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Sample records for chloromethane

  1. Mechanistic aspects of the nucleophilic substitution of pectin. On the formation of chloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailaukhanuly, Yerbolat; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Carlsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Helge

    2014-09-01

    Chloromethane, accounting for approximately 16% of the tropospheric chlorine, is mainly coming from natural sources. However anthropogenic activities, such as combustion of biomass may contribute significantly as well. The present study focuses on the thermal solid state reaction between pectin, an important constituent of biomass, and chloride ions as found in alkali metal chlorides. The formation of chloromethane is evident with the amount formed being linear with respect to chloride if pectin is in great excess. Thus the reaction is explained as a pseudo first order SN2 reaction between the chloride ion and the methyl ester moiety in pectin. It is suggested that the polymeric nature of pectin plays an active role by an enhanced transport of halides along the carbohydrate chain. Optimal reaction temperature is around 210°C. At higher temperatures the yield of chloromethane decreases due to a thermal decomposition of the pectin. The possible influence of the type of cation is discussed. PMID:24997968

  2. Mechanistic aspects of the nucleophilic substitution of pectin. On the formation of chloromethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sailaukhanuly, Yerbolat; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Carlsen, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    Chloromethane, accounting for approximately 16% of the tropospheric chlorine, is mainly coming from natural sources. However anthropogenic activities, such as combustion of biomass may contribute significantly as well. The present study focuses on the thermal solid state reaction between pectin, an...... important constituent of biomass, and chloride ions as found in alkali metal chlorides. The formation of chloromethane is evident with the amount formed being linear with respect to chloride if pectin is in great excess. Thus the reaction is explained as a pseudo first order SN2 reaction between the...... chloride ion and the methyl ester moiety in pectin. It is suggested that the polymeric nature of pectin plays an active role by an enhanced transport of halides along the carbohydrate chain. Optimal reaction temperature is around 210 °C. At higher temperatures the yield of chloromethane decreases due to a...

  3. The 380 kb pCMU01 plasmid encodes chloromethane utilization genes and redundant genes for vitamin B12- and tetrahydrofolate-dependent chloromethane metabolism in Methylobacterium extorquens CM4: a proteomic and bioinformatics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Roselli

    Full Text Available Chloromethane (CH3Cl is the most abundant volatile halocarbon in the atmosphere and contributes to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. The only known pathway for bacterial chloromethane utilization (cmu was characterized in Methylobacterium extorquens CM4, a methylotrophic bacterium able to utilize compounds without carbon-carbon bonds such as methanol and chloromethane as the sole carbon source for growth. Previous work demonstrated that tetrahydrofolate and vitamin B12 are essential cofactors of cmuA- and cmuB-encoded methyltransferases of chloromethane dehalogenase, and that the pathway for chloromethane utilization is distinct from that for methanol. This work reports genomic and proteomic data demonstrating that cognate cmu genes are located on the 380 kb pCMU01 plasmid, which drives the previously defined pathway for tetrahydrofolate-mediated chloromethane dehalogenation. Comparison of complete genome sequences of strain CM4 and that of four other M. extorquens strains unable to grow with chloromethane showed that plasmid pCMU01 harbors unique genes without homologs in the compared genomes (bluB2, btuB, cobA, cbiD, as well as 13 duplicated genes with homologs of chromosome-borne genes involved in vitamin B12-associated biosynthesis and transport, or in tetrahydrofolate-dependent metabolism (folC2. In addition, the presence of both chromosomal and plasmid-borne genes for corrinoid salvaging pathways may ensure corrinoid coenzyme supply in challenging environments. Proteomes of M. extorquens CM4 grown with one-carbon substrates chloromethane and methanol were compared. Of the 49 proteins with differential abundance identified, only five (CmuA, CmuB, PurU, CobH2 and a PaaE-like uncharacterized putative oxidoreductase are encoded by the pCMU01 plasmid. The mainly chromosome-encoded response to chloromethane involves gene clusters associated with oxidative stress, production of reducing equivalents (PntAA, Nuo complex, conversion of

  4. Theoretical Chemistry Study of the Hydrogen-bonded Interaction between Acylamine and Chloromethane Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Qing-Yu; WANG Hai-Jun; CHEN Jian-Hua

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogen-bonded interaction between acylamine and chloromethane was studied using theoretical calculation methods. Looking the interaction system as a hydrogen-bonded complex, the geometric optimization of the interaction system was performed with HF and B3LYP methods at 6-311++G** level. Stable structures of these complexes were obtained. Binding energies and some other physical chemistry parameters of them were computed and compared. According to the calculation results, it can be identified that DMA (DMF or DEF) can form stable complex with chloromethane by the hydrogen-bonded interaction between them. The stable orders of these hydrogen-bonded complexes were obtained and described as: DMF-CHCl3>DMF-CH2Cl2>DMF-CH3Cl, DEF-CHCl3>DEF-CH2Cl2>DEF-CH3Cl, DMA-CHCl3>DMA-CH2Cl2>DMA-CH3Cl, respectively.

  5. Simultaneous coking and dealumination of zeolite H-ZSM-5 during the transformation of chloromethane into olefins

    OpenAIRE

    Ibanez, M.; GAMERO, M; Ruiz-Martinez, J.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Aguayo, A. T.; Bilbao, J.; Castano, P.

    2016-01-01

    The deactivation pathways of a zeolite H-ZSM-5 catalyst containing bentonite and alpha-Al2O3 as binder material have been studied during the transformation of chloromethane into light olefins, which is considered as a possible step to valorize methane from natural gas. The reactions have been carried out in a fixed bed reactor, feeding pure chloromethane at 400, 425 and 450 degrees C, 1.5 bar and with a space-time of 5.4 (g(catalyst)) h (mol(CH2))(-1) for 255 min. The properties of the fresh ...

  6. Catalytic conversion of chloromethane to methanol and dimethyl ether over two catalytic beds: a study of acid strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, D.R.; Leite, T.C.M.; Mota, C.J.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica], e-mail: cmota@iq.ufrj.br

    2010-07-15

    The catalytic hydrolysis of chloromethane to methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) was studied over metal-exchanged Beta and Mordenite zeolites, acidic MCM-22 and SAPO-5. The use of a second catalytic bed with HZSM-5 zeolite increased the selectivity to DME, due to methanol dehydration on the acid sites. The effect was more significant on catalysts presenting medium and weak acid site distribution, showing that dehydration of methanol to DME is accomplished over sites of higher acid strength. (author)

  7. Global emissions of hydrogen chloride and chloromethane from coal combustion, incineration and industrial activities: Reactive Chlorine Emissions Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Archie; Aucott, Michael L.; Benkovitz, Carmen M.; Graedel, Thomas E.; Kleiman, Gary; Midgley, Pauline M.; Li, Yi-Fan

    1999-04-01

    Much if not all of the chlorine present in fossil fuels is released into the atmosphere as hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chloromethane (CH3Cl, methyl chloride). The chlorine content of oil-based fuels is so low that these sources can be neglected, but coal combustion provides significant releases. On the basis of national statistics for the quantity and quality of coal burned during 1990 in power and heat generation, industrial conversion and residential and commercial heating, coupled with information on the chlorine contents of coals, a global inventory of national HCl emissions from this source has been constructed. This was combined with an estimate of the national emissions of HCl from waste combustion (both large-scale incineration and trash burning) which was based on an estimate of the global quantity released from this source expressed per head of population. Account was taken of reduced emissions where flue gases were processed, for example to remove sulphur dioxide. The HCl emitted in 1990, comprising 4.6 ± 4.3 Tg Cl from fossil fuel and 2 ± 1.9 Tg Cl from waste burning, was spatially distributed using available information on point sources such as power generation utilities and population density by default. Also associated with these combustion sources are chloromethane emissions, calculated to be 0.075 ± 0.07 Tg as Cl (equivalent) from fossil fuels and 0.032 ± 0.023 Tg Cl (equivalent) from waste combustion. These were distributed spatially exactly as the HCl emissions, and a further 0.007 Tg Cl in chloromethane from industrial process activity was distributed by point sources.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of bifunctional transition-metal/silica-alumina catalysts for the chloromethane conversion to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, J.F. [Universidade Federal de Rio de Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica; Rojas, L.O.A.; Nascimento, J.C. [Universidade Federal de Rio de Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica; Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil)], E-mail: leopoldo@ctgas.com.br; Ruiz, J.A.C. [Centro de Tecnologias do Gas (CTGAS), Natal, RN (Brazil); Benachour, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica

    2008-10-15

    In this work bifunctional (metal-acid) catalysts of Fe, Ni, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO over amorphous silica alumina support were characterized (acidity) and evaluated for the conversion of chloromethane in a fixed bed reactor. Temperature program tests TPD (Temperature Programmed Desorption) and TPR (Temperature Programmed Reduction) were performed to characterize the chemisorption sites for the impregnated and unimpregnated support. New adsorption sites were created on the metal supported catalysts. The conversion yield of chloromethane was evaluated for the five materials. The highest conversion conversion (85%) was observed for the unmodified support (SiAl) after 6 of reaction at 860 K and a WHSV (Weight Hourly Space Velocity) of 4,5 h{sup -1}. The best selectivity toward desirable hydrocarbons (C{sup 3}, C{sup 4}) was found for the Fe-SiAl catalyst. C{sup 3} was also found in the products stream when Ni/SiAl and NiO/SiAl catalysts were tested. Ni catalysts were the most favorable to methane production. The catalytic tests showed coke formation in all materials. For the SiAl support the desorption energy of chloromethane, determined by TPD runs, was 101,9 KJ/mol. The metals presented lower desorption energies (75,2 KJ/mol for Ni and 133,4 KJ/mol for Fe) than the oxides (190,1 KJ/mol for Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 322,4 KJ/mol for NiO). (author)

  9. Mechanistic elucidation of chloromethane transformation over SAPO-34 using deuterated probe molecule: A FTIR study on the surface evolution of catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingxu; Zhang, Dazhi; Liu, Zhongmin; Su, Bao-Lian

    2007-08-01

    Adsorption and transformation of chloromethane over SAPO-34 catalyst were studied using deuterated CD 3Cl as probe by in situ FTIR spectroscopy and compared with CH 3Cl. The detection of the deuterated hydroxyls Si(OD)Al indicated the existence of the H and D exchange reaction due to the interaction of Si(OH)Al and DCl molecules produced by CD 3Cl conversion. The reversible breaking of Al-O-P bonds as a result of the interaction of Al-O-P with the produced DCl molecules has been clearly evidenced by the observation of P-OD and P-OD-Al species. Increasing CD 3Cl loading favors C dbnd C generation and higher hydrocarbons formation. A possible surface species evolution and formation during CD 3Cl transformation over SAPO-34 catalyst is proposed.

