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Sample records for chlorine-induced lung injury

  1. Inhibition of chlorine-induced lung injury by the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine is a highly toxic respiratory irritant that when inhaled causes epithelial cell injury, alveolar-capillary barrier disruption, airway hyperreactivity, inflammation, and pulmonary edema. Chlorine is considered a chemical threat agent, and its release through accidental or intentional means has the potential to result in mass casualties from acute lung injury. The type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram was investigated as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury. Rolipram inhibits degradation of the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic AMP. Potential beneficial effects of increased cyclic AMP levels include inhibition of pulmonary edema, inflammation, and airway hyperreactivity. Mice were exposed to chlorine (whole body exposure, 228–270 ppm for 1 h) and were treated with rolipram by intraperitoneal, intranasal, or intramuscular (either aqueous or nanoemulsion formulation) delivery starting 1 h after exposure. Rolipram administered intraperitoneally or intranasally inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema. Minor or no effects were observed on lavage fluid IgM (indicative of plasma protein leakage), KC (Cxcl1, neutrophil chemoattractant), and neutrophils. All routes of administration inhibited chlorine-induced airway hyperreactivity assessed 1 day after exposure. The results of the study suggest that rolipram may be an effective rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury and that both systemic and targeted administration to the respiratory tract were effective routes of delivery. -- Highlights: ► Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. ► Rolipram inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema and airway hyperreactivity. ► Post-exposure rolipram treatments by both systemic and local delivery were effective. ► Rolipram shows promise as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury.

  2. Mitigation of chlorine-induced lung injury by low-molecular-weight antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Leustik, Martin; Doran, Stephen; Bracher, Andreas; Williams, Shawn; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Postlethwait, Edward; Matalon, Sadis

    2008-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is a highly reactive oxidant gas used extensively in a number of industrial processes. Exposure to high concentrations of Cl2 results in acute lung injury that may either resolve spontaneously or progress to acute respiratory failure. Presently, the pathophysiological sequelae associated with Cl2-induced acute lung injury in conscious animals, as well as the cellular and biochemical mechanisms involved, have not been elucidated. We exposed conscious Sprague-Dawley rats to Cl2 g...

  3. Acute respiratory changes and pulmonary inflammation involving a pathway of TGF-β1 induction in a rat model of chlorine-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Elfsmark, Linda; Koch, Bo; Bucht, Anders; Jonasson, Sofia

    2016-10-15

    We investigated acute and delayed respiratory changes after inhalation exposure to chlorine (Cl2) with the aim to understand the pathogenesis of the long-term sequelae of Cl2-induced lung-injury. In a rat model of nose-only exposure we analyzed changes in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory responses in airways, expression of pro-inflammatory markers and development of lung fibrosis during a time-course from 5h up to 90days after a single inhalation of Cl2. A single dose of dexamethasone (10mg/kg) was administered 1h following Cl2-exposure. A 15-min inhalation of 200ppm Cl2 was non-lethal in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24h post exposure, Cl2-exposed rats displayed elevated numbers of leukocytes with an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and edema was shown both in lung tissue and the heart. At 24h, the inflammasome-associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were detected in BAL. Concomitant with the acute inflammation a significant AHR was detected. At the later time-points, a delayed inflammatory response was observed together with signs of lung fibrosis as indicated by increased pulmonary macrophages, elevated TGF-β expression in BAL and collagen deposition around airways. Dexamethasone reduced the numbers of neutrophils in BAL at 24h but did not influence the AHR. Inhalation of Cl2 in rats leads to acute respiratory and cardiac changes as well as pulmonary inflammation involving induction of TGF-β1. The acute inflammatory response was followed by sustained macrophage response and lack of tissue repair. It was also found that pathways apart from the acute inflammatory response contribute to the Cl2-induced respiratory dysfunction. PMID:27586366

  4. Repair of tracheal epithelium by basal cells after chlorine-induced injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musah Sadiatu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorine is a widely used toxic compound that is considered a chemical threat agent. Chlorine inhalation injures airway epithelial cells, leading to pulmonary abnormalities. Efficient repair of injured epithelium is necessary to restore normal lung structure and function. The objective of the current study was to characterize repair of the tracheal epithelium after acute chlorine injury. Methods C57BL/6 mice were exposed to chlorine and injected with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU to label proliferating cells prior to sacrifice and collection of tracheas on days 2, 4, 7, and 10 after exposure. Airway repair and restoration of a differentiated epithelium were examined by co-localization of EdU labeling with markers for the three major tracheal epithelial cell types [keratin 5 (K5 and keratin 14 (K14 for basal cells, Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP for Clara cells, and acetylated tubulin (AcTub for ciliated cells]. Morphometric analysis was used to measure proliferation and restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium. Results Epithelial repair was fastest and most extensive in proximal trachea compared with middle and distal trachea. In unexposed mice, cell proliferation was minimal, all basal cells expressed K5, and K14-expressing basal cells were absent from most sections. Chlorine exposure resulted in the sloughing of Clara and ciliated cells from the tracheal epithelium. Two to four days after chlorine exposure, cell proliferation occurred in K5- and K14-expressing basal cells, and the number of K14 cells was dramatically increased. In the period of peak cell proliferation, few if any ciliated or Clara cells were detected in repairing trachea. Expression of ciliated and Clara cell markers was detected at later times (days 7–10, but cell proliferation was not detected in areas in which these differentiated markers were re-expressed. Fibrotic lesions were observed at days 7–10 primarily in distal trachea. Conclusion

  5. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W., E-mail: Gary.Hoyle@louisville.edu

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. - Highlights: • Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. • Corticosteroids may inhibit lung injury through their anti-inflammatory actions. • Corticosteroids inhibited chlorine-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary edema. • Mometasone and budesonide are potential rescue treatments for chlorine lung injury.

  6. Brain injury requires lung protection

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Aguilar, Josefina; Blanch, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    The paper entitled “The high-mobility group protein B1-Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (HMGB1-RAGE) axis mediates traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced pulmonary dysfunction in lung transplantation” published recently in Science Translational Medicine links lung failure after transplantation with alterations in the axis HMGB1-RAGE after TBI, opening a new field for exploring indicators for the early detection of patients at risk of developing acute lung injury (ALI). The lung is on...

  7. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  8. Biomarkers in Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Wendt, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) result in high permeability pulmonary edema causing hypoxic respiratory failure with high morbidity and mortality. As the population ages, the incidence of ALI is expected to rise. Over the last decade, several studies have identified biomarkers in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid providing important insights into the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of ALI. Several biomarkers have been validated in subjec...

  9. Rabbit lung injury induced by explosive decompression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanism of rabbit lunginjury caused by explosive decompression. Methods: A total of 42 rabbits and 10 rats were served as the experimental animals. A slow recompressiondecompression test and an explosive decompression test were applied to the animals, respectively. And the effects of the given tests on the animals were discussed. Results: The slow recompression-decompression did not cause an obvious lung injury, but the explosive decompression did cause lung injuries in different degrees. The greater the decompression range was, the shorter the decompression duration was, and the heavier the lung injuries were. Conclusions: Explosive decompression can cause a similar lung injury as shock wave does. The primary mechanical causes of the lung injury might be a tensile strain or stress in the alveolar wall and the pulmonary surface's impacts on the inside wall of the chest.

  10. Vascular injury in lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhaled particulates which stimulate a 'delayed', cellular mode of alveolar clearance are excreted to the airways through lymphoid foci in the bronchial bifurcations. The anatomic relations and developing pathology of the tissues adjacent to these foci, including the divisions of accompanying arteries, were studied by serial sectioning and photomicrographic modelling of rat lungs. The changes are typical of classic 'delayed' inflammatory reactions and, in the rat, the fully developed stage is characterised by fibrinoid necrosis involving all three layers of the arterial wall in a linear lesion across the leading edge of the flow divider. An hypothesis was developed to relate the injury to pulsatile forces. Recent published findings indicate that similarly placed lesions, with species-specific changes in development, are universal in both cerebral and extra-cranial arterial forks of man and animals. Possible associations of the microvascular changes with human atherosclerosis and their further significance in pulmonary and systemic effects arising from industrial and environmental contaminants are explored. (author)

  11. Bleomycin-Induced Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Reinert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin is a chemotherapeutic agent commonly used to treat curable diseases such as germinative tumors and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The major limitation of bleomycin therapy is pulmonary toxicity, which can be life threatening in up to 10% of patients receiving the drug. The mechanism of bleomycin-induced pneumonitis (BIP involves oxidative damage, relative deficiency of the deactivating enzyme bleomycin hydrolase, genetic susceptibility, and the elaboration of inflammatory cytokines. Ultimately, BIP can progress to lung fibrosis. The diagnosis of BIP is established by the combination of systemic symptoms, radiological and histological findings, and respiratory function tests abnormalities, while other disorders should be excluded. Although the diagnosis and pathophysiology of this disease have been better characterized over the past few years, there is no effective therapy for the disease. In general, the clinical picture is extremely complex. A greater understanding of the BIP pathogenesis may lead to the development of new agents capable of preventing or even treating the injury already present. Physicians who prescribe bleomycin must be aware of the potential pulmonary toxicity, especially in the presence of risk factors. This review will focus on BIP, mainly regarding recent advances and perspectives in diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Irradiation lung injury in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of chest irradiation on pulmonary function was studied in 16 patients with lung cancer and one with malignant thymoma. Radiation pneumonitis was detected by chest radiography in 15 cases (88%), 35 days (average) after the completion of radiation therapy. In these cases the radiation field included the lungs, and the hilar and mediastinal regions. No radiation pneumonitis occurred in the other two patients, receiving only lung field irradiation. Various pulmonary functions were measured in all patients following radiation therapy. Inspiratory reserve volume, inspiratory capacity and diffusing capacity were significantly reduced 1 month and 3 months after the completion of radiotherapy. Furthermore, reduction of vital capacity was found 3 months after treatment. It may be concluded that pulmonary function tests are not useful in predicting the onset of radiation pneumonitis, as chest radiography revealed inflammatory changes before the reduction of pulmonary function was detected. (author)

  13. Stem cells and repair of lung injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randell Scott H

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fueled by the promise of regenerative medicine, currently there is unprecedented interest in stem cells. Furthermore, there have been revolutionary, but somewhat controversial, advances in our understanding of stem cell biology. Stem cells likely play key roles in the repair of diverse lung injuries. However, due to very low rates of cellular proliferation in vivo in the normal steady state, cellular and architectural complexity of the respiratory tract, and the lack of an intensive research effort, lung stem cells remain poorly understood compared to those in other major organ systems. In the present review, we concisely explore the conceptual framework of stem cell biology and recent advances pertinent to the lungs. We illustrate lung diseases in which manipulation of stem cells may be physiologically significant and highlight the challenges facing stem cell-related therapy in the lung.

  14. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akira, Masanori, E-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals.

  15. Role of Airway Recruitment and Derecruitment in Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadiali, S. N.; Huang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical forces generated during the ventilation of patients with acute lung injury causes significant lung damage and inflammation. Low-volume ventilation protocols are commonly used to prevent stretch-related injury that occurs at high lung volumes. However, the cyclic closure and reopening of pulmonary airways at low lung volumes, i.e., derecruitment and recruitment, also causes significant lung damage and inflammation. In this review, we provide an overview of how biomedical enginee...

  16. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals

  17. Relationship between Ulcerative Colitis and Lung Injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-peng Tang; Jia-wei Wu; Yan-cheng Dai; Ya-li Zhang; Rong-rong Bi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between ulcerative colitis (UC) and lung injuries by assessing their clinical manifestations and characteristics. Methods From July 2009 to April 2012, 91 UC patients presenting to Longhua Hospital who met the established inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in this retrospective study. According to the scores of disease activity index, the patients were divided into the mild, moderate, and severe groups. Meanwhile, the records of pulmonary symptoms, chest X-ray image, and pulmonary function were reviewed. Results Sixty-eight (74.7%) patients had at least 1 pulmonary symptom, such as cough (38.5%), shortness of breath (27.5%), and expectoration (17.6%). And 77 (84.6%) had at least 1 ventilation abnormality. Vital capacity value was significantly lower in the severe group than that in the mild group (91.82%±10.38%vs. 98.92%±12.12%, P Conclusions Lung injury is a common extraintestinal complication of UC. According to the theory in Traditional Chinese Medicine that the lung and large intestine are related, both the lungs and large intestine should be treated simultaneously.

  18. Radiation-induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references

  19. Injury to the Developing Lung: experimental and clinic al aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.K.M. Reiss (Irwin)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractInjury to the developing lung or disturbance of normal lung development may lead to a chronic lung disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which may have long-term effects. BPD is characterized by an arrest of development of the lung and the pulmonary vascular system and occurs in aro

  20. Role of Chemokines in the Pathogenesis of Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Madhav; Zemans, Rachel L.; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is due to an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from direct injury to the lung or indirect injury in the setting of a systemic process. Such insults lead to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which includes activation of leukocytes—alveolar macrophages and sequestered neutrophils—in the lung. Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a physiologic response to an insult, systemic leukocyte activation, if excessive, can lead ...

  1. Human models of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair G. Proudfoot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome.

  2. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  3. The role of autophagy in lung ischemia/reperfusion injury after lung transplantation in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Bentong; Huang, Lei; Dai, Bin; Liu, Jichun; Tang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore the role of autophagy in the cold I/R injury following lung transplantation. Methods: The rat orthotopic lung transplantation model was established to perform the level of autophagy in the cold I/R injury in this study. The pretreatment of inhibitor (3-Methyladenine [3-MA]) and activator (rapamycin [RAPA]) of autophagy were performed to assess the role of autophagy in the cold I/R injury following lung transplantation in rats. Results: After lung transplantation, the autophagy, lung cell apoptosis and lung injury were aggravated and peaked at 6 h following the transplantation. The inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA induced downregulated of autophagy, decreased cell apoptosis. Meanwhile, the lung injury, which was indicated by calculating the peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), pulmonary vein blood gas analysis (PO2) and ratio of wet to dry in lung (W/D), was ameliorated after treatment with 3-MA. The activation of autophagy by RAPA causing the upregulated of autophagy and apoptosis of lung cells, and enhanced the lung injury. Conclusion: All the results suggested that the autophagy was involved in the cold I/R injury in lung transplantation model, and played a potential role on the regulation of I/R injury after lung transplantation. PMID:27648150

  4. Spontaneous breathing during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation improves regional lung characteristics in experimental lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heerde, M.; Roubik, K.; Kopelent, V.; Kneyber, M. C. J.; Markhorst, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Maintenance of spontaneous breathing is advocated in mechanical ventilation. This study evaluates the effect of spontaneous breathing on regional lung characteristics during high-frequency oscillatory (HFO) ventilation in an animal model of mild lung injury. Methods Lung injury was induce

  5. Pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Lei; YUE Yuan; ZHANG Mei; PAN Cheng-en

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To study the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Methods:Rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 6, 9 and 12 h after establishment of inducing model. Pancreas and lung tissues were obtained for pathological study, microvascular permeability and MPO examination. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas and lung tissues were detected by RT-PCR. Results:After inducing SAP model, the injury degree of the pancreas and the lung increased gradually, accompanied with gradually increased MPO activity and microvascular permeability. Gene expressions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in pancreas rose at 1 h and reached peak at 7 h. Relatively, their gene expressions in the lungs only rose slightly at 1 h and reached peak at 9-12 h gradually. Conclusion:There is an obvious time window between SAP and lung injury, when earlier protection is beneficial to prevent development of acute lung injury.

