5,721 bp in length and has lost about 1,179 bp. Nucleotides 1-585 of ycf2 when queried in BLAST had hits in the sesame draft genome. Five repeats (R10, R12, R13, R14 and R17 were unique to the sesame chloroplast genome. We also found that IR contraction/expansion in the cp genome alters its rate of evolution. Chloroplast genes and repeats display the signature of convergent evolution in sesame and other species. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Sesamum and other higher plants.

  4. Chloroplast phylogenomics indicates that Ginkgo biloba is sister to cycads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Huang, Ya-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic studies have not yet reached a consensus on the placement of Ginkgoales, which is represented by the only living species, Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo). At least six discrepant placements of ginkgo have been proposed. This study aimed to use the chloroplast phylogenomic approach to examine possible factors that lead to such disagreeing placements. We found the sequence types used in the analyses as the most critical factor in the conflicting placements of ginkgo. In addition, the placement of ginkgo varied in the trees inferred from nucleotide (NU) sequences, which notably depended on breadth of taxon sampling, tree-building methods, codon positions, positions of Gnetopsida (common name: gnetophytes), and including or excluding gnetophytes in data sets. In contrast, the trees inferred from amino acid (AA) sequences congruently supported the monophyly of a ginkgo and Cycadales (common name: cycads) clade, regardless of which factors were examined. Our site-stripping analysis further revealed that the high substitution saturation of NU sequences mainly derived from the third codon positions and contributed to the variable placements of ginkgo. In summary, the factors we surveyed did not affect results inferred from analyses of AA sequences. Congruent topologies in our AA trees give more confidence in supporting the ginkgo-cycad sister-group hypothesis.

  5. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Abies nephrolepis (Pinaceae: Abietoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Keun Yi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant chloroplast (cp genome has maintained a relatively conserved structure and gene content throughout evolution. Cp genome sequences have been used widely for resolving evolutionary and phylogenetic issues at various taxonomic levels of plants. Here, we report the complete cp genome of Abies nephrolepis. The A. nephrolepis cp genome is 121,336 base pairs (bp in length including a pair of short inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb of 139 bp each separated by a small single copy (SSC region of 54,323 bp (SSC and a large single copy region of 66,735 bp (LSC. It contains 114 genes, 68 of which are protein coding genes, 35 tRNA and four rRNA genes, six open reading frames, and one pseudogene. Seventeen repeat units and 64 simple sequence repeats (SSR have been detected in A. nephrolepis cp genome. Large IR sequences locate in 42-kb inversion points (1186 bp. The A. nephrolepis cp genome is identical to Abies koreana’s which is closely related to taxa. Pairwise comparison between two cp genomes revealed 140 polymorphic sites in each. Complete cp genome sequence of A. nephrolepis has a significant potential to provide information on the evolutionary pattern of Abietoideae and valuable data for development of DNA markers for easy identification and classification.

  6. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  7. Identification of the Elusive Pyruvate Reductase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Steven J; Taha, Hussein; Yeoman, Justin A; Iamshanova, Oksana; Chan, Kher Xing; Boehm, Marko; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G; Bialek, Wojciech; Murray, James W; Nixon, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Under anoxic conditions the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates various fermentation pathways leading to the creation of formate, acetate, ethanol and small amounts of other metabolites including d-lactate and hydrogen. Progress has been made in identifying the enzymes involved in these pathways and their subcellular locations; however, the identity of the enzyme involved in reducing pyruvate to d-lactate has remained unclear. Based on sequence comparisons, enzyme activity measurements, X-ray crystallography, biochemical fractionation and analysis of knock-down mutants, we conclude that pyruvate reduction in the chloroplast is catalyzed by a tetrameric NAD(+)-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase encoded by Cre07.g324550. Its expression during aerobic growth supports a possible function as a 'lactate valve' for the export of lactate to the mitochondrion for oxidation by cytochrome-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenases and by glycolate dehydrogenase. We also present a revised spatial model of fermentation based on our immunochemical detection of the likely pyruvate decarboxylase, PDC3, in the cytoplasm. PMID:26574578

  8. Preferential translation of chloroplast ribosomal proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear cr-1 mutant of C. reinhardtii is deficient in the 30S subunit of the chloroplast (cp) ribosome and in cp protein synthesis. The cp spectinomycin resistant mutant, spr-u-1-27-3, has a normal level of 70S ribosomes but only a low rate of cp protein synthesis with spectinomycin present. In both mutants there is little accumulation of the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco LSU), but near wild-type levels of cp synthesized r-proteins. In cells pulse-labelled with 35SO4 and immunoprecipitated with specific antisera, the ratio of the rate of synthesis of cp r-proteins to that of Rubisco LSU is 7 times greater in both mutants than in wild-type. No difference in the rate of turnover between r-proteins and Rubisco LSU in mutant and wild-type cells was observed during a one hour chase. The mRNA levels for r-protein L1 and Rubisco LSU actually increase slightly in the mutants. These data suggest that C. reinhardtii has a translation mechanism for preferential synthesis of cp r-proteins that operates under conditions of reduced total cp protein synthesis

  9. Two complete chloroplast genome sequences of Cannabis sativa varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyehyun; Seo, Boyoung; Lee, Seunghwan; Ahn, Dong-Ha; Jo, Euna; Park, Jin-Kyoung; Min, Gi-Sik

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we determined the complete chloroplast (cp) genomes from two varieties of Cannabis sativa. The genome sizes were 153,848 bp (the Korean non-drug variety, Cheungsam) and 153,854 bp (the African variety, Yoruba Nigeria). The genome structures were identical with 131 individual genes [86 protein-coding genes (PCGs), eight rRNA, and 37 tRNA genes]. Further, except for the presence of an intron in the rps3 genes of two C. sativa varieties, the cp genomes of C. sativa had conservative features similar to that of all known species in the order Rosales. To verify the position of C. sativa within the order Rosales, we conducted phylogenetic analysis by using concatenated sequences of all PCGs from 17 complete cp genomes. The resulting tree strongly supported monophyly of Rosales. Further, the family Cannabaceae, represented by C. sativa, showed close relationship with the family Moraceae. The phylogenetic relationship outlined in our study is well congruent with those previously shown for the order Rosales.

  10. Identification of the Elusive Pyruvate Reductase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Steven J.; Taha, Hussein; Yeoman, Justin A.; Iamshanova, Oksana; Chan, Kher Xing; Boehm, Marko; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G.; Bialek, Wojciech; Murray, James W.; Nixon, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Under anoxic conditions the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates various fermentation pathways leading to the creation of formate, acetate, ethanol and small amounts of other metabolites including d-lactate and hydrogen. Progress has been made in identifying the enzymes involved in these pathways and their subcellular locations; however, the identity of the enzyme involved in reducing pyruvate to d-lactate has remained unclear. Based on sequence comparisons, enzyme activity measurements, X-ray crystallography, biochemical fractionation and analysis of knock-down mutants, we conclude that pyruvate reduction in the chloroplast is catalyzed by a tetrameric NAD+-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase encoded by Cre07.g324550. Its expression during aerobic growth supports a possible function as a ‘lactate valve’ for the export of lactate to the mitochondrion for oxidation by cytochrome-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenases and by glycolate dehydrogenase. We also present a revised spatial model of fermentation based on our immunochemical detection of the likely pyruvate decarboxylase, PDC3, in the cytoplasm. PMID:26574578

  11. Optimizing PHB and Protease Production by Box Behnken Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amro Abd al fattah Amara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixed culture is more suitable to adapt more flexible fermentation process and produce different product simultaneously. In this study a mixed Bacillus culture was investigated for their ability to produce the bioplastic "Polyhydroxybutyrate" and both of the mesophilic and the thermophilic proteases in one flask. Box-Behnken experimental design was used. The produced amount of PHB has been increased significantly. Meanwhile there is a competition between PHB and proteases. The maximum produced amount of PHB using Box-Behnken design was 2.82 g/l/48 h with protease activity equal to 41.9 Units/ml/48 h for thermophilic proteases and 99.65 Units/ml/48 h for mesophilic proteases. Excel solver was used for extra-optimization for the optimum conditions obtained from Box-Behnken experiments and its model. The maximum PHB obtained after using Excel solver was 2.88 g/l/48 h. The maximum mesophilic and thermophilic activities obtained at the same PHB production conditions were 175.68 and 243.38 Units/ml respectively. The model accuracy as obtained from Excel solver was 118.8%, which prove the power of the experimental design in optimizing such complicated process. The strategies used in this study are recommended for the production of PHB and different proteases simultaneously using Bacillus mixed culture. ABSTRAK: Kultur campuran adalah lebih sesuai bagi proses penapaian yang fleksibel dan ia boleh menghasilkan produk yang berbeza secara serentak. Dalam kajian ini keupayaan  menghasilkan "Polyhydroxybutyrate" bioplastik serta mesofilik dan termofilik protease dalam satu flask oleh  kultur Bacillus campuran telah disiasat. Eksperimen rekabentuk Box-Behnken telah digunakan. Jumlah PHB yang dikeluarkan meningkat dengan ketara dan terdapat persaingan antara PHB dan protease. Jumlah keluaran PHB maksima menggunakan rekabentuk Box-Behnken adalah 2.82 g/l/48 jam dengan aktiviti protease sama dengan 41.9 Unit/ml/48 jam untuk protease termofilik dan 99.65 Unit

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF PROTEASE PRODUCTION FROM FUNGI ISOLATED FROM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Sethi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fungal strains isolated from soil by serial dilution method were screened for alkaline protease production. Isolate Penicillium chrysogenum the most potent producer of alkaline protease was identified. The isolate showed highest activity in the optimized medium at pH 9.0, temperature 35ºC, with 1% soycake and peptone incubated for 7 days. Proteases represent one of the largest groups of industrial enzymes and find application in detergents, leather industry, food industry, pharmaceutical industry and bioremediation processes.

  13. Detection of Legume Protease Inhibitors by the Gel-X-ray Film Contact Print Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulimani, Veerappa H.; Sudheendra, Kulkarni; Giri, Ashok P.

    2002-01-01

    Redgram (Cajanus cajan L.) extracts have been analyzed for the protease inhibitors using a new, sensitive, simple, and rapid method for detection of electrophoretically separated protease inhibitors. The detection involves equilibrating the gel successively in the protease assay buffer and protease solution, rinsing the gel in assay buffer, and…

  14. Effects of truncated mutants of the ε subunit of chloroplast ATP synthase on the fast phase of millisecond delayed light emission of chloroplast and its ATP synthesis ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xiaomei; SHI Xiaobing; SHEN Yungang

    2004-01-01

    The ε subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase and the truncated ε mutants which lack some amino acid residues from the N-terminus or C-terminus were overexpressed in E. coli. When the ε subunit or the truncated ε proteins was added to the spinach chloroplast suspension, both the intensity of the fast phase of millisecond delayed light emission (ms-DLE) and the cyclic and noncyclic photophosphorylation activity of chloroplast were enhanced. With an increase in the number of residues deleted from the N-terminus, the enhancement effect of the N-terminal truncated proteins decreased gradually. For the C-terminal truncated proteins, the enhancement effect increased gradually with an increase in the number of residues deleted from the C-terminus. Besides, the ATP synthesis activity of ε-deficient membrane reconstituted with the ε subunit or the truncated ε proteins was compared. The ATP synthesis activity of reconstituted membrane with the N-terminal truncated proteins decreased gradually as the number of residues deleted from the N-terminus increased. For the C-terminal truncated proteins, the ATP synthesis activity of reconstituted membrane increased gradually with an increase in the number of residues deleted from the C-terminus, but was still lower than that of the wild type ε protein. These results suggested that: (a) the N-terminal domain of the ε subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase could affect the ATP synthesis activity of ATP synthase by regulating the efficiency of blocking proton leakage of ε subunit; and (b) the C-terminal domain of the ε subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase had a subtle function in modulating the ATP synthesis ability of ATP synthase.

  15. Arabidopsis FRS4/CPD25 and FHY3/CPD45 work cooperatively to promote the expression of the chloroplast division gene ARC5 and chloroplast division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuefang; Liu, Han; An, Chuanjing; Shi, Yuhong; Liu, Xia; Yuan, Wanqiong; Zhang, Bing; Yang, Jin; Yu, Caixia; Gao, Hongbo

    2013-09-01

    ARC5 is a dynamin-related GTPase essential for the division of chloroplasts in plants. The arc5 mutant frequently exhibits enlarged, dumbbell-shaped chloroplasts, indicating a role for ARC5 in the constriction of the chloroplast division site. In a screen for chloroplast division mutants with a phenotype similar to arc5, two mutants, cpd25 and cpd45, were obtained. CPD45 was identified as being the same gene as FHY3, a key regulator of far-red light signaling recently shown to be involved in the regulation of ARC5. CPD25 was previously named FRS4 and is homologous to FHY3. We found that CPD25 is also required for the expression of ARC5, suggesting that its function is not redundant to that of FHY3. Moreover, cpd25 does not have the far-red light-sensing defect present in fhy3 and far1. Both FRS4/CPD25 and FHY3/CPD45 could bind to the FBS-like 'ACGCGC' motifs in the promoter region of ARC5, and the binding efficiency of FRS4/CPD25 was much higher than that of FHY3/CPD45. Unlike FHY3/CPD45, FRS4/CPD25 has no ARC5 activation activity. Our data suggest that FRS4/CPD25 and FHY3/CPD45 function as a heterodimer that cooperatively activates ARC5, that FRS4/CPD25 plays the major role in promoter binding, and that FHY3/CPD45 is largely responsible for the gene activation. This study not only provides insight into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of chloroplast division in higher plants, but also suggests a model that shows how members of a transcription factor family can evolve to have different DNA-binding and gene activation features.

  16. Combined analysis of the chloroplast genome and transcriptome of the Antarctic vascular plant Deschampsia antarctica Desv.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungeun Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antarctic hairgrass (Deschampsia antarctica Desv. is the only natural grass species in the maritime Antarctic. It has been researched as an important ecological marker and as an extremophile plant for studies on stress tolerance. Despite its importance, little genomic information is available for D. antarctica. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome, transcriptome profiles of the coding/noncoding genes, and the posttranscriptional processing by RNA editing in the chloroplast system. RESULTS: The complete chloroplast genome of D. antarctica is 135,362 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure, including the large (LSC: 79,881 bp and small (SSC: 12,519 bp single-copy regions, separated by a pair of identical inverted repeats (IR: 21,481 bp. It contains 114 unique genes, including 81 unique protein-coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Sequence divergence analysis with other plastomes from the BEP clade of the grass family suggests a sister relationship between D. antarctica, Festuca arundinacea and Lolium perenne of the Poeae tribe, based on the whole plastome. In addition, we conducted high-resolution mapping of the chloroplast-derived transcripts. Thus, we created an expression profile for 81 protein-coding genes and identified ndhC, psbJ, rps19, psaJ, and psbA as the most highly expressed chloroplast genes. Small RNA-seq analysis identified 27 small noncoding RNAs of chloroplast origin that were preferentially located near the 5'- or 3'-ends of genes. We also found >30 RNA-editing sites in the D. antarctica chloroplast genome, with a dominance of C-to-U conversions. CONCLUSIONS: We assembled and characterized the complete chloroplast genome sequence of D. antarctica and investigated the features of the plastid transcriptome. These data may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of D. antarctica within the Poaceae family for use in molecular phylogenetic studies and may also help researchers

  17. Contribution of chloroplast biogenesis to carbon-nitrogen balance during early leaf development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumi, Kensuke; Hirotsuka, Shoko; Shimada, Hiroshi; Chono, Yoko; Matsuda, Osamu; Iba, Koh

    2010-07-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is most significant during the changes in cellular organization associated with leaf development in higher plants. To examine the physiological relationship between developing chloroplasts and host leaf cells during early leaf development, we investigated changes in the carbon and nitrogen contents in leaves at the P4 developmental stage of rice, during which leaf blade structure is established and early events of chloroplast differentiation occur. During the P4 stage, carbon content on a dry mass basis remained constant, whereas the nitrogen content decreased by 30%. Among carbohydrates, sucrose and starch accumulated to high levels early in the P4 stage, and glucose, fructose and cellulose degradation increased during the mid-to-late P4 stage. In the chloroplast-deficient leaves of the virescent-1 mutant of rice, however, the carbon and nitrogen contents, as well as the C/N ratio during the P4 stage, were largely unaffected. These observations suggest that developing rice leaves function as sink organs at the P4 stage, and that chloroplast biogenesis and carbon and nitrogen metabolism in the leaf cell is regulated independently at this stage.

  18. The complete chloroplast genome sequences for four Amaranthus species (Amaranthaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Lindsay; Mangelson, Ryan; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Jellen, Eric N.; Maughan, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: The amaranth genus contains many important grain and weedy species. We further our understanding of the genus through the development of a complete reference chloroplast genome. Methods and Results: A high-quality Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Amaranthaceae) chloroplast genome assembly was developed using long-read technology. This reference genome was used to reconstruct the chloroplast genomes for two closely related grain species (A. cruentus and A. caudatus) and their putative progenitor (A. hybridus). The reference genome was 150,518 bp and possesses a circular structure of two inverted repeats (24,352 bp) separated by small (17,941 bp) and large (83,873 bp) single-copy regions; it encodes 111 genes, 72 for proteins. Relative to the reference chloroplast genome, an average of 210 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122 insertion/deletion polymorphisms (indels) were identified across the analyzed genomes. Conclusions: This reference chloroplast genome, along with the reported simple sequence repeats, SNPs, and indels, is an invaluable genetic resource for studying the phylogeny and genetic diversity within the amaranth genus. PMID:27672525

  19. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in chloroplast genomes of lower and higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Biju; Bhatt, Bhavin S; Awasthi, Mayur; George, Binu; Singh, Achuit K

    2015-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), contain repetitive DNA sequence where tandem repeats of one to six base pairs are present number of times. Chloroplast genome sequences have been  shown to possess extensive variations in the length, number and distribution of SSRs. However, a comparative analysis of chloroplast microsatellites is not available. Considering their potential importance in generating genomic diversity, we have systematically analysed the abundance and distribution of simple and compound microsatellites in 164 sequenced chloroplast genomes from wide range of plants. The key findings of these studies are (1) a large number of mononucleotide repeats as compared to SSR(2-6)(di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexanucleotide repeats) are present in all chloroplast genomes investigated, (2) lower plants such as algae show wide variation in relative abundance, density and distribution of microsatellite repeats as compared to flowering plants, (3) longer SSRs are excluded from coding regions of most chloroplast genomes, (4) GC content has a weak influence on number, relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide as well as SSR(2-6). However, GC content strongly showed negative correlation with relative density (R (2) = 0.5, P plants possesses relatively more genomic diversity compared to higher plants.

  20. CHLOROPLAST GENETIC TOOL FOR THE GREEN MICROALGAE HAEMATOCOCCUS PLUVIALIS (CHLOROPHYCEAE, VOLVOCALES)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Carla L; Gimpel, Javier; Escobar, Carolina; Marshall, Sergio H; Henríquez, Vitalia

    2012-08-01

    At present, there is strong commercial demand for recombinant proteins, such as antigens, antibodies, biopharmaceuticals, and industrial enzymes, which cannot be fulfilled by existing procedures. Thus, an intensive search for alternative models that may provide efficiency, safety, and quality control is being undertaken by a number of laboratories around the world. The chloroplast of the eukaryotic microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow has arisen as a candidate for a novel expression platform for recombinant protein production. However, there are important drawbacks that need to be resolved before it can become such a system. The most significant of these are chloroplast genome characterizations, and the development of chloroplast transformation vectors based upon specific endogenous promoters and on homologous targeting regions. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of endogenous chloroplast sequences for use as genetic tools for the construction of H. pluvialis specific expression vectors to efficiently transform the chloroplast of this microalga via microprojectile bombardment. As a consequence, H. pluvialis shows promise as a platform for expressing recombinant proteins for biotechnological applications, for instance, the development of oral vaccines for aquaculture. PMID:27009007

  1. Synthesis of medium-chain- length-polyhydroxyalkanoates in tobacco via chloroplast genetic engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuhua; WU Zhongyi; ZHANG Xiuhai; CHEN Guoqiang; WU Qiong; HUANG Conglin; YANG Qing

    2005-01-01

    Medium-chain-length-polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs) belong to the group of microbial polyesters containing monomers ranging from 6 to 14 carbons in length. The key enzymes of their biosynthesis are PHA-polymerase (product of phaC gene) and 3-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein-CoA transferase (product of phaG gene). With aadA (aminoglycoside 3′-adenylyltransferase) gene as screening marker, two chloroplast transformation vectors of pTC2 harboring phaC2 gene only and pTGC harboring both phaC and phaG genes were constructed and introduced into tobacco chloroplast genome through particle bombardment. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the insertion of the introduced genes into chloroplast genome. The content of mcl-PHAs accumulated in transgenic plants was analyzed by gas chromatography, mcl-PHAs accumulated up to 4.8 mg/g dry weight (dw) in transgenic line S4-3; their monomers were 3-hydroxyoctanoate and 3-hydroxydecanoate. Accumulation of mcl-PHAs polymers in the tobacco chloroplast was also observed by transmission electron microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of mcl- PHAs in tobacco via chloroplast genetic engineering.