  10. Halomethane: Bisulfide/halide ion methyltransferase, an unusual corrinoid enzyme of environmental significance isolated from an aerobic methylotroph using chloromethane as the sole carbon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, C.; Hamilton, J.T.G.; McRoberts, W.C.; Kulakov, L.; Larkin, M.J.; Harper, D.B.

    1999-10-01

    A novel dehalogenating/transhalogenating enzyme, halomethane:bisulfide/halide ion methyltransferase, has been isolated from the facultatively methylotrophic bacterium strain CC495, which uses chloromethane(CH{sub 3}Cl) as the sole carbon source. Purification of the enzyme to homogeneity was achieved in high yield by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The methyltransferase was composed of a 67-kDa protein with a corrinoid-bound cobalt atom. The purified enzyme was inactive but was activated by precincubation with 5 mM dithiothreitol and 0.5 mM CH{sub 3}Cl; then it catalyzed methyl transfer from CH{sub 3}Cl, CH{sub 3}Br, or CH{sub 3}I to the following acceptor ions (in order of decreasing efficacy): I{sup {minus}}, HS{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, CN{sup {minus}}, and SCN{sup {minus}}. Spectral analysis indicated that cobalt in the native enzyme existed as cob(II)alamin, which upon activation was reduced to the cob(I)alamin state and then was oxidized to methyl cob(III)alamin. During catalysis, the enzyme shuttles between the methyl cob(III)alamin and cob(I)alamin states, being alternately demethylated by the acceptor ion and remethylated by halomethane. Mechanistically the methyltransferase shows features in common with cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase from Escherichia coli.

  11. Investigation of chloromethane complexes of cryptophane‐A analogue with butoxy groups using 13C NMR in the solid state and solution along with single crystal X‐ray diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Emilie; Mathew, Renny; Zimmermann, Iwan; Brotin, Thierry; Edén, Mattias; Kowalewski, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Host‐guest complexes between cryptophane‐A analogue with butoxy groups (cryptophane‐But) and chloromethanes (chloroform, dichloromethane) were investigated in the solid state by means of magic‐angle spinning 13C NMR spectroscopy. The separated local fields method with 13C‐1H dipolar recoupling was used to determine the residual dipolar coupling for the guest molecules encaged in the host cavity. In the case of chloroform guest, the residual dipolar interaction was estimated to be about 19 kHz...

  12. Chloromethane Complexation by Cryptophanes : Host-Guest Chemistry Investigated by NMR and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Takacs, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Host–guest complexes are widely investigated because of their importance in many industrial applications. The investigation of their physico–chemical properties helps understanding the inclusion phenomenon. The hosts investigated in this work are cryptophane molecules possessing a hydrophobic cavity. They can encapsulate small organic guests such as halo–methanes (CH2Cl2, CHCl3). The encapsulation process was investigated from both the guest and the host point of view. With the help of Nuclea...

  13. NMR Investigation of Chloromethane Complexes of Cryptophane-A and Its Analogue with Butoxy Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Takacs, Z.; E. Steiner; Kowalewski, J.; Brotin, T

    2014-01-01

    Host–guest complexes between cryptophane-A as host and dichloromethane and chloroform as guests are investigated using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, a related cryptophane, with the methoxy groups replaced by butoxy units (cryptophane-But), and its complexes with the same guests were also studied. Variable temperature spectra showed effects of chemical exchange between the free and bound guests, as well as of conformational exchange of the host. The guest exchange was studied quantita...

  14. Host–guest complexes between cryptophane-C and chloromethanes revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Takacs, Z.; Soltesova, M; Kowalewski, J.; Lang, J.; Brotin, T; Dutasta, J-P

    2012-01-01

    Cryptophane-C is composed of two nonequivalent cyclotribenzylene caps, one of which contains methoxy group substituents on the phenyl rings. The two caps are connected by three OCH2CH2O linkers in an anti arrangement. Host–guest complexes of cryptophane-C with dichloromethane and chloroform in solution were investigated in detail by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Variable temperature proton and carbon-13 spectra show a variety of dynami...

  15. RT3D Reaction Modules for Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Chloroethanes, Chloroethenes, Chloromethanes, and Daughter Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Christian D.; Truex, Michael J.

    2006-07-25

    This document describes a suite of MNA/EA reaction modules that were developed for addressing complex chlorinated solvent reactions using RT3D. As an introduction, an overview of these MNA/EA reaction modules is presented, including discussions of similarities between reaction modules, the purpose of key reaction parameters, and important considerations for using the reaction modules. Subsequent sections provide the details of the reaction kinetics (conceptual model and equations), data input requirements, and example (batch reactor) results for each reaction module. This document does not discuss reaction module implementation or validation; such information will accompany the software in the form of release notes or a supplement to the RT3D manual.

  16. The salts of chloronium ions R-Cl(+)-R (R = CH3 or CH2Cl): formation, thermal stability, and interaction with chloromethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, Evgenii S

    2016-05-14

    The interaction of CH3Cl/CD3Cl or CH2Cl2/CD2Cl2 with the carborane acid H(CHB11Cl11) (abbreviated as H{Cl11}) generates the salts of CH3-{Cl11} and CH2Cl-{Cl11} and their deuterio analogs, respectively, which are analogs of the salts of asymmetric chloronium cations. Next, salts of chloronium cations CH3-Cl(+)-CH3, ClCH2-Cl(+)-CH2Cl, and ClCH2-Cl(+)-CH3 and their deuterio analogs were obtained from the above compounds. The asymmetric ClCH2-Cl(+)-CH3 cation was found to be unstable, and at ambient temperature, slowly disproportionated into symmetric cations (CH3)2Cl(+) and (CH2Cl)2Cl(+). At a high temperature (150 °C), disproportionation was completed within 5 minutes, and the resulting cations further decomposed into CH3-{Cl11} and CH2Cl-{Cl11}. The molecular fragment ClCH2-(X) of the compounds (X = {Cl11}, -Cl(+)-CH2Cl, or -Cl(+)-CH3) is involved in exchange reactions with CH2Cl2 and CHCl3, converting into CH3-(X) with the formation of chloroform and CCl4, respectively. PMID:27104946

  17. Etude du puits bactérien pour les émissions végétales de chlorométhane

    OpenAIRE

    Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Chloromethane is the most abundant halocarbon in the environment, and responsible for substantial ozone destruction in the stratosphere. Sources and sinks of chloromethane are still poorly constrained. Although synthesized and used industrially, chloromethane is mainly produced naturally, with major emissions from vegetation and especially the phyllosphere, i.e. the aerial parts of plants. Some phyllosphere epiphytes are methylotrophic bacteria which can use single carbon compounds such as me...

  18. Selective esterification of non-conjugated carboxylic acids in the presence of conjugated or aromatic carboxylic acids over active carbon supported methanesulfonic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Non-conjugated carboxylic acids are selectively esterified in good yields in the presence of conjugated or aromatic carboxylic acids by stirring over active carbon supported methanesulfonic acid in di-chloromethane at room temperature.

  19. Microreactor Technology for On-Site Production of Methyl Chloride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, S.A.; Vajglová, Zuzana; Eränen, K.; Murzin, D.Y.; Salmi, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 5 (2014), s. 345-352. ISSN 2191-9542 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : chloromethane * intensification * microreactor * product separation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.125, year: 2014

  20. Microreactor Technology for the On-Site Production of Methyl Chloride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, S.A.; Vajglová, Zuzana; Eränen, K.; Murzin, D.Y.; Salmi, T.

    Vol. Session 7. -, 2014, KN-7. ISBN N. [International Congress on Green Process Engineering /4./. Sevilla (ES), 07.04.2014-10.04.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : chloromethane * intensification * microreactor http://www.gpe2014.org/

  1. Graphene Metal Adsorption as a Model Chemistry for Atmospheric Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Y. P.; A. F. Jalbout

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mechanism by which chloromethane and dichloromethane decomposition reaction occurs on the surfaces of graphene. To this end we have performed calculations on the graphene surface with metal adsorption on the sheet on the opposite side of reactions to reduce the formation of free-radical intermediates.

  2. Methyl Chloride Synthesis in a Microreactor-Development of a Small Scale Production Unit

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, S.A.; Wärnå, J.; Vajglová, Zuzana; Kumar, N.; Eränen, K.; Murzin, D.Yu.; Salmi, T.

    Budapest : Budapest University of Technology and Economics , 2014, s. 57-58. ISBN 978-963-05-9518-6. [International Conference on Microreactor Technology IMRET /13./. Budapest (HU), 23.06.2014-25.06.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : methyl chloride * chloromethane * on-site production Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  3. Organic Molecules in the Sheepbed Mudstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Miller, K. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Summons, R. E.; Brunner, A. E.; Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Archer, P. D.; Franz, H. B.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity rover is designed to determine the inventory of organic and inorganic volatiles thermally released from solid samples using a combination of evolved gas analysis (EGA), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS), and tunable laser spectroscopy. Here we report on various chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloromethanes, chlorobenzene and dichloroalkanes) detected at elevated levels above instrument background at the Cumberland (CB) drill site, and discuss their possible sources.

  4. Health risk assessment of environmental pollutants. Loose-leaf handbook of toxicological reference data and their evaluation. 16. supplement; Gefaehrdungsabschaetzung von Umweltschadstoffen. Ergaenzbares Handbuch toxikologischer Basisdaten und ihre Bewertung. 16. Ergaenzungslieferung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikmann, Thomas [Giessen Univ. (Germany); Heinrich, Uwe [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin ITEM, Hannover (Germany); Heinzow, Birger [Landesamt fuer soziale Dienste - Umweltbezogener Gesundheitsschutz, Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Konietzka, Rainer (eds.) [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    The 16th supplement on health risk assessment of environmental pollutants, a loose-leaf handbook of toxicological reference data and their evaluation, includes supplementary paragraphs on the following issues: human biomonitoring values (HBM), substance monography for lead; 1,2-dichloroethene; human biomonitoring values (HBM), substance monography for nickel: new reference values for nickel in urine of children in Germany; human biomonitoring values (HBM), substance monography for mercury; tetra chloromethane.

