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Sample records for chloroplast genome sequences

  1. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Dendrobium nobile from Northeastern India

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    Parameswaran, Sriram; Sundar, Durai

    2016-01-01

    The orchid species Dendrobium nobile belonging to the family Orchidaceae and genus Dendrobium (a vast genus that encompasses nearly 1,200 species) has an herbal medicinal history of about 2000 years in east and south Asian countries. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of D. nobile from northeastern India for the first time.

  2. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Abies nephrolepis (Pinaceae: Abietoideae

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    Dong-Keun Yi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant chloroplast (cp genome has maintained a relatively conserved structure and gene content throughout evolution. Cp genome sequences have been used widely for resolving evolutionary and phylogenetic issues at various taxonomic levels of plants. Here, we report the complete cp genome of Abies nephrolepis. The A. nephrolepis cp genome is 121,336 base pairs (bp in length including a pair of short inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb of 139 bp each separated by a small single copy (SSC region of 54,323 bp (SSC and a large single copy region of 66,735 bp (LSC. It contains 114 genes, 68 of which are protein coding genes, 35 tRNA and four rRNA genes, six open reading frames, and one pseudogene. Seventeen repeat units and 64 simple sequence repeats (SSR have been detected in A. nephrolepis cp genome. Large IR sequences locate in 42-kb inversion points (1186 bp. The A. nephrolepis cp genome is identical to Abies koreana’s which is closely related to taxa. Pairwise comparison between two cp genomes revealed 140 polymorphic sites in each. Complete cp genome sequence of A. nephrolepis has a significant potential to provide information on the evolutionary pattern of Abietoideae and valuable data for development of DNA markers for easy identification and classification.

  3. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus.

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    Gurusamy, Raman; Lee, Do-Hyung; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-05-01

    The complete chloroplast genome (cpDNA) sequence of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicine was reported and characterized. The cpDNA of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is 149,539 bp, with 36.3% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 24,803 bp is separated by a large single-copy region (LSC, 82,805 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 17,128 bp). It encodes 85 protein-coding genes, 36 tRNA genes and 8 rRNA genes. Of 129 individual genes, 13 genes encoded one intron and three genes have two introns.

  4. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dendropanax morbifera (Léveillé).

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    Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dendropanax morbifera, an economically and medicinally important endemic tree species in Korea, was obtained by de novo assembly with whole-genome sequence data and manual correction. A circular 156 366-bp chloroplast genome showed typical chloroplast genome structure comprising a large single copy region of 86 475 bp, a small single copy region of 18 125 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats of 25 883 bp. The chloroplast genome harbored 87 protein-coding genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the chloroplast genome revealed that D. morbifera is most closely related to Dendropanax dentiger, an evergreen tree species in China and Southeastern Asia.

  5. Sonication-based isolation and enrichment of Chlorella protothecoides chloroplasts for illumina genome sequencing

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    Angelova, Angelina [University of Arizona; Park, Sang-Hycuk [University of Arizona; Kyndt, John [Bellevue University; Fitzsimmons, Kevin [University of Arizona; Brown, Judith K [University of Arizona

    2013-09-01

    With the increasing world demand for biofuel, a number of oleaginous algal species are being considered as renewable sources of oil. Chlorella protothecoides Krüger synthesizes triacylglycerols (TAGs) as storage compounds that can be converted into renewable fuel utilizing an anabolic pathway that is poorly understood. The paucity of algal chloroplast genome sequences has been an important constraint to chloroplast transformation and for studying gene expression in TAGs pathways. In this study, the intact chloroplasts were released from algal cells using sonication followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, resulting in a 2.36-fold enrichment of chloroplasts from C. protothecoides, based on qPCR analysis. The C. protothecoides chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform and found to be 84,576 Kb in size (8.57 Kb) in size, with a GC content of 30.8 %. This is the first report of an optimized protocol that uses a sonication step, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, to release and enrich intact chloroplasts from a microalga (C. prototheocoides) of sufficient quality to permit chloroplast genome sequencing with high coverage, while minimizing nuclear genome contamination. The approach is expected to guide chloroplast isolation from other oleaginous algal species for a variety of uses that benefit from enrichment of chloroplasts, ranging from biochemical analysis to genomics studies.

  6. Chloroplast genome sequence of the moss Tortula ruralis: gene content, polymorphism, and structural arrangement relative to other green plant chloroplast genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf Paul G; Everett Karin DE; Mandoli Dina F; Boore Jeffrey L; Kuehl Jennifer V; Mishler Brent D; Murdock Andrew G; Oliver Melvin J; Duffy Aaron M; Karol Kenneth G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed species in the moss family Pottiaceae, is increasingly used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of T. ruralis, only the second published chloroplast genome for a moss, and the first for a vegetatively desiccation-t...

  7. Diversification and genetic differentiation of cultivated melon inferred from sequence polymorphism in the chloroplast genome

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Akashi, Yukari; FUKUNAGA, Kenji; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Aierken, Yasheng; Nishida, Hidetaka; Long, Chun Lin; Yoshino, Hiromichi; Sato, Yo-Ichiro; KATO, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Molecular analysis encouraged discovery of genetic diversity and relationships of cultivated melon (Cucumis melo L.). We sequenced nine inter- and intra-genic regions of the chloroplast genome, about 5500 bp, using 60 melon accessions and six reference accessions of wild species of Cucumis to show intra-specific variation of the chloroplast genome. Sequence polymorphisms were detected among melon accessions and other Cucumis species, indicating intra-specific diversification of the chloroplas...

  8. Complete sequencing of five araliaceae chloroplast genomes and the phylogenetic implications.

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    Rong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ginseng family (Araliaceae includes a number of economically important plant species. Previously phylogenetic studies circumscribed three major clades within the core ginseng plant family, yet the internal relationships of each major group have been poorly resolved perhaps due to rapid radiation of these lineages. Recent studies have shown that phyogenomics based on chloroplast genomes provides a viable way to resolve complex relationships. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the complete nucleotide sequences of five Araliaceae chloroplast genomes using next-generation sequencing technology. The five chloroplast genomes are 156,333-156,459 bp in length including a pair of inverted repeats (25,551-26,108 bp separated by the large single-copy (86,028-86,566 bp and small single-copy (18,021-19,117 bp regions. Each chloroplast genome contains the same 114 unique genes consisting of 30 transfer RNA genes, four ribosomal RNA genes, and 80 protein coding genes. Gene size, content, and order, AT content, and IR/SC boundary structure are similar among all Araliaceae chloroplast genomes. A total of 140 repeats were identified in the five chloroplast genomes with palindromic repeat as the most common type. Phylogenomic analyses using parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian inference based on the complete chloroplast genomes strongly supported the monophyly of the Asian Palmate group and the Aralia-Panax group. Furthermore, the relationships among the sampled taxa within the Asian Palmate group were well resolved. Twenty-six DNA markers with the percentage of variable sites higher than 5% were identified, which may be useful for phylogenetic studies of Araliaceae. CONCLUSION: The chloroplast genomes of Araliaceae are highly conserved in all aspects of genome features. The large-scale phylogenomic data based on the complete chloroplast DNA sequences is shown to be effective for the phylogenetic reconstruction of Araliaceae.

  9. Chloroplast genome sequence of the moss Tortula ruralis: gene content, polymorphism, and structural arrangement relative to other green plant chloroplast genomes

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    Wolf Paul G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed species in the moss family Pottiaceae, is increasingly used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of T. ruralis, only the second published chloroplast genome for a moss, and the first for a vegetatively desiccation-tolerant plant. Results The Tortula chloroplast genome is ~123,500 bp, and differs in a number of ways from that of Physcomitrella patens, the first published moss chloroplast genome. For example, Tortula lacks the ~71 kb inversion found in the large single copy region of the Physcomitrella genome and other members of the Funariales. Also, the Tortula chloroplast genome lacks petN, a gene found in all known land plant plastid genomes. In addition, an unusual case of nucleotide polymorphism was discovered. Conclusions Although the chloroplast genome of Tortula ruralis differs from that of the only other sequenced moss, Physcomitrella patens, we have yet to determine the biological significance of the differences. The polymorphisms we have uncovered in the sequencing of the genome offer a rare possibility (for mosses of the generation of DNA markers for fine-level phylogenetic studies, or to investigate individual variation within populations.

  10. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Brachypodium distachyon: sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of eight grass plastomes

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    Anderson Olin D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat, barley, and rye, of tribe Triticeae in the Poaceae, are among the most important crops worldwide but they present many challenges to genomics-aided crop improvement. Brachypodium distachyon, a close relative of those cereals has recently emerged as a model for grass functional genomics. Sequencing of the nuclear and organelle genomes of Brachypodium is one of the first steps towards making this species available as a tool for researchers interested in cereals biology. Findings The chloroplast genome of Brachypodium distachyon was sequenced by a combinational approach using BAC end and shotgun sequences derived from a selected BAC containing the entire chloroplast genome. Comparative analysis indicated that the chloroplast genome is conserved in gene number and organization with respect to those of other cereals. However, several Brachypodium genes evolve at a faster rate than those in other grasses. Sequence analysis reveals that rice and wheat have a ~2.1 kb deletion in their plastid genomes and this deletion must have occurred independently in both species. Conclusion We demonstrate that BAC libraries can be used to sequence plastid, and likely other organellar, genomes. As expected, the Brachypodium chloroplast genome is very similar to those of other sequenced grasses. The phylogenetic analyses and the pattern of insertions and deletions in the chloroplast genome confirmed that Brachypodium is a close relative of the tribe Triticeae. Nevertheless, we show that some large indels can arise multiple times and may confound phylogenetic reconstruction.

  11. Genome Sequences of Populus tremula Chloroplast and Mitochondrion: Implications for Holistic Poplar Breeding.

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    Birgit Kersten

    Full Text Available Complete Populus genome sequences are available for the nucleus (P. trichocarpa; section Tacamahaca and for chloroplasts (seven species, but not for mitochondria. Here, we provide the complete genome sequences of the chloroplast and the mitochondrion for the clones P. tremula W52 and P. tremula x P. alba 717-1B4 (section Populus. The organization of the chloroplast genomes of both Populus clones is described. A phylogenetic tree constructed from all available complete chloroplast DNA sequences of Populus was not congruent with the assignment of the related species to different Populus sections. In total, 3,024 variable nucleotide positions were identified among all compared Populus chloroplast DNA sequences. The 5-prime part of the LSC from trnH to atpA showed the highest frequency of variations. The variable positions included 163 positions with SNPs allowing for differentiating the two clones with P. tremula chloroplast genomes (W52, 717-1B4 from the other seven Populus individuals. These potential P. tremula-specific SNPs were displayed as a whole-plastome barcode on the P. tremula W52 chloroplast DNA sequence. Three of these SNPs and one InDel in the trnH-psbA linker were successfully validated by Sanger sequencing in an extended set of Populus individuals. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of P. tremula is the first in the family of Salicaceae. The mitochondrial genomes of the two clones are 783,442 bp (W52 and 783,513 bp (717-1B4 in size, structurally very similar and organized as single circles. DNA sequence regions with high similarity to the W52 chloroplast sequence account for about 2% of the W52 mitochondrial genome. The mean SNP frequency was found to be nearly six fold higher in the chloroplast than in the mitochondrial genome when comparing 717-1B4 with W52. The availability of the genomic information of all three DNA-containing cell organelles will allow a holistic approach in poplar molecular breeding in the future.

  12. Chloroplast genome sequence confirms distinctness of Australian and Asian wild rice.

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    Waters, Daniel L E; Nock, Catherine J; Ishikawa, Ryuji; Rice, Nicole; Henry, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) is an AA genome Oryza species that was most likely domesticated from wild populations of O. rufipogon in Asia. O. rufipogon and O. meridionalis are the only AA genome species found within Australia and occur as widespread populations across northern Australia. The chloroplast genome sequence of O. rufipogon from Asia and Australia and O. meridionalis and O. australiensis (an Australian member of the genus very distant from O. sativa) was obtained by massively parallel sequencing and compared with the chloroplast genome sequence of domesticated O. sativa. Oryza australiensis differed in more than 850 sites single nucleotide polymorphism or indel from each of the other samples. The other wild rice species had only around 100 differences relative to cultivated rice. The chloroplast genomes of Australian O. rufipogon and O. meridionalis were closely related with only 32 differences. The Asian O. rufipogon chloroplast genome (with only 68 differences) was closer to O. sativa than the Australian taxa (both with more than 100 differences). The chloroplast sequences emphasize the genetic distinctness of the Australian populations and their potential as a source of novel rice germplasm. The Australian O. rufipogon may be a perennial form of O. meridionalis.

  13. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of the Medicinal Plant Pogostemon cablin

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    Yang He

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pogostemon cablin, the natural source of patchouli alcohol, is an important herb in the Lamiaceae family. Here, we present the entire chloroplast genome of P. cablin. This genome, with 38.24% GC content, is 152,460 bp in length. The genome presents a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (each 25,417 bp in length, separated by one small and one large single-copy region (17,652 and 83,974 bp in length, respectively. The chloroplast genome encodes 127 genes, of which 107 genes are single-copy, including 79 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 24 tRNA genes. The genome structure, GC content, and codon usage of this chloroplast genome are similar to those of other species in the family, except that it encodes less protein-coding genes and tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that P. cablin diverged from the Scutellarioideae clade about 29.45 million years ago (Mya. Furthermore, most of the simple sequence repeats (SSRs are short polyadenine or polythymine repeats that contribute to high AT content in the chloroplast genome. Complete sequences and annotation of P. cablin chloroplast genome will facilitate phylogenic, population and genetic engineering research investigations involving this particular species.

  14. The complete chloroplast genome sequences for four Amaranthus species (Amaranthaceae)1

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    Chaney, Lindsay; Mangelson, Ryan; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Jellen, Eric N.; Maughan, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: The amaranth genus contains many important grain and weedy species. We further our understanding of the genus through the development of a complete reference chloroplast genome. Methods and Results: A high-quality Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Amaranthaceae) chloroplast genome assembly was developed using long-read technology. This reference genome was used to reconstruct the chloroplast genomes for two closely related grain species (A. cruentus and A. caudatus) and their putative progenitor (A. hybridus). The reference genome was 150,518 bp and possesses a circular structure of two inverted repeats (24,352 bp) separated by small (17,941 bp) and large (83,873 bp) single-copy regions; it encodes 111 genes, 72 for proteins. Relative to the reference chloroplast genome, an average of 210 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122 insertion/deletion polymorphisms (indels) were identified across the analyzed genomes. Conclusions: This reference chloroplast genome, along with the reported simple sequence repeats, SNPs, and indels, is an invaluable genetic resource for studying the phylogeny and genetic diversity within the amaranth genus. PMID:27672525

  15. An improved chloroplast DNA extraction procedure for whole plastid genome sequencing.

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    Chao Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chloroplast genomes supply valuable genetic information for evolutionary and functional studies in plants. The past five years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced chloroplast genomes with the application of second-generation sequencing technology in plastid genome sequencing projects. However, cost-effective high-throughput chloroplast DNA (cpDNA extraction becomes a major bottleneck restricting the application, as conventional methods are difficult to make a balance between the quality and yield of cpDNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first tested two traditional methods to isolate cpDNA from the three species, Oryza brachyantha, Leersia japonica and Prinsepia utihis. Both of them failed to obtain properly defined cpDNA bands. However, we developed a simple but efficient method based on sucrose gradients and found that the modified protocol worked efficiently to isolate the cpDNA from the same three plant species. We sequenced the isolated DNA samples with Illumina (Solexa sequencing technology to test cpDNA purity according to aligning sequence reads to the reference chloroplast genomes, showing that the reference genome was properly covered. We show that 40-50% cpDNA purity is achieved with our method. CONCLUSION: Here we provide an improved method used to isolate cpDNA from angiosperms. The Illumina sequencing results suggest that the isolated cpDNA has reached enough yield and sufficient purity to perform subsequent genome assembly. The cpDNA isolation protocol thus will be widely applicable to the plant chloroplast genome sequencing projects.

  16. The first complete chloroplast genome sequences of Ulmus species by de novo sequencing: Genome comparative and taxonomic position analysis

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    Zhang, Shuang; Yu, Xiao-Yue; Ren, Ya-Chao; Yang, Min-Sheng; Wang, Jin-Mao

    2017-01-01

    Elm (Ulmus) has a long history of use as a high-quality heavy hardwood famous for its resistance to drought, cold, and salt. It grows in temperate, warm temperate, and subtropical regions. This is the first report of Ulmaceae chloroplast genomes by de novo sequencing. The Ulmus chloroplast genomes exhibited a typical quadripartite structure with two single-copy regions (long single copy [LSC] and short single copy [SSC] sections) separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs). The lengths of the chloroplast genomes from five Ulmus ranged from 158,953 to 159,453 bp, with the largest observed in Ulmus davidiana and the smallest in Ulmus laciniata. The genomes contained 137–145 protein-coding genes, of which Ulmus davidiana var. japonica and U. davidiana had the most and U. pumila had the fewest. The five Ulmus species exhibited different evolutionary routes, as some genes had been lost. In total, 18 genes contained introns, 13 of which (trnL-TAA+, trnL-TAA−, rpoC1-, rpl2-, ndhA-, ycf1, rps12-, rps12+, trnA-TGC+, trnA-TGC-, trnV-TAC-, trnI-GAT+, and trnI-GAT) were shared among all five species. The intron of ycf1 was the longest (5,675bp) while that of trnF-AAA was the smallest (53bp). All Ulmus species except U. davidiana exhibited the same degree of amplification in the IR region. To determine the phylogenetic positions of the Ulmus species, we performed phylogenetic analyses using common protein-coding genes in chloroplast sequences of 42 other species published in NCBI. The cluster results showed the closest plants to Ulmaceae were Moraceae and Cannabaceae, followed by Rosaceae. Ulmaceae and Moraceae both belonged to Urticales, and the chloroplast genome clustering results were consistent with their traditional taxonomy. The results strongly supported the position of Ulmaceae as a member of the order Urticales. In addition, we found a potential error in the traditional taxonomies of U. davidiana and U. davidiana var. japonica, which should be confirmed with a

  17. Analysis of complete nucleotide sequences of 12 Gossypium chloroplast genomes: origin and evolution of allotetraploids.

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    Qin Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cotton (Gossypium spp. is a model system for the analysis of polyploidization. Although ascertaining the donor species of allotetraploid cotton has been intensively studied, sequence comparison of Gossypium chloroplast genomes is still of interest to understand the mechanisms underlining the evolution of Gossypium allotetraploids, while it is generally accepted that the parents were A- and D-genome containing species. Here we performed a comparative analysis of 13 Gossypium chloroplast genomes, twelve of which are presented here for the first time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The size of 12 chloroplast genomes under study varied from 159,959 bp to 160,433 bp. The chromosomes were highly similar having >98% sequence identity. They encoded the same set of 112 unique genes which occurred in a uniform order with only slightly different boundary junctions. Divergence due to indels as well as substitutions was examined separately for genome, coding and noncoding sequences. The genome divergence was estimated as 0.374% to 0.583% between allotetraploid species and A-genome, and 0.159% to 0.454% within allotetraploids. Forty protein-coding genes were completely identical at the protein level, and 20 intergenic sequences were completely conserved. The 9 allotetraploids shared 5 insertions and 9 deletions in whole genome, and 7-bp substitutions in protein-coding genes. The phylogenetic tree confirmed a close relationship between allotetraploids and the ancestor of A-genome, and the allotetraploids were divided into four separate groups. Progenitor allotetraploid cotton originated 0.43-0.68 million years ago (MYA. CONCLUSION: Despite high degree of conservation between the Gossypium chloroplast genomes, sequence variations among species could still be detected. Gossypium chloroplast genomes preferred for 5-bp indels and 1-3-bp indels are mainly attributed to the SSR polymorphisms. This study supports that the common ancestor of diploid A-genome

  18. Chloroplast genome sequence confirms distinctness of Australian and Asian wild rice

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Daniel L. E.; Nock, Catherine J; Ishikawa, Ryuji; Rice, Nicole; Henry, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) is an AA genome Oryza species that was most likely domesticated from wild populations of O. rufipogon in Asia. O. rufipogon and O. meridionalis are the only AA genome species found within Australia and occur as widespread populations across northern Australia. The chloroplast genome sequence of O. rufipogon from Asia and Australia and O. meridionalis and O. australiensis (an Australian member of the genus very distant from O. sativa) was obtained by massively pa...

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Helwingia himalaica (Helwingiaceae, Aquifoliales and a chloroplast phylogenomic analysis of the Campanulidae

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    Xin Yao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Complete chloroplast genome sequences have been very useful for understanding phylogenetic relationships in angiosperms at the family level and above, but there are currently large gaps in coverage. We report the chloroplast genome for Helwingia himalaica, the first in the distinctive family Helwingiaceae and only the second genus to be sequenced in the order Aquifoliales. We then combine this with 36 published sequences in the large (c. 35,000 species subclass Campanulidae in order to investigate relationships at the order and family levels. The Helwingia genome consists of 158,362 bp containing a pair of inverted repeat (IR regions of 25,996 bp separated by a large single-copy (LSC region and a small single-copy (SSC region which are 87,810 and 18,560 bp, respectively. There are 142 known genes, including 94 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes, and 40 tRNA genes. The topology of the phylogenetic relationships between Apiales, Asterales, and Dipsacales differed between analyses based on complete genome sequences and on 36 shared protein-coding genes, showing that further studies of campanulid phylogeny are needed.

  20. The first complete chloroplast genome sequence of a lycophyte,Huperzia lucidula (Lycopodiaceae)

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    Wolf, Paul G.; Karol, Kenneth G.; Mandoli, Dina F.; Kuehl,Jennifer V.; Arumuganathan, K.; Ellis, Mark W.; Mishler, Brent D.; Kelch,Dean G.; Olmstead, Richard G.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-02-01

    We used a unique combination of techniques to sequence the first complete chloroplast genome of a lycophyte, Huperzia lucidula. This plant belongs to a significant clade hypothesized to represent the sister group to all other vascular plants. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to isolate the organelles, rolling circle amplification (RCA) to amplify the genome, and shotgun sequencing to 8x depth coverage to obtain the complete chloroplast genome sequence. The genome is 154,373bp, containing inverted repeats of 15,314 bp each, a large single-copy region of 104,088 bp, and a small single-copy region of 19,671 bp. Gene order is more similar to those of mosses, liverworts, and hornworts than to gene order for other vascular plants. For example, the Huperziachloroplast genome possesses the bryophyte gene order for a previously characterized 30 kb inversion, thus supporting the hypothesis that lycophytes are sister to all other extant vascular plants. The lycophytechloroplast genome data also enable a better reconstruction of the basaltracheophyte genome, which is useful for inferring relationships among bryophyte lineages. Several unique characters are observed in Huperzia, such as movement of the gene ndhF from the small single copy region into the inverted repeat. We present several analyses of evolutionary relationships among land plants by using nucleotide data, amino acid sequences, and by comparing gene arrangements from chloroplast genomes. The results, while still tentative pending the large number of chloroplast genomes from other key lineages that are soon to be sequenced, are intriguing in themselves, and contribute to a growing comparative database of genomic and morphological data across the green plants.

  1. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Omani lime (Citrus aurantiifolia and comparative analysis within the rosids.

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    Huei-Jiun Su

    Full Text Available The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C. aurantiifolia. The complete C. aurantiifolia chloroplast genome is 159,893 bp in length; the organization and gene content are similar to most of the rosids lineages characterized to date. Through comparison with the sweet orange (C. sinensis chloroplast genome, we identified three intergenic regions and 94 simple sequence repeats (SSRs that are potentially informative markers with resolution for interspecific relationships. These markers can be utilized to better understand the origin of cultivated Citrus. A comparison among 72 species belonging to 10 families of representative rosids lineages also provides new insights into their chloroplast genome evolution.

  2. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Omani lime (Citrus aurantiifolia) and comparative analysis within the rosids.

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    Su, Huei-Jiun; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2014-01-01

    The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C. aurantiifolia). The complete C. aurantiifolia chloroplast genome is 159,893 bp in length; the organization and gene content are similar to most of the rosids lineages characterized to date. Through comparison with the sweet orange (C. sinensis) chloroplast genome, we identified three intergenic regions and 94 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) that are potentially informative markers with resolution for interspecific relationships. These markers can be utilized to better understand the origin of cultivated Citrus. A comparison among 72 species belonging to 10 families of representative rosids lineages also provides new insights into their chloroplast genome evolution.

  3. A Comparison of the First Two Sequenced Chloroplast Genomes in Asteraceae: Lettuce and Sunflower

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    Timme, Ruth E.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2006-01-20

    Asteraceae is the second largest family of plants, with over 20,000 species. For the past few decades, numerous phylogenetic studies have contributed to our understanding of the evolutionary relationships within this family, including comparisons of the fast evolving chloroplast gene, ndhF, rbcL, as well as non-coding DNA from the trnL intron plus the trnLtrnF intergenic spacer, matK, and, with lesser resolution, psbA-trnH. This culminated in a study by Panero and Funk in 2002 that used over 13,000 bp per taxon for the largest taxonomic revision of Asteraceae in over a hundred years. Still, some uncertainties remain, and it would be very useful to have more information on the relative rates of sequence evolution among various genes and on genome structure as a potential set of phylogenetic characters to help guide future phylogenetic structures. By way of contributing to this, we report the first two complete chloroplast genome sequences from members of the Asteraceae, those of Helianthus annuus and Lactuca sativa. These plants belong to two distantly related subfamilies, Asteroideae and Cichorioideae, respectively. In addition to these, there is only one other published chloroplast genome sequence for any plant within the larger group called Eusterids II, that of Panax ginseng (Araliaceae, 156,318 bps, AY582139). Early chloroplast genome mapping studies demonstrated that H. annuus and L. sativa share a 22 kb inversion relative to members of the subfamily Barnadesioideae. By comparison to outgroups, this inversion was shown to be derived, indicating that the Asteroideae and Cichorioideae are more closely related than either is to the Barnadesioideae. Later sequencing study found that taxa that share this 22 kb inversion also contain within this region a second, smaller, 3.3 kb inversion. These sequences also enable an analysis of patterns of shared repeats in the genomes at fine level and of RNA editing by comparison to available EST sequences. In addition, since

  4. An optimized chloroplast DNA extraction protocol for grasses (Poaceae proves suitable for whole plastid genome sequencing and SNP detection.

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    Kerstin Diekmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obtaining chloroplast genome sequences is important to increase the knowledge about the fundamental biology of plastids, to understand evolutionary and ecological processes in the evolution of plants, to develop biotechnological applications (e.g. plastid engineering and to improve the efficiency of breeding schemes. Extraction of pure chloroplast DNA is required for efficient sequencing of chloroplast genomes. Unfortunately, most protocols for extracting chloroplast DNA were developed for eudicots and do not produce sufficiently pure yields for a shotgun sequencing approach of whole plastid genomes from the monocot grasses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed a simple and inexpensive method to obtain chloroplast DNA from grass species by modifying and extending protocols optimized for the use in eudicots. Many protocols for extracting chloroplast DNA require an ultracentrifugation step to efficiently separate chloroplast DNA from nuclear DNA. The developed method uses two more centrifugation steps than previously reported protocols and does not require an ultracentrifuge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The described method delivered chloroplast DNA of very high quality from two grass species belonging to highly different taxonomic subfamilies within the grass family (Lolium perenne, Pooideae; Miscanthus x giganteus, Panicoideae. The DNA from Lolium perenne was used for whole chloroplast genome sequencing and detection of SNPs. The sequence is publicly available on EMBL/GenBank.

  5. The First Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Boswellia sacra, a Resin-Producing Plant in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Asaf, Sajjad; Park, Chang Eon; Park, Gun-Seok; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Lee, In-Jung; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Boswellia sacra (Burseraceae), a keystone endemic species, is famous for the production of fragrant oleo-gum resin. However, the genetic make-up especially the genomic information about chloroplast is still unknown. Here, we described for the first time the chloroplast (cp) genome of B. sacra. The complete cp sequence revealed a circular genome of 160,543 bp size with 37.61% GC content. The cp genome is a typical quadripartite chloroplast structure with inverted repeats (IRs 26,763 bp) separated by small single copy (SSC; 18,962 bp) and large single copy (LSC; 88,055 bp) regions. De novo assembly and annotation showed the presence of 114 unique genes with 83 protein-coding regions. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the B. sacra cp genome is closely related to the cp genome of Azadirachta indica and Citrus sinensis, while most of the syntenic differences were found in the non-coding regions. The pairwise distance among 76 shared genes of B. sacra and A. indica was highest for atpA, rpl2, rps12 and ycf1. The cp genome of B. sacra reveals a novel genome, which could be used for further studied to understand its diversity, taxonomy and phylogeny. PMID:28085925

  6. Characterization of the chloroplast genome sequence of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthaipaisanwong, P; Chanprasert, J; Shearman, J R; Sangsrakru, D; Yoocha, T; Jomchai, N; Jantasuriyarat, C; Tragoonrung, S; Tangphatsornruang, S

    2012-06-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is an economically important crop, which is grown for oil production. To better understand the molecular basis of oil palm chloroplasts, we characterized the complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence obtained from 454 pyrosequencing. The oil palm cp genome is 156,973 bp in length consisting of a large single-copy region of 85,192 bp flanked on each side by inverted repeats of 27,071 bp with a small single-copy region of 17,639 bp joining the repeats. The genome contains 112 unique genes: 79 protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA genes and 29 tRNA genes. By aligning the cp genome sequence with oil palm cDNA sequences, we observed 18 non-silent and 10 silent RNA editing events among 19 cp protein-coding genes. Creation of an initiation codon by RNA editing in rpl2 has been reported in several monocots and was also found in the oil palm cp genome. Fifty common chloroplast protein-coding genes from 33 plant taxa were used to construct ML and MP phylogenetic trees. Their topologies are similar and strongly support for the position of E. guineensis as the sister of closely related species Phoenix dactylifera in Arecaceae (palm families) of monocot subtrees.

  7. The complete chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences of Boea hygrometrica: insights into the evolution of plant organellar genomes.

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    Tongwu Zhang

    Full Text Available The complete nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast (cp and mitochondrial (mt genomes of resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica (Bh, Gesneriaceae have been determined with the lengths of 153,493 bp and 510,519 bp, respectively. The smaller chloroplast genome contains more genes (147 with a 72% coding sequence, and the larger mitochondrial genome have less genes (65 with a coding faction of 12%. Similar to other seed plants, the Bh cp genome has a typical quadripartite organization with a conserved gene in each region. The Bh mt genome has three recombinant sequence repeats of 222 bp, 843 bp, and 1474 bp in length, which divide the genome into a single master circle (MC and four isomeric molecules. Compared to other angiosperms, one remarkable feature of the Bh mt genome is the frequent transfer of genetic material from the cp genome during recent Bh evolution. We also analyzed organellar genome evolution in general regarding genome features as well as compositional dynamics of sequence and gene structure/organization, providing clues for the understanding of the evolution of organellar genomes in plants. The cp-derived sequences including tRNAs found in angiosperm mt genomes support the conclusion that frequent gene transfer events may have begun early in the land plant lineage.

  8. The complete chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences of Boea hygrometrica: insights into the evolution of plant organellar genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwu; Fang, Yongjun; Wang, Xumin; Deng, Xin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) genomes of resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica (Bh, Gesneriaceae) have been determined with the lengths of 153,493 bp and 510,519 bp, respectively. The smaller chloroplast genome contains more genes (147) with a 72% coding sequence, and the larger mitochondrial genome have less genes (65) with a coding faction of 12%. Similar to other seed plants, the Bh cp genome has a typical quadripartite organization with a conserved gene in each region. The Bh mt genome has three recombinant sequence repeats of 222 bp, 843 bp, and 1474 bp in length, which divide the genome into a single master circle (MC) and four isomeric molecules. Compared to other angiosperms, one remarkable feature of the Bh mt genome is the frequent transfer of genetic material from the cp genome during recent Bh evolution. We also analyzed organellar genome evolution in general regarding genome features as well as compositional dynamics of sequence and gene structure/organization, providing clues for the understanding of the evolution of organellar genomes in plants. The cp-derived sequences including tRNAs found in angiosperm mt genomes support the conclusion that frequent gene transfer events may have begun early in the land plant lineage.

  9. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of American bird pepper (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-chun; Gao, Cheng-wen; Gao, Li-zhi

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of American bird pepper (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum) is reported and characterized in this study. The genome size is 156,612 bp, containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 25,776 bp separated by a large single-copy region of 87,213 bp and a small single-copy region of 17,851 bp. The chloroplast genome harbors 130 known genes, including 89 protein-coding genes, 8 ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 tRNA genes. A total of 18 of these genes are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions, 16 genes contain 1 intron, and 2 genes and one ycf have 2 introns.

  10. Complete sequence and comparative analysis of the chloroplast genome of coconut palm (Cocos nucifera.

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    Ya-Yi Huang

    Full Text Available Coconut, a member of the palm family (Arecaceae, is one of the most economically important trees used by mankind. Despite its diverse morphology, coconut is recognized taxonomically as only a single species (Cocos nucifera L.. There are two major coconut varieties, tall and dwarf, the latter of which displays traits resulting from selection by humans. We report here the complete chloroplast (cp genome of a dwarf coconut plant, and describe the gene content and organization, inverted repeat fluctuations, repeated sequence structure, and occurrence of RNA editing. Phylogenetic relationships of monocots were inferred based on 47 chloroplast protein-coding genes. Potential nodes for events of gene duplication and pseudogenization related to inverted repeat fluctuation were mapped onto the tree using parsimony criteria. We compare our findings with those from other palm species for which complete cp genome sequences are available.

  11. Complete sequence and comparative analysis of the chloroplast genome of coconut palm (Cocos nucifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2013-01-01

    Coconut, a member of the palm family (Arecaceae), is one of the most economically important trees used by mankind. Despite its diverse morphology, coconut is recognized taxonomically as only a single species (Cocos nucifera L.). There are two major coconut varieties, tall and dwarf, the latter of which displays traits resulting from selection by humans. We report here the complete chloroplast (cp) genome of a dwarf coconut plant, and describe the gene content and organization, inverted repeat fluctuations, repeated sequence structure, and occurrence of RNA editing. Phylogenetic relationships of monocots were inferred based on 47 chloroplast protein-coding genes. Potential nodes for events of gene duplication and pseudogenization related to inverted repeat fluctuation were mapped onto the tree using parsimony criteria. We compare our findings with those from other palm species for which complete cp genome sequences are available.

  12. The complete chloroplast genome sequences of five Epimedium species: lights into phylogenetic and taxonomic analyses

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    Yanjun eZhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epimedium L. is a phylogenetically and economically important genus in the family Berberidaceae. We here sequenced the complete chloroplast (cp genomes of four Epimedium species using Illumina sequencing technology via a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly, which was also the first comprehensive cp genome analysis on Epimedium combining the cp genome sequence of E. koreanum previously reported. The five Epimedium cp genomes exhibited typical quadripartite and circular structure that was rather conserved in genomic structure and the synteny of gene order. However, these cp genomes presented obvious variations at the boundaries of the four regions because of the expansion and contraction of the inverted repeat (IR region and the single-copy (SC boundary regions. The trnQ-UUG duplication occurred in the five Epimedium cp genomes, which was not found in the other basal eudicotyledons. The rapidly evolving cp genome regions were detected among the five cp genomes, as well as the difference of simple sequence repeats (SSR and repeat sequence were identified. Phylogenetic relationships among the five Epimedium species based on their cp genomes showed accordance with the updated system of the genus on the whole, but reminded that the evolutionary relationships and the divisions of the genus need further investigation applying more evidences. The availability of these cp genomes provided valuable genetic information for accurately identifying species, taxonomy and phylogenetic resolution and evolution of Epimedium, and assist in exploration and utilization of Epimedium plants.

  13. Complete genome sequence of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Cusano, Roberto; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this study. The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 109,811 bp, which encode a total of 109 genes, including 74 proteins, 3 rRNAs and 31 tRNAs. Moreover, introns are not detected and all genes are present in single copy. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana cpDNA is 65.9%, the coding sequence is 59.1% and a large inverted repeat (IR) is not observed.

  14. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of a major invasive species, crofton weed (Ageratina adenophora.

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    Xiaojun Nie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crofton weed (Ageratina adenophora is one of the most hazardous invasive plant species, which causes serious economic losses and environmental damages worldwide. However, the sequence resource and genome information of A. adenophora are rather limited, making phylogenetic identification and evolutionary studies very difficult. Here, we report the complete sequence of the A. adenophora chloroplast (cp genome based on Illumina sequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The A. adenophora cp genome is 150, 689 bp in length including a small single-copy (SSC region of 18, 358 bp and a large single-copy (LSC region of 84, 815 bp separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs of 23, 755 bp. The genome contains 130 unique genes and 18 duplicated in the IR regions, with the gene content and organization similar to other Asteraceae cp genomes. Comparative analysis identified five DNA regions (ndhD-ccsA, psbI-trnS, ndhF-ycf1, ndhI-ndhG and atpA-trnR containing parsimony-informative characters higher than 2%, which may be potential informative markers for barcoding and phylogenetic analysis. Repeat structure, codon usage and contraction of the IR were also investigated to reveal the pattern of evolution. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a sister relationship between A. adenophora and Guizotia abyssinica and supported a monophyly of the Asterales. CONCLUSION: We have assembled and analyzed the chloroplast genome of A. adenophora in this study, which was the first sequenced plastome in the Eupatorieae tribe. The complete chloroplast genome information is useful for plant phylogenetic and evolutionary studies within this invasive species and also within the Asteraceae family.

  15. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L..

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    Meng Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L., a member of Arecaceae family, is one of the three major economically important woody palms--the two other palms being oil palm and coconut tree--and its fruit is a staple food among Middle East and North African nations, as well as many other tropical and subtropical regions. Here we report a complete sequence of the data palm chloroplast (cp genome based on pyrosequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After extracting 369,022 cp sequencing reads from our whole-genome-shotgun data, we put together an assembly and validated it with intensive PCR-based verification, coupled with PCR product sequencing. The date palm cp genome is 158,462 bp in length and has a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 86,198 bp and small single-copy (SSC, 17,712 bp regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 27,276 bp. Similar to what has been found among most angiosperms, the date palm cp genome harbors 112 unique genes and 19 duplicated fragments in the IR regions. The junctions between LSC/IRs and SSC/IRs show different features of sequence expansion in evolution. We identified 78 SNPs as major intravarietal polymorphisms within the population of a specific cp genome, most of which were located in genes with vital functions. Based on RNA-sequencing data, we also found 18 polycistronic transcription units and three highly expression-biased genes--atpF, trnA-UGC, and rrn23. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike most monocots, date palm has a typical cp genome similar to that of tobacco--with little rearrangement and gene loss or gain. High-throughput sequencing technology facilitates the identification of intravarietal variations in cp genomes among different cultivars. Moreover, transcriptomic analysis of cp genes provides clues for uncovering regulatory mechanisms of transcription and translation in chloroplasts.

  16. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Gao, Huanhuan; Zhu, Yingjie; Xu, Jiang; Pang, Xiaohui; Yao, Hui; Sun, Chao; Li, Xian'en; Li, Chuyuan; Liu, Juyan; Xu, Haibin; Chen, Shilin

    2013-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal plant with great economic and medicinal value. The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza, the first sequenced member of the Lamiaceae family, is reported here. The genome is 151,328 bp in length and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 82,695 bp) and small (SSC, 17,555 bp) single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 25,539 bp). It contains 114 unique genes, including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNAs and four rRNAs. The genome structure, gene order, GC content and codon usage are similar to the typical angiosperm cp genomes. Four forward, three inverted and seven tandem repeats were detected in the Salvia miltiorrhiza cp genome. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis among the 30 asterid cp genomes revealed that most SSRs are AT-rich, which contribute to the overall AT richness of these cp genomes. Additionally, fewer SSRs are distributed in the protein-coding sequences compared to the non-coding regions, indicating an uneven distribution of SSRs within the cp genomes. Entire cp genome comparison of Salvia miltiorrhiza and three other Lamiales cp genomes showed a high degree of sequence similarity and a relatively high divergence of intergenic spacers. Sequence divergence analysis discovered the ten most divergent and ten most conserved genes as well as their length variation, which will be helpful for phylogenetic studies in asterids. Our analysis also supports that both regional and functional constraints affect gene sequence evolution. Further, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a sister relationship between Salvia miltiorrhiza and Sesamum indicum. The complete cp genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza reported in this paper will facilitate population, phylogenetic and cp genetic engineering studies of this medicinal plant.

  17. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

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    Jun Qian

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal plant with great economic and medicinal value. The complete chloroplast (cp genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza, the first sequenced member of the Lamiaceae family, is reported here. The genome is 151,328 bp in length and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 82,695 bp and small (SSC, 17,555 bp single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 25,539 bp. It contains 114 unique genes, including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNAs and four rRNAs. The genome structure, gene order, GC content and codon usage are similar to the typical angiosperm cp genomes. Four forward, three inverted and seven tandem repeats were detected in the Salvia miltiorrhiza cp genome. Simple sequence repeat (SSR analysis among the 30 asterid cp genomes revealed that most SSRs are AT-rich, which contribute to the overall AT richness of these cp genomes. Additionally, fewer SSRs are distributed in the protein-coding sequences compared to the non-coding regions, indicating an uneven distribution of SSRs within the cp genomes. Entire cp genome comparison of Salvia miltiorrhiza and three other Lamiales cp genomes showed a high degree of sequence similarity and a relatively high divergence of intergenic spacers. Sequence divergence analysis discovered the ten most divergent and ten most conserved genes as well as their length variation, which will be helpful for phylogenetic studies in asterids. Our analysis also supports that both regional and functional constraints affect gene sequence evolution. Further, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a sister relationship between Salvia miltiorrhiza and Sesamum indicum. The complete cp genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza reported in this paper will facilitate population, phylogenetic and cp genetic engineering studies of this medicinal plant.

  18. Assembly of the Complete Sitka Spruce Chloroplast Genome Using 10X Genomics’ GemCode Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Lauren; Jackman, Shaun D.; Yang, Chen; Vandervalk, Benjamin P.; Moore, Richard A.; Pleasance, Stephen; Coope, Robin J.; Bohlmann, Joerg; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Birol, Inanc

    2016-01-01

    The linked read sequencing library preparation platform by 10X Genomics produces barcoded sequencing libraries, which are subsequently sequenced using the Illumina short read sequencing technology. In this new approach, long fragments of DNA are partitioned into separate micro-reactions, where the same index sequence is incorporated into each of the sequencing fragment inserts derived from a given long fragment. In this study, we exploited this property by using reads from index sequences associated with a large number of reads, to assemble the chloroplast genome of the Sitka spruce tree (Picea sitchensis). Here we report on the first Sitka spruce chloroplast genome assembled exclusively from P. sitchensis genomic libraries prepared using the 10X Genomics protocol. We show that the resulting 124,049 base pair long genome shares high sequence similarity with the related white spruce and Norway spruce chloroplast genomes, but diverges substantially from a previously published P. sitchensis- P. thunbergii chimeric genome. The use of reads from high-frequency indices enabled separation of the nuclear genome reads from that of the chloroplast, which resulted in the simplification of the de Bruijn graphs used at the various stages of assembly. PMID:27632164

  19. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum Using Illumina Sequencing

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    Sebastin Raveendar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplast (cp genome sequences provide a valuable source for DNA barcoding. Molecular phylogenetic studies have concentrated on DNA sequencing of conserved gene loci. However, this approach is time consuming and more difficult to implement when gene organization differs among species. Here we report the complete re-sequencing of the cp genome of Capsicum pepper (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum using the Illumina platform. The total length of the cp genome is 156,817 bp with a 37.7% overall GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs of 50,284 bp were separated by a small single copy (SSC; 18,948 bp and a large single copy (LSC; 87,446 bp. The number of cp genes in C. annuum var. glabriusculum is the same as that in other Capsicum species. Variations in the lengths of LSC; SSC and IR regions were the main contributors to the size variation in the cp genome of this species. A total of 125 simple sequence repeat (SSR and 48 insertions or deletions variants were found by sequence alignment of Capsicum cp genome. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Capsicum and other higher plants.

  20. The complete chloroplast genome of Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum using Illumina sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveendar, Sebastin; Na, Young-Wang; Lee, Jung-Ro; Shim, Donghwan; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Sok-Young; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2015-07-20

    Chloroplast (cp) genome sequences provide a valuable source for DNA barcoding. Molecular phylogenetic studies have concentrated on DNA sequencing of conserved gene loci. However, this approach is time consuming and more difficult to implement when gene organization differs among species. Here we report the complete re-sequencing of the cp genome of Capsicum pepper (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum) using the Illumina platform. The total length of the cp genome is 156,817 bp with a 37.7% overall GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 50,284 bp were separated by a small single copy (SSC; 18,948 bp) and a large single copy (LSC; 87,446 bp). The number of cp genes in C. annuum var. glabriusculum is the same as that in other Capsicum species. Variations in the lengths of LSC; SSC and IR regions were the main contributors to the size variation in the cp genome of this species. A total of 125 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 48 insertions or deletions variants were found by sequence alignment of Capsicum cp genome. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Capsicum and other higher plants.

  1. Comparative genomics of four Liliales families inferred from the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Veratrum patulum O. Loes. (Melanthiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hoang Dang Khoa; Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2013-11-10

    The sequence of the chloroplast genome, which is inherited maternally, contains useful information for many scientific fields such as plant systematics, biogeography and biotechnology because its characteristics are highly conserved among species. There is an increase in chloroplast genomes of angiosperms that have been sequenced in recent years. In this study, the nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast genome (cpDNA) of Veratrum patulum Loes. (Melanthiaceae, Liliales) was analyzed completely. The circular double-stranded DNA of 153,699 bp consists of two inverted repeat (IR) regions of 26,360 bp each, a large single copy of 83,372 bp, and a small single copy of 17,607 bp. This plastome contains 81 protein-coding genes, 30 distinct tRNA and four genes of rRNA. In addition, there are six hypothetical coding regions (ycf1, ycf2, ycf3, ycf4, ycf15 and ycf68) and two open reading frames (ORF42 and ORF56), which are also found in the chloroplast genomes of the other species. The gene orders and gene contents of the V. patulum plastid genome are similar to that of Smilax china, Lilium longiflorum and Alstroemeria aurea, members of the Smilacaceae, Liliaceae and Alstroemeriaceae (Liliales), respectively. However, the loss rps16 exon 2 in V. patulum results in the difference in the large single copy regions in comparison with other species. The base substitution rate is quite similar among genes of these species. Additionally, the base substitution rate of inverted repeat region was smaller than that of single copy regions in all observed species of Liliales. The IR regions were expanded to trnH_GUG in V. patulum, a part of rps19 in L. longiflorum and A. aurea, and whole sequence of rps19 in S. china. Furthermore, the IGS lengths of rbcL-accD-psaI region were variable among Liliales species, suggesting that this region might be a hotspot of indel events and the informative site for phylogenetic studies in Liliales. In general, the whole chloroplast genome of V. patulum, a

  2. Comparative chloroplast genomics: analyses including new sequences from the angiosperms Nuphar advena and Ranunculus macranthus

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    Boore Jeffrey L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of completely sequenced plastid genomes available is growing rapidly. This array of sequences presents new opportunities to perform comparative analyses. In comparative studies, it is often useful to compare across wide phylogenetic spans and, within angiosperms, to include representatives from basally diverging lineages such as the genomes reported here: Nuphar advena (from a basal-most lineage and Ranunculus macranthus (a basal eudicot. We report these two new plastid genome sequences and make comparisons (within angiosperms, seed plants, or all photosynthetic lineages to evaluate features such as the status of ycf15 and ycf68 as protein coding genes, the distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs and longer dispersed repeats (SDR, and patterns of nucleotide composition. Results The Nuphar [GenBank:NC_008788] and Ranunculus [GenBank:NC_008796] plastid genomes share characteristics of gene content and organization with many other chloroplast genomes. Like other plastid genomes, these genomes are A+T-rich, except for rRNA and tRNA genes. Detailed comparisons of Nuphar with Nymphaea, another Nymphaeaceae, show that more than two-thirds of these genomes exhibit at least 95% sequence identity and that most SSRs are shared. In broader comparisons, SSRs vary among genomes in terms of abundance and length and most contain repeat motifs based on A and T nucleotides. Conclusion SSR and SDR abundance varies by genome and, for SSRs, is proportional to genome size. Long SDRs are rare in the genomes assessed. SSRs occur less frequently than predicted and, although the majority of the repeat motifs do include A and T nucleotides, the A+T bias in SSRs is less than that predicted from the underlying genomic nucleotide composition. In codon usage third positions show an A+T bias, however variation in codon usage does not correlate with differences in A+T-richness. Thus, although plastome nucleotide composition shows "A

  3. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Aquilaria sinensis (Lour. Gilg and the Evolution Analysis within the Malvalesorder

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    Ying eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquilaria sinensis (Lour. Gilg is an important medicinal woody plant producing agarwood, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. High-throughput sequencing of chloroplast (cp genomes enhanced the understanding about evolutionary relationships within plant families. In this study, we determined the complete cp genome sequences for A. sinensis. The size of the A.sinensis cp genome was 159,565 bp. This genome included a large single-copy region of 87,482 bp, a small single-copy region of 19,857 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb of 26,113 bp each. The GC content of the genome was 37.11%. The A.sinensis cp genome encoded 113 functional genes, including 82 protein-coding genes, 27 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Seven genes were duplicated in the protein-coding genes, whereas 11 genes were duplicated in the RNA genes. A total of 45 polymorphic simple-sequence repeat loci and 60 pairs of large repeats were identified. Most simple-sequence repeats were located in the noncoding sections of the large single-copy/small single-copy region and exhibited high A/T content. Moreover, 33 pairs of large repeat sequences were located in the protein-coding genes, whereas 27 pairs were located in the intergenic regions. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome bias ended with A/T on the basis of codon usage. The distribution of codon usage in A.sinensis cp genome was most similar to that in the Gonystylus bancanus cp genome. Comparative results of 82 protein-coding genes from 29 species of cp genomes demonstrated that A.sinensis was a sister species to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome presented the highest sequence similarity of >90% with the G. bancanus cp genome by using CGView Comparison Tool. This finding strongly supports the placement of A.sinensis as a sister to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. The complete A.sinensis cp genome information will be highly beneficial for further studies on this traditional

  4. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pelargonium x hortorum: organization and evolution of the largest and most highly rearranged chloroplast genome of land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumley, Timothy W; Palmer, Jeffrey D; Mower, Jeffrey P; Fourcade, H Matthew; Calie, Patrick J; Boore, Jeffrey L; Jansen, Robert K

    2006-11-01

    The chloroplast genome of Pelargonium x hortorum has been completely sequenced. It maps as a circular molecule of 217,942 bp and is both the largest and most rearranged land plant chloroplast genome yet sequenced. It features 2 copies of a greatly expanded inverted repeat (IR) of 75,741 bp each and, consequently, diminished single-copy regions of 59,710 and 6,750 bp. Despite the increase in size and complexity of the genome, the gene content is similar to that of other angiosperms, with the exceptions of a large number of pseudogenes, the recognition of 2 open reading frames (ORF56 and ORF42) in the trnA intron with similarities to previously identified mitochondrial products (ACRS and pvs-trnA), the losses of accD and trnT-ggu and, in particular, the presence of a highly divergent set of rpoA-like ORFs rather than a single, easily recognized gene for rpoA. The 3-fold expansion of the IR (relative to most angiosperms) accounts for most of the size increase of the genome, but an additional 10% of the size increase is related to the large number of repeats found. The Pelargonium genome contains 35 times as many 31 bp or larger repeats than the unrearranged genome of Spinacia. Most of these repeats occur near the rearrangement hotspots, and 2 different associations of repeats are localized in these regions. These associations are characterized by full or partial duplications of several genes, most of which appear to be nonfunctional copies or pseudogenes. These duplications may also be linked to the disruption of at least 1 but possibly 2 or 3 operons. We propose simple models that account for the major rearrangements with a minimum of 8 IR boundary changes and 12 inversions in addition to several insertions of duplicated sequence.

  5. Chloroplast Genome Sequence of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L. Millspaugh and Cajanus scarabaeoides: Genome organization and Comparison with other legumes

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    Tanvi Kaila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L. Millspaugh, a diploid (2n = 22 legume crop with a genome size of 852 Mbp, serves as an important source of human dietary protein especially in South East Asian and African regions. In this study, the draft chloroplast genomes of Cajanus cajan and Cajanus scarabaeoides were sequenced. Cajanus scarabaeoides is an important species of the Cajanus gene pool and has also been used for developing promising CMS system by different groups. A male sterile genotype harbouring the Cajanus scarabaeoides cytoplasm was used for sequencing the plastid genome. The cp genome of Cajanus cajan is 152,242bp long, having a quadripartite structure with LSC of 83,455 bp and SSC of 17,871 bp separated by IRs of 25,398 bp. Similarly, the cp genome of Cajanus scarabaeoides is 152,201bp long, having a quadripartite structure in which IRs of 25,402 bp length separates 83,423 bp of LSC and 17,854 bp of SSC. The pigeonpea cp genome contains 116 unique genes, including 30 tRNA, 4 rRNA, 78 predicted protein coding genes and 5 pseudogenes. A 50kb inversion was observed in the LSC region of pigeonpea cp genome, consistent with other legumes. Comparison of cp genome with other legumes revealed the contraction of IR boundaries due to the absence of rps19 gene in the IR region. Chloroplast SSRs were mined and a total of 280 and 292 cpSSRs were identified in Cajanus scarabaeoides and Cajanus cajan respectively. RNA editing was observed at 37 sites in both Cajanus scarabaeoides and Cajanus cajan, with maximum occurrence in the ndh genes. The pigeonpea cp genome sequence would be beneficial in providing informative molecular markers which can be utilized for genetic diversity analysis and aid in understanding the plant systematics studies among major grain legumes.

  6. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an endemic monotypic genus Hagenia (Rosaceae: structural comparative analysis, gene content and microsatellite detection

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    Andrew W. Gichira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hagenia is an endangered monotypic genus endemic to the topical mountains of Africa. The only species, Hagenia abyssinica (Bruce J.F. Gmel, is an important medicinal plant producing bioactive compounds that have been traditionally used by African communities as a remedy for gastrointestinal ailments in both humans and animals. Complete chloroplast genomes have been applied in resolving phylogenetic relationships within plant families. We employed high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine the complete chloroplast genome sequence of H. abyssinica. The genome is a circular molecule of 154,961 base pairs (bp, with a pair of Inverted Repeats (IR 25,971 bp each, separated by two single copies; a large (LSC, 84,320 bp and a small single copy (SSC, 18,696. H. abyssinica’s chloroplast genome has a 37.1% GC content and encodes 112 unique genes, 78 of which code for proteins, 30 are tRNA genes and four are rRNA genes. A comparative analysis with twenty other species, sequenced to-date from the family Rosaceae, revealed similarities in structural organization, gene content and arrangement. The observed size differences are attributed to the contraction/expansion of the inverted repeats. The translational initiation factor gene (infA which had been previously reported in other chloroplast genomes was conspicuously missing in H. abyssinica. A total of 172 microsatellites and 49 large repeat sequences were detected in the chloroplast genome. A Maximum Likelihood analyses of 71 protein-coding genes placed Hagenia in Rosoideae. The availability of a complete chloroplast genome, the first in the Sanguisorbeae tribe, is beneficial for further molecular studies on taxonomic and phylogenomic resolution within the Rosaceae family.

  7. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an endemic monotypic genus Hagenia (Rosaceae): structural comparative analysis, gene content and microsatellite detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gichira, Andrew W; Li, Zhizhong; Saina, Josphat K; Long, Zhicheng; Hu, Guangwan; Gituru, Robert W; Wang, Qingfeng; Chen, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Hagenia is an endangered monotypic genus endemic to the topical mountains of Africa. The only species, Hagenia abyssinica (Bruce) J.F. Gmel, is an important medicinal plant producing bioactive compounds that have been traditionally used by African communities as a remedy for gastrointestinal ailments in both humans and animals. Complete chloroplast genomes have been applied in resolving phylogenetic relationships within plant families. We employed high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine the complete chloroplast genome sequence of H. abyssinica. The genome is a circular molecule of 154,961 base pairs (bp), with a pair of Inverted Repeats (IR) 25,971 bp each, separated by two single copies; a large (LSC, 84,320 bp) and a small single copy (SSC, 18,696). H. abyssinica's chloroplast genome has a 37.1% GC content and encodes 112 unique genes, 78 of which code for proteins, 30 are tRNA genes and four are rRNA genes. A comparative analysis with twenty other species, sequenced to-date from the family Rosaceae, revealed similarities in structural organization, gene content and arrangement. The observed size differences are attributed to the contraction/expansion of the inverted repeats. The translational initiation factor gene (infA) which had been previously reported in other chloroplast genomes was conspicuously missing in H. abyssinica. A total of 172 microsatellites and 49 large repeat sequences were detected in the chloroplast genome. A Maximum Likelihood analyses of 71 protein-coding genes placed Hagenia in Rosoideae. The availability of a complete chloroplast genome, the first in the Sanguisorbeae tribe, is beneficial for further molecular studies on taxonomic and phylogenomic resolution within the Rosaceae family.