  2. Delayed fluorescence spectroscopy and mechanism of the 730 nm component of chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng-long; XING Da; FAN Duo-wang; QIAN Long; LU Mai

    2006-01-01

    Charge recombination in reaction center (RC) of photosystem Ⅱ(PS Ⅱ)is regarded as the location of 685 nm delayed fluorescence (DF). The mechanism of 730 nm component appearing in the DF spectrum for chloroplast was studied by various spectral analysis methods. Experimental results of the DF spectrum at different chloroplast concentration show that the intensity of peaks at 685nm and 730 nm ascends with the chloroplast concentration increasing when the concentration is relatively low. When the concentration increases to the level of 7.8 μg/ml, a maximum intensity of the peak at 685 nm appears but the intensity of 730 nm peak still increases. The peak at 730 nm finally reaches a maximum intensity at the chloroplast concentration of 31.2 μg/ml while the intensity of the 685 nm peak has apparently fallen down. The results of absorption spectrum show that the ratios of A685 to A730 keep almost constant with the increasing of chloroplast concentration. Furthermore, the excitation spectrum for 730 nm fluorescence shows that the 685nm light has high excitation efficiency.These results indicate that the 730nm component of DF spectrum is the fluorescence of chlorophyll in PS Ⅰ RC excited by 685 nm DF. Meanwhile, this can be further verified by the invariability of DF spectrum at different delay time (1 second~9 seconds).

  3. Insights into the subunit in-teractions of the chloroplast ATP synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Subunit interactions of the chloroplast F0F1- ATP synthase were studied using the yeast two-hybrid system. The coding sequences of all the nine subunits of spinach chloroplast ATP synthase were cloned in two-hybrid vectors. The vectors were transformed into the yeast strains HF7c and SFY526 by various pairwise combinations, and the protein interactions were analyzed by measuring the yeast growth on minimal SD medium without serine, lucine and histidine. Interactions of γ Subunit with wild type or two truncated mutants of γ sununit, △εN21 and △εC45, which lose their abilities to inhibit the ATP hydrolysis, were also detected by in vitro and in vivo binding assay. The present results are largely accordant to the common structure model of F0F1-ATP synthase. Different from that in the E. Coli F0F1-ATP synthase, the δ subunit of chloroplast ATP syn- thase could interact with β,γ,ε and all the CF0 subunits in the two-hybrid system. These results suggested that though the chloroplast ATP synthase shares the similar structure and composition of subunits with the enzyme from E. Coli, it may be different in the subunit interactions and con- formational change during catalysis between these two sources of ATP synthase. Based on the present results and our knowledge of structure model of E. Coli ATP synthase, a deduced structure model of chloroplast ATP synthase was proposed.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Codon Usage Patterns Among Mitochondrion, Chloroplast and Nuclear Genes in Triticum aestivum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Juan Zhang; Jie Zhou; Zuo-Feng Li; Li Wang; Xun Gu; Yang Zhong

    2007-01-01

    In many organisms, the difference in codon usage patterns among genes reflects variation in local base compositional biases and the intensity of natural selection. In this study, a comparative analysis was performed to investigate the characteristics of codon bias and factors in shaping the codon usage patterns among mitochondrion,chloroplast and nuclear genes in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). GC contents in nuclear genes were higher than that in mitochondrion and chloroplast genes. The neutrality and correspondence analyses indicated that the codon usage in nuclear genes would be a result of relative strong mutational bias, while the codon usage patterns of rnitochondrion and chloroplast genes were more conserved in GC content and influenced by translation level.The Parity Rule 2 (PR2) plot analysis showed that pyrimidines were used more frequently than purines at the third codon position in the three genomes. In addition, using a new alterative strategy, 11, 12, and 24 triplets were defined as preferred codons in the mitochondrion, chloroplast and nuclear genes, respectively. These findings suggested that the mitochondrion, chloroplast and nuclear genes shared particularly different features of codon usage and evolutionary constraints.

  5. Homologous Comparisons of Photosynthetic System 1 Genes among Cyanobacteria and Chloroplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yu; Pei-Jun Ma; Ding-Ji Shi; Shi-Ming Li; Chang-Lu Wang

    2008-01-01

    It has now believed that chloroplasts arose from cyanobacteria,however,during endosymbiosis,the photosynthetic genes in chloroplasts have been reduced.How these changes occurred during plant evolution was the focus of the present study.Beginning with photosystem Ⅰ (PSI) genes,a homologous comparison of amino acid sequences of 18 subunits of PSI from 10 species of cyanobacteria,chloroplasts in 12 species of eucaryotic algae,and 28 species of plants (including bryophytes,pteridophytes,gymnospermae,dicotyledon and monocotyledon) was undertaken.The data showed that 18 genes of PSIcan be divided into two groups: Part Ⅰ including seven genes (psaA,psaB,psaC,psaI,psaJ,yct3 and ycf4) shared both by cyanobacteria and plant chloroplasts;Part Ⅱ containing another 11 genes (psaD,psaE,psaF,psaK,psaL,psaM,btpA,ycf37,psaG,psaH and psaN) appeared to have diversified in different plant groups.Among Part I genes,psaC,psaA and psaB had higher homology in all species of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.Among Part II genes,only psaG,psaH and psaN emerged in seed plants.

  6. Recombination and Heterologous Expression of Allophycocyanin Gene in the Chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Liang SU; Kai-Xian QIAN; Cong-Ping TAN; Chun-Xiao MENG; Song QIN

    2005-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of multiple genes in the nucleus of transgenic plants requires the introduction of an individual gene and the subsequent backcross to reconstitute multi-subunit proteins or metabolic pathways. In order to accomplish the expression of multiple genes in a single transformation event, we inserted both large and small subunits of allophycocyanin gene (apcA and apcB) into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast expression vector, resulting in papc-S. The constructed vector was then introduced into the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii by micro-particle bombardment. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis revealed that the two genes had integrated into the chloroplast genome. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the two genes from the prokaryotic cyanobacteria could be correctly expressed in the chloroplasts of C. reinhardtii. The expressed foreign protein in transformants accounted for about 2%-3% of total soluble proteins. These findings pave the way to the reconstitution of multi-subunit proteins or metabolic pathways in transgenic C. reinhardtii chloroplasts in a single transformation event.

  7. Discrete redox signaling pathways regulate photosynthetic light-harvesting and chloroplast gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Allen

    Full Text Available In photosynthesis in chloroplasts, two related regulatory processes balance the actions of photosystems I and II. These processes are short-term, post-translational redistribution of light-harvesting capacity, and long-term adjustment of photosystem stoichiometry initiated by control of chloroplast DNA transcription. Both responses are initiated by changes in the redox state of the electron carrier, plastoquinone, which connects the two photosystems. Chloroplast Sensor Kinase (CSK is a regulator of transcription of chloroplast genes for reaction centres of the two photosystems, and a sensor of plastoquinone redox state. We asked whether CSK is also involved in regulation of absorbed light energy distribution by phosphorylation of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II. Chloroplast thylakoid membranes isolated from a CSK T-DNA insertion mutant and from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit similar light- and redox-induced (32P-labelling of LHC II and changes in 77 K chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra, while room-temperature chlorophyll fluorescence emission transients from Arabidopsis leaves are perturbed by inactivation of CSK. The results indicate indirect, pleiotropic effects of reaction centre gene transcription on regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting in vivo. A single, direct redox signal is transmitted separately to discrete transcriptional and post-translational branches of an integrated cytoplasmic regulatory system.

  8. Construction of a chloroplast protein interaction network and functional mining of photosynthetic proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Bo Yu; Yong-Lan Cui; Kang Chong; Yi-Xue Li; Yu-Hua Li; Zhongming Zhao; Tie-Liu Shi; Zhong-Nan Yang; Guang Li; Guan Wang; Jing-Chun Sun; Peng-Cheng Wang; Chen Wang; Hua-Ling Mi; Wei-Min Ma; Jian Cui

    2008-01-01

    Chloroplast is a typical plant cell organeUe where photosynthesis takes place.In this study,a total of 1 808 chloroplast core proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana were reliably identified by combining the results of previously published studies and our own predictions.We then constructed a chloroplast protein interaction network primarily based on these core protein interactions.The network had 22 925 protein interaction pairs which involved 2 214 proteins.A total of 160 previously uncharacterized proteins were annotated in this network.The subunits of the photosynthetic complexes were modularized,and the functional relationships among photosystem Ⅰ (PSI),photosystem Ⅱ (PSII),light harvesting complex of photosystem Ⅰ (LHC Ⅰ) and light harvesting complex of photosystem Ⅰ (LHC Ⅱ) could be deduced from the predicted protein interactions in this network.We further confirmed an interaction between an unknown protein AT1G52220 and a photosynthetic subunit PSI-D2 by yeast two-hybrid analysis.Our chloroplast protein interaction network should be useful for functional mining of photosynthetic proteins and investigation of chloroplast-related functions at the systems biology level in Arabidopsis.

  9. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor ePuerto-Galán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs, thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen- and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  10. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Ferrández, Julia; Cano, Beatriz; Naranjo, Belén; Nájera, Victoria A; González, Maricruz; Lindahl, Anna M; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs), thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Stable chloroplast transformation of immature scutella and inflorescences in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuiju Cui; Guangxiao Yang; Guangyuan He; Fei Song; Yi Tan; Xuan Zhou; Wen Zhao; Fengyun Ma; Yunyi Liu; Javeed Hussain; Yuesheng Wang

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in wheat was achieved by bombardment of scutella from immature embryos and immature inflorescences. respectively. A wheat chloroplast sitespecific expression vector, pBAGNRK, was constructed by placing an expression cassette containing neomycin phosphotransferase Ⅱ (nptⅡ) and green fluorescent protein (gfp) as selection and reporter genes, respectively, in the intergenic spacer between atpB and rbcL of wheat chloroplast genome. Integration of gfp gene in the plastome was identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and Southern blotting using gfp gene as a probe. Expression of GFP protein was examined by western blot. Three positive transformants were obtained and the Southern blot of partial fragment of atpB and rbcL (targeting site) probes verified that one of them was homoplasmic. Stable expression of GFP fluorescence was confirmed by confocal microscopy in the leaf tissues from T progeny seedlings. PCR analysis of gfp gene also confirmed the inheritance of transgene in the T progeny. These results strengthen the feasibility of wheat chloroplast transformation and also give a novel method for the introduction of important agronomic traits in wheat through chloroplast transformation.

  12. Proteomic comparison reveals the contribution of chloroplast to salt tolerance of a wheat introgression line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjing; Lv, Hongjun; Zhao, Mingming; Li, Yongchao; Qi, Yueying; Peng, Zhenying; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously bred a salt tolerant wheat cv. SR3 with bread wheat cv. JN177 as the parent via asymmetric somatic hybridization, and found that the tolerance is partially attributed to the superior photosynthesis capacity. Here, we compared the proteomes of two cultivars to unravel the basis of superior photosynthesis capacity. In the maps of two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), there were 26 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), including 18 cultivar-based and 8 stress-responsive ones. 21 of 26 DEPs were identified and classified into four categories, including photosynthesis, photosynthesis system stability, linolenic acid metabolism, and protein synthesis in chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of some DEPs confirmed that the identified DEPs function in the chloroplast. The overexpression of a DEP enhanced salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In line with these data, it is concluded that the contribution of chloroplast to high salinity tolerance of wheat cv. SR3 appears to include higher photosynthesis efficiency by promoting system protection and ROS clearance, stronger production of phytohormone JA by enhancing metabolism activity, and modulating the in chloroplast synthesis of proteins. PMID:27562633

  13. A Cyan Fluorescent Reporter Expressed from the Chloroplast Genome of Marchantia polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R; Ueda, Minoru; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Haseloff, Jim

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha has received increasing attention as a basal plant model for multicellular studies. Its ease of handling, well-characterized plastome and proven protocols for biolistic plastid transformation qualify M. polymorpha as an attractive platform to study the evolution of chloroplasts during the transition from water to land. In addition, chloroplasts of M. polymorpha provide a convenient test-bed for the characterization of genetic elements involved in plastid gene expression due to the absence of mechanisms for RNA editing. While reporter genes have proven valuable to the qualitative and quantitative study of gene expression in chloroplasts, expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in chloroplasts of M. polymorpha has proven problematic. We report the design of a codon-optimized gfp varian, mturq2cp, which allowed successful expression of a cyan fluorescent protein under control of the tobacco psbA promoter from the chloroplast genome of M. polymorpha. We demonstrate the utility of mturq2cp in (i) early screening for transplastomic events following biolistic transformation of M. polymorpha spores; (ii) visualization of stromules as elements of plastid structure in Marchantia; and (iii) quantitative microscopy for the analysis of promoter activity. PMID:26634291

  14. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of the Medicinal Plant Pogostemon cablin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Xiao, Hongtao; Deng, Cao; Xiong, Liang; Yang, Jian; Peng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pogostemon cablin, the natural source of patchouli alcohol, is an important herb in the Lamiaceae family. Here, we present the entire chloroplast genome of P. cablin. This genome, with 38.24% GC content, is 152,460 bp in length. The genome presents a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (each 25,417 bp in length), separated by one small and one large single-copy region (17,652 and 83,974 bp in length, respectively). The chloroplast genome encodes 127 genes, of which 107 genes are single-copy, including 79 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 24 tRNA genes. The genome structure, GC content, and codon usage of this chloroplast genome are similar to those of other species in the family, except that it encodes less protein-coding genes and tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that P. cablin diverged from the Scutellarioideae clade about 29.45 million years ago (Mya). Furthermore, most of the simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are short polyadenine or polythymine repeats that contribute to high AT content in the chloroplast genome. Complete sequences and annotation of P. cablin chloroplast genome will facilitate phylogenic, population and genetic engineering research investigations involving this particular species. PMID:27275817

  15. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of the Medicinal Plant Pogostemon cablin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang He

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pogostemon cablin, the natural source of patchouli alcohol, is an important herb in the Lamiaceae family. Here, we present the entire chloroplast genome of P. cablin. This genome, with 38.24% GC content, is 152,460 bp in length. The genome presents a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (each 25,417 bp in length, separated by one small and one large single-copy region (17,652 and 83,974 bp in length, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 127 genes, of which 107 genes are single-copy, including 79 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 24 tRNA genes. The genome structure, GC content, and codon usage of this chloroplast genome are similar to those of other species in the family, except that it encodes less protein-coding genes and tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that P. cablin diverged from the Scutellarioideae clade about 29.45 million years ago (Mya. Furthermore, most of the simple sequence repeats (SSRs are short polyadenine or polythymine repeats that contribute to high AT content in the chloroplast genome. Complete sequences and annotation of P. cablin chloroplast genome will facilitate phylogenic, population and genetic engineering research investigations involving this particular species.

  16. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Omani lime (Citrus aurantiifolia and comparative analysis within the rosids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Jiun Su

    Full Text Available The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C. aurantiifolia. The complete C. aurantiifolia chloroplast genome is 159,893 bp in length; the organization and gene content are similar to most of the rosids lineages characterized to date. Through comparison with the sweet orange (C. sinensis chloroplast genome, we identified three intergenic regions and 94 simple sequence repeats (SSRs that are potentially informative markers with resolution for interspecific relationships. These markers can be utilized to better understand the origin of cultivated Citrus. A comparison among 72 species belonging to 10 families of representative rosids lineages also provides new insights into their chloroplast genome evolution.

  17. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Omani lime (Citrus aurantiifolia) and comparative analysis within the rosids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huei-Jiun; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2014-01-01

    The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C. aurantiifolia). The complete C. aurantiifolia chloroplast genome is 159,893 bp in length; the organization and gene content are similar to most of the rosids lineages characterized to date. Through comparison with the sweet orange (C. sinensis) chloroplast genome, we identified three intergenic regions and 94 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) that are potentially informative markers with resolution for interspecific relationships. These markers can be utilized to better understand the origin of cultivated Citrus. A comparison among 72 species belonging to 10 families of representative rosids lineages also provides new insights into their chloroplast genome evolution.

  18. A Cyan Fluorescent Reporter Expressed from the Chloroplast Genome of Marchantia polymorpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R.; Ueda, Minoru; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Haseloff, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha has received increasing attention as a basal plant model for multicellular studies. Its ease of handling, well-characterized plastome and proven protocols for biolistic plastid transformation qualify M. polymorpha as an attractive platform to study the evolution of chloroplasts during the transition from water to land. In addition, chloroplasts of M. polymorpha provide a convenient test-bed for the characterization of genetic elements involved in plastid gene expression due to the absence of mechanisms for RNA editing. While reporter genes have proven valuable to the qualitative and quantitative study of gene expression in chloroplasts, expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in chloroplasts of M. polymorpha has proven problematic. We report the design of a codon-optimized gfp varian, mturq2cp, which allowed successful expression of a cyan fluorescent protein under control of the tobacco psbA promoter from the chloroplast genome of M. polymorpha. We demonstrate the utility of mturq2cp in (i) early screening for transplastomic events following biolistic transformation of M. polymorpha spores; (ii) visualization of stromules as elements of plastid structure in Marchantia; and (iii) quantitative microscopy for the analysis of promoter activity. PMID:26634291

  19. Influence of lanthanum on chloroplast ultrastructure of soybean leaves under ultraviolet-B stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Qian; ZHOU Qing

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of lanthanum(Ⅲ) on cell ultrastructure of soybean leaves under elevated ultraviolet-B irradiation (UV-B, 280-320 rim), the chloroplast ultrastructure of soybean seedlings was studied by hydroponics under laboratory conditions. The re-sults showed that the thylakoid in chloroplast was orderly and clearly as soybean leaves were pretreated by La(Ⅲ). The thylakoid was indis-tinctly disordered, expanded and even indiscoverable in the chloroplast under UV-B stress. The impact on the thylakoid by the high in-tensity UV-B irradiation (T2) was bigger than that by the low intensity UV-B irradiation (T1). However, the destruction of the chloroplast structure caused by UV-B stress was alleviated by La(Ⅲ), and the arrangement of the thylakoid in the chloroplast became orderly and clearly. The effect of the alleviation by La(Ⅲ) under the low intensity UV-B irradiation (T1) was better than that under the high intensity UV-B irradiation (T2).

  20. Polyuridylylation and processing of transcripts from multiple gene minicircles in chloroplasts of the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    KAUST Repository

    Barbrook, Adrian C.

    2012-05-05

    Although transcription and transcript processing in the chloroplasts of plants have been extensively characterised, the RNA metabolism of other chloroplast lineages across the eukaryotes remains poorly understood. In this paper, we use RT-PCR to study transcription and transcript processing in the chloroplasts of Amphidinium carterae, a model peridinin-containing dinoflagellate. These organisms have a highly unusual chloroplast genome, with genes located on multiple small \\'minicircle\\' elements, and a number of idiosyncratic features of RNA metabolism including transcription via a rolling circle mechanism, and 3′ terminal polyuridylylation of transcripts. We demonstrate that transcription occurs in A. carterae via a rolling circle mechanism, as previously shown in the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa, and present evidence for the production of both polycistronic and monocistronic transcripts from A. carterae minicircles, including several regions containing ORFs previously not known to be expressed. We demonstrate the presence of both polyuridylylated and non-polyuridylylated transcripts in A. carterae, and show that polycistronic transcripts can be terminally polyuridylylated. We present a model for RNA metabolism in dinoflagellate chloroplasts where long polycistronic precursors are processed to form mature transcripts. Terminal polyuridylylation may mark transcripts with the correct 3′ end. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  1. Synthesis of poly(A)-containing RNA by isolated spinach chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolf, M; Price, C A

    1979-05-01

    Chloroplasts were isolated from spinach leaves and the intact chloroplasts separated by centrifugation on gradients of silica sol. Chloroplasts prepared in this way were almost completely free of cytoplasmic rRNA. The purified chloroplasts were incubated with 32PO4 in the light. The nucleic acids were then extracted and the RNA was fractionated into poly(A)-lacking RNA and poly(A)-containing RNA (poly(A)-RNA) via oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography. The poly(A)-RNA had a mean size of approximately 18--20 S as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The poly(A)-RNA was digested with RNase A and RNase T1, and the resulting poly(A) segments were subjected to electrophoresis on a 10% w/v polyacrylamide gel 98% v/v formamide). Radioactivity was incorporated into both poly(A)-RNA and poly(A)-lacking RNA and into the poly(A) segments themselves. The poly(A) segments were between 10 and 45 residues long and alkaline hydrolysis of poly(A) segments followed by descending paper chromatography showed that they were composed primarily of adenine residues. There was no 32PO4 incorporation into acid-insoluble material in the dark. We conclude that isolated chloroplasts are capable of synthesizing poly(A)-RNA. PMID:435477

  2. Stability and selectivity of alkaline proteases in hydrophilic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Haastrup; Ritthitham, Sinthuwat; Pleissner, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Hydrophilic, organic solvents can be used as co-solvents with water to produce one phase systems sustaining optimal mass transfer of substrates and products of mixed polarity in biocatalysed processes. At concentrations below 50 % hydrophilic solvents can even have a stabilising effect on alkaline...... proteases, but at higher concentrations and particularly in anhydrous systems most enzymes including alkaline proteases will denature and consequently loose activity [1]. However, partial denaturing and increased structural flexibility due to the interaction between hydrophilic solvents and alkaline...... proteases has been agued as the primary reasons for increasing activity, influencing regio-selectivity and improving the enantio-selectivity of these enzymes [2]. Alkaline proteases have been shown to be active not only on peptides, but on a wide range of renewable resources for synthesis of biologically...