  5. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (less than 150 micrometers), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of approximately 50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of approximately 0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the

  6. Effect of chloralkanes on the phenyltrichlorosilane synthesis by gas phase condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Liu; Yunlong Huang; Chao Wang; Qiang Tang; Jinfu Wang

    2015-01-01

    To enhance the process of phenyltrichlorosilane synthesis using gas phase condensation, a series of chloralkanes were introduced. The influence of temperature and chloralkane amount on the synthesis was studied based on the product distribution from a tubular reactor. The promoting effect of chloralkane addition was mainly caused by the chloralkane radicals generated by the dissociation of C–Cl bond. The promoting effect of the chloromethane with more chlorine atoms was better than those with less chlorine atoms. Intermediates detected from the reactions with isoprene and bromobenzene demonstrated that both trichlorosilyl radical and dichlorosilylene existed in the reaction system in the presence of chloralkanes. A detailed reaction scheme was proposed.

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11669-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 563_3200( CP000563 |pid:none) Shewanella baltica OS155, compl... 71 7e-11 CU207211_2741( CU207211 |pid:none) Herminiimonas arsenic...terium chloromethanic... 74 8e-12 CU207211_2633( CU207211 |pid:none) Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans ch... 74 8...clone:ddc27i01, 5' ... 56 0.003 1 ( AM422018 ) Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense complete genome. 54 0.012...: CSM 6905 sequences; 5,674,871 total letters Score E Sequences producing significa...ts (466), Expect = 0.0 Identities = 501/511 (98%) Strand = Plus / Plus Query: 1 actgttggcctactggaaaaaaacattttca

  8. The Search for Organic Compounds of Martian Origin in Gale Crater by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument on Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel; Freissinet, Caroline; Mahaffy, Paul; Miller, Kristen; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Summons, Roger; Archer, Douglas, Jr.; Brunner, Anna; Martin, Mildred; Buch, Arrnaud; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason; Grotzinger, John; Ming, Douglas; Navarro-Gonzales, Rafael; Steele, Andrew; Szopa, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    One of the key objectives of the Mars Science Laboratory rover and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite is to determine the inventory of organic and inorganic volatiles in the atmosphere and surface regolith and rocks to help assess the habitability potential of Gale Crater. The SAM instrument on the Curiosity rover can detect volatile organic compounds thermally evolved from solid samples using a combination of evolved gas analysis (EGA) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) (Mahaffy et al. 2012). The first solid samples analyzed by SAM, a scoop of windblown dust and sand at Rocknest, revealed several chloromethanes and a C4-chlorinated hydrocarbon derived primarily from reactions between a martian oxychlorine phase (e.g. perchlorate) and terrestrial carbon from N-methyl-N-(tertbutyldimethylsilyl)- trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) vapor present in the SAM instrument background (Glavin et al. 2013). After the analyses at Rocknest, Curiosity traveled to Yellowknife Bay and drilled two separate holes in a fluvio-lacustrine sediment (the Sheepbed unit) designated John Klein and Cumberland. Analyses of the drilled materials by both SAM and the CheMin X-Ray Diffraction instrument revealed a mudstone consisting of 20 wt% smectite clays (Ming et al. 2013; Vaniman et al. 2013), which on Earth are known to aid the concentration and preservation of organic matter. Oxychlorine compounds were also detected in the Sheepbed mudstone during pyrolysis; however, in contrast to Rocknest, much higher levels of chloromethanes were released from the Sheepbed materials, suggesting an additional, possibly martian source of organic carbon (Ming et al. 2013). In addition, elevated abundances of chlorobenzene and a more diverse suite of chlorinated alkanes including dichloropropane and dichlorobutane detected in Cumberland compared to Rocknest suggest that martian or meteoritic organic carbon sources may be preserved in the mudstone (Freissinet et al. 2013

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12436-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 ( AC092173 ) Oryza sativa Japonica Group chromosome 10 clone O... 46 3.5 1 ( AC083944 ) Genomic sequence for Oryza sativa, Nipponba...40_179( CP000240 |pid:none) Synechococcus sp. JA-2-3B'a(2-13... 133 2e-29 CP001132_696( CP001132 |pid:none) Acidithiobacillus ferro...as syringae pv. phaseo... 117 1e-24 CU458896_3372( CU458896 |pid:none) Mycobacterium abscessus chro...4 CP001298_4743( CP001298 |pid:none) Methylobacterium chloromethanic... 117 1e-24 AP002745_8( AP002745 |pid:none) Oryza sativa Japon...terium leprae cosmid B1788... 103 1e-20 CP000511_3114( CP000511 |pid:none) Mycobacterium vanbaa

  10. Formation of the center of ignition in a CH3Cl-Cl2 mixture under the action of UV light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begishev, I. R.; Belikov, A. K.; Komrakov, P. V.; Nikitin, I. S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of temperature on time is investigated using a microthermocouple at different distances from a UV light source in a mixture of chlorine and chloromethane. These relationships give an idea of the size and location of a center of photoignition. It is found that if the size of the reaction vessel in the direction of the luminous flux is much greater than the dimensions of the ignition center, the thermal expansion of a reacting gas mixture has a huge impact on such photoignition parameters as the critical concentration limits and the critical intensity of UV radiation. It is found that by increasing the length of the vessel, some chlorinated combustible mixtures lose the ability to ignite when exposed to UV light.

  11. The adsorption and reaction of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) on metal oxides. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The goal of the research is to elucidate the properties of the materials responsible for the activation of halocarbons and the nature of the intermediates formed in the dissociative adsorption of this class of compounds. This information is essential for interpreting and predicting stoichiometric and catalytic pathways for the safe destruction of halocarbon pollutants. The specific objectives are: (1) to study the adsorption and reactivity of chloromethanes and chloroethanes on metal oxides; (2) to identify the reaction intermediates using spectroscopic methods; and (3) to develop kinetic models for the reaction of these halocarbons with oxide surfaces. This report summarizes work after 20 months of a 36-month project. Emphasis has been placed understanding the surfaces phases, as well as the bulk phases that are present during the reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons with strongly basic metal oxides. Most of the research has been carried out with carbon tetrachloride.'

  12. Gaseous Products of Incense Coil Combustion Extracted by Passive Solid Phase Microextraction Samplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsi Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Burning incense indoors is a common behavior in Southeast Asia. In this investigation, needle trap samplers (NTS, a novel, green analytical technology is used for sampling gaseous combustion by-products from sandalwood incense coils. To extract indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs, two NTS are prepared, one using 60–80 mesh and the other using 100–120 mesh divinylbenzene (DVB particles packed in 22-gauge stainless steel needles. This work compares extraction efficiency of an NTS and that of a commercially available 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane solid phase microextration (PDMS-SPME fiber sampler. Experimental results indicated that the 100–120 mesh DVB-NTS performed best among all samplers during a 1 h sampling period. The main extracted compounds were toluene, ethylbenzene, propane, chloromethane, 1,3-butadiene, methanol and dichloromethane. The potential use of small badge-sized or pen-sized NTS for the indoor atmosphere and occupational hygiene applications is addressed.

  13. Spectral behavior and laser activity of 3-(4‧-dimethylaminophenyl)-1-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPrP). A new laser dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Y. S.; El-Daly, S. A.; Gaber, M.

    2010-03-01

    The photophysical properties of DMAPrP have been investigated in different solvents. DMAPrP dye exhibits a large change in dipole-moment upon excitation due to an intramolecular charge transfer interaction. A crystalline solid of DMAPrP give an excimer like emission at 546 nm. The ground and excited state protonation constants of DMAPrP are calculated. DMAPrP acts as good laser dye upon pumping with nitrogen laser in some organic solvents. The laser parameters such as the tuning range, gain coefficient ( α), emission cross section ( σ e) and half-life energy ( E1/2) are also calculated. The photoreactivity and net photochemical quantum yield of DMAPrP in chloromethane solvents are also studied.

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U08927-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -18 CP001349_5638( CP001349 |pid:none) Methylobacterium nodulans ORS 2... 77 1e-17 CP000301_4214( CP000301 |pid:none) Rhodopseudo...ng... 38 3.5 2 ( AC002354 ) Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome II section 98 of ... 36 4.4 4 ( CZ540030 ) SRAA-aad29c09.g1 Str...iguobacterium sp. AT1b, comple... 101 4e-36 CP000771_605( CP000771 |pid:none) Fervidobacterium nodosum Rt17-...P001298_1782( CP001298 |pid:none) Methylobacterium chloromethanic... 89 2e-20 AE008922_56( AE008922 |pid:none) Xanthomonas campestr...s (Tseatse fly) EST fr... 46 3.1 1 ( AC004482 ) Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome

  15. Sampling and analysis of soil from the old F-Area effluent ditch and its surrounding wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four surface soil samples were collected from the wetlands at the old F-Area effluent ditch. All samples were collected near shallow well point locations except FHB012, which was collected from the effluent ditch stream sediment. Samples were analyzed for metals, Target Compound List volatile organic compounds, and gross radiological indicators. Barium, beryllium, and zinc were detected in all four samples and antimony was detected in three of four samples. These metals occur naturally in the wetland soils at the SRS. Comparisons of metals concentrations were male to concentration ranges taken from background wetland soil samples. These comparison, showed that barium and beryllium concentrations were within expected ranges while zinc and antimony concentrations were elevated above expected concentration ranges. Volatile organic compounds were detected in all four samples. Detected compounds included acetone, 2-butanone, chloromethane, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, and toluene. The only radionuclide detected in a significant quantities was tritium which was detected in all four samples

  16. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. G. Hamilton

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca. 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, represents an important substrate for methanogenesis and could be a significant source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  17. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Keppler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, could be an important substrate for methanogenesis and thus be envisaged as a possible source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  18. Nanoscale determination of ecotoxicological hall-mark in animal hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Melinda Haydee; Ristoiu, Dumitru; Ristoiu, Tania

    2010-11-01

    Biomonitoring studies for estimation population health surveillance and exposure risk assessment of different chemical contaminants such as chlorinated compounds or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds has become an important task especially after the Stockholm Convention. If before the toxicological evaluation of humans were done using invasive methods like surgery or pricking, today many scientists tried to elaborate non-invasive analytical methods without disparage the final results. During the last years studies it was observed a relative higher pollution with organochlorine and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in surrounding regions of Dej, Transylvania. These past studies shown that pollution with chlorinated compounds as chlorinated solvents are attributed to the industrial activities from this region. The levels in soil and river water of these compounds were: ~ 20 - 60 μg.kg-1 and ~ 15 - 45 μg.L-1, respectively. In case of PAHs the following results were obtained for soil and river water: for two ring specie was between ~ 26 - 35 μg.kg-1 and ~ 21 - 30 μg.L-1, respectively; for three ring species was 15 - 35 μg.kg-1 and ~ 10 - 24 μg.L-1, respectively; and in case of four ring species was between 10 - 20 μg.kg-1 and ~ 3 - 15 μg.L-1, respectively. These results carry on concern regarding the bioaccumulation of these pollutants by humans through food web chain. In order to establish the uptake level of these compounds by humans, home grown animal hair as pig and cow were analyzed through SIM-GC-MS mode and ECD-FID-GC. The presence of chlorinated solvents detected in pig and cows hair were as follows: compounds from chloromethane family ~ 5 - 10 ng.kg-1 dry weight; compounds from chloroethane family ~ 7 - 34 ng.kg-1 dry weight for pig hair, and ~ 12 - 17 ng.kg-1 dry weight for compounds from chloromethane family and 14 - 48 ng.kg-1 dry weight for cow hair. Difference between accumulation levels of PAH metabolites were observed also

  19. Emissions of volatile organic compounds and particulate matter from small-scale peat fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, I. J.; Black, R.; Walker, J. T.; Hays, M. D.; Tabor, D.; Gullett, B.