  8. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an endemic monotypic genus Hagenia (Rosaceae): structural comparative analysis, gene content and microsatellite detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saina, Josphat K.; Long, Zhicheng; Hu, Guangwan; Gituru, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Hagenia is an endangered monotypic genus endemic to the topical mountains of Africa. The only species, Hagenia abyssinica (Bruce) J.F. Gmel, is an important medicinal plant producing bioactive compounds that have been traditionally used by African communities as a remedy for gastrointestinal ailments in both humans and animals. Complete chloroplast genomes have been applied in resolving phylogenetic relationships within plant families. We employed high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine the complete chloroplast genome sequence of H. abyssinica. The genome is a circular molecule of 154,961 base pairs (bp), with a pair of Inverted Repeats (IR) 25,971 bp each, separated by two single copies; a large (LSC, 84,320 bp) and a small single copy (SSC, 18,696). H. abyssinica’s chloroplast genome has a 37.1% GC content and encodes 112 unique genes, 78 of which code for proteins, 30 are tRNA genes and four are rRNA genes. A comparative analysis with twenty other species, sequenced to-date from the family Rosaceae, revealed similarities in structural organization, gene content and arrangement. The observed size differences are attributed to the contraction/expansion of the inverted repeats. The translational initiation factor gene (infA) which had been previously reported in other chloroplast genomes was conspicuously missing in H. abyssinica. A total of 172 microsatellites and 49 large repeat sequences were detected in the chloroplast genome. A Maximum Likelihood analyses of 71 protein-coding genes placed Hagenia in Rosoideae. The availability of a complete chloroplast genome, the first in the Sanguisorbeae tribe, is beneficial for further molecular studies on taxonomic and phylogenomic resolution within the Rosaceae family.

  9. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Omani Lime (Citrus aurantiifolia) and Comparative Analysis within the Rosids

    OpenAIRE

    Huei-Jiun Su; Hogenhout, Saskia A.; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M.; Chih-Horng Kuo

    2014-01-01

    The genus Citrus contains many economically important fruits that are grown worldwide for their high nutritional and medicinal value. Due to frequent hybridizations among species and cultivars, the exact number of natural species and the taxonomic relationships within this genus are unclear. To compare the differences between the Citrus chloroplast genomes and to develop useful genetic markers, we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete chloroplast genome of Omani lime (C....

  10. Increasing phylogenetic resolution at low taxonomic levels using massively parallel sequencing of chloroplast genomes

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    Cronn Richard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular evolutionary studies share the common goal of elucidating historical relationships, and the common challenge of adequately sampling taxa and characters. Particularly at low taxonomic levels, recent divergence, rapid radiations, and conservative genome evolution yield limited sequence variation, and dense taxon sampling is often desirable. Recent advances in massively parallel sequencing make it possible to rapidly obtain large amounts of sequence data, and multiplexing makes extensive sampling of megabase sequences feasible. Is it possible to efficiently apply massively parallel sequencing to increase phylogenetic resolution at low taxonomic levels? Results We reconstruct the infrageneric phylogeny of Pinus from 37 nearly-complete chloroplast genomes (average 109 kilobases each of an approximately 120 kilobase genome generated using multiplexed massively parallel sequencing. 30/33 ingroup nodes resolved with ≥ 95% bootstrap support; this is a substantial improvement relative to prior studies, and shows massively parallel sequencing-based strategies can produce sufficient high quality sequence to reach support levels originally proposed for the phylogenetic bootstrap. Resampling simulations show that at least the entire plastome is necessary to fully resolve Pinus, particularly in rapidly radiating clades. Meta-analysis of 99 published infrageneric phylogenies shows that whole plastome analysis should provide similar gains across a range of plant genera. A disproportionate amount of phylogenetic information resides in two loci (ycf1, ycf2, highlighting their unusual evolutionary properties. Conclusion Plastome sequencing is now an efficient option for increasing phylogenetic resolution at lower taxonomic levels in plant phylogenetic and population genetic analyses. With continuing improvements in sequencing capacity, the strategies herein should revolutionize efforts requiring dense taxon and character sampling

  11. In silico analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats from chloroplast genomes of Solanaceae species

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    Evandro Vagner Tambarussi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of chloroplast genome (cpDNA sequences of Atropa belladonna, Nicotiana sylvestris, N.tabacum, N. tomentosiformis, Solanum bulbocastanum, S. lycopersicum and S. tuberosum, which are Solanaceae species,allowed us to analyze the organization of cpSSRs in their genic and intergenic regions. In general, the number of cpSSRs incpDNA ranged from 161 in S. tuberosum to 226 in N. tabacum, and the number of intergenic cpSSRs was higher than geniccpSSRs. The mononucleotide repeats were the most frequent in studied species, but we also identified di-, tri-, tetra-, pentaandhexanucleotide repeats. Multiple alignments of all cpSSRs sequences from Solanaceae species made the identification ofnucleotide variability possible and the phylogeny was estimated by maximum parsimony. Our study showed that the plastomedatabase can be exploited for phylogenetic analysis and biotechnological approaches.

  12. CpGAVAS, an integrated web server for the annotation, visualization, analysis, and GenBank submission of completely sequenced chloroplast genome sequences

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    Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complete sequences of chloroplast genomes provide wealthy information regarding the evolutionary history of species. With the advance of next-generation sequencing technology, the number of completely sequenced chloroplast genomes is expected to increase exponentially, powerful computational tools annotating the genome sequences are in urgent need. Results We have developed a web server CPGAVAS. The server accepts a complete chloroplast genome sequence as input. First, it predicts protein-coding and rRNA genes based on the identification and mapping of the most similar, full-length protein, cDNA and rRNA sequences by integrating results from Blastx, Blastn, protein2genome and est2genome programs. Second, tRNA genes and inverted repeats (IR are identified using tRNAscan, ARAGORN and vmatch respectively. Third, it calculates the summary statistics for the annotated genome. Fourth, it generates a circular map ready for publication. Fifth, it can create a Sequin file for GenBank submission. Last, it allows the extractions of protein and mRNA sequences for given list of genes and species. The annotation results in GFF3 format can be edited using any compatible annotation editing tools. The edited annotations can then be uploaded to CPGAVAS for update and re-analyses repeatedly. Using known chloroplast genome sequences as test set, we show that CPGAVAS performs comparably to another application DOGMA, while having several superior functionalities. Conclusions CPGAVAS allows the semi-automatic and complete annotation of a chloroplast genome sequence, and the visualization, editing and analysis of the annotation results. It will become an indispensible tool for researchers studying chloroplast genomes. The software is freely accessible from http://www.herbalgenomics.org/cpgavas.

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: genome structure, evolutionary aspects, gene content and SSR detection.

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    Leila do Nascimento Vieira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR. It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU, which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara. Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. CONCLUSION: The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of

  14. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: Genome Structure, Evolutionary Aspects, Gene Content and SSR Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Rogalski, Marcelo; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Cardoso, Rodrigo Luis Alves; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae) is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp) genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. Methodology/Principal Findings The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR). It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU), which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi) and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara). Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. Conclusion The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of this genus. PMID

  15. Phylogenetic placement of Cynomorium in Rosales inferred from sequences of the inverted repeat region of the chloroplast genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong ZHANG; Chun-Qi LI; Jian-hua LI

    2009-01-01

    Cynomorium is a herbaceous holoparasite that has been placed in Santalales, Saxifragales, Myrtales, or Sapindales. The inverted repeat (IR) region of the chloroplast genome region is slow evolving and, unlike mitochondrial genes, the chloroplast genome experiences few horizontal gene transfers between the host and parasite. Thus, in the present study, we used sequences of the IR region to test the phylogenetic placements of Cynomorium. Phylogenetic analyses of the chloroplast IR sequences generated largely congruent ordinal relationships with those from previous studies of angiosperm phylogeny based on single or multiple genes. Santalales was closely related to Caryophyllales and asterids. Saxifragales formed a clade where Peridiscus was sister to the remainder of the order, whereas Paeonia was sister to the woody clade of Saxifragales. Cynomorium is not closely related to Santalales, Saxifragales, Myrtales, or Sapindales; instead, it is included in Rosales and sister to Rosaceae. The various placements of the holoparasite on the basis of different regions of the mitochondrial genome may indicate the heterogeneous nature of the genome in the parasite. However, it is unlikely that the placement of Cynomorium in Rosales is the result of chloroplast gene transfer because Cynomorium does not parasitize on rosaceous plants and there is no chloroplast gene transfer between Cynomorium and Nitraria, a confirmed host of Cynomorium and a member of Sapindales.

  16. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pelargonium xhortorum: Or ganization and evolution of the largest and most highlyrearranged chloroplast genome of land plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumley, Timothy W.; Palmer, Jeffrey D.; Mower, Jeffrey P.; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Calie, Patrick J.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen,Robert K.

    2006-01-20

    The chloroplast genome of Pelargonium e hortorum has beencompletely sequenced. It maps as a circular molecule of 217,942 bp, andis both the largest and most rearranged land plant chloroplast genome yetsequenced. It features two copies of a greatly expanded inverted repeat(IR) of 75,741 bp each, and consequently diminished single copy regionsof 59,710 bp and 6,750 bp. It also contains two different associations ofrepeated elements that contribute about 10 percent to the overall sizeand account for the majority of repeats found in the genome. Theyrepresent hotspots for rearrangements and gene duplications and include alarge number of pseudogenes. We propose simple models that account forthe major rearrangements with a minimum of eight IR boundary changes and12 inversions in addition to a several insertions of duplicated sequence.The major processes at work (duplication, IR expansion, and inversion)have disrupted at least one and possibly two or three transcriptionaloperons, and the genes involved in these disruptions form the core of thetwo major repeat associations. Despite the vast increase in size andcomplexity of the genome, the gene content is similar to that of otherangiosperms, with the exceptions of a large number of pseudogenes as partof the repeat associations, the recognition of two open reading frames(ORF56 and ORF42) in the trnA intron with similarities to previouslyidentified mitochondrial products (ACRS and pvs-trnA), the loss of accDand trnT-GGU, and in particular, the lack of a recognizably functionalrpoA. One or all of three similar open reading frames may possibly encodethe latter, however.

  17. Comparative analysis of the complete chloroplast genome sequences in psammophytic Haloxylon species (Amaranthaceae

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    Wenpan Dong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Haloxylon genus belongs to the Amaranthaceae (formerly Chenopodiaceae family. The small trees or shrubs in this genus are referred to as the King of psammophytic plants, and perform important functions in environmental protection, including wind control and sand fixation in deserts. To better understand these beneficial plants, we sequenced the chloroplast (cp genomes of Haloxylon ammodendron (HA and Haloxylon persicum (HP and conducted comparative genomic analyses on these and two other representative Amaranthaceae species. Similar to other higher plants, we found that the Haloxylon cp genome is a quadripartite, double-stranded, circular DNA molecule of 151,570 bp in HA and 151,586 bp in HP. It contains a pair of inverted repeats (24,171 bp in HA and 24,177 bp in HP that separate the genome into a large single copy region of 84,214 bp in HA and 84,217 bp in HP, and a small single copy region of 19,014 bp in HA and 19,015 bp in HP. Each Haloxylon cp genome contains 112 genes, including 78 coding, 30 tRNA, and four ribosomal RNA genes. We detected 59 different simple sequence repeat loci, including 44 mono-nucleotide, three di-nucleotide, one tri-nucleotide, and 11 tetra-nucleotide repeats. Comparative analysis revealed only 67 mutations between the two species, including 44 substitutions, 23 insertions/deletions, and two micro-inversions. The two inversions, with lengths of 14 and 3 bp, occur in the petA-psbJ intergenic region and rpl16 intron, respectively, and are predicted to form hairpin structures with repeat sequences of 27 and 19 bp, respectively, at the two ends. The ratio of transitions to transversions was 0.76. These results are valuable for future studies on Haloxylon genetic diversity and will enhance our understanding of the phylogenetic evolution of Amaranthaceae.

  18. The Chloroplast Genome of Passiflora edulis (Passifloraceae) Assembled from Long Sequence Reads: Structural Organization and Phylogenomic Studies in Malpighiales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauz-Santos, Luiz A.; Munhoz, Carla F.; Rodde, Nathalie; Cauet, Stephane; Santos, Anselmo A.; Penha, Helen A.; Dornelas, Marcelo C.; Varani, Alessandro M.; Oliveira, Giancarlo C. X.; Bergès, Hélène; Vieira, Maria Lucia C.

    2017-01-01

    The family Passifloraceae consists of some 700 species classified in around 16 genera. Almost all its members belong to the genus Passiflora. In Brazil, the yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) is of considerable economic importance, both for juice production and consumption as fresh fruit. The availability of chloroplast genomes (cp genomes) and their sequence comparisons has led to a better understanding of the evolutionary relationships within plant taxa. In this study, we obtained the complete nucleotide sequence of the P. edulis chloroplast genome, the first entirely sequenced in the Passifloraceae family. We determined its structure and organization, and also performed phylogenomic studies on the order Malpighiales and the Fabids clade. The P. edulis chloroplast genome is characterized by the presence of two copies of an inverted repeat sequence (IRA and IRB) of 26,154 bp, each separating a small single copy region of 13,378 bp and a large single copy (LSC) region of 85,720 bp. The annotation resulted in the identification of 105 unique genes, including 30 tRNAs, 4 rRNAs, and 71 protein coding genes. Also, 36 repetitive elements and 85 SSRs (microsatellites) were identified. The structure of the complete cp genome of P. edulis differs from that of other species because of rearrangement events detected by means of a comparison based on 22 members of the Malpighiales. The rearrangements were three inversions of 46,151, 3,765 and 1,631 bp, located in the LSC region. Phylogenomic analysis resulted in strongly supported trees, but this could also be a consequence of the limited taxonomic sampling used. Our results have provided a better understanding of the evolutionary relationships in the Malpighiales and the Fabids, confirming the potential of complete chloroplast genome sequences in inferring evolutionary relationships and the utility of long sequence reads for generating very accurate biological information. PMID:28344587

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Ampelopsis: gene organization, comparative analysis and phylogenetic relationships to other angiosperms

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    Gurusamy eRaman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ampelopsis brevipedunculata is an economically important plant that belongs to the Vitaceae family of angiosperms. The phylogenetic placement of Vitaceae is still unresolved. Recent phylogenetic studies suggested that it should be placed in various alternative families including Caryophyllaceae, asteraceae, Saxifragaceae, Dilleniaceae, or with the rest of the rosid families. However, these analyses provided weak supportive results because they were based on only one of several genes. Accordingly, complete chloroplast genome sequences are required to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among angiosperms. Recent phylogenetic analyses based on the complete chloroplast genome sequence suggested strong support for the position of Vitaceae as the earliest diverging lineage of rosids and placed it as a sister to the remaining rosids. These studies also revealed relationships among several major lineages of angiosperms; however, they highlighted the significance of taxon sampling for obtaining accurate phylogenies. In the present study, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of A. brevipedunculata and used these data to assess the relationships among 32 angiosperms, including 18 taxa of rosids. The Ampelopsis chloroplast genome is 161,090 bp in length, and includes a pair of inverted repeats of 26,394 bp that are separated by small and large single copy regions of 19,036 bp and 89,266 bp, respectively. The gene content and order of Ampelopsis is identical to many other unrearranged angiosperm chloroplast genomes, including Vitis and tobacco. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on 70 protein-coding genes of 33 angiosperms showed that both Saxifragales and Vitaceae diverged from the rosid clade and formed two clades with 100% bootstrap value. The position of the Vitaceae is sister to Saxifragales, and both are the basal and earliest diverging lineages. Moreover, Saxifragales forms a sister clade to Vitaceae of rosids. Overall, the results of

  20. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Cephalotaxus oliveri (Cephalotaxaceae): evolutionary comparison of cephalotaxus chloroplast DNAs and insights into the loss of inverted repeat copies in gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xuan; Gao, Lei; Wang, Bo; Su, Ying-Juan; Wang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    We have determined the complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Cephalotaxus oliveri. The genome is 134,337 bp in length, encodes 113 genes, and lacks inverted repeat (IR) regions. Genome-wide mutational dynamics have been investigated through comparative analysis of the cp genomes of C. oliveri and C. wilsoniana. Gene order transformation analyses indicate that when distinct isomers are considered as alternative structures for the ancestral cp genome of cupressophyte and Pinaceae lineages, it is not possible to distinguish between hypotheses favoring retention of the same IR region in cupressophyte and Pinaceae cp genomes from a hypothesis proposing independent loss of IRA and IRB. Furthermore, in cupressophyte cp genomes, the highly reduced IRs are replaced by short repeats that have the potential to mediate homologous recombination, analogous to the situation in Pinaceae. The importance of repeats in the mutational dynamics of cupressophyte cp genomes is also illustrated by the accD reading frame, which has undergone extreme length expansion in cupressophytes. This has been caused by a large insertion comprising multiple repeat sequences. Overall, we find that the distribution of repeats, indels, and substitutions is significantly correlated in Cephalotaxus cp genomes, consistent with a hypothesis that repeats play a role in inducing substitutions and indels in conifer cp genomes.

  1. The complete chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oltmannsiellopsis viridis reveals a distinctive quadripartite architecture in the chloroplast genome of early diverging ulvophytes

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    Lemieux Claude

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Chlorophyta contains the majority of the green algae and is divided into four classes. The basal position of the Prasinophyceae has been well documented, but the divergence order of the Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Chlorophyceae is currently debated. The four complete chloroplast DNA (cpDNA sequences presently available for representatives of these classes have revealed extensive variability in overall structure, gene content, intron composition and gene order. The chloroplast genome of Pseudendoclonium (Ulvophyceae, in particular, is characterized by an atypical quadripartite architecture that deviates from the ancestral type by a large inverted repeat (IR featuring an inverted rRNA operon and a small single-copy (SSC region containing 14 genes normally found in the large single-copy (LSC region. To gain insights into the nature of the events that led to the reorganization of the chloroplast genome in the Ulvophyceae, we have determined the complete cpDNA sequence of Oltmannsiellopsis viridis, a representative of a distinct, early diverging lineage. Results The 151,933 bp IR-containing genome of Oltmannsiellopsis differs considerably from Pseudendoclonium and other chlorophyte cpDNAs in intron content and gene order, but shares close similarities with its ulvophyte homologue at the levels of quadripartite architecture, gene content and gene density. Oltmannsiellopsis cpDNA encodes 105 genes, contains five group I introns, and features many short dispersed repeats. As in Pseudendoclonium cpDNA, the rRNA genes in the IR are transcribed toward the single copy region featuring the genes typically found in the ancestral LSC region, and the opposite single copy region harbours genes characteristic of both the ancestral SSC and LSC regions. The 52 genes that were transferred from the ancestral LSC to SSC region include 12 of those observed in Pseudendoclonium cpDNA. Surprisingly, the overall gene organization of

  2. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck var 'Ridge Pineapple': organization and phylogenetic relationships to other angiosperms

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    Jansen Robert K

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The production of Citrus, the largest fruit crop of international economic value, has recently been imperiled due to the introduction of the bacterial disease Citrus canker. No significant improvements have been made to combat this disease by plant breeding and nuclear transgenic approaches. Chloroplast genetic engineering has a number of advantages over nuclear transformation; it not only increases transgene expression but also facilitates transgene containment, which is one of the major impediments for development of transgenic trees. We have sequenced the Citrus chloroplast genome to facilitate genetic improvement of this crop and to assess phylogenetic relationships among major lineages of angiosperms. Results The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Citrus sinensis is 160,129 bp in length, and contains 133 genes (89 protein-coding, 4 rRNAs and 30 distinct tRNAs. Genome organization is very similar to the inferred ancestral angiosperm chloroplast genome. However, in Citrus the infA gene is absent. The inverted repeat region has expanded to duplicate rps19 and the first 84 amino acids of rpl22. The rpl22 gene in the IRb region has a nonsense mutation resulting in 9 stop codons. This was confirmed by PCR amplification and sequencing using primers that flank the IR/LSC boundaries. Repeat analysis identified 29 direct and inverted repeats 30 bp or longer with a sequence identity ≥ 90%. Comparison of protein-coding sequences with expressed sequence tags revealed six putative RNA edits, five of which resulted in non-synonymous modifications in petL, psbH, ycf2 and ndhA. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony (MP and maximum likelihood (ML methods of a dataset composed of 61 protein-coding genes for 30 taxa provide strong support for the monophyly of several major clades of angiosperms, including monocots, eudicots, rosids and asterids. The MP and ML trees are incongruent in three areas: the position of Amborella and

  3. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han; Cao, Hua; Cai, Yan-Fei; Wang, Ji-Hua; Qu, Su-Ping; Huang, Xing-Qi

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined in this study. The cpDNA was 149,637 bp in length, containing a pair of 24,439 bp inverted repeat regions (IR), which were separated by small and large single copy regions (SSC and LSC) of 17,701 and 83,057 bp, respectively. 53.4% of the sugar beet cpDNA consisted of gene coding regions (protein coding and RNA genes). The gene content and relative positions of 113 individual genes (79 protein encoding genes, 30 tRNA genes, 4 rRNA genes) were almost identical to those of tobacco cpDNA. The overall AT contents of the sugar beet cpDNA were 63.6% and in the LSC, SSC and IR regions were 65.9%, 70.8% and 57.8%, respectively. Fifteen genes contained one intron, while three genes had two introns.

  4. Complete chloroplast genome of Sedum sarmentosum and chloroplast genome evolution in Saxifragales.

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    Wenpan Dong

    Full Text Available Comparative chloroplast genome analyses are mostly carried out at lower taxonomic levels, such as the family and genus levels. At higher taxonomic levels, chloroplast genomes are generally used to reconstruct phylogenies. However, little attention has been paid to chloroplast genome evolution within orders. Here, we present the chloroplast genome of Sedum sarmentosum and take advantage of several available (or elucidated chloroplast genomes to examine the evolution of chloroplast genomes in Saxifragales. The chloroplast genome of S. sarmentosum is 150,448 bp long and includes 82,212 bp of a large single-copy (LSC region, 16.670 bp of a small single-copy (SSC region, and a pair of 25,783 bp sequences of inverted repeats (IRs.The genome contains 131 unique genes, 18 of which are duplicated within the IRs. Based on a comparative analysis of chloroplast genomes from four representative Saxifragales families, we observed two gene losses and two pseudogenes in Paeonia obovata, and the loss of an intron was detected in the rps16 gene of Penthorum chinense. Comparisons among the 72 common protein-coding genes confirmed that the chloroplast genomes of S. sarmentosum and Paeonia obovata exhibit accelerated sequence evolution. Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between the rates of genome evolution and genome size. The detected genome size variations are predominantly caused by the length of intergenic spacers, rather than losses of genes and introns, gene pseudogenization or IR expansion or contraction. The genome sizes of these species are negatively correlated with nucleotide substitution rates. Species with shorter duration of the life cycle tend to exhibit shorter chloroplast genomes than those with longer life cycles.

  5. A comparison of rice chloroplast genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiabin; Xia, Hong'ai; Cao, Mengliang

    2004-01-01

    ), which are both parental varieties of the super-hybrid rice, LYP9. Based on the patterns of high sequence coverage, we partitioned chloroplast sequence variations into two classes, intravarietal and intersubspecific polymorphisms. Intravarietal polymorphisms refer to variations within 93-11 or PA64S...... to intersubspecific polymorphisms. In our study, we found that the intersubspecific variations of 93-11 (indica) and PA64S (japonica) chloroplast genomes consisted of 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 27 insertions or deletions. The intersubspecific polymorphism rates between 93-11 and PA64S were 0.......05% for single nucleotide polymorphisms and 0.02% for insertions or deletions, nearly 8 and 10 times lower than their respective nuclear genomes. Based on the total number of nucleotide substitutions between the two chloroplast genomes, we dated the divergence of indica and japonica chloroplast genomes...

  6. The chloroplast genome sequence of the green alga Leptosira terrestris: multiple losses of the inverted repeat and extensive genome rearrangements within the Trebouxiophyceae

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    Turmel Monique

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Chlorophyta – the green algal phylum comprising the classes Prasinophyceae, Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Chlorophyceae – the chloroplast genome displays a highly variable architecture. While chlorophycean chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs deviate considerably from the ancestral pattern described for the prasinophyte Nephroselmis olivacea, the degree of remodelling sustained by the two ulvophyte cpDNAs completely sequenced to date is intermediate relative to those observed for chlorophycean and trebouxiophyte cpDNAs. Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorellales is currently the only photosynthetic trebouxiophyte whose complete cpDNA sequence has been reported. To gain insights into the evolutionary trends of the chloroplast genome in the Trebouxiophyceae, we sequenced cpDNA from the filamentous alga Leptosira terrestris (Ctenocladales. Results The 195,081-bp Leptosira chloroplast genome resembles the 150,613-bp Chlorella genome in lacking a large inverted repeat (IR but differs greatly in gene order. Six of the conserved genes present in Chlorella cpDNA are missing from the Leptosira gene repertoire. The 106 conserved genes, four introns and 11 free standing open reading frames (ORFs account for 48.3% of the genome sequence. This is the lowest gene density yet observed among chlorophyte cpDNAs. Contrary to the situation in Chlorella but similar to that in the chlorophycean Scenedesmus obliquus, the gene distribution is highly biased over the two DNA strands in Leptosira. Nine genes, compared to only three in Chlorella, have significantly expanded coding regions relative to their homologues in ancestral-type green algal cpDNAs. As observed in chlorophycean genomes, the rpoB gene is fragmented into two ORFs. Short repeats account for 5.1% of the Leptosira genome sequence and are present mainly in intergenic regions. Conclusion Our results highlight the great plasticity of the chloroplast genome in the Trebouxiophyceae and indicate

  7. Utilization of complete chloroplast genomes for phylogenetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramlee, Shairul Izan Binti

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA sequence polymorphisms are a primary source of data in many plant phylogenetic studies. The chloroplast genome is relatively conserved in its evolution making it an ideal molecule to retain phylogenetic signals. The chloroplast genome is also largely, but not completely, free from ot

  8. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of an orchid model plant candidate: Erycina pusilla apply in tropical Oncidium breeding.

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    I-Chun Pan

    Full Text Available Oncidium is an important ornamental plant but the study of its functional genomics is difficult. Erycina pusilla is a fast-growing Oncidiinae species. Several characteristics including low chromosome number, small genome size, short growth period, and its ability to complete its life cycle in vitro make E. pusilla a good model candidate and parent for hybridization for orchids. Although genetic information remains limited, systematic molecular analysis of its chloroplast genome might provide useful genetic information. By combining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones and next-generation sequencing (NGS, the chloroplast (cp genome of E. pusilla was sequenced accurately, efficiently and economically. The cp genome of E. pusilla shares 89 and 84% similarity with Oncidium Gower Ramsey and Phalanopsis aphrodite, respectively. Comparing these 3 cp genomes, 5 regions have been identified as showing diversity. Using PCR analysis of 19 species belonging to the Epidendroideae subfamily, a conserved deletion was found in the rps15-trnN region of the Cymbidieae tribe. Because commercial Oncidium varieties in Taiwan are limited, identification of potential parents using molecular breeding method has become very important. To demonstrate the relationship between taxonomic position and hybrid compatibility of E. pusilla, 4 DNA regions of 36 tropically adapted Oncidiinae varieties have been analyzed. The results indicated that trnF-ndhJ and trnH-psbA were suitable for phylogenetic analysis. E. pusilla proved to be phylogenetically closer to Rodriguezia and Tolumnia than Oncidium, despite its similar floral appearance to Oncidium. These results indicate the hybrid compatibility of E. pusilla, its cp genome providing important information for Oncidium breeding.

  9. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Tartary Buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum and Comparative Analysis with Common Buckwheat (F. esculentum.

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    Kwang-Soo Cho

    Full Text Available We report the chloroplast (cp genome sequence of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum obtained by next-generation sequencing technology and compared this with the previously reported common buckwheat (F. esculentum ssp. ancestrale cp genome. The cp genome of F. tataricum has a total sequence length of 159,272 bp, which is 327 bp shorter than the common buckwheat cp genome. The cp gene content, order, and orientation are similar to those of common buckwheat, but with some structural variation at tandem and palindromic repeat frequencies and junction areas. A total of seven InDels (around 100 bp were found within the intergenic sequences and the ycf1 gene. Copy number variation of the 21-bp tandem repeat varied in F. tataricum (four repeats and F. esculentum (one repeat, and the InDel of the ycf1 gene was 63 bp long. Nucleotide and amino acid have highly conserved coding sequence with about 98% homology and four genes--rpoC2, ycf3, accD, and clpP--have high synonymous (Ks value. PCR based InDel markers were applied to diverse genetic resources of F. tataricum and F. esculentum, and the amplicon size was identical to that expected in silico. Therefore, these InDel markers are informative biomarkers to practically distinguish raw or processed buckwheat products derived from F. tataricum and F. esculentum.

  10. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Tartary Buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum) and Comparative Analysis with Common Buckwheat (F. esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kwang-Soo; Yun, Bong-Kyoung; Yoon, Young-Ho; Hong, Su-Young; Mekapogu, Manjulatha; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We report the chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum) obtained by next-generation sequencing technology and compared this with the previously reported common buckwheat (F. esculentum ssp. ancestrale) cp genome. The cp genome of F. tataricum has a total sequence length of 159,272 bp, which is 327 bp shorter than the common buckwheat cp genome. The cp gene content, order, and orientation are similar to those of common buckwheat, but with some structural variation at tandem and palindromic repeat frequencies and junction areas. A total of seven InDels (around 100 bp) were found within the intergenic sequences and the ycf1 gene. Copy number variation of the 21-bp tandem repeat varied in F. tataricum (four repeats) and F. esculentum (one repeat), and the InDel of the ycf1 gene was 63 bp long. Nucleotide and amino acid have highly conserved coding sequence with about 98% homology and four genes--rpoC2, ycf3, accD, and clpP--have high synonymous (Ks) value. PCR based InDel markers were applied to diverse genetic resources of F. tataricum and F. esculentum, and the amplicon size was identical to that expected in silico. Therefore, these InDel markers are informative biomarkers to practically distinguish raw or processed buckwheat products derived from F. tataricum and F. esculentum.

  11. Transcriptional Slippage and RNA Editing Increase the Diversity of Transcripts in Chloroplasts: Insight from Deep Sequencing of Vigna radiata Genome and Transcriptome.

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    Ching-Ping Lin

    Full Text Available We performed deep sequencing of the nuclear and organellar genomes of three mungbean genotypes: Vigna radiata ssp. sublobata TC1966, V. radiata var. radiata NM92 and the recombinant inbred line RIL59 derived from a cross between TC1966 and NM92. Moreover, we performed deep sequencing of the RIL59 transcriptome to investigate transcript variability. The mungbean chloroplast genome has a quadripartite structure including a pair of inverted repeats separated by two single copy regions. A total of 213 simple sequence repeats were identified in the chloroplast genomes of NM92 and RIL59; 78 single nucleotide variants and nine indels were discovered in comparing the chloroplast genomes of TC1966 and NM92. Analysis of the mungbean chloroplast transcriptome revealed mRNAs that were affected by transcriptional slippage and RNA editing. Transcriptional slippage frequency was positively correlated with the length of simple sequence repeats of the mungbean chloroplast genome (R2=0.9911. In total, 41 C-to-U editing sites were found in 23 chloroplast genes and in one intergenic spacer. No editing site that swapped U to C was found. A combination of bioinformatics and experimental methods revealed that the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-transcribed genes psbF and ndhA are affected by transcriptional slippage in mungbean and in main lineages of land plants, including three dicots (Glycine max, Brassica rapa, and Nicotiana tabacum, two monocots (Oryza sativa and Zea mays, two gymnosperms (Pinus taeda and Ginkgo biloba and one moss (Physcomitrella patens. Transcript analysis of the rps2 gene showed that transcriptional slippage could affect transcripts at single sequence repeat regions with poly-A runs. It showed that transcriptional slippage together with incomplete RNA editing may cause sequence diversity of transcripts in chloroplasts of land plants.

  12. Phylogenetic Relationships of the Fern Cyrtomium falcatum (Dryopteridaceae) from Dokdo Island Based on Chloroplast Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Gurusamy; Choi, Kyoung Su; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-12-02

    Cyrtomium falcatum is a popular ornamental fern cultivated worldwide. Native to the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and Dokdo Island in the Sea of Japan, it is the only fern present on Dokdo Island. We isolated and characterized the chloroplast (cp) genome of C. falcatum, and compared it with those of closely related species. The genes trnV-GAC and trnV-GAU were found to be present within the cp genome of C. falcatum, whereas trnP-GGG and rpl21 were lacking. Moreover, cp genomes of Cyrtomium devexiscapulae and Adiantum capillus-veneris lack trnP-GGG and rpl21, suggesting these are not conserved among angiosperm cp genomes. The deletion of trnR-UCG, trnR-CCG, and trnSeC in the cp genomes of C. falcatum and other eupolypod ferns indicates these genes are restricted to tree ferns, non-core leptosporangiates, and basal ferns. The C. falcatum cp genome also encoded ndhF and rps7, with GUG start codons that were only conserved in polypod ferns, and it shares two significant inversions with other ferns, including a minor inversion of the trnD-GUC region and an approximate 3 kb inversion of the trnG-trnT region. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Equisetum was found to be a sister clade to Psilotales-Ophioglossales with a 100% bootstrap (BS) value. The sister relationship between Pteridaceae and eupolypods was also strongly supported by a 100% BS, but Bayesian molecular clock analyses suggested that C. falcatum diversified in the mid-Paleogene period (45.15 ± 4.93 million years ago) and might have moved from Eurasia to Dokdo Island.

  13. Phylogenomic relationship of feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O.Berg) Burret) with other Myrtaceae based on complete chloroplast genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Lilian de Oliveira; Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Stefenon, Valdir Marcos; Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio de; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi de; Guerra, Miguel Pedro; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-04-01

    Given their distribution, importance, and richness, Myrtaceae species comprise a model system for studying the evolution of tropical plant diversity. In addition, chloroplast (cp) genome sequencing is an efficient tool for phylogenetic relationship studies. Feijoa [Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret; CN: pineapple-guava] is a Myrtaceae species that occurs naturally in southern Brazil and northern Uruguay. Feijoa is known for its exquisite perfume and flavorful fruits, pharmacological properties, ornamental value and increasing economic relevance. In the present work, we reported the complete cp genome of feijoa. The feijoa cp genome is a circular molecule of 159,370 bp with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a Large Single Copy region (LSC 88,028 bp) and a Small Single Copy region (SSC 18,598 bp) separated by Inverted Repeat regions (IRs 26,372 bp). The genome structure, gene order, GC content and codon usage are similar to those of typical angiosperm cp genomes. When compared to other cp genome sequences of Myrtaceae, feijoa showed closest relationship with pitanga (Eugenia uniflora L.). Furthermore, a comparison of pitanga synonymous (Ks) and nonsynonymous (Ka) substitution rates revealed extremely low values. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference analyses produced phylogenomic trees identical in topology. These trees supported monophyly of three Myrtoideae clades.

  14. Direct chloroplast sequencing: comparison of sequencing platforms and analysis tools for whole chloroplast barcoding.

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    Marta Brozynska

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina and Ion Torrent (Life Technology sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare. Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis.

  15. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Gentiana lawrencei var. farreri (Gentianaceae and comparative analysis with its congeneric species

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    Peng-Cheng Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The chloroplast (cp genome is useful in plant systematics, genetic diversity analysis, molecular identification and divergence dating. The genus Gentiana contains 362 species, but there are only two valuable complete cp genomes. The purpose of this study is to report the characterization of complete cp genome of G. lawrencei var. farreri, which is endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP. Methods Using high throughput sequencing technology, we got the complete nucleotide sequence of the G. lawrencei var. farreri cp genome. The comparison analysis including genome difference and gene divergence was performed with its congeneric species G. straminea. The simple sequence repeats (SSRs and phylogenetics were studied as well. Results The cp genome of G. lawrencei var. farreri is a circular molecule of 138,750 bp, containing a pair of 24,653 bp inverted repeats which are separated by small and large single-copy regions of 11,365 and 78,082 bp, respectively. The cp genome contains 130 known genes, including 85 protein coding genes (PCGs, eight ribosomal RNA genes and 37 tRNA genes. Comparative analyses indicated that G. lawrencei var. farreri is 10,241 bp shorter than its congeneric species G. straminea. Four large gaps were detected that are responsible for 85% of the total sequence loss. Further detailed analyses revealed that 10 PCGs were included in the four gaps that encode nine NADH dehydrogenase subunits. The cp gene content, order and orientation are similar to those of its congeneric species, but with some variation among the PCGs. Three genes, ndhB, ndhF and clpP, have high nonsynonymous to synonymous values. There are 34 SSRs in the G. lawrencei var. farreri cp genome, of which 25 are mononucleotide repeats: no dinucleotide repeats were detected. Comparison with the G. straminea cp genome indicated that five SSRs have length polymorphisms and 23 SSRs are species-specific. The phylogenetic analysis of 48 PCGs from 12 Gentianales

  16. High-throughput sequencing of six bamboo chloroplast genomes: phylogenetic implications for temperate woody bamboos (Poaceae: Bambusoideae.

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    Yun-Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bambusoideae is the only subfamily that contains woody members in the grass family, Poaceae. In phylogenetic analyses, Bambusoideae, Pooideae and Ehrhartoideae formed the BEP clade, yet the internal relationships of this clade are controversial. The distinctive life history (infrequent flowering and predominance of asexual reproduction of woody bamboos makes them an interesting but taxonomically difficult group. Phylogenetic analyses based on large DNA fragments could only provide a moderate resolution of woody bamboo relationships, although a robust phylogenetic tree is needed to elucidate their evolutionary history. Phylogenomics is an alternative choice for resolving difficult phylogenies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the complete nucleotide sequences of six woody bamboo chloroplast (cp genomes using Illumina sequencing. These genomes are similar to those of other grasses and rather conservative in evolution. We constructed a phylogeny of Poaceae from 24 complete cp genomes including 21 grass species. Within the BEP clade, we found strong support for a sister relationship between Bambusoideae and Pooideae. In a substantial improvement over prior studies, all six nodes within Bambusoideae were supported with ≥0.95 posterior probability from Bayesian inference and 5/6 nodes resolved with 100% bootstrap support in maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses. We found that repeats in the cp genome could provide phylogenetic information, while caution is needed when using indels in phylogenetic analyses based on few selected genes. We also identified relatively rapidly evolving cp genome regions that have the potential to be used for further phylogenetic study in Bambusoideae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The cp genome of Bambusoideae evolved slowly, and phylogenomics based on whole cp genome could be used to resolve major relationships within the subfamily. The difficulty in resolving the diversification among

  17. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of poisonous and medicinal plant Datura stramonium: organizations and implications for genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Dang, Yuanye; Yuanye, Dang; Li, Qing; Qing, Li; Lu, Jinjian; Jinjian, Lu; Li, Xiwen; Xiwen, Li; Wang, Yitao; Yitao, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Datura stramonium is a widely used poisonous plant with great medicinal and economic value. Its chloroplast (cp) genome is 155,871 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 86,302 bp) and small (SSC, 18,367 bp) single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 25,601 bp). The genome contains 113 unique genes, including 80 protein-coding genes, 29 tRNAs and four rRNAs. A total of 11 forward, 9 palindromic and 13 tandem repeats were detected in the D. stramonium cp genome. Most simple sequence repeats (SSR) are AT-rich and are less abundant in coding regions than in non-coding regions. Both SSRs and GC content were unevenly distributed in the entire cp genome. All preferred synonymous codons were found to use A/T ending codons. The difference in GC contents of entire genomes and of the three-codon positions suggests that the D. stramonium cp genome might possess different genomic organization, in part due to different mutational pressures. The five most divergent coding regions and four non-coding regions (trnH-psbA, rps4-trnS, ndhD-ccsA, and ndhI-ndhG) were identified using whole plastome alignment, which can be used to develop molecular markers for phylogenetics and barcoding studies within the Solanaceae. Phylogenetic analysis based on 68 protein-coding genes supported Datura as a sister to Solanum. This study provides valuable information for phylogenetic and cp genetic engineering studies of this poisonous and medicinal plant.

  18. Sequencing of chloroplast genomes from wheat, barley, rye and their relatives provides a detailed insight into the evolution of the Triticeae tribe.

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    Christopher P Middleton

    Full Text Available Using Roche/454 technology, we sequenced the chloroplast genomes of 12 Triticeae species, including bread wheat, barley and rye, as well as the diploid progenitors and relatives of bread wheat Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides and Ae. tauschii. Two wild tetraploid taxa, Ae. cylindrica and Ae. geniculata, were also included. Additionally, we incorporated wild Einkorn wheat Triticum boeoticum and its domesticated form T. monococcum and two Hordeum spontaneum (wild barley genotypes. Chloroplast genomes were used for overall sequence comparison, phylogenetic analysis and dating of divergence times. We estimate that barley diverged from rye and wheat approximately 8-9 million years ago (MYA. The genome donors of hexaploid wheat diverged between 2.1-2.9 MYA, while rye diverged from Triticum aestivum approximately 3-4 MYA, more recently than previously estimated. Interestingly, the A genome taxa T. boeoticum and T. urartu were estimated to have diverged approximately 570,000 years ago. As these two have a reproductive barrier, the divergence time estimate also provides an upper limit for the time required for the formation of a species boundary between the two. Furthermore, we conclusively show that the chloroplast genome of hexaploid wheat was contributed by the B genome donor and that this unknown species diverged from Ae. speltoides about 980,000 years ago. Additionally, sequence alignments identified a translocation of a chloroplast segment to the nuclear genome which is specific to the rye/wheat lineage. We propose the presented phylogeny and divergence time estimates as a reference framework for future studies on Triticeae.

  19. Chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oedogonium cardiacum (Chlorophyceae: Unique genome architecture, derived characters shared with the Chaetophorales and novel genes acquired through horizontal transfer

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    Lemieux Claude

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To gain insight into the branching order of the five main lineages currently recognized in the green algal class Chlorophyceae and to expand our understanding of chloroplast genome evolution, we have undertaken the sequencing of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA from representative taxa. The complete cpDNA sequences previously reported for Chlamydomonas (Chlamydomonadales, Scenedesmus (Sphaeropleales, and Stigeoclonium (Chaetophorales revealed tremendous variability in their architecture, the retention of only few ancestral gene clusters, and derived clusters shared by Chlamydomonas and Scenedesmus. Unexpectedly, our recent phylogenies inferred from these cpDNAs and the partial sequences of three other chlorophycean cpDNAs disclosed two major clades, one uniting the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales (CS clade and the other uniting the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales (OCC clade. Although molecular signatures provided strong support for this dichotomy and for the branching of the Oedogoniales as the earliest-diverging lineage of the OCC clade, more data are required to validate these phylogenies. We describe here the complete cpDNA sequence of Oedogonium cardiacum (Oedogoniales. Results Like its three chlorophycean homologues, the 196,547-bp Oedogonium chloroplast genome displays a distinctive architecture. This genome is one of the most compact among photosynthetic chlorophytes. It has an atypical quadripartite structure, is intron-rich (17 group I and 4 group II introns, and displays 99 different conserved genes and four long open reading frames (ORFs, three of which are clustered in the spacious inverted repeat of 35,493 bp. Intriguingly, two of these ORFs (int and dpoB revealed high similarities to genes not usually found in cpDNA. At the gene content and gene order levels, the Oedogonium genome most closely resembles its Stigeoclonium counterpart. Characters shared by these chlorophyceans but missing in members

  20. Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Drimys, Liriodendron, andPiper: Implications for the phylogeny of magnoliids and the evolution ofGC content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengqiu, C.; Penaflor, C.; Kuehl, J.V.; Leebens-Mack, J.; Carlson, J.; dePamphilis, C.W.; Boore, J.L.; Jansen, R.K.

    2006-06-01

    The magnoliids represent the largest basal angiosperm clade with four orders, 19 families and 8,500 species. Although several recent angiosperm molecular phylogenies have supported the monophyly of magnoliids and suggested relationships among the orders, the limited number of genes examined resulted in only weak support, and these issues remain controversial. Furthermore, considerable incongruence has resulted in phylogenies supporting three different sets of relationships among magnoliids and the two large angiosperm clades, monocots and eudicots. This is one of the most important remaining issues concerning relationships among basal angiosperms. We sequenced the chloroplast genomes of three magnoliids, Drimys (Canellales), Liriodendron (Magnoliales), and Piper (Piperales), and used these data in combination with 32 other completed angiosperm chloroplast genomes to assess phylogenetic relationships among magnoliids. The Drimys and Piper chloroplast genomes are nearly identical in size at 160,606 and 160,624 bp, respectively. The genomes include a pair of inverted repeats of 26,649 bp (Drimys) and 27,039 (Piper), separated by a small single copy region of 18,621 (Drimys) and 18,878 (Piper) and a large single copy region of 88,685 bp (Drimys) and 87,666 bp (Piper). The gene order of both taxa is nearly identical to many other unrearranged angiosperm chloroplast genomes, including Calycanthus, the other published magnoliid genome. Comparisons of angiosperm chloroplast genomes indicate that GC content is not uniformly distributed across the genome. Overall GC content ranges from 34-39%, and coding regions have a substantially higher GC content than non-coding regions (both intergenic spacers and introns). Among protein-coding genes, GC content varies by codon position with 1st codon > 2nd codon > 3rd codon, and it varies by functional group with photosynthetic genes having the highest percentage and NADH genes the lowest. Across the genome, GC content is highest in

  1. An internal part of the chloroplast atpA gene sequence is present in the mitochondrial genome of Triticum aestivum: molecular organisation and evolutionary aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubier, M F; Lucas, H; Delcher, E; Hartmann, C; Quétier, F; Lejeune, B

    1990-06-01

    An internal part of the chloroplast atpA gene has been identified in the mitochondrial DNA of Triticum aestivum. It is located near the 18S-5S ribosomal genes and partially contained within a repeated sequence. Comparison of the transferred sequence with the original ct sequence reveals several nucleotide changes and shows that neither 5' nor 3' ends are present in the mt genome. No transcript of this region could be detected by Northern analysis. This sequence is present in mitochondrial genomes of other tetraploid and diploid species of Triticum, also in the vicinity of the 18S-5S ribosomal genes, suggesting a unique transfer event. The date of this event is discussed.

  2. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Tanaecium tetragonolobum: The First Bignoniaceae Plastome.

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    Alison Gonçalves Nazareno

    Full Text Available Bignoniaceae is a Pantropical plant family that is especially abundant in the Neotropics. Members of the Bignoniaceae are diverse in many ecosystems and represent key components of the Tropical flora. Despite the ecological importance of the Bignoniaceae and all the efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of this group, whole chloroplast genome information has not yet been reported for any members of the family. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Tanaecium tetragonolobum (Jacq. L.G. Lohmann, which was reconstructed using de novo and referenced-based assembly of single-end reads generated by shotgun sequencing of total genomic DNA in an Illumina platform. The gene order and organization of the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum exhibits the general structure of flowering plants, and is similar to other Lamiales chloroplast genomes. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum is a circular molecule of 153,776 base pairs (bp with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a large single copy region (LSC, 84,612 bp and a small single copy region (SSC, 17,586 bp separated by inverted repeat regions (IRs, 25,789 bp. In addition, the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum has 38.3% GC content and includes 121 genes, of which 86 are protein-coding, 31 are transfer RNA, and four are ribosomal RNA. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum presents a total of 47 tandem repeats and 347 simple sequence repeats (SSRs with mononucleotides being the most common and di-, tri-, tetra-, and hexanucleotides occurring with less frequency. The results obtained here were compared to other chloroplast genomes of Lamiales available to date, providing new insight into the evolution of chloroplast genomes within Lamiales. Overall, the evolutionary rates of genes in Lamiales are lineage-, locus-, and region-specific, indicating that the evolutionary pattern of nucleotide substitution in chloroplast genomes of flowering

  3. Local repeat sequence organization of an intergenic spacer in the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to DNA expansion and sequence scrambling: a complex mode of “copy-choice replication”?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra D Wagle; Subhojit Sen; Basuthkar J Rao

    2001-12-01

    Parent-specific, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were obtained from total genomic DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Such parent-specific RAPD bands (genomic fingerprints) segregated uniparentally (through mt+) in a cross between a pair of polymorphic interfertile strains of Chlamydomonas (C. reinhardtii and C. minnesotti), suggesting that they originated from the chloroplast genome. Southern analysis mapped the RAPD-markers to the chloroplast genome. One of the RAPD-markers, ``P2” (1.6 kb) was cloned, sequenced and was fine mapped to the 3 kb region encompassing 3′ end of 23S, full 5S and intergenic region between 5S and psbA. This region seems divergent enough between the two parents, such that a specific PCR designed for a parental specific chloroplast sequence within this region, amplified a marker in that parent only and not in the other, indicating the utility of RAPD-scan for locating the genomic regions of sequence divergence. Remarkably, the RAPD-product, ``P2” seems to have originated from a PCR-amplification of a much smaller (about 600 bp), but highly repeat-rich (direct and inverted) domain of the 3 kb region in a manner that yielded no linear sequence alignment with its own template sequence. The amplification yielded the same uniquely ``sequence-scrambled” product, whether the template used for PCR was total cellular DNA, chloroplast DNA or a plasmid clone DNA corresponding to that region. The PCR product, a ``unique” new sequence, had lost the repetitive organization of the template genome where it had originated from and perhaps represented a ``complex path” of copy-choice replication.

  4. Phylogenetic Relationships of the Fern Cyrtomium falcatum (Dryopteridaceae) from Dokdo Island, Sea of East Japan, Based on Chloroplast Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Gurusamy; Choi, Kyoung Su; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-12-02

    Cyrtomium falcatum is a popular ornamental fern cultivated worldwide. Native to the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and Dokdo Island in the Sea of Japan, it is the only fern present on Dokdo Island. We isolated and characterized the chloroplast (cp) genome of C. falcatum, and compared it with those of closely related species. The genes trnV-GAC and trnV-GAU were found to be present within the cp genome of C. falcatum, whereas trnP-GGG and rpl21 were lacking. Moreover, cp genomes of Cyrtomium devexiscapulae and Adiantum capillus-veneris lack trnP-GGG and rpl21, suggesting these are not conserved among angiosperm cp genomes. The deletion of trnR-UCG, trnR-CCG, and trnSeC in the cp genomes of C. falcatum and other eupolypod ferns indicates these genes are restricted to tree ferns, non-core leptosporangiates, and basal ferns. The C. falcatum cp genome also encoded ndhF and rps7, with GUG start codons that were only conserved in polypod ferns, and it shares two significant inversions with other ferns, including a minor inversion of the trnD-GUC region and an approximate 3 kb inversion of the trnG-trnT region. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Equisetum was found to be a sister clade to Psilotales-Ophioglossales with a 100% bootstrap (BS) value. The sister relationship between Pteridaceae and eupolypods was also strongly supported by a 100% BS, but Bayesian molecular clock analyses suggested that C. falcatum diversified in the mid-Paleogene period (45.15 ± 4.93 million years ago) and might have moved from Eurasia to Dokdo Island.

  5. The complete chloroplast genome provides insight into the evolution and polymorphism of Panax ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbing eZhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (P. ginseng is an important medicinal plant and is often used in traditional Chinese medicine. With next generation sequencing (NGS technology, we determined the complete chloroplast genome sequences for four Chinese P. ginseng strains, which are Damaya (DMY, Ermaya (EMY, Gaolishen (GLS and Yeshanshen (YSS. The total chloroplast genome sequence length for DMY, EMY and GLS was 156,354 bp, while that for YSS was 156,355 bp. Comparative genomic analysis of the chloroplast genome sequences indicate that gene content, GC content, and gene order in DMY are quite similar to its relative species, and nucleotide sequence diversity of inverted repeat region (IR is lower than that of its counterparts, large single copy region (LSC and small single copy region (SSC. A comparison among these four P. ginseng strains revealed that the chloroplast genome sequences of DMY, EMY, and GLS were identical and YSS had a 1-bp insertion at base 5472. To further study the heterogeneity in chloroplast genome during domestication, high-resolution reads were mapped to the genome sequences to investigate the differences at the minor allele level; 208 minor allele sites with minor allele frequencies (MAF of ≥ 0.05 were identified. The polymorphism site numbers per kb of chloroplast genome sequence for DMY, EMY, GLS, and YSS were 0.74, 0.59, 0.97, and 1.23, respectively. All the minor allele sites located in LSC and IR regions, and the four strains showed the same variation types (substitution base or indel at all identified polymorphism sites. Comparison results of heterogeneity in the chloroplast genome sequences showed that the minor allele sites on the chloroplast genome were undergoing purifying selection to adapt to changing environment during domestication process. A study of P. ginseng chloroplast genome with particular focus on minor allele sites would aid in investigating the dynamics on the chloroplast genomes and different P. ginseng

  6. Cloning and molecular genetics analyses of Deschampsia antarctica Desv. chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.P. Savchuk

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA sequences of Deschampsia antarctica were studied. We had made comparison analysis with completely sequenced genomes of other temperateness plants to find homology.

  7. Characterization of mango (Mangifera indica L.) transcriptome and chloroplast genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, M Kamran; Khan, Ishtaiq A; Zhang, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We characterized mango leaf transcriptome and chloroplast genome using next generation DNA sequencing. The RNA-seq output of mango transcriptome generated >12 million reads (total nucleotides sequenced >1 Gb). De novo transcriptome assembly generated 30,509 unigenes with lengths in the range of 300 to ≥3,000 nt and 67× depth of coverage. Blast searching against nonredundant nucleotide databases and several Viridiplantae genomic datasets annotated 24,593 mango unigenes (80% of total) and identified Citrus sinensis as closest neighbor of mango with 9,141 (37%) matched sequences. The annotation with gene ontology and Clusters of Orthologous Group terms categorized unigene sequences into 57 and 25 classes, respectively. More than 13,500 unigenes were assigned to 293 KEGG pathways. Besides major plant biology related pathways, KEGG based gene annotation pointed out active presence of an array of biochemical pathways involved in (a) biosynthesis of bioactive flavonoids, flavones and flavonols, (b) biosynthesis of terpenoids and lignins and (c) plant hormone signal transduction. The mango transcriptome sequences revealed 235 proteases belonging to five catalytic classes of proteolytic enzymes. The draft genome of mango chloroplast (cp) was obtained by a combination of Sanger and next generation sequencing. The draft mango cp genome size is 151,173 bp with a pair of inverted repeats of 27,093 bp separated by small and large single copy regions, respectively. Out of 139 genes in mango cp genome, 91 found to be protein coding. Sequence analysis revealed cp genome of C. sinensis as closest neighbor of mango. We found 51 short repeats in mango cp genome supposed to be associated with extensive rearrangements. This is the first report of transcriptome and chloroplast genome analysis of any Anacardiaceae family member.

  8. The chloroplast genome of a symbiodinium sp. clade C3 isolate

    KAUST Repository

    Barbrook, Adrian C.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium form important symbioses within corals and other benthic marine animals. Dinoflagellates possess an extremely reduced plastid genome relative to those examined in plants and other algae. In dinoflagellates the plastid genes are located on small plasmids, commonly referred to as \\'minicircles\\'. However, the chloroplast genomes of dinoflagellates have only been extensively characterised from a handful of species. There is also evidence of considerable variation in the chloroplast genome organisation across those species that have been examined. We therefore characterised the chloroplast genome from an environmental coral isolate, in this case containing a symbiont belonging to the Symbiodinium sp. clade C3. The gene content of the genome is well conserved with respect to previously characterised genomes. However, unlike previously characterised dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes we did not identify any \\'empty\\' minicircles. The sequences of this chloroplast genome show a high rate of evolution relative to other algal species. Particularly notable was a surprisingly high level of sequence divergence within the core polypeptides of photosystem I, the reasons for which are currently unknown. This chloroplast genome also possesses distinctive codon usage and GC content. These features suggest that chloroplast genomes in Symbiodinium are highly plastic. © 2013 Adrian C. Barbrook.

  9. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  10. Insights from the complete chloroplast genome into the evolution of Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Zhang

    Full Text Available Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. is one of the oldest oilseed crops. In order to investigate the evolutionary characters according to the Sesame Genome Project, apart from sequencing its nuclear genome, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of S. indicum cv. Yuzhi 11 (white seeded using Illumina and 454 sequencing. Comparisons of chloroplast genomes between S. indicum and the 18 other higher plants were then analyzed. The chloroplast genome of cv. Yuzhi 11 contains 153,338 bp and a total of 114 unique genes (KC569603. The number of chloroplast genes in sesame is the same as that in Nicotiana tabacum, Vitis vinifera and Platanus occidentalis. The variation in the length of the large single-copy (LSC regions and inverted repeats (IR in sesame compared to 18 other higher plant species was the main contributor to size variation in the cp genome in these species. The 77 functional chloroplast genes, except for ycf1 and ycf2, were highly conserved. The deletion of the cp ycf1 gene sequence in cp genomes may be due either to its transfer to the nuclear genome, as has occurred in sesame, or direct deletion, as has occurred in Panax ginseng and Cucumis sativus. The sesame ycf2 gene is only 5,721 bp in length and has lost about 1,179 bp. Nucleotides 1-585 of ycf2 when queried in BLAST had hits in the sesame draft genome. Five repeats (R10, R12, R13, R14 and R17 were unique to the sesame chloroplast genome. We also found that IR contraction/expansion in the cp genome alters its rate of evolution. Chloroplast genes and repeats display the signature of convergent evolution in sesame and other species. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Sesamum and other higher plants.