  6. Glutamine Attenuates Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acid Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Lai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate ventilator settings may cause overwhelming inflammatory responses associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Here, we examined potential benefits of glutamine (GLN on a two-hit model for VILI after acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rats. Rats were intratracheally challenged with hydrochloric acid as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, then randomly received intravenous GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution (vehicle control thirty min before different ventilator strategies. Rats were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation as a second hit with a high tidal volume (TV of 15 mL/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP or a low TV of 6 mL/kg with PEEP of 5 cm H2O. We evaluated lung oxygenation, inflammation, mechanics, and histology. After ventilator use for 4 h, high TV resulted in greater lung injury physiologic and biologic indices. Compared with vehicle treated rats, GLN administration attenuated lung injury, with improved oxygenation and static compliance, and decreased respiratory elastance, lung edema, extended lung destruction (lung injury scores and lung histology, neutrophil recruitment in the lung, and cytokine production. Thus, GLN administration improved the physiologic and biologic profiles of this experimental model of VILI based on the two-hit theory.

  7. Ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutierrez; Rita C. Silveira; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2013-01-01

    In preterm infants, the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced lung injuries and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of the present review was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of injury that involve cytokine-mediated inflammation to contribute to the development of new preventive strategies. Relevant articles were retrieved from the PubMed database using the search terms "ventilator-induced lung injury preterm", "continuou...

  8. Finite element modeling of blast lung injury in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Melissa M; Dang, Xinglai; Adkins, Mark; Powell, Brian; Chan, Philemon

    2015-04-01

    A detailed 3D finite element model (FEM) of the sheep thorax was developed to predict heterogeneous and volumetric lung injury due to blast. A shared node mesh of the sheep thorax was constructed from a computed tomography (CT) scan of a sheep cadaver, and while most material properties were taken from literature, an elastic-plastic material model was used for the ribs based on three-point bending experiments performed on sheep rib specimens. Anesthetized sheep were blasted in an enclosure, and blast overpressure data were collected using the blast test device (BTD), while surface lung injury was quantified during necropsy. Matching blasts were simulated using the sheep thorax FEM. Surface lung injury in the FEM was matched to pathology reports by setting a threshold value of the scalar output termed the strain product (maximum value of the dot product of strain and strain-rate vectors over all simulation time) in the surface elements. Volumetric lung injury was quantified by applying the threshold value to all elements in the model lungs, and a correlation was found between predicted volumetric injury and measured postblast lung weights. All predictions are made for the left and right lungs separately. This work represents a significant step toward the prediction of localized and heterogeneous blast lung injury, as well as volumetric injury, which was not recorded during field testing for sheep.

  9. Acute lung injury induces cardiovascular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suda, Koichi; Tsuruta, Masashi; Eom, Jihyoun;

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with systemic inflammation and cardiovascular dysfunction. IL-6 is a biomarker of this systemic response and a predictor of cardiovascular events, but its possible causal role is uncertain. Inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2 agonists (ICS/LABA) down......-regulate the systemic expression of IL-6, but whether they can ameliorate the cardiovascular dysfunction related to ALI is uncertain. We sought to determine whether IL-6 contributes to the cardiovascular dysfunction related to ALI, and whether budesonide/formoterol ameliorates this process. Wild-type mice were...... these impairments (vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine, P = 0.005; cardiac output, P = 0.025). Pretreatment with the combination of budesonide and formoterol, but not either alone, ameliorated the vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine (P = 0.018) and cardiac output (P drugs also attenuated...

  10. Injury to the Developing Lung: experimental and clinic al aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Irwin

    2008-01-01

    textabstractInjury to the developing lung or disturbance of normal lung development may lead to a chronic lung disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which may have long-term effects. BPD is characterized by an arrest of development of the lung and the pulmonary vascular system and occurs in around 20% of ventilated newborns. In the first part of this thesis, different factors that influence the development of BPD are studied, both in an experimental and a clinical setting. We found that ...

  11. Oxidative Stress and Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Salatti Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury is directly related to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, endothelial cell injury, increased vascular permeability, and the activation of neutrophils and platelets, cytokines, and the complement system. Several studies have confirmed the destructiveness of the toxic oxygen metabolites produced and their role in the pathophysiology of different processes, such as oxygen poisoning, inflammation, and ischemic injury. Due to the different degrees of tissue damage resulting from the process of ischemia and subsequent reperfusion, several studies in animal models have focused on the prevention of IR injury and methods of lung protection. Lung IR injury has clinical relevance in the setting of lung transplantation and cardiopulmonary bypass, for which the consequences of IR injury may be devastating in critically ill patients.

  12. Antenatal infection/inflammation and postnatal lung maturation and injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikegami Machiko

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chorioamnionitis is frequently associated with preterm deliveries before 30 weeks gestation. Chorioamnionitis correlates both with an increased risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and with a decreased risk of respiratory distress syndrome. Both interleukin-1α and endotoxin can induce inflammation in the fetal lungs and lung maturation after preterm birth when given by intra-amniotic injection. Inflammation can also result in an arrest of alveolarization, and this lung developmental abnormality is prominent in the lungs of preterm infants that die of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The mechanisms by which infection/inflammation can have both beneficial and injurious effects on the preterm lung remain to be characterized.

  13. Partial liquid ventilation improves lung function in ventilation-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez de Anda, G.F.; Lachmann, R A; Verbrugge, Serge; Gommers, Diederik; Haitsma, J.J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2001-01-01

    textabstractDisturbances in lung function and lung mechanics are present after ventilation with high peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) and low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Therefore, the authors investigated whether partial liquid ventilation can re-establish lung function after ventilation-induced lung injury. Adult rats were exposed to high PIP without PEEP for 20 min. Thereafter, the animals were randomly divided into five groups. The first group was killed immediately...

  14. [Difficulties in the radiodiagnosis of lung injuries in phthisiatric practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amansakhedov, R B; Perfil'ev, A V; Érgeshov, A É; Sigaev, A T

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes clinical cases of concomitant lung and intrathoracic lymph node involvements as evidenced by conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT). It shows difficulties in the differential diagnosis of different nosological entities in pulmonary tuberculosis. The x-ray semiotics of concomitant lung injuries is also depicted. PMID:25272723

  15. [Difficulties in the radiodiagnosis of lung injuries in phthisiatric practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amansakhedov, R B; Perfil'ev, A V; Érgeshov, A É; Sigaev, A T

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes clinical cases of concomitant lung and intrathoracic lymph node involvements as evidenced by conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT). It shows difficulties in the differential diagnosis of different nosological entities in pulmonary tuberculosis. The x-ray semiotics of concomitant lung injuries is also depicted.

  16. Therapeutic Strategies for Severe Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Janet. V.; Brower, Roy; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the management of patients with severe Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ALI/ARDS), clinicians are sometimes challenged to maintain acceptable gas exchange while avoiding harmful mechanical ventilation practices. In some of these patients, physicians may consider the use of “rescue therapies” to sustain life. Our goal is to provide a practical, evidence-based review to assist critical care physicians’ care for patients with severe ALI/ARDS. Data Sources and Study Selection We searched the Pub Med database for clinical trials examining the use of the following therapies in ALI/ARDS: recruitment maneuvers, high positive end expiratory pressure, prone position, high frequency oscillatory ventilation, glucocorticoids, inhaled nitric oxide, buffer therapy and extracorporeal life support. Study selection All clinical trials that included patients with severe ALI/ARDS were included in the review. Data Synthesis The primary author reviewed the aforementioned trials in depth and then disputed findings and conclusions with other authors until consensus was achieved. Conclusions This article is designed to: a) provide clinicians with a simple, bedside definition for the diagnosis of severe ARDS; b) describe several therapies that can be used in severe ARDS with an emphasis on the potential risks as well as the indications and benefits; and c) to offer practical guidelines for implementation of these therapies. PMID:20562704

  17. Pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Laura C.; Mcauley, Danny F.; Marino, Philip S; Finney, Simon J; Griffiths, Mark J.; Wort, Stephen John

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by protein rich alveolar edema, reduced lung compliance, and acute severe hypoxemia. A degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is also characteristic, higher levels of which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload causes RV dysfunction and failure in some patients, with associated adverse effects on oxygen delivery. Although the introduction of lung p...

  18. Simvastatin attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Holger C; Hellwig, Katharina; Rosseau, Simone; Tschernig, Thomas; Schmiedl, Andreas; Gutbier, Birgitt; Schmeck, Bernd; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Peters, Harm; Morawietz, Lars; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life saving intervention in acute respiratory failure without alternative. However, particularly in pre-injured lungs, even protective ventilation strategies may evoke ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), which is characterized by pulmonary inflammation and vascular leakage. Adjuvant pharmacologic strategies in addition to lung protective ventilation to attenuate VILI are lacking. Simvastatin exhibited anti-inflammatory and endothelial barrier s...

  19. Smoking water pipe is injurious to lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Ringbæk, Thomas; Lange, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the pulmonary consequences of water pipe smoking. Smoking water pipe affects the lung function negatively, is significantly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and increases the risk of lung infections. Case reports suggest that regular smokers of water pipe...... have a higher risk of developing malignancies, particularly lung cancer than cigarette smokers....

  20. Preventing Ventilator Associated Lung Injury: A Perioperative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eKimura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research into the prevention of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in the intensive care unit (ICU has resulted in the development of a number of lung protective strategies, which have become commonplace in the treatment of critically ill patients. An increasing number of studies have applied lung protective ventilation in the operating room to otherwise healthy individuals. We review the history of lung protective strategies in patients with acute respiratory failure and explore their use patients undergoing mechanical ventilation during general anesthesia to provide context for a discussion of the benefits and drawbacks, as well as inform future areas of inquiry.Methods: We completed a database search and reviewed articles investigating lung protective ventilation in both the ICU and in patients receiving general anesthesia through May 2015. Results: Lung protective ventilation was associated with improved outcomes in patients with acute respiratory failure in the ICU. Clinical evidence is less clear regarding lung protective ventilation for patients undergoing surgery. Conclusion: Lung protective ventilation strategies including low tidal volume ventilation and moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP are well established therapies to minimize lung injury in critically ill patients with and without lung disease, and may provide benefit to patients undergoing general anesthesia.

  1. Research progression of lung injury after burn-blast combined injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan HU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available As a result of military conflict, terrorist attacks, industrial and traffic accidents, the incidence of burn-blast combined injury would be escalating. The burn-blast combined injury was a major clinical problem accompanied by multiple complications and high mortality. The lungs were the most severely injured organ in burn-blast combined injury. Dysfunction of ventilation and gas exchange produced by lung damage could affect oxygen supply to organs and systemic tissues, and is one of the pathophysiological changes resulting in shock and other complications. Previous research has indicated that most of alveolar walls were ruptured, capillaries ruptured, and pulmonary capillary endothelial cells were damaged in the lungs after burn-blast combined injury, and they were followed by pulmonary edema and hemorrhage followed by disorders in ventilation and gas exchange, ending in ischemia and hypoxia of systemic organs. So the treatment of lung injury is the major measure for the treatment of burn-blast combined injury. The pathogenesis and treatment of lung injury in burn-blast combined injury are briefly summarized in this article.

  2. Rabbit model of radiation-induced lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Zong Du; Hua Ren; Jian-Fei Song; Li-Fei Zhang; Feng Lin; Hai-Yong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the feasibility of establishing an animal model of chronic radiation-induced lung injury.Methods:Twenty-eightNewZealand white rabbits were randomly divided into3 groups(the right lung irradiation group, the whole lung irradiation group and the control group).Animal model of radiation-induced lung injury was established by high-does radiotherapy in the irradiation groups, then all rabbits underwentCT and pathological examinations at1,2,4,8,12,16 weeks, respectively after radiation.Results:Within4 weeks of irradiation, some rabbits in the right lung irradiation group and whole lung irradiation group died. CT and pathological examinations all showed acute radiation pneumonitis.At8-12 weeks after irradiation,CT scanning showed ground glass samples signs, patchy shadows and fibrotic stripes. Pathological examination showed the fibrosis pulmonary alveolar wall thickened obviously. Conclusions:The clinical animal model of chronic radiation-induced lung injury which corresponds to practical conditions in clinic can be successfully established.

  3. Effects of minimal lipopolysaccharide-instilled lungs on ventilator-induced lung injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-zhong; WANG Qiu-jun; SUN Tao; YAO Shang-long

    2007-01-01

    @@ Mechanical ventilation (MV) may aggravate lung injury induced by a variety of injuries, including intratracheal hydrochloric acid instillation,1 intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) instillation with or without concurrent saline lavage,2 intravenous LPS,3 or intravenous oleic acid.4 However, the mechanism for this detrimental effect of MV is unclear.

  4. Smoking water pipe is injurious to lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Ringbæk, Thomas; Lange, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the pulmonary consequences of water pipe smoking. Smoking water pipe affects the lung function negatively, is significantly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and increases the risk of lung infections. Case reports suggest that regular smokers of water pipe...

  5. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Di Nardo Matteo; Perrotta Daniela; Stoppa Francesca; Cecchetti Corrado; Marano Marco; Pirozzi Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weig...

  6. Adult Stem Cells for Acute Lung Injury: Remaining Questions & Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Ying-Gang; Hao, Qi; Monsel, Antoine; Feng, Xiao-mei; Lee, Jae W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The pathophysiology of ALI involves complex interactions between the inciting event, such as pneumonia, sepsis or aspiration, and the host immune response resulting in lung protein permeability, impaired resolution of pulmonary edema, an intense inflammatory response in the injured alveolus and hypoxemia. In multiple pre-clinical studies, adult stem cells h...

  7. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic finding...

  8. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Paul R. Knight; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, a...

  9. Thionyl-chloride-induced lung injury and bronchiolitis obliterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konichezky, S.; Schattner, A.; Ezri, T.; Bokenboim, P.; Geva, D. (Kaplan Hospital, Rehovot (Israel))

    1993-09-01

    Thionyl-chloride (TCl) is used in the manufacture of lithium batteries, producing SO2 and HCl fumes on contact with water. We report two cases of accidental TCl exposure resulting in lung injury that may vary from a relatively mild and reversible interstitial lung disease to a severe form of bronchiolitis obliterans causing, after a latent period, an acute/chronic respiratory failure as well as other complications (spontaneous pneumothorax and bronchopleural fistula), previously unreported in TCl fume inhalation.

  10. Evolution of endotoxin induced acute lung injury in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Domenici-Lombardo, L.; C. Adembri; Consalvo, M.; Forzini, R.; Meucci, M.; Romagnoli, P; Novelli, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    To clarify the evolution of acute lung injury induced by endotoxin, the progression of lung damage in 26 rats submitted to intratracheal instillation of 5 mg/kg body weight endotoxin was examined by blood gas analysis, computerized tomography, light and electron microscopy. Hypoxaemia, hypercapnia, acidosis and inhomogeneous bilateral infiltrates developed gradually within 48 hours. Monocytes appeared within blood capillaries and the instertitium by 12 hours after treatment, then migrated int...