    2013-12-01

    Air pollution emitted from peat fires can negatively impact regional air quality, visibility, climate, and human health. Peat fires can smolder over long periods of time and, therefore, can release significantly greater amounts of carbon into the atmosphere per unit area compared to burning of other types of biomass. However, few studies have characterized the gas and particulate emissions from peat burning. To assess the atmospheric impact of peat fires, particulate matter (PM) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were quantified from controlled small-scale peat fire experiments. Major carbon emissions (i.e. CO2, CO, methane and total hydrocarbons) were measured during the peat burn experiments. Speciated PM mass was also determined from the peat burns from filter and polyurethane foam samples. Whole air samples were taken in SUMMA canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure 82 trace VOCs. Additional gaseous carbonyl species were measured by sampling with dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated cartridges and analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography. VOCs with highest observed concentrations measured from the peat burns were propylene, benzene, chloromethane and toluene. Gas-phase carbonyls with highest observed concentrations included acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and acetone. Emission factors of major pollutants will be compared with recommended values for peat and other biomass burning.

  20. Transformation of tetrachloromethane to dichloromethane and carbon dioxide by Acetobacterium woodii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five anaerobic bacteria were tested for their abilities to transform tetrachloromethane so that information about enzymes involved in reductive dehalogenations of polychloromethanes could be obtained. Cultures of the sulfate reducer Desulfobacterium autotrophicum transformed some 80 μM tetrachloromethane to trichloromethane and a small amount of dichloromethane in 18 days under conditions of heterotrophic growth. The acetogens Acetobacterium woodii and Clostridium thermoaceticum in fructose-salts and glucose-salts media, respectively, degraded some 80 μM tetrachloromethane completely within 3 days. Trichloromethane accumulated as a transient intermediate, but the only chlorinated methanes recovered at the end of the incubation were 8 μM dichloromethane and traces of chloromethane. Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus and an autotrophic, nitrate-reducing bacterium were unable to transform tetrachloromethane. Reduction of chlorinated methanes was thus observed only in the organisms with the acetyl-coenzyme A pathway. Experiments with [14C]tetrachloromethane were done to determine the fate of this compound in the acetogen A. woodii. Radioactivity in an 11-day heterotrophic culture was largely (67%) recovered in CO2, acetate, pyruvate, and cell material. In experiments with cell suspensions to which [14C]tetrachloromethane was added, 14CO2 appeared within 20 s as the major transformation product. A. woodii thus catalyzes reductive dechlorinations and transforms tetrachloromethane to CO2 by a series of unknown reactions

  1. Organohalogen emission from saline environments – spatial extrapolation using remote sensing as most promising tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Schöler

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to their negative water budget most recent semi-/arid regions are characterized by vast evaporates (salt lakes and salty soils. We recently identified those hyper-saline environments as additional sources for a multitude of volatile halogenated organohalogens (VOX. These compounds affect the ozone layer of the stratosphere and play a key role in the production of aerosols. A remote sensing based analysis was performed in the southern Aral Sea basin, providing information of main soil types as well as their extent and spatial and temporal evolution. VOX production has determined in dry and moist soil samples for 24 h. Several C1- and C2 organohalogens, including chloromethane and bromomethane, have been found in hyper-saline topsoil profiles. The range of naturally produced organohalogens includes dichloroethene. For the 15 000 km2 ranging research area in the southern Aralkum desert a daily production of up to 23 t dichloroethene has been calculated using MODIS time series and supervised image classification. The applied setup reproduces a short-term change in climatic conditions starting from dried-out saline soil, instantly humidified during rain events or flooding. VOX emission from dry fallen Aral Sea sediments will further increase since the area of salt affected soils is expected to increase in future. Opportunities, limits and requirements of satellite based rapid change detection and salt classification are discussed.

  2. Permanent gas analysis using gas chromatography with vacuum ultraviolet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ling; Smuts, Jonathan; Walsh, Phillip; Fan, Hui; Hildenbrand, Zacariah; Wong, Derek; Wetz, David; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of complex mixtures of permanent gases consisting of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, inert gases, and toxic species plays an increasingly important role in today's economy. A new gas chromatography detector based on vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectroscopy (GC-VUV), which simultaneously collects full scan (115-240 nm) VUV and UV absorption of eluting analytes, was applied to analyze mixtures of permanent gases. Sample mixtures ranged from off-gassing of decomposing Li-ion and Li-metal batteries to natural gas samples and water samples taken from private wells in close proximity to unconventional natural gas extraction. Gas chromatography separations were performed with a porous layer open tubular column. Components such as C1-C5 linear and branched hydrocarbons, water, oxygen, and nitrogen were separated and detected in natural gas and the headspace of natural gas-contaminated water samples. Of interest for the transport of lithium batteries were the detection of flammable and toxic gases, such as methane, ethylene, chloromethane, dimethyl ether, 1,3-butadiene, CS2, and methylproprionate, among others. Featured is the capability for deconvolution of co-eluting signals from different analytes. PMID:25724098

  3. Determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using tedlar bag/solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME/GC/MS) in ambient and workplace air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPME techniques have proven to be very useful tools in the analysis of wide VOCs in the air. In this study, we estimated VOCs in ambient and workplace air using a Tedlar ba/SPME/GC/MS system. The calibration curve was set to be linear over the range of 1-30 ppbv. The detection limits ranged from 10 pptv 0.93 ppbv for all VOCs. Reproducibility of TO-14 target gas mixtures by SPME/GC/MS averaged at 8.8 R.S.D (%). Air toxic VOCs (hazardous air pollutants, HAPs) containing a total of forty halohydrocarbons, aromatics, and haloaro-matic carbons could be analyzed with significant accuracy, detection limit and linearity at low ppbv level. Only reactive VOCs with low molecular weight, such as chloromethane, vinylchloride, ethylchloride and 1,2-dichloro-ethane, yielded relatively poor results using this technique. In ambient air samples, ten VOCs were identified and quantified after external calibration. VOC concentration in ambient and workplace air ranged from 0.04 to 1.85 ppbv. The overall process was successfully applied to identify and quantify VOCs in ambient/workplace air

  4. Photophysical properties and semiempirical calculations of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic tetramethylester (PTME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Daly, Samy A; Awad, Mohamed K; Abdel-Halim, Shakir T; Dowidar, Dina A

    2008-12-01

    The spectral behavior and fluorescence quantum yield of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic tetramethylester (PTME) have been measured in different solvents. Both electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are not sensitive to medium polarity. The dye exhibits high fluorescence quantum yield and high photostable. Crystalline solid of PTME gives excimer-like emission at 530 nm. The laser activity of PTME has been investigated. The dye solution in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) gives laser emission around 480 nm upon excitation by 337.1 nm nitrogen laser pulse. The excitation energy transfer from 7-dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarine (DMC) to PTME has also has been studied and the value of energy transfer rate constant, k(ET), and critical transfer distance, R(0) indicate a Förster-type mechanism. The photodecomposition of PTME in chloromethane solvents has been also studied. We applied semiempirical MO calculations using (PM3 and ZINDO-CI) calculations to explain the geometric and electronic behaviors of the PTME molecule in both ground and excited states and make a correlation with the experimental observations. PMID:18436473

  5. Photophysical parameters and laser performance of 3-(4‧-dimethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-furanyl)prop-2-en-1-one (DMAFP): A new laser dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Daly, S. A.; Gaber, M.; El-Sayed, Y. S.

    2009-09-01

    The spectral properties such as singlet absorption, molar absorptivity, emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yield and excited state lifetime of 3-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-furanyl)prop-2-en-1-one (DMAFP) have been determined in different solvents. DMAFP dye exhibits a large red shift in both electronic absorption and emission spectra as the solvent polarity increases, indicating a large change in the dipole moment of molecules upon excitation. A crystalline solid of DMAFP gives an excimer like emission at 566 nm due to the excitation of molecular aggregates. This is expected from the idealized crystal structure of the dye that belongs to the B-type class of Steven's classification. The ground and excited state protonation constants of DMAFP are calculated and amounted to 1.71 and 8.3, respectively. DMAFP acts as a good laser dye upon pumping with nitrogen laser ( λex=337.1 nm) in chloroform, methylene chloride and dioxane and gives laser emission in the range 460-590 nm. The laser parameters such as the tuning range, gain coefficient ( α), emission cross section ( σ e) and half-life energy ( E1/2) are calculated. The photoreactivity and net photochemical quantum yield of DMAFP in chloromethane solvents are also studied.