  11. Complete Chloroplast and Mitochondrial Genome Sequences of the Hydrocarbon Oil-Producing Green Microalga Botryococcus braunii Race B (Showa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blifernez-Klassen, Olga; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Kalinowski, Jörn; Kruse, Olaf

    2016-06-09

    The green alga Botryococcus braunii is capable of the production and excretion of high quantities of long-chain hydrocarbons and exopolysaccharides. In this study, we present the complete plastid and mitochondrial genomes of the hydrocarbon-producing microalga Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa), with a total length of 156,498 and 129,356 bp, respectively.

  12. The complete chloroplast genome of two Brassica species, Brassica nigra and B. Oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Young-Joo; Kim, Kyunghee; Kang, Sang-Ho; Perumal, Sampath; Lee, Jonghoon; Kim, Chang-Kug

    2017-03-01

    The two Brassica species, Brassica nigra and Brassica oleracea, are important agronomic crops. The chloroplast genome sequences were generated by de novo assembly using whole genome next-generation sequences. The chloroplast genomes of B. nigra and B. oleracea were 153 633 bp and 153 366 bp in size, respectively, and showed conserved typical chloroplast structure. The both chloroplast genomes contained a total of 114 genes including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that B. oleracea is closely related to B. rapa and B. napus but B. nigra is more diverse than the neighbor species Raphanus sativus.

  13. Chloroplast genome evolution in early diverged leptosporangiate ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chung, Myong Gi; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the chloroplast (cp) genome sequences from three early diverged leptosporangiate ferns were completed and analyzed in order to understand the evolution of the genome of the fern lineages. The complete cp genome sequence of Osmunda cinnamomea (Osmundales) was 142,812 base pairs (bp). The cp genome structure was similar to that of eusporangiate ferns. The gene/intron losses that frequently occurred in the cp genome of leptosporangiate ferns were not found in the cp genome of O. cinnamomea. In addition, putative RNA editing sites in the cp genome were rare in O. cinnamomea, even though the sites were frequently predicted to be present in leptosporangiate ferns. The complete cp genome sequence of Diplopterygium glaucum (Gleicheniales) was 151,007 bp and has a 9.7 kb inversion between the trnL-CAA and trnVGCA genes when compared to O. cinnamomea. Several repeated sequences were detected around the inversion break points. The complete cp genome sequence of Lygodium japonicum (Schizaeales) was 157,142 bp and a deletion of the rpoC1 intron was detected. This intron loss was shared by all of the studied species of the genus Lygodium. The GC contents and the effective numbers of codons (ENCs) in ferns varied significantly when compared to seed plants. The ENC values of the early diverged leptosporangiate ferns showed intermediate levels between eusporangiate and core leptosporangiate ferns. However, our phylogenetic tree based on all of the cp gene sequences clearly indicated that the cp genome similarity between O. cinnamomea (Osmundales) and eusporangiate ferns are symplesiomorphies, rather than synapomorphies. Therefore, our data is in agreement with the view that Osmundales is a distinct early diverged lineage in the leptosporangiate ferns.

  14. Chloroplast genome analysis of Australian eucalypts--Eucalyptus, Corymbia, Angophora, Allosyncarpia and Stockwellia (Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, Michael J; Rigault, Philippe; Spokevicius, Antanas; Ladiges, Pauline Y; Ades, Peter K; Anderson, Charlotte; Bossinger, Gerd; Merchant, Andrew; Udovicic, Frank; Woodrow, Ian E; Tibbits, Josquin

    2013-12-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis and comparison of structural features of chloroplast genomes for 39 species of the eucalypt group (genera Eucalyptus, Corymbia, Angophora, and outgroups Allosyncarpia and Stockwellia). We use 41 complete chloroplast genome sequences, adding 39 finished-quality chloroplast genomes to two previously published genomes. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses, based on >7000 variable nucleotide positions, produced one fully resolved phylogenetic tree (35 supported nodes, 27 with 100% bootstrap support). Eucalyptus and its sister lineage Angophora+Corymbia show a deep divergence. Within Eucalyptus, three lineages are resolved: the 'eudesmid', 'symphyomyrt' and 'monocalypt' groups. Corymbia is paraphyletic with respect to Angophora. Gene content and order do not vary among eucalypt chloroplasts; length mutations, especially frame shifts, are uncommon in protein-coding genes. Some non-synonymous mutations are highly incongruent with the overall phylogenetic signal, notably in rbcL, and may be adaptive. Application of custom informatics pipelines (GYDLE Inc.) enabled direct chloroplast genome assembly, resolving each genome to finished-quality with no need for PCR gap-filling or contig order resolution. Analysis of whole chloroplast genomes resolved major eucalypt clades and revealed variable regions of the genome that will be useful in lower-level genetic studies (including phylogeography and geneflow).

  15. Analysis of Acorus calamus chloroplast genome and its phylogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Holland, Barbara; Hirsch-Ernst, Karen I; Hellwig, Frank H

    2005-09-01

    Determining the phylogenetic relationships among the major lines of angiosperms is a long-standing problem, yet the uncertainty as to the phylogenetic affinity of these lines persists. While a number of studies have suggested that the ANITA (Amborella-Nymphaeales-Illiciales-Trimeniales-Aristolochiales) grade is basal within angiosperms, studies of complete chloroplast genome sequences also suggested an alternative tree, wherein the line leading to the grasses branches first among the angiosperms. To improve taxon sampling in the existing chloroplast genome data, we sequenced the chloroplast genome of the monocot Acorus calamus. We generated a concatenated alignment (89,436 positions for 15 taxa), encompassing almost all sequences usable for phylogeny reconstruction within spermatophytes. The data still contain support for both the ANITA-basal and grasses-basal hypotheses. Using simulations we can show that were the ANITA-basal hypothesis true, parsimony (and distance-based methods with many models) would be expected to fail to recover it. The self-evident explanation for this failure appears to be a long-branch attraction (LBA) between the clade of grasses and the out-group. However, this LBA cannot explain the discrepancies observed between tree topology recovered using the maximum likelihood (ML) method and the topologies recovered using the parsimony and distance-based methods when grasses are deleted. Furthermore, the fact that neither maximum parsimony nor distance methods consistently recover the ML tree, when according to the simulations they would be expected to, when the out-group (Pinus) is deleted, suggests that either the generating tree is not correct or the best symmetric model is misspecified (or both). We demonstrate that the tree recovered under ML is extremely sensitive to model specification and that the best symmetric model is misspecified. Hence, we remain agnostic regarding phylogenetic relationships among basal angiosperm lineages.

  16. Adaptive Evolutionary Analysis of Chloroplast Genes in Euphyllophytes Based on Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences%基于叶绿体基因组全序列分析真叶植物叶绿体基因的适应性进化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王博; 高磊; 苏应娟; 王艇

    2012-01-01

    Euphyllophytes comprise fems, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. Relatively abundant chloro-plast genome sequence data has been available for them. In this research, chloroplast gene sequences of 29 euphyllophyte species were extracted from their completely sequenced chloroplast genomes; then an a-daptive evolutionary analysis was performed on the chloroplast genes by running PAML under models allowing w (nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratio) to vary among sites. The results showed that: ①The percentage of chloroplast genes under positive selection in ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms were 6. 5%, 7.5% and 19. 2% , respectively. The number of positively selected genes in angiosperms appeared significantly larger than that of ferns and gymnosperms. ②Most positively selected genes were genetic system or photosynthesis-related genes. Their coding proteins often functioned in chloroplast protein synthesis, gene transcription, energy transformation and regulation, and photosynthesis. We infer that the chloroplast functional genes may have played key roles during the adaptation of euphyllophytes to terrestrial ecosystems.%真叶植物包括蕨类、裸子植物和被子植物.迄今已积累有较为丰富的真叶植物叶绿体基因组全序列数据.选取了29种真叶植物的叶绿体基因组全序列,采用PAML软件基于位点间可变ω模型,分别分析了蕨类、裸子植物和被子植物叶绿体基因的适应性进化.结果显示:①蕨类、裸子植物和被子植物各有6.5%、7.5%和19.2%的叶绿体基因受正选择作用;被子植物经历正选择的叶绿体基因明显比蕨类和裸子植物为多;②被正选择作用的叶绿体基因主要是遗传系统和光合系统基因,它们的编码产物涉及叶绿体蛋白质合成、基因转录、能量转化与调节及光合作用等过程.推测叶绿体功能基因可能在真叶植物对陆生生态环境的适应过程中起着重要作用.

  17. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in chloroplast genomes of lower and higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Biju; Bhatt, Bhavin S; Awasthi, Mayur; George, Binu; Singh, Achuit K

    2015-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), contain repetitive DNA sequence where tandem repeats of one to six base pairs are present number of times. Chloroplast genome sequences have been  shown to possess extensive variations in the length, number and distribution of SSRs. However, a comparative analysis of chloroplast microsatellites is not available. Considering their potential importance in generating genomic diversity, we have systematically analysed the abundance and distribution of simple and compound microsatellites in 164 sequenced chloroplast genomes from wide range of plants. The key findings of these studies are (1) a large number of mononucleotide repeats as compared to SSR(2-6)(di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexanucleotide repeats) are present in all chloroplast genomes investigated, (2) lower plants such as algae show wide variation in relative abundance, density and distribution of microsatellite repeats as compared to flowering plants, (3) longer SSRs are excluded from coding regions of most chloroplast genomes, (4) GC content has a weak influence on number, relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide as well as SSR(2-6). However, GC content strongly showed negative correlation with relative density (R (2) = 0.5, P plants possesses relatively more genomic diversity compared to higher plants.

  18. The evolution of chloroplast genes and genomes in ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Paul G; Der, Joshua P; Duffy, Aaron M; Davidson, Jacob B; Grusz, Amanda L; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2011-07-01

    Most of the publicly available data on chloroplast (plastid) genes and genomes come from seed plants, with relatively little information from their sister group, the ferns. Here we describe several broad evolutionary patterns and processes in fern plastid genomes (plastomes), and we include some new plastome sequence data. We review what we know about the evolutionary history of plastome structure across the fern phylogeny and we compare plastome organization and patterns of evolution in ferns to those in seed plants. A large clade of ferns is characterized by a plastome that has been reorganized with respect to the ancestral gene order (a similar order that is ancestral in seed plants). We review the sequence of inversions that gave rise to this organization. We also explore global nucleotide substitution patterns in ferns versus those found in seed plants across plastid genes, and we review the high levels of RNA editing observed in fern plastomes.

  19. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Hare’s Ear Root, Bupleurum falcatum: Its Molecular Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kang, Sang-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Ohg; Kim, Chang-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Bupleurum falcatum, which belongs to the family Apiaceae, has long been applied for curative treatments, especially as a liver tonic, in herbal medicine. The chloroplast (cp) genome has been an ideal model to perform the evolutionary and comparative studies because of its highly conserved features and simple structure. The Apiaceae family is taxonomically close to the Araliaceae family and there have been numerous complete chloroplast genome sequences reported in the Araliaceae family, while little is known about the Apiaceae family. In this study, the complete sequence of the B. falcatum chloroplast genome was obtained. The full-length of the cp genome is 155,989 nucleotides with a 37.66% overall guanine-cytosine (GC) content and shows a quadripartite structure composed of three nomenclatural regions: a large single-copy (LSC) region, a small single-copy (SSC) region, and a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions. The genome occupancy is 85,912-bp, 17,517-bp, and 26,280-bp for LSC, SSC, and IR, respectively. B. falcatum was shown to contain 111 unique genes (78 for protein-coding, 29 for tRNAs, and four for rRNAs, respectively) on its chloroplast genome. Genic comparison found that B. falcatum has no pseudogenes and has two gene losses, accD in the LSC and ycf15 in the IRs. A total of 55 unique tandem repeat sequences were detected in the B. falcatum cp genome. This report is the first to describe the complete chloroplast genome sequence in B. falcatum and will open up further avenues of research to understand the evolutionary panorama and the chloroplast genome conformation in related plant species. PMID:27187480

  20. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Hare’s Ear Root, Bupleurum falcatum: Its Molecular Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ho Shin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bupleurum falcatum, which belongs to the family Apiaceae, has long been applied for curative treatments, especially as a liver tonic, in herbal medicine. The chloroplast (cp genome has been an ideal model to perform the evolutionary and comparative studies because of its highly conserved features and simple structure. The Apiaceae family is taxonomically close to the Araliaceae family and there have been numerous complete chloroplast genome sequences reported in the Araliaceae family, while little is known about the Apiaceae family. In this study, the complete sequence of the B. falcatum chloroplast genome was obtained. The full-length of the cp genome is 155,989 nucleotides with a 37.66% overall guanine-cytosine (GC content and shows a quadripartite structure composed of three nomenclatural regions: a large single-copy (LSC region, a small single-copy (SSC region, and a pair of inverted repeat (IR regions. The genome occupancy is 85,912-bp, 17,517-bp, and 26,280-bp for LSC, SSC, and IR, respectively. B. falcatum was shown to contain 111 unique genes (78 for protein-coding, 29 for tRNAs, and four for rRNAs, respectively on its chloroplast genome. Genic comparison found that B. falcatum has no pseudogenes and has two gene losses, accD in the LSC and ycf15 in the IRs. A total of 55 unique tandem repeat sequences were detected in the B. falcatum cp genome. This report is the first to describe the complete chloroplast genome sequence in B. falcatum and will open up further avenues of research to understand the evolutionary panorama and the chloroplast genome conformation in related plant species.

  1. Conflict amongst chloroplast DNA sequences obscures the phylogeny of a group of Asplenium ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Lara D; Holland, Barbara R; Perrie, Leon R

    2008-07-01

    A previous study of the relationships amongst three subgroups of the Austral Asplenium ferns found conflicting signal between the two chloroplast loci investigated. Because organelle genomes like those of chloroplasts and mitochondria are thought to be non-recombining, with a single evolutionary history, we sequenced four additional chloroplast loci with the expectation that this would resolve these relationships. Instead, the conflict was only magnified. Although tree-building analyses favoured one of the three possible trees, one of the alternative trees actually had one more supporting site (six versus five) and received greater support in spectral and neighbor-net analyses. Simulations suggested that chance alone was unlikely to produce strong support for two of the possible trees and none for the third. Likelihood permutation tests indicated that the concatenated chloroplast sequence data appeared to have experienced recombination. However, recombination between the chloroplast genomes of different species would be highly atypical, and corollary supporting observations, like chloroplast heteroplasmy, are lacking. Wider taxon sampling clarified the composition of the Austral group, but the conflicting signal meant analyses (e.g., morphological evolution, biogeographic) conditional on a well-supported phylogeny could not be performed.

  2. A fragment of chloroplast DNA was transferred horizontally, probably from non-eudicots, to mitochondrial genome of Phaseolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszynska, Magdalena; Bocer, Tomasz; Mackiewicz, Pawel; Janska, Hanna

    2004-11-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of some Phaseolus species contain a fragment of chloroplast trnA gene intron, named pvs-trnA for its location within the Phaseolus vulgaris sterility sequence (pvs). The purpose of this study was to determine the type of transfer (intracellular or horizontal) that gave rise to pvs-trnA. Using a PCR approach we could not find the respective portion of the trnA gene as a part of pvs outside the Phaseolus genus. However, a BLAST search revealed longer fragments of trnA present in the mitochondrial genomes of some Citrus species, Helianthus annuus and Zea mays. Basing on the identity or near-identity between these mitochondrial sequences and their chloroplast counterparts we concluded that they had relocated from chloroplasts to mitochondria via recent, independent, intracellular DNA transfers. In contrast, pvs-trnA displayed a relatively higher sequence divergence when compared with its chloroplast counterpart from Phaseolus vulgaris. Alignment of pvs-trnA with corresponding trnA fragments from 35 plant species as well as phylogenetic analysis revealed that pvs-trnA grouped with non-eudicot sequences and was well separated from all Fabales sequences. In conclusion, we propose that pvs-trnA arose via horizontal transfer of a trnA intron fragment from chloroplast of a non-eudicot plant to Phaseolus mitochondria. This is the first example of horizontal transfer of a chloroplast sequence to the mitochondrial genome in higher plants.

  3. The complete chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of the green macroalga Ulva sp. UNA00071828 (Ulvophyceae, Chlorophyta.

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    James T Melton

    Full Text Available Sequencing mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes has become an integral part in understanding the genomic machinery and the phylogenetic histories of green algae. Previously, only three chloroplast genomes (Oltmannsiellopsis viridis, Pseudendoclonium akinetum, and Bryopsis hypnoides and two mitochondrial genomes (O. viridis and P. akinetum from the class Ulvophyceae have been published. Here, we present the first chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes from the ecologically and economically important marine, green algal genus Ulva. The chloroplast genome of Ulva sp. was 99,983 bp in a circular-mapping molecule that lacked inverted repeats, and thus far, was the smallest ulvophycean plastid genome. This cpDNA was a highly compact, AT-rich genome that contained a total of 102 identified genes (71 protein-coding genes, 28 tRNA genes, and three ribosomal RNA genes. Additionally, five introns were annotated in four genes: atpA (1, petB (1, psbB (2, and rrl (1. The circular-mapping mitochondrial genome of Ulva sp. was 73,493 bp and follows the expanded pattern also seen in other ulvophyceans and trebouxiophyceans. The Ulva sp. mtDNA contained 29 protein-coding genes, 25 tRNA genes, and two rRNA genes for a total of 56 identifiable genes. Ten introns were annotated in this mtDNA: cox1 (4, atp1 (1, nad3 (1, nad5 (1, and rrs (3. Double-cut-and-join (DCJ values showed that organellar genomes across Chlorophyta are highly rearranged, in contrast to the highly conserved organellar genomes of the red algae (Rhodophyta. A phylogenomic investigation of 51 plastid protein-coding genes showed that Ulvophyceae is not monophyletic, and also placed Oltmannsiellopsis (Oltmannsiellopsidales and Tetraselmis (Chlorodendrophyceae closely to Ulva (Ulvales and Pseudendoclonium (Ulothrichales.

  4. Diversity of chloroplast genome among local clones of cocoa (Theobroma cacao, L.) from Central Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwastika, I. Nengah; Pakawaru, Nurul Aisyah; Rifka, Rahmansyah, Muslimin, Ishizaki, Yoko; Cruz, André Freire; Basri, Zainuddin; Shiina, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Chloroplast genomes typically range in size from 120 to 170 kilo base pairs (kb), which relatively conserved among plant species. Recent evaluation on several species, certain unique regions showed high variability which can be utilized in the phylogenetic analysis. Many fragments of coding regions, introns, and intergenic spacers, such as atpB-rbcL, ndhF, rbcL, rpl16, trnH-psbA, trnL-F, trnS-G, etc., have been used for phylogenetic reconstructions at various taxonomic levels. Based on that status, we would like to analysis the diversity of chloroplast genome within species of local cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) from Central Sulawesi. Our recent data showed, there were more than 20 clones from local farming in Central Sulawesi, and it can be detected based on phenotypic and nuclear-genome-based characterization (RAPD- Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA and SSR- Simple Sequences Repeat) markers. In developing DNA marker for this local cacao, here we also included analysis based on the variation of chloroplast genome. At least several regions such as rpl32-TurnL, it can be considered as chloroplast markers on our local clone of cocoa. Furthermore, we could develop phylogenetic analysis in between clones of cocoa.

  5. A rare case of plastid protein-coding gene duplication in the chloroplast genome of Euglena archaeoplastidiata (Euglenophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Matthew S; Shiu, Shin-Han; Triemer, Richard E

    2017-03-12

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary process that allows duplicate functions to diverge, or, in some cases, allows for new functional gains. However, in contrast to the nuclear genome, gene duplications within the chloroplast are extremely rare. Here, we present the chloroplast genome of the photosynthetic protist Euglena archaeoplastidiata. Upon annotation, it was found that the chloroplast genome contained a novel tandem direct duplication that encoded a portion of RuBisCO large subunit (rbcL) followed by a complete copy of ribosomal protein L32 (rpl32), as well as the associated intergenic sequences. Analyses of the duplicated rpl32 were inconclusive regarding selective pressures, although it was found that substitutions in the duplicated region, all non-synonymous, likely had a neutral functional effect. The duplicated region did not exhibit patterns consistent with previously described mechanisms for tandem direct duplications, and demonstrated an unknown mechanism of duplication. In addition, a comparison of this chloroplast genome to other previously characterized chloroplast genomes from the same family revealed characteristics that indicated E. archaeoplastidiata was probably more closely related to taxa in the genera Monomorphina, Cryptoglena, and Euglenaria than it was to other Euglena taxa. Taken together, the chloroplast genome of E. archaeoplastidiata demonstrated multiple characteristics unique to the euglenoid world, and has justified the longstanding curiosity regarding this enigmatic taxon.

  6. Evolutionary analysis of Arabidopsis, cyanobacterial, and chloroplast genomes reveals plastid phylogeny and thousands of cyanobacterial genes in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William; Rujan, Tamas; Richly, Erik; Hansen, Andrea; Cornelsen, Sabine; Lins, Thomas; Leister, Dario; Stoebe, Bettina; Hasegawa, Masami; Penny, David

    2002-09-17

    Chloroplasts were once free-living cyanobacteria that became endosymbionts, but the genomes of contemporary plastids encode only approximately 5-10% as many genes as those of their free-living cousins, indicating that many genes were either lost from plastids or transferred to the nucleus during the course of plant evolution. Previous estimates have suggested that between 800 and perhaps as many as 2,000 genes in the Arabidopsis genome might come from cyanobacteria, but genome-wide phylogenetic surveys that could provide direct estimates of this number are lacking. We compared 24,990 proteins encoded in the Arabidopsis genome to the proteins from three cyanobacterial genomes, 16 other prokaryotic reference genomes, and yeast. Of 9,368 Arabidopsis proteins sufficiently conserved for primary sequence comparison, 866 detected homologues only among cyanobacteria and 834 other branched with cyanobacterial homologues in phylogenetic trees. Extrapolating from these conserved proteins to the whole genome, the data suggest that approximately 4,500 of Arabidopsis protein-coding genes ( approximately 18% of the total) were acquired from the cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids. These proteins encompass all functional classes, and the majority of them are targeted to cell compartments other than the chloroplast. Analysis of 15 sequenced chloroplast genomes revealed 117 nuclear-encoded proteins that are also still present in at least one chloroplast genome. A phylogeny of chloroplast genomes inferred from 41 proteins and 8,303 amino acids sites indicates that at least two independent secondary endosymbiotic events have occurred involving red algae and that amino acid composition bias in chloroplast proteins strongly affects plastid genome phylogeny.

  7. Complete chloroplast genome of Trachelium caeruleum: extensiverearrangements are associated with repeats and tRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberle, Rosemarie C.; Fourcade, Matthew L.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2006-01-09

    Chloroplast genome structure, gene order and content arehighly conserved in land plants. We sequenced the complete chloroplastgenome sequence of Trachelium caeruleum (Campanulaceae) a member of anangiosperm family known for highly rearranged chloroplast genomes. Thetotal genome size is 162,321 bp with an IR of 27,273 bp, LSC of 100,113bp and SSC of 7,661 bp. The genome encodes 115 unique genes, with 19duplicated in the IR, a tRNA (trnI-CAU) duplicated once in the LSC and aprotein coding gene (psbJ) duplicated twice, for a total of 137 genes.Four genes (ycf15, rpl23, infA and accD) are truncated and likelynonfunctional; three others (clpP, ycf1 and ycf2) are so highly divergedthat they may now be pseudogenes. The most conspicuous feature of theTrachelium genome is the presence of eighteen internally unrearrangedblocks of genes that have been inverted or relocated within the genome,relative to the typical gene order of most angiosperm chloroplastgenomes. Recombination between repeats or tRNAs has been suggested as twomeans of chloroplast genome rearrangements. We compared the relativenumber of repeats in Trachelium to eight other angiosperm chloroplastgenomes, and evaluated the location of repeats and tRNAs in relation torearrangements. Trachelium has the highest number and largest repeats,which are concentrated near inversion endpoints or other rearrangements.tRNAs occur at many but not all inversion endpoints. There is likely nosingle mechanism responsible for the remarkable number of alterations inthis genome, but both repeats and tRNAs are clearly associated with theserearrangements. Land plant chloroplast genomes are highly conserved instructure, gene order and content. The chloroplast genomes of ferns, thegymnosperm Ginkgo, and most angiosperms are nearly collinear, reflectingthe gene order in lineages that diverged from lycopsids and the ancestralchloroplast gene order over 350 million years ago (Raubeson and Jansen,1992). Although earlier mapping studies

  8. Analyses of the complete genome and gene expression of chloroplast of sweet potato [Ipomoea batata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lang; Lai, Xianjun; Li, Xuedan; Wei, Changhe; Tan, Xuemei; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] ranks among the top seven most important food crops cultivated worldwide and is hexaploid plant (2n=6x=90) in the Convolvulaceae family with a genome size between 2,200 to 3,000 Mb. The genomic resources for this crop are deficient due to its complicated genetic structure. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of sweet potato, which is a circular molecule of 161,303 bp in the typical quadripartite structure with large (LSC) and small (SSC) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs). The chloroplast DNA contains a total of 145 genes, including 94 protein-encoding genes of which there are 72 single-copy and 11 double-copy genes. The organization and structure of the chloroplast genome (gene content and order, IR expansion/contraction, random repeating sequences, structural rearrangement) of sweet potato were compared with those of Ipomoea (L.) species and some basal important angiosperms, respectively. Some boundary gene-flow and gene gain-and-loss events were identified at intra- and inter-species levels. In addition, by comparing with the transcriptome sequences of sweet potato, the RNA editing events and differential expressions of the chloroplast functional-genes were detected. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on 77 protein-coding genes from 33 taxa and the result may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution progress of the genus Ipomoea (L.), including phylogenetic relationships, intraspecific differentiation and interspecific introgression.

  9. The complete chloroplast genomes of Cannabis sativa and Humulus lupulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Daniela; White, Kristin H; Keepers, Kyle G; Kane, Nolan C

    2016-09-01

    Cannabis and Humulus are sister genera comprising the entirety of the Cannabaceae sensu stricto, including C. sativa L. (marijuana, hemp), and H. lupulus L. (hops) as two economically important crops. These two plants have been used by humans for many purposes including as a fiber, food, medicine, or inebriant in the case of C. sativa, and as a flavoring component in beer brewing in the case of H. lupulus. In this study, we report the complete chloroplast genomes for two distinct hemp varieties of C. sativa, Italian "Carmagnola" and Russian "Dagestani", and one Czech variety of H. lupulus "Saazer". Both C. sativa genomes are 153 871 bp in length, while the H. lupulus genome is 153 751 bp. The genomes from the two C. sativa varieties differ in 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), while the H. lupulus genome differs in 1722 SNPs from both C. sativa cultivars.

  10. SEQUENCE POLYMORPHISMS OF FOUR CHLOROPLAST GENES IN FOUR ACACIA SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthonius Y.P.B.C. Widyatmoko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequence polymorphisms among and within four Acacia species,  A. aulacocarpa, A. auriculiformis, A. crassicarpa, and A. mangium, were investigated using four chloroplast DNA genes (atpA, petA, rbcL, and rpoA. The phylogenetic relationship among these species is discussed in light of the results of the sequence information. No intraspecific sequence variation was found in the four genes of the four species, and a conservative rate of mutation of the chloroplast DNA genes was also confirmed in the Acacia species. In the atpA and petA of the four genes, all four species possessed identical sequences, and no sequence variation was found among the four Acacia species. In the rbcL and rpoA genes, however, sequence polymorphisms were revealed among these species. Acacia aulacocarpa and A. crassicarpa shared an identical sequence, and A. auriculiformis and A. mangium also showed no sequence variation.  The fact that A. mangium and A. auriculiformis shared identical sequences as did A. aulacocarpa and A. crassicarpa indicated that the two respective species were extremely closely related. Although a putative natural hybrid of A. aulacocarpa and A. auriculiformis has been reported, our results suggested that natural hybridization should be further verified using molecular markers.

  11. De novo assembly and characterization of the complete chloroplast genome of radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young-Min; Chung, Won-Hyung; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Namshin; Yu, Hee-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is an edible root vegetable crop that is cultivated worldwide and whose genome has been sequenced. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the radish cultivar WK10039 chloroplast (cp) genome, along with a de novo assembly strategy using whole genome shotgun sequence reads obtained by next generation sequencing. The radish cp genome is 153,368 bp in length and has a typical quadripartite structure, composed of a pair of inverted repeat regions (26,217 bp each), a large single copy region (83,170 bp), and a small single copy region (17,764 bp). The radish cp genome contains 87 predicted protein-coding genes, 37 tRNA genes, and 8 rRNA genes. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of 91 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in the radish cp genome. Phylogenetic analysis of 62 protein-coding gene sequences from the 17 cp genomes of the Brassicaceae family suggested that the radish cp genome is most closely related to the cp genomes of Brassica rapa and Brassicanapus. Comparisons with the B. rapa and B. napus cp genomes revealed highly divergent intergenic sequences and introns that can potentially be developed as diagnostic cp markers. Synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions of cp genes suggested that nucleotide substitutions have occurred at similar rates in most genes. The complete sequence of the radish cp genome would serve as a valuable resource for the development of new molecular markers and the study of the phylogenetic relationships of Raphanus species in the Brassicaceae family.

  12. Balanced gene losses, duplications and intensive rearrangements led to an unusual regularly sized genome in Arbutus unedo chloroplasts.

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    Fernando Martínez-Alberola

    Full Text Available Completely sequenced plastomes provide a valuable source of information about the duplication, loss, and transfer events of chloroplast genes and phylogenetic data for resolving relationships among major groups of plants. Moreover, they can also be useful for exploiting chloroplast genetic engineering technology. Ericales account for approximately six per cent of eudicot diversity with 11,545 species from which only three complete plastome sequences are currently available. With the aim of increasing the number of ericalean complete plastome sequences, and to open new perspectives in understanding Mediterranean plant adaptations, a genomic study on the basis of the complete chloroplast genome sequencing of Arbutus unedo and an updated phylogenomic analysis of Asteridae was implemented. The chloroplast genome of A. unedo shows extensive rearrangements but a medium size (150,897 nt in comparison to most of angiosperms. A number of remarkable distinct features characterize the plastome of A. unedo: five-fold dismissing of the SSC region in relation to most angiosperms; complete loss or pseudogenization of a number of essential genes; duplication of the ndhH-D operon and its location within the two IRs; presence of large tandem repeats located near highly re-arranged regions and pseudogenes. All these features outline the primary evolutionary split between Ericaceae and other ericalean families. The newly sequenced plastome of A. unedo with the available asterid sequences allowed the resolution of some uncertainties in previous phylogenies of Asteridae.

  13. The complete chloroplast genome of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Brigitte; Novak, Johannes

    2013-10-10

    Oregano (Origanum vulgare L., Lamiaceae) is a medicinal and aromatic plant maybe best known for flavouring pizza. New applications e.g. as natural antioxidants for food are emerging due to the plants' high antibacterial and antioxidant activity. The complete chloroplast (cp) genome of Origanum vulgare (GenBank/EBML/DDBJ accession number: JX880022) consists of 151,935 bp and includes a pair of inverted repeats (IR) of 25,527 bp separated by one small and one large single copy region (SSC and LSC) of 17,745 and 83,136 bp, respectively. The genome with an overall GC content of 38% hosts 114 genes that covering 63% of the genome of which 8% were introns. The comparison of the Origanum cp genome with the cp genomes of two other core lamiales (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge and Sesamum indicum L.) revealed completely conserved protein-coding regions in the IR region but also in the LSC and SSC regions. Phylogenetic analysis of the lamiids based on 56 protein-coding genes give a hint at the basic structure of the Lamiales. However, further genomes will be necessary to clarify this taxonomically complicated order. The variability of the cp within the genus Origanum, studied exemplarily on 16 different chloroplast DNA regions, demonstrated that in 14 regions analyzed, the variability was extremely low (max. 0.7%), while only two regions showed a moderate variability of up to 2.3%. The cp genome of Origanum vulgare contains 27 perfect mononucleotide repeats (number of repeats>9) consisting exclusively of the nucleotides A or T. 34 perfect repeats (repeat lengths>1 and number of repeats>3) were found, of which 32 were di-, and 2 were trinucleotide repeats.

  14. A novel class of heat-responsive small RNAs derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa

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    de Ruiter Marjo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding small RNAs play critical roles in various cellular processes in a wide spectrum of eukaryotic organisms. Their responses to abiotic stress have become a popular topic of economic and scientific importance in biological research. Several studies in recent years have reported a small number of non-coding small RNAs that map to chloroplast genomes. However, it remains uncertain whether small RNAs are generated from chloroplast genome and how they respond to environmental stress, such as high temperature. Chinese cabbage is an important vegetable crop, and heat stress usually causes great losses in yields and quality. Under heat stress, the leaves become etiolated due to the disruption and disassembly of chloroplasts. In an attempt to determine the heat-responsive small RNAs in chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage, we carried out deep sequencing, using heat-treated samples, and analysed the proportion of small RNAs that were matched to chloroplast genome. Results Deep sequencing provided evidence that a novel subset of small RNAs were derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage. The chloroplast small RNAs (csRNAs include those derived from mRNA, rRNA, tRNA and intergenic RNA. The rRNA-derived csRNAs were preferentially located at the 3'-ends of the rRNAs, while the tRNA-derived csRNAs were mainly located at 5'-termini of the tRNAs. After heat treatment, the abundance of csRNAs decreased in seedlings, except those of 24 nt in length. The novel heat-responsive csRNAs and their locations in the chloroplast were verified by Northern blotting. The regulation of some csRNAs to the putative target genes were identified by real-time PCR. Our results reveal that high temperature suppresses the production of some csRNAs, which have potential roles in transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusions In addition to nucleus, the chloroplast is another important organelle that generates a number of small

  15. The whole chloroplast genome of wild rice (Oryza australiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Ge, Song

    2016-01-01

    The whole chloroplast genome of wild rice (Oryza australiensis) is characterized in this study. The genome size is 135,224  bp, exhibiting a typical circular structure including a pair of 25,776  bp inverted repeats (IRa,b) separated by a large single-copy region (LSC) of 82,212  bp and a small single-copy region (SSC) of 12,470  bp. The overall GC content of the genome is 38.95%. 110 unique genes were annotated, including 76 protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA genes, and 30t RNA genes. Among these, 18 are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions, 13 genes contain one intron, and 2 genes (rps12 and ycf3) have two introns.

  16. Research Progress of Sugarcane Chloroplast Genome%甘蔗叶绿体基因组研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杨; 周会

    2013-01-01

    Along with the development of modern molecular biology technologies, complete chloroplast genomes have been sequenced in various plant species to date, and the structure, function and expression of these genes have been deter-mined. The chloroplast genome structure in most higher plants is stable, since the gene number, arrangement and composition are conservative. The determination of sugarcane chloroplast genome sequence laid a good foundation for sugarcane chloroplast related research. This article gives a review on the research progress of sugarcane chloroplast genome through the chloroplast genome map, gene structure, function, chloroplast RNA editing, and phylogenetic analysis in Saccharum and relat-ed genera. This study held great potential to clarify more directions in researches, including sugarcane chloroplast genetic transformation, complete chloroplast nu-cleotide sequence determination in Saccharum and closely related genera, cpSSRs development and application.%随着现代分子生物学技术的发展,目前已经完成了多种植物叶绿体基因组的全序列测定,并研究了这些基因的结构、功能与表达。大部分高等植物的叶绿体基因组结构稳定,基因数量、排列顺序及组成上具有保守性。甘蔗叶绿体基因组测序工作的完成为甘蔗叶绿体相关研究奠定了良好基础。文章从甘蔗叶绿体基因组图谱、结构和功能基因、叶绿体RNA编辑以及甘蔗属叶绿体系统进化等方面综合概述了甘蔗叶绿体基因组研究取得的成果,并从甘蔗叶绿体遗传转化、甘蔗及近缘属叶绿体基因组测序和叶绿体基因组 cpSSRs开发利用等方面指出甘蔗叶绿体基因组今后的研究方向。

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Chloroplast Genomic Information of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook with Sibling Species from the Genera Cryptomeria D. Don, Taiwania Hayata, and Calocedrus Kurz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weiwei; Chen, Jinhui; Hao, Zhaodong; Shi, Jisen

    2016-07-07

    Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook) is an important coniferous tree species for timber production, which accounts for ~40% of log supply from plantations in southern China. Chloroplast genetic engineering is an exciting field to engineer several valuable tree traits. In this study, we revisited the published complete Chinese fir (NC_021437) and four other coniferous species chloroplast genome sequence in Taxodiaceae. Comparison of their chloroplast genomes revealed three unique inversions found in the downstream of the gene clusters and evolutionary divergence were found, although overall the chloroplast genomic structure of the Cupressaceae linage was conserved. We also investigated the phylogenetic position of Chinese fir among conifers by examining gene functions, selection forces, substitution rates, and the full chloroplast genome sequence. Consistent with previous molecular systematics analysis, the results provided a well-supported phylogeny framework for the Cupressaceae that strongly confirms the "basal" position of Cunninghamia lanceolata. The structure of the Cunninghamia lanceolata chloroplast genome showed a partial lack of one IR copy, rearrangements clearly occurred and slight evolutionary divergence appeared among the cp genome of C. lanceolata, Taiwania cryptomerioides, Taiwania flousiana, Calocedrus formosana and Cryptomeria japonica. The information from sequence divergence and length variation of genes could be further considered for bioengineering research.

  18. Structure and organization of Marchantia polymorpha chloroplast genome. I. Cloning and gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, K; Fukuzawa, H; Kohchi, T; Sano, T; Sano, S; Shirai, H; Umesono, K; Shiki, Y; Takeuchi, M; Chang, Z

    1988-09-20

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of chloroplast DNA from a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, using a clone bank of chloroplast DNA fragments. The circular genome consists of 121,024 base-pairs and includes two large inverted repeats (IRA and IRB, each 10,058 base-pairs), a large single-copy region (LSC, 81,095 base-pairs), and a small single-copy region (SSC, 19,813 base-pairs). The nucleotide sequence was analysed with a computer to deduce the entire gene organization, assuming the universal genetic code and the presence of introns in the coding sequences. We detected 136 possible genes. 103 gene products of which are related to known stable RNA or protein molecules. Stable RNA genes for four species of ribosomal RNA and 32 species of tRNA were located, although one of the tRNA genes may be defective. Twenty genes encoding polypeptides involved in photosynthesis and electron transport were identified by comparison with known chloroplast genes. Twenty-five open reading frames (ORFs) show structural similarities to Escherichia coli RNA polymerase subunits, 19 ribosomal proteins and two related proteins. Seven ORFs are comparable with human mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase genes. A computer-aided homology search predicted possible chloroplast homologues of bacterial proteins; two ORFs for bacterial 4Fe-4S-type ferredoxin, two for distinct subunits of a protein-dependent transport system, one ORF for a component of nitrogenase, and one for an antenna protein of a light-harvesting complex. The other 33 ORFs, consisting of 29 to 2136 codons, remain to be identified, but some of them seem to be conserved in evolution. Detailed information on gene identification is presented in the accompanying papers. We postulated that there were 22 introns in 20 genes (8 tRNA genes and 12 ORFs), which may be classified into the groups I and II found in fungal mitochondrial genes. The structural gene for ribosomal protein S12 is trans-split on the opposite DNA strand

  19. Comparative transcriptome and chloroplast genome analyses of two related Dipteronia species

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    Tao Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dipteronia (order Sapindales is an endangered genus endemic to China and has two living species, D. sinensis and D. dyeriana. The plants are closely related to the genus Acer, which is also classified in the order Sapindales. Evolutionary studies on Dipteronia have been hindered by the paucity of information on their genomes and plastids. Here, we used next generation sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes and complete chloroplast genomes of both Dipteronia species. A comparison of the transcriptomes of both species identified a total of 7,814 orthologs. Estimation of selection pressures using Ka/Ks ratios showed that only 30 of 5,435 orthologous pairs had a ratio significantly greater than 1, i.e., showing positive selection. However, 4,041 orthologs had a Ka/Ks < 0.5 (p < 0.05, suggesting that most genes had likely undergone purifying selection. Based on orthologous unigenes, 314 single copy nuclear genes were identified. Through a combination of de novo and reference guided assembly, plastid genomes were obtained; that of D. sinensis was 157,080 bp and that of D. dyeriana was 157,071 bp. Both plastid genomes encoded 87 protein coding genes, 40 tRNAs, and 8 rRNAs; no significant differences were detected in the size, gene content, and organization of the two plastomes. We used the whole chloroplast genomes to determine the phylogeny of D. sinensis and D. dyeriana and confirmed that the two species were highly divergent. Overall, our study provides comprehensive transcriptomic and chloroplast genomic resources, which will be valuable for future evolutionary studies of Dipteronia.

  20. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  1. The evolutionary processes of mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes differ from those of nuclear genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpelainen, Helena

    2004-11-01

    This paper first introduces our present knowledge of the origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts, and the organization and inheritance patterns of their genomes, and then carries on to review the evolutionary processes influencing mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes. The differences in evolutionary phenomena between the nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes are highlighted. It is emphasized that varying inheritance patterns and copy numbers among different types of genomes, and the potential advantage achieved through the transfer of many cytoplasmic genes to the nucleus, have important implications for the evolution of nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes. Cytoplasmic genes transferred to the nucleus have joined the more strictly controlled genetic system of the nuclear genome, including also sexual recombination, while genes retained within the cytoplasmic organelles can be involved in selection and drift processes both within and among individuals. Within-individual processes can be either intra- or intercellular. In the case of heteroplasmy, which is attributed to mutations or biparental inheritance, within-individual selection on cytoplasmic DNA may provide a mechanism by which the organism can adapt rapidly. The inheritance of cytoplasmic genomes is not universally maternal. The presence of a range of inheritance patterns indicates that different strategies have been adopted by different organisms. On the other hand, the variability occasionally observed in the inheritance mechanisms of cytoplasmic genomes reduces heritability and increases environmental components in phenotypic features and, consequently, decreases the potential for adaptive evolution.

  2. Chloroplast Genome Evolution in Actinidiaceae: clpP Loss, Heterogenous Divergence and Phylogenomic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Cai; Chen, Si-Yun; Zhang, Xian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Actinidiaceae is a well-known economically important plant family in asterids. To elucidate the chloroplast (cp) genome evolution within this family, here we present complete genomes of three species from two sister genera (Clematoclethra and Actinidia) in the Actinidiaceae via genome skimming technique. Comparative analyses revealed that the genome structure and content were rather conservative in three cp genomes in spite of different inheritance pattern, i.e.paternal in Actinidia and maternal in Clematoclethra. The clpP gene was lacked in all the three sequenced cp genomes examined here indicating that the clpP gene loss is likely a conspicuous synapomorphic characteristic during the cp genome evolution of Actinidiaceae. Comprehensive sequence comparisons in Actinidiaceae cp genomes uncovered that there were apparently heterogenous divergence patterns among the cpDNA regions, suggesting a preferred data-partitioned analysis for cp phylogenomics. Twenty non-coding cpDNA loci with fast evolutionary rates are further identified as potential molecular markers for systematics studies of Actinidiaceae. Moreover, the cp phylogenomic analyses including 31 angiosperm plastomes strongly supported the monophyly of Actinidia, being sister to Clematoclethra in Actinidiaceae which locates in the basal asterids, Ericales.

  3. An efficient procedure for plant organellar genome assembly, based on whole genome data from the 454 GS FLX sequencing platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tongwu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation Complete organellar genome sequences (chloroplasts and mitochondria provide valuable resources and information for studying plant molecular ecology and evolution. As high-throughput sequencing technology advances, it becomes the norm that a shotgun approach is used to obtain complete genome sequences. Therefore, to assemble organellar sequences from the whole genome, shotgun reads are inevitable. However, associated techniques are often cumbersome, time-consuming, and difficult, because true organellar DNA is difficult to separate efficiently from nuclear copies, which have been transferred to the nucleus through the course of evolution. Results We report a new, rapid procedure for plant chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequencing and assembly using the Roche/454 GS FLX platform. Plant cells can contain multiple copies of the organellar genomes, and there is a significant correlation between the depth of sequence reads in contigs and the number of copies of the genome. Without isolating organellar DNA from the mixture of nuclear and organellar DNA for sequencing, we retrospectively extracted assembled contigs of either chloroplast or mitochondrial sequences from the whole genome shotgun data. Moreover, the contig connection graph property of Newbler (a platform-specific sequence assembler ensures an efficient final assembly. Using this procedure, we assembled both chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of a resurrection plant, Boea hygrometrica, with high fidelity. We also present information and a minimal sequence dataset as a reference for the assembly of other plant organellar genomes.

  4. A Phylogenetic Analysis of Chloroplast Genomes Elucidates the Relationships of the Six Economically Important Brassica Species Comprising the Triangle of U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Li, Fei; Zhang, Shifan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei; Bonnema, Guusje; Borm, Theo J. A.

    2017-01-01

    The Brassica genus comprises many economically important worldwide cultivated crops. The well-established model of the Brassica genus, U’s triangle, consists of three basic diploid plant species (Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea, and Brassica nigra) and three amphidiploid species (Brassica napus, Brassica juncea, and Brassica carinata) that arose through interspecific hybridizations. Despite being extensively studied because of its commercial relevance, several aspects of the origin of the Brassica species and the relationships within and among these six species still remain open questions. Here, we successfully de novo assembled 60 complete chloroplast genomes of Brassica genotypes of all six species. A complete map of the single nucleotide variants and insertions and deletions in the chloroplast genomes of different Brassica species was produced. The chloroplast genome consists of a Large and a Small Single Copy (LSC and SSC) region between two inverted repeats, and while these regions of chloroplast genomes have very different molecular evolutionary rates, phylogenetic analyses of different regions yielded no contradicting topologies and separated the Brassica genus into four clades. B. carinata and B. juncea share their chloroplast genome with one of their hybridization donors B. nigra and B. rapa, respectively, which fits the U model. B. rapa, surprisingly, shows evidence of two types of chloroplast genomes, with one type specific to some Italian broccoletto accessions. B. napus clearly has evidence for two independent hybridization events, as it contains either B. rapa chloroplast genomes. The divergence estimation suggests that B. nigra and B. carinata diverged from the main Brassica clade 13.7 million years ago (Mya), while B. rapa and B. oleracea diverged at 2.18 Mya. The use of the complete chloroplast DNA sequence not only provides insights into comparative genome analysis but also paves the way for a better understanding of the phylogenetic

  5. A trnI_CAU triplication event in the complete chloroplast genome of Paris verticillata M.Bieb. (Melanthiaceae, Liliales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hoang Dang Khoa; Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2014-06-19

    The chloroplast is an essential plant organelle responsible for photosynthesis. Gene duplication, relocation, and loss in the chloroplast genome (cpDNA) are useful for exploring the evolution and phylogeny of plant species. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Paris verticillata was sequenced using the 454 sequencing system and Sanger sequencing method to trace the evolutionary pattern in the tribe Parideae of the family Melanthiaceae (Liliales). The circular double-stranded cpDNA of P. verticillata (157,379 bp) consists of two inverted repeat regions each of 28,373 bp, a large single copy of 82,726 bp, and a small single copy of 17,907 bp. Gene content and order are generally similar to the previously reported cpDNA sequences within the order Liliales. However, we found that trnI_CAU was triplicated in P. verticillata. In addition, cemA is suspected to be a pseudogene due to the presence of internal stop codons created by poly(A) insertion and single small CA repeats. Such changes were not found in previously examined cpDNAs of the Melanthiaceae or other families of the Liliales, suggesting that such features are unique to the tribe Parideae of Melanthiaceae. The characteristics of P. verticillata cpDNA will provide useful information for uncovering the evolution within Paris and for further research of plastid genome evolution and phylogenetic studies in Liliales.

  6. Sequencing the maize genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martienssen, Robert A; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew; McCombie, W Richard

    2004-04-01

    Sequencing of complex genomes can be accomplished by enriching shotgun libraries for genes. In maize, gene-enrichment by copy-number normalization (high C(0)t) and methylation filtration (MF) have been used to generate up to two-fold coverage of the gene-space with less than 1 million sequencing reads. Simulations using sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones predict that 5x coverage of gene-rich regions, accompanied by less than 1x coverage of subclones from BAC contigs, will generate high-quality mapped sequence that meets the needs of geneticists while accommodating unusually high levels of structural polymorphism. By sequencing several inbred strains, we propose a strategy for capturing this polymorphism to investigate hybrid vigor or heterosis.

  7. Patterns of synonymous codon usage bias in chloroplast genomes of seed plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Codon usage in chloroplast genome of six seed plants (Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus alba, Zea mays, Triticum aestivum,Pinus koraiensis and Cycas taitungensis) was analyzed to find general patterns of codon usage in chloroplast genomes of seed plants.The results show that chloroplast genomes of the six seed plants had similar codon usage patterns, with a strong bias towards a high representation of NNA and NNT codons. In chloroplast genomes of the six seed plants, the effective number of codons (ENC) for most genes was similar to that of the expected ENC based on the GC content at the third codon position, but several genes with low ENC values were laying below the expected curve. All of these data indicate that codon usage was dominated by a mutational bias in chloroplast genomes of seed plants and that selection appeared to be limited to a subset of genes and to only subtly affect codon us-age. Meantime, four, six, eight, nine, ten and 12 codons were defined as the optimal codons in chloroplast genomes of the six seed plants.

  8. Proliferation of group II introns in the chloroplast genome of the green alga Oedocladium carolinianum (Chlorophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Simon Brouard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The chloroplast genome sustained extensive changes in architecture during the evolution of the Chlorophyceae, a morphologically and ecologically diverse class of green algae belonging to the Chlorophyta; however, the forces driving these changes are poorly understood. The five orders recognized in the Chlorophyceae form two major clades: the CS clade consisting of the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales, and the OCC clade consisting of the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales, and Chaetopeltidales. In the OCC clade, considerable variations in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA structure, size, gene order, and intron content have been observed. The large inverted repeat (IR, an ancestral feature characteristic of most green plants, is present in Oedogonium cardiacum (Oedogoniales but is lacking in the examined members of the Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales. Remarkably, the Oedogonium 35.5-kb IR houses genes that were putatively acquired through horizontal DNA transfer. To better understand the dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution in the Oedogoniales, we analyzed the cpDNA of a second representative of this order, Oedocladium carolinianum. Methods The Oedocladium cpDNA was sequenced and annotated. The evolutionary distances separating Oedocladium and Oedogonium cpDNAs and two other pairs of chlorophycean cpDNAs were estimated using a 61-gene data set. Phylogenetic analysis of an alignment of group IIA introns from members of the OCC clade was performed. Secondary structures and insertion sites of oedogonialean group IIA introns were analyzed. Results The 204,438-bp Oedocladium genome is 7.9 kb larger than the Oedogonium genome, but its repertoire of conserved genes is remarkably similar and gene order differs by only one reversal. Although the 23.7-kb IR is missing the putative foreign genes found in Oedogonium, it contains sequences coding for a putative phage or bacterial DNA primase and a hypothetical protein. Intergenic sequences are 1.5-fold

  9. Mechanisms of Protein Synthesis in Chloroplasts: How to Design Translatable mRNAs in Chloroplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Sugiura

    2007-01-01

    @@ Chloroplast transformation provides a powerful tool to produce useful proteins in plants. After completion of the chloroplast genome sequencing from tobacco plants (Shinozaki et al., 1986, Yukawa et al., 2005), Pal Maliga group developed the high-frequency chloroplast transformation system in tobacco (Svab and Maliga, 1993).

  10. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

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    Maximo Rivarola

    Full Text Available Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  11. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivarola, Maximo; Foster, Jeffrey T; Chan, Agnes P; Williams, Amber L; Rice, Danny W; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M J; Khouri, Hoda M; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Allan, Gerard J; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  12. Castor Bean Organelle Genome Sequencing and Worldwide Genetic Diversity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Agnes P.; Williams, Amber L.; Rice, Danny W.; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M. J.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Allan, Gerard J.; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D.

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade. PMID:21750729

  13. Classifying Genomic Sequences by Sequence Feature Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Liu; Dian Jiao; Xiao Sun

    2005-01-01

    Traditional sequence analysis depends on sequence alignment. In this study, we analyzed various functional regions of the human genome based on sequence features, including word frequency, dinucleotide relative abundance, and base-base correlation. We analyzed the human chromosome 22 and classified the upstream,exon, intron, downstream, and intergenic regions by principal component analysis and discriminant analysis of these features. The results show that we could classify the functional regions of genome based on sequence feature and discriminant analysis.

  14. OrgConv: detection of gene conversion using consensus sequences and its application in plant mitochondrial and chloroplast homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Weilong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ancestry of mitochondria and chloroplasts traces back to separate endosymbioses of once free-living bacteria. The highly reduced genomes of these two organelles therefore contain very distant homologs that only recently have been shown to recombine inside the mitochondrial genome. Detection of gene conversion between mitochondrial and chloroplast homologs was previously impossible due to the lack of suitable computer programs. Recently, I developed a novel method and have, for the first time, discovered recurrent gene conversion between chloroplast mitochondrial genes. The method will further our understanding of plant organellar genome evolution and help identify and remove gene regions with incongruent phylogenetic signals for several genes widely used in plant systematics. Here, I implement such a method that is available in a user friendly web interface. Results OrgConv (Organellar Conversion is a computer package developed for detection of gene conversion between mitochondrial and chloroplast homologous genes. OrgConv is available in two forms; source code can be installed and run on a Linux platform and a web interface is available on multiple operating systems. The input files of the feature program are two multiple sequence alignments from different organellar compartments in FASTA format. The program compares every examined sequence against the consensus sequence of each sequence alignment rather than exhaustively examining every possible combination. Making use of consensus sequences significantly reduces the number of comparisons and therefore reduces overall computational time, which allows for analysis of very large datasets. Most importantly, with the significantly reduced number of comparisons, the statistical power remains high in the face of correction for multiple tests. Conclusions Both the source code and the web interface of OrgConv are available for free from the OrgConv website http

  15. A plant mitochondrial sequence transcribed in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts is not edited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, C.A.; Hanson, M.R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Zoubenko, O.V.; Maliga, P. [State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    RNA editing occurs in two higher-plant organelles, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Because chloroplasts and mitochondria exhibit some similarity in editing site selection, we investigated whether mitochondrial RNA sequences could be edited in chloroplasts. We produced transgenic tobacco plants that contained chimeric genes in which the second exon of a Petunia hybrida mitochondrial coxII gene was under the control of chloroplast gene regulatory sequences. coxII transcripts accumulated to low or high levels in transgenic chloroplasts containing chimeric genes with the plastid ribosomal protein gene rps16 or the rRNA operon promoter, respectively. Exon 2 of coxII was chosen because it carries seven editing sites and is edited in petunia mitochondria even when located in an abnormal context in an aberrant recombined gene. When editing of the coxII transcripts in transgenic chloroplasts was examined, no RNA editing at any of the usual sites was detected, nor was there any novel editing at any other sites. These results indicate that the RNA editing mechanisms of chloroplasts and mitochondria are not identical but must have at least some organelle-specific components. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  17. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Artocarpus (Moraceae) developed from transcriptome sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premise of the study: Chloroplast microsatellite loci were characterized from transcriptomes of Artocarpus (A.) altilis (breadfruit) and A. camansi (breadnut). They were tested in A. odoratissimus (terap) and A. altilis and evaluated in silico for two congeners. Methods and Results: 15 simple seque...

  18. Analysis of the Complete Chloroplast Genome of a Medicinal Plant, Dianthus superbus var. longicalyncinus, from a Comparative Genomics Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Gurusamy; Park, SeonJoo

    2015-01-01

    Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicinal plant that is also used for ornamental purposes. In this study, D. superbus was compared to its closely related family of Caryophyllaceae chloroplast (cp) genomes such as Lychnis chalcedonica and Spinacia oleracea. D. superbus had the longest large single copy (LSC) region (82,805 bp), with some variations in the inverted repeat region A (IRA)/LSC regions. The IRs underwent both expansion and constriction during evolution of the Caryophyllaceae family; however, intense variations were not identified. The pseudogene ribosomal protein subunit S19 (rps19) was identified at the IRA/LSC junction, but was not present in the cp genome of other Caryophyllaceae family members. The translation initiation factor IF-1 (infA) and ribosomal protein subunit L23 (rpl23) genes were absent from the Dianthus cp genome. When the cp genome of Dianthus was compared with 31 other angiosperm lineages, the infA gene was found to have been lost in most members of rosids, solanales of asterids and Lychnis of Caryophyllales, whereas rpl23 gene loss or pseudogization had occurred exclusively in Caryophyllales. Nevertheless, the cp genome of Dianthus and Spinacia has two introns in the proteolytic subunit of ATP-dependent protease (clpP) gene, but Lychnis has lost introns from the clpP gene. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of individual protein-coding genes infA and rpl23 revealed that gene loss or pseudogenization occurred independently in the cp genome of Dianthus. Molecular phylogenetic analysis also demonstrated a sister relationship between Dianthus and Lychnis based on 78 protein-coding sequences. The results presented herein will contribute to studies of the evolution, molecular biology and genetic engineering of the medicinal and ornamental plant, D. superbus var. longicalycinus.