  11. Pressure Controlled Ventilation to Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models are extensively used to investigate acute injuries of different organs systems (1-34). Acute lung injury (ALI), which occurs with prolonged mechanical ventilation, contributes to morbidity and mortality of critical illness, and studies on novel genetic or pharmacological targets are areas of intense investigation (1-3, 5, 8, 26, 30, 33-36). ALI is defined by the acute onset of the disease, which leads to non-cardiac pulmonary edema and subsequent impairment of pulmonary gas exch...

  12. Prevention of reperfusion lung injury by lidocaine in isolated rat lung ventilated with higher oxygen levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das K

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lidocaine, an antiarrhythmic drug has been shown to be effective against post-ischaemic reperfusion injury in heart. However, its effect on pulmonary reperfusion injury has not been investigated. AIMS: We investigated the effects of lidocaine on a postischaemic reperfused rat lung model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Lungs were isolated and perfused at constant flow with Krebs-Henseilet buffer containing 4% bovine serum albumin, and ventilated with 95% oxygen mixed with 5% CO2. Lungs were subjected to ischaemia by stopping perfusion for 60 minutes followed by reperfusion for 10 minutes. Ischaemia was induced in normothermic conditions. RESULTS: Postischaemic reperfusion caused significant (p < 0.0001 higher wet-to-dry lung weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure and peak airway pressure compared to control lungs. Lidocaine, at a dose of 5mg/Kg b.w. was found to significantly (p < 0.0001 attenuate the increase in the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure and peak airway pressure observed in post-ischaemic lungs. CONCLUSION: Lidocaine is effective in preventing post-ischaemic reperfusion injury in isolated, perfused rat lung.

  13. Inhibition of Pyk2 blocks lung inflammation and injury in a mouse model of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Yingli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2 is essential in neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis in vitro. However, its effect on the process of lung inflammation and edema formation during LPS induced acute lung injury (ALI remains unknown. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of inhibiting Pyk2 on LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and injury in vivo. Methods C57BL6 mice were given either 10 mg/kg LPS or saline intratracheally. Inhibition of Pyk2 was effected by intraperitoneal administration TAT-Pyk2-CT 1 h before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage analysis of cell counts, lung histology and protein concentration in BAL were analyzed at 18 h after LPS treatment. KC and MIP-2 concentrations in BAL were measured by a mouse cytokine multiplex kit. The static lung compliance was determined by pressure-volume curve using a computer-controlled small animal ventilator. The extravasated Evans blue concentration in lung homogenate was determined spectrophotometrically. Results Intratracheal instillation of LPS induced significant neutrophil infiltration into the lung interstitium and alveolar space, which was attenuated by pre-treatment with TAT-Pyk2-CT. TAT-Pyk2-CT pretreatment also attenuated 1 myeloperoxidase content in lung tissues, 2 vascular leakage as measured by Evans blue dye extravasation in the lungs and the increase in protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage, and 3 the decrease in lung compliance. In each paradigm, treatment with control protein TAT-GFP had no blocking effect. By contrast, production of neutrophil chemokines MIP-2 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine in the bronchoalveolar lavage was not reduced by TAT-Pyk2-CT. Western blot analysis confirmed that tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 in LPS-challenged lungs was reduced to control levels by TAT-Pyk2-CT pretreatment. Conclusions These results suggest that Pyk2 plays an important role in the development of acute lung injury in mice and

  14. Crocin attenuates lipopolysacchride-induced acute lung injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Kuai, Jianke; Luo, Zhonghua; Wang, Wuping; Wang, Lei; Ke, Changkang; Li, Xiaofei; Ni, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Crocin, a representative of carotenoid compounds, exerts a spectrum of activities including radical scavenger, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the protective effect of crocin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (1 mg/kg). The mice received intragastric injection of crocin (50 mg/kg) 1 h before LPS administration. Pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylineosin stain and lung wet/dry weight ratios were observed. Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung tissues was determined by Western blot analysis. Crocin pretreatment significantly alleviated the severity of lung injury and inhibited the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in mice with ALI. After LPS administration, the lung wet/dry weight ratios, as an index of lung edema, and MPO activity were also markedly reduced by crocin pretreatment. Crocin pretreatment also reduced the concentrations of NO in lung tissues. Furthermore, the expression of iNOS was significantly suppressed by crocin pretreatment. Croncin potently protected against LPS-induced ALI and the protective effects of crocin may attribute partly to the suppression of iNOS expression. PMID:26191176

  15. Tissue plasminogen activator attenuates ventilatorinduced lung injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-ti HUANG; Hsiu-chu CHOU; Leng-fang WANG; Chung-ming CHEN

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To test the hypothesis that the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may counteract the inhibitory effect ot plasminogen activator inhibitors (PAI) and attenuate lung injury in a rat model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI).Methods:Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were ventilated with a HVZP (high-volume zero PEEP) protocol for 2 h at a tidal volume of 30 ml/kg,a respiratory rate of 25 breaths/min,and an inspired oxygen fraction of 21%.The rats were divided into 3 groups (n=7 for each):HVZP+tPA group receiving tPA (1.25 mg/kg,iv) 15 min before ventilation,HVZP group receiving HVZP+vehicle injection,and a control group receiving no ventilation.After 2 h of ventilation,the rats were killed; blood and lungs were collected for biochemical and histological analyses.Results:HVZP ventilation significantly increased total protein content and the concentration of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as the lung injury score.Rats that received HVZP ventilation had significantly higher lung PAI-1 mRNA expression,plasma PAI-1and plasma D-dimer levels than the control animals,tPA treatment significantly reduced the BALF total protein and the lung injury score as compared to the HVZP group,tPA treatment also significantly decreased the plasma D-dimer levels and the HVZP ventilation-induced lung vascular fibrin thrombi,tPA treatment showed no effect on MIP-2 level in BALF.Conclusion:These results demonstrate that VILI increases lung PAI-1 mRNA expression,plasma levels of PAI-1 and D-limers,lung injury score and vascular fibrin deposition,tPA can attenuate VILI by decreasing capillary-alveolar protein leakage as well as local and systemic coagulation as shown by decreased lung vascular fibrin deposition and plasma D-dimers.

  16. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Nardo Matteo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weight who had an asymmetric lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. We used independent lung ventilation applying conventional protective pressure controlled ventilation to the less-compromised lung, with a respiratory frequency proportional to the age of the patient, and a pressure controlled high-frequency ventilation to the atelectatic lung. This was done because a single tube conventional ventilation protective strategy would have exposed the less-compromised lung to a high mean airways pressure. The target of independent lung ventilation is to provide adequate gas exchange at a safe mean airways pressure level and to expand the atelectatic lung. Independent lung ventilation was accomplished for 24 hours. Daily chest radiograph and gas exchange were used to evaluate the efficacy of independent lung ventilation. Extubation was performed after 48 hours of conventional single-tube mechanical ventilation following independent lung ventilation. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the feasibility of independent lung ventilation with two separate tubes in neonates as a treatment of an asymmetric acute lung injury.

  17. Proteome Profiling in Lung Injury after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Viken, Kevin J; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Jagtap, Pratik D; Higgins, LeeAnn; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Kumar, Vipin; Arora, Mukta; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary complications due to infection and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), a noninfectious lung injury in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, are frequent causes of transplantation-related mortality and morbidity. Our objective was to characterize the global bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein expression of IPS to identify proteins and pathways that differentiate IPS from infectious lung injury after HSCT. We studied 30 BALF samples from patients who developed lung injury within 180 days of HSCT or cellular therapy transfusion (natural killer cell transfusion). Adult subjects were classified as having IPS or infectious lung injury by the criteria outlined in the 2011 American Thoracic Society statement. BALF was depleted of hemoglobin and 14 high-abundance proteins, treated with trypsin, and labeled with isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) 8-plex reagent for two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography (LC) and data dependent peptide tandem mass spectrometry (MS) on an Orbitrap Velos system in higher-energy collision-induced dissociation activation mode. Protein identification employed a target-decoy strategy using ProteinPilot within Galaxy P. The relative protein abundance was determined with reference to a global internal standard consisting of pooled BALF from patients with respiratory failure and no history of HSCT. A variance weighted t-test controlling for a false discovery rate of ≤5% was used to identify proteins that showed differential expression between IPS and infectious lung injury. The biological relevance of these proteins was determined by using gene ontology enrichment analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. We characterized 12 IPS and 18 infectious lung injury BALF samples. In the 5 iTRAQ LC-MS/MS experiments 845, 735, 532, 615, and 594 proteins were identified for a total of 1125 unique proteins and 368 common proteins across all 5 LC-MS/MS experiments. When comparing IPS to

  18. Lipocalin-2 Test in Distinguishing Acute Lung Injury Cases from Septic Mice Without Acute Lung Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Zeng; Cong-wei Jia; Jie Liu; Shu-bin Guo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore whether the amount of lipocalin-2 in the biofluid could reflect the onset of sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Methods Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10 mg/kg) injection or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was performed to induce severe sepsis and ALI in C57 BL/6 male mice randomly divided into 5 groups (n=10 in each group):group A (intraperitoneal LPS injection), group B (intravenous LPS injection via tail vein), group C (CLP with 25%of the cecum ligated), group D (CLP with 75%of the cecum ligated), and the control group (6 sham-operation controls plus 4 saline controls). All the mice received volume resuscitation. Measurements of pulmonary morphological and functional alterations were used to identify the presence of experimental ALI. The expressions of lipocalin-2 and interleukin (IL)-6 in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissue were quantified at both protein and mRNA levels. The overall abilities of lipocalin-2 and IL-6 tests to diagnose sepsis-induced ALI were evaluated by generating receiver operator characteristic curves (ROC) and computing area under curve (AUC). Results In both group B and group D, most of the“main features”of experimental ALI were reproduced in mice, while group A and group C showed septic syndrome without definite evidence for the presence of ALI. Compared with septic mice without ALI (group A+group C), lipocalin-2 protein expression in septic mice with ALI (group B+group D) was significantly up-regulated in BALF (P Conclusions Lipocalin-2 expression is significantly up-regulated in septic ALI mice compared with those without ALI. Lipocalin-2 tests with a dual cutoff system could be an effective tool in distinguishing experimental ALI cases.

  19. Histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings in human blast lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokos, Michael; Paulsen, Friedrich; Petri, Susan; Madea, Burkhard; Puschel, Klaus; Turk, Elisabeth E

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this autopsy-based study was to investigate the pathology of human blast lung injury using histology, Fat Red 7B staining, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy on lung specimens from eight medicolegal autopsy cases of fatal close-range detonations of chemical explosives. The micromorphologic equivalents of human blast lung injury can be summarized as follows: diffuse alveolar overdistension, circumscribed interstitial hemorrhages showing a cufflike pattern around pulmonary vessels, venous air embolism, bone marrow embolism, and pulmonary fat embolism. Hemorrhages within the lung parenchyma that were present in this study in blast victims without coexisting blunt or penetrating chest trauma must be regarded as potentially life-threatening intrapulmonary bleeding sites in survivors. In addition, the potential clinical importance of the presence of massive pulmonary fat embolism, which has, to the best of our knowledge, not been described previously in human blast lung injury, must be emphasized because pulmonary fat embolism may be a leading cause of the rapid respiratory deterioration with progressive hypoxia and development of acute respiratory distress syndrome in blast victims who survive. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that air embolism presenting in blast victims is not a mere ventilation-induced artifact. PMID:12842857

  20. Histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings in human blast lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokos, Michael; Paulsen, Friedrich; Petri, Susan; Madea, Burkhard; Puschel, Klaus; Turk, Elisabeth E

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this autopsy-based study was to investigate the pathology of human blast lung injury using histology, Fat Red 7B staining, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy on lung specimens from eight medicolegal autopsy cases of fatal close-range detonations of chemical explosives. The micromorphologic equivalents of human blast lung injury can be summarized as follows: diffuse alveolar overdistension, circumscribed interstitial hemorrhages showing a cufflike pattern around pulmonary vessels, venous air embolism, bone marrow embolism, and pulmonary fat embolism. Hemorrhages within the lung parenchyma that were present in this study in blast victims without coexisting blunt or penetrating chest trauma must be regarded as potentially life-threatening intrapulmonary bleeding sites in survivors. In addition, the potential clinical importance of the presence of massive pulmonary fat embolism, which has, to the best of our knowledge, not been described previously in human blast lung injury, must be emphasized because pulmonary fat embolism may be a leading cause of the rapid respiratory deterioration with progressive hypoxia and development of acute respiratory distress syndrome in blast victims who survive. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that air embolism presenting in blast victims is not a mere ventilation-induced artifact.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells reduce the irradiation induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from mouse bone and embryo dorsal aorta (DA) area in the treatment of irradiation induced lung injury of mouse model. Methods: The mice were divided into four groups as normal control group, irradiation group,bone MSCs treatment group and DA MSCs treatment group. Immunohistochemical Analysis of lung tissue was observed after 9 months of treatment. Results: Fibrosis and alveolar infiltration were scored in each group. The score for fibrosis and alveolar is 0. 17 in normal control group, 2 in irradiation group, 1 in bone MSCs treat group and 1.38 in DA MSCs treat group. Conclusion: The extent of irradiation Induced Lung Injury could be reduced thorough the treatment of MSCs derived from mouse bone and embryos dorsal aorta ( DA ) area. (authors)

  2. Spontaneous Transient Lateral Thoracic Lung Herniation Resulting in Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) and Subsequent Contralateral Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Antony Kaliyadan; Amal Kebede; Tabassum Ali; Michael Karchevsky; Bernard Vasseur; Nirav Patel

    2011-01-01

    Lung herniation is a relatively rare clinical entity that is most commonly either congenital or acquired traumatically. We describe a case of spontaneous lung herniation secondary to acute cough in an obese male smoker complicated by contralateral acute lung injury and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Mechanisms of lung herniation, classification, diagnosis, and management will be discussed.

  3. Strategies to prevent intraoperative lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siminelakis Stavros N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During open heart surgery the influence of a series of factors such as cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, hypothermia, operation and anaesthesia, as well as medication and transfusion can cause a diffuse trauma in the lungs. This injury leads mostly to a postoperative interstitial pulmonary oedema and abnormal gas exchange. Substantial improvements in all of the above mentioned factors may lead to a better lung function postoperatively. By avoiding CPB, reducing its time, or by minimizing the extracorporeal surface area with the use of miniaturized circuits of CPB, beneficial effects on lung function are reported. In addition, replacement of circuit surface with biocompatible surfaces like heparin-coated, and material-independent sources of blood activation, a better postoperative lung function is observed. Meticulous myocardial protection by using hypothermia and cardioplegia methods during ischemia and reperfusion remain one of the cornerstones of postoperative lung function. The partial restoration of pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB possibly contributes to prevent pulmonary ischemia and lung dysfunction. Using medication such as corticosteroids and aprotinin, which protect the lungs during CPB, and leukocyte depletion filters for operations expected to exceed 90 minutes in CPB-time appear to be protective against the toxic impact of CPB in the lungs. The newer methods of ultrafiltration used to scavenge pro-inflammatory factors seem to be protective for the lung function. In a similar way, reducing the use of cardiotomy suction device, as well as the contact-time between free blood and pericardium, it is expected that the postoperative lung function will be improved.