  6. A stable isotope approach for source apportionment of chlorinated ethene plumes at a complex multi-contamination events urban site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Schmidt, Marie; Pellegatti, Eleonora; Paramatti, Enrico; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Gargini, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of chlorinated aliphatic compounds such as chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethenes was examined as an intrinsic fingerprint for apportionment of sources. A complex field site located in Ferrara (Italy), with more than 50years history of use of chlorinated aliphatic compounds, was investigated in order to assess contamination sources. Several contamination plumes were found in a complex alluvial sandy multi-aquifer system close to the river Po; sources are represented by uncontained former industrial and municipal dump sites as well as by spills at industrial areas. The carbon stable isotope signature allowed distinguishing 2 major sources of contaminants. One source of chlorinated aliphatic contaminants was strongly depleted in ¹³C (methane for synthesis. The other source had typical carbon isotope compositions of >-40‰ which is commonly observed in recent production of chlorinated solvents. The degradation processes in the plumes could be traced interpreting the isotope enrichment and depletion of parent and daughter compounds, respectively. We demonstrate that, under specific production conditions, namely when highly chlorinated ethenes are produced as by-product during chloromethanes production, ¹³C depleted fingerprinting of contaminants can be obtained and this can be used to track sources and address the responsible party of the pollution in urban areas. PMID:24077332

  7. Predominance of biotic over abiotic formation of halogenated hydrocarbons in hypersaline sediments in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, A; Weigold, P; Behrens, S; Jochmann, M; Laaks, J; Kappler, A

    2014-08-19

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds (VOX) contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. There is evidence of natural VOX formation in many environments ranging from forest soils to salt lakes. Laboratory studies have suggested that VOX formation can be chemically stimulated by reactive Fe species while field studies have provided evidence for direct biological (enzymatic) VOX formation. However, the relative contribution of abiotic and biotic processes to global VOX budgets is still unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify VOX release from sediments from a hypersaline lake in Western Australia (Lake Strawbridge) and to distinguish between the relative contributions of biotic and abiotic VOX formation in microbially active and sterilized microcosms. Our experiments demonstrated that the release of organochlorines from Lake Strawbridge sediments was mainly biotic. Among the organochlorines detected were monochlorinated, e.g., chloromethane (CH3Cl), and higher chlorinated VOX compounds such as trichloromethane (CHCl3). Amendment of sediments with either Fe(III) oxyhydroxide (ferrihydrite) or a mixture of lactate/acetate or both ferrihydrite and lactate/acetate did not stimulate VOX formation. This suggests that although microbial Fe(III) reduction took place, there was no stimulation of VOX formation via Fe redox transformations or the formation of reactive Fe species under our experimental conditions. PMID:25073729

  8. The dynamics of azulene in liquids and compressed gases on ultrafast timescales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, K.E.

    1992-02-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of vibrationally hot ground state azulene molecules have been time resolved by picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in a variety of solvents including hexane, chloromethanes, methanol, CClF{sub 3}, Xe and Kr. A high pressure optical cell was used to liquify gases for use as solvents and change their density and temperature, independently, over the entire liquid density range. Experimental results indicate the vibrational cooling rate is strongly solvent dependent, with cooling rates of approximately 20 psec in molecular solvents and approximately 150 psec in atomic solvents. Comparison of the rates in Xe and Kr at constant density demonstrates the strong effect of solvent mass on energy transfer. The effect of solvent temperature on vibrational cooling is minimal, as is the effect of solvent density. This latter result is quite surprising in light of earlier experiments on simpler molecular systems, such as I{sub 2} in Xe. This anomalous density effect is examined in light of Isolated Binary Collision (IBC) theory and bulk thermal transport models. Both theories accurately model all experimental results obtained with the exception of the density effort. Possible explanations for the breakdown of the IBC theory in this case are offered along with methods to improve IBC theory for application to complex three dimensional molecular systems.

  9. Impact of biomass burning on urban air quality estimated by organic tracers: Guangzhou and Beijing as cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impacts of biomass burning have not been adequately studied in China. In this work, chemical compositions of volatile organic compounds and particulate organic matters were measured in August 2005 in Beijing and in October 2004 in Guangzhou city. The performance of several possible tracers for biomass burning is compared by using acetonitrile as a reference compound. The correlations between the possible tracers and acetonitrile show that the use of K+ as a tracer could result in bias because of the existence of other K+ sources in urban areas, while chloromethane is not reliable due to its wide use as industrial chemical. The impact of biomass burning on air quality is estimated using acetonitrile and levoglucosan as tracers. The results show that the impact of biomass burning is ubiquitous in both suburban and urban Guangzhou, and the frequencies of air pollution episodes significantly influenced by biomass burning were 100% for Xinken and 58% for downtown Guangzhou city. Fortunately, the air quality in only 2 out of 22 days was partly impacted by biomass burning in August in Beijing, the month that 2008 Olympic games will take place. The quantitative contribution of biomass burning to ambient PM2.5 concentrations in Guangzhou city was also estimated by the ratio of levoglocusan to PM2.5 in both the ambient air and biomass burning plumes. The results show that biomass burning contributes 3.02013;16.8% and 4.02013;19.0% of PM2.5 concentrations in Xinken and Guangzhou downtown, respectively. (Author)

  10. Impact of biomass burning on urban air quality estimated by organic tracers: Guangzhou and Beijing as cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaoqiao; Shao, Min; Liu, Ying; William, Kuster; Paul, Goldan; Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Yuan; Lu, Sihua

    The impacts of biomass burning have not been adequately studied in China. In this work, chemical compositions of volatile organic compounds and particulate organic matters were measured in August 2005 in Beijing and in October 2004 in Guangzhou city. The performance of several possible tracers for biomass burning is compared by using acetonitrile as a reference compound. The correlations between the possible tracers and acetonitrile show that the use of K + as a tracer could result in bias because of the existence of other K + sources in urban areas, while chloromethane is not reliable due to its wide use as industrial chemical. The impact of biomass burning on air quality is estimated using acetonitrile and levoglucosan as tracers. The results show that the impact of biomass burning is ubiquitous in both suburban and urban Guangzhou, and the frequencies of air pollution episodes significantly influenced by biomass burning were 100% for Xinken and 58% for downtown Guangzhou city. Fortunately, the air quality in only 2 out of 22 days was partly impacted by biomass burning in August in Beijing, the month that 2008 Olympic games will take place. The quantitative contribution of biomass burning to ambient PM2.5 concentrations in Guangzhou city was also estimated by the ratio of levoglocusan to PM2.5 in both the ambient air and biomass burning plumes. The results show that biomass burning contributes 3.0-16.8% and 4.0-19.0% of PM2.5 concentrations in Xinken and Guangzhou downtown, respectively.

  11. The dynamics of azulene in liquids and compressed gases on ultrafast time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrafast dynamics of vibrationally hot ground state azulene molecules have been time resolved by picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in a variety of solvents including hexane, chloromethanes, methanol, CClF3, Xe and Kr. A high pressure optical cell was used to liquify gases for use as solvents and change their density and temperature, independently, over the entire liquid density range. Experimental results indicate that the vibrational cooling rate is strongly solvent dependent, with cooling rates of approximately 20 psec in molecular solvents and approximately 150 psec in atomic solvents. Comparison of the rates in Xe and Kr at constant density demonstrates the strong effect of solvent mass on energy transfer. The effect of solvent temperature on vibrational cooling is minimal, as is the effect of solvent density. This latter result is quite surprising in light of earlier experiments on simpler molecular systems, such as I2 in Xe. This anomalous density effect is examined in light of Isolated Binary Collision (IBC) theory and bulk thermal transport models. Both theories accurately model all experimental results obtained with the exception of the density effect. Possible explanations for the breakdown of IBC theory in this case are offered along with methods to improve IBC theory for application to complex three dimensional molecular systems

  12. Fragranced consumer products and undisclosed ingredients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragranced consumer products-such as air fresheners, laundry supplies, personal care products, and cleaners-are widely used in homes, businesses, institutions, and public places. While prevalent, these products can contain chemicals that are not disclosed to the public through product labels or material safety data sheets (MSDSs). What are some of these chemicals and what limits their disclosure? This article investigates these questions, and brings new pieces of evidence to the science, health, and policy puzzle. Results from a regulatory analysis, coupled with a chemical analysis of six best-selling products (three air fresheners and three laundry supplies), provide several findings. First, no law in the U.S. requires disclosure of all chemical ingredients in consumer products or in fragrances. Second, in these six products, nearly 100 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified, but none of the VOCs were listed on any product label, and one was listed on one MSDS. Third, of these identified VOCs, ten are regulated as toxic or hazardous under federal laws, with three (acetaldehyde, chloromethane, and 1,4-dioxane) classified as Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs). Results point to a need for improved understanding of product constituents and mechanisms between exposures and effects

  13. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ingrid J.; Black, Robert R.; Geron, Chris D.; Aurell, Johanna; Hays, Michael D.; Preston, William T.; Gullett, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, volatile and semi-volatile organic compound (VOCs and SVOCs) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. The peat samples originated from two National Wildlife Refuges on the coastal plain of North Carolina, U.S.A. Gas- and particle-phase organic compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by high pressure liquid chromatography. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) accounted for a large fraction (∼60%) of the speciated VOC emissions from peat burning, including large contributions of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and chloromethane. In the fine particle mass (PM2.5), the following organic compound classes were dominant: organic acids, levoglucosan, n-alkanes, and n-alkenes. Emission factors for the organic acids in PM2.5 including n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanedioic acids, and aromatic acids were reported for the first time for peat burning, representing the largest fraction of organic carbon (OC) mass (11-12%) of all speciated compound classes measured in this work. Levoglucosan contributed to 2-3% of the OC mass, while methoxyphenols represented 0.2-0.3% of the OC mass on a carbon mass basis. Retene was the most abundant particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Total HAP VOC and particulate PAH emissions from a 2008 peat wildfire in North Carolina were estimated, suggesting that peat fires can contribute a large fraction of state-wide HAP emissions.

  14. Photophysical Parameters, Excitation Energy Transfer, and Photoreactivity of 1,4-Bis(5-phenyl-2-oxazolylbenzene (POPOP Laser Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy A. El-Daly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of solvents on the absorption and emission spectra of 1,4-bis(5-phenyl-2-oxazolylbenzene (POPOP laser dye has been studied in various solvents at 298 K. A bathochromic shift was observed in absorption and fluorescence spectra upon increase of solvent polarity, which indicates that this transition is π-∗. The ground and excited state dipole moments were calculated as 2.23 and 6.34 Debye, respectively. The dye solution in MeOH, n-heptane, and methyl isobutyl ketone gives laser emission in the blue region upon excitation by a 337.1 nm nitrogen pulse; the gain coefficient and emission cross section as well as normalized photostability have been determined. Excitation energy transfer from POPOP to rhodamine B and fluorescine was studied to improve the laser emission from these dyes. Such an energy transfer dye laser system (ETDL obeys a long range columbic energy transfer mechanism with a critical transfer distance, R0, of 25 and 33 Å and kq equal to 10.4×1012 and 26.2×1012M−1s−1 for the POPOP/RB and POPOP/fluorescine pair, respectively. The POPOP dye is highly photostable in polar protic and polar aprotic solvents, while it displays photodecomposition in chloromethane solvent via formation of a contact ion pair. The photochemical quantum yield and rate of photodecomposition depend on the electron affinity of solvent.