  19. Analysis of the Complete Chloroplast Genome of a Medicinal Plant, Dianthus superbus var. longicalyncinus, from a Comparative Genomics Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusamy Raman

    Full Text Available Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicinal plant that is also used for ornamental purposes. In this study, D. superbus was compared to its closely related family of Caryophyllaceae chloroplast (cp genomes such as Lychnis chalcedonica and Spinacia oleracea. D. superbus had the longest large single copy (LSC region (82,805 bp, with some variations in the inverted repeat region A (IRA/LSC regions. The IRs underwent both expansion and constriction during evolution of the Caryophyllaceae family; however, intense variations were not identified. The pseudogene ribosomal protein subunit S19 (rps19 was identified at the IRA/LSC junction, but was not present in the cp genome of other Caryophyllaceae family members. The translation initiation factor IF-1 (infA and ribosomal protein subunit L23 (rpl23 genes were absent from the Dianthus cp genome. When the cp genome of Dianthus was compared with 31 other angiosperm lineages, the infA gene was found to have been lost in most members of rosids, solanales of asterids and Lychnis of Caryophyllales, whereas rpl23 gene loss or pseudogization had occurred exclusively in Caryophyllales. Nevertheless, the cp genome of Dianthus and Spinacia has two introns in the proteolytic subunit of ATP-dependent protease (clpP gene, but Lychnis has lost introns from the clpP gene. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of individual protein-coding genes infA and rpl23 revealed that gene loss or pseudogenization occurred independently in the cp genome of Dianthus. Molecular phylogenetic analysis also demonstrated a sister relationship between Dianthus and Lychnis based on 78 protein-coding sequences. The results presented herein will contribute to studies of the evolution, molecular biology and genetic engineering of the medicinal and ornamental plant, D. superbus var. longicalycinus.

  20. A genomic approach for isolating chloroplast microsatellite markers for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Jessica N. C.; Nazareno, Alison G.; Lohmann, Lúcia G.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: In this study, we developed chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae) to investigate the population structure and genetic diversity of this species. Methods and Results: We used Illumina HiSeq data to reconstruct the chloroplast genome of P. kerere by a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly. We then used the chloroplast genome to develop a set of cpSSRs from intergenic regions. Overall, 24 primer pairs were designed, 21 of which amplified successfully and were polymorphic, presenting three to nine alleles per locus. The unbiased haploid diversity per locus varied from 0.207 (Pac28) to 0.817 (Pac04). All but one locus amplified for all other taxa of Pachyptera. Conclusions: The markers reported here will serve as a basis for studies to assess the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of Pachyptera. PMID:27672522

  1. Complete chloroplast genomes from apomictic Taraxacum (Asteraceae): Identity and variation between three microspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Salih, Rubar Hussein; Majeský, Ľuboš; Schwarzacher, Trude; Gornall, Richard; Heslop-Harrison, Pat

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA sequences show substantial variation between higher plant species, and less variation within species, so are typically excellent markers to investigate evolutionary, population and genetic relationships and phylogenies. We sequenced the plastomes of Taraxacum obtusifrons Markl. (O978); T. stridulum Trávniček ined. (S3); and T. amplum Markl. (A978), three apomictic triploid (2n = 3x = 24) dandelions from the T. officinale agg. We aimed to characterize the variation in plastomes, define relationships and correlations with the apomictic microspecies status, and refine placement of the microspecies in the evolutionary or phylogenetic context of the Asteraceae. The chloroplast genomes of accessions O978 and S3 were identical and 151,322 bp long (where the nuclear genes are known to show variation), while A978 was 151,349 bp long. All three genomes contained 135 unique genes, with an additional copy of the trnF-GGA gene in the LSC region and 20 duplicated genes in the IR region, along with short repeats, the typical major Inverted Repeats (IR1 and IR2, 24,431bp long), and Large and Small Single Copy regions (LSC 83,889bp and SSC 18,571bp in O978). Between the two Taraxacum plastomes types, we identified 28 SNPs. The distribution of polymorphisms suggests some parts of the Taraxacum plastome are evolving at a slower rate. There was a hemi-nested inversion in the LSC region that is common to Asteraceae, and an SSC inversion from ndhF to rps15 found only in some Asteraceae lineages. A comparative repeat analysis showed variation between Taraxacum and the phylogenetically close genus Lactuca, with many more direct repeats of 40bp or more in Lactuca (1% larger plastome than Taraxacum). When individual genes and non-coding regions were for Asteraceae phylogeny reconstruction, not all showed the same evolutionary scenario suggesting care is needed for interpretation of relationships if a limited number of markers are used. Studying genotypic diversity in

  2. Complete chloroplast genomes from apomictic Taraxacum (Asteraceae): Identity and variation between three microspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeský, Ľuboš; Schwarzacher, Trude; Gornall, Richard; Heslop-Harrison, Pat

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA sequences show substantial variation between higher plant species, and less variation within species, so are typically excellent markers to investigate evolutionary, population and genetic relationships and phylogenies. We sequenced the plastomes of Taraxacum obtusifrons Markl. (O978); T. stridulum Trávniček ined. (S3); and T. amplum Markl. (A978), three apomictic triploid (2n = 3x = 24) dandelions from the T. officinale agg. We aimed to characterize the variation in plastomes, define relationships and correlations with the apomictic microspecies status, and refine placement of the microspecies in the evolutionary or phylogenetic context of the Asteraceae. The chloroplast genomes of accessions O978 and S3 were identical and 151,322 bp long (where the nuclear genes are known to show variation), while A978 was 151,349 bp long. All three genomes contained 135 unique genes, with an additional copy of the trnF-GGA gene in the LSC region and 20 duplicated genes in the IR region, along with short repeats, the typical major Inverted Repeats (IR1 and IR2, 24,431bp long), and Large and Small Single Copy regions (LSC 83,889bp and SSC 18,571bp in O978). Between the two Taraxacum plastomes types, we identified 28 SNPs. The distribution of polymorphisms suggests some parts of the Taraxacum plastome are evolving at a slower rate. There was a hemi-nested inversion in the LSC region that is common to Asteraceae, and an SSC inversion from ndhF to rps15 found only in some Asteraceae lineages. A comparative repeat analysis showed variation between Taraxacum and the phylogenetically close genus Lactuca, with many more direct repeats of 40bp or more in Lactuca (1% larger plastome than Taraxacum). When individual genes and non-coding regions were for Asteraceae phylogeny reconstruction, not all showed the same evolutionary scenario suggesting care is needed for interpretation of relationships if a limited number of markers are used. Studying genotypic diversity in

  3. The evolution of chloroplast genome structure in ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Paul G; Roper, Jessie M; Duffy, Aaron M

    2010-09-01

    The plastid genome (plastome) is a rich source of phylogenetic and other comparative data in plants. Most land plants possess a plastome of similar structure. However, in a major group of plants, the ferns, a unique plastome structure has evolved. The gene order in ferns has been explained by a series of genomic inversions relative to the plastome organization of seed plants. Here, we examine for the first time the structure of the plastome across fern phylogeny. We used a PCR-based strategy to map and partially sequence plastomes. We found that a pair of partially overlapping inversions in the region of the inverted repeat occurred in the common ancestor of most ferns. However, the ancestral (seed plant) structure is still found in early diverging branches leading to the osmundoid and filmy fern lineages. We found that a second pair of overlapping inversions occurred on a branch leading to the core leptosporangiates. We also found that the unique placement of the gene matK in ferns (lacking a flanking intron) is not a result of a large-scale inversion, as previously thought. This is because the intron loss maps to an earlier point on the phylogeny than the nearby inversion. We speculate on why inversions may occur in pairs and what this may mean for the dynamics of plastome evolution.

  4. Malaria Genome Sequencing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    facts have stimulated efforts to develop an international, coordinated strategy for malaria research and control . Development of new drugs and...Interpolated Markov models for facilitate the development of new drugs and vaccines, the genome eukaryotic gene finding. Genomics 59, 24-31 (1999). of...Gardner, M. I. & Tettelin, H. Interpolated Markov models for facilitate the development of new drugs and vaccines, the genome eukaryotic gene finding

  5. Complex interplay among DNA modification, noncoding RNA expression and protein-coding RNA expression in Salvia miltiorrhiza chloroplast genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimei Chen

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza is one of the most widely used medicinal plants. As a first step to develop a chloroplast-based genetic engineering method for the over-production of active components from S. miltiorrhiza, we have analyzed the genome, transcriptome, and base modifications of the S. miltiorrhiza chloroplast. Total genomic DNA and RNA were extracted from fresh leaves and then subjected to strand-specific RNA-Seq and Single-Molecule Real-Time (SMRT sequencing analyses. Mapping the RNA-Seq reads to the genome assembly allowed us to determine the relative expression levels of 80 protein-coding genes. In addition, we identified 19 polycistronic transcription units and 136 putative antisense and intergenic noncoding RNA (ncRNA genes. Comparison of the abundance of protein-coding transcripts (cRNA with and without overlapping antisense ncRNAs (asRNA suggest that the presence of asRNA is associated with increased cRNA abundance (p<0.05. Using the SMRT Portal software (v1.3.2, 2687 potential DNA modification sites and two potential DNA modification motifs were predicted. The two motifs include a TATA box-like motif (CPGDMM1, "TATANNNATNA", and an unknown motif (CPGDMM2 "WNYANTGAW". Specifically, 35 of the 97 CPGDMM1 motifs (36.1% and 91 of the 369 CPGDMM2 motifs (24.7% were found to be significantly modified (p<0.01. Analysis of genes downstream of the CPGDMM1 motif revealed the significantly increased abundance of ncRNA genes that are less than 400 bp away from the significantly modified CPGDMM1motif (p<0.01. Taking together, the present study revealed a complex interplay among DNA modifications, ncRNA and cRNA expression in chloroplast genome.

  6. Whole-exome/genome sequencing and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grody, Wayne W; Thompson, Barry H; Hudgins, Louanne

    2013-12-01

    As medical genetics has progressed from a descriptive entity to one focused on the functional relationship between genes and clinical disorders, emphasis has been placed on genomics. Genomics, a subelement of genetics, is the study of the genome, the sum total of all the genes of an organism. The human genome, which is contained in the 23 pairs of nuclear chromosomes and in the mitochondrial DNA of each cell, comprises >6 billion nucleotides of genetic code. There are some 23,000 protein-coding genes, a surprisingly small fraction of the total genetic material, with the remainder composed of noncoding DNA, regulatory sequences, and introns. The Human Genome Project, launched in 1990, produced a draft of the genome in 2001 and then a finished sequence in 2003, on the 50th anniversary of the initial publication of Watson and Crick's paper on the double-helical structure of DNA. Since then, this mass of genetic information has been translated at an ever-increasing pace into useable knowledge applicable to clinical medicine. The recent advent of massively parallel DNA sequencing (also known as shotgun, high-throughput, and next-generation sequencing) has brought whole-genome analysis into the clinic for the first time, and most of the current applications are directed at children with congenital conditions that are undiagnosable by using standard genetic tests for single-gene disorders. Thus, pediatricians must become familiar with this technology, what it can and cannot offer, and its technical and ethical challenges. Here, we address the concepts of human genomic analysis and its clinical applicability for primary care providers.

  7. Phylogenomic analysis of transcriptomic sequences of mitochondria and chloroplasts of essential brown algae (Phaeophyceae) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Shangang; LIU Tao; WU Shuangxiu; WANG Xumin; LI Tianyong; QIAN Hao; SUN Jing; WANG Liang; YU Jun; REN Lufeng; YIN Jinlong

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplast and mitochondrion of brown algae (Class Phaeophyceae of Phylum Ochrophyta) may have originated from different endosymbiosis. In this study, we carried out phylogenomic analysis to distinguish their evolutionary lineages by using algal RNA-seq datasets of the 1 000 Plants (1KP) Project and publicly available complete genomes of mitochondria and chloroplasts of Kingdom Chromista. We have found that there is a split between Class Phaeophyceae of Phylum Ochrophyta and the others (Phylum Cryptophyta and Haptophyta) in Kingdom Chromista, and identified more diversity in chloroplast genes than mitochondrial ones in their phylogenetic trees. Taxonomy resolution for Class Phaeophyceae showed that it was divided into Laminariales-Ectocarpales clade and Fucales clade, and phylogenetic positions of Kjellmaniella crassi-folia, Hizikia fusifrome and Ishige okamurai were confirmed. Our analysis provided the basic phylogenetic relationships of Chromista algae, and demonstrated their potential ability to study endosymbiotic events.

  8. Relative rates of synonymous substitutions in the mitochondrial, chloroplast and nuclear genomes of seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Guy; Daoud, Hanane; Xia, Junnan

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have estimated that, in angiosperms, the synonymous substitution rate of chloroplast genes is three times higher than that of mitochondrial genes and that of nuclear genes is twelve times higher than that of mitochondrial genes. Here we used 12 genes in 27 seed plant species to investigate whether these relative rates of substitutions are common to diverse seed plant groups. We find that the overall relative rate of synonymous substitutions of mitochondrial, chloroplast and nuclear genes of all seed plants is 1:3:10, that these ratios are 1:2:4 in gymnosperms but 1:3:16 in angiosperms and that they go up to 1:3:20 in basal angiosperms. Our results show that the mitochondrial, chloroplast and nuclear genomes of seed plant groups have different synonymous substitutions rates, that these rates are different in different seed plant groups and that gymnosperms have smaller ratios than angiosperms.

  9. Identification of chloroplast genome loci suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic studies of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (Araceae) and closely related taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Matthews, Peter J; Biggs, Patrick J; Naeem, Muhammad; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we reported the chloroplast genome-wide association of oligonucleotide repeats, indels and nucleotide substitutions in aroid chloroplast genomes. We hypothesized that the distribution of oligonucleotide repeat sequences in a single representative genome can be used to identify mutational hotspots and loci suitable for population genetic, phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. Using information on the location of oligonucleotide repeats in the chloroplast genome of taro (Colocasia esculenta), we designed 30 primer pairs to amplify and sequence polymorphic loci. The primers have been tested in a range of intra-specific to intergeneric comparisons, including ten taro samples (Colocasia esculenta) from diverse geographical locations, four other Colocasia species (C. affinis, C. fallax, C. formosana, C. gigantea) and three other aroid genera (represented by Remusatia vivipara, Alocasia brisbanensis and Amorphophallus konjac). Multiple sequence alignments for the intra-specific comparison revealed nucleotide substitutions (point mutations) at all 30 loci and microsatellite polymorphisms at 14 loci. The primer pairs reported here reveal levels of genetic variation suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic and evolutionary studies of taro and other closely related aroids. Our results confirm that information on repeat distribution can be used to identify loci suitable for such studies, and we expect that this approach can be used in other plant groups.

  10. Sequence and expression characteristics of a nuclear-encoded chloroplast sigma factor from mustard (Sinapis alba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestermann, M; Neukirchen, S; Kloppstech, K; Link, G

    1998-06-01

    Plant chloroplasts contain transcription factors that functionally resemble bacterial sigma factors. We have cloned the full-length cDNA from mustard (Sinapis alba) for a 53 kDa derived polypeptide that contains similarity to regions 1.2-4.2 of sigma70-type factors. The amino acid sequence at the N-terminus has characteristics of a chloroplast transit peptide. An in vitro synthesized polypeptide containing this region was shown to be imported into the chloroplast and processed. The recombinant factor lacking the N-terminal extension was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. It confers the ability on E.coli core RNA polymerase to bind specifically to a DNA fragment that contains the chloroplast psbA promoter. Transcription of the psbA template by E.coli core enzyme in the presence of recombinant SIG1 results in enhanced formation of transcripts of the size expected for correct initiation at the in vivo start site. Together, these data suggest that the mature protein acts as one of the chloroplast transcription factors in mustard. RNA gel blot hybridization reveals a transcript at approximately 1.8 kb, which is more abundant in light-grown than in dark-grown mustard seedlings.

  11. Sequence characteristics and divergent evolution of the chloroplast psbA-trnH noncoding region in gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, D C; Chen, S L; Xiao, P G

    2010-01-01

    The psbA-trnH intergenic region is among the most variable regions in the gymnosperm chloroplast genome. It is proposed as suitable for DNA barcoding studies and is useful in phylogenetics at the species level. This region consists of two parts differing in their evolutionary characteristics: 1) the psbA 3’UTR (untranslated region) and 2) the psbA-trnH intergenic spacer. We compared the sequence and RNA secondary structure of the psbA 3’ UTR across gymnosperms and found consensus motifs corresponding to the stem portions of the RNA stem-loop structures and a consensus TGGATTGTTATGT box. The psbA-trnH spacer is highly variable in length and composition. Tandem repeats that form stem-loop structures were detected in both the psbA 3’ UTR and the psbA-trnH spacer. The presence of promoters and stem-loop structures in the psbA-trnH spacer and high sequence variation in this region suggest that psbA and trnH in some gymnosperms are independently transcribed. A comparison of chloroplast UTRs across gymnosperms offer clues to the identity of putative regulatory elements and information on selective constraints imposed on the chloroplast non-coding regions. The present study should inspire researchers to explore the full potential of the psbA-trnH non-coding sequence and to further stimulate its application in a broader spectrum of studies, not limited to phylogenetics and DNA barcoding.

  12. Analysis of synonymous codon usage in chloroplast genome of Populus alba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Meng; LONG Wei; LI Xia

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of codon usage in the chloroplast genome of Populus alba was investigated.Correspondence analysis (a commonly used multivariate statistical approach) and method of effective number of codons (ENc)-plot were conducted to analyze synonymous codon usage.The results of correspondence analysis showed that the distribution of genes on the major axis was significantly correlated with the frequency of use of G+C in synonymously variable third position of sense codon (GC3S),(r=0.349),and the positions of genes on the axis 2 and axis 3 were significantly correlated with CAI (r=-0.348,p<0.01 and r=0.602,p<0.01).The ENc for most genes was similar to that for the expected ENc based on the GC3S,but several genes with low ENC values were lying below the expected curve.All of these data indicated that codon usage was dominated by a mutational bias in chloroplast genome of P.alba.The selection in nature for translational efficiency only played a minor role in shaping codon usage in the chloroplast genome of P.alba.

  13. Comparative Chloroplast Genome Analyses of Streptophyte Green Algae Uncover Major Structural Alterations in the Klebsormidiophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Claude; Otis, Christian; Turmel, Monique

    2016-01-01

    The Streptophyta comprises all land plants and six main lineages of freshwater green algae: Mesostigmatophyceae, Chlorokybophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Charophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. Previous comparisons of the chloroplast genome from nine streptophyte algae (including four zygnematophyceans) revealed that, although land plant chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) inherited most of their highly conserved structural features from green algal ancestors, considerable cpDNA changes took place during the evolution of the Zygnematophyceae, the sister group of land plants. To gain deeper insights into the evolutionary dynamics of the chloroplast genome in streptophyte algae, we sequenced the cpDNAs of nine additional taxa: two klebsormidiophyceans (Entransia fimbriata and Klebsormidium sp. SAG 51.86), one coleocheatophycean (Coleochaete scutata) and six zygnematophyceans (Cylindrocystis brebissonii, Netrium digitus, Roya obtusa, Spirogyra maxima, Cosmarium botrytis and Closterium baillyanum). Our comparative analyses of these genomes with their streptophyte algal counterparts indicate that the large inverted repeat (IR) encoding the rDNA operon experienced loss or expansion/contraction in all three sampled classes and that genes were extensively shuffled in both the Klebsormidiophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. The klebsormidiophycean genomes boast greatly expanded IRs, with the Entransia 60,590-bp IR being the largest known among green algae. The 206,025-bp Entransia cpDNA, which is one of the largest genome among streptophytes, encodes 118 standard genes, i.e., four additional genes compared to its Klebsormidium flaccidum homolog. We inferred that seven of the 21 group II introns usually found in land plants were already present in the common ancestor of the Klebsormidiophyceae and its sister lineages. At 107,236 bp and with 117 standard genes, the Coleochaete IR-less genome is both the smallest and most compact among the streptophyte algal cpDNAs analyzed thus

  14. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.L.; Bolund, L.; Churcher, C.; Fredholm, M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Harlizius, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. Results - Assemblies of the B

  15. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos V Papageorgiou

    Full Text Available Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154 isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively. The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease.

  16. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Eudes; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel Tj;

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also...... in an exponential increase in draft (partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome...

  17. The complete chloroplast genome of Cupressus gigantea, an endemic conifer species to Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huie; Guo, Qiqiang; Zheng, Weilie

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome of the wild Cupressus gigantea (Cupressaceae) is determined in this study. The circular genome is 128 244 bp in length with 115 single copy genes and two duplicated genes (trnI-CAU and trnQ-UUG). This genome contains 82 protein-coding genes, four ribosomal RNA genes and 31 transfer RNA genes. In these genes, eight genes (atpF, rpoC1, ndhA, ndhB, petB, petD, rpl16 and rpl2) harbor a single intron and two genes (rps12 and ycf3) harbor two introns. This genome does not contain canonical IRs, and the overall GC content is 34.7%. A maximum parsimony phylogenetic analysis revealed that C. gigantea and C. sempervirens are more closely related.

  18. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. RESULTS: Assemblies......) is under construction and will incorporate whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS) data providing > 30x genome coverage. The WGS sequence, most of which comprise short Illumina/Solexa reads, were generated from DNA from the same single Duroc sow as the source of the BAC library from which clones were...

  19. Analysis of whole chloroplast genomes from the genera of the Clauseneae, the curry tribe (Rutaceae, Citrus family).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, Vikram S; Appelhans, Marc S; Johnson, Gabriel; Carlsen, Monica; Zimmer, Elizabeth A

    2016-12-11

    The Clauseneae (Aurantioideae, Rutaceae) is a tribe in the Citrus family that, although economically important as it contains the culinary and medicinally-useful curry tree (Bergera koenigii), has been relatively understudied. Due to the recent significant taxonomic changes made to this tribe, a closer inspection of the genetic relationships among its genera has been warranted. Whole genome skimming was used to generate chloroplast genomes from six species, representing each of the four genera (Bergera, Clausena, Glycosmis, Micromelum) in the Clauseneae tribe plus one closely related outgroup (Merrillia), using the published plastome sequence of Citrus sinensis as a reference. Phylogenetically informative character (PIC) data were analyzed using a genome alignment of the seven species, and variability frequency among the species was recorded for each coding and non-coding region, with the regions of highest variability identified for future phylogenetic studies. Non-coding regions exhibited a higher percentage of variable characters as expected, and the phylogenetic markers ycf1, matK, rpoC2, ndhF, trnS-trnG spacer, and trnH-psbA spacer proved to be among the most variable regions. Other markers that are frequently used in phylogenetic studies, e.g. rps16, atpB-rbcL, rps4-trnT, and trnL-trnF, proved to be far less variable. Phylogenetic analyses of the aligned sequences were conducted using Bayesian inference (MrBayes) and Maximum Likelihood (RAxML), yielding highly supported divisions among the four genera.

  20. Capturing the biofuel wellhead and powerhouse: the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of the leguminous feedstock tree Pongamia pinnata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H Kazakoff

    Full Text Available Pongamia pinnata (syn. Millettia pinnata is a novel, fast-growing arboreal legume that bears prolific quantities of oil-rich seeds suitable for the production of biodiesel and aviation biofuel. Here, we have used Illumina® 'Second Generation DNA Sequencing (2GS' and a new short-read de novo assembler, SaSSY, to assemble and annotate the Pongamia chloroplast (152,968 bp; cpDNA and mitochondrial (425,718 bp; mtDNA genomes. We also show that SaSSY can be used to accurately assemble 2GS data, by re-assembling the Lotus japonicus cpDNA and in the process assemble its mtDNA (380,861 bp. The Pongamia cpDNA contains 77 unique protein-coding genes and is almost 60% gene-dense. It contains a 50 kb inversion common to other legumes, as well as a novel 6.5 kb inversion that is responsible for the non-disruptive, re-orientation of five protein-coding genes. Additionally, two copies of an inverted repeat firmly place the species outside the subclade of the Fabaceae lacking the inverted repeat. The Pongamia and L. japonicus mtDNA contain just 33 and 31 unique protein-coding genes, respectively, and like other angiosperm mtDNA, have expanded intergenic and multiple repeat regions. Through comparative analysis with Vigna radiata we measured the average synonymous and non-synonymous divergence of all three legume mitochondrial (1.59% and 2.40%, respectively and chloroplast (8.37% and 8.99%, respectively protein-coding genes. Finally, we explored the relatedness of Pongamia within the Fabaceae and showed the utility of the organellar genome sequences by mapping transcriptomic data to identify up- and down-regulated stress-responsive gene candidates and confirm in silico predicted RNA editing sites.

  1. The chloroplast genome hidden in plain sight, open access publishing and anti-fragile distributed data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, Kevin Judd

    2016-11-01

    We sequenced several cannabis genomes in 2011 of June and the first and the longest contigs to emerge were the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes. Having been a contributor to the Human Genome Project and an eye-witness to the real benefits of immediate data release, I have first hand experience with the potential mal-investment of millions of dollars of tax payer money narrowly averted due to the adopted global rapid data release policy. The policy was vital in reducing duplication of effort and economic waste. As a result, we felt obligated to publish the Cannabis genome data in a similar spirit and placed them immediately on a cloud based Amazon server in August of 2011. While these rapid data release practices were heralded by many in the media, we still find some authors fail to find or reference said work and hope to compel the readership that this omission has more pervasive repercussions than bruised egos and is a regression for our community.

  2. Genome Sequences of Eight Morphologically Diverse Alphaproteobacteria▿

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Pamela J.B.; Kysela, David T.; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V

    2011-01-01

    The Alphaproteobacteriacomprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium.

  3. Genome sequences of eight morphologically diverse Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V

    2011-09-01

    The Alphaproteobacteria comprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium.

  4. Genome Sequences of Eight Morphologically Diverse Alphaproteobacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Pamela J. B.; Kysela, David T.; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V.

    2011-01-01

    The Alphaproteobacteriacomprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium. PMID:21705585

  5. Genome Sequence of Mycobacteriophage Momo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H; Bina, Elizabeth A; Brahme, Indraneel S; Hill, Amy B; Himmelstein, Philip H; Hunsicker, Sara M; Ish, Amanda R; Le, Tinh S; Martin, Mary M; Moscinski, Catherine N; Shetty, Sameer A; Swierzewski, Tomasz; Iyengar, Varun B; Kim, Hannah; Schafer, Claire E; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Bowman, Charles A; Russell, Daniel A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-06-18

    Momo is a newly discovered phage of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155. Momo has a double-stranded DNA genome 154,553 bp in length, with 233 predicted protein-encoding genes, 34 tRNA genes, and one transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) gene. Momo has a myoviral morphology and shares extensive nucleotide sequence similarity with subcluster C1 mycobacteriophages.

  6. RNA Editing Sites Exist in Protein-coding Genes in the Chloroplast Genome of Cycas taitungensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Chen; Likun Deng; Yuan Jiang; Ping Lu; Jianing Yu

    2011-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that results in modifications of ribonucleotides at specific locations.In land plants editing can occur in both mitochondria and chloroplasts and most commonly involves C-to-U changes,especially in seed plants.Using prediction and experimental determination,we investigated RNA editing in 40 protein-coding genes from the chloroplast genome of Cycas taitungensis.A total of 85 editing sites were identified in 25 transcripts.Comparison analysis of the published editotypes of these 25 transcripts in eight species showed that RNA editing events gradually disappear during plant evolution.The editing in the first and third codon position disappeared quicker than that in the second codon position,ndh genes have the highest editing frequency while serine and proline codons were more frequently edited than the codons of other amino acids.These results imply that retained RNA editing sites have imbalanced distribution in genes and most of them may function by changing protein structure or interaction.Mitochondrion protein-coding genes have three times the editing sites compared with chloroplast genes of Cycas,most likely due to slower evolution speed.

  7. Identifying the Basal Angiosperm Node in Chloroplast GenomePhylogenies: Sampling One's Way Out of the Felsenstein Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leebens-Mack, Jim; Raubeson, Linda A.; Cui, Liying; Kuehl,Jennifer V.; Fourcade, Matthew H.; Chumley, Timothy W.; Boore, JeffreyL.; Jansen, Robert K.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2005-05-27

    While there has been strong support for Amborella and Nymphaeales (water lilies) as branching from basal-most nodes in the angiosperm phylogeny, this hypothesis has recently been challenged by phylogenetic analyses of 61 protein-coding genes extracted from the chloroplast genome sequences of Amborella, Nymphaea and 12 other available land plant chloroplast genomes. These character-rich analyses placed the monocots, represented by three grasses (Poaceae), as sister to all other extant angiosperm lineages. We have extracted protein-coding regions from draft sequences for six additional chloroplast genomes to test whether this surprising result could be an artifact of long-branch attraction due to limited taxon sampling. The added taxa include three monocots (Acorus, Yucca and Typha), a water lily (Nuphar), a ranunculid(Ranunculus), and a gymnosperm (Ginkgo). Phylogenetic analyses of the expanded DNA and protein datasets together with microstructural characters (indels) provided unambiguous support for Amborella and the Nymphaeales as branching from the basal-most nodes in the angiospermphylogeny. However, their relative positions proved to be dependent on method of analysis, with parsimony favoring Amborella as sister to all other angiosperms, and maximum likelihood and neighbor-joining methods favoring an Amborella + Nympheales clade as sister. The maximum likelihood phylogeny supported the later hypothesis, but the likelihood for the former hypothesis was not significantly different. Parametric bootstrap analysis, single gene phylogenies, estimated divergence dates and conflicting in del characters all help to illuminate the nature of the conflict in resolution of the most basal nodes in the angiospermphylogeny. Molecular dating analyses provided median age estimates of 161 mya for the most recent common ancestor of all extant angiosperms and 145 mya for the most recent common ancestor of monocots, magnoliids andeudicots. Whereas long sequences reduce variance in

  8. Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial genomes and complex inheritance of chloroplast genomes in Actinidia Lind.: evidences from interspecific crosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dawei; Qi, Xiaoqiong; Li, Xinwei; Li, Li; Zhong, Caihong; Huang, Hongwen

    2013-04-01

    The inheritance pattern of chloroplast and mitochondria is a critical determinant in studying plant phylogenetics, biogeography and hybridization. To better understand chloroplast and mitochondrial inheritance patterns in Actinidia (traditionally called kiwifruit), we performed 11 artificial interspecific crosses and studied the ploidy levels, morphology, and sequence polymorphisms of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of parents and progenies. Sequence analysis showed that the mtDNA haplotypes of F1 hybrids entirely matched those of the female parents, indicating strictly maternal inheritance of Actinidia mtDNA. However, the cpDNA haplotypes of F1 hybrids, which were predominantly derived from the male parent (9 crosses), could also originate from the mother (1 cross) or both parents (1 cross), demonstrating paternal, maternal, and biparental inheritance of Actinidia cpDNA. The inheritance patterns of the cpDNA in Actinidia hybrids differed according to the species and genotypes chosen to be the parents, rather than the ploidy levels of the parent selected. The multiple inheritance modes of Actinidia cpDNA contradicted the strictly paternal inheritance patterns observed in previous studies, and provided new insights into the use of cpDNA markers in studies of phylogenetics, biogeography and introgression in Actinidia and other angiosperms.

  9. A hybrid swarm population of Pinus densiflora × P. sylvestris inferred from sequence analysis of chloroplast DNA and morphological characters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Young Hee Joung; Jerry L.Hill; Jung Oh Hyun; Ding Mu; Juchun Luo; Do Hyung Lee; Takayuki Kawahara; Jeung Keun Suh; Mark S.Roh

    2013-01-01

    To confirm a hybrid swarm population ofPinus densiflora × P.sylvestris in Jilin,China,we used needles and seeds from P.densiflora,P.sylvestris,and P.densiflora × P.sylvestris collected from natural stands or experimental stations to study whether shoot apex morphology of 4-year old seedlings can be correlated with the sequence of a chloroplast DNA simple sequence repeat marker (cpDNA SSRs).Total genomic DNA was extracted and subjected to sequence analysis of the pine cpDNA SSR marker Pt15169.Results show that morphological characters from 4-year old seedlings did not correlate with sequence variants of this marker.Marker haplotypes from all P.sylvestris trees had a CTAT element that was absent from all sampled P.densiflora trees.However,both haplotype classes involving this insertion/deletion element were found in a P.densiflora × P.sylvestris population and its seedling progeny.It was concluded that the P.densiflora × P.sylvestris accessions sampled from Jilin,China resulted from bi-directional crosses,as evidenced by both species' cpDNA haplotypes within the hybrid swarm population.

  10. Comparative analysis of the complete sequence of the plastid genome of Parthenium argentatum and identification of DNA barcodes to differentiate Parthenium species and lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornish Katrina

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parthenium argentatum (guayule is an industrial crop that produces latex, which was recently commercialized as a source of latex rubber safe for people with Type I latex allergy. The complete plastid genome of P. argentatum was sequenced. The sequence provides important information useful for genetic engineering strategies. Comparison to the sequences of plastid genomes from three other members of the Asteraceae, Lactuca sativa, Guitozia abyssinica and Helianthus annuus revealed details of the evolution of the four genomes. Chloroplast-specific DNA barcodes were developed for identification of Parthenium species and lines. Results The complete plastid genome of P. argentatum is 152,803 bp. Based on the overall comparison of individual protein coding genes with those in L. sativa, G. abyssinica and H. annuus, we demonstrate that the P. argentatum chloroplast genome sequence is most closely related to that of H. annuus. Similar to chloroplast genomes in G. abyssinica, L. sativa and H. annuus, the plastid genome of P. argentatum has a large 23 kb inversion with a smaller 3.4 kb inversion, within the large inversion. Using the matK and psbA-trnH spacer chloroplast DNA barcodes, three of the four Parthenium species tested, P. tomentosum, P. hysterophorus and P. schottii, can be differentiated from P. argentatum. In addition, we identified lines within P. argentatum. Conclusion The genome sequence of the P. argentatum chloroplast will enrich the sequence resources of plastid genomes in commercial crops. The availability of the complete plastid genome sequence may facilitate transformation efficiency by using the precise sequence of endogenous flanking sequences and regulatory elements in chloroplast transformation vectors. The DNA barcoding study forms the foundation for genetic identification of commercially significant lines of P. argentatum that are important for producing latex.

  11. Translational genomics for plant breeding with the genome sequence explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yang Jae; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Jeong, Haneul; Satyawan, Dani; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2016-04-01

    The use of next-generation sequencers and advanced genotyping technologies has propelled the field of plant genomics in model crops and plants and enhanced the discovery of hidden bridges between genotypes and phenotypes. The newly generated reference sequences of unstudied minor plants can be annotated by the knowledge of model plants via translational genomics approaches. Here, we reviewed the strategies of translational genomics and suggested perspectives on the current databases of genomic resources and the database structures of translated information on the new genome. As a draft picture of phenotypic annotation, translational genomics on newly sequenced plants will provide valuable assistance for breeders and researchers who are interested in genetic studies.

  12. Transfer of a eubacteria-type cell division site-determining factor CrMinD gene to the nucleus from the chloroplast genome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WeiZhong; HU Yong; ZHANG RunJie; ZHOU WeiWei; ZHU JiaYing; LIU XiangLin; HE YiKun

    2007-01-01

    MinD is a ubiquitous ATPase that plays a crucial role in selection of the division site in eubacteria, chloroplasts, and probably Archaea. In four green algae, Mesostigma viride, Nephroselmis olivacea, Chlorella vulgaris and Prototheca wickerhamii, MinD homologues are encoded in the plastid genome. However, in Arabidopsis, MinD is a nucleus-encoded, chloroplast-targeted protein involved in chloroplast division, which suggests that MinD has been transferred to the nucleus in higher land plants. Yet the lateral gene transfer (LGT) of MinD from plastid to nucleus during plastid evolution remains poorly understood. Here, we identified a nucleus-encoded MinD homologue from unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a basal species in the green plant lineage. Overexpression of CrMinD in wild type E. coli inhibited cell division and resulted in the filamentous cell formation, clearly demonstrated the conservation of the MinD protein during the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. The transient expression of CrMinD-egfp confirmed the role of CrMinD protein in the regulation of plastid division. Searching all the published plastid genomic sequences of land plants, no MinD homologues were found, which suggests that the transfer of MinD from plastid to nucleus might have occurred before the evolution of land plants.

  13. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  14. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard A; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony V; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  15. Fungal genome sequencing: basic biology to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-08-01

    The genome sequences provide a first glimpse into the genomic basis of the biological diversity of filamentous fungi and yeast. The genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a small genome size, unicellular growth, and rich history of genetic and molecular analyses was a milestone of early genomics in the 1990s. The subsequent completion of fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and genetic model, Neurospora crassa initiated a revolution in the genomics of the fungal kingdom. In due course of time, a substantial number of fungal genomes have been sequenced and publicly released, representing the widest sampling of genomes from any eukaryotic kingdom. An ambitious genome-sequencing program provides a wealth of data on metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into medical science, agriculture science, ecology, bioremediation, bioenergy, and the biotechnology industry. Fungal genomics have higher potential to positively affect human health, environmental health, and the planet's stored energy. With a significant increase in sequenced fungal genomes, the known diversity of genes encoding organic acids, antibiotics, enzymes, and their pathways has increased exponentially. Currently, over a hundred fungal genome sequences are publicly available; however, no inclusive review has been published. This review is an initiative to address the significance of the fungal genome-sequencing program and provides the road map for basic and applied research.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 2166.

    OpenAIRE

    Karlyshev, Andrey V.; Melnikov, Vyacheslav G.; Kosarev, Igor V.; Abramov, Vyacheslav M.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we present a draft sequence of the genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain 2166, a potential novel probiotic. Genome annotation and read mapping onto a reference genome of L. rhamnosus strain GG allowed for the identification of the differences and similarities in the genomic contents and gene arrangements of these strains.

  17. Building a model: developing genomic resources for common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca with low coverage genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitemier Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milkweeds (Asclepias L. have been extensively investigated in diverse areas of evolutionary biology and ecology; however, there are few genetic resources available to facilitate and compliment these studies. This study explored how low coverage genome sequencing of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L. could be useful in characterizing the genome of a plant without prior genomic information and for development of genomic resources as a step toward further developing A. syriaca as a model in ecology and evolution. Results A 0.5× genome of A. syriaca was produced using Illumina sequencing. A virtually complete chloroplast genome of 158,598 bp was assembled, revealing few repeats and loss of three genes: accD, clpP, and ycf1. A nearly complete rDNA cistron (18S-5.8S-26S; 7,541 bp and 5S rDNA (120 bp sequence were obtained. Assessment of polymorphism revealed that the rDNA cistron and 5S rDNA had 0.3% and 26.7% polymorphic sites, respectively. A partial mitochondrial genome sequence (130,764 bp, with identical gene content to tobacco, was also assembled. An initial characterization of repeat content indicated that Ty1/copia-like retroelements are the most common repeat type in the milkweed genome. At least one A. syriaca microread hit 88% of Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae unigenes (median coverage of 0.29× and 66% of single copy orthologs (COSII in asterids (median coverage of 0.14×. From this partial characterization of the A. syriaca genome, markers for population genetics (microsatellites and phylogenetics (low-copy nuclear genes studies were developed. Conclusions The results highlight the promise of next generation sequencing for development of genomic resources for any organism. Low coverage genome sequencing allows characterization of the high copy fraction of the genome and exploration of the low copy fraction of the genome, which facilitate the development of molecular tools for further study of a target species

  18. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eudes; GV; Barbosa; Flavia; F; Aburjaile; Rommel; TJ; Ramos; Adriana; R; Carneiro; Yves; Le; Loir; Jan; Baumbach; Anderson; Miyoshi; Artur; Silva; Vasco; Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing(NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also heightened expectations that NGS would boost antibacterial discovery and vaccine development. Although many possible drug and vaccine targets have been discovered, the success rate of genome-based analysis has remained below expectations. Furthermore, NGS has had consequences for genome quality, resulting in an exponential increase in draft(partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the "scientific value" of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses the factors that could be leading to the increase in the number of draft deposits and the consequent loss of relevant biological information.

  19. Microbial genomics: from sequence to function.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, I

    2000-01-01

    The era of genomics (the study of genes and their function) began a scant dozen years ago with a suggestion by James Watson that the complete DNA sequence of the human genome be determined. Since that time, the human genome project has attracted a great deal of attention in the scientific world and the general media; the scope of the sequencing effort, and the extraordinary value that it will provide, has served to mask the enormous progress in sequencing other genomes. Microbial genome seque...

  20. Noncoding sequences from the slowly evolving chloroplast inverted repeat in addition to rbcL data do not support gnetalean affinities of angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremykin, V; Bobrova, V; Pahnke, J; Troitsky, A; Antonov, A; Martin, W

    1996-02-01

    We developed PCR primers against highly conserved regions of the rRNA operon located within the inverted repeat of the chloroplast genome and used these to amplify the region spanning from the 3' terminus of the 23S rRNA gene to the 5' terminus of the 5S rRNA gene. The sequence of this roughly 500-bp region, which includes the 4.5S rRNA gene and two chloroplast intergenic transcribed spacer regions (cpITS2 and cpITS3), was determined from 20 angiosperms, 7 gymnosperms, and 16 ferns (21,700 bp). Sequences for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcL) from the same or confamilial genera were analyzed in both separate and combined data sets. Due to the low substitution rate in the inverted repeat region, noncoding sequences in the cpITS region are not saturated with substitutions, in contrast to synonymous sites in rbcL, which are shown to evolve roughly six times faster than noncoding cpITS sequences. Several length polymorphisms with very clear phylogenetic distributions were detected in the data set. Results of phylogenetic analyses provide very strong bootstrap support for monophyly of both spermatophytes and angiosperms. No support for a sister group relationship between Gnetales and angiosperms in either cpITS or rbcL data was found. Rather, weak bootstrap support for monophyly of gymnosperms studied and for a basal position for the aquatic angiosperm Nymphaea among angiosperms studied was observed. Noncoding sequences from the inverted repeat region of chloroplast DNA appear suitable for study of land plant evolution.

  1. Maternal inheritance of chloroplast genome and paternal inheritance of mitochondrial genome in bananas (Musa acuminata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauré, S; Noyer, J L; Carreel, F; Horry, J P; Bakry, F; Lanaud, C

    1994-03-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were used as markers to determine the transmission of cytoplasmic DNA in diploid banana crosses. Progenies from two controlled crosses were studied with heterologous cytoplasmic probes. This analysis provided evidence for a strong bias towards maternal transmission of chloroplast DNA and paternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA in Musa acuminata. These results suggest the existence of two separate mechanisms of organelle transmission and selection, but no model to explain this can be proposed at the present time. Knowledge of the organelle mode of inheritance constitutes an important point for phylogeny analyses in bananas and may offer a powerful tool to confirm hybrid origins.

  2. Isolation and analysis of high quality nuclear DNA with reduced organellar DNA for plant genome sequencing and resequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdepski Anna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput sequencing (HTS technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics by drastically reducing the cost of sequencing, making it feasible for individual labs to sequence or resequence plant genomes. Obtaining high quality, high molecular weight DNA from plants poses significant challenges due to the high copy number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA, as well as high levels of phenolic compounds and polysaccharides. Multiple methods have been used to isolate DNA from plants; the CTAB method is commonly used to isolate total cellular DNA from plants that contain nuclear DNA, as well as chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA. Alternatively, DNA can be isolated from nuclei to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. Results We describe optimized protocols for isolation of nuclear DNA from eight different plant species encompassing both monocot and eudicot species. These protocols use nuclei isolation to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. We also developed a protocol to determine the number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies relative to the nuclear DNA using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR. We compared DNA isolated from nuclei to total cellular DNA isolated with the CTAB method. As expected, DNA isolated from nuclei consistently yielded nuclear DNA with fewer chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies, as compared to the total cellular DNA prepared with the CTAB method. This protocol will allow for analysis of the quality and quantity of nuclear DNA before starting a plant whole genome sequencing or resequencing experiment. Conclusions Extracting high quality, high molecular weight nuclear DNA in plants has the potential to be a bottleneck in the era of whole genome sequencing and resequencing. The methods that are described here provide a framework for researchers to extract and quantify nuclear DNA in multiple types of plants.

  3. The Bryopsis hypnoides plastid genome: multimeric forms and complete nucleotide sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Lü

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bryopsis hypnoides Lamouroux is a siphonous green alga, and its extruded protoplasm can aggregate spontaneously in seawater and develop into mature individuals. The chloroplast of B. hypnoides is the biggest organelle in the cell and shows strong autonomy. To better understand this organelle, we sequenced and analyzed the chloroplast genome of this green alga. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 111 functional genes, including 69 potential protein-coding genes, 5 ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 tRNA genes were identified. The genome size (153,429 bp, arrangement, and inverted-repeat (IR-lacking structure of the B. hypnoides chloroplast DNA (cpDNA closely resembles that of Chlorella vulgaris. Furthermore, our cytogenomic investigations using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and southern blotting methods showed that the B. hypnoides cpDNA had multimeric forms, including monomer, dimer, trimer, tetramer, and even higher multimers, which is similar to the higher order organization observed previously for higher plant cpDNA. The relative amounts of the four multimeric cpDNA forms were estimated to be about 1, 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8 based on molecular hybridization analysis. Phylogenetic analyses based on a concatenated alignment of chloroplast protein sequences suggested that B. hypnoides is sister to all Chlorophyceae and this placement received moderate support. CONCLUSION: All of the results suggest that the autonomy of the chloroplasts of B. hypnoides has little to do with the size and gene content of the cpDNA, and the IR-lacking structure of the chloroplasts indirectly demonstrated that the multimeric molecules might result from the random cleavage and fusion of replication intermediates instead of recombinational events.

  4. The nucleotide sequence of 4.5S ribosomal RNA from tobacco chloroplasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Takaiwa, F; Sugiura, M

    1980-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of tobacco chloroplast 4.5S ribosomal RNA has been determined to be: OHG-A-A-G-G-U-C-A-C-G-G-C-G-A-G-A-C-G-A-G-C-C-G-U-U-U-A-U-C-A-U-U-A-C-G-A-U-A-G-G-U-G-U-C-A-A-G-U-G-G-A-A-G-U-G-C-A-G-U-G-A-U-G-U-A-U-G-C-(G-A)-C-U-G-A-G-G-C-A-U-C-C-U-A-A-C-A-G-A-C-C-G-G-U-A-G-A-C-U-U-G-A-A-COH. The 4.5S RNA is 103 nucleotides long and its 5'-terminus is not phosphorylated.

  5. Maize genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lance E; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew L; Balija, Vivekanand S; Nascimento, Lidia U; Dike, Sujit; de la Bastide, Melissa; Martienssen, Robert A; McCombie, W Richard

    2003-12-19

    Gene enrichment strategies offer an alternative to sequencing large and repetitive genomes such as that of maize. We report the generation and analysis of nearly 100,000 undermethylated (or methylation filtration) maize sequences. Comparison with the rice genome reveals that methylation filtration results in a more comprehensive representation of maize genes than those that result from expressed sequence tags or transposon insertion sites sequences. About 7% of the repetitive DNA is unmethylated and thus selected in our libraries, but potentially active transposons and unmethylated organelle genomes can be identified. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction can be used to finish the maize transcriptome.

  6. Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new sequencesfrom the angiosperms Nuphar advena and Ranunculus macranthus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubeso, Linda A.; Peery, Rhiannon; Chumley, Timothy W.; Dziubek,Chris; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2007-03-01

    The number of completely sequenced plastid genomes available is growing rapidly. This new array of sequences presents new opportunities to perform comparative analyses. In comparative studies, it is most useful to compare across wide phylogenetic spans and, within angiosperms, to include representatives from basally diverging lineages such as the new genomes reported here: Nuphar advena (from a basal-most lineage) and Ranunculus macranthus (from the basal group of eudicots). We report these two new plastid genome sequences and make comparisons (within angiosperms, seed plants, or all photosynthetic lineages) to evaluate features such as the status of ycf15 and ycf68 as protein coding genes, the distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and longer dispersed repeats (SDR), and patterns of nucleotide composition.

  7. The Chloroplast Genome of Euglena mutabilis-Cluster Arrangement, Intron Analysis, and Intrageneric Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, Nadja; Preisfeld, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the chloroplast genome of Euglena mutabilis underlined a high diversity in the evolution of plastids in euglenids. Gene clusters in more derived Euglenales increased in complexity with only a few, but remarkable changes in the genus Euglena. Euglena mutabilis differed from other Euglena species in a mirror-inverted arrangement of 12 from 15 identified clusters, making it very likely that the emergence at the base of the genus Euglena, which has been considered a long branch artifact, is truly a probable position. This was corroborated by many similarities in gene arrangement and orientation with Strombomonas and Monomorphina, rendering the genome organization of E. mutabilis in certain clusters as plesiomorphic feature. By RNA analysis exact exon-intron boundaries and the type of the 77 introns identified were mostly determined unambiguously. A detailed intron study of psbC pointed at two important issues: First, the number of introns varied even between species, and no trend from few to many introns could be observed. Second, mat1 was localized in Eutreptiales exclusively in intron 1, and mat2 was not identified. With the emergence of Euglenaceae in most species, a new intron containing mat2 inserted in front of the previous intron 1 and thereby became intron 2 with mat1.

  8. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  9. Strategies for complete plastid genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyford, Alex D; Ness, Rob W

    2016-10-28

    Plastid sequencing is an essential tool in the study of plant evolution. This high-copy organelle is one of the most technically accessible regions of the genome, and its sequence conservation makes it a valuable region for comparative genome evolution, phylogenetic analysis and population studies. Here, we discuss recent innovations and approaches for de novo plastid assembly that harness genomic tools. We focus on technical developments including low-cost sequence library preparation approaches for genome skimming, enrichment via hybrid baits and methylation-sensitive capture, sequence platforms with higher read outputs and longer read lengths, and automated tools for assembly. These developments allow for a much more streamlined assembly than via conventional short-range PCR. Although newer methods make complete plastid sequencing possible for any land plant or green alga, there are still challenges for producing finished plastomes particularly from herbarium material or from structurally divergent plastids such as those of parasitic plants.

  10. Plantagora: modeling whole genome sequencing and assembly of plant genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Barthelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genomics studies are being revolutionized by the next generation sequencing technologies, which have made whole genome sequencing much more accessible to the average researcher. Whole genome sequencing with the new technologies is a developing art that, despite the large volumes of data that can be produced, may still fail to provide a clear and thorough map of a genome. The Plantagora project was conceived to address specifically the gap between having the technical tools for genome sequencing and knowing precisely the best way to use them. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For Plantagora, a platform was created for generating simulated reads from several different plant genomes of different sizes. The resulting read files mimicked either 454 or Illumina reads, with varying paired end spacing. Thousands of datasets of reads were created, most derived from our primary model genome, rice chromosome one. All reads were assembled with different software assemblers, including Newbler, Abyss, and SOAPdenovo, and the resulting assemblies were evaluated by an extensive battery of metrics chosen for these studies. The metrics included both statistics of the assembly sequences and fidelity-related measures derived by alignment of the assemblies to the original genome source for the reads. The results were presented in a website, which includes a data graphing tool, all created to help the user compare rapidly the feasibility and effectiveness of different sequencing and assembly strategies prior to testing an approach in the lab. Some of our own conclusions regarding the different strategies were also recorded on the website. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Plantagora provides a substantial body of information for comparing different approaches to sequencing a plant genome, and some conclusions regarding some of the specific approaches. Plantagora also provides a platform of metrics and tools for studying the process of sequencing and assembly

  11. A Phylogenetic Analysis of 34 Chloroplast Genomes Elucidates the Relationships between Wild and Domestic Species within the Genus Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Alonso, Roberto; Ibañez, Victoria; Terol, Javier; Talon, Manuel; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2015-08-01

    Citrus genus includes some of the most important cultivated fruit trees worldwide. Despite being extensively studied because of its commercial relevance, the origin of cultivated citrus species and the history of its domestication still remain an open question. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the chloroplast genomes of 34 citrus genotypes which constitutes the most comprehensive and detailed study to date on the evolution and variability of the genus Citrus. A statistical model was used to estimate divergence times between the major citrus groups. Additionally, a complete map of the variability across the genome of different citrus species was produced, including single nucleotide variants, heteroplasmic positions, indels (insertions and deletions), and large structural variants. The distribution of all these variants provided further independent support to the phylogeny obtained. An unexpected finding was the high level of heteroplasmy found in several of the analyzed genomes. The use of the complete chloroplast DNA not only paves the way for a better understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within the Citrus genus but also provides original insights into other elusive evolutionary processes, such as chloroplast inheritance, heteroplasmy, and gene selection.

  12. Microbial species delineation using whole genome sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatics, Kostas; Pati, Amrita; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos

    2014-10-20

    Species assignments in prokaryotes use a manual, poly-phasic approach utilizing both phenotypic traits and sequence information of phylogenetic marker genes. With thousands of genomes being sequenced every year, an automated, uniform and scalable approach exploiting the rich genomic information in whole genome sequences is desired, at least for the initial assignment of species to an organism. We have evaluated pairwise genome-wide Average Nucleotide Identity (gANI) values and alignment fractions (AFs) for nearly 13,000 genomes using our fast implementation of the computation, identifying robust and widely applicable hard cut-offs for species assignments based on AF and gANI. Using these cutoffs, we generated stable species-level clusters of organisms, which enabled the identification of several species mis-assignments and facilitated the assignment of species for organisms without species definitions.

  13. Genomic prediction using QTL derived from whole genome sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Su, Guosheng; Janss, Luc

    This study investigated the gain in accuracy of genomic prediction when a small number of significant variants from single marker analysis based on whole genome sequence data were added to the regular 54k SNP data. Analyses were performed for Nordic Holstein and Danish Jersey animals, using eithe...

  14. Systematic positions of Lamiophiomis and Paraphlomis (Lamiaceae) based on nuclear and chloroplast sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Zhi PAN; Li-Qin FANG; Gang HAO; Jie CAI; Xun GONG

    2009-01-01

    Genera Lamiophlomis and Paraphlomis were originally separated from genus Phlomis s.l. on the basis of particular morphological characteristics. However, their relationship was highly contentious, as evidenced by the literature. In the present paper, the systematic positions of Lamiophlomis, Paraphlomis, and their related genera were assessed based on nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and chloroplast rpl16 and trnL-F sequence data using maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian methods. In total, 24 species representing six genera of the ingroup and outgroup were sampled. Analyses of both separate and combined sequence data were conducted to resolve the systematic relationships of these genera. The results reveal that Lamiophlomis is nested within Phlomis sect. Phlomoides and its genetic status is not supported. With the inclusion of Lamiophlomis rotata in sect. Phlomoides, sections Phlomis and Phlomoides of Phlomis were resolved as monophyletic. Paraphlomis was supported as an inde-pendent genus. However, the resolution of its monophyly conflicted between MP and Bayesian analyses, suggesting the need for expended sampling and further evidence.

  15. The characterization of twenty sequenced human genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Pelak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of twenty human genomes to evaluate the prospects for identifying rare functional variants that contribute to a phenotype of interest. We sequenced at high coverage ten "case" genomes from individuals with severe hemophilia A and ten "control" genomes. We summarize the number of genetic variants emerging from a study of this magnitude, and provide a proof of concept for the identification of rare and highly-penetrant functional variants by confirming that the cause of hemophilia A is easily recognizable in this data set. We also show that the number of novel single nucleotide variants (SNVs discovered per genome seems to stabilize at about 144,000 new variants per genome, after the first 15 individuals have been sequenced. Finally, we find that, on average, each genome carries 165 homozygous protein-truncating or stop loss variants in genes representing a diverse set of pathways.

  16. Fathead minnow genome sequencing and assembly

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset provides the URLs for accessing the genome sequence data and two draft assemblies as well as fathead minnow genotyping data associated with estimating...

  17. Sequencing of Australian wild rice genomes reveals ancestral relationships with domesticated rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozynska, Marta; Copetti, Dario; Furtado, Agnelo; Wing, Rod A; Crayn, Darren; Fox, Glen; Ishikawa, Ryuji; Henry, Robert J

    2016-11-27

    The related A genome species of the Oryza genus are the effective gene pool for rice. Here, we report draft genomes for two Australian wild A genome taxa: O. rufipogon-like population, referred to as Taxon A, and O. meridionalis-like population, referred to as Taxon B. These two taxa were sequenced and assembled by integration of short- and long-read next-generation sequencing (NGS) data to create a genomic platform for a wider rice gene pool. Here, we report that, despite the distinct chloroplast genome, the nuclear genome of the Australian Taxon A has a sequence that is much closer to that of domesticated rice (O. sativa) than to the other Australian wild populations. Analysis of 4643 genes in the A genome clade showed that the Australian annual, O. meridionalis, and related perennial taxa have the most divergent (around 3 million years) genome sequences relative to domesticated rice. A test for admixture showed possible introgression into the Australian Taxon A (diverged around 1.6 million years ago) especially from the wild indica/O. nivara clade in Asia. These results demonstrate that northern Australia may be the centre of diversity of the A genome Oryza and suggest the possibility that this might also be the centre of origin of this group and represent an important resource for rice improvement.