  3. The Place of protease inhibitors in antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Tenore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a number of drugs have been developed. The best choice concerning which antiretroviral analogs to start is always under discussion, especially in the choice between non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based therapies and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. Both are proven to control viral replication and lead to immunological gain. The choice between a non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor as a third antiretroviral drug in the therapy should consider factors related to the individual, as well as the inclusion of the best therapy in the patient's daily activities and potential adherence. The protease inhibitor-based therapies showed similar efficacy among the various inhibitors with characteristics concerning the adverse events from each medicine. For the treatment of protease-resistant patients, darunavir and tipranavir showed good efficacy with higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  4. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna Sigrid P.; Sørensen, Hans Peter;

    2011-01-01

    , have attracted considerable attention. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of binding of peptidic inhibitors to serine protease targets. Our model is upain-1 (CSWRGLENHRMC), a disulfide-bond-constrained competitive inhibitor of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a noncanonical......Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries...... is stabilised by intrapeptide contacts between the N-terminal extension and the core peptide around Trp3. These results provide a uniquely detailed description of the binding of a peptidic protease inhibitor to its target and are of general importance in the development of peptidic inhibitors with high...

  5. Staphylococcal Proteases Aid in Evasion of the Human Complement System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz;

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that presents severe health care concerns due to the prevalence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New treatment strategies are urgently needed, which requires an understanding of disease causation mechanisms. Complement is one of the first...... lines of defense against bacterial pathogens, and S. aureus expresses several specific complement inhibitors. The effect of extracellular proteases from this bacterium on complement, however, has been the subject of limited investigation, except for a recent report regarding cleavage of the C3 component...... by aureolysin (Aur). We demonstrate here that four major extracellular proteases of S. aureus are potent complement inhibitors. Incubation of human serum with the cysteine proteases staphopain A and staphopain B, the serine protease V8 and the metalloproteinase Aur resulted in a drastic decrease...

  6. Toxoplasma gondii aspartic protease 1 is not essential in tachyzoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonais, Valerie; Shea, Michael; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    Aspartic proteases are important virulence factors for pathogens and are recognized as attractive drug targets. Seven aspartic proteases (ASPs) have been identified in Toxoplasma gondii genome. Bioinformatics and phylogenetic analyses regroup them into five monophyletic groups. Among them, TgASP1, a coccidian specific aspartic protease related to the food vacuole plasmepsins, is associated with the secretory pathway in non-dividing cells and relocalizes in close proximity to the nascent inner membrane complex (IMC) of daughter cells during replication. Despite a potential role for TgASP1 in IMC formation, the generation of a conventional knockout of the TgASP1 gene revealed that this protease is not required for T. gondii tachyzoite survival or for proper IMC biogenesis.

  7. Amplified detection of protease activity using porous silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Manuel

    This dissertation will focus on harnessing the optical properties of porous silicon to sense protease activity. Electrochemical etching of polished silicon wafers produces porous silicon with unique optical properties such as Fabry-Perot fringes or a dielectric mirror reflecting specific wavelengths. Porous silicon optical transducers are coupled to a biochemical reaction (protease activity) and optically measured in a label-free manner. The first chapter is an introductory chapter discussing the current methods of detecting protease activity. Also discussed is the use of porous silicon for label-free sensing. The second chapter discusses the use of thin protein layers that are spin coated on the surface of a porous silicon film and excluded from the porous matrix based on size. When active proteases are introduced to the protein layer, small peptide fragments are generated, causing a change in refractive index from low to high. This can be used as a tool to monitor protease activity and amplify the signal to the naked eye. To extend on the second chapter, a double layered porous silicon film with the first layer have large pores and the second layer etched below having small pores was used for sensing protease activity. Proteases are adsorbed into the first layer and introduction of whole protein substrate produces small peptide fragments that can enter the second layer (changing the effective optical thickness). The fourth chapter describes a method of using luminescent transducers coupled to protein films. An "on-off" sensor using protein coated luminescent porous silicon was used to detect a decrease in the intensity of luminescence due to degradation of the protein film. An "off-on" sensor involved a fluorescent dye housed in the porous film and capped with a protein coating. The release of the dye is caused by the action of a protease causing an increase in fluorescent intensity from the dye.

  8. Marine-derived fungi as a source of proteases

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kamat, T.; Rodrigues, C.; Naik, C.G.

    known sources of extra cellular enzymes and proteases from the genus Aspergillus have been studied extensivelyl. Fungi from marine and estuarine environment have been screened forproteas~production 20 • Fungi associated with marine organisms, due.... The growth and protease activity as observed is presented in Table 2. Amongst the fungal isolates obtained from five marine organisms Aspergillus terreu,\\' group was most , dominant followed by Acremonium fusidioides. The soft coral Sinularia kavarattiensis...

  9. Substrate modulation of enzyme activity in the herpesvirus protease family

    OpenAIRE

    Lazic, Ana; Goetz, David H.; Nomura, Anson M.; Marnett, Alan B.; Craik, Charles S.

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus proteases are an example in which allosteric regulation of an enzyme activity is achieved through the formation of quaternary structure. Here, we report a 1.7 Å resolution structure of Kaposi’s Sarcoma herpesvirus protease in complex with a hexapeptide transition state analogue that stabilizes the dimeric state of the enzyme. Extended substrate binding sites are induced upon peptide binding. In particular, 104 Å2 of surface are buried in the newly formed S4 pocket when tyrosin...

  10. Proteomic Substrate Identification for Membrane Proteases in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan A.; Scilabra, Simone D.; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell communication in the brain is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including proteolysis. Membrane-bound proteases generate signaling molecules from membrane-bound precursor proteins and control the length and function of cell surface membrane proteins. These proteases belong to different families, including members of the “a disintegrin and metalloprotease” (ADAM), the beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzymes (BACE), membrane-type matrix metalloproteases (MT-MMP) and rhomboids. Some of these proteases, in particular ADAM10 and BACE1 have been shown to be essential not only for the correct development of the mammalian brain, but also for myelination and maintaining neuronal connections in the adult nervous system. Additionally, these proteases are considered as drug targets for brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), schizophrenia and cancer. Despite their biomedical relevance, the molecular functions of these proteases in the brain have not been explored in much detail, as little was known about their substrates. This has changed with the recent development of novel proteomic methods which allow to identify substrates of membrane-bound proteases from cultured cells, primary neurons and other primary brain cells and even in vivo from minute amounts of mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This review summarizes the recent advances and highlights the strengths of the individual proteomic methods. Finally, using the example of the Alzheimer-related proteases BACE1, ADAM10 and γ-secretase, as well as ADAM17 and signal peptide peptidase like 3 (SPPL3), we illustrate how substrate identification with novel methods is instrumental in elucidating broad physiological functions of these proteases in the brain and other organs.

  11. Purification and characterization of alkaline protease from Lysinibacillus fusiformis

    OpenAIRE

    Suppiah S*; Sendeshkannan K; Prabakaran P; Rajkumar G; Yasothkumar N

    2012-01-01

    A novel alkaline protease producing bacterium was isolated from the gut of an estuarine fish Etroplus suratensis. The strain was identified by sequencing the fragment of their bacterial 16s rRNA and its homology was 97% closest to the Lysinibacillus fusiformis. An extracellular protease from this organism was purified by acetone precipitation, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography methods and the specific activity of the purified enzyme was found to be 20.39 U/mg, 169....

  12. Chloroplast genome evolution in early diverged leptosporangiate ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chung, Myong Gi; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the chloroplast (cp) genome sequences from three early diverged leptosporangiate ferns were completed and analyzed in order to understand the evolution of the genome of the fern lineages. The complete cp genome sequence of Osmunda cinnamomea (Osmundales) was 142,812 base pairs (bp). The cp genome structure was similar to that of eusporangiate ferns. The gene/intron losses that frequently occurred in the cp genome of leptosporangiate ferns were not found in the cp genome of O. cinnamomea. In addition, putative RNA editing sites in the cp genome were rare in O. cinnamomea, even though the sites were frequently predicted to be present in leptosporangiate ferns. The complete cp genome sequence of Diplopterygium glaucum (Gleicheniales) was 151,007 bp and has a 9.7 kb inversion between the trnL-CAA and trnVGCA genes when compared to O. cinnamomea. Several repeated sequences were detected around the inversion break points. The complete cp genome sequence of Lygodium japonicum (Schizaeales) was 157,142 bp and a deletion of the rpoC1 intron was detected. This intron loss was shared by all of the studied species of the genus Lygodium. The GC contents and the effective numbers of codons (ENCs) in ferns varied significantly when compared to seed plants. The ENC values of the early diverged leptosporangiate ferns showed intermediate levels between eusporangiate and core leptosporangiate ferns. However, our phylogenetic tree based on all of the cp gene sequences clearly indicated that the cp genome similarity between O. cinnamomea (Osmundales) and eusporangiate ferns are symplesiomorphies, rather than synapomorphies. Therefore, our data is in agreement with the view that Osmundales is a distinct early diverged lineage in the leptosporangiate ferns.

  13. Towards resolving Lamiales relationships: insights from rapidly evolving chloroplast sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heubl Günther

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the large angiosperm order Lamiales, a diverse array of highly specialized life strategies such as carnivory, parasitism, epiphytism, and desiccation tolerance occur, and some lineages possess drastically accelerated DNA substitutional rates or miniaturized genomes. However, understanding the evolution of these phenomena in the order, and clarifying borders of and relationships among lamialean families, has been hindered by largely unresolved trees in the past. Results Our analysis of the rapidly evolving trnK/matK, trnL-F and rps16 chloroplast regions enabled us to infer more precise phylogenetic hypotheses for the Lamiales. Relationships among the nine first-branching families in the Lamiales tree are now resolved with very strong support. Subsequent to Plocospermataceae, a clade consisting of Carlemanniaceae plus Oleaceae branches, followed by Tetrachondraceae and a newly inferred clade composed of Gesneriaceae plus Calceolariaceae, which is also supported by morphological characters. Plantaginaceae (incl. Gratioleae and Scrophulariaceae are well separated in the backbone grade; Lamiaceae and Verbenaceae appear in distant clades, while the recently described Linderniaceae are confirmed to be monophyletic and in an isolated position. Conclusions Confidence about deep nodes of the Lamiales tree is an important step towards understanding the evolutionary diversification of a major clade of flowering plants. The degree of resolution obtained here now provides a first opportunity to discuss the evolution of morphological and biochemical traits in Lamiales. The multiple independent evolution of the carnivorous syndrome, once in Lentibulariaceae and a second time in Byblidaceae, is strongly supported by all analyses and topological tests. The evolution of selected morphological characters such as flower symmetry is discussed. The addition of further sequence data from introns and spacers holds promise to eventually obtain a

  14. Geographic variation of chloroplast DNA in Platycarya strobilacea (Juglandaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Chao CHEN; Li ZHANG; Jie ZENG; Fei SHI; Hong YANG; Yun-Rui MAO; Cheng-Xin FU

    2012-01-01

    The monotypic genus Platycarya (Juglandaceae) is one of the most widespread temperate tree species in East Asia.In this research,we implemented a phylogeographical study using chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) (psbA-trnH and atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer) sequences on Platycarya strobilacea,in order to identify the locations of the species' main refugia and migration routes.A total of 180 individuals of P.stobilacea from 27 populations from China and Jeju Island (Korea) were collected.The results revealed that P.strobilacea had 35 haplotypes for the two intergenic spacers and high genetic diversity (hT =0.926).This surprisingly high diversity ofhaplotypes indicates its long evolutionary history,which is in agreement with previous phylogenetic analyses and fossil records.Significant cpDNA population subdivision was detected (GST =0.720; NST =0.862),suggesting low levels of recurrent gene flow through seeds among populations and significant phylogeographical structure (NST > GST,P < 0.05).The construction of phylogenetic relationships of the 35 chlorotypes detected four major cpDNA clades.Divergence dating analyses using BEAST suggest that the divergence of the major cpDNA clades occurred before the Miocene.Demographic analysis indicated that the Eastern clade underwent localized demographic expansions.The molecular phylogenetic data,together with the geographic distribution of the haplotypes,suggest the existence of multiple glacial refugia in most of its current range in China through Quaternary climatic oscillations.

  15. Effect of protease inhibitors on the sense of taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, S S; Zervakis, J; Heffron, S; Heald, A E

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the taste properties of protease inhibitors which are essential components of drug regimes used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In this study, the taste properties of four protease inhibitors (indinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir, and nelfinavir) were investigated in unmedicated HIV-infected patients and healthy controls. Three of the four protease inhibitors (indinavir, ritonavir, and saquinavir) were found to be predominantly bitter (with additional qualities of medicinal, metallic, astringent, sour, and burning). Nelfinavir was found to be relatively tasteless. HIV-infected and uninfected control subjects detected protease inhibitors at similar concentrations, but HIV-infected subjects perceived suprathreshold concentrations as more bitter than controls. Detection thresholds ranged from 0.0061 mM for saquinavir in HIV-infected patients to 0.0702 mM for ritonavir in uninfected control subjects. Suprathreshold studies indicated that protease inhibitors modified the taste perception of a variety of other taste compounds. These results are consistent with clinical findings that protease inhibitors produce taste complaints that can impact patient compliance. PMID:10501290

  16. Proteases induce secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werb, Z.; Aggeler, J.

    1978-04-01

    We have observed that treatment of rabbit synovial fibroblasts with proteolytic enzymes can induce secretion of collagenase (EC 3.4.24.7) and plasminogen activator (EC 3.4.21.-). Cells treated for 2 to 24 hr with plasmin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, papain, bromelain, thermolysin, or ..cap alpha..-protease but not with thrombin or neuraminidase secreted detectable amounts of collagenase within 16 to 48 hr. Treatment of fibroblasts with trypsin also induced secretion of plasminogen activator. Proteases initiated secretion of collagenase (up to 20 units per 10/sup 6/ cells per 24 hr) only when treatment produced decreased cell adhesion. Collagenase production did not depend on continued presence of proteolytic activity or on subsequent cell adhesion, spreading, or proliferation. Routine subculturing with crude trypsin also induced collagenase secretion by cells. Secretion of collagenase was prevented and normal spreading was obtained if the trypsinized cells were placed into medium containing fetal calf serum. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, bovine serum albumin, collagen, and fibronectin did not inhibit collagenase production. Although proteases that induced collagenase secretion also removed surface glycoprotein, the kinetics of induction of cell protease secretion were different from those for removal of fibronectin. Physiological inducers of secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by cells have not been identified. These results suggest that extracellular proteases in conjunction with plasma proteins may govern protease secretion by cells.

  17. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schauperl

    Full Text Available Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points. Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4' with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design.

  18. Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana Accession Landsberg erecta, Assembled from Single-Molecule, Real-Time Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgräwe, Daniela; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    A publicly available data set from Pacific Biosciences was used to create an assembly of the chloroplast genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana genotype Landsberg erecta. The assembly is solely based on single-molecule, real-time sequencing data and hence provides high resolution of the two inverted repeat regions typically contained in chloroplast genomes. PMID:27660776

  19. Specific and efficient targeting of cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters to the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu eUehara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Installation of cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters to the inner envelope membrane (IEM of chloroplasts in C3 plants has been thought to improve photosynthetic performance. However, the method to deliver cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters to the chloroplast IEM remains to be established. In this study, we provide evidence that the cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters, BicA and SbtA, can be specifically installed into the chloroplast IEM using the chloroplast IEM targeting signal in conjunction with the transit peptide. We fused the transit peptide and the mature portion of Cor413im1, whose targeting mechanism to the IEM has been characterized in detail, to either BicA or SbtA isolated from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Among the seven chimeric constructs tested, we confirmed that four chimeric bicarbonate transporters, designated as BicAI, BicAII, SbtAII, and SbtAIII, were expressed in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, these chimeric transporters were specifically targeted to the chloroplast IEM. They were also resistant to alkaline extraction but can be solubilized by Triton X-100, indicating that they are integral membrane proteins in the chloroplast IEM. One of the transporters, BicA, could reside in the chloroplast IEM even after removal of the IEM targeting signal. Taken together, our results indicate that the addition of IEM targeting signal, as well as the transit peptide, to bicarbonate transporters allows us to efficiently target nuclear-encoded chimeric bicarbonate transporters to the chloroplast IEM.

  20. Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana Accession Landsberg erecta, Assembled from Single-Molecule, Real-Time Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadermann, Kai Bernd; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    A publicly available data set from Pacific Biosciences was used to create an assembly of the chloroplast genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana genotype Landsberg erecta The assembly is solely based on single-molecule, real-time sequencing data and hence provides high resolution of the two inverted repeat regions typically contained in chloroplast genomes. PMID:27660776

  1. Comparative studies on codon usage pattern of chloroplasts and their host nuclear genes in four plant species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qingpo Liu; Qingzhong Xue

    2005-04-01

    A detailed comparison was made of codon usage of chloroplast genes with their host (nuclear) genes in the four angiosperm species Oryza sativa, Zea mays, Triticum aestivum and Arabidopsis thaliana. The average GC content of the entire genes, and at the three codon positions individually, was higher in nuclear than in chloroplast genes, suggesting different genomic organization and mutation pressures in nuclear and chloroplast genes. The results of Nc-plots and neutrality plots suggested that nucleotide compositional constraint had a large contribution to codon usage bias of nuclear genes in O. sativa, Z. mays, and T. aestivum, whereas natural selection was likely to be playing a large role in codon usage bias in chloroplast genomes. Correspondence analysis and chi-test showed that regardless of the genomic environment (species) of the host, the codon usage pattern of chloroplast genes differed from nuclear genes of their host species by their AU-richness. All the chloroplast genomes have predominantly A- and/or U-ending codons, whereas nuclear genomes have G-, C- or U-ending codons as their optimal codons. These findings suggest that the chloroplast genome might display particular characteristics of codon usage that are different from its host nuclear genome. However, one feature common to both chloroplast and nuclear genomes in this study was that pyrimidines were found more frequently than purines at the synonymous codon position of optimal codons.

  2. Cystatin protease inhibitors and immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavasnik-Bergant, Tina

    2008-05-01

    Cystatins are natural tight-binding reversible inhibitors of cysteine proteases. They are wide spread in all living organisms (mammals, nematodes, arthropods etc.) and are involved in various biological processes where they regulate normal proteolysis and also take part in disease pathology. Many cystatins show changes in expression and/or localization, as well as changes in secretion, following certain stimuli acting on immune cells. In immune cells, cystatins interfere with antigen processing and presentation, phagocytosis, expression of cytokines and nitric oxide and these ways modify the immune response. Further, it has been suggested that cystatin-type molecules secreted from parasites down-modulate the host immune response. Precise understanding of the regulatory roles on proteolytic enzymes of endogenous and exogenous cystatins, such as those from parasites, will provide us with valuable insight into how immune response could be modulated to treat a specific disease. This review covers some specific functions of individual cystatins, with a particular focus on the relevance of cystatins to the immune response.

  3. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Lilium hansonii Leichtlin ex D.D.T.Moore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Hwang, Yoon-Jung; Lee, Sang-Choon; Yang, Tae-Jin; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2016-09-01

    Lilium hansonii is a lily species native to Korea and an important wild species for lily breeding. The chloroplast genome of L. hansonii was completed by de novo assembly using the small amount of whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of L. hansonii was 152 655 bp long and consisted of large single copy region (82 051 bp), small single copy region (17 620 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (26 492 bp). A total of 115 genes were annotated, which included 81 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that L. hansonii is most closely related to L. superbum (Turk's-cap lily) and L. longiflorum (Easter lily). PMID:26404645

  4. Wax esters of different compositions produced via engineering of leaf chloroplast metabolism in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Selcuk; Sun, Chuanxin; Leonova, Svetlana; Dutta, Paresh; Dörmann, Peter; Domergue, Frédéric; Stymne, Sten; Hofvander, Per

    2014-09-01

    In a future bio-based economy, renewable sources for lipid compounds at attractive cost are needed for applications where today petrochemical derivatives are dominating. Wax esters and fatty alcohols provide diverse industrial uses, such as in lubricant and surfactant production. In this study, chloroplast metabolism was engineered to divert intermediates from de novo fatty acid biosynthesis to wax ester synthesis. To accomplish this, chloroplast targeted fatty acyl reductases (FAR) and wax ester synthases (WS) were transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Wax esters of different qualities and quantities were produced providing insights to the properties and interaction of the individual enzymes used. In particular, a phytyl ester synthase was found to be a premium candidate for medium chain wax ester synthesis. Catalytic activities of FAR and WS were also expressed as a fusion protein and determined functionally equivalent to the expression of individual enzymes for wax ester synthesis in chloroplasts.

  5. Stable expression of a bifunctional diterpene synthase in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedler, Julie A Z; Gangl, Doris; Hamberger, Björn Robert;

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been shown to hold significant promise as a production platform for recombinant proteins, but transformation of the nuclear genome is still a non-trivial process due to random gene insertion and frequent silencing. Insertion of transgenes into the chloroplasts...... is an alternative strategy, and we report here the stable expression of a large (91 kDa) protein in the chloroplast using a recently developed low-cost transformation protocol. Moreover, selection of transformants is based on restoration of prototrophy using an endogenous gene (psbH) as the marker, thereby allowing...... the generation of transgenic lines without the use of antibiotic-resistance genes. Here, we have expressed a bifunctional diterpene synthase in C. reinhardtii chloroplasts. Homoplasmic transformants were obtained with the expressed enzyme accounting for 3.7 % of total soluble protein. The enzyme was purified...