  15. Design and Analysis of SAW Based MEMS Gas Sensor for the Detection of Volatile Organic Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staline Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper portrays the design and analysis of SAW based MEMS gas sensor for the detection of volatile organic gases. The gas sensor consists of interdigitated transducers modeled on a piezoelectric substrate and covered by a thin film of polyisobutylene (PIB which acts as the sensing layer. The piezoelectric substrate material used is YZ cut Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3 and electrodes used are made of Aluminium (Al. Mass loading effect on the sensing layer is used for the detection of volatile organic gases. The design and simultions were carried out by using comsol multiphysics software based on Finite Element Method (FEM for analytical simulations. The resonant frequency of the SAW device was determined and simulations are carried out by exposing the sensor to 100 ppm of various volatile organic gases and corresponding shift in resonant frequency for various gases are determined. The reduction in the resonant frequency is used for the detection of volatile organic gases such as chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, tetrachloroethene, carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene.

  16. IN-VITRO PHARMACOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE PLANT BOERHAVIA REPENS (FAMILY: NYCTAGINACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avijit Dey

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Boerhavia repens is an important medicinal plant having application in jaundice, fever and various other disorders. The whole plant Boerhavia repens was sun dried and extracted using methanol. Later the crude methanolic extract was fractionated into four different fractions using Petroleum ether, carbon tetra-chloride, Di-chloromethane and Ethyl acetate. The anti-oxidant activity of the different fractions was measured by the DPPH free radical scavenging activity. The ethyl acetate and the di-chloro methane soluble fractions showed very potent anti-oxidant activity by the DPPH free radical scavenging method. The anti-microbial activity of the different fractions was measured by disc diffusion method. The antimicrobial screening of the plant showed that the carbon tetra-chloride soluble fractions and the Petroleum ether soluble fractions showed mild antimicrobial activity. Evaluation of cyto-toxic activity was done using the brine-shrimp lethality bio-assay. The petroleum ether soluble fraction and the ethyl acetate soluble fractions showed significant cyto-toxic activity.

  17. Analogue Experiments Identify Possible Precursor Compounds for Chlorohydrocarbons Detected in SAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K.; Summons, R. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M. G.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, aboard the Curiosity Rover, has conducted multiple analyses of scooped and drilled samples and has identified a suite of chlorohydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene (Glavin et al., 2013; Leshin et al., 2013). These compounds were identified after samples were pyrolysed at temperatures up to ~835°C through a combination of Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS). Since these chlorinated species were well above the background levels determined by empty cup blanks analyzed prior to solid sample analyses, thermal degradation of oxychlorine phases, such as perchlorate, present in the Martian soil, are the most likely source of chlorine needed to generate these chlorohydrocarbons. Laboratory analogue experiments show that terrestrial organics internal to SAM, such as N-methyl-N(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a derivatization agent, can react with perchlorates to produce all of the chlorohydrocarbons detected by SAM. However, in pyrolysis-trap-GCMS laboratory experiments with MTBSTFA, C4 compounds are the predominant chlorohydrocarbon observed, whereas on SAM the C1 chlorohydrocarbons dominate (Glavin et al., 2013). This, in addition to the previous identification of chloromethane and dichloromethane by the 1976 Viking missions (Biemann et al., 1977), suggest that there could be another, possibly Martian, source of organic carbon contributing to the formation of the C1 chlorohydrocarbons, or other components of the solid samples analyzed by SAM are having a catalytic effect on chlorohydrocarbon generation. Laboratory analogue experiments investigated a suite of organic compounds that have the potential to accumulate on Mars (Benner et al., 2000) and thus serve as sources of carbon for the formation of chlorohydrocarbons detected by the SAM and

  18. Muonium formation and the 'missing fraction' in vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vapor phase fractional polarizations of positive muons thermalizing as the muonium atom (Psub(M)) and in diamagnetic environments (Psub(D)) has been measured in H2O, CH3OH, C6H14, C6H12, CCl4, CHCl3, CH2Cl2 and TMS, in order to compare with the corresponding fractions measured in the condensed phases. There is a marked contrast in every case, with the vapor phase results being largely understandable in terms of a charge exchange/hot atom model. Unlike the situation in the corresponding liquids, there is no permanent lost fraction in the vapor phase in the limit of even moderately high pressures (approximately 1 atm); at lower pressures, depolarization is due to hyperfine mixing and is believed to be well understood. For vapor phase CH3OH, C6H14, C6H12, and TMS the relative fractions are found to be pressure dependent, suggesting the importance of termolecular hot atom (or ion) reactions in the slowing-down process. For vapor phase H2O and the chloromethanes, the relative fractions are pressure independent. For CCl4, Psub(M) = Psub(D) approximately 0.5 in the vapor phase vs. Psub(D) = 1.0 in the liquid phase; fast thermal reactions of Mu likely contribute significantly to this difference in the liquid phase. For H2O, Psub(M) approximately 0.9 and Psub(D) approximately 0.1 in the vapor phase vs. Psub(D) approximately 0.6 and Psub(M) approximately 0.2 in the liquid phase. Water appears to be the one unequivocal case where the basic charge exchange/hot atom model is inappropriate in the condensed phase, suggesting, therefore, that radiation-induced 'spur' effects play a major role

  19. Dramatic 13C-depletion in the plant methoxyl pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, F.; Kalin, R. M.; Harper, D. B.; McRoberts, C. W.; Hamilton, J. T.

    2004-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become a powerful tool for environmental scientists, plant biologists, ecologists and geochemists studying global elemental cycles or past climatic conditions. Thus most plant species have been photosynthetically characterised as Calvin cycle (C3), Slack-Hatch cycle (C4) and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) categories using carbon isotope signatures. Moreover variations in the carbon isotope composition (d13C) of compounds, produced and destroyed in the global carbon cycle, are often used to investigate biogeochemical cycles and global source-sink relationships, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Stable isotope techniques are increasingly applied to the study of atmospheric budgets of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We report evidence that methoxyl groups in terrestrial plants (in esters and aromatic ethers) have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are also highly depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. Our observations suggest that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of C1 compounds of plant origin in the biosphere such as methanol, chloromethane, bromomethane, iodomethane, and cyanomethane. Moreover this pool, which comprises approximately 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass and represents an important substrate for methanogenesis, is likely to be a significant source of highly depleted methane entering the atmosphere. The distinct 13C depletion of methoxyl groups in plants which is reflected in isotope signatures of C1 VOCs may provide a helpful tool in constraining complex environmental processes. These isotope anomalies have a tremendous potential to improve our understanding of the global cycles of atmospheric trace gases and the biochemical pathways involved. Furthermore methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  20. Impact of biomass burning on urban air quality estimated by organic tracers: Guangzhou and Beijing as cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiaoqiao Wang; Min Shao; Ying Liu [State Joint Key Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, (China); Kuster, William; Goldan, Paul [Earth System Research Laboratory, U.S. Department of Commerce, Boulder, CO 80305, (United States); Xiaohua Li; Yuan Liu; Sihua Lu [State Joint Key Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, (China)

    2007-12-15

    The impacts of biomass burning have not been adequately studied in China. In this work, chemical compositions of volatile organic compounds and particulate organic matters were measured in August 2005 in Beijing and in October 2004 in Guangzhou city. The performance of several possible tracers for biomass burning is compared by using acetonitrile as a reference compound. The correlations between the possible tracers and acetonitrile show that the use of K{sup +} as a tracer could result in bias because of the existence of other K+ sources in urban areas, while chloromethane is not reliable due to its wide use as industrial chemical. The impact of biomass burning on air quality is estimated using acetonitrile and levoglucosan as tracers. The results show that the impact of biomass burning is ubiquitous in both suburban and urban Guangzhou, and the frequencies of air pollution episodes significantly influenced by biomass burning were 100% for Xinken and 58% for downtown Guangzhou city. Fortunately, the air quality in only 2 out of 22 days was partly impacted by biomass burning in August in Beijing, the month that 2008 Olympic games will take place. The quantitative contribution of biomass burning to ambient PM{sub 2.5} concentrations in Guangzhou city was also estimated by the ratio of levoglocusan to PM{sub 2.5} in both the ambient air and biomass burning plumes. The results show that biomass burning contributes 3.02013;16.8% and 4.02013;19.0% of PM{sub 2.5} concentrations in Xinken and Guangzhou downtown, respectively. (Author).

  1. Impact of biomass burning on urban air quality estimated by organic tracers: Guangzhou and Beijing as cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiaoqiao Wang; Min Shao; Ying Liu [State Joint Key Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, (China); Kuster, William; Goldan, Paul [Earth System Research Laboratory, U.S. Department of Commerce, Boulder, CO 80305, (United States); Xiaohua Li; Yuan Liu; Sihua Lu [State Joint Key Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, (China)

    2007-12-15

    The impacts of biomass burning have not been adequately studied in China. In this work, chemical compositions of volatile organic compounds and particulate organic matters were measured in August 2005 in Beijing and in October 2004 in Guangzhou city. The performance of several possible tracers for biomass burning is compared by using acetonitrile as a reference compound. The correlations between the possible tracers and acetonitrile show that the use of K{sup +} as a tracer could result in bias because of the existence of other K+ sources in urban areas, while chloromethane is not reliable due to its wide use as industrial chemical. The impact of biomass burning on air quality is estimated using acetonitrile and levoglucosan as tracers. The results show that the impact of biomass burning is ubiquitous in both suburban and urban Guangzhou, and the frequencies of air pollution episodes significantly influenced by biomass burning were 100% for Xinken and 58% for downtown Guangzhou city. Fortunately, the air quality in only 2 out of 22 days was partly impacted by biomass burning in August in Beijing, the month that 2008 Olympic games will take place. The quantitative contribution of biomass burning to ambient PM{sub 2.5} concentrations in Guangzhou city was also estimated by the ratio of levoglocusan to PM{sub 2.5} in both the ambient air and biomass burning plumes. The results show that biomass burning contributes 3.02013;16.8% and 4.02013;19.0% of PM{sub 2.5} concentrations in Xinken and Guangzhou downtown, respectively. (Author)