  18. Complete sequence of heterogenous-composition mitochondrial genome (Brassica napus and its exogenous source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Juan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unlike maternal inheritance of mitochondria in sexual reproduction, somatic hybrids follow no obvious pattern. The introgressed segment orf138 from the mitochondrial genome of radish (Raphanus sativus to its counterpart in rapeseed (Brassica napus demonstrates that this inheritance mode derives from the cytoplasm of both parents. Sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome of five species from Brassica family allowed the prediction of other extraneous sources of the cybrids from the radish parent, and the determination of their mitochondrial rearrangement. Results We obtained the complete mitochondrial genome of Ogura-cms-cybrid (oguC rapeseed. To date, this is the first time that a heterogeneously composed mitochondrial genome was sequenced. The 258,473 bp master circle constituted of 33 protein-coding genes, 3 rRNA sequences, and 23 tRNA sequences. This mitotype noticeably holds two copies of atp9 and is devoid of cox2-2. Relative to nap mitochondrial genome, 40 point mutations were scattered in the 23 protein-coding genes. atp6 even has an abnormal start locus whereas tatC has an abnormal end locus. The rearrangement of the 22 syntenic regions that comprised 80.11% of the genome was influenced by short repeats. A pair of large repeats (9731 bp was responsible for the multipartite structure. Nine unique regions were detected when compared with other published Brassica mitochondrial genome sequences. We also found six homologous chloroplast segments (Brassica napus. Conclusions The mitochondrial genome of oguC is quite divergent from nap and pol, which are more similar with each other. We analyzed the unique regions of every genome of the Brassica family, and found that very few segments were specific for these six mitotypes, especially cam, jun, and ole, which have no specific segments at all. Therefore, we conclude that the most specific regions of oguC possibly came from radish. Compared with the chloroplast genome

  19. Genome sequence and analysis of Lactobacillus helveticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eCremonesi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological characterization of lactobacilli is historically well developed, but the genomic analysis is recent. Because of the widespread use of L. helveticus in cheese technology, information concerning the heterogeneity in this species is accumulating rapidly. Recently, the genome of five L. helveticus strains was sequenced to completion and compared with other genomically characterized lactobacilli. The genomic analysis of the first sequenced strain, L. helveticus DPC 4571, isolated from cheese and selected for its characteristics of rapid lysis and high proteolytic activity, has revealed a plethora of genes with industrial potential including those responsible for key metabolic functions such as proteolysis, lipolysis, and cell lysis. These genes and their derived enzymes can facilitate the production of cheese and cheese derivatives with potential for use as ingredients in consumer foods. In addition, L. helveticus has the potential to produce peptides with a biological function, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity, in fermented dairy products, demonstrating the therapeutic value of this species. A most intriguing feature of the genome of L. helveticus is the remarkable similarity in gene content with many intestinal lactobacilli. Comparative genomics has allowed the identification of key gene sets that facilitate a variety of lifestyles including adaptation to food matrices or the gastrointestinal tract.As genome sequence and functional genomic information continues to explode, key features of the genomes of L. helveticus strains continue to be discovered, answering many questions but also raising many new ones.

  20. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  1. Complex chloroplast RNA metabolism: just debugging the genetic programme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz-Linneweber Christian

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene expression system of chloroplasts is far more complex than that of their cyanobacterial progenitor. This gain in complexity affects in particular RNA metabolism, specifically the transcription and maturation of RNA. Mature chloroplast RNA is generated by a plethora of nuclear-encoded proteins acquired or recruited during plant evolution, comprising additional RNA polymerases and sigma factors, and sequence-specific RNA maturation factors promoting RNA splicing, editing, end formation and translatability. Despite years of intensive research, we still lack a comprehensive explanation for this complexity. Results We inspected the available literature and genome databases for information on components of RNA metabolism in land plant chloroplasts. In particular, new inventions of chloroplast-specific mechanisms and the expansion of some gene/protein families detected in land plants lead us to suggest that the primary function of the additional nuclear-encoded components found in chloroplasts is the transgenomic suppression of point mutations, fixation of which occurred due to an enhanced genetic drift exhibited by chloroplast genomes. We further speculate that a fast evolution of transgenomic suppressors occurred after the water-to-land transition of plants. Conclusion Our inspections indicate that several chloroplast-specific mechanisms evolved in land plants to remedy point mutations that occurred after the water-to-land transition. Thus, the complexity of chloroplast gene expression evolved to guarantee the functionality of chloroplast genetic information and may not, with some exceptions, be involved in regulatory functions.

  2. Complete genome sequence of arracacha mottle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orílio, Anelise F; Lucinda, Natalia; Dusi, André N; Nagata, Tatsuya; Inoue-Nagata, Alice K

    2013-01-01

    Arracacha mottle virus (AMoV) is the only potyvirus reported to infect arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhiza) in Brazil. Here, the complete genome sequence of an isolate of AMoV was determined to be 9,630 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3' poly-A tail, and encoding a polyprotein of 3,135 amino acids and a putative P3N-PIPO protein. Its genomic organization is typical of a member of the genus Potyvirus, containing all conserved motifs. Its full genome sequence shared 56.2 % nucleotide identity with sunflower chlorotic mottle virus and verbena virus Y, the most closely related viruses.

  3. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vattipally B Sreenu; Pankaj Kumar; Javaregowda Nagaraju; Hampapathalu A Nagarajaram

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are the repetitive nucleotide sequences of motifs of length 1–6 bp. They are scattered throughout the genomes of all the known organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes. Microsatellites undergo mutations in the form of insertions and deletions (INDELS) of their repeat units with some bias towards insertions that lead to microsatellite tract expansion. Although prokaryotic genomes derive some plasticity due to microsatellite mutations they have in-built mechanisms to arrest undue expansions of microsatellites and one such mechanism is constituted by post-replicative DNA repair enzymes MutL, MutH and MutS. The mycobacterial genomes lack these enzymes and as a null hypothesis one could expect these genomes to harbour many long tracts. It is therefore interesting to analyse the mycobacterial genomes for distribution and abundance of microsatellites tracts and to look for potentially polymorphic microsatellites. Available mycobacterial genomes, Mycobacterium avium, M. leprae, M. bovis and the two strains of M. tuberculosis (CDC1551 and H37Rv) were analysed for frequencies and abundance of SSRs. Our analysis revealed that the SSRs are distributed throughout the mycobacterial genomes at an average of 220–230 SSR tracts per kb. All the mycobacterial genomes contain few regions that are conspicuously denser or poorer in microsatellites compared to their expected genome averages. The genomes distinctly show scarcity of long microsatellites despite the absence of a post-replicative DNA repair system. Such severe scarcity of long microsatellites could arise as a result of strong selection pressures operating against long and unstable sequences although influence of GC-content and role of point mutations in arresting microsatellite expansions can not be ruled out. Nonetheless, the long tracts occasionally found in coding as well as non-coding regions may account for limited genome plasticity in these genomes.

  4. Sequencing the Cotton Genomes-Gossypium spp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PATERSON Andrew H

    2008-01-01

    @@ The genomes of most major crops,including cotton,will be fully sequenced in the next fewyears.Cotton is unusual,although not unique,in that we will need to sequence not only cultivated(tetraploid) genotypes but their diploid progenitors,to understand how elite cottons have surpassedthe productivity and quality of their progenitors.

  5. Whole-genome sequencing for comparative genomics and de novo genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjak, Andrej; Sala, Claudia; Hartkoorn, Ruben C

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies for whole-genome sequencing of mycobacteria are rapidly becoming an attractive alternative to more traditional sequencing methods. In particular this technology is proving useful for genome-wide identification of mutations in mycobacteria (comparative genomics) as well as for de novo assembly of whole genomes. Next-generation sequencing however generates a vast quantity of data that can only be transformed into a usable and comprehensible form using bioinformatics. Here we describe the methodology one would use to prepare libraries for whole-genome sequencing, and the basic bioinformatics to identify mutations in a genome following Illumina HiSeq or MiSeq sequencing, as well as de novo genome assembly following sequencing using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio).

  6. Genome Sequence of the Palaeopolyploid soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Cannon, Steven B.; Schlueter, Jessica; Ma, Jianxin; Mitros, Therese; Nelson, William; Hyten, David L.; Song, Qijian; Thelen, Jay J.; Cheng, Jianlin; Xu, Dong; Hellsten, Uffe; May, Gregory D.; Yu, Yeisoo; Sakura, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Taishi; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder; Valliyodan, Babu; Lindquist, Erika; Peto, Myron; Grant, David; Shu, Shengqiang; Goodstein, David; Barry, Kerrie; Futrell-Griggs, Montona; Abernathy, Brian; Du, Jianchang; Tian, Zhixi; Zhu, Liucun; Gill, Navdeep; Joshi, Trupti; Libault, Marc; Sethuraman, Anand; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Nguyen, Henry T.; Wing, Rod A.; Cregan, Perry; Specht, James; Grimwood, Jane; Rokhsar, Dan; Stacey, Gary; Shoemaker, Randy C.; Jackson, Scott A.

    2009-08-03

    Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70percent more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78percent of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75percent of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.

  7. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, whole genome shotgun sequencing project first submission of genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The size and repetitive nature of the Rhipicephalus microplus genome makes obtaining a full genome sequence difficult. Cot filtration/selection techniques were used to reduce the repetitive fraction of the tick genome and enrich for the fraction of DNA with gene-containing regions. The Cot-selected ...

  8. Viral genome sequencing by random priming methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinsheng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most emerging health threats are of zoonotic origin. For the overwhelming majority, their causative agents are RNA viruses which include but are not limited to HIV, Influenza, SARS, Ebola, Dengue, and Hantavirus. Of increasing importance therefore is a better understanding of global viral diversity to enable better surveillance and prediction of pandemic threats; this will require rapid and flexible methods for complete viral genome sequencing. Results We have adapted the SISPA methodology 123 to genome sequencing of RNA and DNA viruses. We have demonstrated the utility of the method on various types and sources of viruses, obtaining near complete genome sequence of viruses ranging in size from 3,000–15,000 kb with a median depth of coverage of 14.33. We used this technique to generate full viral genome sequence in the presence of host contaminants, using viral preparations from cell culture supernatant, allantoic fluid and fecal matter. Conclusion The method described is of great utility in generating whole genome assemblies for viruses with little or no available sequence information, viruses from greatly divergent families, previously uncharacterized viruses, or to more fully describe mixed viral infections.

  9. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, Laurens G; Hart, Elizabeth A; Coggill, Penny C; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G R; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC.

  10. Sequencing and Analysis of a Genomic Fragment Provide an Insight into the Dunaliella viridis Genomic Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ming SUN; Yuan-Ping TANG; Xiang-Zong MENG; Wen-Wen ZHANG; Shan LI; Zhi-Rui DENG; Zheng-Kai XU; Ren-Tao SONG

    2006-01-01

    Dunaliella is a genus of wall-less unicellular eukaryotic green alga. Its exceptional resistances to salt and various other stresses have made it an ideal model for stress tolerance study. However, very little is known about its genome and genomic sequences. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed a 29,268 bp genomic fragment from Dunaliella viridis. The fragment showed low sequence homology to the GenBank database. At the nucleotide level, only a segment with significant sequence homology to 18S rRNA was found. The fragment contained six putative genes, but only one gene showed significant homology at the protein level to GenBank database. The average GC content of this sequence was 51.1%, which was much lower than that of close related green algae Chlamydomonas (65.7%). Significant segmental duplications were found within this fragment. The duplicated sequences accounted for about 35.7% of the entire region. Large amounts of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites) were found, with strong bias towards (AC)n type (76%). Analysis of other Dunaliella genomic sequences in the GenBank database (total 25,749 bp) was in agreement with these findings. These sequence features made it difficult to sequence Dunaliella genomic sequences. Further investigation should be made to reveal the biological significance of these unique sequence features.

  11. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS......) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available to scientists and routine diagnostic laboratories. Currently, the cost is below that of traditional MLST. The new challenges will be how to extract the relevant information from the large amount of data so as to allow for comparison over time...... and between laboratories. Ideally, this information should also allow for comparison to historical data. We developed a Web-based method for MLST of 66 bacterial species based on WGS data. As input, the method uses short sequence reads from four sequencing platforms or preassembled genomes. Updates from...

  12. Sorghum genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Bedell

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF technology. The evidence suggests that 96% of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65% across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis.

  13. Sorghum genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedell, Joseph A; Budiman, Muhammad A; Nunberg, Andrew; Citek, Robert W; Robbins, Dan; Jones, Joshua; Flick, Elizabeth; Rholfing, Theresa; Fries, Jason; Bradford, Kourtney; McMenamy, Jennifer; Smith, Michael; Holeman, Heather; Roe, Bruce A; Wiley, Graham; Korf, Ian F; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Lakey, Nathan; McCombie, W Richard; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Martienssen, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF) technology. The evidence suggests that 96% of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65% across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis.

  14. Cactus: Algorithms for genome multiple sequence alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Paten, Benedict; Earl, Dent; Nguyen, Ngan; Diekhans, Mark; Zerbino, Daniel; Haussler, David

    2011-01-01

    Much attention has been given to the problem of creating reliable multiple sequence alignments in a model incorporating substitutions, insertions, and deletions. Far less attention has been paid to the problem of optimizing alignments in the presence of more general rearrangement and copy number variation. Using Cactus graphs, recently introduced for representing sequence alignments, we describe two complementary algorithms for creating genomic alignments. We have implemented these algorithms...

  15. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  16. Analysis of the Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Diploid Cotton Gossypium raimondii by Comparative Genomics Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwei Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton is one of the most important economic crops and the primary source of natural fiber and is an important protein source for animal feed. The complete nuclear and chloroplast (cp genome sequences of G. raimondii are already available but not mitochondria. Here, we assembled the complete mitochondrial (mt DNA sequence of G. raimondii into a circular genome of length of 676,078 bp and performed comparative analyses with other higher plants. The genome contains 39 protein-coding genes, 6 rRNA genes, and 25 tRNA genes. We also identified four larger repeats (63.9 kb, 10.6 kb, 9.1 kb, and 2.5 kb in this mt genome, which may be active in intramolecular recombination in the evolution of cotton. Strikingly, nearly all of the G. raimondii mt genome has been transferred to nucleus on Chr1, and the transfer event must be very recent. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that G. raimondii, as a member of Malvaceae, is much closer to another cotton (G. barbadense than other rosids, and the clade formed by two Gossypium species is sister to Brassicales. The G. raimondii mt genome may provide a crucial foundation for evolutionary analysis, molecular biology, and cytoplasmic male sterility in cotton and other higher plants.

  17. The diploid genome sequence of an Asian individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Li, Ruiqiang

    2008-01-01

    Here we present the first diploid genome sequence of an Asian individual. The genome was sequenced to 36-fold average coverage using massively parallel sequencing technology. We aligned the short reads onto the NCBI human reference genome to 99.97% coverage, and guided by the reference genome, we...

  18. Genome sequence of Lactobacillus farciminis KCTC 3681.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Kang, Aram; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Aeri; Kim, Dae-Soo; Park, Hong-Seog

    2011-04-01

    Lactobacillus farciminis is one of the most prevalent lactic acid bacterial species present during the manufacturing process of kimchi, the best-known traditional Korean dish. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the type strain Lactobacillus farciminis KCTC 3681 (2,498,309 bp, with a G+C content of 36.4%), which consists of 5 scaffolds.

  19. A Draft Sequence of the Neandertal Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard E.; Li, Heng; Zhai, Weiwei; Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang; Hansen, Nancy F.; Durand, Eric Y.; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Prüfer, Kay; Meyer, Matthias; Burbano, Hernán A.; Good, Jeffrey M.; Schultz, Rigo; Aximu-Petri, Ayinuer; Butthof, Anne; Höber, Barbara; Höffner, Barbara; Siegemund, Madlen; Weihmann, Antje; Nusbaum, Chad; Lander, Eric S.; Russ, Carsten; Novod, Nathaniel; Affourtit, Jason; Egholm, Michael; Verna, Christine; Rudan, Pavao; Brajkovic, Dejana; Kucan, Željko; Gušic, Ivan; Doronichev, Vladimir B.; Golovanova, Liubov V.; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Fortea, Javier; Rosas, Antonio; Schmitz, Ralf W.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Eichler, Evan E.; Falush, Daniel; Birney, Ewan; Mullikin, James C.; Slatkin, Montgomery; Nielsen, Rasmus; Kelso, Janet; Lachmann, Michael; Reich, David; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    Neandertals, the closest evolutionary relatives of present-day humans, lived in large parts of Europe and western Asia before disappearing 30,000 years ago. We present a draft sequence of the Neandertal genome composed of more than 4 billion nucleotides from three individuals. Comparisons of the Neandertal genome to the genomes of five present-day humans from different parts of the world identify a number of genomic regions that may have been affected by positive selection in ancestral modern humans, including genes involved in metabolism and in cognitive and skeletal development. We show that Neandertals shared more genetic variants with present-day humans in Eurasia than with present-day humans in sub-Saharan Africa, suggesting that gene flow from Neandertals into the ancestors of non-Africans occurred before the divergence of Eurasian groups from each other. PMID:20448178

  20. Advancing Eucalyptus genomics: identification and sequencing of lignin biosynthesis genes from deep-coverage BAC libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudrna David

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eucalyptus species are among the most planted hardwoods in the world because of their rapid growth, adaptability and valuable wood properties. The development and integration of genomic resources into breeding practice will be increasingly important in the decades to come. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries are key genomic tools that enable positional cloning of important traits, synteny evaluation, and the development of genome framework physical maps for genetic linkage and genome sequencing. Results We describe the construction and characterization of two deep-coverage BAC libraries EG_Ba and EG_Bb obtained from nuclear DNA fragments of E. grandis (clone BRASUZ1 digested with HindIII and BstYI, respectively. Genome coverages of 17 and 15 haploid genome equivalents were estimated for EG_Ba and EG_Bb, respectively. Both libraries contained large inserts, with average sizes ranging from 135 Kb (Eg_Bb to 157 Kb (Eg_Ba, very low extra-nuclear genome contamination providing a probability of finding a single copy gene ≥ 99.99%. Libraries were screened for the presence of several genes of interest via hybridizations to high-density BAC filters followed by PCR validation. Five selected BAC clones were sequenced and assembled using the Roche GS FLX technology providing the whole sequence of the E. grandis chloroplast genome, and complete genomic sequences of important lignin biosynthesis genes. Conclusions The two E. grandis BAC libraries described in this study represent an important milestone for the advancement of Eucalyptus genomics and forest tree research. These BAC resources have a highly redundant genome coverage (> 15×, contain large average inserts and have a very low percentage of clones with organellar DNA or empty vectors. These publicly available BAC libraries are thus suitable for a broad range of applications in genetic and genomic research in Eucalyptus and possibly in related species of Myrtaceae

  1. Intra-individual polymorphism in chloroplasts from NGS data: where does it come from and how to handle it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarcelli, N; Mariac, C; Couvreur, T L P; Faye, A; Richard, D; Sabot, F; Berthouly-Salazar, C; Vigouroux, Y

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing allows access to a large quantity of genomic data. In plants, several studies used whole chloroplast genome sequences for inferring phylogeography or phylogeny. Even though the chloroplast is a haploid organelle, NGS plastome data identified a nonnegligible number of intra-individual polymorphic SNPs. Such observations could have several causes such as sequencing errors, the presence of heteroplasmy or transfer of chloroplast sequences in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The occurrence of allelic diversity has practical important impacts on the identification of diversity, the analysis of the chloroplast data and beyond that, significant evolutionary questions. In this study, we show that the observed intra-individual polymorphism of chloroplast sequence data is probably the result of plastid DNA transferred into the mitochondrial and/or the nuclear genomes. We further assess nine different bioinformatics pipelines' error rates for SNP and genotypes calling using SNPs identified in Sanger sequencing. Specific pipelines are adequate to deal with this issue, optimizing both specificity and sensitivity. Our results will allow a proper use of whole chloroplast NGS sequence and will allow a better handling of NGS chloroplast sequence diversity.

  2. Unexpected Diversity of Chloroplast Noncoding RNAs as Revealed by Deep Sequencing of the Arabidopsis Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotto, Amber M; Schmitz, Robert J; Fei, Zhangjun; Ecker, Joseph R; Stern, David B

    2011-12-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are widely expressed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Eukaryotic ncRNAs are commonly micro- and small-interfering RNAs (18-25 nt) involved in posttranscriptional gene silencing, whereas prokaryotic ncRNAs vary in size and are involved in various aspects of gene regulation. Given the prokaryotic origin of organelles, the presence of ncRNAs might be expected; however, the full spectrum of organellar ncRNAs has not been determined systematically. Here, strand-specific RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify 107 candidate ncRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts, primarily encoded opposite protein-coding and tRNA genes. Forty-eight ncRNAs were shown to accumulate by RNA gel blot as discrete transcripts in wild-type (WT) plants and/or the pnp1-1 mutant, which lacks the chloroplast ribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (cpPNPase). Ninety-eight percent of the ncRNAs detected by RNA gel blot had different transcript patterns between WT and pnp1-1, suggesting cpPNPase has a significant role in chloroplast ncRNA biogenesis and accumulation. Analysis of materials deficient for other major chloroplast ribonucleases, RNase R, RNase E, and RNase J, showed differential effects on ncRNA accumulation and/or form, suggesting specificity in RNase-ncRNA interactions. 5' end mapping demonstrates that some ncRNAs are transcribed from dedicated promoters, whereas others result from transcriptional read-through. Finally, correlations between accumulation of some ncRNAs and the symmetrically transcribed sense RNA are consistent with a role in RNA stability. Overall, our data suggest that this extensive population of ncRNAs has the potential to underpin a previously underappreciated regulatory mode in the chloroplast.

  3. BSMAP: whole genome bisulfite sequence MAPping program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wei

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bisulfite sequencing is a powerful technique to study DNA cytosine methylation. Bisulfite treatment followed by PCR amplification specifically converts unmethylated cytosines to thymine. Coupled with next generation sequencing technology, it is able to detect the methylation status of every cytosine in the genome. However, mapping high-throughput bisulfite reads to the reference genome remains a great challenge due to the increased searching space, reduced complexity of bisulfite sequence, asymmetric cytosine to thymine alignments, and multiple CpG heterogeneous methylation. Results We developed an efficient bisulfite reads mapping algorithm BSMAP to address the above issues. BSMAP combines genome hashing and bitwise masking to achieve fast and accurate bisulfite mapping. Compared with existing bisulfite mapping approaches, BSMAP is faster, more sensitive and more flexible. Conclusion BSMAP is the first general-purpose bisulfite mapping software. It is able to map high-throughput bisulfite reads at whole genome level with feasible memory and CPU usage. It is freely available under GPL v3 license at http://code.google.com/p/bsmap/.

  4. Agaricus bisporus genome sequence: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Richard W; Challen, Michael P; Burton, Kerry S

    2013-06-01

    The genomes of two isolates of Agaricus bisporus have been sequenced recently. This soil-inhabiting fungus has a wide geographical distribution in nature and it is also cultivated in an industrialized indoor process ($4.7bn annual worldwide value) to produce edible mushrooms. Previously this lignocellulosic fungus has resisted precise econutritional classification, i.e. into white- or brown-rot decomposers. The generation of the genome sequence and transcriptomic analyses has revealed a new classification, 'humicolous', for species adapted to grow in humic-rich, partially decomposed leaf material. The Agaricus biporus genomes contain a collection of polysaccharide and lignin-degrading genes and more interestingly an expanded number of genes (relative to other lignocellulosic fungi) that enhance degradation of lignin derivatives, i.e. heme-thiolate peroxidases and β-etherases. A motif that is hypothesized to be a promoter element in the humicolous adaptation suite is present in a large number of genes specifically up-regulated when the mycelium is grown on humic-rich substrate. The genome sequence of A. bisporus offers a platform to explore fungal biology in carbon-rich soil environments and terrestrial cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

  5. Comparative analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial genomes in identification of phylogenetic association among seven melon (Cucumis melo L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qianglong; Gao, Peng; Liu, Shi; Amanullah, Sikandar; Luan, Feishi

    2016-12-01

    A variety of melons are cultivated worldwide, and their specific biological properties make them an attractive model for molecular studies. This study aimed to investigate the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the mitochondrial, chloroplast, and nuclear genomes of seven melon accessions (Cucumis melo L.) to identify the phylogenetic relationships among melon cultivars with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform and bioinformatical analyses. The data showed that there were a total of 658 mitochondrial SNPs (207-295 in each), while there were 0-60 chloroplast SNPs among these seven melon cultivars, compared to the reference genome. Bioinformatical analysis showed that the mitochondrial tree topology was unable to separate the melon features, whereas the maximum parsimony/neighbor joining (MP/NJ) tree of the chloroplast SNPs could define melon features such as seed length, width, thickness, 100-seed weight, and type. SNPs of the nuclear genome were better than the mitochondrial and chloroplast SNPs in the identification of melon features. The data demonstrated the usefulness of mitochondrial, chloroplast, and nuclear SNPs in identification of phylogenetic associations among these seven melon cultivars.

  6. Synaptotagmin gene content of the sequenced genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craxton Molly

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmins exist as a large gene family in mammals. There is much interest in the function of certain family members which act crucially in the regulated synaptic vesicle exocytosis required for efficient neurotransmission. Knowledge of the functions of other family members is relatively poor and the presence of Synaptotagmin genes in plants indicates a role for the family as a whole which is wider than neurotransmission. Identification of the Synaptotagmin genes within completely sequenced genomes can provide the entire Synaptotagmin gene complement of each sequenced organism. Defining the detailed structures of all the Synaptotagmin genes and their encoded products can provide a useful resource for functional studies and a deeper understanding of the evolution of the gene family. The current rapid increase in the number of sequenced genomes from different branches of the tree of life, together with the public deposition of evolutionarily diverse transcript sequences make such studies worthwhile. Results I have compiled a detailed list of the Synaptotagmin genes of Caenorhabditis, Anopheles, Drosophila, Ciona, Danio, Fugu, Mus, Homo, Arabidopsis and Oryza by examining genomic and transcript sequences from public sequence databases together with some transcript sequences obtained by cDNA library screening and RT-PCR. I have compared all of the genes and investigated the relationship between plant Synaptotagmins and their non-Synaptotagmin counterparts. Conclusions I have identified and compared 98 Synaptotagmin genes from 10 sequenced genomes. Detailed comparison of transcript sequences reveals abundant and complex variation in Synaptotagmin gene expression and indicates the presence of Synaptotagmin genes in all animals and land plants. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicate patterns of conservation and diversity in function. Phylogenetic analysis shows the origin of Synaptotagmins in multicellular eukaryotes and their

  7. Establishment of a Gene Expression System in Rice Chloroplast and Obtainment of PPT-Resistant Rice Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi-nü; SUN Bing-yao; SU Ning; MENG Xiang-xun; ZHANG Zhi-fang; SHEN Gui-fang

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to the situation of random integration of foreign genes in nuclear transformation,the introduction of genes via chloroplast genetic engineering is characterized by site-specific pattern via homologous recombination.To establish an expression system for alien genes in rice chloroplast,the intergenic region of ndhF and trnL was selected as target for sitespecific integration of PPT-resistant bar gene in this study.Two DNA fragments suitable for homologous recombination were cloned from rice chloroplast genome DNA using PCR technique,and the chloroplast-specific expression vector pRB was constructed by fusing a modified 16S rRNA gene promoter to bar gene together with terminator of psbA gene 3'sequence.Chloroplast transformation was carried out by biolistic bombardment of sterile rice calli with the pRB construct.Subsequently,the regenerated plantlets and seeds of progeny arising from reciprocal cross to the wild-type lines were obtained.Molecular analysis suggested that the bar gene has been integrated into rice chloroplast genome.Genetic analysis revealed that bar gene could be transmitted and expressed normally in chloroplast genome.Thus,the bar gene conferred not only selection pressure for the transformation of rice chloroplast genome,but PPT-resistant trait for rice plants as well.It is suggested that an efficient gene expression system in the rice chloroplast has been established by chloroplast transformation technique.

  8. Complete Sequence and Analysis of Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera) Mitochondrial Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Zeng, Jingyao; Alamer, Ali; Alanazi, Ibrahim O.; Alawad, Abdullah O.; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M.; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.), a member of the palm family (Arecaceae), is one of the most economically important crops in tropics, serving as an important source of food, drink, fuel, medicine, and construction material. Here we report an assembly of the coconut (C. nucifera, Oman local Tall cultivar) mitochondrial (mt) genome based on next-generation sequencing data. This genome, 678,653bp in length and 45.5% in GC content, encodes 72 proteins, 9 pseudogenes, 23 tRNAs, and 3 ribosomal RNAs. Within the assembly, we find that the chloroplast (cp) derived regions account for 5.07% of the total assembly length, including 13 proteins, 2 pseudogenes, and 11 tRNAs. The mt genome has a relatively large fraction of repeat content (17.26%), including both forward (tandem) and inverted (palindromic) repeats. Sequence variation analysis shows that the Ti/Tv ratio of the mt genome is lower as compared to that of the nuclear genome and neutral expectation. By combining public RNA-Seq data for coconut, we identify 734 RNA editing sites supported by at least two datasets. In summary, our data provides the second complete mt genome sequence in the family Arecaceae, essential for further investigations on mitochondrial biology of seed plants. PMID:27736909

  9. Complete Sequence and Analysis of Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera) Mitochondrial Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljohi, Hasan Awad; Liu, Wanfei; Lin, Qiang; Zhao, Yuhui; Zeng, Jingyao; Alamer, Ali; Alanazi, Ibrahim O; Alawad, Abdullah O; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.), a member of the palm family (Arecaceae), is one of the most economically important crops in tropics, serving as an important source of food, drink, fuel, medicine, and construction material. Here we report an assembly of the coconut (C. nucifera, Oman local Tall cultivar) mitochondrial (mt) genome based on next-generation sequencing data. This genome, 678,653bp in length and 45.5% in GC content, encodes 72 proteins, 9 pseudogenes, 23 tRNAs, and 3 ribosomal RNAs. Within the assembly, we find that the chloroplast (cp) derived regions account for 5.07% of the total assembly length, including 13 proteins, 2 pseudogenes, and 11 tRNAs. The mt genome has a relatively large fraction of repeat content (17.26%), including both forward (tandem) and inverted (palindromic) repeats. Sequence variation analysis shows that the Ti/Tv ratio of the mt genome is lower as compared to that of the nuclear genome and neutral expectation. By combining public RNA-Seq data for coconut, we identify 734 RNA editing sites supported by at least two datasets. In summary, our data provides the second complete mt genome sequence in the family Arecaceae, essential for further investigations on mitochondrial biology of seed plants.

  10. Complete plastid genome sequence of Primula sinensis (Primulaceae: structure comparison, sequence variation and evidence for accD transfer to nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Jian Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Species-rich genus Primula L. is a typical plant group with which to understand genetic variance between species in different levels of relationships. Chloroplast genome sequences are used to be the information resource for quantifying this difference and reconstructing evolutionary history. In this study, we reported the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Primula sinensis and compared it with other related species. This genome of chloroplast showed a typical circular quadripartite structure with 150,859 bp in sequence length consisting of 37.2% GC base. Two inverted repeated regions (25,535 bp were separated by a large single-copy region (82,064 bp and a small single-copy region (17,725 bp. The genome consists of 112 genes, including 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and four rRNA genes. Among them, seven coding genes, seven tRNA genes and four rRNA genes have two copies due to their locations in the IR regions. The accD and infA genes lacking intact open reading frames (ORF were identified as pseudogenes. SSR and sequence variation analyses were also performed on the plastome of Primula sinensis, comparing with another available plastome of P. poissonii. The four most variable regions, rpl36–rps8, rps16–trnQ, trnH–psbA and ndhC–trnV, were identified. Phylogenetic relationship estimates using three sub-datasets extracted from a matrix of 57 protein-coding gene sequences showed the identical result that was consistent with previous studies. A transcript found from P. sinensis transcriptome showed a high similarity to plastid accD functional region and was identified as a putative plastid transit peptide at the N-terminal region. The result strongly suggested that plastid accD has been functionally transferred to the nucleus in P. sinensis.

  11. A hybrid swarm population of Pinus densiflora x P. sylvestris hybrids inferred from sequence analysis of chloroplast DNA and morphological characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    To confirm a hybrid swarm population of Pinus densiflora × P. sylvestris in Jilin, China and to study whether shoot apex morphology of 4-year old seedlings can be correlated with the sequence of a chloroplast DNA simple sequence repeat marker (cpDNA SSR), needles and seeds from P. densiflora, P. syl...

  12. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  13. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae

    KAUST Repository

    Dippenaar, Anzaan

    2015-10-21

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi.

  14. Complexity of rice Hsp100 gene family: lessons from rice genome sequence data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gaurav Batra; Vineeta Singh Chauhan; Amanjot Singh; Neelam K Sarkar; Anil Grover

    2007-04-01

    Elucidation of genome sequence provides an excellent platform to understand detailed complexity of the various gene families. Hsp100 is an important family of chaperones in diverse living systems. There are eight putative gene loci encoding for Hsp100 proteins in Arabidopsis genome. In rice, two full-length Hsp100 cDNAs have been isolated and sequenced so far. Analysis of rice genomic sequence by in silico approach showed that two isolated rice Hsp100 cDNAs correspond to Os05g44340 and Os02g32520 genes in the rice genome database. There appears to be three additional proteins (encoded by Os03g31300, Os04g32560 and Os04g33210 gene loci) that are variably homologous to Os05g44340 and Os02g32520 throughout the entire amino acid sequence. The above five rice Hsp100 genes show significant similarities in the signature sequences known to be conserved among Hsp100 proteins. While Os05g44340 encodes cytoplasmic Hsp100 protein, those encoded by the other four genes are predicted to have chloroplast transit peptides.

  15. Analysis of BAC end sequences in oak, a keystone forest tree species, providing insight into the composition of its genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Provost Grégoire

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the key goals of oak genomics research is to identify genes of adaptive significance. This information may help to improve the conservation of adaptive genetic variation and the management of forests to increase their health and productivity. Deep-coverage large-insert genomic libraries are a crucial tool for attaining this objective. We report herein the construction of a BAC library for Quercus robur, its characterization and an analysis of BAC end sequences. Results The EcoRI library generated consisted of 92,160 clones, 7% of which had no insert. Levels of chloroplast and mitochondrial contamination were below 3% and 1%, respectively. Mean clone insert size was estimated at 135 kb. The library represents 12 haploid genome equivalents and, the likelihood of finding a particular oak sequence of interest is greater than 99%. Genome coverage was confirmed by PCR screening of the library with 60 unique genetic loci sampled from the genetic linkage map. In total, about 20,000 high-quality BAC end sequences (BESs were generated by sequencing 15,000 clones. Roughly 5.88% of the combined BAC end sequence length corresponded to known retroelements while ab initio repeat detection methods identified 41 additional repeats. Collectively, characterized and novel repeats account for roughly 8.94% of the genome. Further analysis of the BESs revealed 1,823 putative genes suggesting at least 29,340 genes in the oak genome. BESs were aligned with the genome sequences of Arabidopsis thaliana, Vitis vinifera and Populus trichocarpa. One putative collinear microsyntenic region encoding an alcohol acyl transferase protein was observed between oak and chromosome 2 of V. vinifera. Conclusions This BAC library provides a new resource for genomic studies, including SSR marker development, physical mapping, comparative genomics and genome sequencing. BES analysis provided insight into the structure of the oak genome. These sequences will be

  16. What Will We Do with a Cotton Genome Sequence?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BRUBAKER Curt

    2008-01-01

    @@ With the publication of "Toward Sequencing Cotton (Gossypium) Genomes" [Chen et al.PlantPhysiology,2007,145:1303-1310-] a clear consensus emerged from the cotton genomics community not only that cotton genome sequences were a critical resource for research and commercial innovationin cotton genomics,but that there was a logical means of achieving this goal.

  17. Sequencing of a Cultivated Diploid Cotton Genome-Gossypium arboreum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WILKINS; Thea; A

    2008-01-01

    Sequencing the genomes of crop species and model systems contributes significantly to our understanding of the organization,structure and function of plant genomes.In a `white paper' published in 2007,the cotton community set forth a strategic plan for sequencing the AD genome of cultivated upland cotton that initially targets less complex diploid genomes.This strategy banks on the high degree

  18. Draft genome sequence of an aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species, A. bombycis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genome of the A. bombycis Type strain was sequenced using a Personal Genome Machine, followed by annotation of its predicted genes. The genome size for A. bombycis was found to be approximately 37 Mb and contained 12,266 genes. This announcement introduces a sequenced genome for an aflatoxigenic...

  19. Cloning and Analysis of a cDNA Encoding psbL and psbJ Gene in Rice Chloroplast Genome%水稻叶绿体基因组中一个编码psbL 和psbJ基因cDNA的克隆与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾克余; 罗林广; 苏昌潮; 翟虎渠

    2001-01-01

    A 505 bp cDNA was cloned from the leaves of rice (Oryza sativaL.) Shanyou 63 combination. DNA sequence analysis showed that it is a part of rice chloroplast genome. Its homology comparison with those known in GenBank found that it encodes 38 amino acid peptide deduced from psbL gene and 40 amino acid peptide deduced from psbJ gene in rice chloroplast PSⅡ. Northern hybridization showed that the cDNA was differentially displayed in hybrid F1 and its parental lines.

  20. The first symbiont-free genome sequence of marine red alga, Susabi-nori (Pyropia yezoensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Nakamura

    Full Text Available Nori, a marine red alga, is one of the most profitable mariculture crops in the world. However, the biological properties of this macroalga are poorly understood at the molecular level. In this study, we determined the draft genome sequence of susabi-nori (Pyropia yezoensis using next-generation sequencing platforms. For sequencing, thalli of P. yezoensis were washed to remove bacteria attached on the cell surface and enzymatically prepared as purified protoplasts. The assembled contig size of the P. yezoensis nuclear genome was approximately 43 megabases (Mb, which is an order of magnitude smaller than the previously estimated genome size. A total of 10,327 gene models were predicted and about 60% of the genes validated lack introns and the other genes have shorter introns compared to large-genome algae, which is consistent with the compact size of the P. yezoensis genome. A sequence homology search showed that 3,611 genes (35% are functionally unknown and only 2,069 gene groups are in common with those of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae. As color trait determinants of red algae, light-harvesting genes involved in the phycobilisome were predicted from the P. yezoensis nuclear genome. In particular, we found a second homolog of phycobilisome-degradation gene, which is usually chloroplast-encoded, possibly providing a novel target for color fading of susabi-nori in aquaculture. These findings shed light on unexplained features of macroalgal genes and genomes, and suggest that the genome of P. yezoensis is a promising model genome of marine red algae.

  1. From Genome Sequence to Taxonomy - A Skeptic’s View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özen, Asli Ismihan; Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    The relative ease of sequencing bacterial genomes has resulted in thousands of sequenced bacterial genomes available in the public databases. This same technology now allows for using the entire genome sequence as an identifier for an organism. There are many methods available which attempt to us...

  2. Enhanced Dynamic Algorithm of Genome Sequence Alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabi E. keshk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The merging of biology and computer science has created a new field called computational biology that explore the capacities of computers to gain knowledge from biological data, bioinformatics. Computational biology is rooted in life sciences as well as computers, information sciences, and technologies. The main problem in computational biology is sequence alignment that is a way of arranging the sequences of DNA, RNA or protein to identify the region of similarity and relationship between sequences. This paper introduces an enhancement of dynamic algorithm of genome sequence alignment, which called EDAGSA. It is filling the three main diagonals without filling the entire matrix by the unused data. It gets the optimal solution with decreasing the execution time and therefore the performance is increased. To illustrate the effectiveness of optimizing the performance of the proposed algorithm, it is compared with the traditional methods such as Needleman-Wunsch, Smith-Waterman and longest common subsequence algorithms. Also, database is implemented for using the algorithm in multi-sequence alignments for searching the optimal sequence that matches the given sequence.

  3. Assessment of multi-enzyme operon engineering of tobacco chloroplast genome for high-level simultaneous expression of cellulolytic enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotilin, I. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON (Canada); Pereira, E.O.; Menassa, R. [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology; Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The use of biofuels as an environmentally-sound substitute for depleting fossil fuels was discussed. Commercially produced biofuels are generated primarily from starch or sugar and supply only a small fraction of global fuel requirements. Although cellulosic biomass can serve as an abundant and renewable source of fermentable sugars, the cost of converting biomass to fuel is too high. Plant genetic engineering techniques are more economical for producing recombinant proteins because of the low-cost of the growing bioreactors. The transformation of the tobacco chloroplast genome has proven to be very prolific in terms of recombinant protein yield, which typically reaches 10 to 20 per cent of total soluble protein. In addition, plastid transcription-translation machinery allows for the simultaneous expression of several genes from artificial operons, providing the potential to engineer several proteins in one transformation step. The purpose of this study was to produce transplastomic tobacco plants bearing single genes as well as operons of cell wall-degrading enzymes for high-level expression. An attempt was made to reproduce an engineering approach in tobacco chloroplasts to generate a potent mini-cellulosome. The resulting enzymes were evaluated for their ability to degrade biomass. The study also examined the feasibility of using crude extracts of highly-expressing plants as an additive in the biomass fermentation process. The productivity of transplastomic plants was compared with plants transiently expressing cellulolytic enzymes directed to other cellular compartments.

  4. Phylogeography of Cyananthus delavayi (Campanulaceae) in Hengduan Mountains inferred from variation in nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Dong LI; Liang-Liang YUE; Hang SUN; Zi-Gang QIAN

    2012-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies on alpine plants endemic to the Hengduan Mountains of the southeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau are still limited in number.In this study,we used sequence variation of one nuclear gene (ncpGS,which encodes the chloroplastic glutamine synthetase) and in two chloroplast DNA segments to investigate the phylogeographic structure and population demographic history of Cyananthus delavayi,a narrow-range species endemic to this region.We identified eight chlorotypes and 16 nuclear genotypes in a survey of 10 populations sampled throughout the range of the species.The results of both phylogenetic and network analyses suggested that the genealogical relationships of both chlorotypes and nuclear genotypes showed a clear geographical correlation.High total genetic diversity,low levels of within-population diversity,and strong population differentiation (chloroplast DNA:hT =0.827,hS =0.087,NST =0.899,GST =0.895; nuclear DNA:hT =0.910,hS =0.348,NST =0719,GST =0.618) were identified.Based on the mismatch distribution analyses,no evidence of recent demographic population expansion was found for this species.Nested clade analyses of both chlorotypes and nuclear genotypes indicated that restricted gene flow resulting from isolation by distance and allopatrc fragmentation were likely to have been the major processes that shaped their present-day spatial distribution.Our dating of the genetic divergences between three major geographic lineages suggested that the largest glaciation of the early Quaternary developed in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and mountainous isolation may have together led to deep intraspecific vicariance within this species.

  5. Transforming clinical microbiology with bacterial genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Bowden, Rory; Wilson, Daniel J; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W

    2012-09-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of bacteria has recently emerged as a cost-effective and convenient approach for addressing many microbiological questions. Here, we review the current status of clinical microbiology and how it has already begun to be transformed by using next-generation sequencing. We focus on three essential tasks: identifying the species of an isolate, testing its properties, such as resistance to antibiotics and virulence, and monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial pathogens. We predict that the application of next-generation sequencing will soon be sufficiently fast, accurate and cheap to be used in routine clinical microbiology practice, where it could replace many complex current techniques with a single, more efficient workflow.

  6. Plastome sequences of Lygodium japonicum and Marsilea crenata reveal the genome organization transformation from basal ferns to core leptosporangiates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Ying-Juan; Wang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that core leptosporangiates, the most species-rich group of extant ferns (monilophytes), have a distinct plastid genome (plastome) organization pattern from basal fern lineages. However, the details of genome structure transformation from ancestral ferns to core leptosporangiates remain unclear because of limited plastome data available. Here, we have determined the complete chloroplast genome sequences of Lygodium japonicum (Lygodiaceae), a member of schizaeoid ferns (Schizaeales), and Marsilea crenata (Marsileaceae), a representative of heterosporous ferns (Salviniales). The two species represent the sister and the basal lineages of core leptosporangiates, respectively, for which the plastome sequences are currently unavailable. Comparative genomic analysis of all sequenced fern plastomes reveals that the gene order of L. japonicum plastome occupies an intermediate position between that of basal ferns and core leptosporangiates. The two exons of the fern ndhB gene have a unique pattern of intragenic copy number variances. Specifically, the substitution rate heterogeneity between the two exons is congruent with their copy number changes, confirming the constraint role that inverted repeats may play on the substitution rate of chloroplast gene sequences.

  7. Detecting overlapping coding sequences in virus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Chris M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting new coding sequences (CDSs in viral genomes can be difficult for several reasons. The typically compact genomes often contain a number of overlapping coding and non-coding functional elements, which can result in unusual patterns of codon usage; conservation between related sequences can be difficult to interpret – especially within overlapping genes; and viruses often employ non-canonical translational mechanisms – e.g. frameshifting, stop codon read-through, leaky-scanning and internal ribosome entry sites – which can conceal potentially coding open reading frames (ORFs. Results In a previous paper we introduced a new statistic – MLOGD (Maximum Likelihood Overlapping Gene Detector – for detecting and analysing overlapping CDSs. Here we present (a an improved MLOGD statistic, (b a greatly extended suite of software using MLOGD, (c a database of results for 640 virus sequence alignments, and (d a web-interface to the software and database. Tests show that, from an alignment with just 20 mutations, MLOGD can discriminate non-overlapping CDSs from non-coding ORFs with a typical accuracy of up to 98%, and can detect CDSs overlapping known CDSs with a typical accuracy of 90%. In addition, the software produces a variety of statistics and graphics, useful for analysing an input multiple sequence alignment. Conclusion MLOGD is an easy-to-use tool for virus genome annotation, detecting new CDSs – in particular overlapping or short CDSs – and for analysing overlapping CDSs following frameshift sites. The software, web-server, database and supplementary material are available at http://guinevere.otago.ac.nz/mlogd.html.

  8. B chromosomes of Aegilops speltoides are enriched in organelle genome-derived sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alevtina Ruban

    Full Text Available B chromosomes (Bs are dispensable components of the genome exhibiting non-Mendelian inheritance. Chromosome counts and flow cytometric analysis of the grass species Aegilops speltoides revealed a tissue-type specific distribution of the roughly 570 Mbp large B chromosomes. To address the question whether organelle-to-nucleus DNA transfer is a mechanism that drives the evolution of Bs, in situ hybridization was performed with labelled organellar DNA. The observed B-specific accumulation of chloroplast- and mitochondria-derived sequences suggests a reduced selection against the insertion of organellar DNA in supernumerary chromosomes. The distribution of B-localised organellar-derived sequences and other sequences differs between genotypes of different geographical origins.

  9. Why Assembling Plant Genome Sequences Is So Challenging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Seoane

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the biological and economic importance of plants, relatively few plant species have been sequenced. Only the genome sequence of plants with relatively small genomes, most of them angiosperms, in particular eudicots, has been determined. The arrival of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed the rapid and efficient development of new genomic resources for non-model or orphan plant species. But the sequencing pace of plants is far from that of animals and microorganisms. This review focuses on the typical challenges of plant genomes that can explain why plant genomics is less developed than animal genomics. Explanations about the impact of some confounding factors emerging from the nature of plant genomes are given. As a result of these challenges and confounding factors, the correct assembly and annotation of plant genomes is hindered, genome drafts are produced, and advances in plant genomics are delayed.

  10. Why Assembling Plant Genome Sequences Is So Challenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claros, Manuel Gonzalo; Bautista, Rocío; Guerrero-Fernández, Darío; Benzerki, Hicham; Seoane, Pedro; Fernández-Pozo, Noé

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the biological and economic importance of plants, relatively few plant species have been sequenced. Only the genome sequence of plants with relatively small genomes, most of them angiosperms, in particular eudicots, has been determined. The arrival of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed the rapid and efficient development of new genomic resources for non-model or orphan plant species. But the sequencing pace of plants is far from that of animals and microorganisms. This review focuses on the typical challenges of plant genomes that can explain why plant genomics is less developed than animal genomics. Explanations about the impact of some confounding factors emerging from the nature of plant genomes are given. As a result of these challenges and confounding factors, the correct assembly and annotation of plant genomes is hindered, genome drafts are produced, and advances in plant genomics are delayed. PMID:24832233

  11. An evaluation of Comparative Genome Sequencing (CGS by comparing two previously-sequenced bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herring Christopher D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the development of new technology, it has recently become practical to resequence the genome of a bacterium after experimental manipulation. It is critical though to know the accuracy of the technique used, and to establish confidence that all of the mutations were detected. Results In order to evaluate the accuracy of genome resequencing using the microarray-based Comparative Genome Sequencing service provided by Nimblegen Systems Inc., we resequenced the E. coli strain W3110 Kohara using MG1655 as a reference, both of which have been completely sequenced using traditional sequencing methods. CGS detected 7 of 8 small sequence differences, one large deletion, and 9 of 12 IS element insertions present in W3110, but did not detect a large chromosomal inversion. In addition, we confirmed that CGS also detected 2 SNPs, one deletion and 7 IS element insertions that are not present in the genome sequence, which we attribute to changes that occurred after the creation of the W3110 lambda clone library. The false positive rate for SNPs was one per 244 Kb of genome sequence. Conclusion CGS is an effective way to detect multiple mutations present in one bacterium relative to another, and while highly cost-effective, is prone to certain errors. Mutations occurring in repeated sequences or in sequences with a high degree of secondary structure may go undetected. It is also critical to follow up on regions of interest in which SNPs were not called because they often indicate deletions or IS element insertions.

  12. Genome sequence and analysis of the tuber crop potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, X.; Pan, S.; Cheng, S.;

    2011-01-01

    and assemble 86% of the 844-megabase genome. We predict 39,031 protein-coding genes and present evidence for at least two genome duplication events indicative of a palaeopolyploid origin. As the first genome sequence of an asterid, the potato genome reveals 2,642 genes specific to this large angiosperm clade...... contributed to the evolution of tuber development. The potato genome sequence provides a platform for genetic improvement of this vital crop....

  13. Primers for the Amplification of the Circular Chloroplast DNA from the A-genome Group of Cultivated Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IBRAHIM Rashid Ismael Hag; AZUMA Jun-Ichi; SAKAMOTO Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    @@ The availability of the plastid genome sequences is one of the bases for comparative,functional,and structural genomic studies of plastid-containing living organisms,in addition to the application of plastid genetic engineering technology.The past efforts to sequence plastid genomes involve complicated preparation protocols.One procedure starts with the isolation of plastids,which was tiresome and time wasting that followed by a second step to extract plastid DNA from the isolated plastids,then finally the build up of plasmid or bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library.

  14. Building the sequence map of the human pan-genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng

    2010-01-01

    Here we integrate the de novo assembly of an Asian and an African genome with the NCBI reference human genome, as a step toward constructing the human pan-genome. We identified approximately 5 Mb of novel sequences not present in the reference genome in each of these assemblies. Most novel...... analysis of predicted genes indicated that the novel sequences contain potentially functional coding regions. We estimate that a complete human pan-genome would contain approximately 19-40 Mb of novel sequence not present in the extant reference genome. The extensive amount of novel sequence contributing...... to the genetic variation of the pan-genome indicates the importance of using complete genome sequencing and de novo assembly....

  15. Phylogeny of Ptychostomum (Bryaceae, Musci) inferred from sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and chloroplast rps4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Ying WANG; Jian-Cheng ZHAO

    2009-01-01

    The phylogeny of Ptychostomum was first undertaken based on analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal (nr) DNA and by combining data from nrDNA ITS and chloroplast DNA rps4 sequences. Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses all support the conclu-sion that the reinstated genus Ptychostomum is not monophyletic. Ptychostomum funkii (Schwagr.) J. R. Spence (= Bryum funkii Schwagr.) is placed within a clade containing the type species of Bryum, B. argenteum Hedw. The remaining members of Ptychostomum investigated in the present study constitute another well-supported clade. The results are congruent with previous molecular analyses. On the basis of phylogenetic evidence, we agree with Bryum lonchocaulon Mull. Hal., Bryum pallescens Schleich. ex Schwagr., and Bryum pallens Sw. to Ptychostomum.

  16. Detecting long tandem duplications in genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audemard Eric

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting duplication segments within completely sequenced genomes provides valuable information to address genome evolution and in particular the important question of the emergence of novel functions. The usual approach to gene duplication detection, based on all-pairs protein gene comparisons, provides only a restricted view of duplication. Results In this paper, we introduce ReD Tandem, a software using a flow based chaining algorithm targeted at detecting tandem duplication arrays of moderate to longer length regions, with possibly locally weak similarities, directly at the DNA level. On the A. thaliana genome, using a reference set of tandem duplicated genes built using TAIR,a we show that ReD Tandem is able to predict a large fraction of recently duplicated genes (dS  Conclusions ReD Tandem allows to identify large tandem duplications without any annotation, leading to agnostic identification of tandem duplications. This approach nicely complements the usual protein gene based which ignores duplications involving non coding regions. It is however inherently restricted to relatively recent duplications. By recovering otherwise ignored events, ReD Tandem gives a more comprehensive view of existing evolutionary processes and may also allow to improve existing annotations.

  17. Rapid whole genome sequencing and precision neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrikin, Joshua E; Willig, Laurel K; Smith, Laurie D; Kingsmore, Stephen F

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, genetic testing has been too slow or perceived to be impractical to initial management of the critically ill neonate. Technological advances have led to the ability to sequence and interpret the entire genome of a neonate in as little as 26 h. As the cost and speed of testing decreases, the utility of whole genome sequencing (WGS) of neonates for acute and latent genetic illness increases. Analyzing the entire genome allows for concomitant evaluation of the currently identified 5588 single gene diseases. When applied to a select population of ill infants in a level IV neonatal intensive care unit, WGS yielded a diagnosis of a causative genetic disease in 57% of patients. These diagnoses may lead to clinical management changes ranging from transition to palliative care for uniformly lethal conditions for alteration or initiation of medical or surgical therapy to improve outcomes in others. Thus, institution of 2-day WGS at time of acute presentation opens the possibility of early implementation of precision medicine. This implementation may create opportunities for early interventional, frequently novel or off-label therapies that may alter disease trajectory in infants with what would otherwise be fatal disease. Widespread deployment of rapid WGS and precision medicine will raise ethical issues pertaining to interpretation of variants of unknown significance, discovery of incidental findings related to adult onset conditions and carrier status, and implementation of medical therapies for which little is known in terms of risks and benefits. Despite these challenges, precision neonatology has significant potential both to decrease infant mortality related to genetic diseases with onset in newborns and to facilitate parental decision making regarding transition to palliative care.

  18. The complete plastid genome sequence of Welwitschia mirabilis: an unusually compact plastome with accelerated divergence rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boore Jeffrey L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Welwitschia mirabilis is the only extant member of the family Welwitschiaceae, one of three lineages of gnetophytes, an enigmatic group of gymnosperms variously allied with flowering plants or conifers. Limited sequence data and rapid divergence rates have precluded consensus on the evolutionary placement of gnetophytes based on molecular characters. Here we report on the first complete gnetophyte chloroplast genome sequence, from Welwitschia mirabilis, as well as analyses on divergence rates of protein-coding genes, comparisons of gene content and order, and phylogenetic implications. Results The chloroplast genome of Welwitschia mirabilis [GenBank: EU342371] is comprised of 119,726 base pairs and exhibits large and small single copy regions and two copies of the large inverted repeat (IR. Only 101 unique gene species are encoded. The Welwitschia plastome is the most compact photosynthetic land plant plastome sequenced to date; 66% of the sequence codes for product. The genome also exhibits a slightly expanded IR, a minimum of 9 inversions that modify gene order, and 19 genes that are lost or present as pseudogenes. Phylogenetic analyses, including one representative of each extant seed plant lineage and based on 57 concatenated protein-coding sequences, place Welwitschia at the base of all seed plants (distance, maximum parsimony or as the sister to Pinus (the only conifer representative in a monophyletic gymnosperm clade (maximum likelihood, bayesian. Relative rate tests on these gene sequences show the Welwitschia sequences to be evolving at faster rates than other seed plants. For these genes individually, a comparison of average pairwise distances indicates that relative divergence in Welwitschia ranges from amounts about equal to other seed plants to amounts almost three times greater than the average for non-gnetophyte seed plants. Conclusion Although the basic organization of the Welwitschia plastome is typical, its

  19. Genomic Sequence Comparisons, 1987-2003 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George M. Church

    2004-07-29

    This project was to develop new DNA sequencing and RNA and protein quantitation methods and related genome annotation tools. The project began in 1987 with the development of multiplex sequencing (published in Science in 1988), and one of the first automated sequencing methods. This lead to the first commercial genome sequence in 1994 and to the establishment of the main commercial participants (GTC then Agencourt) in the public DOE/NIH genome project. In collaboration with GTC we contributed to one of the first complete DOE genome sequences, in 1997, that of Methanobacterium thermoautotropicum, a species of great relevance to energy-rich gas production.