  6. A genomic approach for isolating chloroplast microsatellite markers for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Jessica N. C.; Nazareno, Alison G.; Lohmann, Lúcia G.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: In this study, we developed chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae) to investigate the population structure and genetic diversity of this species. Methods and Results: We used Illumina HiSeq data to reconstruct the chloroplast genome of P. kerere by a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly. We then used the chloroplast genome to develop a set of cpSSRs from intergenic regions. Overall, 24 primer pairs were designed, 21 of which amplified successfully and were polymorphic, presenting three to nine alleles per locus. The unbiased haploid diversity per locus varied from 0.207 (Pac28) to 0.817 (Pac04). All but one locus amplified for all other taxa of Pachyptera. Conclusions: The markers reported here will serve as a basis for studies to assess the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of Pachyptera. PMID:27672522

  7. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum L. (Polygonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xiao-Jie; Huang, Min; Wang, Xu-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum L. (Polygonaceae) has been reconstructed from the whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The genome is 161 541 bp in length, and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 86 518 bp) and small (SSC, 13 111 bp) single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 30 956 bp each). The chloroplast genome contains 131 genes, including 84 protein-coding genes (78 PCG species), eight ribosomal RNA genes (four rRNA species) and 37 transfer RNA genes (28 tRNA species). Phylogenetic tree based on the maximum parsimony (MP) analysis of 65 chloroplast protein-coding genes for 13 taxa demonstrated a close relationship between R. palmatum and Fagopyrum esculentum subsp. ancestrale in Polygonaceae. PMID:26153751

  8. Metabolic engineering of chloroplasts for artemisinic acid biosynthesis and impact on plant growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhawna Saxena; Mayavan Subramaniyan; Karan Malhotra; Neel Sarovar Bhavesh; Shobha Devi Potlakayala; Shashi Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Chloroplasts offer high-level transgene expression and transgene containment due to maternal inheritance, and are ideal hosts for biopharmaceutical biosynthesis via multigene engineering. To exploit these advantages, we have expressed 12 enzymes in chloroplasts for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid (precursor of artemisinin, antimalarial drug) in an alternative plant system. Integration of transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome via homologous recombination was confirmed by molecular analysis, and biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in plant leaf tissues was detected with the help of 13C NMR and ESI-mass spectrometry. The excess metabolic flux of isopentenyl pyrophosphate generated by an engineered mevalonate pathway was diverted for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid. However, expression of megatransgenes impacted the growth of the transplastomic plantlets. By combining two exogenous pathways, artemisinic acid was produced in transplastomic plants, which can be improved further using better metabolic engineering strategies for commercially viable yield of desirable isoprenoid products.

  9. A genomic approach for isolating chloroplast microsatellite markers for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Jessica N. C.; Nazareno, Alison G.; Lohmann, Lúcia G.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: In this study, we developed chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae) to investigate the population structure and genetic diversity of this species. Methods and Results: We used Illumina HiSeq data to reconstruct the chloroplast genome of P. kerere by a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly. We then used the chloroplast genome to develop a set of cpSSRs from intergenic regions. Overall, 24 primer pairs were designed, 21 of which amplified successfully and were polymorphic, presenting three to nine alleles per locus. The unbiased haploid diversity per locus varied from 0.207 (Pac28) to 0.817 (Pac04). All but one locus amplified for all other taxa of Pachyptera. Conclusions: The markers reported here will serve as a basis for studies to assess the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of Pachyptera.

  10. Phylogenomic analysis of transcriptomic sequences of mitochondria and chloroplasts of essential brown algae (Phaeophyceae) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Shangang; LIU Tao; WU Shuangxiu; WANG Xumin; LI Tianyong; QIAN Hao; SUN Jing; WANG Liang; YU Jun; REN Lufeng; YIN Jinlong

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplast and mitochondrion of brown algae (Class Phaeophyceae of Phylum Ochrophyta) may have originated from different endosymbiosis. In this study, we carried out phylogenomic analysis to distinguish their evolutionary lineages by using algal RNA-seq datasets of the 1 000 Plants (1KP) Project and publicly available complete genomes of mitochondria and chloroplasts of Kingdom Chromista. We have found that there is a split between Class Phaeophyceae of Phylum Ochrophyta and the others (Phylum Cryptophyta and Haptophyta) in Kingdom Chromista, and identified more diversity in chloroplast genes than mitochondrial ones in their phylogenetic trees. Taxonomy resolution for Class Phaeophyceae showed that it was divided into Laminariales-Ectocarpales clade and Fucales clade, and phylogenetic positions of Kjellmaniella crassi-folia, Hizikia fusifrome and Ishige okamurai were confirmed. Our analysis provided the basic phylogenetic relationships of Chromista algae, and demonstrated their potential ability to study endosymbiotic events.

  11. Protease encoding microbial communities and protease activity of the rhizosphere and bulk soils of two maize lines with different N uptake efficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Baraniya, Divyashri; Puglisi, Edoardo; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Pietramellara, Giacomo; Giagnoni, Laura; Arenella, Mariarita; Nannipieri, Paolo; Renella, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to understand the interplay of plant Nitrogen Utilizing Efficiency (NEU) with protease activtiy and microbial proteolytic community composition in the rhizosphere and bulk soils. Protease activity, diversity and abundance of protease genes (using DGGE and qPCR respectively of two key bacterial protease encoding genes: alkaline metallo-peptidase (apr) and neutral-metallopeptidases (npr) were monitored in both rhizosphere and bulk soils from two maize in-bred lines L0...

  12. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Hare’s Ear Root, Bupleurum falcatum: Its Molecular Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ho Shin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bupleurum falcatum, which belongs to the family Apiaceae, has long been applied for curative treatments, especially as a liver tonic, in herbal medicine. The chloroplast (cp genome has been an ideal model to perform the evolutionary and comparative studies because of its highly conserved features and simple structure. The Apiaceae family is taxonomically close to the Araliaceae family and there have been numerous complete chloroplast genome sequences reported in the Araliaceae family, while little is known about the Apiaceae family. In this study, the complete sequence of the B. falcatum chloroplast genome was obtained. The full-length of the cp genome is 155,989 nucleotides with a 37.66% overall guanine-cytosine (GC content and shows a quadripartite structure composed of three nomenclatural regions: a large single-copy (LSC region, a small single-copy (SSC region, and a pair of inverted repeat (IR regions. The genome occupancy is 85,912-bp, 17,517-bp, and 26,280-bp for LSC, SSC, and IR, respectively. B. falcatum was shown to contain 111 unique genes (78 for protein-coding, 29 for tRNAs, and four for rRNAs, respectively on its chloroplast genome. Genic comparison found that B. falcatum has no pseudogenes and has two gene losses, accD in the LSC and ycf15 in the IRs. A total of 55 unique tandem repeat sequences were detected in the B. falcatum cp genome. This report is the first to describe the complete chloroplast genome sequence in B. falcatum and will open up further avenues of research to understand the evolutionary panorama and the chloroplast genome conformation in related plant species.

  13. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Hare's Ear Root, Bupleurum falcatum: Its Molecular Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kang, Sang-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Ohg; Kim, Chang-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Bupleurum falcatum, which belongs to the family Apiaceae, has long been applied for curative treatments, especially as a liver tonic, in herbal medicine. The chloroplast (cp) genome has been an ideal model to perform the evolutionary and comparative studies because of its highly conserved features and simple structure. The Apiaceae family is taxonomically close to the Araliaceae family and there have been numerous complete chloroplast genome sequences reported in the Araliaceae family, while little is known about the Apiaceae family. In this study, the complete sequence of the B. falcatum chloroplast genome was obtained. The full-length of the cp genome is 155,989 nucleotides with a 37.66% overall guanine-cytosine (GC) content and shows a quadripartite structure composed of three nomenclatural regions: a large single-copy (LSC) region, a small single-copy (SSC) region, and a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions. The genome occupancy is 85,912-bp, 17,517-bp, and 26,280-bp for LSC, SSC, and IR, respectively. B. falcatum was shown to contain 111 unique genes (78 for protein-coding, 29 for tRNAs, and four for rRNAs, respectively) on its chloroplast genome. Genic comparison found that B. falcatum has no pseudogenes and has two gene losses, accD in the LSC and ycf15 in the IRs. A total of 55 unique tandem repeat sequences were detected in the B. falcatum cp genome. This report is the first to describe the complete chloroplast genome sequence in B. falcatum and will open up further avenues of research to understand the evolutionary panorama and the chloroplast genome conformation in related plant species. PMID:27187480

  14. Slugs' last meals: molecular identification of sequestered chloroplasts from different algal origins in Sacoglossa (Opisthobranchia, Gastropoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händeler, Katharina; Wägele, Heike; Wahrmund, Ute; Rüdinger, Mareike; Knoop, Volker

    2010-11-01

    Some sacoglossan sea slugs have become famous for their unique capability to extract and incorporate functional chloroplasts from algal food organisms (mainly Ulvophyceae) into their gut cells. The functional incorporation of the so-called kleptoplasts allows the slugs to rely on photosynthetic products for weeks to months, enabling them to survive long periods of food shortage over most of their life-span. The algal food spectrum providing kleptoplasts as temporary, non-inherited endosymbionts appears to vary among sacoglossan slugs, but detailed knowledge is sketchy or unavailable. Accurate identification of algal donor species, which provide the chloroplasts for long-term retention is of primary importance to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms allowing long-term functionality of the captured chloroplast in the foreign animal cell environment. Whereas some sacoglossans forage on a variety of algal species, (e.g. Elysia crispata and E. viridis) others are more selective. Hence, characterizing the range of functional sacoglossan-chloroplast associations in nature is a prerequisite to understand the basis of this enigmatic endosymbiosis. Here, we present a suitable chloroplast gene (tufA) as a marker, which allows identification of the respective algal kleptoplast donor taxa by analysing DNA from whole animals. This novel approach allows identification of donor algae on genus or even species level, thus providing evidence for the taxonomic range of food organisms. We report molecular evidence that chloroplasts from different algal sources are simultaneously incorporated in some species of Elysia. NeigborNet analyses for species assignments are preferred over tree reconstruction methods because the former allow more reliable statements on species identification via barcoding, or rather visualize alternative allocations not to be seen in the latter. PMID:21565106

  15. Signalling by the global regulatory molecule ppGpp in bacteria and chloroplasts of land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozawa, Y; Nomura, Y

    2011-09-01

    The hyperphosphorylated guanine ribonucleotide ppGpp mediates the stringent response in bacteria. Biochemical and genetic studies of this response in Escherichia coli have shown that the biosynthesis of ppGpp is catalysed by two homologous enzymes, RelA and SpoT. RelA is activated in response to amino acid starvation, and SpoT responds to abiotic physical stress beside nutritional stress. All free-living bacteria, including Gram-positive firmicutes, contain RelA-SpoT homologues (RSH). Further, novel ppGpp biosynthetic enzymes, designated small alarmone synthetases (SASs), were recently identified in a subset of bacteria, including the Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis, and were shown to consist only of a ppGpp synthetase domain. Studies suggest that these SAS proteins contribute to ppGpp signalling in response to stressful conditions in a manner distinct from that of RelA-SpoT enzymes. SAS proteins currently appear to always occur in addition to RSH enzymes in various combinations but never alone. RSHs have also been identified in chloroplasts, organelles of photosynthetic eukaryotes that originated from endosymbiotic photosynthetic bacteria. These chloroplast RSHs are exclusively encoded in nuclear DNA and targeted into chloroplasts. The findings suggest that ppGpp may regulate chloroplast functions similar to those regulated in bacteria, including transcription and translation. In addition, a novel ppGpp synthetase that is regulated by Ca²⁺ as a result of the presence of two EF-hand motifs at its COOH terminus was recently identified in chloroplasts of land plants. This finding indicates the existence of a direct connection between eukaryotic Ca²⁺ signalling and prokaryotic ppGpp signalling in chloroplasts. The new observations with regard to ppGpp signalling in land plants suggest that such signalling contributes to the regulation of a wider range of cellular functions than previously anticipated.

  16. Alleviation effects of Ce3+on inhibition of photochemical activity caused by linolenic acid in spinach chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaoqing; HUANG Hao; LIU Chao; MA Linglan; LIU Jie; YIN Sitao; HONG Fashui

    2008-01-01

    Linolenic acid has great effects on the structure and function of chloroplast. The function of Ce3+ on the improvement of chloro-plast photoreduction activity and oxygen evolution damaged by linolenic acid in spinach by in vitro investigation was studied. Results showed that adding Ce3+ to the linolenic acid treated chloroplast could greatly decrease the reduction linolenic acid exerted on the whole chain electron transport rate and the photoreduction activity of photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) and photosystem Ⅰ (PSⅠ) as well as the oxygen evolution rate of chloroplast. It indicated that Ce3+ had the ability to relieve the inhibition of the photochemical reaction of chloroplast caused by lino-lenic acid to some extent.

  17. Long-day photoperiod induced unhealthy development of chloroplasts in the photoperiod-sensitive genie male-sterile rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By measurement of photochemical activities of chloroplasts and observation on supramolecular archi tecture of thylakoids in chloroplasts, it was found that compared with the effects of short-day photoperiod, long-day pho toperiod could induce normal development of chloroplasts in seedlings of NK58S (photoperiod-sensitive genie male-sterile rice) and NK58 (original line) which do not enter the photoperiod sensitive phase and in seedlings of NK58 just enter the photoperiod-sensitive phase. However, it could induce unhealthy development of chloroplasts in seedlings of NK58S which also just enter the photoperiod sensitive phase. This special effect of long-day photoperiod on the development of chloroplasts in NK58S is probably one of main reasons why long-day photoperiod induces rale-sterility in NK58S and normal fertility in NK58.

  18. Cloning and functional analysis of chloroplast division gene NtFtsZ2-1 in Nicotiana tabacum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    FtsZ protein plays an important role in the division of chloroplasts. With the finding and functional analysis of higher plant FtsZ proteins, people have deepened the understanding in the molecular mechanism of chloroplast division. Multiple ftsZ genes are diversified into two families in higher plants, ftsZ1 and ftsZ2. On the basis of the research on ftsZ1 family, we analyzed the function of NtFtsZ2-1 gene in Nicotiana tabacum. Microscopic analysis of the sense and antisense NtFtsZ2-1 transgenic tobacco plants revealed that the chloroplasts were abnormal in size and also in number when compared with wild-type tobacco chloroplasts. Our investigations confirmed that the NtFtsZ2-1 gene is involved in plant chloroplast division.

  19. Photoregulation of fructose and glucose respiration in the intact chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 and spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoregulation of chloroplastic respiration was studied by monitoring in darkness and in light the release of 14CO2 from whole chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) supplied externally with [14C]glucose and [14C]fructose, respectively. CO2 release was inhibited more than 90% in both chloroplasts by a light intensity of 4 W m-2. Oxidants, oxaloacetate in Chlamydomonas, nitrite in spinach, and phenazine methosulfate in both chloroplasts, reversed the inhibition. The onset of the photoinhibitory effect on CO2 release was relatively rapid compared to the restoration of CO2 release following illumination. In both darkened chloroplasts, dithiothreitol inhibited release. Of the four enzymes (fructokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase, and gluconate-6-P dehydrogenase) in the pathway catalyzing the release of CO2 from fructose, only glucose-6-P dehydrogenase was deactivated by light and by dithiothreitol. 33 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Spectral characteristics and orientation of native forms of pigment in chloroplasts of barley seedlings under intermittent and continuous irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorophyll (Chl) form at 710-712 nm localized on the small protein simultaneously connected with the reaction centre of photosystem 1 (RC PS1) and the light-harvesting complex I (LHC-I) polypeptides is supposed to be the source of long-wavelength band of low-temperature fluorescence of chloroplasts at 735-740 nm. Chloroplasts of intermittently irradiated seedlings (or chloroplasts of the Chl b-less barley mutant) did not differ from chloroplasts of continuously irradiated seedlings (or chloroplasts of wild type barley) in the set of Chl a and beta-carotene forms and their orientation in the membrane. A competition for the newly synthesized Chl a molecules occurred between the RC PS 2 and LHC-II polypeptides

  1. The role of Serine Proteases and Serine Protease Inhibitors in the migration of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Ann-Judith

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms regulating neuronal migration during development remain largely undefined. Extracellular matrix cues, target site released factors, and components of the migratory neurons themselves are likely all coordinated in time and space directing neurons to their appropriate locations. We have studied the effects of proteases and their inhibitors on the extracellular matrix and the consequences to the migration of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in the embryonic chick. Chick GnRH neurons differentiate in the olfactory epithelium, migrate along the olfactory nerve and enter the forebrain. The accessibility of this coherent cell group make it amenable for studying protease/inhibitor roles in migratory processes. Results Affigel blue beads were used to deliver a serine protease inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1, and a target protease, trypsin, to the olfactory epithelium coincident with initiation of GnRH neuronal migration. PN-1 inhibited neuronal migration while trypsin accelerated their transit into the CNS. Prior to initiation of migration, neither PN-1 nor trypsin altered the timing of neuronal exit. Trypsin did, however, accelerate the timing of neuronal crossing into the nerve-forebrain junction. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that protease activity modulates neuronal movements across barriers. Moreover, the data suggest, for the first time, that aspects of GnRH neuronal migration may be cell autonomous but modulated by ECM alterations.

  2. PURIFIKASI DAN KARAKTERISASI PROTEASE DARI BAKTERI PATOGEN Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Purification and Characterization of Protease from Pathogenic Bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ace Baehaki1

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, concern on protease as medical target for overcoming bacterial diseases and viral diseases has been rapidly increased because of the obvious involvement of this enzyme in the molecular of the diseases. The purpose of this research was to purify and characterize protease from pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bacteria were grown in media containing triptone 1%, NaCl 1% and Yeast extract 0,5%. Protease of P.aeruginosa was purified using column chromatography with Sephadex G-100 gel. There were three peaks of enzyme protein, which were detected on fractions 14, 17 and 30. The optimum pH of the extracelluler protease from P. aeruginosa was 8. The optimum temperature of P.aeruginosa protease was 300C. Fe3+ (1dan 5 mM was strong activator and Co2+ was strong inhibitor. Study on the effect of metals ion and spesific inhibitors indicated that protease from P. aeruginosa was serin metaloprotease. The apparent moleculer weights, as determined by SDS-PAGE and zymogram technique, 36 kD and 42 kD.

  3. Proteomics of the chloroplast: systematic identification and targeting analysis of lumenal and peripheral thylakoid proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltier, J B; Friso, G; Kalume, D E;

    2000-01-01

    the twin arginine motif that is characteristic for substrates of the TAT pathway. Logoplots were used to provide a detailed analysis of the lumenal targeting signals, and all nuclear-encoded proteins identified on the two-dimensional gels were used to test predictions for chloroplast localization...... and transit peptides made by the software programs ChloroP, PSORT, and SignalP. A combination of these three programs was found to provide a useful tool for evaluating chloroplast localization and transit peptides and also could reveal possible alternative processing sites and dual targeting. The potential...

  4. A set of 100 chloroplast DNA primer pairs to study population genetics and phylogeny in monocotylenons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarcelli, Nora; Bernaud, Adeline; Eiserhardt, Wolf L.;

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA sequences are of great interest for population genetics and phylogenetic studies. However, only a small set of markers are commonly used. Most of them have been designed for amplification in a large range of Angiosperms and are located in the Large Single Copy (LSC). Here we...... developed a new set of 100 primer pairs optimized for amplification in Monocotyledons. Primer pairs amplify coding (exon) and non-coding regions (intron and intergenic spacer). They span the different chloroplast regions: 72 are located in the LSC, 13 in the Small Single Copy (SSC) and 15 in the Inverted...

  5. Multiple regulatory mechanisms in the chloroplast of green algae: relation to hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Taras K; Krendeleva, Tatyana E; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2015-09-01

    A complex regulatory network in the chloroplast of green algae provides an efficient tool for maintenance of energy and redox balance in the cell under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In this review, we discuss the structural and functional organizations of electron transport pathways in the chloroplast, and regulation of photosynthesis in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The focus is on the regulatory mechanisms induced in response to nutrient deficiency stress and anoxia and especially on the role of a hydrogenase-mediated reaction in adaptation to highly reducing conditions and ATP deficiency in the cell. PMID:25986411

  6. Noncoding RNA mediated traffic of foreign mRNA into chloroplasts reveals a novel signaling mechanism in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gómez

    Full Text Available Communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus is one of the milestones of the evolution of plants on earth. Proteins encoded by ancestral chloroplast-endogenous genes were transferred to the nucleus during the endosymbiotic evolution and originated this communication, which is mainly dependent on specific transit-peptides. However, the identification of nuclear-encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast lacking these canonical signals suggests the existence of an alternative cellular pathway tuning this metabolic crosstalk. Non-coding RNAS (NcRNAs are increasingly recognized as regulators of gene expression as they play roles previously believed to correspond to proteins. Avsunviroidae family viroids are the only noncoding functional RNAs that have been reported to traffic inside the chloroplasts. Elucidating mechanisms used by these pathogens to enter this organelle will unearth novel transport pathways in plant cells. Here we show that a viroid-derived NcRNA acting as a 5'UTR-end mediates the functional import of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP mRNA into chloroplast. This claim is supported by the observation at confocal microscopy of a selective accumulation of GFP in the chloroplast of the leaves expressing the chimeric vd-5'UTR/GFP and by the detection of the GFP mRNA in chloroplasts isolated from cells expressing this construct. These results support the existence of an alternative signaling mechanism in plants between the host cell and chloroplasts, where an ncRNA functions as a key regulatory molecule to control the accumulation of nuclear-encoded proteins in this organelle. In addition, our findings provide a conceptual framework to develop new biotechnological tools in systems using plant chloroplast as bioreactors. Finally, viroids of the family Avsunviroidae have probably evolved to subvert this signaling mechanism to regulate their differential traffic into the chloroplast of infected cells.