  2. Stereospecific approach to the synthesis of [/sup 18/F]12-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-mannose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of methyl 4,6-O-benzylidene-3-O-benzyl-2-O- trifluoromethanesulfonyl-β-D-glucopyranoside in acetonitrile at 750 for 30 min with [/sup 18/F]tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride, followed by silica gel column purification (di-chloromethane: acetone, 95:5) gave the corresponding [/sup 18/F] methyl 4,6-O-benzylidene-3-O-benzyl- 2-fluoro- β -D-mannopyranoside with complete regio- and stereoselectivity (42% radiochemical yield). Hydrolysis of the radiolabeled fluoromannopyranoside intermediate with either 6N HCl or 50% methanesulfonic acid for 30 min at reflux, followed by purification by column chromatography (ion retardation, AG11A8 resin and neutral alumina) gave pure [/sup 18/F]2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-mannose ([/sup 18/F] 2-FDM) suitable for human injection with a total radiochemical yield (from [/sup 18/F] fluoride ion) of 34%. Since chromatographic identification of 2-fluorodeoxyhexoses does not necessarily constitute a proof of chemical structure, unequivocal evidence of the identity of the final product was obtained using Fourier transform /sup 19/F-NMR. Samples with sufficient fluorine 19 mass when analyzed using /sup 19/F-NMR spectroscopy [Bruker WM-500, 470.56 MHz] after F-18 decay, showed only two peaks corresponding to the two anomers of 2-FDM (α=38.16, β=56.56; D/sub 2/O, solvent; C/sub 6/F/sub 6/, external reference; proton decoupled). The synthetic procedure described here permits the routine preparation of large amounts of [/sup 18/F]/sub 2/-FDM for tomographic studies. In this manner, comparisons of the biological and kinetic behavior of epimerically pure [/sup 18/F]2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ([/sup 18/F]2-FDG) and [/sup 18/F]2-FDM in humans are now possible

  3. Ozone-depleting substances and the greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and SF6. Danish consumption and emissions, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sander Poulsen, T. [PlanMiljoe (Denmark)

    2006-05-19

    The objective of this project was to map the 2004 consumption of newly produced industrial ozone-depleting substances and the consumption and actual emissions of HFCs, PFCs, and SF6. The evaluation was made in accordance with the IPCC guidelines, and following the method employed in previous evaluations and it covers the net consumption of ozone-depleting substances. The term 'net consumption' is understood as the amount of imported goods in bulk or drums, less any re-export of substances as raw materials. Ozone-depleting substances contained in finished products that are imported and exported are not included in the evaluation. This delimitation is in full compliance with international guidelines. The evaluation does not account for the consumption of ozone-depleting substances used as raw material in the production of other substances, such as tetra chloromethane, and which are not subsequently emitted to the atmosphere. The information on consumption has been gathered from importers, suppliers and enterprise end-users (usually purchasing departments), and Statistics Denmark. This method of data gathering means that the information gathered is about the quantities of substances traded. Purchase and sales figures are used as an expression of consumption. This approach is considered to be suitable and adequate for the present purpose, since experience from previous projects shows that a levelling out occurs with time and that the substances sold/purchased are consumed within a relatively small time horizon. None of the substances covered here are produced in Denmark. Furthermore, ozone-depleting substances are treated at chemical waste processing plants in Denmark. Treatment and destruction data was gathered for the evaluation, but in line with all previous evaluations it has not been accounted for in the consumption figures. (BA)

  4. Cytotoxic Activity and Apoptosis Induction of Hypericum scabrum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeloo-Moghadam, Maryam; Khalaj, Amir; Malekmohammadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the acquired biological hallmarks of tumor multistep development is the resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis; therefore, induction of apoptosis is an important therapeutic approach. Hypericum species are spread throughout the world and have been investigated for their biological properties. Objectives: Our previous studies had demonstrated cytotoxicity of Hypericum scabrum L. methanol extract against some tumor cell lines, suggesting the species for further studies. The objectives of the present study were to determine the most cytotoxic fraction of Hypericum scabrum L. and to assess the apoptosis induction ability of the most effective fraction as well as its methanol extract. The laboratory evidence has been presented to support the potency of Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM) medicinal plants as a source of different biological activity surveys and drug discoveries. Materials and Methods: The present research is a descriptive study. The sampling strategy was based on ITM data of cancer phytotherapy. Hypericum scabrum was collected from Alborz province, Iran (2012) and the herbarium specimen was taxonomically identified. The petroleum ether, dichloromethane, and methanol fractions have been evaluated for cytotoxicity against M-CF7, A-549, HT-29, and HepG-2 cell lines through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide or MTT assay. The apoptosis induction ability has been assessed by activated caspase-3 inspection and Annexin V FITC/PI (propidium iodide) assays. Results: Di-chloromethane fraction demonstrated IC50 values of 25.72 μg/mL and 24.73 μg/mL against HT-29 and HepG-2 cell lines, respectively and IC50 values of petroleum ether fraction were 22.6 μg/mL and 18.31 μg/mL against HT-29 and HepG-2, respectively. The methanol fraction did not show cytotoxic activity. Both the methanol extract and the petroleum ether fraction of Hypericum scabrum L. revealed apoptosis induction ability. Conclusions: Considering the

  5. Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride by Tetrachloroethene and Trichloroethene Respiring Anaerobic Mixed Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickstrom, K. E.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater contaminant with the potential to form a broad range of transformation products. Of the possible biochemical pathways through which CT can be degraded, reductive dehalogenation to less chlorinated compounds and mineralization to carbon dioxide (CO2) appear to be the most frequently utilized pathways by anaerobic organisms. Results will be presented from batch experiments of CT degradation by the Evanite (EV), Victoria Strain (VS) and Point Mugu (PM) anaerobic dechlorinating cultures. The cultures are grown in chemostats and are capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene by halorespiration via reductive dehalogenase enzymes. For the batch CT transformation tests, the cells along with supernatant were harvested from chemostats fed PCE or TCE, but never CT. The batch reactors were initially fed 0.0085 mM CT and an excess of formate (EV and VS) or lactate (PM) as electron donor. Transformation of CT was 100% with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) and undetected products. Multiple additions of CT showed a slowing of pseudo first-order CT transformation rates across all cultures. Batch reactors were then established and fed 0.085 mM CT with an excess of electron donor in order to better quantify the reductive pathway. CT was transformed to CF and dichloromethane (DCM), with trace amounts of chloromethane (CM) detected. Between 60-90% of the mass added to the system was accounted for, showing that the majority of the carbon tetrachloride present is being reductively dehalogenated. Results from batch reactors that were poisoned using sodium azide, and from reactors not provided electron donor will be presented to distinguish between biotic and abiotic reactions. Furthermore, results from reactors prepared with acetylene (a potent, reversible inhibitor of reductive dehalogenases (1)) will be presented as a means of identifying the enzymes involved in the

  6. A first-principles study on the B5O5+/0 and B5O5− clusters: The boron oxide analogs of C6H5+/0 and CH3Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of boronyl (BO) and the BO/H isolobal analogy build an interesting structural link between boron oxide clusters and hydrocarbons. Based upon global-minimum searches and first-principles electronic structural calculations, we present here the perfectly planar C2v B5O5+ (1, 1A1), C2v B5O5 (2, 2A1), and tetrahedral Cs B5O5− (3, 1A′) clusters, which are the global minima of the systems. Structural and molecular orbital analyses indicate that C2v B5O5+ (1) [B3O3(BO)2+] and C2v B5O5 (2) [B3O3(BO)2] feature an aromatic six-membered boroxol (B3O3) ring as the core with two equivalent boronyl terminals, similar to the recently reported boronyl boroxine D3h B6O6 [B3O3(BO)3]; whereas Cs B5O5− (3) [B(BO)3(OBO)−] is characterized with a tetrahedral B− center, terminated with three BO groups and one OBO unit, similar to the previously predicted boronyl methane Td B5O4− [B(BO)4−]. Alternatively, the 1–3 clusters can be viewed as the boron oxide analogs of phenyl cation C6H5+, phenyl radical C6H5, and chloromethane CH3Cl, respectively. Chemical bonding analyses also reveal a dual three-center four-electron (3c-4e) π hyperbond in Cs B5O5− (3). The infrared absorption spectra of B5O5+ (1), B5O5 (2), and B5O5− (3) and anion photoelectron spectrum of B5O5− (3) are predicted to facilitate their forthcoming experimental characterizations. The present work completes the BnOn+/0/− series for n = 1–6 and enriches the analogous relationship between boron oxides and hydrocarbons

  7. Determination of trace amount of SDS surfactant by Oxtractionspectrophotometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) is linear surfactant that widely used in detergent formulations such as dishwashing liquids, hair and body shampoos etc. Various analytical techniques have been reported for the determination of SDS including capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (Y. Tanaka et al., Bunseki Kagaku Abstract, 1998, Vol. 47. No. 9.), turbidimetry (M. L. Fielden et al., Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 198 (1998), 261-265.). and polarographic method. (S. Hiromiti, et al., Japan Analyst, 38(1989), 288-291.). A simple, sensitive extraction-spectrophotometric method for determination of trace amounts of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is reported.The (SDS--OTB+) ion-pair in buffered media is quantitatively extracted into di-chloromethane and its absorbance is measured at 625 nm in room temperature.The effect of different variables such as solvent, volume of extractant, volume of cationic reagent, pH, shaking time is investigated and optimum conditions for quantitative extraction of SDS is obtained. Linear calibration curve over the SDS concentration range of 0.14 μg mL-1 and regression coefficient of 0.9996 is obtained.The relative standard deviation (RSD) of seven replicate determinations of SDS concentrations of 0.2 μg mL-1 , 1 μg mL-1 and 4 μg mL-1 is 3.75%, 1.84% and 0.63% respectively. The detection limit of the method is 8.91 ng mL-1.The amount of SDS in Karoon river as real sample is determined by standard addition method which is 0.141 μg mL-1.The interference of 22 cationic and anionic species have also been evaluated and it was found that most species have no effect on the extraction selectivity. The method was applied to the Karoon river raw water contaminated with industrial and house savages. The results showed high potential of the recommended method for the determination of SDS in water samples. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of this work by Ahwaz Petroleum Faculty

  8. SPE- HPLC determination of pyrethroid pesticide residues in Platycodon grandiflorum%固相萃取-高效液相色谱法测定桔梗中拟除虫菊酯的农药残留

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁淑琴; 游勇基

    2011-01-01

    目的:建立桔梗中甲氰菊酯、高效氯氟氰菊酯、溴氰菊酯、氰戊菊酯、氯菊酯、联苯菊酯共6个拟除虫菊酯类农药残留的提取、净化及其残留量测定的方法.方法:样品运用石油醚提取,商品CARB/NH2小柱净化,乙腈-二氯甲烷(5:95)洗脱,HPLC - DAD检测.色谱条件:采用Hypersil BDS C18(250 mm ×4.6 mm,5μm)色谱柱,流动相为乙腈-水(70:30),流速1mL·min-1,检测波长230nm.结果:样品4水平添加时的6个拟除虫菊酯类化合物回收率在75.63%~107.5%范围内,RSD在2.3% ~9.9%范围内,可以满足农药残留分析的要求.结论:该方法灵敏度高,选择性强,操作简单、快速,净化效果好.可应用于桔梗药材中痕量农药残留的检测.%Objective: To develop a method for the extraction, clean - up and determination of fenpropathrin, lambda - cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, fenvalerate, permethrin and bifenthrin in Platycodon grandiflorum. Methods: Pesticide residues were extracted from samples with ligarine; Extracts were cleaned - up by CARB/NH2 column, eluted with acetonitrile -chloromethane(5: 95). Analytical screening was determined by HPLC with a diode array detector. HPLC condition:Hypersil BDS C18(250mm ×4. 6 mm,5 μm)column was adopted,the mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile - water(70: 30) at a flow rate of 1 mL · min-1 ,and the detection wavelength was 230 ran. Results; The average recoveries were in the range of 75. 63% - 107. 6% with RSD of 2. 3% - 9. 9%. The method met the requirement of pesticide residue analysis. Conclusion: The proposed method has high sensitivity, repeatability and selectivity, it is simple and fast, which can be used for the analysis of 6 pyrethroid pesticides.