  4. Marked Recovery From Paraquat-Induced Lung Injury During Long-Term Follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kwon-Hyun; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Kim, Young-Tong; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Paraquat-induced lung injury has been considered a progressive and irreversible disease. The purpose of this study was to report the long-term evolution of lung lesions in eight survivors with significant paraquat-induced lung injuries who could be followed-up for longer than 6 months. Methods We retrospectively examined high-resolution computed tomography and pulmonary function test of eight survivors with significant paraquat-induced lung injurys. Results High-resolution com...

  5. Protective effects of asiaticoside on septic lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-na; Zheng, Jia-jia; Zhang, Li; Gong, Xia; Huang, Hai; Wang, Chang-dong; Wang, Bin; Wu, Meng-jiao; Li, Xiao-hui; Sun, Wen-juan; Liu, Ying-ju; Wan, Jing-yuan

    2011-09-01

    Asiaticoside (AS), a major triterpenoid saponin component isolated from Centella asiatica, has been described to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study aimed to determine the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of AS on septic lung injury induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Mice were pretreated with the AS (45 mg/kg) or AS as well as GW9662 at 1h before CLP, the survival, lung injury, inflammatory mediators and signaling molecules, and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) were determined 24 h after CLP. The results showed that AS significantly decreased CLP-induced the mortality, lung pathological damage, the infiltration of mononuclear, polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes and total proteins. Moreover, AS inhibited CLP-induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein in lung tissues, and the production of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Interestingly, the expression of PPAR-γ protein in lung tissue was up-regulated by AS. Furthermore, GW9662 (the inhibitor of PPAR-γ) significantly reversed these beneficial effects of AS in septic mice. These findings suggest that AS could effectively protect from septic lung injury induced by CLP and the underlying mechanisms might be related to up-regulation of PPAR-γ expression to some extent, which inhibits MAPKs and NF-κB pathway.

  6. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  7. Early injury of the neonatal lung contributes to premature lung aging: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiners, Silke; Hilgendorff, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Chronic lung disease of the newborn, also known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), is the most common chronic lung disease in early infancy and results in an increased risk for long-lasting pulmonary impairment in the adult. BPD develops upon injury of the immature lung by oxygen toxicity, mechanical ventilation, and infections which trigger sustained inflammatory immune responses and extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix together with dysregulated growth factor signaling. Histopathologically, BPD is characterized by impaired alveolarization, disrupted vascular development, and saccular wall fibrosis. Here, we explore the hypothesis that development of BPD involves disturbance of conserved pathways of molecular aging that may contribute to premature aging of the lung and an increased susceptibility to chronic lung diseases in adulthood. PMID:27406259

  8. Neutrophil Elastase Contributes to Acute Lung Injury Induced by Bilateral Nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Tomoko; DOI, Kent; Okamoto, Koji; Imamura, Mitsuru; Dohi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Toshiro; Noiri, Eisei

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious problem in critically ill patients of intensive care units. It has been reported previously that AKI can induce acute lung injury (ALI), as well as cause injuries to other remote organs, including the lungs. Patients with AKI complicated by ALI show remarkably high mortality. ALI is characterized by neutrophil infiltration into the lung. Neutrophil elastase (NE) is a key enzyme for tissue injury caused by activated neutrophils, such as occurs in ALI. The...

  9. Sex-specific differences in neonatal hyperoxic lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2016-08-01

    Male sex is considered an independent predictor for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) after adjusting for other confounders. BPD is characterized by an arrest in lung development with marked impairment of alveolar septation and vascular development. The reasons underlying sexually dimorphic outcomes in premature neonates are not known. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that male neonatal mice will be more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury and will display larger arrest in lung alveolarization. Neonatal male and female mice (C57BL/6) were exposed to hyperoxia [95% FiO2, postnatal day (PND) 1-5] and euthanized on PND 7 and 21. Extent of alveolarization, pulmonary vascularization, inflammation, and modulation of the NF-κB pathway were determined and compared with room air controls. Macrophage and neutrophil infiltration was significantly increased in hyperoxia-exposed animals but was increased to a larger extent in males compared with females. Lung morphometry showed a higher mean linear intercept (MLI) and a lower radial alveolar count (RAC) and therefore greater arrest in lung development in male mice. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in the expression of markers of angiogenesis (PECAM1 and VEGFR2) in males after hyperoxia exposure compared with females. Interestingly, female mice showed increased activation of the NF-κB pathway in the lungs compared with males. These results support the hypothesis that sex plays a crucial role in hyperoxia-mediated lung injury in this model. Elucidation of the sex-specific molecular mechanisms may aid in the development of novel individualized therapies to prevent/treat BPD. PMID:27343189

  10. Lung Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Response and Regulation During Acute and Chronic Lung Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F.;

    2013-01-01

    lung injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized......BACKGROUND: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum in...... three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. METHODS: Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. RESULTS: In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP-D in...

  11. APRV Mode in Ventilator Induced Lung Injury (VILI)

    OpenAIRE

    Ata Mahmoodpoor; Samad EJ Golzari

    2014-01-01

    Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI), being a significant iatrogenic complication in the ICU patients, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Numerous approaches, protocols and ventilation modes have been introduced and examined to decrease the incidence of VILI in the ICU patients. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), firstly introduced by Stock and Downs in 1987, applies higher Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) levels in prolonged periods (P and T high) in order t...

  12. Pattern Recognition Receptor–Dependent Mechanisms of Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Meng; Fan, Jie

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) that clinically manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome is caused by an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from clinical events including sepsis, major surgery and trauma. Innate immunity activation plays a central role in the development of ALI. Innate immunity is activated through families of related pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize conserved microbial motifs or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Toll-like...

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Attenuates Neutrophil-predominant Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in an In Vivo Rat Model of Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Tian-Shun Lai; Zhi-Hong Wang; Shao-Xi Cai

    2015-01-01

    Background: Subsequent neutrophil (polymorphonuclear neutrophil [PMN])-predominant inflammatory response is a predominant feature of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) can improve mice survival model of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury, reduce lung impairs, and enhance the repair of VILI. However, whether MSC could attenuate PMN-predominant inflammatory in the VILI is still unknown. This study aimed to test whether MSC intervention could attenuate the PM...

  14. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO2 > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2 alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure

  15. Hypervolemia induces and potentiates lung damage after recruitment maneuver in a model of sepsis-induced acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Pedro L; Cruz, Fernanda F.; Fujisaki, Livia C; Gisele P. Oliveira; Samary, Cynthia S; Ornellas, Debora S; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Rocha, Nazareth N.; Goldenberg, Regina; Garcia, Cristiane SNB; MARCELO M. MORALES; Vera L. Capelozzi; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia RM

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Recruitment maneuvers (RMs) seem to be more effective in extrapulmonary acute lung injury (ALI), caused mainly by sepsis, than in pulmonary ALI. Nevertheless, the maintenance of adequate volemic status is particularly challenging in sepsis. Since the interaction between volemic status and RMs is not well established, we investigated the effects of RMs on lung and distal organs in the presence of hypovolemia, normovolemia, and hypervolemia in a model of extrapulmonary lung injury ...

  16. Computerized tomography versus perfusion lung scanning in canine radiation lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, I.H.; Logus, J.W.; El-Khatib, E.; Battista, J.J.; Ferri, H.; Lentle, B.C.; Man, G.C.; Man, S.F. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-03-01

    Computerized tomographic (CT) measurements of lung density were obtained before and serially after thoracic irradiation in dogs to detect the alterations caused by radiation therapy. Fourteen mongrel dogs were given either 2000 cGy (Group A, 10 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), 1000 cGy (Group B, 2 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), or 500 cGy (Group C, 2 dogs, right lung irradiation) in one fraction. Once before and bi-weekly after irradiation, the anesthetized dogs had thoracic CT scans. CT numbers for the irradiated area were compared to their preirradiation control values. Macro-aggregated albumin (MAA) perfusion lung scans were also obtained before and at weekly intervals after irradiation and were evaluated visually and quantitatively for abnormalities. When both these tests were abnormal, or at the end of the scheduled study, the dogs were sacrificed to confirm radiation lung injury histologically. Our results showed that CT numbers (as a measure of tissue density) were higher with higher doses of radiation. Among all the techniques used, only the quantitative assessment of macro-aggregated albumin perfusion scan detected abnormalities in all the dogs given 2000 cGy. Their abnormalities correlated well with the presence of radiation lung damage histologically, however, the applicability of these methods in the detection of early injury has to be further evaluated.

  17. The progress in research on the mechanism, prevention and treatment of radiation-induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During radiotherapy of chest tumor,many patients often develop radiation-induced lung injury (including radiation induced interstitial pneumonia or pulmonary fibrosis), which significantly affects their quality of life. Therefore, it is very important to study the mechanism, prevention, and treatment of radiation-induced lung injury. Herein a review of recent research advances in radiation-induced lung injury is made, in order to provide theoretical basis for further research. (authors)

  18. The role of the acute phase protein PTX3 in the ventilator-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    JM Real; MM. Marques; GMGT Spilborghs; EM Negri; MM Matzuk; RP Moura; AA Camargo; Deheinzelin, D; AAM Dias

    2008-01-01

    The pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is an acute phase proinflammatory protein produced by fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 is a key modulator of inflammation. Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life saving therapeutic approach for patients with acute lung injury that, nevertheless could lead to an inflammatory response and tissue injury (ventilator-induced lung injury: VILI), representing a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive units. Our obje...

  19. Intravascular activation of complement and acute lung injury. Dependency on neutrophils and toxic oxygen metabolites.

    OpenAIRE

    Till, G O; Johnson, K J; R. Kunkel; Ward, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    Intravascular activation of the complement system with cobra venom factor results in acute lung injury, which has been quantitated by increases in lung vascular permeability. Cobra venom factor preparations devoid of phospholipase A2 activity retain full lung-damaging capacity. The lung injury is associated with the preceding appearance of chemotactic activity in the serum coincident with the development of a profound neutropenia. The chemotactic activity is immunochemically related to human ...

  20. Plasma levels of surfactant protein D and KL-6 for evaluation of lung injury in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Slutsky Arthur S; Zhang Haibo; Haitsma Jack J; Royakkers Annick ANM; Determann Rogier M; Ranieri V Marco; Schultz Marcus J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Preventing ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) has become pivotal in mechanical ventilation of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or its more severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the present study we investigated whether plasma levels of lung-specific biological markers can be used to evaluate lung injury in patients with ALI/ARDS and patients without lung injury at onset of mechanical ventilation. Methods Plasma levels of surfactant protein ...

  1. Differential effects of kidney-lung cross-talk during acute kidney injury and bacterial pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Singbartl, Kai; Bishop, Jeffery; Wen, Xiaoyan; Murugan, Raghavan; Chandra, Saurabh; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; John A Kellum

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute lung injury (ALI) represent serious, complex clinical problems. The combination of AKI and ALI drastically decreases survival. However, detailed knowledge about the interactions between these two organs is scarce.

  2. KL-6 in acute lung injury: will it leave its mark?

    OpenAIRE

    Shyamsundar, Murali; Danny F McAuley

    2008-01-01

    Studies have indicated that measuring biochemical measures of epithelial injury in plasma and alveolar fluid may be useful in predicting outcome in acute lung injury. The present commentary briefly reviews the evidence supporting the use of these biochemical biomarkers of epithelial injury in acute lung injury, and in particular KL-6, as well as their limitations. The article additionally proposes the need for physiological markers of epithelial function to complement current biochemical biom...

  3. Altered pulmonary epithelial permeability in canine radiation lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, I.H.; el-Khatib, E.; Logus, J.W.; Man, G.C.; Jacques, J.; Man, S.F.

    1986-09-01

    A radioaerosol scanning technique measuring regional clearance of sodium pertechnetate (99mTcO-4) and 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA) was used to assess changes in canine pulmonary epithelial permeability following lung irradiation. Doses of 2000 cGy (11 dogs), 1000 cGy (2 dogs), and 500 cGy (2 dogs) were given in one fraction to either the entire right hemithorax (500 cGy) or the right lower lung (1000 and 2000 cGy). Radioaerosol scans, chest roentgenograms, and computerized tomograms (CT) were obtained before and serially after irradiation. A dose of 2000 cGy resulted in a decrease in regional pulmonary epithelial permeability to both 99mTcO4- and 99mTc-DTPA; both showed significant decreases from the 2nd wk postirradiation onward. In comparison, CT and chest roentgenogram did not become abnormal until 7.1 +/- 2.8 (SD) and 8.2 +/- 2.6 wk, respectively. Doses of 1,000 and 500 cGy produced reversible decreases in 99mTcO4- clearance. Lung morphology showed definite changes of radiation pneumonitis after 2000 and 1000 cGy but not after 500 cGy at approximately 9, 17, and 12 wk postirradiation, respectively. These results suggest that dose-dependent changes in pulmonary physiology may precede obvious structural alterations in radiation lung injury.

  4. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Jun Lee

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day. Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis.

  5. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  6. Epithelial cell apoptosis causes acute lung injury masquerading as emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouded, Majd; Egea, Eduardo E; Brown, Matthew J; Hanlon, Shane M; Houghton, A McGarry; Tsai, Larry W; Ingenito, Edward P; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-10-01

    Theories of emphysema traditionally revolved around proteolytic destruction of extracellular matrix. Models have recently been developed that show airspace enlargement with the induction of pulmonary cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which a model of epithelial cell apoptosis caused airspace enlargement. Mice were treated with either intratracheal microcystin (MC) to induce apoptosis, intratracheal porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE), or their respective vehicles. Mice from all groups were inflated and morphometry was measured at various time points. Physiology measurements were performed for airway resistance, tissue elastance, and lung volumes. The groups were further analyzed by air-saline quasistatic measurements, surfactant staining, and surfactant functional studies. Mice treated with MC showed evidence of reversible airspace enlargement. In contrast, PPE-treated mice showed irreversible airspace enlargement. The airspace enlargement in MC-treated mice was associated with an increase in elastic recoil due to an increase in alveolar surface tension. PPE-treated mice showed a loss of lung elastic recoil and normal alveolar surface tension, a pattern more consistent with human emphysema. Airspace enlargement that occurs with the MC model of pulmonary epithelial cell apoptosis displays physiology distinct from human emphysema. Reversibility, restrictive physiology due to changes in surface tension, and alveolar enlargement associated with heterogeneous alveolar collapse are most consistent with a mild acute lung injury. Inflation near total lung capacity gives the appearance of enlarged alveoli as neighboring collapsed alveoli exert tethering forces. PMID:19188661

  7. UNILATERAL LUNG INJURY IN SCLERODERMA SYSTEMATICA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Alekperov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic scleroderma (SSD is a clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by obliterating microangiopathy, autoimmune activation, and fibrosis of the skin and viscera. Interstitial lung fibrosis (ILF is a characteristic visceral injury in SSD and considered to be a main cause of disability and death. The diagnosis of SSD-associated ILF is made on the basis of a cluster of symptoms, physical examination, external respiratory function changes, and high-resolution computed tomography. Pulmonary fibrosis is included in the 1980 American College of Rheumatology (ACR classification criteria and in the joint ACR and 2013 European League against Rheumatism diagnostic criteria. According to the definition given in these criteria, pulmonary fibrosis in SSD isdescribed as bilateral changes, most pronounced in the basal lung segments, which are not a sign of primary lung disease. The paper describes a case of a SSD patient with a complete spectrum of characteristic signs of unilateral pulmonary fibrosis. This case is the first description of unilateral ILF in SSD and shows the need for ruling outconnective tissue diseases, primarily SSD, when such lung changes concurrent with extrapulmonary manifestations are detected.