  7. Reorganized actin filaments anchor chloroplasts along the anticlinal walls of Vallisneria epidermal cells under high-intensity blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuuki; Takagi, Shingo

    2005-08-01

    In epidermal cells of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, high-intensity blue light (BL) induces the avoidance response of chloroplasts. We examined simultaneous BL-induced changes in the configuration of actin filaments in the cytoplasmic layers that face the outer periclinal wall (P side) and the anticlinal wall (A side). The results clearly showed that dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton occurs on both sides. Upon BL irradiation, thick, long bundles of actin filaments appeared, concomitant with the directed migration of chloroplasts from the P side to the A side. After 15-20 min of BL irradiation, fine actin bundles on only the A side appeared to associate with chloroplasts that had migrated from the P side. To examine the role of the fine actin bundles, we evaluated the anchorage of chloroplasts by centrifuging living cells. Upon BL irradiation, the resistance of chloroplasts on both the P and A sides to the centrifugal force decreased remarkably. After 20 min of BL irradiation, the resistance of chloroplasts on the A side increased again, but chloroplasts on the P side could still be displaced. The BL-induced recovery of resistance of chloroplasts on the A side was sensitive to photosynthesis inhibitors but insensitive to an inhibitor of flavoproteins. The photosynthesis inhibitors also prevented the fine actin bundles from appearing on the A side under BL irradiation. These results strongly suggest that the BL-induced avoidance response of chloroplasts includes photosynthesis-dependent and actin-dependent anchorage of chloroplasts on the A side of epidermal cells. PMID:15809866

  8. Pharmacological potentials of phenolic compounds from Prosopis spp.-a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dhananjaya Seturaman Prabha; Hans-Uwe Dahms; Prabha Malliga

    2014-01-01

    The shrub Prosopsis juliflora (Sw.) DC. revealed several medicinal properties due to its different chemical compounds such as alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, saponins and phenolic compounds distributed in different parts of the plant body, such as woody parts (roots, stem, branches and bark) as well as leaves and pollen have been used for the extraction of medically active substances. Prosopsis juliflora containing a diverse group of secondary metabolites has unique and multifactorial medicinal properties. The utilization of this abundant resource provides a viable option for producing bioactive natural products that may serve as lead substances for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. This review highlights accessible bioactive sources from this plant that are of potential interest for industrial applications.

  9. The structure of a universally employed enzyme: V8 protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Lata; Leduc, Yvonne; Hayakawa, Koto; Delbaere, Louis T.J. (Saskatchewan)

    2008-06-27

    V8 protease, an extracellular protease of Staphylococcus aureus, is related to the pancreatic serine proteases. The enzyme cleaves peptide bonds exclusively on the carbonyl side of aspartate and glutamate residues. Unlike the pancreatic serine proteases, V8 protease possesses no disulfide bridges. This is a major evolutionary difference, as all pancreatic proteases have at least two disulfide bridges. The structure of V8 protease shows structural similarity with several other serine proteases, specifically the epidermolytic toxins A and B from S. aureus and trypsin, in which the conformation of the active site is almost identical. V8 protease is also unique in that the positively charged N-terminus is involved in determining the substrate-specificity of the enzyme.

  10. The Rieske Fe/S protein of the cytochrome b6/f complex in chloroplasts: missing link in the evolution of protein transport pathways in chloroplasts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molik, S; Karnauchov, I; Weidlich, C; Herrmann, R G; Klösgen, R B

    2001-11-16

    The Rieske Fe/S protein, a nuclear-encoded subunit of the cytochrome b(6)/f complex in chloroplasts, is retarded in the stromal space after import into the chloroplast and only slowly translocated further into the thylakoid membrane system. As shown by the sensitivity to nigericin and to specific competitor proteins, thylakoid transport takes place by the DeltapH-dependent TAT pathway. The Rieske protein is an untypical TAT substrate, however. It is only the second integral membrane protein shown to utilize this pathway, and it is the first authentic substrate without a cleavable signal peptide. Transport is instead mediated by the NH(2)-terminal membrane anchor, which lacks, however, the twin-arginine motif indicative of DeltapH/TAT-dependent transport signals. Furthermore, transport is affected by sodium azide as well as by competitor proteins for the Sec pathway in chloroplasts, demonstrating for the first time some cross-talk of the two pathways. This might take place in the stroma where the Rieske protein accumulates after import in several complexes of high molecular mass, among which the cpn60 complex is the most prominent. These untypical features suggest that the Rieske protein represents an intermediate or early state in the evolution of the thylakoidal protein transport pathways. PMID:11526115

  11. Predictors of virologic response to ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelin, Anne-Genevieve; Flandre, Philippe; Peytavin, Gilles; Calvez, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    The primary mechanism of resistance to protease inhibitors involves the stepwise accumulation of mutations that alter and block the substrate binding site of HIV protease. The large degree of cross-resistance among the different protease inhibitors is a source of considerable concern for the management of patients after treatment failure. Although the output of HIV-resistance tests has been based on therapeutically arbitrary criteria, there is now an ongoing move towards correlating test interpretation with virologic outcomes on treatment. This approach is undeniably superior, in principle, for tests intended to guide drug choices. However, the predictive accuracy of a given stratagem that links genotype or phenotype to drug response is strongly influenced by the study design, data capture and the analytical methodology used to derive it. There is no definitively superior methodology for generating a genotype-response association for use in interpreting a resistance test, and the various approaches used to date all have their strengths and weaknesses. Combining the information of therapeutic drug monitoring and resistance tests is likely to be of greatest clinical utility in antiretroviral-experienced patients harboring HIV strains with reduced susceptibility. The combination of pharmacologic and virologic parameters as a predictor of the virologic response has been merged into the parameter known as "inhibitory quotient". This article discusses the potential interest of the use of inhibitory quotients as an approach for enhancing the potency and durability of boosted protease inhibitors against protease inhibitor-resistant viruses. PMID:16425962

  12. Characterization, biomedical and agricultural applications of protease inhibitors: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Tooba Naz; Parveen, Romana; Fatima, Sadaf

    2016-10-01

    This review describes Protease Inhibitors (PIs) which target or inhibit proteases, protein digesting enzymes. These proteases play a crucial task in many biological events including digestion, blood coagulation, apoptosis etc. Regardless of their crucial roles, they need to be checked regularly by PIs as their excess may possibly damage host organism. On basis of amino acid composition of PIs where Protease-PI enzymatic reactions occur i.e. serine, cysteine, and aspartic acid, they are classified. Nowadays, various PIs are being worked upon to fight various parasitic or viral diseases including malaria, schistosomiasis, colds, flu', dengue etc. They prevent an ongoing process begun by carcinogen exposure by keeping a check on metastasis. They also possess potential to reduce carcinogen-induced, increased levels of gene amplification to almost normal levels. Some PIs can principally be used for treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure by blocking conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II for example Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). Also PIs target amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) level in brain which is prime responsible for development of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Also, PIs inhibit enzymatic activity of HIV-1 Protease Receptor (PR) by preventing cleavage events in Gag and Gag-Pol that result in production of non-virulent virus particles. PMID:26955746

  13. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A. (UMASS, MED)

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  14. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Nakamura, China; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we determined if CRBN has a protective function against oxidative stress, similar to Lon protease. We report that CRBN partially distributes in mitochondria, suggesting it has a mitochondrial function. To specify the mitochondrial role of CRBN, we mitochondrially expressed CRBN in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The resulting stable SH-SY5Y cell line showed no apparent effect on the mitochondrial functions of fusion, fission, and membrane potential. However, mitochondrially expressed CRBN exhibited protease activity, and was induced by oxidative stress. In addition, stably expressed cells exhibited suppressed neuronal cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that CRBN functions specifically as a Lon-type protease in mitochondria. PMID:27417535

  15. Plant collagenase: unique collagenolytic activity of cysteine proteases from ginger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Misook; Hamilton, Susan E; Guddat, Luke W; Overall, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    Two cysteine proteases, GP2 and GP3, have been isolated from ginger rhizomes (Zingiber officinale). GP2 is virtually identical to a previously identified ginger protease GPII [K.H. Choi, and R.A. Laursen, Amino-acid sequence and glycan structures of cysteine proteases with proline specificity from ginger rhizome Zingiber officinale, Eur. J. Biochem. 267 (2000) 1516-1526.], and cleaves native type I collagen at multiple discrete sites, which are in the interior of the triple helical region of this molecule. In reaction with proline-containing peptides GP2 shows preference for Pro in the P2 position, and at least 10-fold higher efficiency of hydrolysis than papain. Comparison of models of GP2 and GP3 with the crystal structure of papain shows that the three enzymes have different S2 pocket structures. The S2 pocket in GP2 and GP3 is half the size of that of papain. GP2 is the only reported plant cysteine protease with a demonstrated ability to hydrolyse native collagen. The results support a role for ginger proteases as an alternative to papain, in commercial applications such as meat tenderization, where collagen is the target substrate. PMID:17920199

  16. Alkaline protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 mitigates industrial pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Amit; Ansari, Mohammad W; Anwar, Mohmmad S; Agrawal, Ruchi; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Proteases have found a wide application in the several industrial processes, such as laundry detergents, protein recovery or solubilization, prion degradation, meat tenderizations, and in bating of hides and skins in leather industries. But the main hurdle in industrial application of proteases is their economical production on a large scale. The present investigation aimed to exploit the locally available inexpensive agricultural and household wastes for alkaline protease production using Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via solid-state fermentation (SSF) technique. The alkaline enzyme is potentially useful as an additive in commercial detergents to mitigate pollution load due to extensive use of caustic soda-based detergents. Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 showed good protease production under SSF conditions of 55 °C, pH 9, and 50 % moisture content with potato peels as solid substrate. The presented findings revealed that crude alkaline protease produced by Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via SSF is of potential application in silver recovery from used X-ray films. PMID:24122212

  17. Purification and characterization of an extracellular protease from Clonostachys rosea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; HUANG Xiao-wei; ZHANG Ke-qin

    2004-01-01

    @@ An extracellular protease from Clonostachys rosea (syn. Gliocladium roseum) was purified to SDSPAGE homogeneity with 14-fold purification by ultrafiltration、 ammonium sulfate precipetation、hydrophobic interaction chromatography and anion exchange chromatography. The molecular weight of the protease was 32 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The N-terminal sequence of first 10 amino acids was A-T-Q-S-N-A-P-W-G-L. This enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima of 9-10 and 60℃, respectively, and was stable over a wide range of pH 4-10 and temperature 4-50 ℃. It did not require Ca2+ for activity and thermal stability. Pre-incubation of enzyme with Zn2+ , Cu2+ , Hg2+,Fe3+ inhibited most of the enzyme activity, but Mn2+ increased enzyme activity up to 38%. It remained stable in the presence of Tween20, H2O2, EDTA. The inhibition profile of the enzymes by PMSF, suggested that this purified protease belongs to the serine protease family. The protease could immobilize nematodes (Panagrellus redivirus) in bioassays and hydrolyzed proteins of the purified cuticle.

  18. Fatores antinutricionais: inibidores de proteases e lectinas Antinutritional factors: protease inhibitors and lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Reis SILVA

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Os fatores antinutricionais presentes em alimentos podem provocar efeitos fisiológicos adversos ou diminuir a biodisponibilidade de nutrientes. A maior questão sobre os riscos à saúde provocados por antinutrientes é o desconhecimento dos níveis de tolerância, do grau de variação do risco individual e da influência de fatores ambientais sobre a capacidade de detoxificação do organismo humano. Dentre os fatores antinutricionais os inibidores de proteases e as lectinas são considerados instáveis ao tratamento térmico. A hipertrofia pancreática causada pelos inibidores de tripsina tem sido relatada em alguns estudos com animais. As alterações da função fisiológica em animais causadas por ação de lectinas no intestino parecem estar relacionadas à especificidade destas substâncias com as células da mucosa intestinal. Os possíveis efeitos adversos dos inibidores de proteases e das lectinas na maioria das vezes são inferidos somente de experimentos com animais de laboratório.The antinutritional factors present in foods can cause adverse physiological effects or decrease the bioavailability of nutrients. Health risk factors associated with antinutrients include: lack of knowledge of the tolerance levels to these compounds in the human organism, little available information on the degree of variation of individual risks and little knowledge with respect to the influence of environmental factors on the detoxification capacity of the human organism. The possible adverse effects of protease inhibitors and lectin on human health are, in most cases, only inferred by way of experiments with laboratory animals. Pancreatic hypertrophy caused by trypsin inhibitors has been shown in some animal experiments. Alterations in physiological functions at the intestinal level shown by animals submitted to lectins containing diets seem to be related to the specificity of these substances with the intestinal mucosa cells. There is no evidence

  19. Identifying the North American plum species phylogenetic signal using nuclear, mitochondrial, and chloroplast DNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premise of the study: Prunus L. phylogeny has extensively studied using cpDNA sequences. CpDNA has a slow rate of evolution which is beneficial to determine species relationships at a deeper level. However, a limitation of the chloroplast based phylogenies is its transfer by interspecific hybridizat...

  20. Chloroplast DNA variation of oaks in western Central Europe and genetic consequences of human influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    König, A.O.; Ziegenhagen, B.; Dam, van B.C.; Csaikl, U.M.; Coart, E.; Degen, B.; Burg, K.; Vries, de S.M.G.; Petit, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Oak chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation was studied in a grid-based inventory in western Central Europe, including Belgium, The Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany, the Czech Republic, and the northern parts of Upper and Lower Austria. A total of 2155 trees representing 426 populations of Quercus robur L

  1. Cowpea chloroplastic ATP synthase is the source of multiple plant defense elicitors during insect herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant responses to damage vary dependant upon the nature of the biotic and abiotic stresses. We recently described an elicitor, from Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) oral secretions (OS) termed inceptin, derived from chloroplastic ATP synthase '-subunit (cATPC) proteins that activate phytohormo...

  2. Chloroplast evolution in the Pinus montezumae complex: a coalescent approach to hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, J A; Schaal, B A

    2000-08-01

    This study addresses the evolutionary history of the chloroplast genomes of two closely related pine species, Pinus hartwegii Lindl. and P. montezumae Lamb (subsect. Ponderosae) using coalescent theory and some of the statistical tools that have been developed from it during the past two decades. Pinus hartwegii and P. montezumae are closely related species in the P. montezumae complex (subsect. Ponderosae) of Mexico and Central America. Pinus hartwegii is a high elevation species, whereas P. montezumae occurs at lower elevations. The two species occur on many of the same mountains throughout Mexico. A total of 350 individuals of P. hartwegii and P. montezumae were collected from Nevado de Colima (Jalisco), Cerro Potosí (Nuevo León), Iztaccihuatl/Popocatepetl (México), and Nevado de Toluca (México). The chloroplast genome of P. hartwegii and P. montezumae was mapped using eight restriction enzymes. Fifty-one different haplotypes were characterized; 38 of 160 restriction sites were polymorphic. Clades of most parsimoniously related chloroplast haplotypes are geographically localized and do not overlap in distribution, and the geographically localized clades of haplotypes include both P. hartwegii and P. montezumae. Some haplotypes in the clades occur in only one of the two species, whereas other haplotypes occur in both species. These data strongly suggest ancient and/or ongoing hybridization between P. hartwegii and P. montezumae and a shared chloroplast genome history within geographic regions of Mexico. PMID:11005290

  3. Cladistic biogeography of Juglans (Juglandaceae) based on chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    The phylogenetic utility of sequence variation from five chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) regions: trnT-trnF, psbA-trnH, atpB-rbcL, trnV-16S rRNA, and trnS-trnfM was examined in the genus Juglans. A total of seventeen taxa representing the four sections within Juglans and an outgroup taxon, ...

  4. Identification of Two Conserved Residues Involved in Copper Release from Chloroplast PIB-1-ATPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautron, Emeline; Giustini, Cécile; Dang, ThuyVan; Moyet, Lucas; Salvi, Daniel; Crouzy, Serge; Rolland, Norbert; Catty, Patrice; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2016-09-16

    Copper is an essential transition metal for living organisms. In the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana, half of the copper content is localized in the chloroplast, and as a cofactor of plastocyanin, copper is essential for photosynthesis. Within the chloroplast, copper delivery to plastocyanin involves two transporters of the PIB-1-ATPases subfamily: HMA6 at the chloroplast envelope and HMA8 in the thylakoid membranes. Both proteins are high affinity copper transporters but share distinct enzymatic properties. In the present work, the comparison of 140 sequences of PIB-1-ATPases revealed a conserved region unusually rich in histidine and cysteine residues in the TMA-L1 region of eukaryotic chloroplast copper ATPases. To evaluate the role of these residues, we mutated them in HMA6 and HMA8. Mutants of interest were selected from phenotypic tests in yeast and produced in Lactococcus lactis for further biochemical characterizations using phosphorylation assays from ATP and Pi Combining functional and structural data, we highlight the importance of the cysteine and the first histidine of the CX3HX2H motif in the process of copper release from HMA6 and HMA8 and propose a copper pathway through the membrane domain of these transporters. Finally, our work suggests a more general role of the histidine residue in the transport of copper by PIB-1-ATPases. PMID:27493208

  5. Immunogenicity of recombinant F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG expressed in tobacco chloroplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huifeng; Qian, Bingjun; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Zhenhua; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2010-08-01

    To test the possibility of producing the novel vaccine in plants against diarrhea normally found in neonatal and newly weaned piglets, the faeG gene, encoding a major F4ac fimbrial subunit protein, was introduced into the tobacco chloroplast genome. After two rounds of selection under spectinomycin, we obtained the transgenic plants nearly homoplasmic. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that faeG and the antibiotic selective gene aminoglycoside 3' adenylyltransferase (aadA) were highly transcribed as a dicistron, while the translational level of recombinant FaeG in transplastomic tobacco was about 0.15% of total soluble protein. The immunogenicity of recombinant FaeG produced in tobacco chloroplasts was confirmed by the observation that FaeG-specific antibodies were elicited in mice immunized with total soluble protein of transgenic plants, as well as the result that mouse sera stimulated by chloroplast-derived recombinant FaeG could neutralize F4ac enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in vivo. This study provides a new alternative for producing the ETEC vaccine using the chloroplast expression system.

  6. The Research of Bt and OC Gene Cotransformation in Tobacco Chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Ning; YANG Bo; MENG Kun; LI Yi-nü; SUN Meng; SUN Bing-yao; SHEN Gui-fang

    2002-01-01

    The Bt Cry IA (C) chloroplast expression cassette and OC chloroplast expression cassette were constructed. The Bt expression cassette contained the 3.5 kb wild type Bt Cry IA (C) gene under the control of the strong light-induced psbA promoter and terminator from rice (Oryza sativa. L) chloroplast, the gene:trnH-psbA-trnk from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum. L) as the homologous fragment. The OC chloroplast expression cassette contained the OC gene under the control of 16S promoter and terminator from tobacco, the tobacco gene: psbA-ORF512 as homologous fragment. The two cassettes both had the aadA gene expression cassette as the selectable marker. Leaves of tobacco were cotransformed with the particle bombardment method. After selection by spectinomycin, the transformants were obtained. The integration of Bt and OC gene were confirmed by Southern-blotting analysis, and Western-blotting analysis. Proteinase inhibitor assays showed that the Bt and OC gene had expressed. Bioassays showed that the transgenic tobacco had a significant resistance to the larvae of cotton bollworm ( helicoverpa zea ).

  7. Growth and grazing responses of two chloroplast-retaining dinoflagellates: effect of irradiance and prey species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Hansen, P.J.; Larsen, J.

    2000-01-01

    associated with surfaces. Both organisms are able to retain functional chloroplasts from their prey. They are both able to grow heterotrophically in the dark, but growth rates increase in the light. The maximum growth and ingestion rates of G, gracilentum are much higher than those of A. poecilochroum...

  8. Sequencing of chloroplast genome using whole cellular DNA and Solexa sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eWu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing of the chloroplast genome using traditional sequencing methods has been difficult because of its size (>120 kb and the complicated procedures required to prepare templates. To explore the feasibility of sequencing the chloroplast genome using DNA extracted from whole cells and Solexa sequencing technology, we sequenced whole cellular DNA isolated from leaves of three Brassica rapa accessions with one lane per accession. In total, 246 Mb, 362Mb, 361 Mb sequence data were generated for the three accessions Chiifu-401-42, Z16 and FT, respectively. Microreads were assembled by reference-guided assembly using the cpDNA sequences of B. rapa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Nicotiana tabacum. We achieved coverage of more than 99.96% of the cp genome in the three tested accessions using the B. rapa sequence as the reference. When A. thaliana or N. tabacum sequences were used as references, 99.7–99.8% or 95.5–99.7% of the B. rapa chloroplast genome was covered, respectively. These results demonstrated that sequencing of whole cellular DNA isolated from young leaves using the Illumina Genome Analyzer is an efficient method for high-throughput sequencing of chloroplast genome.

  9. Guard cell chloroplasts are essential for blue light-dependent stomatal opening in Arabidopsis.

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    Noriyuki Suetsugu

    Full Text Available Blue light (BL induces stomatal opening through the activation of H+-ATPases with subsequent ion accumulation in guard cells. In most plant species, red light (RL enhances BL-dependent stomatal opening. This RL effect is attributable to the chloroplasts of guard cell, the only cells in the epidermis possessing this organelle. To clarify the role of chloroplasts in stomatal regulation, we investigated the effects of RL on BL-dependent stomatal opening in isolated epidermis, guard cell protoplasts, and intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. In isolated epidermal tissues and intact leaves, weak BL superimposed on RL enhanced stomatal opening while BL alone was less effective. In guard cell protoplasts, RL enhanced BL-dependent H+-pumping and DCMU, a photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor, eliminated this effect. RL enhanced phosphorylation levels of the H+-ATPase in response to BL, but this RL effect was not suppressed by DCMU. Furthermore, DCMU inhibited both RL-induced and BL-dependent stomatal opening in intact leaves. The photosynthetic rate in leaves correlated positively with BL-dependent stomatal opening in the presence of DCMU. We conclude that guard cell chloroplasts provide ATP and/or reducing equivalents that fuel BL-dependent stomatal opening, and that they indirectly monitor photosynthetic CO2 fixation in mesophyll chloroplasts by absorbing PAR in the epidermis.