  20. Insights from 20 years of bacterial genome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jun, Se-Ran

    2015-01-01

    of more than 2000 Escherichia coli genomes finds an E. coli core genome of about 3100 gene families and a total of about 89,000 different gene families. Why do we care about bacterial genome sequencing? There are many practical applications, such as genome-scale metabolic modeling, biosurveillance...

  1. The closest relatives of cacti: insights from phylogenetic analyses of chloroplast and mitochondrial sequences with special emphasis on relationships in the tribe Anacampseroteae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Reto

    2007-01-01

    Recent molecular and morphological systematic investigations revealed that the cacti are most closely related to Anacampseroteae, Portulaca and Talinum of the family Portulacaceae (ACPT clade of suborder Portulacineae). A combined analysis of ndhF, matK, and nad1 sequence data from the chloroplast and the mitochondrial genomes indicates that the tribe Anacampseroteae is the sister group of the family Cactaceae. This clade, together with Portulaca, is well characterized by the presence of axillary hairs or scales. Relationships within Anacampseroteae are characterized by a grade of five species of Grahamia s.l. from North and South America, and Grahamia australiana is found to be sister to the genera Anacampseros and Avonia. A comparison of vegetative characteristics indicates an evolutionary transition from woody subshrubs to dwarf perennial and highly succulent herbs during the diversification of Anacampseroteae. Available evidence from the present investigation as well as from previously published studies suggests that a revised classification of Portulacineae on the basis of inferred phylogenetic relationships might consist of a superfamily that includes Cactaceae and the three genera Anacampseros s.l. (including Avonia and Grahamia s.l.), Portulaca, and Talinum (including Talinella), either referred to three monogeneric families or to a paraphyletic family Portulacaceae*.

  2. De novo genome assembly of the economically important weed horseweed using integrated data from multiple sequencing platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanhui; Lai, Zhao; Lane, Thomas; Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Okada, Miki; Jasieniuk, Marie; O'Geen, Henriette; Kim, Ryan W; Sammons, R Douglas; Rieseberg, Loren H; Stewart, C Neal

    2014-11-01

    Horseweed (Conyza canadensis), a member of the Compositae (Asteraceae) family, was the first broadleaf weed to evolve resistance to glyphosate. Horseweed, one of the most problematic weeds in the world, is a true diploid (2n = 2x = 18), with the smallest genome of any known agricultural weed (335 Mb). Thus, it is an appropriate candidate to help us understand the genetic and genomic bases of weediness. We undertook a draft de novo genome assembly of horseweed by combining data from multiple sequencing platforms (454 GS-FLX, Illumina HiSeq 2000, and PacBio RS) using various libraries with different insertion sizes (approximately 350 bp, 600 bp, 3 kb, and 10 kb) of a Tennessee-accessed, glyphosate-resistant horseweed biotype. From 116.3 Gb (approximately 350× coverage) of data, the genome was assembled into 13,966 scaffolds with 50% of the assembly = 33,561 bp. The assembly covered 92.3% of the genome, including the complete chloroplast genome (approximately 153 kb) and a nearly complete mitochondrial genome (approximately 450 kb in 120 scaffolds). The nuclear genome is composed of 44,592 protein-coding genes. Genome resequencing of seven additional horseweed biotypes was performed. These sequence data were assembled and used to analyze genome variation. Simple sequence repeat and single-nucleotide polymorphisms were surveyed. Genomic patterns were detected that associated with glyphosate-resistant or -susceptible biotypes. The draft genome will be useful to better understand weediness and the evolution of herbicide resistance and to devise new management strategies. The genome will also be useful as another reference genome in the Compositae. To our knowledge, this article represents the first published draft genome of an agricultural weed.

  3. Two genome sequences of the same bacterial strain, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAl 5, suggest a new standard in genome sequence submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giongo, Adriana; Tyler, Heather L; Zipperer, Ursula N; Triplett, Eric W

    2010-06-15

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAl 5 is of agricultural significance due to its ability to provide fixed nitrogen to plants. Consequently, its genome sequence has been eagerly anticipated to enhance understanding of endophytic nitrogen fixation. Two groups have sequenced the PAl 5 genome from the same source (ATCC 49037), though the resulting sequences contain a surprisingly high number of differences. Therefore, an optical map of PAl 5 was constructed in order to determine which genome assembly more closely resembles the chromosomal DNA by aligning each sequence against a physical map of the genome. While one sequence aligned very well, over 98% of the second sequence contained numerous rearrangements. The many differences observed between these two genome sequences could be owing to either assembly errors or rapid evolutionary divergence. The extent of the differences derived from sequence assembly errors could be assessed if the raw sequencing reads were provided by both genome centers at the time of genome sequence submission. Hence, a new genome sequence standard is proposed whereby the investigator supplies the raw reads along with the closed sequence so that the community can make more accurate judgments on whether differences observed in a single stain may be of biological origin or are simply caused by differences in genome assembly procedures.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Rift Valley Fever Virus Strain Lunyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Sarah; Horton, Daniel L; Marston, Denise A; Johnson, Nicholas; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2016-04-14

    Using next-generation sequencing technologies, the first complete genome sequence of Rift Valley fever virus strain Lunyo is reported here. Originally reported as an attenuated antigenic variant strain from Uganda, genomic sequence analysis shows that Lunyo clusters together with other Ugandan isolates.

  5. Genome Sequence of Stachybotrys chartarum Strain 51-11

    OpenAIRE

    Betancourt, Doris A.; Dean, Timothy R.; Kim, Jean; Levy, Josh

    2015-01-01

    The Stachybotrys chartarum strain 51-11 genome was sequenced by shotgun sequencing utilizing Illumina HiSeq 2000 and PacBio technologies. Since S. chartarum has been implicated as having health impacts within water-damaged buildings, any information extracted from the genomic sequence data relating to toxins or the metabolism of the fungus might be useful.

  6. Draft genome sequence of the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlton, Jane M.; Hirt, Robert P.; Silva, Joana C.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the genome sequence of the protist Trichomonas vaginalis, a sexually transmitted human pathogen. Repeats and transposable elements comprise about two-thirds of the approximately 160-megabase genome, reflecting a recent massive expansion of genetic material. This expansion...

  7. Coevolution between simple sequence repeats (SSRs and virus genome size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xiangyan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relationship between the level of repetitiveness in genomic sequence and genome size has been investigated by making use of complete prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, but relevant studies have been rarely made in virus genomes. Results In this study, a total of 257 viruses were examined, which cover 90% of genera. The results showed that simple sequence repeats (SSRs is strongly, positively and significantly correlated with genome size. Certain repeat class is distributed in a certain range of genome sequence length. Mono-, di- and tri- repeats are widely distributed in all virus genomes, tetra- SSRs as a common component consist in genomes which more than 100 kb in size; in the range of genome  Conclusions We conducted this research standing on the height of the whole virus. We concluded that genome size is an important factor in affecting the occurrence of SSRs; hosts are also responsible for the variances of SSRs content to a certain degree.

  8. Terpene metabolic engineering via nuclear or chloroplast genomes profoundly and globally impacts off-target pathways through metabolite signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasoreck, Elise K; Su, Jin; Silverman, Ian M; Gosai, Sager J; Gregory, Brian D; Yuan, Joshua S; Daniell, Henry

    2016-09-01

    The impact of metabolic engineering on nontarget pathways and outcomes of metabolic engineering from different genomes are poorly understood questions. Therefore, squalene biosynthesis genes FARNESYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (FPS) and SQUALENE SYNTHASE (SQS) were engineered via the Nicotiana tabacum chloroplast (C), nuclear (N) or both (CN) genomes to promote squalene biosynthesis. SQS levels were ~4300-fold higher in C and CN lines than in N, but all accumulated ~150-fold higher squalene due to substrate or storage limitations. Abnormal leaf and flower phenotypes, including lower pollen production and reduced fertility, were observed regardless of the compartment or level of transgene expression. Substantial changes in metabolomes of all lines were observed: levels of 65-120 unrelated metabolites, including the toxic alkaloid nicotine, changed by as much as 32-fold. Profound effects of transgenesis on nontarget gene expression included changes in the abundance of 19 076 transcripts by up to 2000-fold in CN; 7784 transcripts by up to 1400-fold in N; and 5224 transcripts by as much as 2200-fold in C. Transporter-related transcripts were induced, and cell cycle-associated transcripts were disproportionally repressed in all three lines. Transcriptome changes were validated by qRT-PCR. The mechanism underlying these large changes likely involves metabolite-mediated anterograde and/or retrograde signalling irrespective of the level of transgene expression or end product, due to imbalance of metabolic pools, offering new insight into both anticipated and unanticipated consequences of metabolic engineering.

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Klebsiella variicola Plant Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús; Barrios, Humberto; Rodríguez-Medina, Nadia; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa Elena; Garza-Ramos, Ulises

    2015-09-10

    Three endophytic Klebsiella variicola isolates-T29A, 3, and 6A2, obtained from sugar cane stem, maize shoots, and banana leaves, respectively-were used for whole-genome sequencing. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of circular chromosomes and plasmids. The genomes contain plant colonization and cellulases genes. This study will help toward understanding the genomic basis of K. variicola interaction with plant hosts.

  10. Chloroplast protein and centrosomal genes, a tRNA intron, and odd telomeres in an unusually compact eukaryotic genome, the cryptomonad nucleomorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauner, S; Fraunholz, M; Wastl, J; Penny, S; Beaton, M; Cavalier-Smith, T; Maier, U G; Douglas, S

    2000-01-04

    Cells of several major algal groups are evolutionary chimeras of two radically different eukaryotic cells. Most of these "cells within cells" lost the nucleus of the former algal endosymbiont. But after hundreds of millions of years cryptomonads still retain the nucleus of their former red algal endosymbiont as a tiny relict organelle, the nucleomorph, which has three minute linear chromosomes, but their function and the nature of their ends have been unclear. We report extensive cryptomonad nucleomorph sequences (68.5 kb), from one end of each of the three chromosomes of Guillardia theta. Telomeres of the nucleomorph chromosomes differ dramatically from those of other eukaryotes, being repeats of the 23-mer sequence (AG)(7)AAG(6)A, not a typical hexamer (commonly TTAGGG). The subterminal regions comprising the rRNA cistrons and one protein-coding gene are exactly repeated at all three chromosome ends. Gene density (one per 0.8 kb) is the highest for any cellular genome. None of the 38 protein-coding genes has spliceosomal introns, in marked contrast to the chlorarachniophyte nucleomorph. Most identified nucleomorph genes are for gene expression or protein degradation; histone, tubulin, and putatively centrosomal ranbpm genes are probably important for chromosome segregation. No genes for primary or secondary metabolism have been found. Two of the three tRNA genes have introns, one in a hitherto undescribed location. Intergenic regions are exceptionally short; three genes transcribed by two different RNA polymerases overlap their neighbors. The reported sequences encode two essential chloroplast proteins, FtsZ and rubredoxin, thus explaining why cryptomonad nucleomorphs persist.

  11. Reconstructing cancer genomes from paired-end sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oesper Layla

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cancer genome is derived from the germline genome through a series of somatic mutations. Somatic structural variants - including duplications, deletions, inversions, translocations, and other rearrangements - result in a cancer genome that is a scrambling of intervals, or "blocks" of the germline genome sequence. We present an efficient algorithm for reconstructing the block organization of a cancer genome from paired-end DNA sequencing data. Results By aligning paired reads from a cancer genome - and a matched germline genome, if available - to the human reference genome, we derive: (i a partition of the reference genome into intervals; (ii adjacencies between these intervals in the cancer genome; (iii an estimated copy number for each interval. We formulate the Copy Number and Adjacency Genome Reconstruction Problem of determining the cancer genome as a sequence of the derived intervals that is consistent with the measured adjacencies and copy numbers. We design an efficient algorithm, called Paired-end Reconstruction of Genome Organization (PREGO, to solve this problem by reducing it to an optimization problem on an interval-adjacency graph constructed from the data. The solution to the optimization problem results in an Eulerian graph, containing an alternating Eulerian tour that corresponds to a cancer genome that is consistent with the sequencing data. We apply our algorithm to five ovarian cancer genomes that were sequenced as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas. We identify numerous rearrangements, or structural variants, in these genomes, analyze reciprocal vs. non-reciprocal rearrangements, and identify rearrangements consistent with known mechanisms of duplication such as tandem duplications and breakage/fusion/bridge (B/F/B cycles. Conclusions We demonstrate that PREGO efficiently identifies complex and biologically relevant rearrangements in cancer genome sequencing data. An implementation of the PREGO algorithm is

  12. Next-generation sequencing strategies for characterizing the turkey genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalloul, Rami A; Zimin, Aleksey V; Settlage, Robert E; Kim, Sungwon; Reed, Kent M

    2014-02-01

    The turkey genome sequencing project was initiated in 2008 and has relied primarily on next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Our first efforts used a synergistic combination of 2 NGS platforms (Roche/454 and Illumina GAII), detailed bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) maps, and unique assembly tools to sequence and assemble the genome of the domesticated turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. Since the first release in 2010, efforts to improve the genome assembly, gene annotation, and genomic analyses continue. The initial assembly build (2.01) represented about 89% of the genome sequence with 17X coverage depth (931 Mb). Sequence contigs were assigned to 30 of the 40 chromosomes with approximately 10% of the assembled sequence corresponding to unassigned chromosomes (ChrUn). The sequence has been refined through both genome-wide and area-focused sequencing, including shotgun and paired-end sequencing, and targeted sequencing of chromosomal regions with low or incomplete coverage. These additional efforts have improved the sequence assembly resulting in 2 subsequent genome builds of higher genome coverage (25X/Build3.0 and 30X/Build4.0) with a current sequence totaling 1,010 Mb. Further, BAC with end sequences assigned to the Z/W and MG18 (MHC) chromosomes, ChrUn, or not placed in the previous build were isolated, deeply sequenced (Hi-Seq), and incorporated into the latest build (5.0). To aid in the annotation and to generate a gene expression atlas of major tissues, a comprehensive set of RNA samples was collected at various developmental stages of female and male turkeys. Transcriptome sequencing data (using Illumina Hi-Seq) will provide information to enhance the final assembly and ultimately improve sequence annotation. The most current sequence covers more than 95% of the turkey genome and should yield a much improved gene level of annotation, making it a valuable resource for studying genetic variations underlying economically important traits in poultry.

  13. Phylogeny and divergence of Chinese Angiopteridaceae based on chloroplast DNA sequence data (rbcL and trnL-F)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChunXiang; LU ShuGang

    2007-01-01

    Marattioid ferns are an ancient lineage of primitive vascular plants that first appeared in the middle Carboniferous. Extant members are almost exclusively restricted to tropical regions, and the species-rich family Angiopteridaceae are limited in their distribution to the eastern hemisphere; relationships within the group are currently vague. Here the phylogenetic relationship between Angiopteris Hoffm. and Archangiopteris Christ et Gies. was evaluated based on the sequence analysis of chloroplast rbcL gene and trnL-F intergenic spacer with MEGA2 and MrBayes v3.0b4. On the basis of the phylogenetic pattern and fossil record, we further estimated the divergence time for the two genera. The phylogenetic trees revealed that all species of Angiopteris and Archangiopteris in this study formed a monophyletic group with strong statistical support, but the relationship between the two genera remained unresolved based on individual sequence analysis. On the other hand, the sequence analyses of combined data set revealed that Archangiopteris species diverged first, indicating that Archangiopteris may not be a direct derivative as traditionally assumed. The clade of Angiopteris and Archangiopteris appears to have diversified in the late Oligocene (≈26 Ma) based on the molecular estimate. Thus, the evolutionary history of extant Angiopteris and Archangiopteris has been characterized by ancient origin and recent diversification, and these groups are not relic and endangered lineages as traditionally considered.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Viscerotropic Strain N1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Ricardo W.; Sousa, Thiago J.; Rocha, Flávia; Pereira, Felipe L.; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Menezes, Nildo; Macedo, Eduardo S.; Moura-Costa, Lilia F.; Meyer, Roberto; Leal, Carlos A. G.; Figueiredo, Henrique C.; Azevedo, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain N1. The sequencing was performed with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine system. The genome is a circular chromosome with 2,337,845 bp, a G+C content of 52.85%, and a total of 2,045 coding sequences, 12 rRNAs, 49 tRNAs, and 58 pseudogenes. PMID:26823597

  15. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the chloroplast 16S rRNA, tufA, and rbcL genes from Bryopsis hypnoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Fang; WANG Guangce

    2011-01-01

    Using shotgun sequencing data,the complete sequences of chloroplast 16S rRNA and tufA genes were acquired from native specimens of Bryopsis hypnoides (Qingdao,China).There are two group Ⅰ introns in the 16S rRNA gene,which is structurally similar to that of Caulerpa sertularioides (Bryopsidales,Chlorophyta).The chloroplast-encoded tufA gene sequence is 1230 bp long,very AT-rich (61.5%),and is similar to previously published 16S rRNA sequences of bryopsidinean algae.Phylogenetic analyses based on chloroplast 16S rRNA and tufA gene sequence data support previous hypotheses that the Bryopsidineae,Halimedineae,and Ostreobidineae are three distinct lineages.These results also confirmed the exclusion of Avrainvillea from the family Udoteaceae.Phylogenetic analyses inferred that the genus Bryopsis as sister to Derbesia; however,this clade lacked robust nodal support.Moreover,the phylogenetic tree inferred from rbcL GenBank sequences,combined with the geographical distributions of Bryopsis species,identified a strongly supportive clade for three differently distributed Asian Bryopsis species.The preliminary results suggesting that these organisms are of distinct regional endemism.

  16. A taste of pineapple evolution through genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-12-01

    The genome sequence assembly of the highly heterozygous Ananas comosus and its varieties is an impressive technical achievement. The sequence opens the door to a greater understanding of pineapple morphology and evolution.

  17. Insights from twenty years of bacterial genome sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jun, Se Ran [ORNL; Nookaew, Intawat [ORNL; Leuze, Michael Rex [ORNL; Ahn, Tae-Hyuk [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Lund, Ole [Technical University of Denmark; Kora, Guruprasad H [ORNL; Wassenaar, Trudy [Molecular Microbiology & Genomics Consultants, Zotzenheim, Germany; Poudel, Suresh [ORNL; Ussery, David W [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Since the first two complete bacterial genome sequences were published in 1995, the science of bacteria has dramatically changed. Using third-generation DNA sequencing, it is possible to completely sequence a bacterial genome in a few hours and identify some types of methylation sites along the genome as well. Sequencing of bacterial genome sequences is now a standard procedure, and the information from tens of thousands of bacterial genomes has had a major impact on our views of the bacterial world. In this review, we explore a series of questions to highlight some insights that comparative genomics has produced. To date, there are genome sequences available from 50 different bacterial phyla and 11 different archaeal phyla. However, the distribution is quite skewed towards a few phyla that contain model organisms. But the breadth is continuing to improve, with projects dedicated to filling in less characterized taxonomic groups. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system provides bacteria with immunity against viruses, which outnumber bacteria by tenfold. How fast can we go? Second-generation sequencing has produced a large number of draft genomes (close to 90 % of bacterial genomes in GenBank are currently not complete); third-generation sequencing can potentially produce a finished genome in a few hours, and at the same time provide methlylation sites along the entire chromosome. The diversity of bacterial communities is extensive as is evident from the genome sequences available from 50 different bacterial phyla and 11 different archaeal phyla. Genome sequencing can help in classifying an organism, and in the case where multiple genomes of the same species are available, it is possible to calculate the pan- and core genomes; comparison of more than 2000 Escherichia coli genomes finds an E. coli core genome of about 3100 gene families and a total of about 89,000 different gene families. Why do we care about bacterial genome

  18. Whole-Genome Sequence Assembly for Mammalian Genomes: Arachne 2

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffe, David B.; Butler, Jonathan; Gnerre, Sante; Mauceli, Evan; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Jill P. Mesirov; Michael C Zody; Lander, Eric S.

    2003-01-01

    We previously described the whole-genome assembly program Arachne, presenting assemblies of simulated data for small to mid-sized genomes. Here we describe algorithmic adaptations to the program, allowing for assembly of mammalian-size genomes, and also improving the assembly of smaller genomes. Three principal changes were simultaneously made and applied to the assembly of the mouse genome, during a six-month period of development: (1) Supercontigs (scaffolds) were iteratively broken and rej...

  19. Genome Project Standards in a New Era of Sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GSC Consortia; HMP Jumpstart Consortia; Chain, P. S. G.; Grafham, D. V.; Fulton, R. S.; FitzGerald, M. G.; Hostetler, J.; Muzny, D.; Detter, J. C.; Ali, J.; Birren, B.; Bruce, D. C.; Buhay, C.; Cole, J. R.; Ding, Y.; Dugan, S.; Field, D.; Garrity, G. M.; Gibbs, R.; Graves, T.; Han, C. S.; Harrison, S. H.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Khouri, H. M.; Kodira, C. D.; Kolker, E.; Kyrpides, N. C.; Lang, D.; Lapidus, A.; Malfatti, S. A.; Markowitz, V.; Metha, T.; Nelson, K. E.; Parkhill, J.; Pitluck, S.; Qin, X.; Read, T. D.; Schmutz, J.; Sozhamannan, S.; Strausberg, R.; Sutton, G.; Thomson, N. R.; Tiedje, J. M.; Weinstock, G.; Wollam, A.

    2009-06-01

    For over a decade, genome 43 sequences have adhered to only two standards that are relied on for purposes of sequence analysis by interested third parties (1, 2). However, ongoing developments in revolutionary sequencing technologies have resulted in a redefinition of traditional whole genome sequencing that requires a careful reevaluation of such standards. With commercially available 454 pyrosequencing (followed by Illumina, SOLiD, and now Helicos), there has been an explosion of genomes sequenced under the moniker 'draft', however these can be very poor quality genomes (due to inherent errors in the sequencing technologies, and the inability of assembly programs to fully address these errors). Further, one can only infer that such draft genomes may be of poor quality by navigating through the databases to find the number and type of reads deposited in sequence trace repositories (and not all genomes have this available), or to identify the number of contigs or genome fragments deposited to the database. The difficulty in assessing the quality of such deposited genomes has created some havoc for genome analysis pipelines and contributed to many wasted hours of (mis)interpretation. These same novel sequencing technologies have also brought an exponential leap in raw sequencing capability, and at greatly reduced prices that have further skewed the time- and cost-ratios of draft data generation versus the painstaking process of improving and finishing a genome. The resulting effect is an ever-widening gap between drafted and finished genomes that only promises to continue (Figure 1), hence there is an urgent need to distinguish good and poor datasets. The sequencing institutes in the authorship, along with the NIH's Human Microbiome Project Jumpstart Consortium (3), strongly believe that a new set of standards is required for genome sequences. The following represents a set of six community-defined categories of genome sequence standards that better

  20. Finishing The Euchromatic Sequence Of The Human Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel; Pennacchio, Len

    2004-09-07

    The sequence of the human genome encodes the genetic instructions for human physiology, as well as rich information about human evolution. In 2001, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium reported a draft sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome. Since then, the international collaboration has worked to convert this draft into a genome sequence with high accuracy and nearly complete coverage. Here, we report the result of this finishing process.The current genome sequence (Build 35) contains 2.85 billion nucleotides interrupted by only 341 gaps. It covers {approx}99% of the euchromatic genome and is accurate to an error rate of {approx}1 event per 100,000 bases. Many of the remaining euchromatic gaps are associated with segmental duplications and will require focused work with new methods. The near-complete sequence, the first for a vertebrate, greatly improves the precision of biological analyses of the human genome including studies of gene number,birth and death. Notably, the human genome seems to encode only20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence reported here should serve as a firm foundation for biomedical research in the decades ahead.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of a Diarrheagenic Morganella morganii Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pallavi; Mosci, Rebekah; Rudrik, James T; Manning, Shannon D

    2015-10-08

    This is a report of the whole-genome draft sequence of a diarrheagenic Morganella morganii isolate from a patient in Michigan, USA. This genome represents an important addition to the limited number of pathogenic M. morganii genomes available.

  2. DNA Barcoding: Amplification and sequence analysis of rbcl and matK genome regions in three divergent plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Iqbal Wattoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA barcoding is a novel method of species identification based on nucleotide diversity of conserved sequences. The establishment and refining of plant DNA barcoding systems is more challenging due to high genetic diversity among different species. Therefore, targeting the conserved nuclear transcribed regions would be more reliable for plant scientists to reveal genetic diversity, species discrimination and phylogeny. Methods: In this study, we amplified and sequenced the chloroplast DNA regions (matk+rbcl of Solanum nigrum, Euphorbia helioscopia and Dalbergia sissoo to study the functional annotation, homology modeling and sequence analysis to allow a more efficient utilization of these sequences among different plant species. These three species represent three families; Solanaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Fabaceae respectively. Biological sequence homology and divergence of amplified sequences was studied using Basic Local Alignment Tool (BLAST. Results: Both primers (matk+rbcl showed good amplification in three species. The sequenced regions reveled conserved genome information for future identification of different medicinal plants belonging to these species. The amplified conserved barcodes revealed different levels of biological homology after sequence analysis. The results clearly showed that the use of these conserved DNA sequences as barcode primers would be an accurate way for species identification and discrimination. Conclusion: The amplification and sequencing of conserved genome regions identified a novel sequence of matK in native species of Solanum nigrum. The findings of the study would be applicable in medicinal industry to establish DNA based identification of different medicinal plant species to monitor adulteration.

  3. Sequencing of a Cultivated Diploid CottonGenome-Gossypium arboreum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WILKINS Thea A

    2008-01-01

    @@ Sequencing the genomes of crop species and model systems contributes significantly to our under-standing of the organization,structure and function of plant genomes.In a "white paper" published in2007,the cotton community set forth a strategic plan for sequencing the AD genome of cultivated up-land cotton that initially targets less complex diploid genomes.This strategy banks on the high degreeof conservation between diploid progenitors and AD species that will allow information derived fromdiploid genomes to be directly applied to the tetraploids.

  4. Genome sequencing and annotation of Cellulomonas sp. HZM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric Chua

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the draft genome sequence of Cellulomonas sp. HZM, isolated from a tropical peat swamp forest. The draft genome size is 3,559,280 bp with a G + C content of 73% and contains 3 rRNA sequences (single copies of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Human Gut Symbiont Roseburia hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Anthony J.; Kelly, Denise; Flint, Harry J;

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the human gut symbiont Roseburia hominis A2-183(T) (= DSM 16839(T) = NCIMB 14029(T)), isolated from human feces. The genome is represented by a 3,592,125-bp chromosome with 3,405 coding sequences. A number of potential functions contributing to host-...

  6. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Heum; Kim, Sewhan; Kim, Jae Young; Lee, Soojin; Um, Youngsoon; Oh, Min-Kyu; Kim, Young-Rok; Lee, Jinwon; Yang, Kap-Seok

    2012-05-01

    This is the first complete genome sequence of the Enterobacter aerogenes species. Here we present the genome sequence of E. aerogenes KCTC 2190, which contains 5,280,350 bp with a G + C content of 54.8 mol%, 4,912 protein-coding genes, and 109 structural RNAs.

  7. Investigation of genome sequences within the family Pasteurellaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angen, Øystein; Ussery, David

    . The homology between genomes ranged from 47.2% to 94.1%. The number of genes found increased steadily for each sequence added to the analysis and the pan-genome of all 20 sequences consisted of around 8500 genes. On the other hand, the number of genes found in all strains steadily decreased when adding...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Raoultella planticola, Isolated from River Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothikumar, Narayanan; Kahler, Amy; Strockbine, Nancy; Gladney, Lori; Hill, Vincent R

    2014-10-16

    We isolated Raoultella planticola from a river water sample, which was phenotypically indistinguishable from Escherichia coli on MI agar. The genome sequence of R. planticola was determined to gain information about its metabolic functions contributing to its false positive appearance of E. coli on MI agar. We report the first whole genome sequence of Raoultella planticola.

  9. Whole-Genome Sequences of 26 Vibrio cholerae Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watve, Samit S.; Chande, Aroon T.; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Jordan, I. King

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae employs several adaptive mechanisms for environmental persistence, including natural transformation and type VI secretion, creating a reservoir for the spread of disease. Here, we report whole-genome sequences of 26 diverse V. cholerae isolates, significantly increasing the sequence diversity of publicly available V. cholerae genomes. PMID:28007852

  10. A gapless genome sequence of the fungus Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, Van Jan A.L.; Stassen, Joost H.M.; Mosbach, Andreas; Lee, Van Der Theo A.J.; Faino, Luigi; Farmer, Andrew D.; Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G.; Zhou, Shiguo; Seidl, Michael F.; Cottam, Eleanor; Edel, Dominique; Hahn, Matthias; Schwartz, David C.; Dietrich, Robert A.; Widdison, Stephanie; Scalliet, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Following earlier incomplete and fragmented versions of a genome sequence for the grey mould Botrytis cinerea, a gapless, near-finished genome sequence for B. cinerea strain B05.10 is reported. The assembly comprised 18 chromosomes and was confirmed by an optical map and a genetic map based on ap

  11. Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, E S; Linton, L M; Birren, B; Nusbaum, C; Zody, M C; Baldwin, J; Devon, K; Dewar, K; Doyle, M; FitzHugh, W; Funke, R; Gage, D; Harris, K; Heaford, A; Howland, J; Kann, L; Lehoczky, J; LeVine, R; McEwan, P; McKernan, K; Meldrim, J; Mesirov, J P; Miranda, C; Morris, W; Naylor, J; Raymond, C; Rosetti, M; Santos, R; Sheridan, A; Sougnez, C; Stange-Thomann, Y; Stojanovic, N; Subramanian, A; Wyman, D; Rogers, J; Sulston, J; Ainscough, R; Beck, S; Bentley, D; Burton, J; Clee, C; Carter, N; Coulson, A; Deadman, R; Deloukas, P; Dunham, A; Dunham, I; Durbin, R; French, L; Grafham, D; Gregory, S; Hubbard, T; Humphray, S; Hunt, A; Jones, M; Lloyd, C; McMurray, A; Matthews, L; Mercer, S; Milne, S; Mullikin, J C; Mungall, A; Plumb, R; Ross, M; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Waterston, R H; Wilson, R K; Hillier, L W; McPherson, J D; Marra, M A; Mardis, E R; Fulton, L A; Chinwalla, A T; Pepin, K H; Gish, W R; Chissoe, S L; Wendl, M C; Delehaunty, K D; Miner, T L; Delehaunty, A; Kramer, J B; Cook, L L; Fulton, R S; Johnson, D L; Minx, P J; Clifton, S W; Hawkins, T; Branscomb, E; Predki, P; Richardson, P; Wenning, S; Slezak, T; Doggett, N; Cheng, J F; Olsen, A; Lucas, S; Elkin, C; Uberbacher, E; Frazier, M; Gibbs, R A; Muzny, D M; Scherer, S E; Bouck, J B; Sodergren, E J; Worley, K C; Rives, C M; Gorrell, J H; Metzker, M L; Naylor, S L; Kucherlapati, R S; Nelson, D L; Weinstock, G M; Sakaki, Y; Fujiyama, A; Hattori, M; Yada, T; Toyoda, A; Itoh, T; Kawagoe, C; Watanabe, H; Totoki, Y; Taylor, T; Weissenbach, J; Heilig, R; Saurin, W; Artiguenave, F; Brottier, P; Bruls, T; Pelletier, E; Robert, C; Wincker, P; Smith, D R; Doucette-Stamm, L; Rubenfield, M; Weinstock, K; Lee, H M; Dubois, J; Rosenthal, A; Platzer, M; Nyakatura, G; Taudien, S; Rump, A; Yang, H; Yu, J; Wang, J; Huang, G; Gu, J; Hood, L; Rowen, L; Madan, A; Qin, S; Davis, R W; Federspiel, N A; Abola, A P; Proctor, M J; Myers, R M; Schmutz, J; Dickson, M; Grimwood, J; Cox, D R; Olson, M V; Kaul, R; Raymond, C; Shimizu, N; Kawasaki, K; Minoshima, S; Evans, G A; Athanasiou, M; Schultz, R; Roe, B A; Chen, F; Pan, H; Ramser, J; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; McCombie, W R; de la Bastide, M; Dedhia, N; Blöcker, H; Hornischer, K; Nordsiek, G; Agarwala, R; Aravind, L; Bailey, J A; Bateman, A; Batzoglou, S; Birney, E; Bork, P; Brown, D G; Burge, C B; Cerutti, L; Chen, H C; Church, D; Clamp, M; Copley, R R; Doerks, T; Eddy, S R; Eichler, E E; Furey, T S; Galagan, J; Gilbert, J G; Harmon, C; Hayashizaki, Y; Haussler, D; Hermjakob, H; Hokamp, K; Jang, W; Johnson, L S; Jones, T A; Kasif, S; Kaspryzk, A; Kennedy, S; Kent, W J; Kitts, P; Koonin, E V; Korf, I; Kulp, D; Lancet, D; Lowe, T M; McLysaght, A; Mikkelsen, T; Moran, J V; Mulder, N; Pollara, V J; Ponting, C P; Schuler, G; Schultz, J; Slater, G; Smit, A F; Stupka, E; Szustakowki, J; Thierry-Mieg, D; Thierry-Mieg, J; Wagner, L; Wallis, J; Wheeler, R; Williams, A; Wolf, Y I; Wolfe, K H; Yang, S P; Yeh, R F; Collins, F; Guyer, M S; Peterson, J; Felsenfeld, A; Wetterstrand, K A; Patrinos, A; Morgan, M J; de Jong, P; Catanese, J J; Osoegawa, K; Shizuya, H; Choi, S; Chen, Y J; Szustakowki, J

    2001-02-15

    The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterococcus mundtii CRL1656

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Enterococcus mundtii CRL1656, which was isolated from the stripping milk of a clinically healthy adult Holstein dairy cow from a dairy farm of the northwestern region of Tucumán (Argentina). The 3.10-Mb genome sequence consists of 450 large contigs and contains 2,741 predicted protein-coding genes.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Type Strain LMG 22219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelkhair, Mohamed A.; Riley, Matthew C.; Bemis, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the first complete genome sequence of LMG 22219 (=ON 86T = CCUG 49543T), the Staphylococcus pseudintermedius type strain isolated from feline lung tissue. This sequence information will facilitate phylogenetic comparisons of staphylococcal species and other bacteria at the genome level. PMID:28209834

  14. Complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter africanus’

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter africanus’ (Laf), strain ptsapsy, was obtained by an Illumina HiSeq 2000. The Laf genome comprises 1,192,232 nucleotides, 34.5% GC content, 1,141 predicted coding sequences, 44 tRNAs, 3 complete copies of ribosomal RNA genes (16S, 23S and 5S) ...

  15. Genome sequence of Kocuria palustris strain W4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herschend, Jakob; Raghupathi, Prem Krishnan; Røder, Henriette Lyng;

    2016-01-01

    We report the 3.09 Mb draft genome sequence ofKocuria palustrisW4, isolated from a slaughterhouse in Denmark.......We report the 3.09 Mb draft genome sequence ofKocuria palustrisW4, isolated from a slaughterhouse in Denmark....

  16. Nearly Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain NIZO2877

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martino, M.E.; Bayjanov, J.R.; Joncour, P.; Hughes, S.; Gillet, B.; Kleerebezem, M; Siezen, R.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Leulier, F.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a versatile bacterial species that is isolated mostly from foods. Here, we present the first genome sequence of L. plantarum strain NIZO2877 isolated from a hot dog in Vietnam. Its two contigs represent a nearly complete genome sequence.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 8198

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qing-Qing; Hu, Hai-Jie; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Gu, Xiang-Chao; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Wen-Juan; Ni, Xiao-Meng

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 8198, a novel probiotic strain isolated from fermented herbage. We have determined the complete genome sequence of strain L. plantarum CGMCC 8198, which consists of genes that are likely to be involved in dairy fermentation and that have probiotic qualities. PMID:28183756

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Tannerella forsythia Type Strain ATCC 43037.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Valentin; Pabinger, Stephan; Chen, Tsute; Messner, Paul; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Schäffer, Christina

    2015-06-11

    Tannerella forsythia is an oral pathogen implicated in the development of periodontitis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the Tannerella forsythia strain ATCC 43037. The previously available genome of this designation (NCBI reference sequence NC_016610.1) was discovered to be derived from a different strain, FDC 92A2 (= ATCC BAA-2717).

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Tannerella forsythia Type Strain ATCC 43037

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, Valentin; Pabinger, Stephan; Chen, Tsute; Messner, Paul; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Schäffer, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is an oral pathogen implicated in the development of periodontitis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the Tannerella forsythia strain ATCC 43037. The previously available genome of this designation (NCBI reference sequence NC_016610.1) was discovered to be derived from a different strain, FDC 92A2 (= ATCC BAA-2717).

  20. Unexpected cross-species contamination in genome sequencing projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samier Merchant

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The raw data from a genome sequencing project sometimes contains DNA from contaminating organisms, which may be introduced during sample collection or sequence preparation. In some instances, these contaminants remain in the sequence even after assembly and deposition of the genome into public databases. As a result, searches of these databases may yield erroneous and confusing results. We used efficient microbiome analysis software to scan the draft assembly of domestic cow, Bos taurus, and identify 173 small contigs that appeared to derive from microbial contaminants. In the course of verifying these findings, we discovered that one genome, Neisseria gonorrhoeae TCDC-NG08107, although putatively a complete genome, contained multiple sequences that actually derived from the cow and sheep genomes. Our findings illustrate the need to carefully validate findings of anomalous DNA that rely on comparisons to either draft or finished genomes.

  1. The complete nucleotide sequence and multipartite organization of the tobacco mitochondrial genome: comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Y; Watase, Y; Nagase, M; Makita, N; Yagura, S; Hirai, A; Sugiura, M

    2005-02-01

    Tobacco is a valuable model system for investigating the origin of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in amphidiploid plants and studying the genetic interaction between mitochondria and chloroplasts in the various functions of the plant cell. As a first step, we have determined the complete mtDNA sequence of Nicotiana tabacum. The mtDNA of N. tabacum can be assumed to be a master circle (MC) of 430,597 bp. Sequence comparison of a large number of clones revealed that there are four classes of boundaries derived from homologous recombination, which leads to a multipartite organization with two MCs and six subgenomic circles. The mtDNA of N. tabacum contains 36 protein-coding genes, three ribosomal RNA genes and 21 tRNA genes. Among the first class, we identified the genes rps1 and psirps14, which had previously been thought to be absent in tobacco mtDNA on the basis of Southern analysis. Tobacco mtDNA was compared with those of Arabidopsis thaliana, Beta vulgaris, Oryza sativa and Brassica napus. Since repeated sequences show no homology to each other among the five angiosperms, it can be supposed that these were independently acquired by each species during the evolution of angiosperms. The gene order and the sequences of intergenic spacers in mtDNA also differ widely among the five angiosperms, indicating multiple reorganizations of genome structure during the evolution of higher plants. Among the conserved genes, the same potential conserved nonanucleotide-motif-type promoter could only be postulated for rrn18-rrn5 in four of the dicotyledonous plants, suggesting that a coding sequence does not necessarily move with the promoter upon reorganization of the mitochondrial genome.

  2. Comparison of 61 Sequenced Escherichia coli Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Wassenaar, T. M.; Ussery, David

    2010-01-01

    MLST was performed, many of the various strains appear jumbled and less well resolved. The predicted pan-genome comprises 15,741 gene families, and only 993 (6%) of the families are represented in every genome, comprising the core genome. The variable or 'accessory' genes thus make up more than 90......% of the pan-genome and about 80% of a typical genome; some of these variable genes tend to be co-localized on genomic islands. The diversity within the species E. coli, and the overlap in gene content between this and related species, suggests a continuum rather than sharp species borders in this group...

  3. Draft sequences of the radish (Raphanus sativus L.) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Li, Feng; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Zou, Zhongwei; Hasegawa, Yoichi; Tonosaki, Kaoru; Shirasawa, Sachiko; Fukushima, Aki; Yokoi, Shuji; Takahata, Yoshihito; Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Ishida, Masahiko; Okamoto, Shunsuke; Sakamoto, Koji; Shirasawa, Kenta; Tabata, Satoshi; Nishio, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L., n = 9) is one of the major vegetables in Asia. Since the genomes of Brassica and related species including radish underwent genome rearrangement, it is quite difficult to perform functional analysis based on the reported genomic sequence of Brassica rapa. Therefore, we performed genome sequencing of radish. Short reads of genomic sequences of 191.1 Gb were obtained by next-generation sequencing (NGS) for a radish inbred line, and 76,592 scaffolds of ≥ 300 bp were constructed along with the bacterial artificial chromosome-end sequences. Finally, the whole draft genomic sequence of 402 Mb spanning 75.9% of the estimated genomic size and containing 61,572 predicted genes was obtained. Subsequently, 221 single nucleotide polymorphism markers and 768 PCR-RFLP markers were used together with the 746 markers produced in our previous study for the construction of a linkage map. The map was combined further with another radish linkage map constructed mainly with expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers into a high-density integrated map of 1,166 cM with 2,553 DNA markers. A total of 1,345 scaffolds were assigned to the linkage map, spanning 116.0 Mb. Bulked PCR products amplified by 2,880 primer pairs were sequenced by NGS, and SNPs in eight inbred lines were identified.

  4. Ancient Human Genome Sequence of an Extinct Palaeo-Eskimo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Li, Yingrui; Lindgreen, Stinus;

    2010-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of an ancient human. Obtained from approximately 4,000-year-old permafrost-preserved hair, the genome represents a male individual from the first known culture to settle in Greenland. Sequenced to an average depth of 20x, we recover 79% of the diploid genome, an...... for a migration from Siberia into the New World some 5,500 years ago, independent of that giving rise to the modern Native Americans and Inuit....

  5. Whole-Genome Sequences of Thirteen Isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schutzer S. E.; Dunn J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Casjens, S. R.; Qiu, W.-G.; Mongodin, E. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2011-02-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a causative agent of Lyme disease in North America and Eurasia. The first complete genome sequence of B. burgdorferi strain 31, available for more than a decade, has assisted research on the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Because a single genome sequence is not sufficient to understand the relationship between genotypic and geographic variation and disease phenotype, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 13 additional B. burgdorferi isolates that span the range of natural variation. These sequences should allow improved understanding of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for novel detection, diagnosis, and prevention strategies.

  6. Scrutinizing virus genome termini by high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Li

    Full Text Available Analysis of genomic terminal sequences has been a major step in studies on viral DNA replication and packaging mechanisms. However, traditional methods to study genome termini are challenging due to the time-consuming protocols and their inefficiency where critical details are lost easily. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS have enabled it to be a powerful tool to study genome termini. In this study, using NGS we sequenced one iridovirus genome and twenty phage genomes and confirmed for the first time that the high frequency sequences (HFSs found in the NGS reads are indeed the terminal sequences of viral genomes. Further, we established a criterion to distinguish the type of termini and the viral packaging mode. We also obtained additional terminal details such as terminal repeats, multi-termini, asymmetric termini. With this approach, we were able to simultaneously detect details of the genome termini as well as obtain the complete sequence of bacteriophage genomes. Theoretically, this application can be further extended to analyze larger and more complicated genomes of plant and animal viruses. This study proposed a novel and efficient method for research on viral replication, packaging, terminase activity, transcription regulation, and metabolism of the host cell.

  7. The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, V; Gwilliam, R; Rajandream, M-A; Lyne, M; Lyne, R; Stewart, A; Sgouros, J; Peat, N; Hayles, J; Baker, S; Basham, D; Bowman, S; Brooks, K; Brown, D; Brown, S; Chillingworth, T; Churcher, C; Collins, M; Connor, R; Cronin, A; Davis, P; Feltwell, T; Fraser, A; Gentles, S; Goble, A; Hamlin, N; Harris, D; Hidalgo, J; Hodgson, G; Holroyd, S; Hornsby, T; Howarth, S; Huckle, E J; Hunt, S; Jagels, K; James, K; Jones, L; Jones, M; Leather, S; McDonald, S; McLean, J; Mooney, P; Moule, S; Mungall, K; Murphy, L; Niblett, D; Odell, C; Oliver, K; O'Neil, S; Pearson, D; Quail, M A; Rabbinowitsch, E; Rutherford, K; Rutter, S; Saunders, D; Seeger, K; Sharp, S; Skelton, J; Simmonds, M; Squares, R; Squares, S; Stevens, K; Taylor, K; Taylor, R G; Tivey, A; Walsh, S; Warren, T; Whitehead, S; Woodward, J; Volckaert, G; Aert, R; Robben, J; Grymonprez, B; Weltjens, I; Vanstreels, E; Rieger, M; Schäfer, M; Müller-Auer, S; Gabel, C; Fuchs, M; Düsterhöft, A; Fritzc, C; Holzer, E; Moestl, D; Hilbert, H; Borzym, K; Langer, I; Beck, A; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; Pohl, T M; Eger, P; Zimmermann, W; Wedler, H; Wambutt, R; Purnelle, B; Goffeau, A; Cadieu, E; Dréano, S; Gloux, S; Lelaure, V; Mottier, S; Galibert, F; Aves, S J; Xiang, Z; Hunt, C; Moore, K; Hurst, S M; Lucas, M; Rochet, M; Gaillardin, C; Tallada, V A; Garzon, A; Thode, G; Daga, R R; Cruzado, L; Jimenez, J; Sánchez, M; del Rey, F; Benito, J; Domínguez, A; Revuelta, J L; Moreno, S; Armstrong, J; Forsburg, S L; Cerutti, L; Lowe, T; McCombie, W R; Paulsen, I; Potashkin, J; Shpakovski, G V; Ussery, D; Barrell, B G; Nurse, P; Cerrutti, L

    2002-02-21

    We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.

  8. Generation of physical map contig-specific sequences useful for whole genome sequence scaffolding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanliang Jiang

    Full Text Available Along with the rapid advances of the nextgen sequencing technologies, more and more species are added to the list of organisms whose whole genomes are sequenced. However, the assembled draft genome of many organisms consists of numerous small contigs, due to the short length of the reads generated by nextgen sequencing platforms. In order to improve the assembly and bring the genome contigs together, more genome resources are needed. In this study, we developed a strategy to generate a valuable genome resource, physical map contig-specific sequences, which are randomly distributed genome sequences in each physical contig. Two-dimensional tagging method was used to create specific tags for 1,824 physical contigs, in which the cost was dramatically reduced. A total of 94,111,841 100-bp reads and 315,277 assembled contigs are identified containing physical map contig-specific tags. The physical map contig-specific sequences along with the currently available BAC end sequences were then used to anchor the catfish draft genome contigs. A total of 156,457 genome contigs (~79% of whole genome sequencing assembly were anchored and grouped into 1,824 pools, in which 16,680 unique genes were annotated. The physical map contig-specific sequences are valuable resources to link physical map, genetic linkage map and draft whole genome sequences, consequently have the capability to improve the whole genome sequences assembly and scaffolding, and improve the genome-wide comparative analysis as well. The strategy developed in this study could also be adopted in other species whose whole genome assembly is still facing a challenge.

  9. Generation of Physical Map Contig-Specific Sequences Useful for Whole Genome Sequence Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanliang; Ninwichian, Parichart; Liu, Shikai; Zhang, Jiaren; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Sun, Fanyue; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2013-01-01

    Along with the rapid advances of the nextgen sequencing technologies, more and more species are added to the list of organisms whose whole genomes are sequenced. However, the assembled draft genome of many organisms consists of numerous small contigs, due to the short length of the reads generated by nextgen sequencing platforms. In order to improve the assembly and bring the genome contigs together, more genome resources are needed. In this study, we developed a strategy to generate a valuable genome resource, physical map contig-specific sequences, which are randomly distributed genome sequences in each physical contig. Two-dimensional tagging method was used to create specific tags for 1,824 physical contigs, in which the cost was dramatically reduced. A total of 94,111,841 100-bp reads and 315,277 assembled contigs are identified containing physical map contig-specific tags. The physical map contig-specific sequences along with the currently available BAC end sequences were then used to anchor the catfish draft genome contigs. A total of 156,457 genome contigs (~79% of whole genome sequencing assembly) were anchored and grouped into 1,824 pools, in which 16,680 unique genes were annotated. The physical map contig-specific sequences are valuable resources to link physical map, genetic linkage map and draft whole genome sequences, consequently have the capability to improve the whole genome sequences assembly and scaffolding, and improve the genome-wide comparative analysis as well. The strategy developed in this study could also be adopted in other species whose whole genome assembly is still facing a challenge. PMID:24205335

  10. The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, D; Garrity, G; Gray, T;

    2008-01-01

    the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources...... that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the 'transparency' of the information contained in existing genomic databases....

  11. Chloroplast movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    Chloroplast movement is important for plant survival under high light and for efficient photosynthesis under low light. This review introduces recent knowledge on chloroplast movement and shows how to analyze the responses and the moving mechanisms, potentially inspiring research in this field. Avoidance from the strong light is mediated by blue light receptor phototropin 2 (phot2) plausibly localized on the chloroplast envelop and accumulation at the week light-irradiated area is mediated by phot1 and phot2 localized on the plasma membrane. Chloroplasts move by chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments that must be polymerized by Chloroplast Unusual Positioning1 (CHUP1) at the front side of moving chloroplast. To understand the signal transduction pathways and the mechanism of chloroplast movement, that is, from light capture to motive force-generating mechanism, various methods should be employed based on the various aspects. Observation of chloroplast distribution pattern under different light condition by fixed cell sectioning is somewhat an old-fashioned technique but the most basic and important way. However, most importantly, precise chloroplast behavior during and just after the induction of chloroplast movement by partial cell irradiation using an irradiator with either low light or strong light microbeam should be recorded by time lapse photographs under infrared light and analyzed. Recently various factors involved in chloroplast movement, such as cp-actin filaments and CHUP1, could be traced in Arabidopsis transgenic lines with fluorescent protein tags under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and/or a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). These methods are listed and their advantages and disadvantages are evaluated.

  12. Genomic libraries: II. Subcloning, sequencing, and assembling large-insert genomic DNA clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quail, Mike A; Matthews, Lucy; Sims, Sarah; Lloyd, Christine; Beasley, Helen; Baxter, Simon W

    2011-01-01

    Sequencing large insert clones to completion is useful for characterizing specific genomic regions, identifying haplotypes, and closing gaps in whole genome sequencing projects. Despite being a standard technique in molecular laboratories, DNA sequencing using the Sanger method can be highly problematic when complex secondary structures or sequence repeats are encountered in genomic clones. Here, we describe methods to isolate DNA from a large insert clone (fosmid or BAC), subclone the sample, and sequence the region to the highest industry standard. Troubleshooting solutions for sequencing difficult templates are discussed.

  13. Phylogeography of Spiraea alpina (Rosaceae) in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau inferred from chloroplast DNA sequence variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa-Qi ZHANG; Qing-Bo GAO; De-Jun ZHANG; Yi-Zhong DUAN; Yin-Hu LI; Peng-Cheng FU; Rui XING; Khan GULZAR; Shi-Long CHEN

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the phylogeographic patterns of Spiraea alpina (Rosaceae) and clarify its response to past climatic changes in the climate-sensitive Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP).We sequenced a chloroplast DNA fragment (trnL-trnF) from 528 individuals representing 43 populations.We identified 10 haplotypes,which were tentatively divided into three groups.These haplotypes or groups were distributed in the different regions of the QTP.Only half the populations were fixed by a single haplotype,whereas the others contained two or more.In the central and eastern regions,adjacent populations at the local scale shared the same haplotype.Our phylogeographic analyses suggest that this alpine shrub survived in multiple refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum and that earlier glaciations may have trigged deep intraspecific divergences.Post-glacial expansions occurred only within populations or across multiple populations within a local range.The findings of the present study together with previous phylogeographic reports suggest that evolutionary histories of plants in the QTP are complex and variable depending on the species investigated.

  14. Using Partial Genomic Fosmid Libraries for Sequencing CompleteOrganellar Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, Joel R.; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Arumuganathan, K.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2005-08-26

    Organellar genome sequences provide numerous phylogenetic markers and yield insight into organellar function and molecular evolution. These genomes are much smaller in size than their nuclear counterparts; thus, their complete sequencing is much less expensive than total nuclear genome sequencing, making broader phylogenetic sampling feasible. However, for some organisms it is challenging to isolate plastid DNA for sequencing using standard methods. To overcome these difficulties, we constructed partial genomic libraries from total DNA preparations of two heterotrophic and two autotrophic angiosperm species using fosmid vectors. We then used macroarray screening to isolate clones containing large fragments of plastid DNA. A minimum tiling path of clones comprising the entire genome sequence of each plastid was selected, and these clones were shotgun-sequenced and assembled into complete genomes. Although this method worked well for both heterotrophic and autotrophic plants, nuclear genome size had a dramatic effect on the proportion of screened clones containing plastid DNA and, consequently, the overall number of clones that must be screened to ensure full plastid genome coverage. This technique makes it possible to determine complete plastid genome sequences for organisms that defy other available organellar genome sequencing methods, especially those for which limited amounts of tissue are available.

  15. Next-Gen phylogeography of rainforest trees: exploring landscape-level cpDNA variation from whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, M; McPherson, H; Siow, J; Rossetto, M

    2014-01-01

    Standardized phylogeographic studies across codistributed taxa can identify important refugia and biogeographic barriers, and potentially uncover how changes in adaptive constraints through space and time impact on the distribution of genetic diversity. The combination of next-generation sequencing and methodologies that enable uncomplicated analysis of the full chloroplast genome may provide an invaluable resource for such studies. Here, we assess the potential of a shotgun-based method across twelve nonmodel rainforest trees sampled from two evolutionary distinct regions. Whole genomic shotgun sequencing libraries consisting of pooled individuals were used to assemble species-specific chloroplast references (in silicio). For each species, the pooled libraries allowed for the detection of variation within and between data sets (each representing a geographic region). The potential use of nuclear rDNA as an additional marker from the NGS libraries was investigated by mapping reads against available references. We successfully obtained phylogeographically informative sequence data from a range of previously unstudied rainforest trees. Greater levels of diversity were found in northern refugial rainforests than in southern expansion areas. The genetic signatures of varying evolutionary histories were detected, and interesting associative patterns between functional characteristics and genetic diversity were identified. This approach can suit a wide range of landscape-level studies. As the key laboratory-based steps do not require prior species-specific knowledge and can be easily outsourced, the techniques described here are even suitable for researchers without access to wet-laboratory facilities, making evolutionary ecology questions increasingly accessible to the research community.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Rutaceous plants based on single nucleotide polymorphism in chloroplast and nuclear gene sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family Rutaceae encompasses several genera including the economically important genus Citrus. In this study, we selected 22 citrus relatives belonging to the various sub groups of Rutaceae and compared the sequences of three gene fragments. The accessions selected belong to the subfamily Rutoide...

  17. A Probabilistic Genome-Wide Gene Reading Frame Sequence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Mørk, Søren

    We introduce a new type of probabilistic sequence model, that model the sequential composition of reading frames of genes in a genome. Our approach extends gene finders with a model of the sequential composition of genes at the genome-level -- effectively producing a sequential genome annotation...... and are evaluated by the effect on prediction performance. Since bacterial gene finding to a large extent is a solved problem it forms an ideal proving ground for evaluating the explicit modeling of larger scale gene sequence composition of genomes. We conclude that the sequential composition of gene reading frames...... as output. The model can be used to obtain the most probable genome annotation based on a combination of i: a gene finder score of each gene candidate and ii: the sequence of the reading frames of gene candidates through a genome. The model --- as well as a higher order variant --- is developed and tested...

  18. Determining and comparing protein function in Bacterial genome sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla

    In November 2013, there was around 21.000 different prokaryotic genomes sequenced and publicly available, and the number is growing daily with another 20.000 or more genomes expected to be sequenced and deposited by the end of 2014. An important part of the analysis of this data is the functional...... on known functions. This thesis describes the development of new tools for comparative functional annotation and a system for comparative genomics in general. As novel sequenced genomes are becoming more readily available, there is a need for standard analysis tools. The system CMG-biotools is presented...... here as an example of such a system and was used to analyze a set of genomes from the Negativicutes class, a group of bacteria closely related to Gram positives but which has a different cell wall structure and stains Gram negative, as the name indicates. The results of this work show that genomes...