  9. Comparison of detection methods of total lipid content in microalgae%微藻油脂含量不同测定方法的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭悦; 刘玉莹; 祁艳霞; 胡玉才; 付晚涛

    2015-01-01

    为了对微藻油脂含量不同测定方法进行比较,以球等鞭金藻8701 Isochrysis galbana Parke 8701和小新月菱形藻Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima两种微藻为研究对象,采用溶剂提取法和苏丹黑B染色法对其油脂含量进行测定,建立了两种微藻油脂含量与苏丹黑染色后吸光度A645 nm的线性回归方程,并应用于微藻油脂积累培养过程的快速测定,利用气相色谱法对两种微藻脂肪酸组成进行分析。结果表明:当提取溶剂为二氯甲烷和甲醇的混合溶剂(二者的体积比为1:2)时,油脂提取效果较好,得到球等鞭金藻8701和小新月菱形藻的油脂含量分别为22.99%和16.89%;采用苏丹黑B染色法测定的油脂含量基本和生物量大体一致,是一种可行的估测油脂含量的方法;气相色谱检测结果显示,两种微藻具有明显不同的脂肪酸组成特征,球等鞭金藻8701的饱和脂肪酸含量(55.02%)较小新月菱形藻(51.39%)高。研究表明,从两种微藻的油脂含量和脂肪酸组成来看,球等鞭金藻8701较小新月菱形藻更适用于作为生物柴油的原料。%The total lipid contents were analyzed by methods of organic solvents and Sudan black B staining in two species of microalgae, Isochrysis galbana Parke 8701 and Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima. linear regression e-quations were established between lipid contents and absorbance at a wavelength of 645 nm. It was found that mi-croalgae cells were stained with Sudan black B, and applied to rapid determination of the microalgae oil accumula-tion rapidly. Fatty acid compositions were also analyzed by gas chromatography ( GC) . The extraction of solvent di-chloromethane/methanol ( volume ratio =1:2 ) revealed that there was total lipid content of 22 . 99% in Isochrysis galbana Parke 8701, and 16. 89% in Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima. The total lipid was consistent with the bi-omass by Sudan black B staining method

  10. A Continuous Flow Column Study of the Anaerobic Transformation of a CAH Mixture of Tetrachloroethene and Carbon Tetrachloride Using Formate as an Electron Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M. F.; Kim, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Many groundwater sites are contaminated with mixtures of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) that represent a challenge when biological remediation processes are being considered. This is especially challenging when high concentrations of CAHs are present.Trichloromethane (CF), for example, has been observed to inhibit and potentially exert toxicity on reductive dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). Results will be presented from a continuous flow column study where the simultaneous transformation of PCE and carbon tetrachloride (CT) was achieved. The column was packed with a quartz sand and bioaugmented with the Evanite Culture (EV) that is capable of transforming PCE to ethene. The column was fed a synthetic groundwater that was amended with PCE to achieve an influent concentration near its solubility limit (0.10 mM) and formate (1.5 mM) that reacts to produce hydrogen as the ultimate electron donor. The column was operated for over 1600 days prior to the addition of CT. During this period PCE was transformed mainly to vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) and minor amounts of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and TCE. The transformation extent achieved based on the column effluent concentrations ranged from about 50% ETH, 30% VC, and 20 cis-DCE up to 80% ETH and 20% VC. When the column was fed sulfate, it was completely transformed via sulfate reduction. Ferrous iron production from ferric iron reduction was observed early in the study. Acetate was also formed as a result of homoacetogenesis from hydrogen utilization. CT addition (0.015 mM) was started at 1600 days while PCE addition was continued. During the first 25 days of CT addition, CT concentrations gradually increased to 50% of the injection concentration and chloromethane (CM) and CF were observed as transformation products. CT concentrations then decreased with over 98% transformation achieved.CM was removed to below the detection limit and CF concentration decreases to

  11. Emission of Volatile OrganoHalogens by Southern African Solar Salt Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotte, Karsten; Weissflog, Ludwig; Lange, Christian Albert; Huber, Stefan; Pienaar, Jacobus J.

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds containing halogens - especially chlorine - have been considered for a long time of industrial origin only, and it was assumed that the production and emission of these compounds can easily be controlled by humans in case they will cause a threat for life on Earth. Since the middle of the 80ies of the last century it became clear that the biologically active organohalogens isolated by chemists are purposefully produced by nature as antibiotics or as antifeedant etc. To date more than 3800 organohalogens are known to be naturally produced by bio-geochemical processes. The global budgets of many such species are poorly understood and only now with the emergence of better analytical techniques being discovered. For example the compound chloromethane nature's production (5 GT) outdates the anthropogenic production (50 KT) by a factor of 100. Thus organohalogens are an interesting recent case in point since they can influence the ozone budget of the boundary layer, play a role in the production of aerosols and the climate change discussion. An intriguing observation is that most of the atmospheric CH3Cl and CH3Br are of terrestrial rather than of marine origin and that a number of halogenated small organic molecules are produced in soils. The high concentrations of halides in salt soils point to a possibly higher importance of natural halogenation processes as a source of volatile organohalogens. Terrestrial biota, such as fungi, plants, animals and insects, as well as marine algea, bacteria and archaea are known or suspected to be de-novo producers of volatile organohalogens. In recent years we revealed the possibility for VOX to form actively in water and bottom sediments of hyper-saline environments in the course of studying aridization processes during climatic warming. Due to the nature of their production process solar salt works, as to be found along-side the Southern African coast line but also upcountry, combine a variety of semi- and

  12. A first-principles study on the B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup +/0} and B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup −} clusters: The boron oxide analogs of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup +/0} and CH{sub 3}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Wen-Juan; You, Xue-Rui; Ou, Ting; Chen, Qiang; Li, Si-Dian, E-mail: lisidian@sxu.edu.cn [Nanocluster Laboratory, Institute of Molecular Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Li, Da-Zhi [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Binzhou University, Binzhou 256603 (China); Zhai, Hua-Jin, E-mail: hj.zhai@sxu.edu.cn [Nanocluster Laboratory, Institute of Molecular Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2015-08-14

    The concept of boronyl (BO) and the BO/H isolobal analogy build an interesting structural link between boron oxide clusters and hydrocarbons. Based upon global-minimum searches and first-principles electronic structural calculations, we present here the perfectly planar C{sub 2v} B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup +} (1, {sup 1}A{sub 1}), C{sub 2v} B{sub 5}O{sub 5} (2, {sup 2}A{sub 1}), and tetrahedral C{sub s} B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup −} (3, {sup 1}A′) clusters, which are the global minima of the systems. Structural and molecular orbital analyses indicate that C{sub 2v} B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup +} (1) [B{sub 3}O{sub 3}(BO){sub 2}{sup +}] and C{sub 2v} B{sub 5}O{sub 5} (2) [B{sub 3}O{sub 3}(BO){sub 2}] feature an aromatic six-membered boroxol (B{sub 3}O{sub 3}) ring as the core with two equivalent boronyl terminals, similar to the recently reported boronyl boroxine D{sub 3h} B{sub 6}O{sub 6} [B{sub 3}O{sub 3}(BO){sub 3}]; whereas C{sub s} B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup −} (3) [B(BO){sub 3}(OBO){sup −}] is characterized with a tetrahedral B{sup −} center, terminated with three BO groups and one OBO unit, similar to the previously predicted boronyl methane T{sub d} B{sub 5}O{sub 4}{sup −} [B(BO){sub 4}{sup −}]. Alternatively, the 1–3 clusters can be viewed as the boron oxide analogs of phenyl cation C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup +}, phenyl radical C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, and chloromethane CH{sub 3}Cl, respectively. Chemical bonding analyses also reveal a dual three-center four-electron (3c-4e) π hyperbond in C{sub s} B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup −} (3). The infrared absorption spectra of B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup +} (1), B{sub 5}O{sub 5} (2), and B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup −} (3) and anion photoelectron spectrum of B{sub 5}O{sub 5}{sup −} (3) are predicted to facilitate their forthcoming experimental characterizations. The present work completes the B{sub n}O{sub n}{sup +/0/−} series for n = 1–6 and enriches the analogous relationship between boron oxides and hydrocarbons.

  13. Organic carbon compounds detected by the SAM instrument suite on Curiosity: results of the first year of exploration at Gale Crater (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Miller, K.; Glavin, D. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Martin, M. G.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    A search for organic matter is a high priority in the search for habitable environments on Mars as it is in the quest for clues about the nature of early life on Earth. These endeavors are technically challenging because of the inherent instability of organic matter under conditions that exist in the regolith of both planets and the antiquity of the sediments of interest. In the case of the early Earth, exposure to ionizing radiation and the heat associated with burial and tectonism are the main obstacles to organic matter preservation. On Mars, exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical oxidation are the prime threats to organic matter preservation. It has been hypothesized that UV-generated hydroxyl radicals will almost certainly oxidize or highly alter any organic carbon of martian or meteoritic origin at Mars' surface. Also, there could be diagenetic processes peculiar to Mars, for which no terrestrial analogs are presently known. Thus, the search for organics on Mars must be informed by data from the entire Curiosity payload since the results are mutually informative. Sediments from the Rocknest aeolian drift and the probable fluvio-lacustrine sediments of Yellowknife Bay in Gale Crater, when analyzed by pyrolysis with evolved gas analysis (EGA) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), afforded a number of chlorohydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene (1, 2). Some proportion of these compounds can be traced to instrument background from organic materials within the chromatographic columns, hydrocarbon traps and wet chemistry capability of SAM. N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide, compounds carried in SAM for chemical derivatization can react with gases released from the sediments to yield the C1 and C4 chlorohydrocarbons. However, we continue to explore the possibility that a portion of the C1 chlorohydrocarbons are derived