  10. Structure of the ATP synthase from chloroplasts studied by electron microscopy and image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Heel, Marin van; Gräber, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The structure of the hydrophilic part of the ATP synthase from chloroplasts (CF1) has been investigated by electron microscopy of negatively stained samples. The staining conditions, which are generally critical for such small objects as CF1, could be improved by mixing CF1 samples with a much large

  11. Quantitative local photosynthetic flux measurements at isolated chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kim; Martin, Sophie; Robinson, Colin; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-07-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) offers a fast and quantitative method to measure local fluxes within photosynthesis. In particular, we have measured the flux of oxygen and ferrocyanide (Fe(CN)6(4-)), from the artificial electron acceptor ferricyanide (Fe(CN)6(3-)), using a stationary ultramicroelectrode at chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes (sourced from chloroplasts). Oxygen generation at films of chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes was detected directly during photosynthesis, but in the case of thylakoid membranes, this switched to sustained oxygen consumption at longer illumination times. An initial oxygen concentration spike was detected over both chloroplast and thylakoid membrane films, and the kinetics of the oxygen generation were extracted by fitting the experimental data to a finite element method (FEM) simulation. In contrast to previous work, the oxygen generation spike was attributed to the limited size of the plastoquinone pool, a key component in the linear electron transport pathway and a contributing factor in photoinhibition. Finally, the mobile nature of the SECM probe, and its high spatial resolution, also allowed us to detect ferrocyanide produced from a single thylakoid membrane. These results further demonstrate the power of SECM for localized flux measurements in biological processes, in this case photosynthesis, and that the high time resolution, combined with FEM simulations, allows the elucidation of quantitative kinetic information.

  12. The ultrastructure of chloroplasts in variegata irregulare mutants of garden petunias (Petunia hybrida hort. superbissima

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    Stanisław Muszyński

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of mutated chloroplasts in tetraploid garden petunias (Petunia hybrida hort. superbissima was analyzed by electron microscopy. The formation of grana structure is inhibited after secondary thylacoids start forming. Rapid dezintegration of the structure is observed. It is suggested that a substance responsible for photostabilization of grana structure is lacking.

  13. Characterization of chloroplast phosphoproteins controlling manganese use efficiency using quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jørgen; Sprenger, Richard Remko; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina;

    Manganese is important for molecular functions in plants, i.e. as a co-factor in enzymes and in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, located like most of the photosynthetic machinery, in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts. Soils that lack plant available micronutrients...

  14. Energetic cost of protein import across the envelope membranes of chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M

    2013-01-15

    Chloroplasts are the organelles of green plants in which light energy is transduced into chemical energy, forming ATP and reduced carbon compounds upon which all life depends. The expenditure of this energy is one of the central issues of cellular metabolism. Chloroplasts contain ~3,000 proteins, among which less than 100 are typically encoded in the plastid genome. The rest are encoded in the nuclear genome, synthesized in the cytosol, and posttranslationally imported into the organelle in an energy-dependent process. We report here a measurement of the amount of ATP hydrolyzed to import a protein across the chloroplast envelope membranes--only the second complete accounting of the cost in Gibbs free energy of protein transport to be undertaken. Using two different precursors prepared by three distinct techniques, we show that the import of a precursor protein into chloroplasts is accompanied by the hydrolysis of ~650 ATP molecules. This translates to a ΔG(protein) (transport) of some 27,300 kJ/mol protein imported. We estimate that protein import across the plastid envelope membranes consumes ~0.6% of the total light-saturated energy output of the organelle. PMID:23277572

  15. Structure of the ATP synthase from chloroplasts studied by electron microscopy. Localization of the small subunits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Xiao, Jianping; McCarty, Richard E.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the hydrophilic part of the ATP synthase from chloroplasts (CF1) has been further investigated by electron microscopy and image analysis of negatively stained samples. The projections of three different types of CF1 were analyzed: the holoenzyme with five different subunits and two

  16. Expression patterns of cotton chloroplast genes during development: implications for development of plastid transformation vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to express genes of interest in plastids, transformation vectors must be developed that include appropriate promoters to drive expression at effective levels in both green and non-green tissues. Typically, chloroplasts are transformed with vectors that contain ribosomal RNA promoters for h...

  17. Electrochromic effects in relation to energy transduction and energy coupling in chloroplast membranes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.L.A.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made on the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 electrochromic bandshift signal in spinach leaves and isolated chloroplasts. It was found that part of the signal (i.e. the slow component, also called reaction 2), normally present in dark-adapted membranes is absent from the signal under c

  18. Role of membrane glycerolipids in photosynthesis, thylakoid biogenesis and chloroplast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The lipid bilayer of the thylakoid membrane in plant chloroplasts and cyanobacterial cells is predominantly composed of four unique lipid classes; monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). MGDG and DGDG are uncharged galactolipids that constitute the bulk of thylakoid membrane lipids and provide a lipid bilayer matrix for photosynthetic complexes as the main constituents. The glycolipid SQDG and phospholipid PG are anionic lipids with a negative charge on their head groups. SQDG and PG substitute for each other to maintain the amount of total anionic lipids in the thylakoid membrane, with PG having indispensable functions in photosynthesis. In addition to biochemical studies, extensive analyses of mutants deficient in thylakoid lipids have revealed important roles of these lipids in photosynthesis and thylakoid membrane biogenesis. Moreover, recent studies of Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that thylakoid lipid biosynthesis triggers the expression of photosynthesis-associated genes in both the nucleus and plastids and activates the formation of photosynthetic machineries and chloroplast development. Meanwhile, galactolipid biosynthesis is regulated in response to chloroplast functionality and lipid metabolism at transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review summarizes the roles of thylakoid lipids with their biosynthetic pathways in plants and discusses the coordinated regulation of thylakoid lipid biosynthesis with the development of photosynthetic machinery during chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:27114097

  19. A tiling microarray for global analysis of chloroplast genome expression in cucumber and other plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pląder Wojciech

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plastids are small organelles equipped with their own genomes (plastomes. Although these organelles are involved in numerous plant metabolic pathways, current knowledge about the transcriptional activity of plastomes is limited. To solve this problem, we constructed a plastid tiling microarray (PlasTi-microarray consisting of 1629 oligonucleotide probes. The oligonucleotides were designed based on the cucumber chloroplast genomic sequence and targeted both strands of the plastome in a non-contiguous arrangement. Up to 4 specific probes were designed for each gene/exon, and the intergenic regions were covered regularly, with 70-nt intervals. We also developed a protocol for direct chemical labeling and hybridization of as little as 2 micrograms of chloroplast RNA. We used this protocol for profiling the expression of the cucumber chloroplast plastome on the PlasTi-microarray. Owing to the high sequence similarity of plant plastomes, the newly constructed microarray can be used to study plants other than cucumber. Comparative hybridization of chloroplast transcriptomes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato and spinach showed that the PlasTi-microarray is highly versatile.

  20. The complete chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oltmannsiellopsis viridis reveals a distinctive quadripartite architecture in the chloroplast genome of early diverging ulvophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Claude

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Chlorophyta contains the majority of the green algae and is divided into four classes. The basal position of the Prasinophyceae has been well documented, but the divergence order of the Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Chlorophyceae is currently debated. The four complete chloroplast DNA (cpDNA sequences presently available for representatives of these classes have revealed extensive variability in overall structure, gene content, intron composition and gene order. The chloroplast genome of Pseudendoclonium (Ulvophyceae, in particular, is characterized by an atypical quadripartite architecture that deviates from the ancestral type by a large inverted repeat (IR featuring an inverted rRNA operon and a small single-copy (SSC region containing 14 genes normally found in the large single-copy (LSC region. To gain insights into the nature of the events that led to the reorganization of the chloroplast genome in the Ulvophyceae, we have determined the complete cpDNA sequence of Oltmannsiellopsis viridis, a representative of a distinct, early diverging lineage. Results The 151,933 bp IR-containing genome of Oltmannsiellopsis differs considerably from Pseudendoclonium and other chlorophyte cpDNAs in intron content and gene order, but shares close similarities with its ulvophyte homologue at the levels of quadripartite architecture, gene content and gene density. Oltmannsiellopsis cpDNA encodes 105 genes, contains five group I introns, and features many short dispersed repeats. As in Pseudendoclonium cpDNA, the rRNA genes in the IR are transcribed toward the single copy region featuring the genes typically found in the ancestral LSC region, and the opposite single copy region harbours genes characteristic of both the ancestral SSC and LSC regions. The 52 genes that were transferred from the ancestral LSC to SSC region include 12 of those observed in Pseudendoclonium cpDNA. Surprisingly, the overall gene organization of

  1. Intra-individual polymorphism in chloroplasts from NGS data: where does it come from and how to handle it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarcelli, N; Mariac, C; Couvreur, T L P; Faye, A; Richard, D; Sabot, F; Berthouly-Salazar, C; Vigouroux, Y

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing allows access to a large quantity of genomic data. In plants, several studies used whole chloroplast genome sequences for inferring phylogeography or phylogeny. Even though the chloroplast is a haploid organelle, NGS plastome data identified a nonnegligible number of intra-individual polymorphic SNPs. Such observations could have several causes such as sequencing errors, the presence of heteroplasmy or transfer of chloroplast sequences in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The occurrence of allelic diversity has practical important impacts on the identification of diversity, the analysis of the chloroplast data and beyond that, significant evolutionary questions. In this study, we show that the observed intra-individual polymorphism of chloroplast sequence data is probably the result of plastid DNA transferred into the mitochondrial and/or the nuclear genomes. We further assess nine different bioinformatics pipelines' error rates for SNP and genotypes calling using SNPs identified in Sanger sequencing. Specific pipelines are adequate to deal with this issue, optimizing both specificity and sensitivity. Our results will allow a proper use of whole chloroplast NGS sequence and will allow a better handling of NGS chloroplast sequence diversity.

  2. The kinesin-like proteins, KAC1/2, regulate actin dynamics underlying chloroplast light-avoidance in Physcomitrella patens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyuan Shen; Yen-Chen Liu; Jeffrey P Bibeau; Kyle P Lemoi; Erkan Tzel; Luis Vidali

    2015-01-01

    In plants, light determines chloroplast position;these organelles show avoidance and accumulation re-sponses in high and low fluence-rate light, respectively. Chloroplast motility in response to light is driven by cytoskeletal elements. The actin cytoskeleton mediates chloroplast photorelocation responses in Arabidopsis thali-ana. In contrast, in the moss Physcomitrella patens, both, actin filaments and microtubules can transport chloroplasts. Because of the surprising evidence that two kinesin-like proteins (called KACs) are important for actin-dependent chloroplast photorelocation in vascular plants, we wanted to determine the cytoskeletal system responsible for the function of these proteins in moss. We performed gene-specific silencing using RNA interference in P. patens. We confirmed existing reports using gene knockouts, that PpKAC1 and PpKAC2 are required for chloroplast dispersion under uniform white light conditions, and that the two proteins are functionally equivalent. To address the specific cytoskeletal elements responsible for motility, this loss-of-function approach was combined with cytoskeleton-targeted drug studies. We found that, in P. patens, these KACs mediate the chloroplast light-avoidance response in an actin filament-dependent, rather than a microtubule-dependent manner. Using correlation-decay analysis of cytoskeletal dynamics, we found that PpKAC stabilizes cortical actin filaments, but has no effect on microtubule dynamics.

  3. The DnaJ OsDjA7/8 is essential for chloroplast development in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Liang, Sihui; Yin, Junjie; Yuan, Can; Wang, Jing; Li, Weitao; He, Min; Wang, Jichun; Chen, Weilan; Ma, Bingtian; Wang, Yuping; Qin, Peng; Li, Shigui; Chen, Xuewei

    2015-12-10

    DnaJ proteins belong to chaperones of Hsp40 family that ubiquitously participate in various cellular processes. Previous studies have shown chloroplast-targeted DnaJs are involved in the development of chloroplast in some plant species. However, little is known about the function of DnaJs in rice, one of the main staple crops. In this study, we characterized a type I DnaJ protein OsDjA7/8. We found that the gene OsDjA7/8 was expressed in all collected tissues, with a priority in the vigorous growth leaf. Subcellular localization revealed that the protein OsDjA7/8 was mainly distributed in chloroplast. Reduced expression of OsDjA7/8 in rice led to albino lethal at the seedling stage. Transmission electron microscopy observation showed that the chloroplast structures were abnormally developed in the plants silenced for OsDjA7/8. In addition, the transcriptional expression of the genes tightly associated with the development of chloroplast was deeply reduced in the plants silenced for OsDjA7/8. Collectively, our study reveals that OsDjA7/8 encodes a chloroplast-localized protein and is essential for chloroplast development and differentiation in rice.

  4. Origins of the amphiploid species Brassica napus L. investigated by chloroplast and nuclear molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allender Charlotte J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amphiploid species Brassica napus (oilseed rape, Canola is a globally important oil crop yielding food, biofuels and industrial compounds such as lubricants and surfactants. Identification of the likely ancestors of each of the two genomes (designated A and C found in B. napus would facilitate incorporation of novel alleles from the wider Brassica genepool in oilseed rape crop genetic improvement programmes. Knowledge of the closest extant relatives of the genotypes involved in the initial formation of B. napus would also allow further investigation of the genetic factors required for the formation of a stable amphiploid and permit the more efficient creation of fully fertile re-synthesised B. napus. We have used a combination of chloroplast and nuclear genetic markers to investigate the closest extant relatives of the original maternal progenitors of B. napus. This was based on a comprehensive sampling of the relevant genepools, including 83 accessions of A genome B. rapa L. (both wild and cultivated types, 94 accessions of B. napus and 181 accessions of C genome wild and cultivated B. oleracea L. and related species. Results Three chloroplast haplotypes occurred in B. napus. The most prevalent haplotype (found in 79% of accessions was not present within the C genome accessions but was found at low frequencies in B. rapa. Chloroplast haplotypes characteristic of B. napus were found in a small number of wild and weedy B. rapa populations, and also in two accessions of cultivated B. rapa 'brocoletto'. Whilst introgression of the B. napus chloroplast type in the wild and weedy B. rapa populations has been proposed by other studies, the presence of this haplotype within the two brocoletto accessions is unexplained. Conclusions The distribution of chloroplast haplotypes eliminate any of the C genome species as being the maternal ancestor of the majority of the B. napus accessions. The presence of multiple chloroplast

  5. Screening of Alkaline Protease-Producing Streptomyces diastaticus and Optimization of Enzyme Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Dawoodi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Alkaline proteases are used in pharmaceutical, film and photography, silk production and food, leather and detergent industries. Actinomycetes are gram positive bacteria that produce different enzymes such as proteases. The aims of this research were isolation of native alkaline protease-producing Actinomycete spp. from different soil samples as well as optimizing the conditions for enzyme production. Materials and Methods: The different soil samples were collected from different locations of the provinces of Khouzestan, Chahar Mahalo Bakhtiari and Isfahan, Iran. After determining of the best alkaline protease producing species using Lowry method, the optimization of alkaline protease was performed. Results: The alkaline protease producing Actinomycete spp. was isolated from soil. The most enzyme activity was measured in S.diastaticus. The best concentration of sucrose as the carbon source for the highest production of alkaline protease was 10 g/l. The optimum pH and temperature for the alkaline protease production by S. diastaticus were 10 and 30°C respectively. The maximum activity of alkaline protease was measured at 200 rpm as the best aeration speed. Conclusions: This is the first report of alkaline protease production by Streptomyces diastaticus in Iran. The accomplished examinations in this research confirmed the previous theories of alkaline protease production by Actinomycetes relatively. Regarding the immense applications of alkaline proteases in several industries and isolation of a native alkaline protease producing Actinomycete, The production potential of this enzyme in our country could be accessible in the near future.

  6. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  7. Allostery in trypsin-like proteases suggests new therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohara, David W; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    Trypsin-like proteases (TLPs) are a large family of enzymes responsible for digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, development, fertilization, apoptosis and immunity. A current paradigm posits that the irreversible transition from an inactive zymogen to the active protease form enables productive interaction with substrate and catalysis. Analysis of the entire structural database reveals two distinct conformations of the active site: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other occluded by the collapse of a specific segment (E*). The allosteric E*-E equilibrium provides a reversible mechanism for activity and regulation in addition to the irreversible zymogen to protease conversion and points to new therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting or activating the enzyme. In this review, we discuss relevant examples, with emphasis on the rational engineering of anticoagulant thrombin mutants.

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: Beyond the Protease/Antiprotease Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosio, Manuel G; Bazzan, Erica; Rigobello, Chiara; Tinè, Mariaenrica; Turato, Graziella; Baraldo, Simonetta; Saetta, Marina

    2016-08-01

    From the discovery that alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) was an effective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase originated the classic paradigm of protease/antiprotease imbalance, linking lung destruction to the unopposed effect of proteases in patients with the deficiency. Notwithstanding its importance as an antiprotease, it has become evident that alpha-1 antitrypsin has important antiinflammatory and immune-regulatory activities, which may be critically involved in lung destruction. We review here recent evidence showing that, indeed, an important adaptive immune reaction is present in lungs with AAT deficiency, similar to the one seen in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with normal AAT. On the basis of recent evidence from epidemiological, clinical, and pathogenetic studies, it is likely time to move on from the original protease/antiprotease hypothesis for the production of emphysema toward a more complex paradigm, involving the antiinflammatory and immune modulating functions of AAT. PMID:27564665

  9. Tobacco Etch Virus protease: A shortcut across biotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaratto, Francesca; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2016-08-10

    About thirty years ago, studies on the RNA genome of Tobacco Etch Virus revealed the presence of an efficient and specific protease, called Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEVp), that was part of the Nuclear Inclusion a (NIa) enzyme. TEVp is an efficient and specific protease of 27kDa that has become a valuable biotechnological tool. Nowadays TEVp is a unique endopeptidase largely exploited in biotechnology from industrial applications to in vitro and in vivo cellular studies. A number of TEVp mutants with different rate of cleavage, stability and specificity have been reported. Similarly, a panel of different target cleavage sites, derived from the canonical ENLYFQ-G/S site, has been established. In this review we describe these aspects of TEVp and some of its multiple applications. A particular focus is on the use and molecular biology of TEVp in living cells and organisms.

  10. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-06-01

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the subtilase class were cloned from Thermus aquaticus and Deinococcus geothermalis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes were highly thermostable and catalyzed efficient peptide bond synthesis at 80°C and 60°C in neat acetonitrile with excellent conversion (>90%). The enzymes tolerated high levels of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as a cosolvent (40-50% v/v), which improved substrate solubility and gave good conversion in 5+3 peptide condensation reactions. The results suggest that proteases from thermophiles can be used for peptide synthesis under harsh reaction conditions.

  11. Substrate specificity of the ubiquitin and Ubl proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronau, Judith A; Beckmann, John F; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Conjugation and deconjugation of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls) to cellular proteins are highly regulated processes integral to cellular homeostasis. Most often, the C-termini of these small polypeptides are attached to lysine side chains of target proteins by an amide (isopeptide) linkage. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and Ubl-specific proteases (ULPs) comprise a diverse group of proteases that recognize and remove ubiquitin and Ubls from their substrates. How DUBs and ULPs distinguish among different modifiers, or different polymeric forms of these modifiers, remains poorly understood. The specificity of ubiquitin/Ubl-deconjugating enzymes for particular substrates depends on multiple factors, ranging from the topography of specific substrate features, as in different polyubiquitin chain types, to structural elements unique to each enzyme. Here we summarize recent structural and biochemical studies that provide insights into mechanisms of substrate specificity among various DUBs and ULPs. We also discuss the unexpected specificities of non-eukaryotic proteases in these families. PMID:27012468

  12. Protease-triggered siRNA delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozema, David B; Blokhin, Andrei V; Wakefield, Darren H; Benson, Jonathan D; Carlson, Jeffrey C; Klein, Jason J; Almeida, Lauren J; Nicholas, Anthony L; Hamilton, Holly L; Chu, Qili; Hegge, Julia O; Wong, So C; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hagen, Collin M; Kitas, Eric; Wolff, Jon A; Lewis, David L

    2015-07-10

    The safe and efficacious delivery of membrane impermeable therapeutics requires cytoplasmic access without the toxicity of nonspecific cytoplasmic membrane lysis. We have developed a mechanism for control of cytoplasmic release which utilizes endogenous proteases as a trigger and results in functional delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA). The delivery approach is based on reversible inhibition of membrane disruptive polymers with protease-sensitive substrates. Proteolytic hydrolysis upon endocytosis restores the membrane destabilizing activity of the polymers thereby allowing cytoplasmic access of the co-delivered siRNA. Protease-sensitive polymer masking reagents derived from polyethylene glycol (PEG), which inhibit membrane interactions, and N-acetylgalactosamine, which targets asialoglycoprotein receptors on hepatocytes, were synthesized and used to formulate masked polymer-siRNA delivery vehicles. The size, charge and stability of the vehicles enable functional delivery of siRNA after subcutaneous administration and, with modification of the targeting ligand, have the potential for extrahepatic targeting.