  19. Identification of optimum sequencing depth especially for de novo genome assembly of small genomes using next generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Aarti; Marwah, Veer Singh; Yadav, Akshay; Jha, Vineet; Dhaygude, Kishor; Bangar, Ujwala; Kulkarni, Vivek; Jere, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a disruptive technology that has found widespread acceptance in the life sciences research community. The high throughput and low cost of sequencing has encouraged researchers to undertake ambitious genomic projects, especially in de novo genome sequencing. Currently, NGS systems generate sequence data as short reads and de novo genome assembly using these short reads is computationally very intensive. Due to lower cost of sequencing and higher throughput, NGS systems now provide the ability to sequence genomes at high depth. However, currently no report is available highlighting the impact of high sequence depth on genome assembly using real data sets and multiple assembly algorithms. Recently, some studies have evaluated the impact of sequence coverage, error rate and average read length on genome assembly using multiple assembly algorithms, however, these evaluations were performed using simulated datasets. One limitation of using simulated datasets is that variables such as error rates, read length and coverage which are known to impact genome assembly are carefully controlled. Hence, this study was undertaken to identify the minimum depth of sequencing required for de novo assembly for different sized genomes using graph based assembly algorithms and real datasets. Illumina reads for E.coli (4.6 MB) S.kudriavzevii (11.18 MB) and C.elegans (100 MB) were assembled using SOAPdenovo, Velvet, ABySS, Meraculous and IDBA-UD. Our analysis shows that 50X is the optimum read depth for assembling these genomes using all assemblers except Meraculous which requires 100X read depth. Moreover, our analysis shows that de novo assembly from 50X read data requires only 6-40 GB RAM depending on the genome size and assembly algorithm used. We believe that this information can be extremely valuable for researchers in designing experiments and multiplexing which will enable optimum utilization of sequencing as well as analysis resources.

  20. Comparison of intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric chloroplast diversity in Cycads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Hinsinger, Damien Daniel; Strijk, Joeri Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Cycads are among the most threatened plant species. Increasing the availability of genomic information by adding whole chloroplast data is a fundamental step in supporting phylogenetic studies and conservation efforts. Here, we assemble a dataset encompassing three taxonomic levels in cycads, including ten genera, three species in the genus Cycas and two individuals of C. debaoensis. Repeated sequences, SSRs and variations of the chloroplast were analyzed at the intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric scale, and using our sequence data, we reconstruct a phylogenomic tree for cycads. The chloroplast was 162,094 bp in length, with 133 genes annotated, including 87 protein-coding, 37 tRNA and 8 rRNA genes. We found 7 repeated sequences and 39 SSRs. Seven loci showed promising levels of variations for application in DNA-barcoding. The chloroplast phylogeny confirmed the division of Cycadales in two suborders, each of them being monophyletic, revealing a contradiction with the current family circumscription and its evolution. Finally, 10 intraspecific SNPs were found. Our results showed that despite the extremely restricted distribution range of C. debaoensis, using complete chloroplast data is useful not only in intraspecific studies, but also to improve our understanding of cycad evolution and in defining conservation strategies for this emblematic group. PMID:27558458

  1. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum type strain (5175T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Lang, Elke [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum deleyianum Schumacher et al. 1993 is the type species of the genus Sulfurospirillum. S. deleyianum is a model organism for studying sulfur reduction and dissimilatory nitrate reduction as energy source for growth. Also, it is a prominent model organism for studying the structural and functional characteristics of the cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Sulfurospirillum. The 2,306,351 bp long genome with its 2291 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae phage JD001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zelin; Shen, Wenbin; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Haotian; Me, Rao; Wang, Yanchun; Zeng, Lingbin; Zhu, Yongzhang; Qin, Jinhong; He, Ping; Guo, Xiaokui

    2012-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, opportunistic pathogens that are among the eight most prevalent infectious agents in hospitals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of K. pneumoniae has became a public health problem globally. To develop an effective antimicrobial agent, we isolated a bacteriophage, named JD001, from seawater and sequenced its genome. Comparative genome analysis of phage JD001 with other K. pneumoniae bacteriophages revealed that phage JD001 has little similarity to previously published K. pneumoniae phages KP15, KP32, KP34, and phiKO2. Here we announce the complete genome sequence of JD001 and report major findings from the genomic analysis.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Gordonia bronchialis type strain (3410T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Jando, Marlen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2010-01-01

    Gordonia bronchialis Tsukamura 1971 is the type species of the genus. G. bronchialis is a human-pathogenic organism that has been isolated from a large variety of human tissues. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Gordoniaceae. The 5,290,012 bp long genome with its 4,944 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Oxford Nanopore MinION Sequencing and Genome Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hengyun Lu; Francesca Giordano; Zemin Ning

    2016-01-01

    The revolution of genome sequencing is continuing after the successful second-generation sequencing (SGS) technology. The third-generation sequencing (TGS) technology, led by Pacific Biosciences (PacBio), is progressing rapidly, moving from a technology once only capable of providing data for small genome analysis, or for performing targeted screening, to one that pro-mises high quality de novo assembly and structural variation detection for human-sized genomes. In 2014, the MinION, the first commercial sequencer using nanopore technology, was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT). MinION identifies DNA bases by measuring the changes in electrical conductivity generated as DNA strands pass through a biological pore. Its portability, affordability, and speed in data production makes it suitable for real-time applications, the release of the long read sequencer MinION has thus generated much excitement and interest in the geno-mics community. While de novo genome assemblies can be cheaply produced from SGS data, assem-bly continuity is often relatively poor, due to the limited ability of short reads to handle long repeats. Assembly quality can be greatly improved by using TGS long reads, since repetitive regions can be easily expanded into using longer sequencing lengths, despite having higher error rates at the base level. The potential of nanopore sequencing has been demonstrated by various studies in gen-ome surveillance at locations where rapid and reliable sequencing is needed, but where resources are limited.

  6. The Genomic Scrapheap Challenge; Extracting Relevant Data from Unmapped Whole Genome Sequencing Reads, Including Strain Specific Genomic Segments, in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weide, Robin H; Simonis, Marieke; Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Cuppen, Edwin; de Ligt, Joep

    2016-01-01

    Unmapped next-generation sequencing reads are typically ignored while they contain biologically relevant information. We systematically analyzed unmapped reads from whole genome sequencing of 33 inbred rat strains. High quality reads were selected and enriched for biologically relevant sequences; similarity-based analysis revealed clustering similar to previously reported phylogenetic trees. Our results demonstrate that on average 20% of all unmapped reads harbor sequences that can be used to improve reference genomes and generate hypotheses on potential genotype-phenotype relationships. Analysis pipelines would benefit from incorporating the described methods and reference genomes would benefit from inclusion of the genomic segments obtained through these efforts.

  7. Genome sequencing and annotation of Aeromonas sp. HZM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric Chua

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas sp. strain HZM, isolated from tropical peat swamp forest soil. The draft genome size is 4,451,364 bp with a G + C content of 61.7% and contains 10 rRNA sequences (eight copies of 5S rRNA genes, single copy of 16S and 23S rRNA each. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. JEMQ00000000.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John; Kawchuk, Lawrence

    2015-08-13

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the first published complete genome sequence of a phytopathogenic P. atrosepticum bacteriophage, and details provide important information for the development of biocontrol by advancing our understanding of phage-phytopathogen interactions.

  9. Evolution and targeting of Omp85 homologs in the chloroplast outer envelope membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Michael Day

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Translocon at the outer-envelope-membrane of chloroplasts 75 (Toc75 is the core component of the chloroplast protein import machinery. It belongs to the Omp85 family whose members exist in various Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts of eukaryotes. Chloroplasts of Viridiplantae contain another Omp85 homolog called outer envelope protein 80 (OEP80, whose exact function is unknown. In addition, the Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes truncated forms of Toc75 and OEP80. Multiple studies have shown a common origin of the Omp85 homologs of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts but their results about evolutionary relationships among cyanobacterial Omp85 (cyanoOmp85, Toc75 and OEP80 are inconsistent. The bipartite targeting sequence-dependent sorting of Toc75 has been demonstrated but the targeting mechanisms of other chloroplast Omp85 homologs remain largely unexplored. This study was aimed to address these unresolved issues in order to further our understanding of chloroplast evolution. Sequence alignments and recently determined structures of bacterial Omp85 homologs were used to predict structures of chloroplast Omp85 homologs. The results enabled us to identify amino acid residues that may indicate functional divergence of Toc75 from cyanoOmp85 and OEP80. Phylogenetic analyses using Omp85 homologs from various cyanobacteria and chloroplasts provided strong support for the grouping of Toc75 and OEP80 sister to cyanoOmp85. However, this support was diminished when the analysis included Omp85 homologs from other bacteria and mitochondria. Finally, results of import assays using isolated chloroplasts support outer membrane localization of OEP80tr and indicate that OEP80 may carry a cleavable targeting sequence.

  10. MIPS: a database for genomes and protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Frishman, D; Güldener, U; Mannhaupt, G; Mayer, K; Mokrejs, M; Morgenstern, B; Münsterkötter, M; Rudd, S; Weil, B

    2002-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS-GSF, Neuherberg, Germany) continues to provide genome-related information in a systematic way. MIPS supports both national and European sequencing and functional analysis projects, develops and maintains automatically generated and manually annotated genome-specific databases, develops systematic classification schemes for the functional annotation of protein sequences, and provides tools for the comprehensive analysis of protein sequences. This report updates the information on the yeast genome (CYGD), the Neurospora crassa genome (MNCDB), the databases for the comprehensive set of genomes (PEDANT genomes), the database of annotated human EST clusters (HIB), the database of complete cDNAs from the DHGP (German Human Genome Project), as well as the project specific databases for the GABI (Genome Analysis in Plants) and HNB (Helmholtz-Netzwerk Bioinformatik) networks. The Arabidospsis thaliana database (MATDB), the database of mitochondrial proteins (MITOP) and our contribution to the PIR International Protein Sequence Database have been described elsewhere [Schoof et al. (2002) Nucleic Acids Res., 30, 91-93; Scharfe et al. (2000) Nucleic Acids Res., 28, 155-158; Barker et al. (2001) Nucleic Acids Res., 29, 29-32]. All databases described, the protein analysis tools provided and the detailed descriptions of our projects can be accessed through the MIPS World Wide Web server (http://mips.gsf.de).

  11. ICDS database: interrupted CoDing sequences in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrodou, Emmanuel; Deshayes, Caroline; Muller, Jean; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Ripp, Raymond; Poch, Olivier; Reyrat, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Odile

    2006-01-01

    Unrecognized frameshifts, in-frame stop codons and sequencing errors lead to Interrupted CoDing Sequence (ICDS) that can seriously affect all subsequent steps of functional characterization, from in silico analysis to high-throughput proteomic projects. Here, we describe the Interrupted CoDing Sequence database containing ICDS detected by a similarity-based approach in 80 complete prokaryotic genomes. ICDS can be retrieved by species browsing or similarity searches via a web interface (http://www-bio3d-igbmc.u-strasbg.fr/ICDS/). The definition of each interrupted gene is provided as well as the ICDS genomic localization with the surrounding sequence. Furthermore, to facilitate the experimental characterization of ICDS, we propose optimized primers for re-sequencing purposes. The database will be regularly updated with additional data from ongoing sequenced genomes. Our strategy has been validated by three independent tests: (i) ICDS prediction on a benchmark of artificially created frameshifts, (ii) comparison of predicted ICDS and results obtained from the comparison of the two genomic sequences of Bacillus licheniformis strain ATCC 14580 and (iii) re-sequencing of 25 predicted ICDS of the recently sequenced genome of Mycobacterium smegmatis. This allows us to estimate the specificity and sensitivity (95 and 82%, respectively) of our program and the efficiency of primer determination.

  12. Genomic treasure troves: complete genome sequencing of herbarium and insect museum specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Staats

    Full Text Available Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22-82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus were generated with 81.4-97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2-71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes, but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylogenetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more

  13. Real-time, portable genome sequencing for Ebola surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Joseph Akoi; Koundouno, Raymond; Dudas, Gytis; Mikhail, Amy; Ouédraogo, Nobila; Afrough, Babak; Bah, Amadou; Baum, Jonathan HJ; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Boettcher, Jan-Peter; Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Mar; Camino-Sanchez, Alvaro; Carter, Lisa L.; Doerrbecker, Juiliane; Enkirch, Theresa; Dorival, Isabel Graciela García; Hetzelt, Nicole; Hinzmann, Julia; Holm, Tobias; Kafetzopoulou, Liana Eleni; Koropogui, Michel; Kosgey, Abigail; Kuisma, Eeva; Logue, Christopher H; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Meisel, Sarah; Mertens, Marc; Michel, Janine; Ngabo, Didier; Nitzsche, Katja; Pallash, Elisa; Patrono, Livia Victoria; Portmann, Jasmine; Repits, Johanna Gabriella; Rickett, Natasha Yasmin; Sachse, Andrea; Singethan, Katrin; Vitoriano, Inês; Yemanaberhan, Rahel L; Zekeng, Elsa G; Trina, Racine; Bello, Alexander; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Faye, Ousmane; Faye, Oumar; Magassouba, N’Faly; Williams, Cecelia V.; Amburgey, Victoria; Winona, Linda; Davis, Emily; Gerlach, Jon; Washington, Franck; Monteil, Vanessa; Jourdain, Marine; Bererd, Marion; Camara, Alimou; Somlare, Hermann; Camara, Abdoulaye; Gerard, Marianne; Bado, Guillaume; Baillet, Bernard; Delaune, Déborah; Nebie, Koumpingnin Yacouba; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Savane, Yacouba; Pallawo, Raymond Bernard; Gutierrez, Giovanna Jaramillo; Milhano, Natacha; Roger, Isabelle; Williams, Christopher J; Yattara, Facinet; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Taylor, Jamie; Rachwal, Philip; Turner, Daniel; Pollakis, Georgios; Hiscox, Julian A.; Matthews, David A.; O’Shea, Matthew K.; Johnston, Andrew McD; Wilson, Duncan; Hutley, Emma; Smit, Erasmus; Di Caro, Antonino; Woelfel, Roman; Stoecker, Kilian; Fleischmann, Erna; Gabriel, Martin; Weller, Simon A.; Koivogui, Lamine; Diallo, Boubacar; Keita, Sakoba; Rambaut, Andrew; Formenty, Pierre; Gunther, Stephan; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa is the largest on record, responsible for >28,599 cases and >11,299 deaths 1. Genome sequencing in viral outbreaks is desirable in order to characterize the infectious agent to determine its evolutionary rate, signatures of host adaptation, identification and monitoring of diagnostic targets and responses to vaccines and treatments. The Ebola virus genome (EBOV) substitution rate in the Makona strain has been estimated at between 0.87 × 10−3 to 1.42 × 10−3 mutations per site per year. This is equivalent to 16 to 27 mutations in each genome, meaning that sequences diverge rapidly enough to identify distinct sub-lineages during a prolonged epidemic 2-7. Genome sequencing provides a high-resolution view of pathogen evolution and is increasingly sought-after for outbreak surveillance. Sequence data may be used to guide control measures, but only if the results are generated quickly enough to inform interventions 8. Genomic surveillance during the epidemic has been sporadic due to a lack of local sequencing capacity coupled with practical difficulties transporting samples to remote sequencing facilities 9. In order to address this problem, we devised a genomic surveillance system that utilizes a novel nanopore DNA sequencing instrument. In April 2015 this system was transported in standard airline luggage to Guinea and used for real-time genomic surveillance of the ongoing epidemic. Here we present sequence data and analysis of 142 Ebola virus (EBOV) samples collected during the period March to October 2015. We were able to generate results in less than 24 hours after receiving an Ebola positive sample, with the sequencing process taking as little as 15-60 minutes. We show that real-time genomic surveillance is possible in resource-limited settings and can be established rapidly to monitor outbreaks. PMID:26840485

  14. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Foster, Brian [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Correction for Measurement Error from Genotyping-by-Sequencing in Genomic Variance and Genomic Prediction Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Bilal; Janss, Luc; Jensen, Just

    . In the current work we show how the correction for measurement error in GBSeq can also be applied in whole genome genomic variance and genomic prediction models. Bayesian whole-genome random regression models are proposed to allow implementation of large-scale SNP-based models with a per-SNP correction......Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBSeq) is becoming a cost-effective genotyping platform for species without available SNP arrays. GBSeq considers to sequence short reads from restriction sites covering a limited part of the genome (e.g., 5-10%) with low sequencing depth per individual (e.g., 5-10X per...... sample). The GBSeq data can be used directly in genomic models in the form of individual SNP allele-frequency estimates (e.g., reference reads/total reads per polymorphic site per individual), but is subject to measurement error due to the low sequencing depth per individual. Due to technical reasons...

  16. Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Genomes of Rhizobia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ya-mei; HAN Yi-qiang; TANG Hui; SUN Dong-mei; WANG Yan-jie; WANG Wei-dong

    2008-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites, as genetic markers, are ubiquitous in genomes of various organisms. The analysis of SSR in rhizobia genome provides useful information for a variety of applications in population genetics of rhizobia. We analyzed the occurrences, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs, the most common in Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Mesorhizobium loti, and Sinorhizobium meliloti genomes se-quenced in the microorganisms tandem repeats database, and SSRs in the three species genomes were compared with each other. The result showed that there were 1 410, 859, and 638 SSRs in B. japonicum, M. loti, and 5. meliloti genomes, respectively. In the genomes of B. japonicum, M. loti, and 5. meliloti, tetranucleotide, pentanucleotide, and hexanucleotide repeats were more abundant and indicated higher mutation rates in these species. The least abundance was mononucleotide repeat. The SSRs type and distribution were similar among these species.

  17. The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

    2011-04-29

    In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium phlei Type Strain RIVM601174

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, A. M.

    2012-05-24

    Mycobacterium phlei is a rapidly growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium species that is typically nonpathogenic, with few reported cases of human disease. Here we report the whole genome sequence of M. phlei type strain RIVM601174.

  19. Cancer Genome Sequencing and Its Implications for Personalized Cancer Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Gillanders

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available New DNA sequencing platforms have revolutionized human genome sequencing. The dramatic advances in genome sequencing technologies predict that the $1,000 genome will become a reality within the next few years. Applied to cancer, the availability of cancer genome sequences permits real-time decision-making with the potential to affect diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, and has opened the door towards personalized medicine. A promising strategy is the identification of mutated tumor antigens, and the design of personalized cancer vaccines. Supporting this notion are preliminary analyses of the epitope landscape in breast cancer suggesting that individual tumors express significant numbers of novel antigens to the immune system that can be specifically targeted through cancer vaccines.

  20. Cancer Genome Sequencing and Its Implications for Personalized Cancer Vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lijin [Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Goedegebuure, Peter [Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Mardis, Elaine R. [The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); The Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108 (United States); Ellis, Matthew J.C. [The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Zhang, Xiuli; Herndon, John M. [Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Fleming, Timothy P. [Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Carreno, Beatriz M. [The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Hansen, Ted H. [The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Gillanders, William E., E-mail: gillandersw@wudosis.wustl.edu [Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2011-11-25

    New DNA sequencing platforms have revolutionized human genome sequencing. The dramatic advances in genome sequencing technologies predict that the $1,000 genome will become a reality within the next few years. Applied to cancer, the availability of cancer genome sequences permits real-time decision-making with the potential to affect diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, and has opened the door towards personalized medicine. A promising strategy is the identification of mutated tumor antigens, and the design of personalized cancer vaccines. Supporting this notion are preliminary analyses of the epitope landscape in breast cancer suggesting that individual tumors express significant numbers of novel antigens to the immune system that can be specifically targeted through cancer vaccines.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Paecilomyces hepiali, Isolated from Cordyceps sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Wang, Wenting; Wang, Linping; Pang, Fang; Guo, Lanping; Song, Lai; Liu, Guiming; Feng, Chengqiang

    2016-07-07

    Paecilomyces hepiali is an endoparasitic fungus that commonly exists in the natural Cordyceps sinensis Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. hepiali, which will facilitate the exploitation of medicinal compounds produced by the fungus.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Nine Cyanobacterial Strains from Diverse Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tao; Hou, Shengwei

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the annotated draft genome sequences of nine different cyanobacteria, which were originally collected from different habitats, including hot springs, terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments, and cover four of the five morphological subsections of cyanobacteria. PMID:28254973

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Coprobacter fastidiosus NSB1T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, A. V.; Efimov, B. A.; Khokhlova, E. V.; Kafarskaia, L. I.; Tupikin, A. E.; Kabilov, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Coprobacter fastidiosus is a Gram-negative obligate anaerobic bacterium belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. In this work, we report the draft genome sequence of C. fastidiosus strain NSB1T isolated from human infant feces. PMID:24604645

  4. Comparative genomics beyond sequence-based alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Þórarinsson, Elfar; Yao, Zizhen; Wiklund, Eric D.;

    2008-01-01

    Recent computational scans for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in multiple organisms have relied on existing multiple sequence alignments. However, as sequence similarity drops, a key signal of RNA structure--frequent compensating base changes--is increasingly likely to cause sequence-based alignment me...

  5. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus.

  6. Intra-species sequence comparisons for annotating genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffelli, Dario; Weer, Claire V.; Weng, Li; Lewis, Keith D.; Shoukry, Malak I.; Pachter, Lior; Keys, David N.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-07-15

    Analysis of sequence variation among members of a single species offers a potential approach to identify functional DNA elements responsible for biological features unique to that species. Due to its high rate of allelic polymorphism and ease of genetic manipulability, we chose the sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis, to explore intra-species sequence comparisons for genome annotation. A large number of C. intestinalis specimens were collected from four continents and a set of genomic intervals amplified, resequenced and analyzed to determine the mutation rates at each nucleotide in the sequence. We found that regions with low mutation rates efficiently demarcated functionally constrained sequences: these include a set of noncoding elements, which we showed in C intestinalis transgenic assays to act as tissue-specific enhancers, as well as the location of coding sequences. This illustrates that comparisons of multiple members of a species can be used for genome annotation, suggesting a path for the annotation of the sequenced genomes of organisms occupying uncharacterized phylogenetic branches of the animal kingdom and raises the possibility that the resequencing of a large number of Homo sapiens individuals might be used to annotate the human genome and identify sequences defining traits unique to our species. The sequence data from this study has been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AY667278-AY667407.

  7. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium Phage Waterfoul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Paige N.; Embry, Ella K.; Johnson, Christa O.; Watson, Tiara L.; Weast, Sayre K.; DeGraw, Caroline J.; Douglas, Jessica R.; Sellers, J. Michael; D’Angelo, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Waterfoul is a newly isolated temperate siphovirus of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. It was identified as a member of the K5 cluster of Mycobacterium phages and has a 61,248-bp genome with 95 predicted genes. PMID:27856585

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj; Temple, Louise

    2016-08-18

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain 407 Cry-

    OpenAIRE

    Poehlein, Anja; Liesegang, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen that has been used widely as a biopesticide. Here, we report the genome sequence of strain 407 Cry-, which is used to study the genetic determinants of pathogenicity. The genome consists of a 5.5-Mb chromosome and nine plasmids, including a novel 502-kb megaplasmid.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium bifidum S17.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhurina, D.; Zomer, A.L.; Gleinser, M.; Brancaccio, V.F.; Auchter, M.; Waidmann, M.S.; Westermann, C.; Sinderen, D. van; Riedel, C.U.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the first completely annotated genome sequence of a Bifidobacterium bifidum strain. B. bifidum S17, isolated from feces of a breast-fed infant, was shown to strongly adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and has potent anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo. The genome se

  11. Draft genome sequence of the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlton, Jane M.; Hirt, Robert P.; Silva, Joana C.; Delcher, Arthur L.; Schatz, Michael; Zhao, Qi; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Bidwell, Shelby L.; Alsmark, U. Cecilia M.; Besteiro, Sebastien; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Noel, Christophe J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Foster, Peter G.; Simillion, Cedric; Van de Peer, Yves; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Mueller, Sylke; Dessi, Daniele; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Ren, Qinghu; Paulsen, Ian; Zhang, Hanbang; Bastida-Corcuera, Felix D.; Simoes-Barbosa, Augusto; Brown, Mark T.; Hayes, Richard D.; Mukherjee, Mandira; Okumura, Cheryl Y.; Schneider, Rachel; Smith, Alias J.; Vanacova, Stepanka; Villalvazo, Maria; Haas, Brian J.; Pertea, Mihaela; Feldblyum, Tamara V.; Utterback, Terry R.; Shu, Chung-Li; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; de Jong, Pieter J.; Hrdy, Ivan; Horvathova, Lenka; Zubacova, Zuzana; Dolezal, Pavel; Malik, Shehre-Banoo; Logsdon, John M.; Henze, Katrin; Gupta, Arti; Wang, Ching C.; Dunne, Rebecca L.; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.; Upcroft, Peter; White, Owen; Salzberg, Steven L.; Tang, Petrus; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lee, Ying-Shiung; Embley, T. Martin; Coombs, Graham H.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Tachezy, Jan; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the genome sequence of the protist Trichomonas vaginalis, a sexually transmitted human pathogen. Repeats and transposable elements comprise about two-thirds of the similar to 160-megabase genome, reflecting a recent massive expansion of genetic material. This expansion, in conjunction wi

  12. Complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila AL06-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeromonas hydrophila occurs in freshwater environments and infects fish and mammals. In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila AL06-06, which was isolated from diseased goldfish and is being used for comparative genomic studies with A. hydrophila strains causing ba...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus tequilensis Strain FJAT-14262a

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qian-Qian; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guo-hong; Wang, Jie-ping; Che, Jian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus tequilensis FJAT-14262a is a Gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium. Here, we report the 4,038,551-bp genome sequence of B. tequilensis FJAT-14262a, which will provide useful information for genomic taxonomy and phylogenomics of Bacillus.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus tequilensis Strain FJAT-14262a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian-Qian; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guo-Hong; Wang, Jie-Ping; Che, Jian-Mei

    2015-11-12

    Bacillus tequilensis FJAT-14262a is a Gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium. Here, we report the 4,038,551-bp genome sequence of B. tequilensis FJAT-14262a, which will provide useful information for genomic taxonomy and phylogenomics of Bacillus.

  15. Whole-Genome Sequences of Three Symbiotic Endozoicomonas Bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Neave, Matthew J.

    2014-08-14

    Members of the genus Endozoicomonas associate with a wide range of marine organisms. Here, we report on the whole-genome sequencing, assembly, and annotation of three Endozoicomonas type strains. These data will assist in exploring interactions between Endozoicomonas organisms and their hosts, and it will aid in the assembly of genomes from uncultivated Endozoicomonas spp.

  16. Draft genome sequences of 10 strains of the genus exiguobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C; Pfiffner, Susan M; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Markowitz, Victor M; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan W; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Shapiro, Nicole; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, X Susan; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-10-16

    High-quality draft genome sequences were determined for 10 Exiguobacterium strains in order to provide insight into their evolutionary strategies for speciation and environmental adaptation. The selected genomes include psychrotrophic and thermophilic species from a range of habitats, which will allow for a comparison of metabolic pathways and stress response genes.

  17. Finished Genome Sequence of Collimonas arenae Cal35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Je-Jia; de Jager, Victor; Deng, Wen-ling; Leveau, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We announce the finished genome sequence of soil forest isolate Collimonas arenae Cal35, which comprises a 5.6-Mbp chromosome and 41-kb plasmid. The Cal35 genome is the second one published for the bacterial genus Collimonas and represents the first opportunity for high-resolution comparison of geno

  18. Draft genome sequence of the silver pomfret fish, Pampus argenteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMomin, Sabah; Kumar, Vinod; Al-Amad, Sami; Al-Hussaini, Mohsen; Dashti, Talal; Al-Enezi, Khaznah; Akbar, Abrar

    2016-01-01

    Silver pomfret, Pampus argenteus, is a fish species from coastal waters. Despite its high commercial value, this edible fish has not been sequenced. Hence, its genetic and genomic studies have been limited. We report the first draft genome sequence of the silver pomfret obtained using a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology. We assembled 38.7 Gb of nucleotides into scaffolds of 350 Mb with N50 of about 1.5 kb, using high quality paired end reads. These scaffolds represent 63.7% of the estimated silver pomfret genome length. The newly sequenced and assembled genome has 11.06% repetitive DNA regions, and this percentage is comparable to that of the tilapia genome. The genome analysis predicted 16 322 genes. About 91% of these genes showed homology with known proteins. Many gene clusters were annotated to protein and fatty-acid metabolism pathways that may be important in the context of the meat texture and immune system developmental processes. The reference genome can pave the way for the identification of many other genomic features that could improve breeding and population-management strategies, and it can also help characterize the genetic diversity of P. argenteus.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Pediococcus pentosaceus Strain SL4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Shruti Harnal; Bielak, Eliza Maria; Seo, Jae-Gu;

    2013-01-01

    Pediococcus pentosaceus SL4 was isolated from a Korean fermented vegetable product, kimchi. We report here the whole-genome sequence (WGS) of P. pentosaceus SL4. The genome consists of a 1.79-Mb circular chromosome (G+C content of 37.3%) and seven distinct plasmids ranging in size from 4 kb to 50...

  20. Whole-genome sequence-based analysis of thyroid function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Peter N.; Porcu, Eleonora; Chew, Shelby

    2015-01-01

    Normal thyroid function is essential for health, but its genetic architecture remains poorly understood. Here, for the heritable thyroid traits thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4), we analyse whole-genome sequence data from the UK10K project (N = 2,287). Using additional whole-genome seque...

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1

    OpenAIRE

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John; Kawchuk, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the fir...

  2. Draft genome sequence of Therminicola potens strain JR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne-Bailey, K.G.; Wrighton, K.C.; Melnyk, R.A.; Agbo, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Coates, J.D.

    2010-07-01

    'Thermincola potens' strain JR is one of the first Gram-positive dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) for which there is a complete genome sequence. Consistent with the physiology of this organism, preliminary annotation revealed an abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes that are putatively associated with the periplasm and cell surface in a Gram-positive bacterium. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain JR.

  3. Whole genome and transcriptome sequencing of a B3 thymoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacopo Petrini

    Full Text Available Molecular pathology of thymomas is poorly understood. Genomic aberrations are frequently identified in tumors but no extensive sequencing has been reported in thymomas. Here we present the first comprehensive view of a B3 thymoma at whole genome and transcriptome levels. A 55-year-old Caucasian female underwent complete resection of a stage IVA B3 thymoma. RNA and DNA were extracted from a snap frozen tumor sample with a fraction of cancer cells over 80%. We performed array comparative genomic hybridization using Agilent platform, transcriptome sequencing using HiSeq 2000 (Illumina and whole genome sequencing using Complete Genomics Inc platform. Whole genome sequencing determined, in tumor and normal, the sequence of both alleles in more than 95% of the reference genome (NCBI Build 37. Copy number (CN aberrations were comparable with those previously described for B3 thymomas, with CN gain of chromosome 1q, 5, 7 and X and CN loss of 3p, 6, 11q42.2-qter and q13. One translocation t(11;X was identified by whole genome sequencing and confirmed by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Ten single nucleotide variations (SNVs and 2 insertion/deletions (INDELs were identified; these mutations resulted in non-synonymous amino acid changes or affected splicing sites. The lack of common cancer-associated mutations in this patient suggests that thymomas may evolve through mechanisms distinctive from other tumor types, and supports the rationale for additional high-throughput sequencing screens to better understand the somatic genetic architecture of thymoma.

  4. Coelacanth genome sequence reveals the evolutionary history of vertebrate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, James P; Grimwood, Jane; Danke, Joshua; Schmutz, Jeremy; Dickson, Mark; Amemiya, Chris T; Myers, Richard M

    2004-12-01

    The coelacanth is one of the nearest living relatives of tetrapods. However, a teleost species such as zebrafish or Fugu is typically used as the outgroup in current tetrapod comparative sequence analyses. Such studies are complicated by the fact that teleost genomes have undergone a whole-genome duplication event, as well as individual gene-duplication events. Here, we demonstrate the value of coelacanth genome sequence by complete sequencing and analysis of the protocadherin gene cluster of the Indonesian coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis. We found that coelacanth has 49 protocadherin cluster genes organized in the same three ordered subclusters, alpha, beta, and gamma, as the 54 protocadherin cluster genes in human. In contrast, whole-genome and tandem duplications have generated two zebrafish protocadherin clusters comprised of at least 97 genes. Additionally, zebrafish protocadherins are far more prone to homogenizing gene conversion events than coelacanth protocadherins, suggesting that recombination- and duplication-driven plasticity may be a feature of teleost genomes. Our results indicate that coelacanth provides the ideal outgroup sequence against which tetrapod genomes can be measured. We therefore present L. menadoensis as a candidate for whole-genome sequencing.

  5. Large-Scale Sequencing: The Future of Genomic Sciences Colloquium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret Riley; Merry Buckley

    2009-01-01

    Genetic sequencing and the various molecular techniques it has enabled have revolutionized the field of microbiology. Examining and comparing the genetic sequences borne by microbes - including bacteria, archaea, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes - provides researchers insights into the processes microbes carry out, their pathogenic traits, and new ways to use microorganisms in medicine and manufacturing. Until recently, sequencing entire microbial genomes has been laborious and expensive, and the decision to sequence the genome of an organism was made on a case-by-case basis by individual researchers and funding agencies. Now, thanks to new technologies, the cost and effort of sequencing is within reach for even the smallest facilities, and the ability to sequence the genomes of a significant fraction of microbial life may be possible. The availability of numerous microbial genomes will enable unprecedented insights into microbial evolution, function, and physiology. However, the current ad hoc approach to gathering sequence data has resulted in an unbalanced and highly biased sampling of microbial diversity. A well-coordinated, large-scale effort to target the breadth and depth of microbial diversity would result in the greatest impact. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium to discuss the scientific benefits of engaging in a large-scale, taxonomically-based sequencing project. A group of individuals with expertise in microbiology, genomics, informatics, ecology, and evolution deliberated on the issues inherent in such an effort and generated a set of specific recommendations for how best to proceed. The vast majority of microbes are presently uncultured and, thus, pose significant challenges to such a taxonomically-based approach to sampling genome diversity. However, we have yet to even scratch the surface of the genomic diversity among cultured microbes. A coordinated sequencing effort of cultured organisms is an appropriate place to begin

  6. Dissection of the octoploid strawberry genome by deep sequencing of the genomes of Fragaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Hideki; Shirasawa, Kenta; Kosugi, Shunichi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Nakayama, Shinobu; Yamada, Manabu; Kohara, Mistuyo; Watanabe, Akiko; Kishida, Yoshie; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Komaki, Akiko; Yanagi, Tomohiro; Guoxin, Qin; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Kuhara, Satoru; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko N

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) is octoploid and shows allogamous behaviour. The present study aims at dissecting this octoploid genome through comparison with its wild relatives, F. iinumae, F. nipponica, F. nubicola, and F. orientalis by de novo whole-genome sequencing on an Illumina and Roche 454 platforms. The total length of the assembled Illumina genome sequences obtained was 698 Mb for F. x ananassa, and ∼200 Mb each for the four wild species. Subsequently, a virtual reference genome termed FANhybrid_r1.2 was constructed by integrating the sequences of the four homoeologous subgenomes of F. x ananassa, from which heterozygous regions in the Roche 454 and Illumina genome sequences were eliminated. The total length of FANhybrid_r1.2 thus created was 173.2 Mb with the N50 length of 5137 bp. The Illumina-assembled genome sequences of F. x ananassa and the four wild species were then mapped onto the reference genome, along with the previously published F. vesca genome sequence to establish the subgenomic structure of F. x ananassa. The strategy adopted in this study has turned out to be successful in dissecting the genome of octoploid F. x ananassa and appears promising when applied to the analysis of other polyploid plant species.

  7. First fungal genome sequence from Africa: A preliminary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Sutherland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most significant breakthroughs in the biological sciences this century will emerge from the development of next generation sequencing technologies. The ease of availability of DNA sequence made possible through these new technologies has given researchers opportunities to study organisms in a manner that was not possible with Sanger sequencing. Scientists will, therefore, need to embrace genomics, as well as develop and nurture the human capacity to sequence genomes and utilise the ’tsunami‘ of data that emerge from genome sequencing. In response to these challenges, we sequenced the genome of Fusarium circinatum, a fungal pathogen of pine that causes pitch canker, a disease of great concern to the South African forestry industry. The sequencing work was conducted in South Africa, making F. circinatum the first eukaryotic organism for which the complete genome has been sequenced locally. Here we report on the process that was followed to sequence, assemble and perform a preliminary characterisation of the genome. Furthermore, details of the computer annotation and manual curation of this genome are presented. The F. circinatum genome was found to be nearly 44 million bases in size, which is similar to that of four other Fusarium genomes that have been sequenced elsewhere. The genome contains just over 15 000 open reading frames, which is less than that of the related species, Fusarium oxysporum, but more than that for Fusarium verticillioides. Amongst the various putative gene clusters identified in F. circinatum, those encoding the secondary metabolites fumosin and fusarin appeared to harbour evidence of gene translocation. It is anticipated that similar comparisons of other loci will provide insights into the genetic basis for pathogenicity of the pitch canker pathogen. Perhaps more importantly, this project has engaged a relatively large group of scientists

  8. Analysis of gene sequences indicates that quantity not quality of chloroplast small HSPs improves thermotolerance in C4 and CAM plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Samina N; Ul Haq, Noor; Heckathorn, Scott; Luthe, D S

    2012-10-01

    Chloroplast-localized small heat-shock proteins (Cp-sHSP) protect Photosystem II and thylakoid membranes during heat and other stresses, and Cp-sHSP production levels are related to plant thermotolerance. However, to date, a paucity of Cp-sHSP sequences from C4 or CAM species, or from other extremely heat-tolerant species, has precluded an examination to determine if Cp-sHSP genes or proteins might differ among plants with photosynthetic pathways or between heat-sensitive and heat-tolerant species. To investigate this, we isolated and characterized novel Cp-sHSP genes in four plant species: two moderately heat-tolerant C4 species, Spartina alterniflora (monocot) and Amaranthus retroflexus (eudicot), and two very heat-tolerant CAM species, Agave americana (monocot) and Ferocactus wislizenii (eudicot) (respective genes: SasHSP27.12, ArsHSP26.43, AasHSP26.85 and FwsHSP27.52) by PCR-based genome walking and cDNA RACE. Analysis of these Cp-sHSPs has confirmed the presence of conserved domains common to previously examined species. As expected, the transit peptide was found to be the most variable part of these proteins. Promoter analysis of these genes revealed differences in CAM versus C3 and C4 species that were independent of a general difference between monocots and eudicots observed for the entire protein. Heat-induced gene and protein expression indicated that Cp-sHSP protein levels were correlated with thermotolerance of photosynthetic electron transport, and that in most cases protein and transcript levels were correlated. Thus, available evidence indicates little variation in the amino acid sequence of Cp-sHSP mature proteins between heat-sensitive and -tolerant species, but that variation in Cp-sHSP protein production is related to heat tolerance or photosynthetic pathway (CAM vs. C3 and C4) and is driven by promoter differences. Key message We isolated and characterized four novel Cp-sHSP genes with promoters from wild plants, analysis has shown qualitative

  9. Resequencing of the common marmoset genome improves genome assemblies and gene-coding sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kengo; Kuroki, Yoko; Kumita, Wakako; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kawai, Jun; Iriki, Atsushi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-11-20

    The first draft of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) genome was published by the Marmoset Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium. The draft was based on whole-genome shotgun sequencing, and the current assembly version is Callithrix_jacches-3.2.1, but there still exist 187,214 undetermined gap regions and supercontigs and relatively short contigs that are unmapped to chromosomes in the draft genome. We performed resequencing and assembly of the genome of common marmoset by deep sequencing with high-throughput sequencing technology. Several different sequence runs using Illumina sequencing platforms were executed, and 181 Gbp of high-quality bases including mate-pairs with long insert lengths of 3, 8, 20, and 40 Kbp were obtained, that is, approximately 60× coverage. The resequencing significantly improved the MGSAC draft genome sequence. The N50 of the contigs, which is a statistical measure used to evaluate assembly quality, doubled. As a result, 51% of the contigs (total length: 299 Mbp) that were unmapped to chromosomes in the MGSAC draft were merged with chromosomal contigs, and the improved genome sequence helped to detect 5,288 new genes that are homologous to human cDNAs and the gaps in 5,187 transcripts of the Ensembl gene annotations were completely filled.

  10. Genome size evolution in pufferfish: an insight from BAC clone-based Diodon holocanthus genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Xiaoni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in genome size within and between species have been observed since the 1950 s in diverse taxonomic groups. Serving as model organisms, smooth pufferfish possess the smallest vertebrate genomes. Interestingly, spiny pufferfish from its sister family have genome twice as large as smooth pufferfish. Therefore, comparative genomic analysis between smooth pufferfish and spiny pufferfish is useful for our understanding of genome size evolution in pufferfish. Results Ten BAC clones of a spiny pufferfish Diodon holocanthus were randomly selected and shotgun sequenced. In total, 776 kb of non-redundant sequences without gap representing 0.1% of the D. holocanthus genome were identified, and 77 distinct genes were predicted. In the sequenced D. holocanthus genome, 364 kb is homologous with 265 kb of the Takifugu rubripes genome, and 223 kb is homologous with 148 kb of the Tetraodon nigroviridis genome. The repetitive DNA accounts for 8% of the sequenced D. holocanthus genome, which is higher than that in the T. rubripes genome (6.89% and that in the Te. nigroviridis genome (4.66%. In the repetitive DNA, 76% is retroelements which account for 6% of the sequenced D. holocanthus genome and belong to known families of transposable elements. More than half of retroelements were distributed within genes. In the non-homologous regions, repeat element proportion in D. holocanthus genome increased to 10.6% compared with T. rubripes and increased to 9.19% compared with Te. nigroviridis. A comparison of 10 well-defined orthologous genes showed that the average intron size (566 bp in D. holocanthus genome is significantly longer than that in the smooth pufferfish genome (435 bp. Conclusion Compared with the smooth pufferfish, D. holocanthus has a low gene density and repeat elements rich genome. Genome size variation between D. holocanthus and the smooth pufferfish exhibits as length variation between homologous region and different

  11. Complete genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain AS12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

    2012-01-01

    A plant associated member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Serratia plymuthica strain AS12 was isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of scientific interest due to its plant growth promoting and plant pathogen inhibiting ability. The genome of S. plymuthica AS12 comprises a 5,443,009 bp long circular chromosome, which consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010) as part of the project entitled 'Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens'.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Ferroglobus placidus AEDII12DO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Risso, Carla [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Holmes, Dawn [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Ferroglobus placidus belongs to the order Archaeoglobales within the archaeal phylum Euryar- chaeota. Strain AEDII12DO is the type strain of the species and was isolated from a shallow marine hydrothermal system at Vulcano, Italy. It is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic chemoli- thoautotroph, but it can also use a variety of aromatic compounds as electron donors. Here we describe the features of this organism together with the complete genome sequence and anno- tation. The 2,196,266 bp genome with its 2,567 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes was se- quenced as part of a DOE Joint Genome Institute Laboratory Sequencing Program (LSP) project.

  13. Specialized microbial databases for inductive exploration of microbial genome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabau Cédric

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enormous amount of genome sequence data asks for user-oriented databases to manage sequences and annotations. Queries must include search tools permitting function identification through exploration of related objects. Methods The GenoList package for collecting and mining microbial genome databases has been rewritten using MySQL as the database management system. Functions that were not available in MySQL, such as nested subquery, have been implemented. Results Inductive reasoning in the study of genomes starts from "islands of knowledge", centered around genes with some known background. With this concept of "neighborhood" in mind, a modified version of the GenoList structure has been used for organizing sequence data from prokaryotic genomes of particular interest in China. GenoChore http://bioinfo.hku.hk/genochore.html, a set of 17 specialized end-user-oriented microbial databases (including one instance of Microsporidia, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a member of Eukarya has been made publicly available. These databases allow the user to browse genome sequence and annotation data using standard queries. In addition they provide a weekly update of searches against the world-wide protein sequences data libraries, allowing one to monitor annotation updates on genes of interest. Finally, they allow users to search for patterns in DNA or protein sequences, taking into account a clustering of genes into formal operons, as well as providing extra facilities to query sequences using predefined sequence patterns. Conclusion This growing set of specialized microbial databases organize data created by the first Chinese bacterial genome programs (ThermaList, Thermoanaerobacter tencongensis, LeptoList, with two different genomes of Leptospira interrogans and SepiList, Staphylococcus epidermidis associated to related organisms for comparison.

  14. Monitoring genomic sequences during SELEX using high-throughput sequencing: neutral SELEX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Zimmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SELEX is a well established in vitro selection tool to analyze the structure of ligand-binding nucleic acid sequences called aptamers. Genomic SELEX transforms SELEX into a tool to discover novel, genomically encoded RNA or DNA sequences binding a ligand of interest, called genomic aptamers. Concerns have been raised regarding requirements imposed on RNA sequences undergoing SELEX selection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate SELEX and assess the extent of these effects, we designed and performed a Neutral SELEX experiment omitting the selection step, such that the sequences are under the sole selective pressure of SELEX's amplification steps. Using high-throughput sequencing, we obtained thousands of full-length sequences from the initial genomic library and the pools after each of the 10 rounds of Neutral SELEX. We compared these to sequences obtained from a Genomic SELEX experiment deriving from the same initial library, but screening for RNAs binding with high affinity to the E. coli regulator protein Hfq. With each round of Neutral SELEX, sequences became less stable and changed in nucleotide content, but no sequences were enriched. In contrast, we detected substantial enrichment in the Hfq-selected set with enriched sequences having structural stability similar to the neutral sequences but with significantly different nucleotide selection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that positive selection in SELEX acts independently of the neutral selective requirements imposed on the sequences. We conclude that Genomic SELEX, when combined with high-throughput sequencing of positively and neutrally selected pools, as well as the gnomic library, is a powerful method to identify genomic aptamers.

  15. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol

    2010-01-01

    preferentially selected for sequencing. In accordance with the Bermuda and Fort Lauderdale agreements and the more recent Toronto Statement the data have been released into public sequence repositories (Genbank/EMBL, NCBI/Ensembl trace repositories) in a timely manner and in advance of publication. CONCLUSIONS...

  16. Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulman, Al

    2009-08-09

    Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

  17. Long-read sequence assembly of the gorilla genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David; Huddleston, John; Chaisson, Mark J. P.; Hill, Christopher M.; Kronenberg, Zev N.; Munson, Katherine M.; Malig, Maika; Raja, Archana; Fiddes, Ian; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Dunn, Christopher; Baker, Carl; Armstrong, Joel; Diekhans, Mark; Paten, Benedict; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K.; Haussler, David; Chin, Chen-Shan; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate sequence and assembly of genomes is a critical first step for studies of genetic variation. We generated a high-quality assembly of the gorilla genome using single-molecule, real-time sequence technology and a string graph de novo assembly algorithm. The new assembly improves contiguity by two to three orders of magnitude with respect to previously released assemblies, recovering 87% of missing reference exons and incomplete gene models. Although regions of large, high-identity segmental duplications remain largely unresolved, this comprehensive assembly provides new biological insight into genetic diversity, structural variation, gene loss, and representation of repeat structures within the gorilla genome. The approach provides a path forward for the routine assembly of mammalian genomes at a level approaching that of the current quality of the human genome. PMID:27034376

  18. Open access to sequence: Browsing the Pichia pastoris genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graf Alexandra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The first genome sequences of the important yeast protein production host Pichia pastoris have been released into the public domain this spring. In order to provide the scientific community easy and versatile access to the sequence, two web-sites have been installed as a resource for genomic sequence, gene and protein information for P. pastoris: A GBrowse based genome browser was set up at http://www.pichiagenome.org and a genome portal with gene annotation and browsing functionality at http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/bogas. Both websites are offering information on gene annotation and function, regulation and structure. In addition, a WiKi based platform allows all users to create additional information on genes, proteins, physiology and other items of P. pastoris research, so that the Pichia community can benefit from exchange of knowledge, data and materials.

  19. Sequencing and analysis of an Irish human genome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tong, Pin

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies generating complete human sequences from Asian, African and European subgroups have revealed population-specific variation and disease susceptibility loci. Here, choosing a DNA sample from a population of interest due to its relative geographical isolation and genetic impact on further populations, we extend the above studies through the generation of 11-fold coverage of the first Irish human genome sequence.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Kocuria palustris MU14/1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F

    2015-10-15

    Presented here is the first completely assembled genome sequence of Kocuria palustris, an actinobacterial species with broad ecological distribution. The single, circular chromosome of K. palustris MU14/1 comprises 2,854,447 bp, has a G+C content of 70.5%, and contains a deduced gene set of 2,521 coding sequences.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Kocuria palustris MU14/1

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Presented here is the first completely assembled genome sequence of Kocuria palustris, an actinobacterial species with broad ecological distribution. The single, circular chromosome of K. palustris MU14/1 comprises 2,854,447 bp, has a G+C content of 70.5%, and contains a deduced gene set of 2,521 coding sequences.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus fermentum NB-22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkoporov, A. N.; Efimov, B. A.; Pikina, A. P.; Borisova, O. Y.; Gladko, I. A.; Postnikova, E. A.; Lordkipanidze, A. E.; Kafarskaia, L. I.

    2015-01-01

    We announce here a draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus fermentum NB-22, a strain isolated from human vaginal microbiota. The assembled sequence consists of 190 contigs, joined into 137 scaffolds, and the total size is 2.01 Mb. PMID:26272572

  3. The genome sequence of the model ascomycete fungus Podospora anserina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espagne, Eric; Lespinet, Olivier; Malagnac, Fabienne; Da Silva, Corinne; Jaillon, Olivier; Porcel, Betina M; Couloux, Arnaud; Aury, Jean-Marc; Ségurens, Béatrice; Poulain, Julie; Anthouard, Véronique; Grossetete, Sandrine; Khalili, Hamid; Coppin, Evelyne; Déquard-Chablat, Michelle; Picard, Marguerite; Contamine, Véronique; Arnaise, Sylvie; Bourdais, Anne; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Gautheret, Daniel; de Vries, Ronald P; Battaglia, Evy; Coutinho, Pedro M; Danchin, Etienne Gj; Henrissat, Bernard; Khoury, Riyad El; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie; Boivin, Antoine; Pinan-Lucarré, Bérangère; Sellem, Carole H; Debuchy, Robert; Wincker, Patrick; Weissenbach, Jean; Silar, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dung-inhabiting ascomycete fungus Podospora anserina is a model used to study various aspects of eukaryotic and fungal biology, such as ageing, prions and sexual development. RESULTS: We present a 10X draft sequence of P. anserina genome, linked to the sequences of a large expressed

  4. Complete Genomic Sequence of Issyk-Kul Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Barry; Marston, Denise A; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2015-07-02

    Issyk-Kul virus (ISKV) is an ungrouped virus tentatively assigned to the Bunyaviridae family and is associated with an acute febrile illness in several central Asian countries. Using next-generation sequencing technologies, we report here the full-genome sequence for this novel unclassified arboviral pathogen circulating in central Asia.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated from Semen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Victoria; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Dowall, Stuart D.; Pullan, Steven T.; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogenic flavivirus currently circulating in numerous countries in South America, the Caribbean, and the Western Pacific Region. Using an unbiased metagenomic sequencing approach, we report here the first complete genome sequence of ZIKV isolated from a clinical semen sample. PMID:27738033

  6. Genome sequence of Stachybotrys chartarum Strain 51-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachybotrys chartarum strain 51-11 genome was sequenced by shotgun sequencing utilizing Illumina Hiseq 2000 and PacBio long read technology. Since Stachybotrys chartarum has been implicated in health impacts within water-damaged buildings, any information extracted from the geno...

  7. Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

  8. Genomic insight into the common carp (Cyprinus carpio genome by sequencing analysis of BAC-end sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jintu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common carp is one of the most important aquaculture teleost fish in the world. Common carp and other closely related Cyprinidae species provide over 30% aquaculture production in the world. However, common carp genomic resources are still relatively underdeveloped. BAC end sequences (BES are important resources for genome research on BAC-anchored genetic marker development, linkage map and physical map integration, and whole genome sequence assembling and scaffolding. Result To develop such valuable resources in common carp (Cyprinus carpio, a total of 40,224 BAC clones were sequenced on both ends, generating 65,720 clean BES with an average read length of 647 bp after sequence processing, representing 42,522,168 bp or 2.5% of common carp genome. The first survey of common carp genome was conducted with various bioinformatics tools. The common carp genome contains over 17.3% of repetitive elements with GC content of 36.8% and 518 transposon ORFs. To identify and develop BAC-anchored microsatellite markers, a total of 13,581 microsatellites were detected from 10,355 BES. The coding region of 7,127 genes were recognized from 9,443 BES on 7,453 BACs, with 1,990 BACs have genes on both ends. To evaluate the similarity to the genome of closely related zebrafish, BES of common carp were aligned against zebrafish genome. A total of 39,335 BES of common carp have conserved homologs on zebrafish genome which demonstrated the high similarity between zebrafish and common carp genomes, indicating the feasibility of comparative mapping between zebrafish and common carp once we have physical map of common carp. Conclusion BAC end sequences are great resources for the first genome wide survey of common carp. The repetitive DNA was estimated to be approximate 28% of common carp genome, indicating the higher complexity of the genome. Comparative analysis had mapped around 40,000 BES to zebrafish genome and established over 3

  9. Sequence analysis of the genome of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Masafumi; Kosugi, Shunichi; Hirakawa, Hideki; Ohmiya, Akemi; Tanase, Koji; Harada, Taro; Kishimoto, Kyutaro; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Ichimura, Kazuo; Onozaki, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Miyahara, Taira; Nishizaki, Yuzo; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Noriko; Suzuki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Shusei; Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Akiko; Nakayama, Shinobu; Kishida, Yoshie; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Tabata, Satoshi

    2014-06-01

    The whole-genome sequence of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) cv. 'Francesco' was determined using a combination of different new-generation multiplex sequencing platforms. The total length of the non-redundant sequences was 568,887,315 bp, consisting of 45,088 scaffolds, which covered 91% of the 622 Mb carnation genome estimated by k-mer analysis. The N50 values of contigs and scaffolds were 16,644 bp and 60,737 bp, respectively, and the longest scaffold was 1,287,144 bp. The average GC content of the contig sequences was 36%. A total of 1050, 13, 92 and 143 genes for tRNAs, rRNAs, snoRNA and miRNA, respectively, were identified in the assembled genomic sequences. For protein-encoding genes, 43 266 complete and partial gene structures excluding those in transposable elements were deduced. Gene coverage was ∼ 98%, as deduced from the coverage of the core eukaryotic genes. Intensive characterization of the assigned carnation genes and comparison with those of other plant species revealed characteristic features of the carnation genome. The results of this study will serve as a valuable resource for fundamental and applied research of carnation, especially for breeding new carnation varieties. Further information on the genomic sequences is available at http://carnation.kazusa.or.jp.

  10. Combining two technologies for full genome sequencing of human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skryabin, K G; Prokhortchouk, E B; Mazur, A M; Boulygina, E S; Tsygankova, S V; Nedoluzhko, A V; Rastorguev, S M; Matveev, V B; Chekanov, N N; D A, Goranskaya; Teslyuk, A B; Gruzdeva, N M; Velikhov, V E; Zaridze, D G; Kovalchuk, M V

    2009-10-01

    At present, the new technologies of DNA sequencing are rapidly developing allowing quick and efficient characterisation of organisms at the level of the genome structure. In this study, the whole genome sequencing of a human (Russian man) was performed using two technologies currently present on the market - Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection (SOLiD™) (Applied Biosystems) and sequencing technologies of molecular clusters using fluorescently labeled precursors (Illumina). The total number of generated data resulted in 108.3 billion base pairs (60.2 billion from Illumina technology and 48.1 billion from SOLiD technology). Statistics performed on reads generated by GAII and SOLiD showed that they covered 75% and 96% of the genome respectively. Short polymorphic regions were detected with comparable accuracy however, the absolute amount of them revealed by SOLiD was several times less than by GAII. Optimal algorithm for using the latest methods of sequencing was established for the analysis of individual human genomes. The study is the first Russian effort towards whole human genome sequencing.

  11. Genome sequencing of a single tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Kazuharu; Yoshida, Yuki; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-08-16

    Tardigrades are ubiquitous microscopic animals that play an important role in the study of metazoan phylogeny. Most terrestrial tardigrades can withstand extreme environments by entering an ametabolic desiccated state termed anhydrobiosis. Due to their small size and the non-axenic nature of laboratory cultures, molecular studies of tardigrades are prone to contamination. To minimize the possibility of microbial contaminations and to obtain high-quality genomic information, we have developed an ultra-low input library sequencing protocol to enable the genome sequencing of a single tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini individual. Here, we describe the details of our sequencing data and the ultra-low input library preparation methodologies.

  12. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, T.; Rodland, E.A.; Lagesen, K.

    2004-01-01

    coding regions are the DNA uptake sequences (DUS) required for natural genetic transformation. More importantly, we found a significantly higher density of DUS within genes involved in DNA repair, recombination, restriction-modification and replication than in any other annotated gene group......Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within...

  13. DNA sequencing leads to genomics progress in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JiaYan; XIAO JingFa; ZHANG RuoSi; YU Jun

    2011-01-01

    1 Science in the large-scale sequencing era Ten years ago,the first draft sequence assembly of the human genome was completed [1],bringing biomedical research one-step closer toward the goal of revolutionizing diagnosis,prevention,and treatment of human diseases.Recently,journalists from the journal Nature surveyed more than 1000 life scientists regarding this laudable aim [2],obtaining substantially negative responses [3].However,almost all of those surveyed had been influenced,in one way or another,by the availability of the human genome sequence,and they also agreed with the notion that the "sequence is the start." The complexity of genome biology and almost every aspect of human biology is far greater than previously thought [4].