  8. A case of miriplatin-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasawa, Fumio; Miura, Takao; Takahashi, Toshimi; Endo, Daisuke; Ohki, Takashi; Nakagawara, Hiroshi; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Tsujino, Ichiro; Masahiro, Ogawa; Gon, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Noriaki; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Hashimoto, Shu

    2016-07-01

    A 69-year-old man with an 8-year history of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was hospitalized for treatment of recurrent tumour. In 2010, the first transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) using miriplatin with agents (Lipiodol Ultra-Fluid) was performed and did not occur any adverse events. In 2014, since his HCC recurred, the TACE using miriplatin with agents was performed. Following this therapy, pyrexia occurred on day 3, followed by respiratory failure with cough and dyspnea on day 5. Chest radiography revealed scattered infiltration in the right upper lung fields, and chest computed tomography revealed ground grass attenuations, indicating fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia. These findings progressively deteriorated, and a diagnosis of miriplatin-induced lung injury was made. His respiratory failure also progressively deteriorated. Treatment with pulse methylprednisolone therapy resulted in a dramatic improvement in both patient symptoms and radiological abnormalities. PMID:26867794

  9. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragaller Maximillian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, more information accumulates about the possibility of treating patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome with specially designed mechanical ventilation strategies. Ventilator modes, positive end-expiratory pressure settings, and recruitment maneuvers play a major role in these strategies. However, what can we take from these experimental and clinical data to the clinical practice? In this article, we discuss substantial options of mechanical ventilation together with some adjunctive therapeutic measures, such as prone positioning and inhalation of nitric oxide.

  10. Regulation and repair of the alveolar-capillary barrier in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Jahar; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the basic mechanisms that regulate fluid and protein exchange across the endothelial and epithelial barriers of the lung under both normal and pathological conditions. Clinically relevant lung injury occurs most commonly from severe viral and bacterial infections, aspiration syndromes, and severe shock. The mechanisms of lung injury have been identified in both experimental and clinical studies. Recovery from lung injury requires the reestablishment of an intact endothelial barrier and a functional alveolar epithelial barrier capable of secreting surfactant and removing alveolar edema fluid. Repair mechanisms include the participation of endogenous progenitor cells in strategically located niches in the lung. Novel treatment strategies include the possibility of cell-based therapy that may reduce the severity of lung injury and enhance lung repair. PMID:23398155

  11. Animal study on lung injury caused by simulant segmented shock waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the lung injury caused by se gmented shock waves.   Methods: A total of 60 rabbits and 20 rats were used in this st udy. The process of transmission of shock waves was divided into three phases, i .e., the recompression phase (RP), the decompression phase (DP) and the underpre ssure phase (UP). And the recompression wave (RW), the decompression wave (DW) a nd the underpressure wave (UW) simulated the three phases, respectively, generat ed by the equipment designed by us. The RW test, DW test and UW test were respec tively applied to the animals. And lung injuries caused by segmented shock waves were discussed.   Results: Under the experimental conditions, the RW did not caus e obvious lung injury, but the DW could cause different severities of lung injur ies. The greater the decompression ranged and the shorter the decompression dura tion was adopted, the more severe the lung injury was observed. The UW, to some extent, could cause obvious lung injury.   Conclusions: It suggests that lung injury under shock waves pro bably occurs during the DP primarily. It probably does not cause direct obvious lung injury during the RP, but significantly influences the capability of causin g lung injury during the DP.

  12. Melatonin reduces acute lung injury in endotoxemic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG You; XU San-peng; WU Yan; JIANG Yuan-xu; WU Zhou-yang; YUAN Shi-ying; YAO Shang-long

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment with melatonin significantly reduces lung injury induced by bleomycin, paraquat and ischemia reperfusion. In the present study, we investigated the possible protective roles of melatonin in pulmonary inflammation and lung injury during acute endotoxemia.Methods Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: vehicle + saline group, melatonin + saline group, vehicle + lipopolysaccharide group, melatonin + lipopolysaccharide group. The rats were treated with melatonin (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection (I.p.)) or vehicle (1% ethanol saline), 30 minutes prior to lipopolysaccharide administration (6 mg/kg, intravenous injection). Four hours after lipopolysaccharide injection, samples of pulmonary tissue were collected. Blood gas analysis was carried out. Optical microscopy was performed to examine pathological changes in lungs and lung injury score was assessed. Wet/dry ratios (W/D), myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde concentrations and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels in lungs were measured. The pulmonary expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-KB) p65 was evaluated by Western blotting. Results PaO2 in the vehicle + lipopolysaccharide group decreased compared with that in the vehicle + saline group. This decrease was significantly reduced in the melatonin + lipopolysaccharide group. The lung tissues from the saline + lipopolysaccharide group were significantly damaged, which were less pronounced in the melatonin + lipopolysaccharide group. The W/D ratio increased significantly in the vehicle + lipopolysaccharide group (6.1±0.18) as compared with that in the vehicle + saline group (3.611±0.3) (P <0.01), which was significantly reduced in the melatonin + lipopolysaccharide group (4.8±0.25) (P <0.01). Myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels increased significantly in the vehicle + lipopolysaccharide group compared with that in the vehicle + saline group, which

  13. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  14. Total liquid ventilation reduces oleic acid-induced lung injury in piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yao-bin; LIU Dong-hai; ZHANG Yan-bo; LIU Ai-jun; FAN Xiang-ming; QIAO Chen-hui; WANG Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric patients are susceptible to lung injury that does not respond to traditional therapies.Total liquid ventilation has been developed as an alternative ventilatory strategy for severe lung injury.The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of total liquid ventilation on oleic acid (OA)-induced lung injury in piglets.Methods Twelve Chinese immature piglets were induced acute lung injury by OA.Twelve piglets were randomly treated with conventional gas ventilation (control group) or total liquid ventilation (study group) for 240 minutes.Samples for blood gas analysis were collected before,and at 60-minute intervals after OA-induced lung injury.The degree of lung injury was quantified by histologic examination.The inflammatory cells and the levels of IL-1β,IL-6,IL-10 and TNF-α in plasma,tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage were analyzed.Results Neutrophil and macrophage counts in bronchoalveolar lavage were significantly decreased in the study group (P<0.05).The total lung injury score was also reduced in the study group (P<0.05).The cconcentrations of IL-1β,IL-6,IL-10and TNF-α in plasma,tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage were significantly reduced in the study group (P<0.05).Conclusions Total liquid ventilation reduces biochemical and histologic OA-induced lung injury in piglets.

  15. Nebulized Anticoagulants Limit Pulmonary Coagulopathy, But Not Inflammation, in a Model of Experimental Lung Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Hofstra; A.P. Vlaar; A.D. Cornet; B. Dixon; J.J. Roelofs; G. Choi; T. van der Poll; M. Levi; M.J. Schultz

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary coagulopathy may contribute to an adverse outcome in lung injury. We assessed the effects of local anticoagulant therapy on bronchoalveolar and systemic haemostasis in a rat model of endotoxemia-induced lung injury. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously challenge

  16. Nebulized anticoagulants limit pulmonary coagulopathy, but not inflammation, in a model of experimental lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, Jorrit J; Vlaar, Alexander P; Cornet, Alexander D; Dixon, Barry; Roelofs, Joris J; Choi, Goda; van der Poll, Tom; Levi, Marcel; Schultz, Marcus J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary coagulopathy may contribute to an adverse outcome in lung injury. We assessed the effects of local anticoagulant therapy on bronchoalveolar and systemic haemostasis in a rat model of endotoxemia-induced lung injury. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously challenge

  17. ACE mediates ventilator-induced lung injury in rats via angiotensin II but not bradykinin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Wösten-van Asperen; R. Lutter (Rene); J.J. Haitsma; M.P. Merkus; J.B. van Woensel; C.M. van der Loos; S. Florquin (Sandrine); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard); A.P. Bos (Albert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractVentilator-induced lung injury is characterised by inflammation and apoptosis, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study proposed a role for angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) via angiotensin II (Ang II) and/or bradykinin in acute lung injury. The authors as

  18. Cytokines and biotrauma in ventilator-induced lung injury: a critical review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halbertsma, F.J.; Vaneker, M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation is known to induce and aggravate lung injury. One of the underlying mechanisms is biotrauma, an inflammatory response in which cytokines play a crucial role. OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on the role of cytokines in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and m

  19. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  20. Protective effect of salvianolate on lung injury induced by ischemia reperfusion injury of liver in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-xin WANG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the protective effect of salvianolate on lung injury induced by hepatic ischemia reperfusion(IR injury in mice and its underlying mechanisms.Methods A hepatic IR model of mice was reproduced,and 24 animals were assigned into 3 groups(8 each: sham operation(SO group,control group and salvianolate(SV group.Just before ischemia induction,animals in SV group received salvianolate injection at a dose of 60 mg/kg via tail vein,while in control group the mice received normal saline with an equal volume,and in SO group the mice received the same operation as in SV group but without producing liver ischemia.Four hours after reperfusion,the serum,liver and lung tissue were collected.The alanine aminotransferase(ALT and aspartate aminotransferase(AST levels in serum were detected and the histological changes in liver and lung were examined.The wet-to-dry weight ratio of pulmonary tissue was measured.The contents of tumor necrosis factor α(TNF-α,interleukin(IL-6,IL-1β and IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid(BALF were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA,and the relative mRNA levels of TNF-α,IL-6,IL-1β and IL-10 in pulmonary tissue were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription PCR(RT-PCR.The activaty of transcription factor NF-κB was measured with Western blotting analysis.Results No significant pathologic change was found in mice of SO group.Compared with the mice in control group,those in SV group exhibited lower levels of ALT and AST(P < 0.01,lighter histological changes in liver and lung(P < 0.05,lower levels of wet-to-dry weight ratio of lung tissue(P < 0.05,lower expression levels of TNF-α,IL-6,IL-1β and IL-10 in BALF and lung tissue(P < 0.05 or P < 0.01.Further examination demonstrated that the activity of NF-κB in SV group was significantly down-regulated as compared with that in control group.Conclusion Salvianolate can attenuate lung injury induced by hepatic IR in mice,the mechanism may inclade

  1. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  2. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  3. Bronchoscopy-derived correlates of lung injury following inhalational injuries: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel W Jones

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute lung injury (ALI is a major factor determining morbidity following burns and inhalational injury. In experimental models, factors potentially contributing to ALI risk include inhalation of toxins directly causing cell damage; inflammation; and infection. However, few studies have been done in humans. METHODS: We carried out a prospective observational study of patients admitted to the NC Jaycees Burn Center who were intubated and on mechanical ventilation for burns and suspected inhalational injury. Subjects were enrolled over an 8-month period and followed till discharge or death. Serial bronchial washings from clinically-indicated bronchoscopies were collected and analyzed for markers of cell injury and inflammation. These markers were compared with clinical markers of ALI. RESULTS: Forty-three consecutive patients were studied, with a spectrum of burn and inhalation injury severity. Visible soot at initial bronchoscopy and gram negative bacteria in the lower respiratory tract were associated with ALI in univariate analyses. Subsequent multivariate analysis also controlled for % body surface area burns, infection, and inhalation severity. Elevated IL-10 and reduced IL-12p70 in bronchial washings were statistically significantly associated with ALI. CONCLUSIONS: Independently of several factors including initial inhalational injury severity, infection, and extent of surface burns, high early levels of IL-10 and low levels of IL-12p70 in the central airways are associated with ALI in patients intubated after acute burn/inhalation injury. Lower airway secretions can be collected serially in critically ill burn/inhalation injury patients and may yield important clues to specific pathophysiologic pathways.

  4. Clinical review: The implications of experimental and clinical studies of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Piacentini Gómez, Enrique; Villagrá, Ana; López Aguilar, Josefina; Blanch Torra, Lluís

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation can cause and perpetuate lung injury if alveolar overdistension, cyclic collapse, and reopening of alveolar units occur. The use of low tidal volume and limited airway pressure has improved survival in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The use of recruitment maneuvers has been proposed as an adjunct to mechanical ventilation to re-expand collapsed lung tissue. Many investigators have studied the benefits of recruitment maneuvers in ...

  5. Time profile of oxidative stress and neutrophil activation in ovine acute lung injury and sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Matthias; Szabo, Csaba; Traber, Daniel L.; Horvath, Eszter; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D.; Cox, Robert A.; Schmalstieg, Frank C.; Herndon, David N.; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2012-01-01

    The formation of oxidative stress in the lung and activation of neutrophils are major determinants in the development of respiratory failure following acute lung injury (ALI) and sepsis. However, the time changes of these pathogenic factors have not been sufficiently described. Twenty-four chronically instrumented sheep were subjected to cotton smoke inhalation injury and instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lungs. The sheep and were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 hours p...

  6. Injurious mechanical ventilation in the normal lung causes a progressive pathologic change in dynamic alveolar mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Pavone, Lucio A; Albert, Scott; Carney, David; Gatto, Louis A; Halter, Jeffrey M; Nieman, Gary F.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory distress syndrome causes a heterogeneous lung injury, and without protective mechanical ventilation a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury can occur. To ventilate noncompliant lung regions, high inflation pressures are required to 'pop open' the injured alveoli. The temporal impact, however, of these elevated pressures on normal alveolar mechanics (that is, the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during ventilation) is unknown. In the present study we ...

  7. Titrating Open Lung PEEP in Acute Lung Injury : A clinical method based on changes in dynamic compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Suarez Sipmann, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The recognition that supportive mechanical ventilation can also damage the lung, the so called ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), has revived the more than 40 year long debate on the optimal level of PEEP to be used. It is established that the prevention of VILI improves patient outcome and that PEEP exerts protective effects by preventing unstable diseased alveoli from collapsing. Therefore, the term “open lung PEEP” (OL-PEEP) has been introduced as the end-expiratory pressure that keep...