  13. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  14. Unexpected Diversity of Chloroplast Noncoding RNAs as Revealed by Deep Sequencing of the Arabidopsis Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotto, Amber M; Schmitz, Robert J; Fei, Zhangjun; Ecker, Joseph R; Stern, David B

    2011-12-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are widely expressed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Eukaryotic ncRNAs are commonly micro- and small-interfering RNAs (18-25 nt) involved in posttranscriptional gene silencing, whereas prokaryotic ncRNAs vary in size and are involved in various aspects of gene regulation. Given the prokaryotic origin of organelles, the presence of ncRNAs might be expected; however, the full spectrum of organellar ncRNAs has not been determined systematically. Here, strand-specific RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify 107 candidate ncRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts, primarily encoded opposite protein-coding and tRNA genes. Forty-eight ncRNAs were shown to accumulate by RNA gel blot as discrete transcripts in wild-type (WT) plants and/or the pnp1-1 mutant, which lacks the chloroplast ribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (cpPNPase). Ninety-eight percent of the ncRNAs detected by RNA gel blot had different transcript patterns between WT and pnp1-1, suggesting cpPNPase has a significant role in chloroplast ncRNA biogenesis and accumulation. Analysis of materials deficient for other major chloroplast ribonucleases, RNase R, RNase E, and RNase J, showed differential effects on ncRNA accumulation and/or form, suggesting specificity in RNase-ncRNA interactions. 5' end mapping demonstrates that some ncRNAs are transcribed from dedicated promoters, whereas others result from transcriptional read-through. Finally, correlations between accumulation of some ncRNAs and the symmetrically transcribed sense RNA are consistent with a role in RNA stability. Overall, our data suggest that this extensive population of ncRNAs has the potential to underpin a previously underappreciated regulatory mode in the chloroplast.

  15. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Ye-Xing-Ba (Scrophularia dentata; Scrophulariaceae, an Alpine Tibetan Herb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianghong Ni

    Full Text Available Scrophularia dentata is an important Tibetan medicinal plant and traditionally used for the treatment of exanthema and fever in Traditional Tibetan Medicine (TTM. However, there is little sequence and genomic information available for S. dentata. In this paper, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of S. dentata and it is the first sequenced member of the Sect. Tomiophyllum within Scrophularia (Scrophulariaceae. The gene order and organization of the chloroplast genome of S. dentata are similar to other Lamiales chloroplast genomes. The plastome is 152,553 bp in length and includes a pair of inverted repeats (IRs of 25,523 bp that separate a large single copy (LSC region of 84,058 bp and a small single copy (SSC region of 17,449 bp. It has 38.0% GC content and includes 114 unique genes, of which 80 are protein-coding, 30 are transfer RNA, and 4 are ribosomal RNA. Also, it contains 21 forward repeats, 19 palindrome repeats and 41 simple sequence repeats (SSRs. The repeats and SSRs within S. dentata were compared with those of S. takesimensis and present certain discrepancies. The chloroplast genome of S. dentata was compared with other five publicly available Lamiales genomes from different families. All the coding regions and non-coding regions (introns and intergenic spacers within the six chloroplast genomes have been extracted and analysed. Furthermore, the genome divergent hotspot regions were identified. Our studies could provide basic data for the alpine medicinal species conservation and molecular phylogenetic researches of Scrophulariaceae and Lamiales.

  16. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Ye-Xing-Ba (Scrophularia dentata; Scrophulariaceae), an Alpine Tibetan Herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lianghong; Zhao, Zhili; Dorje, Gaawe; Ma, Mi

    2016-01-01

    Scrophularia dentata is an important Tibetan medicinal plant and traditionally used for the treatment of exanthema and fever in Traditional Tibetan Medicine (TTM). However, there is little sequence and genomic information available for S. dentata. In this paper, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of S. dentata and it is the first sequenced member of the Sect. Tomiophyllum within Scrophularia (Scrophulariaceae). The gene order and organization of the chloroplast genome of S. dentata are similar to other Lamiales chloroplast genomes. The plastome is 152,553 bp in length and includes a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 25,523 bp that separate a large single copy (LSC) region of 84,058 bp and a small single copy (SSC) region of 17,449 bp. It has 38.0% GC content and includes 114 unique genes, of which 80 are protein-coding, 30 are transfer RNA, and 4 are ribosomal RNA. Also, it contains 21 forward repeats, 19 palindrome repeats and 41 simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The repeats and SSRs within S. dentata were compared with those of S. takesimensis and present certain discrepancies. The chloroplast genome of S. dentata was compared with other five publicly available Lamiales genomes from different families. All the coding regions and non-coding regions (introns and intergenic spacers) within the six chloroplast genomes have been extracted and analysed. Furthermore, the genome divergent hotspot regions were identified. Our studies could provide basic data for the alpine medicinal species conservation and molecular phylogenetic researches of Scrophulariaceae and Lamiales. PMID:27391235

  17. An improved chloroplast DNA extraction procedure for whole plastid genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chloroplast genomes supply valuable genetic information for evolutionary and functional studies in plants. The past five years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced chloroplast genomes with the application of second-generation sequencing technology in plastid genome sequencing projects. However, cost-effective high-throughput chloroplast DNA (cpDNA extraction becomes a major bottleneck restricting the application, as conventional methods are difficult to make a balance between the quality and yield of cpDNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first tested two traditional methods to isolate cpDNA from the three species, Oryza brachyantha, Leersia japonica and Prinsepia utihis. Both of them failed to obtain properly defined cpDNA bands. However, we developed a simple but efficient method based on sucrose gradients and found that the modified protocol worked efficiently to isolate the cpDNA from the same three plant species. We sequenced the isolated DNA samples with Illumina (Solexa sequencing technology to test cpDNA purity according to aligning sequence reads to the reference chloroplast genomes, showing that the reference genome was properly covered. We show that 40-50% cpDNA purity is achieved with our method. CONCLUSION: Here we provide an improved method used to isolate cpDNA from angiosperms. The Illumina sequencing results suggest that the isolated cpDNA has reached enough yield and sufficient purity to perform subsequent genome assembly. The cpDNA isolation protocol thus will be widely applicable to the plant chloroplast genome sequencing projects.

  18. High-throughput sequencing of three Lemnoideae (duckweeds chloroplast genomes from total DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chloroplast genomes provide a wealth of information for evolutionary and population genetic studies. Chloroplasts play a particularly important role in the adaption for aquatic plants because they float on water and their major surface is exposed continuously to sunlight. The subfamily of Lemnoideae represents such a collection of aquatic species that because of photosynthesis represents one of the fastest growing plant species on earth. METHODS: We sequenced the chloroplast genomes from three different genera of Lemnoideae, Spirodela polyrhiza, Wolffiella lingulata and Wolffia australiana by high-throughput DNA sequencing of genomic DNA using the SOLiD platform. Unfractionated total DNA contains high copies of plastid DNA so that sequences from the nucleus and mitochondria can easily be filtered computationally. Remaining sequence reads were assembled into contiguous sequences (contigs using SOLiD software tools. Contigs were mapped to a reference genome of Lemna minor and gaps, selected by PCR, were sequenced on the ABI3730xl platform. CONCLUSIONS: This combinatorial approach yielded whole genomic contiguous sequences in a cost-effective manner. Over 1,000-time coverage of chloroplast from total DNA were reached by the SOLiD platform in a single spot on a quadrant slide without purification. Comparative analysis indicated that the chloroplast genome was conserved in gene number and organization with respect to the reference genome of L. minor. However, higher nucleotide substitution, abundant deletions and insertions occurred in non-coding regions of these genomes, indicating a greater genomic dynamics than expected from the comparison of other related species in the Pooideae. Noticeably, there was no transition bias over transversion in Lemnoideae. The data should have immediate applications in evolutionary biology and plant taxonomy with increased resolution and statistical power.

  19. The chloroplast genome of Phacus orbicularis (Euglenophyceae): an initial datum point for the phacaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiborski, Beth A; Bennett, Matthew S; Linton, Eric W

    2016-06-01

    The Euglenophyceae chloroplast was acquired when a heterotrophic euglenoid engulfed a green alga and subsequently retained the algal chloroplast, in a process known as secondary endosymbiosis. Since this event, Euglenophyceae have diverged widely and their chloroplast genomes (cpGenomes) have as well. Changes to the cpGenome include extensive gene rearrangement and the proliferation of introns, the analyses of which have proven to be useful in examining cpGenome changes throughout the Euglenophyceae. The Euglenales fall into two families, Euglenaceae and Phacaceae. Euglenaceae contains eight genera and at least one cpGenome has been published for each genus. Phacaceae, on the other hand, contains three genera, none of which have had a representative chloroplast genome sequenced. Members of this family have many small disk-shaped chloroplasts that lack pyrenoids. We sequenced and annotated the cpGenome of Phacus orbicularis in order to fill in the large gap in our understanding of Euglenophyceae cpGenome evolution, especially in regard to intron number and gene order. We compared this cpGenome to those of species from both the Euglenaceae and Eutreptiales of the Euglenophyceae phylogenetic tree. The cpGenome showed characteristics that were more derived than that of the basal species Eutreptia viridis, with extensive gene rearrangements and nearly three times as many introns. In contrast, it contained fewer introns than all but one of the previously reported Euglenaceae cpGenomes, had a smaller estimated genome size, and shared greater synteny with two main branches of that family. PMID:27273533

  20. Actomyosin-based motility of endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplasts in Vallisneria mesophyll cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebe, S; Menzel, D

    1995-01-01

    Intracellular localization and motile behaviour of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), plastids and mitochondria were studied in living mesophyll cells of Vallisneria using the vital fluorochrome 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (DIOC6(3)). In quiescent cells, the ER was composed of a three-dimensional network of tubular and lamellar elements. Chloroplasts were distributed evenly throughout the cell periphery and appeared embedded within the ER network. The ER network was relatively stationary, with the exception of rare motile episodes occurring as movement of tubular ER strands and adjacent areas of the polygonal network in localized areas of the cell. During experimental induction of streaming, most of the lamellar ER elements transformed into tubules and together with the chloroplasts they began to translocate to the anticlinal walls to establish the circular streaming around the circumference of the cell. Microwave-accelerated fixation followed by immunofluorescence revealed an hitherto unknown phase of actin reorganization occurring within the cells and most interestingly at the surface of the chloroplasts during streaming induction. Myosin was localized in an ER-like pattern in quiescent as well as in streaming cells, with bright fluorescent label localized on mitochondria and proplastids. In addition, myosin label appeared on the surface of the chloroplasts, preferentially in streaming mesophyll cells. Motile activities were impeded by the actin-depolymerizing drug cytochalasin D (CD), the thioreagent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the ER-Ca(2+)-ATPase. These inhibitors also interfered with the integrity of actin filaments, the intracellular distribution of myosin and calcium-homeostasis, respectively. These effects suggested an obligate association of at least one type of myosin with the membranes of ER and smaller organelles and are consistent with the appearance of another type of myosin on the chloroplast surface upon streaming

  1. Trichuris suis: thiol protease activity from adult worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D E; Sakanari, J A

    1997-01-01

    Trichuris suis, the whipworm of swine, causes anemia, weight loss, anorexia, mucohemorrhagic diarrhea, and death in heavy infections. A zinc metalloprotease has been suggested to play a role in the severe enteric pathology associated with infection and the infiltration of opportunistic bacteria into deeper tissues in the swine colon. In this study, a thiol protease from gut extracts of adult T. suis and from excretory/secretory components (E/S) of adult worms was characterized using fluorogenic peptide substrates and protein substrate gels. The protease cleaved the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC, and this cleavage was completely inhibited by the thiol protease inhibitors E-64, leupeptin, Z-Phe-Ala-CH2F, and Z-Phe-Arg-CH2F. Gelatin substrate gels and fluorescence assays using both the gut and the stichosome extracts and E/S revealed enhanced activity when 2 mM dithiothreitol or 5 mM cysteine was included in the incubation buffer, and optimal activity was seen over a pH range of 5.5 to 8.5. Incubation of gut extracts or E/S material with inhibitors of aspartic, serine, or metalloproteases had no effect on the cleavage of Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Thiol protease activity was found in extracts of gut tissue but not in the extracts of stichocytes of adult worms. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the protease revealed sequence homologies with cathepsin B-like thiol protease identified from parasitic and free-living nematodes. PMID:9024202

  2. Effects of Ce3+ on improvement of spectral characteristics and function of chloroplasts damaged by linolenic acid in spinach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaoqing; ZE Yuguan; LIU Chao; ZHOU Min; LI Na; DUAN Yanmei; YIN Sitao; HONG Fashui

    2009-01-01

    Linolenic acid has great effects on the structure and function of chloroplast. We studied the effects of Ce3+ on the improvement of chloroplast spectral characteristics and oxygen evolution damaged by linolenic acid in spinach. Results showed that Ce3+ could decrease the light absorption increased by linolenic acid and promote the distribution of excitation energy to PS Ⅱ and alleviate the decrease of PS Ⅱ fluo-rescence yield caused by linolenic acid. The linolenic acid treatments in various concentrations reduced the oxygen-evolving rate of chloro-plasts, but the rate was accelerated since adding Ce3+.

  3. CLIP proteases and Plasmodium melanization in Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2007-07-01

    Melanization is a potent immune response mediated by phenoloxidase (PO). Multiple Clip-domain serine proteases (CLIP) regulate PO activation as part of a complex cascade of proteases that are cleaved sequentially. The role of several CLIP as key activators or suppressors of the melanization responses of Anopheles gambiae to Plasmodium berghei (murine malaria) has been established recently using a genome-wide reverse genetics approach. Important differences in regulation of PO activation between An. gambiae strains were also identified. This review summarizes these findings and discusses our current understanding of the An. gambiae melanization responses to Plasmodium. PMID:17512801

  4. [Isolation of Actinomycetes synthesizing proteases with thrombolytic activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, S V; Salivonik, S M

    1988-01-01

    Proteases with the thrombolytic activity were studied in 212 strains of actinomycetes isolated from different soils of the Soviet Union. The cultures belonged to the genera Micromonospora, Nocardia and Streptomyces. Proteases were synthesized by 41% of the studied actinomycetes and some of their strains completely dissolved in vitro artificially obtained blood thrombi within 120-240 min. In the Streptomyces genus, more active strains were found in the groups Flavus, Fradia and Globisporus. The groups Olivaceus, Violaceus and Viridis had less active strains. PMID:3062331

  5. PENGEMPUKAN DAGING DENGAN ENZIM PROTEASE TANAMAN BIDURI (Calotropis gigantea [Meat Tenderization using Protease of Biduri Plant (Calotropis gigantea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erni Sofia Murtini1

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Tenderness is the main attribute quality of meat, which influences consumer acceptability. Protease enzyme (like papain, bromelin and ficin are known to be used for improving tenderness of meat trough degradation of the protein. Biduri plant (Calotropis gigantea contains protease enzyme in its latex or the young tissue (0-20 cm plant tip. After isolation of crude enzyme using ammonium sulphate, the enzyme was the applied to tenderise meat at concentrations 0 ; 0,25; 0,5; 0,75 and 1,0%. The result showed that concentration of protease enzyme affected to meat tenderness that determined by compression test and tensile strength. The enzyme (0.5% was enough to tenderise meat indicated by decreasing its compression test value to 201,160 N 9 from control of 228,582 N and tensile strength value to 4,618 N (from control 9,588N

  6. ISOLASI DAN KARAKTERISASI PROTEASE DARI BAKTERI TANAH RAWA INDRALAYA, SUMATERA SELATAN [Isolation and Characterization of Proteases from Indralaya Soil Swamp Bacteria,South Sumatera

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    Ace Baehaki*

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort of obtaining indigenous protease producing bacteria, screening for bacterial protease was conducted from samples collected from Indralaya soil swamp, South Sumatera. Three of 31 colonies showed high protease activity with proteolytic index >1.00. T1S1 produced enzyme with the highest activity. The crude enzyme activity after 48 hours of incubation was 0.391 IU/ml. The optimum pH of the extracelull proteases from T1S1, T3S2 and T3S3 were 8.0, 8.0, and 7.5, respectively. The optimum temperature of T1S1, T3S2 and T3S3 proteases were 40, 50, and 500C, respectively. All metal ions tested (Na+, K+, Mn2+, Zn2+ and Fe2+ inhibited proteases except Fe2+ which activatesthe T3S3 protease at 5 mM. EDTA (1 and 5 mM inhibited all proteases. Study on the effect of metals ion and spesific inhibitors indicated that all protease are metaloprotease. Molecular weights was determined using SDS-PAGE and zymogram technique. The molecular weight of T1S1 proteases was 121 kD,T3S2 proteaseswere 51, 71, and 119 kD whereas T3S3 proteaseswere 49, 70, and 116 kD.

  7. Boosted protease inhibitors and the electrocardiographic measures of QT and PR durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Elsayed Z; Lundgren, Jens D; Roediger, Mollie P;

    2011-01-01

    There are contradictory reports regarding the effects of protease inhibitors on the ECG measures of QT and PR interval durations. The effect of interrupting use of protease inhibitors on QT and PR progression is also unknown.......There are contradictory reports regarding the effects of protease inhibitors on the ECG measures of QT and PR interval durations. The effect of interrupting use of protease inhibitors on QT and PR progression is also unknown....

  8. Protease Inhibitors from Marine Venomous Animals and Their Counterparts in Terrestrial Venomous Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Mourão, Caroline B.F.; Elisabeth F Schwartz

    2013-01-01

    The Kunitz-type protease inhibitors are the best-characterized family of serine protease inhibitors, probably due to their abundance in several organisms. These inhibitors consist of a chain of ~60 amino acid residues stabilized by three disulfide bridges, and was first observed in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-like protease inhibitors, which strongly inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin. In this review we present the protease inhibitors (PIs) described to date from marine venomo...

  9. Production, purification and characterization of a thermotolerant alkaline serine protease from a novel species Bacillus caseinilyticus

    OpenAIRE

    Mothe, Thirumala; Sultanpuram, Vishnuvardhan Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline proteases are important enzymes in many industrial applications, especially as additives in laundry detergent industry. Though there are a number of Bacillus species which are reported to be producing proteases, the efficiency of a protease produced by a novel strain has to be studied in comparison to the others. Hence, in this study, an alkaline serine protease produced by a novel species Bacillus caseinilyticus was purified and characterized for its possible usage in detergent indu...

  10. Modulation of visceral pain and inflammation by protease-activated receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is exposed to a large array of proteases, under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The discovery of G protein-coupled receptors activated by proteases, the protease-activated receptors (PARs), has highlighted new signaling functions for proteases in the GI tract, particularly in the domains of inflammation and pain mechanisms. Activation of PARs by selective peptidic agonists in the intestine or the pancreas leads to inflammatory events and c...

  11. Fecal Protease Activity Is Associated with Compositional Alterations in the Intestinal Microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Ian M.; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Ferrier, Laurent; Wu, Michael C.; Siddle, Jennica P.; Bueno, Lionel; Ringel, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Intestinal proteases carry out a variety of functions in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Studies have reported that elevated enteric proteases in patients with GI disease can alter intestinal physiology, however the origin (human vs. microbial) of elevated proteases in patients with GI disease is unclear. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between protease activity and the microbiota in human fecal samples. Design: In order to capture a wide range of fec...

  12. Recombinant expression, refolding, purification and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa protease IV in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingzhi; Cai, Man; Wu, Feilin; Zhang, Yao; Xiong, Zhi; Xu, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Several protease IV enzymes are widely used in proteomic research. Specifically, protease IV from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has lysyl endopeptidase activity. Here, we report the recombinant expression, refolding, activation, and purification of this protease in Escherichia coli. Proteolytic instability of the activated intermediate, a major obstacle for efficient production, is controlled through ammonium sulfate precipitation. The purified protease IV exhibits superior lysyl endopeptidase activity compared to a commercial product. PMID:27260967

  13. Genetic evidence supporting the association of protease and protease inhibitor genes with inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Cleynen

    Full Text Available As part of the European research consortium IBDase, we addressed the role of proteases and protease inhibitors (P/PIs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, characterized by chronic mucosal inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, which affects 2.2 million people in Europe and 1.4 million people in North America. We systematically reviewed all published genetic studies on populations of European ancestry (67 studies on Crohn's disease [CD] and 37 studies on ulcerative colitis [UC] to identify critical genomic regions associated with IBD. We developed a computer algorithm to map the 807 P/PI genes with exact genomic locations listed in the MEROPS database of peptidases onto these critical regions and to rank P/PI genes according to the accumulated evidence for their association with CD and UC. 82 P/PI genes (75 coding for proteases and 7 coding for protease inhibitors were retained for CD based on the accumulated evidence. The cylindromatosis/turban tumor syndrome gene (CYLD on chromosome 16 ranked highest, followed by acylaminoacyl-peptidase (APEH, dystroglycan (DAG1, macrophage-stimulating protein (MST1 and ubiquitin-specific peptidase 4 (USP4, all located on chromosome 3. For UC, 18 P/PI genes were retained (14 proteases and 4 protease inhibitors, with a considerably lower amount of accumulated evidence. The ranking of P/PI genes as established in this systematic review is currently used to guide validation studies of candidate P/PI genes, and their functional characterization in interdisciplinary mechanistic studies in vitro and in vivo as part of IBDase. The approach used here overcomes some of the problems encountered when subjectively selecting genes for further evaluation and could be applied to any complex disease and gene family.

  14. A Kunitz-type cysteine protease inhibitor from cauliflower and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halls, C.E.; Rogers, S. W.; Ouffattole, M.;

    2006-01-01

    proaleurain maturation protease and of papain when assayed at pH 4.5 but not at pH 6.3. In a pull-down assay, the inhibitor bound tightly to papain, but only weakly to the aspartate protease pepsin. When the cauliflower protease inhibitor was transiently expressed in tobacco suspension culture protoplasts...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1027 - Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. 184... enzyme product. (a) Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product is an enzyme preparation that includes carbohydrase and protease activity. It is obtained from the culture filtrate resulting from a pure...