  14. Genomic multiple sequence alignments: refinement using a genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefkowitz Elliot J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic sequence data cannot be fully appreciated in isolation. Comparative genomics – the practice of comparing genomic sequences from different species – plays an increasingly important role in understanding the genotypic differences between species that result in phenotypic differences as well as in revealing patterns of evolutionary relationships. One of the major challenges in comparative genomics is producing a high-quality alignment between two or more related genomic sequences. In recent years, a number of tools have been developed for aligning large genomic sequences. Most utilize heuristic strategies to identify a series of strong sequence similarities, which are then used as anchors to align the regions between the anchor points. The resulting alignment is globally correct, but in many cases is suboptimal locally. We describe a new program, GenAlignRefine, which improves the overall quality of global multiple alignments by using a genetic algorithm to improve local regions of alignment. Regions of low quality are identified, realigned using the program T-Coffee, and then refined using a genetic algorithm. Because a better COFFEE (Consistency based Objective Function For alignmEnt Evaluation score generally reflects greater alignment quality, the algorithm searches for an alignment that yields a better COFFEE score. To improve the intrinsic slowness of the genetic algorithm, GenAlignRefine was implemented as a parallel, cluster-based program. Results We tested the GenAlignRefine algorithm by running it on a Linux cluster to refine sequences from a simulation, as well as refine a multiple alignment of 15 Orthopoxvirus genomic sequences approximately 260,000 nucleotides in length that initially had been aligned by Multi-LAGAN. It took approximately 150 minutes for a 40-processor Linux cluster to optimize some 200 fuzzy (poorly aligned regions of the orthopoxvirus alignment. Overall sequence identity increased only

  15. Complete genome sequences of three strains of coxsackievirus a7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Koskinen, Satu; Karelehto, Eveliina; Sittig, Eleonora; Roivainen, Merja; Hyypiä, Timo; Susi, Petri

    2013-04-11

    Genomes of three strains (Parker, USSR, and 275/58) of coxsackievirus A7 (CV-A7) were amplified by the long reverse transcription (RT)-PCR method and sequenced. While the sequences of Parker and USSR were identical, the similarities of 275/58 to the CV-A7 reference sequence, accession no. AY421765, were 82.6% and 96.2% for nucleotides and amino acids, respectively.

  16. Phylogeny of Pelargonium (Geraniaceae) based on DNA sequences from three genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F.T.; Culham, A.; Hettiarachi, P.; Touloumendidou, T.; Gibby, M.

    2004-01-01

    Phylogenetic hypotheses for the largely South African genus Pelargonium L'Hér. (Geraniaceae) were derived based on DNA sequence data from nuclear, chloroplast and mitochondrial encoded regions. The datasets were unequally represented and comprised cpDNA trnL-F sequences for 152 taxa, nrDNA ITS seque

  17. Membrane heredity and early chloroplast evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2000-04-01

    Membrane heredity was central to the unique symbiogenetic origin from cyanobacteria of chloroplasts in the ancestor of Plantae (green plants, red algae, glaucophytes) and to subsequent lateral transfers of plastids to form even more complex photosynthetic chimeras. Each symbiogenesis integrated disparate genomes and several radically different genetic membranes into a more complex cell. The common ancestor of Plantae evolved transit machinery for plastid protein import. In later secondary symbiogeneses, signal sequences were added to target proteins across host perialgal membranes: independently into green algal plastids (euglenoids, chlorarachneans) and red algal plastids (alveolates, chromists). Conservatism and innovation during early plastid diversification are discussed.

  18. Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, James P.; Coop, Graham; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Smith, Doug; Krause, Johannes; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Platt, Darren; Paabo, Svante; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge of Neanderthals is based on a limited number of remains and artifacts from which we must make inferences about their biology, behavior, and relationship to ourselves. Here, we describe the characterization of these extinct hominids from a new perspective, based on the development of a Neanderthal metagenomic library and its high-throughput sequencing and analysis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the 65,250 base pairs of hominid sequence so far identified in the library a...

  19. Inconsistencies in Neanderthal genomic DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Wall

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Two recently published papers describe nuclear DNA sequences that were obtained from the same Neanderthal fossil. Our reanalyses of the data from these studies show that they are not consistent with each other and point to serious problems with the data quality in one of the studies, possibly due to modern human DNA contaminants and/or a high rate of sequencing errors.

  20. Genome-wide sequence variations among Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yi eHsu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ap, the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD, infects many farmed ruminants, wildlife animals and humans. To better understand the molecular pathogenesis of these infections, we analyzed the whole genome sequences of several M. ap and M. avium subspecies avium (M. avium strains isolated from various hosts and environments. Using Next-generation sequencing technology, all 6 M. ap isolates showed a high percentage of homology (98% to the reference genome sequence of M. ap K-10 isolated from cattle. However, 2 M. avium isolates (DT 78 and Env 77 showed significant sequence diversity from the reference strain M. avium 104. The genomes of M. avium isolates DT 78 and Env 77 exhibited only 87% and 40% homology, respectively, to the M. avium 104 reference genome. Within the M. ap isolates, genomic rearrangements (insertions/deletions, Indels were not detected, and only unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were observed among the 6 M. ap strains. While most of the SNPs (~100 in M. ap genomes were non-synonymous, a total of ~ 6000 SNPs were detected among M. avium genomes, most of them were synonymous suggesting a differential selective pressure between M. ap and M. avium isolates. In addition, SNPs-based phylo-genomic analysis showed that isolates from goat and Oryx are closely related to the cattle (K-10 strain while the human isolate (M. ap 4B is closely related to the environmental strains, indicating environmental source to human infections. Overall, SNPs were the most common variations among M. ap isolates while SNPs in addition to Indels were prevalent among M. avium isolates. Genomic variations will be useful in designing host-specific markers for the analysis of mycobacterial evolution and for developing novel diagnostics directed against Johne’s disease in animals.

  1. The diploid genome sequence of an individual human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Levy

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is a genome sequence of an individual human. It was produced from approximately 32 million random DNA fragments, sequenced by Sanger dideoxy technology and assembled into 4,528 scaffolds, comprising 2,810 million bases (Mb of contiguous sequence with approximately 7.5-fold coverage for any given region. We developed a modified version of the Celera assembler to facilitate the identification and comparison of alternate alleles within this individual diploid genome. Comparison of this genome and the National Center for Biotechnology Information human reference assembly revealed more than 4.1 million DNA variants, encompassing 12.3 Mb. These variants (of which 1,288,319 were novel included 3,213,401 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, 53,823 block substitutions (2-206 bp, 292,102 heterozygous insertion/deletion events (indels(1-571 bp, 559,473 homozygous indels (1-82,711 bp, 90 inversions, as well as numerous segmental duplications and copy number variation regions. Non-SNP DNA variation accounts for 22% of all events identified in the donor, however they involve 74% of all variant bases. This suggests an important role for non-SNP genetic alterations in defining the diploid genome structure. Moreover, 44% of genes were heterozygous for one or more variants. Using a novel haplotype assembly strategy, we were able to span 1.5 Gb of genome sequence in segments >200 kb, providing further precision to the diploid nature of the genome. These data depict a definitive molecular portrait of a diploid human genome that provides a starting point for future genome comparisons and enables an era of individualized genomic information.

  2. Comparison of methods for genomic localization of gene trap sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrin Thomas E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene knockouts in a model organism such as mouse provide a valuable resource for the study of basic biology and human disease. Determining which gene has been inactivated by an untargeted gene trapping event poses a challenging annotation problem because gene trap sequence tags, which represent sequence near the vector insertion site of a trapped gene, are typically short and often contain unresolved residues. To understand better the localization of these sequences on the mouse genome, we compared stand-alone versions of the alignment programs BLAT, SSAHA, and MegaBLAST. A set of 3,369 sequence tags was aligned to build 34 of the mouse genome using default parameters for each algorithm. Known genome coordinates for the cognate set of full-length genes (1,659 sequences were used to evaluate localization results. Results In general, all three programs performed well in terms of localizing sequences to a general region of the genome, with only relatively subtle errors identified for a small proportion of the sequence tags. However, large differences in performance were noted with regard to correctly identifying exon boundaries. BLAT correctly identified the vast majority of exon boundaries, while SSAHA and MegaBLAST missed the majority of exon boundaries. SSAHA consistently reported the fewest false positives and is the fastest algorithm. MegaBLAST was comparable to BLAT in speed, but was the most susceptible to localizing sequence tags incorrectly to pseudogenes. Conclusion The differences in performance for sequence tags and full-length reference sequences were surprisingly small. Characteristic variations in localization results for each program were noted that affect the localization of sequence at exon boundaries, in particular.

  3. Genetic Analysis of Chloroplast Translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, Alice

    2005-08-15

    The assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus requires the concerted action of hundreds of genes distributed between the two physically separate genomes in the nucleus and chloroplast. Nuclear genes coordinate this process by controlling the expression of chloroplast genes in response to developmental and environmental cues. However, few regulatory factors have been identified. We used mutant phenotypes to identify nuclear genes in maize that modulate chloroplast translation, a key control point in chloroplast gene expression. This project focused on the nuclear gene crp1, required for the translation of two chloroplast mRNAs. CRP1 is related to fungal proteins involved in the translation of mitochondrial mRNAs, and is the founding member of a large gene family in plants, with {approx}450 members. Members of the CRP1 family are defined by a repeated 35 amino acid motif called a ''PPR'' motif. The PPR motif is closely related to the TPR motif, which mediates protein-protein interactions. We and others have speculated that PPR tracts adopt a structure similar to that of TPR tracts, but with a substrate binding surface adapted to bind RNA instead of protein. To understand how CRP1 influences the translation of specific chloroplast mRNAs, we sought proteins that interact with CRP1, and identified the RNAs associated with CRP1 in vivo. We showed that CRP1 is associated in vivo with the mRNAs whose translation it activates. To explore the functions of PPR proteins more generally, we sought mutations in other PPR-encoding genes: mutations in the maize PPR2 and PPR4 were shown to disrupt chloroplast ribosome biogenesis and chloroplast trans-splicing, respectively. These and other results suggest that the nuclear-encoded PPR family plays a major role in modulating the expression of the chloroplast genome in higher plants.

  4. Molecular phylogeography and evolutionary history of Picea likiangensis in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau inferred from mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA sequence variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Bin ZOU; Xiao-Li PENG; Long LI; Jian-Quan LIU; Georg MIEHE; Lars OPGENOORTH

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the phylogeographic and evolutionary history of Picea likiangensis,a dominant species of the conifer forests in the eastern declivity of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.We collected 422 individuals from 42 natural populations of three major varieties classified under this species.In conifers,mitochondrial (mt) DNA and chloroplast (cp) DNA dispersed by seeds or pollen experience very different levels of gene flow.To this end,we examined the sequence variation of two mtDNA fragments (nad5 intron 1 and nadl intron b/c) and three cpDNA fragments (trnL-trnF,trnS-trnG and nadhK/C).We found that cpDNA probably introgressed from P.purpurea into remote populations of P.likiangensis through long-distance dispersal.Multiple refugia seem to have been maintained for P.likiangensis during the Last Glacial Maximum because the cpDNA and mtDNA haplotypes recovered were fixed in the different regions.Postglacial expansions were only detected at the distributional edges of this species where a single cpDNA or mtDNA haplotype was fixed in adjacent populations.However,genetic imprints of postglacial expansions from these two sets of markers were different in the western and southeastern regions,which may result from the long-distance dispersal of the cpDNA,as well as its fast lineage sorting during intraspecific divergences.Analysis of molecular variance further suggested that genetic differentiation between the three varieties is higher at cpDNA markers than at mtDNA markers,which supports the previous viewpoint that cpDNA markers with a high rate of gene flow may be more effective in delimitating closely related taxa.Together,the results of the present study highlight the evolutionary complexity of a widely distributed species owing to interactions among local and edge expansion,long-distance dispersal,and intraspecific divergences at two sets of DNA genomes with different rates of gene flow.

  5. Deep whole-genome sequencing of 100 southeast Asian Malays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lai-Ping; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Poh, Wan-Ting; Liu, Xuanyao; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Lam, Kevin Koi-Yau; Pillai, Nisha Esakimuthu; Sim, Kar-Seng; Xu, Haiyan; Sim, Ngak-Leng; Teo, Shu-Mei; Foo, Jia-Nee; Tan, Linda Wei-Lin; Lim, Yenly; Koo, Seok-Hwee; Gan, Linda Seo-Hwee; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wee, Sharon; Yap, Eric Peng-Huat; Ng, Pauline Crystal; Lim, Wei-Yen; Soong, Richie; Wenk, Markus Rene; Aung, Tin; Wong, Tien-Yin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Little, Peter; Chia, Kee-Seng; Teo, Yik-Ying

    2013-01-10

    Whole-genome sequencing across multiple samples in a population provides an unprecedented opportunity for comprehensively characterizing the polymorphic variants in the population. Although the 1000 Genomes Project (1KGP) has offered brief insights into the value of population-level sequencing, the low coverage has compromised the ability to confidently detect rare and low-frequency variants. In addition, the composition of populations in the 1KGP is not complete, despite the fact that the study design has been extended to more than 2,500 samples from more than 20 population groups. The Malays are one of the Austronesian groups predominantly present in Southeast Asia and Oceania, and the Singapore Sequencing Malay Project (SSMP) aims to perform deep whole-genome sequencing of 100 healthy Malays. By sequencing at a minimum of 30× coverage, we have illustrated the higher sensitivity at detecting low-frequency and rare variants and the ability to investigate the presence of hotspots of functional mutations. Compared to the low-pass sequencing in the 1KGP, the deeper coverage allows more functional variants to be identified for each person. A comparison of the fidelity of genotype imputation of Malays indicated that a population-specific reference panel, such as the SSMP, outperforms a cosmopolitan panel with larger number of individuals for common SNPs. For lower-frequency (population-level sequencing versus low-pass sequencing, especially in populations that are poorly represented in population-genetics studies.

  6. CGKB: an annotation knowledge base for cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. methylation filtered genomic genespace sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spraggins Thomas A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp.] is one of the most important food and forage legumes in the semi-arid tropics because of its ability to tolerate drought and grow on poor soils. It is cultivated mostly by poor farmers in developing countries, with 80% of production taking place in the dry savannah of tropical West and Central Africa. Cowpea is largely an underexploited crop with relatively little genomic information available for use in applied plant breeding. The goal of the Cowpea Genomics Initiative (CGI, funded by the Kirkhouse Trust, a UK-based charitable organization, is to leverage modern molecular genetic tools for gene discovery and cowpea improvement. One aspect of the initiative is the sequencing of the gene-rich region of the cowpea genome (termed the genespace recovered using methylation filtration technology and providing annotation and analysis of the sequence data. Description CGKB, Cowpea Genespace/Genomics Knowledge Base, is an annotation knowledge base developed under the CGI. The database is based on information derived from 298,848 cowpea genespace sequences (GSS isolated by methylation filtering of genomic DNA. The CGKB consists of three knowledge bases: GSS annotation and comparative genomics knowledge base, GSS enzyme and metabolic pathway knowledge base, and GSS simple sequence repeats (SSRs knowledge base for molecular marker discovery. A homology-based approach was applied for annotations of the GSS, mainly using BLASTX against four public FASTA formatted protein databases (NCBI GenBank Proteins, UniProtKB-Swiss-Prot, UniprotKB-PIR (Protein Information Resource, and UniProtKB-TrEMBL. Comparative genome analysis was done by BLASTX searches of the cowpea GSS against four plant proteomes from Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Medicago truncatula, and Populus trichocarpa. The possible exons and introns on each cowpea GSS were predicted using the HMM-based Genscan gene predication program and the

  7. Complete genome sequence of Arcobacter nitrofigilis type strain (CIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2010-01-01

    Arcobacter nitrofigilis (McClung et al. 1983) Vandamme et al. 1991 is the type species of the genus Arcobacter in the epsilonproteobacterial family Campylobacteraceae. The species was first described in 1983 as Campylobacter nitrofigilis [1] after its detection as a free-living, nitrogen-fixing Campylobacter species associated with Spartina alterniflora Loisel. roots [2]. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its lifestyle as a symbiotic organism in a marine environment in contrast to many other Arcobacter species which are associated with warm-blooded animals and tend to be pathogenic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a type stain of the genus Arcobacter. The 3,192,235 bp genome with its 3,154 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lang, Elke [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the ge-nus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobia-ceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomi-crobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. The complete plastid genome sequence of Bomarea edulis (Alstroemeriaceae: Liliales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Yoon, Chang Young; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Bomarea, a member of the family Alstroemeriaceae, is distributed from Chile to Mexico and includes approximately 120 species. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have clarified the monophyly of the family within the order Liliales and the sister relationship with the family Colchicaceae. At this time, five plastid genomes of Liliales have been analyzed at the familial level. To examine plastid genome variation at the generic level, we sequenced the plastid genome of Bomarea edulis, which is the most widely distributed species in the genus, and compared it with Alstroemeria aurea. The plastid genome sequence of B. edulis was 154,925 bp in length with a similar structure as A. aurea, excluding the IR-LSC junction. Ycf68 and infA were pseudogenes caused by frameshift mutations, and the ycf15 gene was deleted, similar to A. aurea.

  10. Whole genome sequencing in clinical and public health microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, J C; McCallum, N; Sintchenko, V; Howden, B P

    2015-04-01

    Genomics and whole genome sequencing (WGS) have the capacity to greatly enhance knowledge and understanding of infectious diseases and clinical microbiology.The growth and availability of bench-top WGS analysers has facilitated the feasibility of genomics in clinical and public health microbiology.Given current resource and infrastructure limitations, WGS is most applicable to use in public health laboratories, reference laboratories, and hospital infection control-affiliated laboratories.As WGS represents the pinnacle for strain characterisation and epidemiological analyses, it is likely to replace traditional typing methods, resistance gene detection and other sequence-based investigations (e.g., 16S rDNA PCR) in the near future.Although genomic technologies are rapidly evolving, widespread implementation in clinical and public health microbiology laboratories is limited by the need for effective semi-automated pipelines, standardised quality control and data interpretation, bioinformatics expertise, and infrastructure.

  11. Using the NCBI Map Viewer to browse genomic sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsberg, Tyra G

    2011-04-01

    This unit includes a basic protocol with an introduction to the Map Viewer, describing how to perform a simple text-based search of genome annotations to view the genomic context of a gene, navigate along a chromosome, zoom in and out, and change the displayed maps to hide and show information. It also describes some of NCBI's sequence-analysis tools, which are provided as links from the Map Viewer. The alternate protocols describe different ways to query the genome sequence, and also illustrate additional features of the Map Viewer. Alternate Protocol 1 shows how to perform and interpret the results of a BLAST search against the human genome. Alternate Protocol 2 demonstrates how to retrieve a list of all genes between two STS markers. Finally, Alternate Protocol 3 shows how to find all annotated members of a gene family.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans type strain (5575T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schroder, Maren [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Gleim, Dorothea [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2009-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans Widdel and Pfennig 1977 was one of the first sulfate-reducing bacteria known to grow with acetate as sole energy and carbon source. It is able to oxidize substrates completely to carbon dioxide with sulfate as the electron acceptor, which is reduced to hydrogen sulfide. All available data about this species are based on strain 5575T, isolated from piggery waste in Germany. Here we describe the features of this organ-ism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a Desulfotomaculum species with validly published name. The 4,545,624 bp long single replicon genome with its 4370 protein-coding and 100 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Halorhabdus utahensis type strain (AX-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain; Tindall, Brian J; Pomrenke, Helga; Göker, Markus; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-11-22

    Halorhabdus utahensis Wainø et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus, which is of phylogenetic interest because of its location on one of the deepest branches within the very extensive euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. utahensis is a free-living, motile, rod shaped to pleomorphic, Gram-negative archaeon, which was originally isolated from a sediment sample collected from the southern arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. When grown on appropriate media, H. utahensis can form polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the a member of halobacterial genus Halorhabdus, and the 3,116,795 bp long single replicon genome with its 3027 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Nakamurella multipartita type strain (Y-104).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Hope; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Sims, David; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Detter, John C; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-03-30

    Nakamurella multipartita (Yoshimi et al. 1996) Tao et al. 2004 is the type species of the monospecific genus Nakamurella in the actinobacterial suborder Frankineae. The nonmotile, coccus-shaped strain was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing synthetic wastewater, and is capable of accumulating large amounts of polysaccharides in its cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Nakamurellaceae. The 6,060,298 bp long single replicon genome with its 5415 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Draft genome sequence of the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Ahmad Yamin Abdul

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hevea brasiliensis, a member of the Euphorbiaceae family, is the major commercial source of natural rubber (NR. NR is a latex polymer with high elasticity, flexibility, and resilience that has played a critical role in the world economy since 1876. Results Here, we report the draft genome sequence of H. brasiliensis. The assembly spans ~1.1 Gb of the estimated 2.15 Gb haploid genome. Overall, ~78% of the genome was identified as repetitive DNA. Gene prediction shows 68,955 gene models, of which 12.7% are unique to Hevea. Most of the key genes associated with rubber biosynthesis, rubberwood formation, disease resistance, and allergenicity have been identified. Conclusions The knowledge gained from this genome sequence will aid in the future development of high-yielding clones to keep up with the ever increasing need for natural rubber.

  16. Plasmodium knowlesi genome sequences from clinical isolates reveal extensive genomic dimorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel M Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Plasmodium knowlesi is a newly described zoonosis that causes malaria in the human population that can be severe and fatal. The study of P. knowlesi parasites from human clinical isolates is relatively new and, in order to obtain maximum information from patient sample collections, we explored the possibility of generating P. knowlesi genome sequences from archived clinical isolates. Our patient sample collection consisted of frozen whole blood samples that contained excessive human DNA contamination and, in that form, were not suitable for parasite genome sequencing. We developed a method to reduce the amount of human DNA in the thawed blood samples in preparation for high throughput parasite genome sequencing using Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq sequencing platforms. Seven of fifteen samples processed had sufficiently pure P. knowlesi DNA for whole genome sequencing. The reads were mapped to the P. knowlesi H strain reference genome and an average mapping of 90% was obtained. Genes with low coverage were removed leaving 4623 genes for subsequent analyses. Previously we identified a DNA sequence dimorphism on a small fragment of the P. knowlesi normocyte binding protein xa gene on chromosome 14. We used the genome data to assemble full-length Pknbpxa sequences and discovered that the dimorphism extended along the gene. An in-house algorithm was developed to detect SNP sites co-associating with the dimorphism. More than half of the P. knowlesi genome was dimorphic, involving genes on all chromosomes and suggesting that two distinct types of P. knowlesi infect the human population in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. We use P. knowlesi clinical samples to demonstrate that Plasmodium DNA from archived patient samples can produce high quality genome data. We show that analyses, of even small numbers of difficult clinical malaria isolates, can generate comprehensive genomic information that will improve our understanding of malaria parasite diversity and

  17. Annotation-based genome-wide SNP discovery in the large and complex Aegilops tauschii genome using next-generation sequencing without a reference genome sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Ming-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many plants have large and complex genomes with an abundance of repeated sequences. Many plants are also polyploid. Both of these attributes typify the genome architecture in the tribe Triticeae, whose members include economically important wheat, rye and barley. Large genome sizes, an abundance of repeated sequences, and polyploidy present challenges to genome-wide SNP discovery using next-generation sequencing (NGS of total genomic DNA by making alignment and clustering of short reads generated by the NGS platforms difficult, particularly in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Results An annotation-based, genome-wide SNP discovery pipeline is reported using NGS data for large and complex genomes without a reference genome sequence. Roche 454 shotgun reads with low genome coverage of one genotype are annotated in order to distinguish single-copy sequences and repeat junctions from repetitive sequences and sequences shared by paralogous genes. Multiple genome equivalents of shotgun reads of another genotype generated with SOLiD or Solexa are then mapped to the annotated Roche 454 reads to identify putative SNPs. A pipeline program package, AGSNP, was developed and used for genome-wide SNP discovery in Aegilops tauschii-the diploid source of the wheat D genome, and with a genome size of 4.02 Gb, of which 90% is repetitive sequences. Genomic DNA of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78 was sequenced with the Roche 454 NGS platform. Genomic DNA and cDNA of Ae. tauschii accession AS75 was sequenced primarily with SOLiD, although some Solexa and Roche 454 genomic sequences were also generated. A total of 195,631 putative SNPs were discovered in gene sequences, 155,580 putative SNPs were discovered in uncharacterized single-copy regions, and another 145,907 putative SNPs were discovered in repeat junctions. These SNPs were dispersed across the entire Ae. tauschii genome. To assess the false positive SNP discovery rate, DNA

  18. Complete coding sequences of the rabbitpox virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Chen, N; Roper, R L; Feng, Z; Hunter, A; Danila, M; Lefkowitz, E J; Buller, R M L; Upton, C

    2005-11-01

    Rabbitpox virus (RPXV) is highly virulent for rabbits and it has long been suspected to be a close relative of vaccinia virus. To explore these questions, the complete coding region of the rabbitpox virus genome was sequenced to permit comparison with sequenced strains of vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses. The genome of RPXV strain Utrecht (RPXV-UTR) is 197 731 nucleotides long, excluding the terminal hairpin structures at each end of the genome. The RPXV-UTR genome has 66.5 % A + T content, 184 putative functional genes and 12 fragmented ORF regions that are intact in other orthopoxviruses. The sequence of the RPXV-UTR genome reveals that two RPXV-UTR genes have orthologues in variola virus (VARV; the causative agent of smallpox), but not in vaccinia virus (VACV) strains. These genes are a zinc RING finger protein gene (RPXV-UTR-008) and an ankyrin repeat family protein gene (RPXV-UTR-180). A third gene, encoding a chemokine-binding protein (RPXV-UTR-001/184), is complete in VARV but functional only in some VACV strains. Examination of the evolutionary relationship between RPXV and other orthopoxviruses was carried out using the central 143 kb DNA sequence conserved among all completely sequenced orthopoxviruses and also the protein sequences of 49 gene products present in all completely sequenced chordopoxviruses. The results of these analyses both confirm that RPXV-UTR is most closely related to VACV and suggest that RPXV has not evolved directly from any of the sequenced VACV strains, since RPXV contains a 719 bp region not previously identified in any VACV.

  19. Identification of probable genomic packaging signal sequence from SARS—CoV genome by bioinformatics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QINLei; XIONGBin; LUOCheng; GUOZong-Ming; HAOPei; SUJiong; NANPeng; FENGYing; SHIYi-Xiang; YUXiao-Jing; LUOXiao-Min; CHENKai-Xian; SHENXu; SHENJian-Hua; ZOUJian-Ping; ZHAOGuo-Ping; SHITie-Liu; HEWei-Zhong; ZHONGYang; JIANGHua-Liang; LIYi-Xue

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To predict the probable genomic packaging signal of SARS-CoV by bioinformatics analysis. The derived packaging signal may be used to design antisense RNA and RNA interfere (RANi) drugs treating SARS. methods: Based on the studies about the genomic packaging signals of MHV and BCoV, especially the information about primary and secondary structures, the putative genomic packaging signal of SARS_CoV were analyzed by using bioinformatic tools. Multi-alignment for the genomic sequences was performed among SARS-CoV,MHV,BCoV, PEDV and HCoV 229E. Secondary structures of RNA sequences were also predicted for the identification fo the possible genomic packaging signals. Meanwhile, the N and M proteins of all five viruses were analyzed to study the evolutionary relationship with genomic packaging signals. RESULTS: The putative genomic packaging signal of SARS-CoV locates at the 3′ end of ORF1b near that of MHV and BCoV, where is the most variable region of this gene. The RNA secondary structure of SARS-CoV genomic packaging signal is very similar to that of MHV and BCoV. The same result was also obtained in studying the genomic packaging signals of PEDV and HCoV 229E. Further more, the genomic sequence multi-alignment indicated that the locations of packaging signals of SARS-CoV, PEDV, and HCoV overlaped each other. It seems that the mutation rate of packaging signal sequences is much higher than the N protein, while only subtle variations for the M protein. CONCLUSIONS: The probable genomic packaging signal of SARS-CoV is analogous to that of MHV and BCoV, with the corresponding secondary RNA structure locating at the similar region of ORF1b. The positions where genomic packaging signals exist have suffered rounds of mutations, which may influence the primary structures of the N and M proteins consequently.

  20. Genome Sequence of the Urethral Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa RN21

    OpenAIRE

    Wibberg, Daniel; Tielen, Petra; Narten, Maike; Schobert, Max; Blom, Jochen; Schatschneider, Sarah; Meyer, Ann-Kathrin; Neubauer, Rüdiger; Albersmeier, Andreas; Albaum, Stefan; Jahn, Martina; Goesmann, Alexander; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Pühler, Alfred; Jahn, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is known to cause complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). The improved 7.0-Mb draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa RN21, isolated from a patient with an acute UTI, was determined. It carries three (pro)phage genomes, genes for two restriction/modification systems, and a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system.

  1. Genome Sequences of Equid Herpesviruses 2 and 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Kerr, Karen; Stewart, James P.; Studdert, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We resequenced the genome of equid herpesvirus 2 (EHV2) strain 86/67 and sequenced the genomes of EHV2 strain G9/92 and equid herpesvirus 5 (EHV5) strain 2-141/67. The most prominent genetic differences are the dissimilar locations of the interleukin-10 (IL-10)-like genes and the presence of an OX-2-like gene in EHV5 only. PMID:25767243

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae YH43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain YH43, isolated from sweet potato. The genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 5,520,319 bp in length. It carries 8 copies of rRNA operons, 86 tRNA genes, 5,154 protein-coding genes, and the nif gene cluster for nitrogen fixation. PMID:27081127

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Daweishan Mini chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming-Li; Ding, Su-Ping; Ye, Shao-Hui; Wang, Chun-Guang; He, Bao-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Dong; Liu, Li-Li

    2016-01-01

    Daweishan Mini chicken is a valuable chicken breed in China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Daweishan Mini chicken using PCR amplification, sequencing and assembling has been obtained for the first time. The total length of the mitochondrial genome was 16,785 bp, with the base composition of 30.26% A, 23.73% T, 32.51% C, 13.51% G. It contained 37 genes (2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes) and a major non-coding control region (D-loop region). The protein start codons are ATG, except for COX1 that begins with GTG. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Daweishan Mini chicken provides an important data set for further investigation on the phylogenetic relationships within Gallus gallus.

  4. Genome sequence and genetic diversity of European ash trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollars, Elizabeth S A; Harper, Andrea L; Kelly, Laura J;

    2016-01-01

    Ash trees (genus Fraxinus, family Oleaceae) are widespread throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but are being devastated in Europe by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, causing ash dieback, and in North America by the herbivorous beetle Agrilus planipennis. Here we sequence the genome of a low......-heterozygosity Fraxinus excelsior tree from Gloucestershire, UK, annotating 38,852 protein-coding genes of which 25% appear ash specific when compared with the genomes of ten other plant species. Analyses of paralogous genes suggest a whole-genome duplication shared with olive (Olea europaea, Oleaceae). We also re......-sequence 37 F. excelsior trees from Europe, finding evidence for apparent long-term decline in effective population size. Using our reference sequence, we re-analyse association transcriptomic data, yielding improved markers for reduced susceptibility to ash dieback. Surveys of these markers in British...

  5. Genome and exome sequencing in the clinic: unbiased genomic approaches with a high diagnostic yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelen, M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    For the reasons discussed here, we think whole-genome- or exome-based approaches are currently most suited for diagnostic implementation in genetically heterogeneous diseases, initially to complement and later to replace Sanger sequencing, qPCR and genomic microarrays. Patients do need to be counsel

  6. Quantitative trait loci markers derived from whole genome sequence data increases the reliability of genomic prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Su, Guosheng; Janss, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect on the reliability of genomic prediction when a small number of significant variants from single marker analysis based on whole genome sequence data were added to the regular 54k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data. The extra markers were selected wi...

  7. Complete genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis of an emerging human pathogen, serotype V Streptococcus agalactiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tettelin, H; Masignani, [No Value; Cieslewicz, MJ; Eisen, JA; Peterson, S; Paulsen, IT; Nelson, KE; Margarit, [No Value; Read, TD; Madoff, LC; Beanan, MJ; Brinkac, LM; Daugherty, SC; DeBoy, RT; Durkin, AS; Kolonay, JF; Madupu, R; Lewis, MR; Radune, D; Fedorova, NB; Scanlan, D; Khouri, H; Mulligan, S; Carty, HA; Cline, RT; Van Aken, SE; Gill, J; Scarselli, M; Mora, M; Iacobini, ET; Brettoni, C; Galli, G; Mariani, M; Vegni, F; Maione, D; Rinaudo, D; Rappuoli, R; Telford, JL; Kasper, DL; Grandi, G; Fraser, CM

    2002-01-01

    The 2,160,267 bp genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae, the leading cause of bacterial sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis in neonates in the U.S. and Europe, is predicted to encode 2,175 genes. Genome comparisons among S. agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and the oth

  8. Whole-genome amplification of single-cell genomes for next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfhage, Christian; Fisch, Evelyn; Fricke, Evelyn; Baedker, Silke; Loeffert, Dirk

    2013-10-11

    DNA sequence analysis and genotyping of biological samples using next-generation sequencing (NGS), microarrays, or real-time PCR is often limited by the small amount of sample available. A single cell contains only one to four copies of the genomic DNA, depending on the organism (haploid or diploid organism) and the cell-cycle phase. The DNA content of a single cell ranges from a few femtograms in bacteria to picograms in mammalia. In contrast, a deep analysis of the genome currently requires a few hundred nanograms up to micrograms of genomic DNA for library formation necessary for NGS sequencing or labeling protocols (e.g., microarrays). Consequently, accurate whole-genome amplification (WGA) of single-cell DNA is required for reliable genetic analysis (e.g., NGS) and is particularly important when genomic DNA is limited. The use of single-cell WGA has enabled the analysis of genomic heterogeneity of individual cells (e.g., somatic genomic variation in tumor cells). This unit describes how the genome of single cells can be used for WGA for further genomic studies, such as NGS. Recommendations for isolation of single cells are given and common sources of errors are discussed.

  9. The genome sequence of the colonial chordate, Botryllus schlosseri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Neff, Norma F; Sahoo, Debashis; Newman, Aaron M; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Koh, Winston; Passarelli, Benedetto; Fan, H Christina; Mantalas, Gary L; Palmeri, Karla J; Ishizuka, Katherine J; Gissi, Carmela; Griggio, Francesca; Ben-Shlomo, Rachel; Corey, Daniel M; Penland, Lolita; White, Richard A; Weissman, Irving L; Quake, Stephen R

    2013-01-01

    Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial urochordate that follows the chordate plan of development following sexual reproduction, but invokes a stem cell-mediated budding program during subsequent rounds of asexual reproduction. As urochordates are considered to be the closest living invertebrate relatives of vertebrates, they are ideal subjects for whole genome sequence analyses. Using a novel method for high-throughput sequencing of eukaryotic genomes, we sequenced and assembled 580 Mbp of the B. schlosseri genome. The genome assembly is comprised of nearly 14,000 intron-containing predicted genes, and 13,500 intron-less predicted genes, 40% of which could be confidently parceled into 13 (of 16 haploid) chromosomes. A comparison of homologous genes between B. schlosseri and other diverse taxonomic groups revealed genomic events underlying the evolution of vertebrates and lymphoid-mediated immunity. The B. schlosseri genome is a community resource for studying alternative modes of reproduction, natural transplantation reactions, and stem cell-mediated regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00569.001 PMID:23840927

  10. Standardized metadata for human pathogen/vector genomic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien G Dugan

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing has accelerated the determination of genome sequences for thousands of human infectious disease pathogens and dozens of their vectors. The scale and scope of these data are enabling genotype-phenotype association studies to identify genetic determinants of pathogen virulence and drug/insecticide resistance, and phylogenetic studies to track the origin and spread of disease outbreaks. To maximize the utility of genomic sequences for these purposes, it is essential that metadata about the pathogen/vector isolate characteristics be collected and made available in organized, clear, and consistent formats. Here we report the development of the GSCID/BRC Project and Sample Application Standard, developed by representatives of the Genome Sequencing Centers for Infectious Diseases (GSCIDs, the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs for Infectious Diseases, and the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH, informed by interactions with numerous collaborating scientists. It includes mapping to terms from other data standards initiatives, including the Genomic Standards Consortium's minimal information (MIxS and NCBI's BioSample/BioProjects checklists and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI. The standard includes data fields about characteristics of the organism or environmental source of the specimen, spatial-temporal information about the specimen isolation event, phenotypic characteristics of the pathogen/vector isolated, and project leadership and support. By modeling metadata fields into an ontology-based semantic framework and reusing existing ontologies and minimum information checklists, the application standard can be extended to support additional project-specific data fields and integrated with other data represented with comparable standards. The use of this metadata standard by all ongoing and future GSCID sequencing projects will

  11. Low-pass sequencing for microbial comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Sean

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied four extremely halophilic archaea by low-pass shotgun sequencing: (1 the metabolically versatile Haloarcula marismortui; (2 the non-pigmented Natrialba asiatica; (3 the psychrophile Halorubrum lacusprofundi and (4 the Dead Sea isolate Halobaculum gomorrense. Approximately one thousand single pass genomic sequences per genome were obtained. The data were analyzed by comparative genomic analyses using the completed Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 genome as a reference. Low-pass shotgun sequencing is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid approach that can readily be performed on any cultured microbe. Results As expected, the four archaeal halophiles analyzed exhibit both bacterial and eukaryotic characteristics as well as uniquely archaeal traits. All five halophiles exhibit greater than sixty percent GC content and low isoelectric points (pI for their predicted proteins. Multiple insertion sequence (IS elements, often involved in genome rearrangements, were identified in H. lacusprofundi and H. marismortui. The core biological functions that govern cellular and genetic mechanisms of H. sp. NRC-1 appear to be conserved in these four other halophiles. Multiple TATA box binding protein (TBP and transcription factor IIB (TFB homologs were identified from most of the four shotgunned halophiles. The reconstructed molecular tree of all five halophiles shows a large divergence between these species, but with the closest relationship being between H. sp. NRC-1 and H. lacusprofundi. Conclusion Despite the diverse habitats of these species, all five halophiles share (1 high GC content and (2 low protein isoelectric points, which are characteristics associated with environmental exposure to UV radiation and hypersalinity, respectively. Identification of multiple IS elements in the genome of H. lacusprofundi and H. marismortui suggest that genome structure and dynamic genome reorganization might be similar to that previously observed in the

  12. Genomic Treasure Troves: Complete Genome Sequencing of Herbarium and Insect Museum Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Martijn; Erkens, Roy H. J.; van de Vossenberg, Bart; Wieringa, Jan J.; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Stielow, Benjamin; Geml, József; Richardson, James E.; Bakker, Freek T.

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS) world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22–82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus) were generated with 81.4–97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2–71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes), but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylo)genetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more

  13. The longest ultraconserved sequences and evolution of vertebrate mitochondrial genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We compared 753 genomes of bacteria, archaea, and mitochondria (more than 540 M data) and found four unique ultraconserved sequences in 352 vertebrate mitochondrial genomes which are the longest or second longest or third longest ultraconserved subsequences in the vertebrate mitochondrial genomes, their lengths are approximate to those of small RNA. Surprisingly, the classification and evolution relationship among some high-level categories of animals can be clearly reflected by their regularity of occurrence; moreover, these findings gave rise to some new ideas of evolution of mitochondria and living beings. For instance, the variations in mitochondrial genomes of animals may help clarify the evolution relationship between Aves and Reptile, and understand the fact that the origin of mitochondrion is at least not a simple copy of genomes of lower living things such as bacteria and archaea.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Haliscomenobacter hydrossis type strain (OT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Verbarg, Susanne [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Haliscomenobacter hydrossis van Veen et al. 1973 is the type species of the genus Halisco- menobacter, which belongs to order 'Sphingobacteriales'. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life, especially the so far genomically un- charted part of it, and because the organism grows in a thin, hardly visible hyaline sheath. Members of the species were isolated from fresh water of lakes and from ditch water. The genome of H. hydrossis is the first completed genome sequence reported from a member of the family 'Saprospiraceae'. The 8,771,651 bp long genome with its three plasmids of 92 kbp, 144 kbp and 164 kbp length contains 6,848 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Sequencing and analysis of the giant panda genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG HuanMing

    2010-01-01

    @@ The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is loved all over the world and is considered a symbol of China, as illustrated by its being one of the mascots for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games.It is also one of the world's most endangered animals and a flagship species for conservation.Using next-generation sequencing technology (Illumina Genome Analyzer) and our in-house assembly software, we have generated the first map of the giant panda genome sequence.This map will provide an unparalleled amount of information to aid in understanding the genetic and biological nature of this unique species and will contribute significantly to disease control and conservation efforts for this endangered species.In March 2008, the giant panda genome sequencing and analysis project was started at the Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI) in Shenzhen with collaborators from the Kunming Institute of Zoology and the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding.On 21 Jan.2010, this collaboration resulted in the publication, as a cover story in the journal Nature, of the sequencing and analysis of the giant panda genome.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Pyrolobus fumarii type strain (1AT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolobus fumarii Bl chl et al. 1997 is the type species of the genus Pyrolobus, which be- longs to the crenarchaeal family Pyrodictiaceae. The species is a facultatively microaerophilic non-motile crenarchaeon. It is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life and because it is a hyperthermophilic chemolithoautotroph known as the primary producer of organic matter at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. P. fumarii exhibits currently the highest optimal growth temperature of all life forms on earth (106 C). This is the first com- pleted genome sequence of a member of the genus Pyrolobus to be published and only the second genome sequence from a member of the family Pyrodictiaceae. Although Diversa Corporation announced the completion of sequencing of the P. fumarii genome on Septem- ber 25, 2001, this sequence was never released to the public. The 1,843,267 bp long genome with its 1,986 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using GeneScan and BLAST

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew M. Lynn; Chakresh Kumar Jain; K. Kosalai; Pranjan Barman; Nupur Thakur; Harish Batra; Alok Bhattacharya

    2001-04-01

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated annotation of genome DNA sequences.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Emperor Penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiwu; Xia, Yan; Dang, Xiao; Chen, Xiaoli

    2016-09-01

    The emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) is the largest living species of penguin. Herein, we first reported the complete mitochondrial genome of emperor penguin. The mitochondrial genome is a circular molecule of 17 301 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA, and one control region. To verify the accuracy and the utility of new determined mitogenome sequences, we constructed the species phylogenetic tree of emperor penguin together with 10 other closely species. This is the second complete mitochondrial genome of penguin, and this is going to be an important data to study mitochondrial evolution of birds.

  19. Establishing a framework for comparative analysis of genome sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, A.K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes a framework and a high-level language toolkit for comparative analysis of genome sequence alignment The framework integrates the information derived from multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree (hypothetical tree of evolution) to derive new properties about sequences. Multiple sequence alignments are treated as an abstract data type. Abstract operations have been described to manipulate a multiple sequence alignment and to derive mutation related information from a phylogenetic tree by superimposing parsimonious analysis. The framework has been applied on protein alignments to derive constrained columns (in a multiple sequence alignment) that exhibit evolutionary pressure to preserve a common property in a column despite mutation. A Prolog toolkit based on the framework has been implemented and demonstrated on alignments containing 3000 sequences and 3904 columns.

  20. The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Webb; Drautz, Daniela I; Janecka, Jan E;

    2009-01-01

    We report the first two complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), or so-called Tasmanian tiger, extinct since 1936. The thylacine's phylogenetic position within australidelphian marsupials has long been debated, and here we provide strong support for the ......We report the first two complete mitochondrial genome sequences of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), or so-called Tasmanian tiger, extinct since 1936. The thylacine's phylogenetic position within australidelphian marsupials has long been debated, and here we provide strong support...... for the thylacine's basal position in Dasyuromorphia, aided by mitochondrial genome sequence that we generated from the extant numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus). Surprisingly, both of our thylacine sequences differ by 11%-15% from putative thylacine mitochondrial genes in GenBank, with one of our samples originating...... from a direct offspring of the previously sequenced individual. Our data sample each mitochondrial nucleotide an average of 50 times, thereby providing the first high-fidelity reference sequence for thylacine population genetics. Our two sequences differ in only five nucleotides out of 15,452, hinting...

  1. An integrated semiconductor device enabling non-optical genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Jonathan M; Hinz, Wolfgang; Rearick, Todd M; Schultz, Jonathan; Mileski, William; Davey, Mel; Leamon, John H; Johnson, Kim; Milgrew, Mark J; Edwards, Matthew; Hoon, Jeremy; Simons, Jan F; Marran, David; Myers, Jason W; Davidson, John F; Branting, Annika; Nobile, John R; Puc, Bernard P; Light, David; Clark, Travis A; Huber, Martin; Branciforte, Jeffrey T; Stoner, Isaac B; Cawley, Simon E; Lyons, Michael; Fu, Yutao; Homer, Nils; Sedova, Marina; Miao, Xin; Reed, Brian; Sabina, Jeffrey; Feierstein, Erika; Schorn, Michelle; Alanjary, Mohammad; Dimalanta, Eileen; Dressman, Devin; Kasinskas, Rachel; Sokolsky, Tanya; Fidanza, Jacqueline A; Namsaraev, Eugeni; McKernan, Kevin J; Williams, Alan; Roth, G Thomas; Bustillo, James

    2011-07-20

    The seminal importance of DNA sequencing to the life sciences, biotechnology and medicine has driven the search for more scalable and lower-cost solutions. Here we describe a DNA sequencing technology in which scalable, low-cost semiconductor manufacturing techniques are used to make an integrated circuit able to directly perform non-optical DNA sequencing of genomes. Sequence data are obtained by directly sensing the ions produced by template-directed DNA polymerase synthesis using all-natural nucleotides on this massively parallel semiconductor-sensing device or ion chip. The ion chip contains ion-sensitive, field-effect transistor-based sensors in perfect register with 1.2 million wells, which provide confinement and allow parallel, simultaneous detection of independent sequencing reactions. Use of the most widely used technology for constructing integrated circuits, the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, allows for low-cost, large-scale production and scaling of the device to higher densities and larger array sizes. We show the performance of the system by sequencing three bacterial genomes, its robustness and scalability by producing ion chips with up to 10 times as many sensors and sequencing a human genome.

  2. Complete genome sequence of the European sheatfish virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavian, Carla; López-Bueno, Alberto; Fernández Somalo, María Pilar; Alcamí, Antonio; Alejo, Alí

    2012-06-01

    Viral diseases are an increasing threat to the thriving aquaculture industry worldwide. An emerging group of fish pathogens is formed by several ranaviruses, which have been isolated at different locations from freshwater and seawater fish species since 1985. We report the complete genome sequence of European sheatfish ranavirus (ESV), the first ranavirus isolated in Europe, which causes high mortality rates in infected sheatfish (Silurus glanis) and in other species. Analysis of the genome sequence shows that ESV belongs to the amphibian-like ranaviruses and is closely related to the epizootic hematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV), a disease agent geographically confined to the Australian continent and notifiable to the World Organization for Animal Health.

  3. Whole-genome sequence-based analysis of thyroid function

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Peter N; Porcu, Eleonora; Chew, Shelby; Campbell, Purdey J.; Traglia, Michela; Brown, Suzanne J.; Mullin, Benjamin H; Shihab, Hashem A.; Min, Josine; Walter, Klaudia; Memari, Yasin; Huang, Jie; Barnes, Michael R.; Beilby, John P.; Charoen, Pimphen

    2015-01-01

    Normal thyroid function is essential for health, but its genetic architecture remains poorly understood. Here, for the heritable thyroid traits thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4), we analyse whole-genome sequence data from the UK10K project (N=2,287). Using additional whole-genome sequence and deeply imputed data sets, we report meta-analysis results for common variants (MAF≥1%) associated with TSH and FT4 (N=16,335). For TSH, we identify a novel variant in SYN2 (MAF=23.5%, P=6.15 × 1...

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    OpenAIRE

    Hadidi, Ahmed; Flores, Ricardo; Candresse, Thierry; Barba, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA, or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21–24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant vir...

  5. Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of the Brown Alga Undaria pinnatifida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available In this study, we fully sequenced the circular plastid genome of a brown alga, Undaria pinnatifida. The genome is 130,383 base pairs (bp in size; it contains a large single-copy (LSC, 76,598 bp and a small single-copy region (SSC, 42,977 bp, separated by two inverted repeats (IRa and IRb: 5,404 bp. The genome contains 139 protein-coding, 28 tRNA, and 6 rRNA genes; none of these genes contains introns. Organization and gene contents of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome were similar to those of Saccharina japonica. There is a co-linear relationship between the plastid genome of U. pinnatifida and that of three previously sequenced large brown algal species. Phylogenetic analyses of 43 taxa based on 23 plastid protein-coding genes grouped all plastids into a red or green lineage. In the large brown algae branch, U. pinnatifida and S. japonica formed a sister clade with much closer relationship to Ectocarpus siliculosus than to Fucus vesiculosus. For the first time, the start codon ATT was identified in the plastid genome of large brown algae, in the atpA gene of U. pinnatifida. In addition, we found a gene-length change induced by a 3-bp repetitive DNA in ycf35 and ilvB genes of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome.

  6. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS`s do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the ``Extensible Object Model``, to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  7. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS's do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the Extensible Object Model'', to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  8. Genomic divergences among cattle, dog and human estimated from large-scale alignments of genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shade Larry L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 11 Mb of finished high quality genomic sequences were sampled from cattle, dog and human to estimate genomic divergences and their regional variation among these lineages. Results Optimal three-way multi-species global sequence alignments for 84 cattle clones or loci (each >50 kb of genomic sequence were constructed using the human and dog genome assemblies as references. Genomic divergences and substitution rates were examined for each clone and for various sequence classes under different functional constraints. Analysis of these alignments revealed that the overall genomic divergences are relatively constant (0.32–0.37 change/site for pairwise comparisons among cattle, dog and human; however substitution rates vary across genomic regions and among different sequence classes. A neutral mutation rate (2.0–2.2 × 10(-9 change/site/year was derived from ancestral repetitive sequences, whereas the substitution rate in coding sequences (1.1 × 10(-9 change/site/year was approximately half of the overall rate (1.9–2.0 × 10(-9 change/site/year. Relative rate tests also indicated that cattle have a significantly faster rate of substitution as compared to dog and that this difference is about 6%. Conclusion This analysis provides a large-scale and unbiased assessment of genomic divergences and regional variation of substitution rates among cattle, dog and human. It is expected that these data will serve as a baseline for future mammalian molecular evolution studies.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ke; Sanseverino, John; Chauhan, Archana; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chang, Y.J.; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Moser, Scott; Jegier, Patricia; Close, Dan; DeBruyn, Jennifer M.; Wang, Ying; Layton, Alice C.; Allen, Michael S.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T, an isolate belonging to genus Thauera, of the family Rhodocyclaceae and the class the Betaproteobacteria, has been characterized for its ability to produce abundant exopolysaccharide and degrade various aromatic compounds with nitrate as an electron acceptor. These properties, if fully understood at the genome-sequence level, can aid in environmental processing of organic matter in anaerobic cycles by short-circuiting a central anaerobic metabolite, acetate, from microbiological conversion to methane, a critical greenhouse gas. Strain MZ1T is the first strain from the genus Thauera with a completely sequenced genome. The 4,496,212 bp chromosome and 78,374 bp plasmid contain 4,071 protein-coding and 71 RNA genes, and were sequenced as part of the DOE Community Sequencing Program CSP_776774. PMID:23407619

  10. Complete genome sequence of Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanseverino, John [ORNL; Chauhan, Archana [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Moser, Scott [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jegier, Patricia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Close, Dan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, Ying [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Allen, Michael S. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sayler, Gary [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01

    Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T, an isolate belonging to genus Thauera, of the family Rhodocyclaceae and the class the Betaproteobacteria, has been characterized for its ability to produce abundant exopolysaccharide and degrade various aromatic compounds with nitrate as an electron acceptor. These properties, if fully understood at the genome-sequence level, can aid in environmental processing of organic matter in anaerobic cycles by short-circuiting a central anaerobic metabolite, acetate, from microbiological conversion to methane, a criti-cal greenhouse gas. Strain MZ1T is the first strain from the genus Thauera with a completely sequenced genome. The 4,496,212 bp chromosome and 78,374 bp plasmid contain 4,071 protein-coding and 71 RNA genes, and were sequenced as part of the DOE Community Se-quencing Program CSP{_}776774.

  11. Genome Calligrapher: A Web Tool for Refactoring Bacterial Genome Sequences for de Novo DNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Matthias; Deutsch, Samuel; Christen, Beat

    2015-08-21

    Recent advances in synthetic biology have resulted in an increasing demand for the de novo synthesis of large-scale DNA constructs. Any process improvement that enables fast and cost-effective streamlining of digitized genetic information into fabricable DNA sequences holds great promise to study, mine, and engineer genomes. Here, we present Genome Calligrapher, a computer-aided design web tool intended for whole genome refactoring of bacterial chromosomes for de novo DNA synthesis. By applying a neutral recoding algorithm, Genome Calligrapher optimizes GC content and removes obstructive DNA features known to interfere with the synthesis of double-stranded DNA and the higher order assembly into large DNA constructs. Subsequent bioinformatics analysis revealed that synthesis constraints are prevalent among bacterial genomes. However, a low level of codon replacement is sufficient for refactoring bacterial genomes into easy-to-synthesize DNA sequences. To test the algorithm, 168 kb of synthetic DNA comprising approximately 20 percent of the synthetic essential genome of the cell-cycle bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was streamlined and then ordered from a commercial supplier of low-cost de novo DNA synthesis. The successful assembly into eight 20 kb segments indicates that Genome Calligrapher algorithm can be efficiently used to refactor difficult-to-synthesize DNA. Genome Calligrapher is broadly applicable to recode biosynthetic pathways, DNA sequences, and whole bacterial genomes, thus offering new opportunities to use synthetic biology tools to explore the functionality of microbial diversity. The Genome Calligrapher web tool can be accessed at https://christenlab.ethz.ch/GenomeCalligrapher  .

  12. 基于柑橘及其近缘属植物DNA条形码的叶绿体编码序列筛选%Screening Potential DNA Barcode Regions of Chloroplast Coding Genome for Citrus and Its Related Genera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于杰; 闫化学; 鲁振华; 周志钦

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] Four coding regions of chloroplast genome of Citrus and its close relatives were analyzed in an attempt to find suitable DNA barcoding markers for species identification and lay a foundation for further study of non-coding region.[ Method ] Four chloroplast DNA regions (matK, rpoB, rpoC1 and rbcL ) of 59 Citrus accessions were sequenced, the intergeneric,interspecific, intraspecific genetic distances were calculated, and the phylogenetic tree of all the accessions tested was built based on the distance data obtained. [Result] The intergeneric and interspecific sequence variations of matK were the highest among four coding regions tested, and had significant difference from other regions studied. On the contrary, no obvious variations were found in the rpoB and rpoC1 regions. The sequence variation of rbcL was medium among the fragments sequenced. [Conclusion] The matK sequence could be used as potential candidate fragment for future DNA barcoding study of Citrus and its closely related genera.%[目的]通过对柑橘及其近缘属植物叶绿体4种编码序列的测定分析,获得能进行DNA条形编码的特征序列,为进一步研究叶绿体非编码区序列奠定基础.[方法]对柑橘及其近缘属植物59份样品进行matK、rpoB、rpoC1、rbcL测序,序列比对与人工校正,计算属间,种同、种内的遗传距离,比较序列间的差异,建立系统发育树.[结果]4种序列中,matK序列在属间、种间差异最大,与其它序列相比具有显著性差异,rbcL序列次之,而rpoB、rpoC1序列两者间没有显著性差异.[结论]matK序列是柑橘及其近缘属植物DNA条形码的未来研究中一个重要的候选片段.

  13. cpSSR: a New Tool to Analyze Chloroplast Genome of Citrus Somatic Hybrids%叶绿体S S R标记:柑橘体细胞杂种胞质遗传分析的一种新方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程运江; 郭文武; 邓秀新

    2003-01-01

    Chloroplast simple sequence repeat (cpSSR) markers in Citrus were developed and success-fully used to analyze chloroplast genome inheritance of Citrus somatic hybrids. Twenty-two previouslyreported cpSSR primer pairs from pine (Pinus thunbergii Parl.), rice (Oryza sativa L.) and tobacco (Nicotianatabacum L.) were tested in Citrus, nine of which could amplify intensive PCR products by agarose gelelectrophoresis. Chloroplast genome inheritance of Citrus somatic hybrids from nine fusions was thenanalyzed, and five of the nine pre-screened primer pairs showed polymorphisms by polyacrylamide gelelectrophoresis. The results revealed the random inheritance nature of chloroplast genome in all analyzedCitrus somatic hybrids, which was in agreement with previous reports based on RFLP or CAPS analyses. Itwas also shown that cpSSR is a