  8. Bronchoalveolar hemostasis in lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, G J; Van Der Sluijs, K F; Schultz, M J; Hofstra, J-J H; Van Der Poll, T; Levi, M

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced intrapulmonary fibrin deposition as a result of abnormal broncho-alveolar fibrin turnover is a hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and is important to the pathogenesis of these conditions. The mechanisms that contribute to alveolar coagulopathy are localized tissue factor-mediated thrombin generation, impaired activity of natural coagulation inhibitors and depression of bronchoalveolar urokinase plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis, caused by the increase of plasminogen activator inhibitors. There is an intense and bidirectional interaction between coagulation and inflammatory pathways in the bronchoalveolar compartment. Systemic or local administration of anticoagulant agents (including activated protein C, antithrombin and heparin) and profibrinolytic agents (such as plasminogen activators) attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy. Several preclinical studies show additional anti-inflammatory effects of these therapies in ARDS and pneumonia. PMID:23114008

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Attenuates Neutrophil-predominant Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in an In Vivo Rat Model of Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Shun Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subsequent neutrophil (polymorphonuclear neutrophil [PMN]-predominant inflammatory response is a predominant feature of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI, and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC can improve mice survival model of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury, reduce lung impairs, and enhance the repair of VILI. However, whether MSC could attenuate PMN-predominant inflammatory in the VILI is still unknown. This study aimed to test whether MSC intervention could attenuate the PMN-predominate inflammatory in the mechanical VILI. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were ventilated for 2 hours with large tidal volume (20 mL/kg. MSCs were given before or after ventilation. The inflammatory chemokines and gas exchange were observed and compared dynamically until 4 hours after ventilation, and pulmonary pathological change and activation of PMN were observed and compared 4 hours after ventilation. Results: Mechanical ventilation (MV caused significant lung injury reflected by increasing in PMN pulmonary sequestration, inflammatory chemokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and injury score of the lung tissue. These changes were accompanied with excessive PMN activation which reflected by increases in PMN elastase activity, production of radical oxygen series. MSC intervention especially pretreatment attenuated subsequent lung injury, systemic inflammation response and PMN pulmonary sequestration and excessive PMN activation initiated by injurious ventilation. Conclusions: MV causes profound lung injury and PMN-predominate inflammatory responses. The protection effect of MSC in the VILI rat model is related to the suppression of the PMN activation.

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Attenuates Neutrophil-predominant Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in an In Vivo Rat Model of Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Shun Lai; Zhi-Hong Wang; Shao-Xi Cai

    2015-01-01

    Background:Subsequent neutrophil (polymorphonuclear neutrophil [PMN])-predominant inflammatory response is a predominant feature of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI),and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) can improve mice survival model of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury,reduce lung impairs,and enhance the repair of VILI.However,whether MSC could attenuate PMN-predominant inflammatory in the VILI is still unknown.This study aimed to test whether MSC intervention could attenuate the PMN-predominate inflammatory in the mechanical VILI.Methods:Sprague-Dawley rats were ventilated for 2 hours with large tidal volume (20 mL/kg).MSCs were given before or after ventilation.The inflammatory chemokines and gas exchange were observed and compared dynamically until 4 hours after ventilation,and pulmonary pathological change and activation of PMN were observed and compared 4 hours after ventilation.Results:Mechanical ventilation (MV) caused significant lung injury reflected by increasing in PMN pulmonary sequestration,inflammatory chemokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha,interleukin-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein 2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid,and injury score of the lung tissue.These changes were accompanied with excessive PMN activation which reflected by increases in PMN elastase activity,production of radical oxygen series.MSC intervention especially pretreatment attenuated subsequent lung injury,systemic inflammation response and PMN pulmonary sequestration and excessive PMN activation initiated by injurious ventilation.Conclusions:MV causes profound lung injury and PMN-predominate inflammatory responses.The protection effect of MSC in the VILI rat model is related to the suppression of the PMN activation.

  11. Ultrafine particles in the airway aggravated experimental lung injury through impairment in Treg function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanggang; Cao, Yinghua; Sun, Yue; Xu, Ruxiang; Zheng, Zhendong; Song, Haihan

    2016-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening condition characterized by rapid-onset alveolar-capillary damage mediated by pathogenic proinflammatory immune responses. Since exposure to airway particulate matter (PM) could significantly change the inflammatory status of the individual, we investigated whether PM instillation in the airway could alter the course of ALI, using a murine model with experimental lung injury induced by intratracheal LPS challenge. We found that PM-treated mice presented significantly aggravated lung injury, which was characterized by further reductions in body weight, increased protein concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and higher mortality rate, compared to control saline-treated mice. The PM-treated mice also presented elevated lung and systemic type 1 T helper cell (Th1) frequency as well as reduced lung regulatory T cell (Treg) frequency, which was associated with severity of lung injury. Further examinations revealed that the Treg function was impaired in PM-treated mice, characterized by significantly repressed transforming growth factor beta production. Adoptive transfer of functional Tregs from control mice to PM-treated mice significantly improved their prognosis after intratracheal LPS challenge. Together, these results demonstrated that first, PM in the airway aggravated lung injury; second, severity of lung injury was associated with T cell subset imbalance in PM-treated mice; and third, PM treatment induced quantitative as well as qualitative changes in the Tregs. PMID:27179778

  12. Serum and lung endothelin-1 increased in a canine model of ventilator-induced lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Tian-shun; CAI Shao-xi; GUO Zhen-hui

    2010-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). A change in the balance of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and NO in the ALI/ARDS can also add to these problems. However, the profile of ET-1 and the balance of ET-1 and NO are still unknown in a VILI model.Methods Models of oleic acid induced ALI were established in dogs; these models were then randomized into three groups undergone different tidal volume (VT) mechanical ventilation, which included a VT6 group (VT equaled to 6 ml/kg body weight, positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) equaled to 10 cmH_2O, n=6), a VT10 group (VT equaled to 10 ml/kg body weight, PEEP equaled to 10 cmH_2O, n=4) and a VT20 group (VT equaled to 20 ml/kg body weight, PEEP equaled to 10 cmH_2O, n=6) for 6-hour ventilation. The levels of ET-1 and NO in serum and tissue homogenates of lung were observed throughout the trial.Results PaO_2 was increased after mechanical ventilation, but hypercapnia occurred in the VT6 group. The magnitudes of lung injury in the VT20 group were more severe than those in the VT6 group and the VT10 group. Serum levels of ET-1 and NO increased after ALI models were established and slightly decreased after a 6-hour ventilation in both the VT6 group and the VT20 group. The serum ET-1 level in the VT20 group was higher than that in the VT6 group and the VT10 group after the 6-hour ventilation (P 0.05). There was no significant difference in serum ratio of ET-1/NO between any two out of three groups (P >0.05), although there was a significant positive relationship between serum ET-1 and serum NO (r=0.80, P0.05). In the lung tissue, the ratio of ET-1/NO was significantly higher in the VT20 group than in the VT6 group and VT10 group after the 6-hour ventilation (P<0.05) as there was a significant positive relationship between ET-1 and NO in the lung (r=0.54, P<0.05).Conclusions The production of ET-1 and NO

  13. Protective effect of albumin on lung injury in traumatic/hemorrhagic shock in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Chen-yan; CHEN Zuo-bing; ZHENG Shu-sen; GAO Yuan; ZHANG Yun; ZHAO Xue-hong; NI Ling-mei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of albumin administration on lung injury in traumatic/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) in rats. Methods: Forty-eight adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups randomly (n=16 in each group): Group A, Group B, Group C. In Group A, rats underwent laparotomy without shock. In Group B, rats undergoing T/HS were resuscitated with their blood plus lactated Ringer's (twice the volume of shed blood). In Group C, rats undergoing T/HS were resuscitated with their shed blood plus additional 3 ml of 5% human albumin. The expression of polymorphonuclear neutrophils CD18/CD11b in jugular vein blood was evaluated. The main lung injury indexes (the activity of myeloperoxidase and lung injury score) were measured. Results: Significant differences of the expression of CD18/11b and the severity degree of lung injury were found between the three groups.(P<0.05). The expression of CD18/CD11b and the main lung injury indexes in Group B and Goup C incresed significantly compared with those in Group A(P<0.05).At the same time, the expression of CD18/CD11b and the main lung injury indexes in Group C decreased dramatically, compared with those in Group B (P<0.05). Conclusions: The infusion of albumin during resuscitation period can protect lungs from injury and decrease the expression of CD18/CD11b in T/HS rats.

  14. High bias gas flows increase lung injury in the ventilated preterm lamb.

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    Katinka P Bach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation of preterm babies increases survival but can also cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI, leading to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD. It is not known whether shear stress injury from gases flowing into the preterm lung during ventilation contributes to VILI. METHODS: Preterm lambs of 131 days' gestation (term = 147 d were ventilated for 2 hours with a bias gas flow of 8 L/min (n = 13, 18 L/min (n = 12 or 28 L/min (n = 14. Physiological parameters were measured continuously and lung injury was assessed by measuring mRNA expression of early injury response genes and by histological analysis. Control lung tissue was collected from unventilated age-matched fetuses. Data were analysed by ANOVA with a Tukey post-hoc test when appropriate. RESULTS: High bias gas flows resulted in higher ventilator pressures, shorter inflation times and decreased ventilator efficiency. The rate of rise of inspiratory gas flow was greatest, and pulmonary mRNA levels of the injury markers, EGR1 and CTGF, were highest in lambs ventilated with bias gas flows of 18 L/min. High bias gas flows resulted in increased cellular proliferation and abnormal deposition of elastin, collagen and myofibroblasts in the lung. CONCLUSIONS: High ventilator bias gas flows resulted in increased lung injury, with up-regulation of acute early response genes and increased histological lung injury. Bias gas flows may, therefore, contribute to VILI and BPD.

  15. Ventilator-associated lung injury during assisted mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddy, Felipe; Sutherasan, Yuda; Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    Assisted mechanical ventilation (MV) may be a favorable alternative to controlled MV at the early phase of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), since it requires less sedation, no paralysis and is associated with less hemodynamic deterioration, better distal organ perfusion, and lung protection, thus reducing the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI). In the present review, we discuss VALI in relation to assisted MV strategies, such as volume assist-control ventilation, pressure assist-control ventilation, pressure support ventilation (PSV), airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), APRV with PSV, proportional assist ventilation (PAV), noisy ventilation, and neurally adjusted ventilatory assistance (NAVA). In summary, we suggest that assisted MV can be used in ARDS patients in the following situations: (1) Pao(2)/Fio(2) >150 mm Hg and positive end-expiratory pressure ≥ 5 cm H(2)O and (2) with modalities of pressure-targeted and time-cycled breaths including more or less spontaneous or supported breaths (A-PCV [assisted pressure-controlled ventilation] or APRV). Furthermore, during assisted MV, the following parameters should be monitored: inspiratory drive, transpulmonary pressure, and tidal volume (6 mL/kg). Further studies are required to determine the impact of novel modalities of assisted ventilation such as PAV, noisy pressure support, and NAVA on VALI. PMID:25105820

  16. Lung Injury Combined with Loss of Regulatory T Cells Leads to De Novo Lung-Restricted Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Stephen; Fernandez, Ramiro; Subramanian, Vijay; Sun, Haiying; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Kreisel, Daniel; Perlman, Harris; Budinger, G R Scott; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Bharat, Ankit

    2016-07-01

    More than one third of patients with chronic lung disease undergoing lung transplantation have pre-existing Abs against lung-restricted self-Ags, collagen type V (ColV), and k-α1 tubulin (KAT). These Abs can also develop de novo after lung transplantation and mediate allograft rejection. However, the mechanisms leading to lung-restricted autoimmunity remain unknown. Because these self-Ags are normally sequestered, tissue injury is required to expose them to the immune system. We previously showed that respiratory viruses can induce apoptosis in CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), the key mediators of self-tolerance. Therefore, we hypothesized that lung-tissue injury can lead to lung-restricted immunity if it occurs in a setting when Tregs are impaired. We found that human lung recipients who suffer respiratory viral infections experienced a decrease in peripheral Tregs. Pre-existing lung allograft injury from donor-directed Abs or gastroesophageal reflux led to new ColV and KAT Abs post respiratory viral infection. Similarly, murine parainfluenza (Sendai) respiratory viral infection caused a decrease in Tregs. Intratracheal instillation of anti-MHC class I Abs, but not isotype control, followed by murine Sendai virus infection led to development of Abs against ColV and KAT, but not collagen type II (ColII), a cartilaginous protein. This was associated with expansion of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells specific to ColV and KAT, but not ColII. Intratracheal anti-MHC class I Abs or hydrochloric acid in Foxp3-DTR mice induced ColV and KAT, but not ColII, immunity, only if Tregs were depleted using diphtheria toxin. We conclude that tissue injury combined with loss of Tregs can lead to lung-tissue-restricted immunity. PMID:27194786

  17. Ventilation-induced lung injury is not exacerbated by growth restriction in preterm lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Beth J; Hooper, Stuart B; Coia, Elise; Zahra, Valerie A; Jenkin, Graham; Malhotra, Atul; Sehgal, Arvind; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Sozo, Foula; Miller, Suzanne L; Polglase, Graeme R

    2016-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and preterm birth are frequent comorbidities and, combined, increase the risk of adverse respiratory outcomes compared with that in appropriately grown (AG) infants. Potential underlying reasons for this increased respiratory morbidity in IUGR infants compared with AG infants include altered fetal lung development, fetal lung inflammation, increased respiratory requirements, and/or increased ventilation-induced lung injury. IUGR was surgically induced in preterm fetal sheep (0.7 gestation) by ligation of a single umbilical artery. Four weeks later, preterm lambs were euthanized at delivery or delivered and ventilated for 2 h before euthanasia. Ventilator requirements, lung inflammation, early markers of lung injury, and morphological changes in lung parenchymal and vascular structure and surfactant composition were analyzed. IUGR preterm lambs weighed 30% less than AG preterm lambs, with increased brain-to-body weight ratio, indicating brain sparing. IUGR did not induce lung inflammation or injury or alter lung parenchymal and vascular structure compared with AG fetuses. IUGR and AG lambs had similar oxygenation and respiratory requirements after birth and had significant, but similar, increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression, lung injury markers, gene expression, and surfactant phosphatidylcholine species compared with unventilated controls. IUGR does not induce pulmonary structural changes in our model. Furthermore, IUGR and AG preterm lambs have similar ventilator requirements in the immediate postnatal period. This study suggests that increased morbidity and mortality in IUGR infants is not due to altered lung tissue or vascular structure, or to an altered response to early ventilation. PMID:26608532

  18. EXPRESSION OF INTERCELLULAR ADHESION MOLECULE IN LUNG TISSUES OF EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND THE AFFECT OF RHUBARB ON IT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To approach the relation and the possible mechanism between the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) mRNA and acute lung injury (ALI) and the mechanisms of rhubarb in the prevention and treatment of the lung injury.Methods. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected into the sublingual vein of male Wistar rats to perform ALI animal model. The rats were divided into 4 groups: LPS group, control group, rhubarb group and dexamethasone group. Macroscopic and histopathological examinations were performed and biological markers were measured for the lung specimens. The markers included lung wet/dry weight, the rate of neutrophils and protein content in the pulmonary alveolar lavage fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability and pulmonary alveolar permeability index. Molecular hybridization method was used to determine the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA.Results. In the lung tissues, the ICAM-1 mRNA expression was increased in the endothelial cells of pulmonary veins and capillaries, rhubarb and dexamethasone had the action of decreasing the expression. The light reflex value in the gray scale scanning showed that in the comparison between the LPS and the control group, the gray scale value of the lung tissues in ALI was significantly increased, thus the light reflex value was markedly decreased (P<0.01), demonstrating the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA was increased. In comparison with the LPS group, dexamethasone and rhubarb could decrease the gray scale value of the lung tissue significantly, thus the light reflex value was elevated (P<0.01, P<0.05); the corresponding pathologic changes of lung tissues and the biological markers of the lung injury were significantly decreased or ameliorated.Conclusions. The increase of the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in the lung tissues of ALI plays the roles in ALI. The application of rhubarb and dexamethasone can decrease the expression and ameliorate the lung damage; its mechanism is possibly via the inhibition of ICAM