  16. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

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    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  17. Teaching Foundational Topics and Scientific Skills in Biochemistry within the Conceptual Framework of HIV Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    HIV protease has served as a model protein for understanding protein structure, enzyme kinetics, structure-based drug design, and protein evolution. Inhibitors of HIV protease are also an essential part of effective HIV/AIDS treatment and have provided great societal benefits. The broad applications for HIV protease and its inhibitors make it a…

  18. Blue-light-induced reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the avoidance response of chloroplasts in epidermal cells of Vallisneria gigantea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Nami; Domoto, Kikuko; Takagi, Shingo

    2005-04-01

    In leaf epidermal cells of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, high-intensity blue light induces the actin-dependent avoidance response of chloroplasts. By semi-quantitative motion analysis and phalloidin staining, time courses of the blue-light-induced changes in the mode of movement of individual chloroplasts and in the configuration of actin filaments were examined in the presence and absence of a flavoprotein inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium. In dark-adapted cells, short, thick actin bundles seemed to surround each chloroplast, which was kept motionless in the outer periclinal cytoplasm of the cells. After 10 min of irradiation with high-intensity blue light, a rapid, unidirectional movement of chloroplasts was induced, concomitant with the appearance of aggregated, straight actin bundles stretched over the outer periclinal cytoplasm. Diphenylene iodonium inhibited the avoidance response of chloroplasts, apparently by delaying a change in the mode of chloroplast movement from random sway to unidirectional migration, by suppressing the appearance of aggregated, straight actin bundles. In partially irradiated individual cells, redistribution of chloroplasts and reorganization of actin filaments occurred only in the areas exposed to blue light. From the results, we propose that the short, thick actin bundles in the vicinity of chloroplasts function to anchor the chloroplasts in dark-adapted cells, and that the aggregated, straight actin bundles organized under blue-light irradiation provide tracks for unidirectional movement of chloroplasts. PMID:15843965

  19. Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O; Lewis, Louise A

    2016-05-01

    Chloroplast sequence data are widely used to infer phylogenies of plants and algae. With the increasing availability of complete chloroplast genome sequences, the opportunity arises to resolve ancient divergences that were heretofore problematic. On the flip side, properly analyzing large multi-gene data sets can be a major challenge, as these data may be riddled with systematic biases and conflicting signals. Our study contributes new data from nine complete and four fragmentary chloroplast genome sequences across the green algal order Sphaeropleales. Our phylogenetic analyses of a 56-gene data set show that analyzing these data on a nucleotide level yields a well-supported phylogeny - yet one that is quite different from a corresponding amino acid analysis. We offer some possible explanations for this conflict through a range of analyses of modified data sets. In addition, we characterize the newly sequenced genomes in terms of their structure and content, thereby further contributing to the knowledge of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:26903036

  20. Structure and organization of Marchantia polymorpha chloroplast genome. I. Cloning and gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, K; Fukuzawa, H; Kohchi, T; Sano, T; Sano, S; Shirai, H; Umesono, K; Shiki, Y; Takeuchi, M; Chang, Z

    1988-09-20

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of chloroplast DNA from a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, using a clone bank of chloroplast DNA fragments. The circular genome consists of 121,024 base-pairs and includes two large inverted repeats (IRA and IRB, each 10,058 base-pairs), a large single-copy region (LSC, 81,095 base-pairs), and a small single-copy region (SSC, 19,813 base-pairs). The nucleotide sequence was analysed with a computer to deduce the entire gene organization, assuming the universal genetic code and the presence of introns in the coding sequences. We detected 136 possible genes. 103 gene products of which are related to known stable RNA or protein molecules. Stable RNA genes for four species of ribosomal RNA and 32 species of tRNA were located, although one of the tRNA genes may be defective. Twenty genes encoding polypeptides involved in photosynthesis and electron transport were identified by comparison with known chloroplast genes. Twenty-five open reading frames (ORFs) show structural similarities to Escherichia coli RNA polymerase subunits, 19 ribosomal proteins and two related proteins. Seven ORFs are comparable with human mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase genes. A computer-aided homology search predicted possible chloroplast homologues of bacterial proteins; two ORFs for bacterial 4Fe-4S-type ferredoxin, two for distinct subunits of a protein-dependent transport system, one ORF for a component of nitrogenase, and one for an antenna protein of a light-harvesting complex. The other 33 ORFs, consisting of 29 to 2136 codons, remain to be identified, but some of them seem to be conserved in evolution. Detailed information on gene identification is presented in the accompanying papers. We postulated that there were 22 introns in 20 genes (8 tRNA genes and 12 ORFs), which may be classified into the groups I and II found in fungal mitochondrial genes. The structural gene for ribosomal protein S12 is trans-split on the opposite DNA strand

  1. Analysis of complete nucleotide sequences of 12 Gossypium chloroplast genomes: origin and evolution of allotetraploids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cotton (Gossypium spp. is a model system for the analysis of polyploidization. Although ascertaining the donor species of allotetraploid cotton has been intensively studied, sequence comparison of Gossypium chloroplast genomes is still of interest to understand the mechanisms underlining the evolution of Gossypium allotetraploids, while it is generally accepted that the parents were A- and D-genome containing species. Here we performed a comparative analysis of 13 Gossypium chloroplast genomes, twelve of which are presented here for the first time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The size of 12 chloroplast genomes under study varied from 159,959 bp to 160,433 bp. The chromosomes were highly similar having >98% sequence identity. They encoded the same set of 112 unique genes which occurred in a uniform order with only slightly different boundary junctions. Divergence due to indels as well as substitutions was examined separately for genome, coding and noncoding sequences. The genome divergence was estimated as 0.374% to 0.583% between allotetraploid species and A-genome, and 0.159% to 0.454% within allotetraploids. Forty protein-coding genes were completely identical at the protein level, and 20 intergenic sequences were completely conserved. The 9 allotetraploids shared 5 insertions and 9 deletions in whole genome, and 7-bp substitutions in protein-coding genes. The phylogenetic tree confirmed a close relationship between allotetraploids and the ancestor of A-genome, and the allotetraploids were divided into four separate groups. Progenitor allotetraploid cotton originated 0.43-0.68 million years ago (MYA. CONCLUSION: Despite high degree of conservation between the Gossypium chloroplast genomes, sequence variations among species could still be detected. Gossypium chloroplast genomes preferred for 5-bp indels and 1-3-bp indels are mainly attributed to the SSR polymorphisms. This study supports that the common ancestor of diploid A

  2. A Comparison of the First Two Sequenced Chloroplast Genomes in Asteraceae: Lettuce and Sunflower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timme, Ruth E.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2006-01-20

    Asteraceae is the second largest family of plants, with over 20,000 species. For the past few decades, numerous phylogenetic studies have contributed to our understanding of the evolutionary relationships within this family, including comparisons of the fast evolving chloroplast gene, ndhF, rbcL, as well as non-coding DNA from the trnL intron plus the trnLtrnF intergenic spacer, matK, and, with lesser resolution, psbA-trnH. This culminated in a study by Panero and Funk in 2002 that used over 13,000 bp per taxon for the largest taxonomic revision of Asteraceae in over a hundred years. Still, some uncertainties remain, and it would be very useful to have more information on the relative rates of sequence evolution among various genes and on genome structure as a potential set of phylogenetic characters to help guide future phylogenetic structures. By way of contributing to this, we report the first two complete chloroplast genome sequences from members of the Asteraceae, those of Helianthus annuus and Lactuca sativa. These plants belong to two distantly related subfamilies, Asteroideae and Cichorioideae, respectively. In addition to these, there is only one other published chloroplast genome sequence for any plant within the larger group called Eusterids II, that of Panax ginseng (Araliaceae, 156,318 bps, AY582139). Early chloroplast genome mapping studies demonstrated that H. annuus and L. sativa share a 22 kb inversion relative to members of the subfamily Barnadesioideae. By comparison to outgroups, this inversion was shown to be derived, indicating that the Asteroideae and Cichorioideae are more closely related than either is to the Barnadesioideae. Later sequencing study found that taxa that share this 22 kb inversion also contain within this region a second, smaller, 3.3 kb inversion. These sequences also enable an analysis of patterns of shared repeats in the genomes at fine level and of RNA editing by comparison to available EST sequences. In addition, since

  3. Activity profiling of papain-like cysteine proteases in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, van der R.A.L.; Leeuwenburgh, M.A.; Bogyo, M.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.; Peck, S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Transcriptomic and proteomic technologies are generating a wealth of data that are frequently used by scientists to predict the function of proteins based on their expression or presence. However, activity of many proteins, such as transcription factors, kinases, and proteases, depends on posttransl

  4. Design, synthesis, and activity of nanocellulosic protease sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we contrast the molecular assembly, and biochemical utility of nanocellulosic materials prepared from cotton and wood as protease sensors. The cotton-based nanocellulosic substrates were prepared in a variety of ways to produce nanocrystals, films and aerogels, which were derivatized with eithe...

  5. Tomato ringspot nepovirus protease: characterization and cleavage site specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, F.; Sanfacon, H.

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned the region of tomato ringspot nepovirus (TomRSV) RNA-1 coding for the putative TomRSV 3C-related protease (amino acids 1213 to 1508) in a transcription vector and in a transient expression vector. Using cell-free transcription and translation systems and plant protoplasts, we have dem

  6. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S;

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...

  7. graal: a Drosophila gene coding for several mosaic serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, Anne Isabelle; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Janeway, Charles A; Doucet, Daniel; Capovilla, Maria; Lagueux, Marie

    2004-10-01

    Serine proteases play vital roles in several biological processes such as development and immunity. We have characterized Graal, a large multi-domain serine protease from Drosophila. Graal is spliced in at least three transcripts that are present throughout development. The domains found in Graal proteins are: chitin-binding domains (CBD), scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains, low density lipoprotein receptor cysteine-rich (LDLR-CR) domains, histidine and proline-rich domains, a NGGYQPP-repeat domain and a serine protease domain. The last 2370 nucleotides of these RNAs are identical and encode a His-rich domain, two SRCR domains, two LDLR-CR domains and a protease domain. The transcription of graal is upregulated after fungal or bacterial infection. Analysis of the Iso1 (y;cn,sp,bw) strain shows that graal transcription is impaired in this fly line due to the insertion of a retrotransposon in the sixth exon. However, no phenotype could be observed consecutive to the absence of graal full length transcripts, particularly in the context of an immune challenge.

  8. Manipulating the autolytic pathway of a Bacillus protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VandenBurg, B; Eijsink, VGH; Vriend, G; Veltman, OR; Venema, G; HopsuHavu, VK; Jarvinen, M; Kirschke, H

    1997-01-01

    Autolytic degradation of Bacillus subtilis thermolysin-like proteinase (TLP-sub) is responsible for the irreversible inactivation of the enzyme at elevated temperatures. Previously, we reported five autolysis sites in B. subtilis neutral protease (Van den Burg et al., 1990, Biochem. J. 272:93-97). I

  9. Prions in Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy: An Update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, W.Q.; Gambetti, P.; Xiao, X.; Yuan, J.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Pirisinu, L.

    2013-01-01

    Human prion diseases, including sporadic, familial, and acquired forms such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), are caused by prions in which an abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) derived from its normal cellular isoform (PrPC) is the only known component. The recently-identified variably protease-sensi

  10. Protease determination using an optimized alcohol enzyme electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardeletti, G; Carillon, C

    1993-12-01

    A new method for the determination of protease activities is described. In this large family, trypsin is used as a protease model that cleaves the ethyl or methyl ester of artificial substrates producing ethanol or methanol. Alcohol is detected using an alcohol oxidase enzyme electrode. The H2O2 production that occurs is measured amperometrically. At 30 degrees C, in a 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.5, the enzyme electrode response for ethanol was calibrated at 3.10(-6)-3.10(-3)M and for methanol from 3.10(-7) to 4.10(-4)M in the cell measurement. Trypsin levels as determined by the proposed method and by a conventional spectrophotometric method are in good agreement when using the same measurement conditions. A detection limit of 10 U.L-1 and a linear calibration curve of 10-100,000 U.L-1 in the sample were obtained. Measuring time for the required trypsin solution concentration was from 4 min (for the most dilute samples) to 1 min (for the most concentrate samples). In a typical experiment, protease measurements did not inactivate the alcohol oxidase on the probe, nor did a more classical use for alcohol detection. The procedure developed could permit any protease estimation on the condition that they hydrolyze ester bonds from synthetic substrate. PMID:8109959

  11. Purification and characterization of a pineapple crown leaf thiol protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, L Rupachandra; Devi, Th Premila; Devi, S Kunjeshwori

    2004-02-01

    A thiol protease was isolated and purified from the crown leaf of pineapple, Ananas comosus (L.) Merr. cv. Queen, by an immunoaffinity procedure. After the purification to electrophoretic homogeneity, the enzyme was characterized with respect to some of its physico-chemical and kinetic properties. The molecular weight of the protease (22.4-22.9 kDa), Km (97 microM) and kcat (8.8 s(-1)) for its esterolytic cleavage of the synthetic protease substrate N(alpha)-CBZ-L-lysine p-nitrophenyl ester, the concentration of its thiol activator L-cysteine required for half maximal activation A0.5 (9.9 microM), optimum pH (6.5) for its proteolytic action on azocasein, T(1/2) (60 degrees C) for inactivation by heating the enzyme (35.5 microg protein/mL) in citrate buffer pH 6.0 for 15 min, and SH-group content (0.98 mol/mol enzyme) were determined. Most of these physicochemical and kinetic properties were found to be similar to those of the already well-characterized stem bromelain (EC 3.4.22.32). Thus, the immunoaffinity purified crown leaf protease appeared to be closely related to stem bromelain.

  12. THE ROLE OF CYSTEINE PROTEASE IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanbasic, Samra; Jahic, Alma; Karahmet, Emina; Sejranic, Asja; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cysteine protease are biological catalysts which play a pivotal role in numerous biological reactions in organism. Much of the literature is inscribed to their biochemical significance, distribution and mechanism of action. Many diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, develop due to enzyme balance disruption. Understanding of cysteine protease’s disbalance is therefor a key to unravel the new possibilities of treatment. Cysteine protease are one of the most important enzymes for protein disruption during programmed cell death. Whether protein disruption is part of cell deaths is not enough clear in any cases. Thereafter, any tissue disruption, including proteolysis, generate more or less inflammation appearance. Review: This review briefly summarizes the current knowledge about pathological mechanism’s that results in AD, with significant reference to the role of cysteine protease in it. Based on the summary, new pharmacological approach and development of novel potent drugs with selective toxicity targeting cysteine protease will be a major challenge in years to come.

  13. Breakdown of the innate immune system by bacterial proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarman, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria have developed many strategies to circumvent our immune system to survive and colonize human tissues. One of these strategies is by secreting proteases that specifically target the innate immune system. Aureolysin is a metalloprotease from Staphylococcus aureus which target the main compone

  14. In-cell protease assay systems based on trans-localizing molecular beacon proteins using HCV protease as a model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Hee Kim

    Full Text Available This study describes a sensitive in-cell protease detection system that enables direct fluorescence detection of a target protease and its inhibition inside living cells. This live-cell imaging system provides a fluorescent molecular beacon protein comprised of an intracellular translocation signal sequence, a protease-specific cleavage sequence, and a fluorescent tag sequence(s. The molecular beacon protein is designed to change its intracellular localization upon cleavage by a target protease, i.e., from the cytosol to a subcellular organelle or from a subcellular organelle to the cytosol. Protease activity can be monitored at the single cell level, and accordingly the entire cell population expressing the protease can be accurately enumerated. The clear cellular change in fluorescence pattern makes this system an ideal tool for various life science and drug discovery research, including high throughput and high content screening applications.

  15. Expression of fungal cutinase and swollenin in tobacco chloroplasts reveals novel enzyme functions and/or substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheeraj Verma

    Full Text Available In order to produce low-cost biomass hydrolyzing enzymes, transplastomic lines were generated that expressed cutinase or swollenin within chloroplasts. While swollenin expressing plants were homoplasmic, cutinase transplastomic lines remained heteroplasmic. Both transplastomic lines showed interesting modifications in their phenotype, chloroplast structure, and functions. Ultrastructural analysis of chloroplasts from cutinase- and swollenin-expressing plants did not show typical lens shape and granal stacks. But, their thylakoid membranes showed unique scroll like structures and chloroplast envelope displayed protrusions, stretching into the cytoplasm. Unusual honeycomb structures typically observed in etioplasts were observed in mature chloroplasts expressing swollenin. Treatment of cotton fiber with chloroplast-derived swollenin showed enlarged segments and the intertwined inner fibers were irreversibly unwound and fully opened up due to expansin activity of swollenin, causing disruption of hydrogen bonds in cellulose fibers. Cutinase transplastomic plants showed esterase and lipase activity, while swollenin transplastomic lines lacked such enzyme activities. Higher plants contain two major galactolipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG, in their chloroplast thylakoid membranes that play distinct roles in their structural organization. Surprisingly, purified cutinase effectively hydrolyzed DGDG to MGDG, showing alpha galactosidase activity. Such hydrolysis resulted in unstacking of granal thylakoids in chloroplasts and other structural changes. These results demonstrate DGDG as novel substrate and function for cutinase. Both MGDG and DGDG were reduced up to 47.7% and 39.7% in cutinase and 68.5% and 67.5% in swollenin expressing plants. Novel properties and functions of both enzymes reported here for the first time should lead to better understanding and enhanced biomass hydrolysis.

  16. Comparative chloroplast genomics and phylogenetics of Fagopyrum esculentum ssp. ancestrale – A wild ancestor of cultivated buckwheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhingra Amit

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplast genome sequences are extremely informative about species-interrelationships owing to its non-meiotic and often uniparental inheritance over generations. The subject of our study, Fagopyrum esculentum, is a member of the family Polygonaceae belonging to the order Caryophyllales. An uncertainty remains regarding the affinity of Caryophyllales and the asterids that could be due to undersampling of the taxa. With that background, having access to the complete chloroplast genome sequence for Fagopyrum becomes quite pertinent. Results We report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of a wild ancestor of cultivated buckwheat, Fagopyrum esculentum ssp. ancestrale. The sequence was rapidly determined using a previously described approach that utilized a PCR-based method and employed universal primers, designed on the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of chloroplast genomes. The gene content and order in buckwheat chloroplast genome is similar to Spinacia oleracea. However, some unique structural differences exist: the presence of an intron in the rpl2 gene, a frameshift mutation in the rpl23 gene and extension of the inverted repeat region to include the ycf1 gene. Phylogenetic analysis of 61 protein-coding gene sequences from 44 complete plastid genomes provided strong support for the sister relationships of Caryophyllales (including Polygonaceae to asterids. Further, our analysis also provided support for Amborella as sister to all other angiosperms, but interestingly, in the bayesian phylogeny inference based on first two codon positions Amborella united with Nymphaeales. Conclusion Comparative genomics analyses revealed that the Fagopyrum chloroplast genome harbors the characteristic gene content and organization as has been described for several other chloroplast genomes. However, it has some unique structural features distinct from previously reported complete chloroplast genome sequences. Phylogenetic

  17. Expression of ROS-responsive genes and transcription factors after metabolic formation of H2O2 in chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Balazadeh, Salma; Jaspert, Nils; Arif, Muhammad; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Maurino, Veronica G.

    2012-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GO) catalyses the oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate, thereby consuming O(2) and producing H(2)O(2). In this work, Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing GO in the chloroplasts (GO plants) were used to assess the expressional behavior of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive genes and transcription factors (TFs) after metabolic induction of H(2)O(2) formation in chloroplasts. In this organelle, GO uses the glycolate derived from the oxygenase activity of RubisCO. Here,...

  18. Production of therapeutic proteins in algae, analysis of expression of seven human proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Rasala, Beth A.; Muto, Machiko; Lee, Philip A.; Jager, Michal; Cardoso, Rosa MF; Behnke, Craig A; Kirk, Peter; Hokanson, Craig A.; Crea, Roberto; Mendez, Michael; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are widely used today in many industries, including the biopharmaceutical industry, and can be expressed in bacteria, yeasts, mammalian and insect cell cultures, or in transgenic plants and animals. In addition, transgenic algae have also been shown to support recombinant protein expression, both from the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, to date, there are only a few reports on recombinant proteins expressed in the algal chloroplast. It is unclear if this is due ...

  19. The S8 serine, C1A cysteine and A1 aspartic protease families in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Eric P; Jones, Alan M; Dickerman, Allan W

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome has over 550 protease sequences representing all five catalytic types: serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, metallo and threonine (MEROPS peptidase database, http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), which probably reflect a wide variety of as yet unidentified functions performed by plant proteases. Recent indications that the 26S proteasome, a T1 family-threonine protease, is a regulator of light and hormone responsive signal transduction highlight the potential of proteases to participate in many aspects of plant growth and development. Recent discoveries that proteases are required for stomatal distribution, embryo development and disease resistance point to wider roles for four additional multigene families that include some of the most frequently studied (yet poorly understood) plant proteases: the subtilisin-like, serine proteases (family S8), the papain-like, cysteine proteases (family C1A), the pepsin-like, aspartic proteases (family A1) and the plant matrixin, metalloproteases (family M10A). In this report, 54 subtilisin-like, 30 papain-like and 59 pepsin-like proteases from Arabidopsis, are compared with S8, C1A and A1 proteases known from other plant species at the functional, phylogenetic and gene structure levels. Examples of structural conservation between S8, C1A and A1 genes from rice, barley, tomato and soybean and those from Arabidopsis are noted, indicating that some common, essential plant protease roles were established before the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Numerous examples of tandem duplications of protease genes and evidence for a variety of restricted expression patterns suggest that a high degree of specialization exists among proteases within each family. We propose that comprehensive analysis of the functions of these genes in Arabidopsis will firmly establish serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases as regulators and effectors of a wide range of plant processes.

  20. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.)

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.