  19. EXPRESSION OF INTERCELLULAR ADHESION MOLECULE IN LUNG TISSUES OF EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND THE AFFECT OF RHUBARB ON IT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春盛; 桂培春; 何新华

    2000-01-01

    Objeaive. To approach the relation and the possible mechanism between the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) mRNA and acute lung injury (ALI) and the mechanisms of rhubarb in the prevention and treatment of the lung injury. Methods. Lipopolysaeeharide (LPS) was injected into the sublingual vein of male Wistar rats to perform ALI animal model. The rats were divided into 4 groups: LPS group, control group, rhubarb group and dexamethasoue group.Macroscopic and histopathological e~aminatiom were performed and biological markers were measured for the lung specimem. The markers included lung wet/dry weight, the rate of neutrophils and protein content in the pulmonary alveolar lavage fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability and pulmonary alveolar permeability index. Molecular hybridization method was used to determine the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA. Results. In the lung tissues, the ICAM-1 mRNA expression was increased in the endothelial cells of pulmonary veins and capillaries, rhubarb and dexamethasone had the action of decreasing the expression. The light reflex value in the gray scale scanning showed that in the comparison between the LPS and the control group, the gray scale value of the lung tissues in ALI was significantly increased, thus the light reflex value was markedly decreased (P < 0.01),demonstrating the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA was increased. In comparison with the LPS group, dexamethasoue and rhubarb emfld decrease the gray scale value of the lung tissue significantly, thus the light reflex value was elevated (P< 0.01, P < 0.05) ; the correslxmding pathologic changes of lung tissues and the biological markers of the lung injury were simifieantlv decreased or ameliorated. Conclusions. The increase of the expression d ICAM-1 mRNA in the lung tissues of ALI plays the roles in ALI.The application of rhubarb and dexamethasone can decrease the expression and ameliorate the lung damage; its mechanism is possibly via the inhibition of ICAM-1 m

  20. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.H. Bakkal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg. Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  1. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage

  2. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  3. Interleukin-22 ameliorates acute severe pancreatitis-associated lung injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chang-Qin; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Hong-wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential protective effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-22 (rIL-22) on L-arginine-induced acute severe pancreatitis (SAP)-associated lung injury and the possible signaling pathway involved.

  4. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury. PMID:27053543

  5. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-04-06

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury.

  6. Measuring dead-space in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallet, R H

    2012-11-01

    Several recent studies have advanced our understanding of dead-space ventilation in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). They have demonstrated the utility of measuring physiologic dead-space-to-tidal volume ratio (VD/VT) and related variables in assessing outcomes as well as therapeutic interventions. These studies have included the evaluation of mortality risk, pulmonary perfusion, as well as the effectiveness of drug therapy, prone positioning, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration, and inspiratory pattern in improving gas exchange. In patients with ALI/ARDS managed with lung-protective ventilation a significant relationship between elevated VD/VT and increased mortality continues to be reported in both early and intermediate phases of ALI/ARDS. Some clinical evidence now supports the suggestion that elevated VD/VT in part reflects the severity of pulmonary vascular endothelial damage. Monitoring VD/VT also appears useful in assessing alveolar recruitment when titrating PEEP and may be a particularly expedient method for assessing the effectiveness of prone positioning. It also has revealed how subtle manipulations of inspiratory time and pattern can improve CO(2) excretion. Much of this has been accomplished using volumetric capnography. This allows for more sophisticated measurements of pulmonary gas exchange function including: alveolar VD/VT, the volume of CO(2) excretion and the slope of the alveolar plateau which reflects ventilation: perfusion heterogeneity. Many of these measurements now can be made non-invasively which should only increase the research and clinical utility of volumetric capnography in studying and managing patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:22858884

  7. Alveolar macrophages regulate neutrophil recruitment in endotoxin-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Beck-Schimmer, B; Schwendener, R.; Pasch, T; Reyes, L.; Booy, C; Schimmer, R C

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alveolar macrophages play an important role during the development of acute inflammatory lung injury. In the present study, in vivo alveolar macrophage depletion was performed by intratracheal application of dichloromethylene diphosphonate-liposomes in order to study the role of these effector cells in the early endotoxin-induced lung injury. METHODS: Lipopolysaccharide was applied intratracheally and the inflammatory reaction was assessed 4 hours later. Neutrophil accumulation an...

  8. Alveolar macrophages regulate neutrophil recruitment in endotoxin-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes Livia; Pasch Thomas; Schwendener Reto; Beck-Schimmer Beatrice; Booy Christa; Schimmer Ralph C

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages play an important role during the development of acute inflammatory lung injury. In the present study, in vivo alveolar macrophage depletion was performed by intratracheal application of dichloromethylene diphosphonate-liposomes in order to study the role of these effector cells in the early endotoxin-induced lung injury. Methods Lipopolysaccharide was applied intratracheally and the inflammatory reaction was assessed 4 hours later. Neutrophil accumula...

  9. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Masahiro Hashizume; Marc Mouner; Joshua M. Chouteau; Gorodnya, Olena M.; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Gillespie, Mark N.; Parker, James C.

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII) which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP) was reversed by EndoIII pret...

  10. Surfactant alterations and treatment of lung transplant ischemia-reperfusion injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaij, Niels; Lachmann, Robert; Bogers, Ad; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis review addresses surfactant alterations and treatment in lung transplant ischemia-reperfusion injury. Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury damages the endogenous surfactant system as a result of the production of reactive oxygen species, proteolytic enzymes and (phospho)lipases. Surfactant is composed of phospholipids and proteins and its main function is to reduce the surface tension inside the alveolus. Impairment of surfactant will cause atelectasis, influx of serum proteins, ...

  11. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  12. 5-Lipoxygenase Deficiency Prevents Respiratory Failure during Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Caironi, Pietro; Ichinose, Fumito; Liu, Rong; Jones, Rosemary C; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Mechanical ventilation with high VT (HVT) progressively leads to lung injury and decreased efficiency of gas exchange. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) directs blood flow to well-ventilated lung regions, preserving systemic oxygenation during pulmonary injury. Recent experimental studies have revealed an important role for leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis by 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) in the impairment of HPV by endotoxin. Objectives: To investigate whether or not impairment of HPV ...

  13. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Audi, Said H.; Maleki, Sepideh; Staniszewski, Kevin; EIS, ANNIE L.; Konduri, Girija G.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damag...

  14. Inflammation and lung maturation from stretch injury in preterm fetal sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Hillman, Noah H.; Graeme R Polglase; Jane Pillow, J.; Saito, Masatoshi; Suhas G Kallapur; Alan H Jobe

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a risk factor for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature infants. Fifteen minutes of high tidal volume (Vt) ventilation induces inflammatory cytokine expression in small airways and lung parenchyma within 3 h. Our objective was to describe the temporal progression of cytokine and maturation responses to lung injury in fetal sheep exposed to a defined 15-min stretch injury. After maternal anesthesia and hysterotomy, 129-day gestation fetal lambs (n...

  15. Recruitment Maneuver Does not Increase the Risk of Ventilator Induced Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Akıncı, İbrahim Özkan; Atalan, Korkut; Tuğrul, Simru; Özcan, Perihan Ergin; Yılmazbayhan, Dilek; Kıran, Bayram; Basel, Ahmet; Telci, Lutfi; Çakar, Nahit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mechanical ventilation (MV) may induce lung injury. Aims: To assess and evaluate the role of different mechanical ventilation strategies on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in comparison to a strategy which includes recruitment manoeuvre (RM). Study design: Randomized animal experiment. Methods: Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetised, tracheostomised and divided into 5 groups randomly according to driving pressures; these were mechani...

  16. APRV Mode in Ventilator Induced Lung Injury (VILI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI, being a significant iatrogenic complication in the ICU patients, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Numerous approaches, protocols and ventilation modes have been introduced and examined to decrease the incidence of VILI in the ICU patients. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV, firstly introduced by Stock and Downs in 1987, applies higher Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP levels in prolonged periods (P and T high in order to preserve satisfactory lung volume and consequently alveolar recruitment. This mode benefits a time-cycled release phase to a lower set of pressure for a short period of time (P and T low i.e. release time (1,2. While some advantages have been introduced for APRV such as efficiently recruited alveoli over time, more homogeneous ventilation, less volutrauma, probable stabilization of patent alveoli and reduction in atelectrauma, protective effects of APRV on lung damage only seem to be substantial if spontaneous breathing responds to more than 30% of total minute ventilation (3. APRV in ARDS patients should be administered cautiously; T low<0.6 seconds, for recruiting collapsed alveoli; however overstretching of alveoli especially during P high should not be neglected and appropriate sedation considered. The proposed advantages for APRV give the impression of being outstanding; however, APRV, as a non-physiologic inverse ratio mode of ventilation, might result in inflammation mainly due to impaired patient-ventilator interaction explaining the negative or minimally desirable effects of APRV on inflammation (4. Consequently, continuous infusion of neuromuscular blocking drugs during ARDS has been reported to reduce mortality (5. There are insufficient confirming data on the superiority of APRV above other ventilatory methods in regard to oxygenation, hemodynamics, regional blood flow, patient comfort and length of mechanical ventilation. Based on current findings

  17. Penetrating injury of the lungs and multiple injuries of lower extremities caused by aircraft bombs splinters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Injuries caused by aircraft bombs cause severe damages to the human body. They are characterized by massive destruction of injured tissues and organs, primary contamination by polymorph bacterial flora and modified reactivity of the body. Upon being wounded by aircraft bombs projectiles a victim simultaneously sustains severe damages of many organs and organ systems due to the fact that a large number of projectiles at the same time injure the chest, stomach, head and extremities. Case report. We presented a patient, 41 years of age, injured by aircraft bomb with hemo-pneumothorax and destruction of the bone and soft tissue structures of the foot, as well as the treatment result of such heavy injuries. After receiving thoracocentesis and short reanimation, the patient underwent surgical procedure. The team performed thoracotomy, primary treatment of the wound and atypical resection of the left lung. Thoracic drains were placed. The wounds on the lower leg and feet were treated primarily. Due to massive destruction of bone tissue of the right foot by cluster bomb splinters, and impossibility of reconstruction of the foot, guillotine amputation of the right lower leg was performed. Twelve days after the wounding caused by cluster bomb splinters, soft tissue of the left lower leg was covered by Tirsch free transplantant and the defect in the area of the left foot was covered by dorsalis pedis flap. The transplant and flap were accepted and the donor sites were epithelized. Twenty-six days following the wounding reamputation was performed and amputation stump of the right lower leg was closed. The patient was given a lower leg prosthesis with which he could move. Conclusion. Upon being wounded by aircraft bomb splinters, the injured person sustains severe wounds of multiple organs and organ systems due to simultaneous injuries caused by a large number of projectiles. It is necessary to take care of the vital organs first because they

  18. Acute lung injury: How macrophages orchestrate resolution of inflammation and tissue repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eHerold

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung macrophages are long living cells with broad differentiation potential, which reside in the lung interstitium and alveoli or are organ-recruited upon inflammatory stimuli. A role of resident and recruited macrophages in initiating and maintaining pulmonary inflammation in lung infection or injury has been convincingly demonstrated. More recent reports suggest that lung macrophages are main orchestrators of termination and resolution of inflammation and initiators of parenchymal repair processes that are essential for return to homeostasis with normal gas exchange. In this review we will discuss cellular cross-talk mechanisms and molecular pathways of macrophage plasticity which define their role in inflammation resolution and in initiation of lung barrier repair following lung injury.

  19. Nitric Oxide as a Mediator of Oxidant Lung Injury Due to Paraquat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1994-08-01

    At low concentrations, nitric oxide is a physiological transmitter, but in excessive concentrations it may cause cell and tissue injury. We report that in acute oxidant injury induced by the herbicide paraquat in isolated guinea pig lungs, nitric oxide synthesis was markedly stimulated, as evidenced by increased levels of cyclic GMP in lung perfusate and of nitrite and L-citrulline production in lung tissue. All signs of injury, including increased airway and perfusion pressures, pulmonary edema, and protein leakage into the airspaces, were dose-dependently attenuated or totally prevented by either N^G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or N^ω-nitro-L-arginine, selective and competitive inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. Protection was reversed by excess L-arginine but not by its enantiomer D-arginine. When blood was added to the lung perfusate, the paraquat injury was moderated or delayed as it was when paraquat was given to anesthetized guinea pigs. The rapid onset of injury and its failure to occur in the absence of Ca2+ suggest that constitutive rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase was responsible for the stimulated nitric oxide synthesis. The findings indicate that nitric oxide plays a critical role in the production of lung tissue injury due to paraquat, and it may be a pathogenetic factor in other forms of oxidant tissue injury.

  20. Radiological and functional assessment of radiation-induced lung injury in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vujaskovic, Z; Down, JD; van t'Veld, AA; Mooyaart, EL; Meertens, H; Piers, DA; Szabo, BG; Konings, AWT

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an experimental model to measure localized radiation-induced lung injury using multiple end-points including breathing frequency, high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide perfusion. The rats were anaesthetized and the right lung irradiated wi

  1. Normothermic ex vivo perfusion prevents lung injury compared to extended cold preservation for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cypel, M; Rubacha, M; Yeung, J; Hirayama, S; Torbicki, K; Madonik, M; Fischer, S; Hwang, D; Pierre, A; Waddell, T K; de Perrot, M; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2009-10-01

    Treatment of injured donor lungs ex vivo to accelerate organ recovery and ameliorate reperfusion injury could have a major impact in lung transplantation. We have recently demonstrated a feasible technique for prolonged (12 h) normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). This study was performed to examine the impact of prolonged EVLP on ischemic injury. Pig donor lungs were cold preserved in Perfadex for 12 h and subsequently divided into two groups: cold static preservation (CSP) or EVLP at 37 degrees C with Steen solution for a further 12 h (total 24 h preservation). Lungs were then transplanted and reperfused for 4 h. EVLP preservation resulted in significantly better lung oxygenation (PaO(2) 531 +/- 43 vs. 244 +/- 49 mmHg, p < 0.01) and lower edema formation rates after transplantation. Alveolar epithelial cell tight junction integrity, evaluated by zona occludens-1 protein staining, was disrupted in the cell membranes after prolonged CSP but not after EVLP. The maintenance of integrity of barrier function during EVLP translates into significant attenuation of reperfusion injury and improved graft performance after transplantation. Integrity of functional metabolic pathways during normothermic perfusion was confirmed by effective gene transfer and GFP protein synthesis by lung alveolar cells. In conclusion, EVLP prevents ongoing injury associated with prolonged ischemia and accelerates lung recovery. PMID:19663886

  2. A review of pulmonary coagulopathy in acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Laurens; de Groot, Philip G.; Grutters, Jan C.; Biesma, Douwe H.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced bronchoalveolar coagulation is a hallmark of many acute inflammatory lung diseases such as acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. Intervention with natural anticoagulants in these diseases has therefore become a topic of interest. Recently, new data on the rol

  3. Airway Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevents Arrested Alveolar Growth in Neonatal Lung Injury in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    van Haaften, Timothy; Byrne, Roisin; Bonnet, Sebastien; Rochefort, Gael Y.; Akabutu, John; Bouchentouf, Manaf; Rey-Parra, Gloria J.; Galipeau, Jacques; Haromy, Alois; Eaton, Farah; Chen, Ming; Hashimoto, Kyoko; Abley, Doris; Korbutt, Greg; Archer, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and emphysema are characterized by arrested alveolar development or loss of alveoli; both are significant global health problems and currently lack effective therapy. Bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) prevent adult lung injury, but their therapeutic potential in neonatal lung disease is unknown.

  4. Surfactant therapy restores gas exchange in lung injury due to paraquat intoxication in rats

    OpenAIRE

    So, K. L.; Buijzer, E.; Gommers, Diederik; Kaisers, U; Genderen, Perry; Lachmann, Burkhard

    1998-01-01

    textabstractParaquat is a weed killer which causes often fatal lung damage in humans and other animals. There is evidence that the pulmonary surfactant system is involved in the pathophysiology of respiratory failure after paraquat intoxication and, therefore, the possible therapeutic effect of intratracheal surfactant administration on gas exchange in rats with progressive lung injury induced by paraquat poisoning was studied. In one group of rats, the time course of the development of lung ...

  5. The Role of Hyaluronan Synthase 3 in Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Kuan-Jen; Spicer, Andrew P.; Mascarenhas, Marcella M.; Yu, Lunyin; Ochoa, Cristhiaan D; Garg, Hari G.; Quinn, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    We recently found that low-molecular-weight hyaluronan was induced by cyclic stretch in lung fibroblasts and accumulated in lungs from animals with ventilator-induced lung injury. The low-molecular-weight hyaluronan produced by stretch increased interleukin-8 production in epithelial cells, and was accompanied by an upregulation of hyaluronan synthase–3 mRNA. We hypothesized that low-molecular-weight hyaluronan induced by high VT was dependent on hyaluronan synthase 3, and was associated with...

  6. Conflicting Physiological and Genomic Cardiopulmonary Effects of Recruitment Maneuvers in Murine Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Voiriot, Guillaume; Zhou, Tong; Marcos, Elisabeth; Dudek, Steven M.; Jacobson, Jeff R.; Machado, Roberto,; Adnot, Serge; Brochard, Laurent; Maitre, Bernard; Joe G N Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Low tidal volume ventilation, although promoting atelectasis, is a protective strategy against ventilator-induced lung injury. Deep inflation (DI) recruitment maneuvers restore lung volumes, but potentially compromise lung parenchymal and vascular function via repetitive overdistention. Our objective was to examine cardiopulmonary physiological and transcriptional consequences of recruitment maneuvers. C57/BL6 mice challenged with either PBS or LPS via aspiration were placed on mechanical ven...

  7. Time-dependent changes of autophagy and apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide-induced rat acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Li Lin; Lijun Zhang; Liangzhu Yu; Lu Han; Wanli Ji; Hui Shen; Zhenwu Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Abnormal lung cell death including autophagy and apoptosis is the central feature in acute lung injury (ALI). To identify the cellular mechanisms and the chronology by which different types of lung cell death are activated during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI, we decided to evaluate autophagy (by LC3-II and autophagosome) and apoptosis (by caspase-3) at different time points after LPS treatment in a rat model of LPS-induced ALI. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley ra...

  8. Therapeutic Modulation of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sebag, Sara C.; Bastarache, Julie A.; Ware, Lorraine B.

    2011-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI) are characterized by excessive intra-alveolar fibrin deposition, driven, at least in part by inflammation. The imbalance between activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis in patients with ALI/ARDS favors fibrin formation and appears to occur both systemically and in the lung and airspace. Tissue factor (TF), a key mediator of the activation of coagulation in the lung, has been implicated in the pathogenesis ...

  9. Protective Effect of Curcumin on Endotoxin-induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of curcumin on endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in rats, and explore the underlying mechanisms, 24 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups: sham-vehicle (S), sham-curcumin (C), lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-vehicle (L), and curcumin-lipopolysaccharide (C-L) groups. The wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio of the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid protein content were used as measures of lung injury. Neutrophil recruitment and activation were evaluated by BAL fluid cellularity and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in cell-free BAL and lung tissue. The levels of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1(CINC-1) in lung tissues were measured by ELISA. The histopathological changes of lung tissues were observed by using the HE staining. Our results showed that lung injury parameters, including the wet/dry weight ratio and protein content in BALF, were significantly higher in the L group than in the S group (P<0.01). In the L group, higher numbers of neutrophils and greater MPO activity in cell-free BAL and lung homogenates were observed when compared with the S group (P<0.01).There was a marked increase in CINC-1 levels in lung tissues in response to LPS challenge (P<0.01,L group vs S group). Curcumin pretreatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced changes in these indices. LPS caused extensive morphological lung damage, which was also lessened after curcumin pretreatment. All the above-mentioned parameters in the C group were not significantly different from those of the S group. It is concluded that curcumin pretreatment attenuates LPS-induced lung injury in rats. This beneficial effect of curcumin may involves, in part, inhibition of neutrophilic recruitment and activity, possibly through inhibition of lung CINC-1 expression.

  10. Addition of ulinastatin to preservation solution promotes protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in rabbit lung

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ming; WEN Xiao-hong; CHEN Shu-ping; AN Xiao-xia; XU He-yun

    2011-01-01

    Background The composition of the lung preservation solution used in lung graft procurement has been considered the key to minimize lung injury during the period of ischemia. Low-potassium dextran glucose (LPDG), an extracellular-type solution, has been adopted by most lung transplantation centers, due to the experimental and clinical evidences that LPDG is superior to intracellular-type solutions. Ulinastatin has been shown to attenuate ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in various organs in animals. We supposed that the addition of ulinastatin to LPDG as a flushing solution, would further ameliorate I/R lung injury than LPDG solution alone.Methods Twelve male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups. Using an alternative in situ lung I/R model, the left lung in the control group was supplied and preserved with LPDG solution for 120 minutes. In the study group 50 000 U/kg of ulinastatin was added to the LPDG solution for lung preservation. Then re-ventilation and reperfusion of the left lung were performed for 90 minutes. Blood gas analysis (PaO2, PaCO2), mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) and serum TNF-α level were measured intermittently. The pulmonary water index (D/W), tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) content and morphologic changes were analyzed.Results The study group showed significantly higher PaO2 and lower MPAP at the end of reperfusion. Serum TNF-α level, left lung tissue MPO and MDA in the study group were significantly lower than those in the control group. D/W and pathologic evaluation were also remarkably different between the two groups.Conclusions This study indicated that better lung preservation could be achieved with the use of an ulinastatin modified LPDG solution. Ulinastatin further attenuated lung I/R injury, at least partly by reducing oxidative reactions,inhibiting the release of inflammatory factors and neutrophils immigration.

  11. Reactive oxygen species perpetuate radiation-induced lung injury: causes and cures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of unacceptable radiation-induced lung injury remains a significant limiting factor in the current treatment of the tumors involving the thoracic region. Despite advances in normal tissue radiobiology, demonstrating that ionizing radiation triggers a cascade of genetic and molecular events that proceed during a latent period of pulmonary injury, the precise mechanisms underlying radiation-induced lung injury remain unclear. Based on our recent results, we propose a new paradigm of radiation-induced lung injury hypothesizing that hypoxia plays a central role in generating a non-healing wound response that perpetuates radiation lung injury through continuous generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and expression/activation of cytokines. Several lines of evidence from our group support this hypothesis. Using electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping we have demonstrated the presence of ROS in rat lungs 13 weeks after irradiation. In a transgenic mouse model we have shown that overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD), an important scavenger of ROS, ameliorates RT-induced lung injury. In addition, our data show that synthetic superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic compounds can be used to target ROS and reduce RT-induced lung damage. The findings noted above indicating a role for chronic ROS expression in the perpetuation of a wound healing response, suggest that long term SOD mimetic administration may be an effective therapeutic intervention. This strategy may reduce the risk of radiation-induced lung injury at standard radiation doses and may allow for higher doses of radiation to be delivered to selected tumors without increasing the risk of pulmonary complications

  12. Experimental study of acute lung injury induced by different tidal volume ventilation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-ri; DU Yong-cheng; JIANG Hong-ying; XU Jian-ying; XU Yong-jian

    2005-01-01

    @@ Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a dual blade sward which if misused could lead to lung injury, called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). Pathogenesis of VILI is very complex with various manifestations, which is the focus in MV field in recent years.1 In our research, the rats were ventilated with different tidal volume, then the pathological changes of the lungs were observed under macroscopy, light and electronic microscope, and various laboratory tests in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were also carried out in order to probe further the pathologic characteristics and the pathogenesis of VILI.

  13. Protective Effect of Genistein on Lipopolysaccharide-induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingwang; XU Tao; LIAN Qingquan; ZENG Bangxiong; ZHANG Bing; XIE Yubo

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of genistein on endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in rats, and explore the underlying mechanisms, 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups: saline control, genistein alone, lipopolysaccaride alone, and genistein pretreatment. Each treatment group consisted of eight animals. Animals were observed for 6 h after LPS challenge, and the wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio of the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid(BALF) protein content were used as a measure of lung injury. Neutrophil recruitment and activation were evaluated by BALF cellularity and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. RT-PCR analysis was performed in lung tissue to assess gene expression of ICAM-1. The histopathological changes were also observed using the HE staining of lung tissue. Our results showed that lung injury parameters, including the wet/dry weight ratio and protein content in BALF, were significantly higher in the LPS alone group than in the saline control group (P<0.01). In the LPS alone group, a larger number of neutrophils and greater MPO activity in cell-free BAL and lung homogenates were observed when compared with the saline control group (P<0.01). There was a significant increase in lung ICAM-1 mRNA in response to LPS challenge (P< 0. 01, group L versus group S).Genistein pretreatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced changes in these indices. LPS caused extensive lung damage, which was also lessened after genistein pretreatment. All above-mentioned parameters in the genistein alone group were not significantly different from those of the saline control group. It is concluded that genistein pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced lung injury in rats.This beneficial effect of genistein may involves, in part, an inhibition of neutrophilic recruitment and activity, possibly through an inhibition of lung ICAM-1 expression.

  14. Renin-angiotensin system and its role in hyperoxic acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P X; Han, C H; Zhou, F J; Li, L; Zhang, H M; Liu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is essential to sustain life, but at a high partial pressure oxygen may cause toxicity to the human body. These injuries to the lung are known as hyperoxic acute lung injury [HALI]). To date, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the pathogenesis of HALI, for which some hypotheses have been proposed. Accumulating evidence indicates that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of some lung diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and HALI. In this review, we briefly introduce the classic RAS, local (tissue) RAS and intracellular RAS, and we summarize findings on the relationship between local/classic RAS and HALI. The importance--and ambiguity--of the results of these studies indicate a need for further investigations of the RAS and its role in the patho- genesis of HALI. PMID:27416692

  15. The value of nitrogen washout/washin method in assessing alveolar recruitment volume in acute lung injury patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李洋

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the precision and feasibility of nitrogen washout/washin method in assessing lung recruitment of acute lung injury(ALI)patients.Methods Fifteen ALI patients underwent mechanical ventilation

  16. Antenatal and postnatal corticosteroid and resuscitation induced lung injury in preterm sheep

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    Kallapur Suhas G

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Initiation of ventilation using high tidal volumes in preterm lambs causes lung injury and inflammation. Antenatal corticosteroids mature the lungs of preterm infants and postnatal corticosteroids are used to treat bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Objective To test if antenatal or postnatal corticosteroids would decrease resuscitation induced lung injury. Methods 129 d gestational age lambs (n = 5-8/gp; term = 150 d were operatively delivered and ventilated after exposure to either 1 no medication, 2 antenatal maternal IM Betamethasone 0.5 mg/kg 24 h prior to delivery, 3 0.5 mg/kg Dexamethasone IV at delivery or 4 Cortisol 2 mg/kg IV at delivery. Lambs then were ventilated with no PEEP and escalating tidal volumes (VT to 15 mL/kg for 15 min and then given surfactant. The lambs were ventilated with VT 8 mL/kg and PEEP 5 cmH20 for 2 h 45 min. Results High VT ventilation caused a deterioration of lung physiology, lung inflammation and injury. Antenatal betamethasone improved ventilation, decreased inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and alveolar protein leak, but did not prevent neutrophil influx. Postnatal dexamethasone decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, but had no beneficial effect on ventilation, and postnatal cortisol had no effect. Ventilation increased liver serum amyloid mRNA expression, which was unaffected by corticosteroids. Conclusions Antenatal betamethasone decreased lung injury without decreasing lung inflammatory cells or systemic acute phase responses. Postnatal dexamethasone or cortisol, at the doses tested, did not have important effects on lung function or injury, suggesting that corticosteroids given at birth will not decrease resuscitation mediated injury.

  17. Reproduction and evaluation of a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog

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    Yi-fan LIU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce and evaluate a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog. Methods The smog composition was analyzed and a rat model of inhalation lung injury was reproduced. Forty two healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control (NC group and 1h, 2h, 6h, 24h, 48h and 96h after inhalation group (n=6. The arterial blood gas, wet to dry weight ratio (W/D of lung, leukocyte count, and protein concentration in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF were determined. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in lung tissue were observed. Results The composition of black gunpowder smog was composed mainly of CO2 and CO, and their concentrations remained stable within 12 minutes. Smog inhalation caused a significant hypoxemia, the concentration of blood COHb reached a peak value 1h, and the W/D of lung reached peak value 2h after inhalation (P<0.05. The amount of leukocytes and content of protein in BALF increased significantly within 24h after inhalation (P<0.05. Histopathological observation showed diffuse hemorrhage, edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue as manifestations of acute lung injury, and the injury did not recover at 96h after inhalation. Conclusion The rat model of inhalation lung injury can be reproduced using black gunpowder smog, and it has the advantages of its readiness for reproduction, reliability and stability, and it could be used for the experiment of inhalation injury in a battlefield environment.

  18. Cardiopulmonary function of dogs with plutonium-induced chronic lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagle dogs had signs of restrictive lung disease 1 to 5 years after exposure by inhalation to 239PuO2 aerosols. The 239PuO2 aerosols were monodisperse with activity median aerodynamic diameters of 0.75, 1.5, or 3.0 microns. The plutonium particles produced protracted alpha irradiation of the lungs. Ten dogs had specific initial pulmonary burdens (IPB) of 330 to 4100 kBq of 239PuO2/kg of body mass. The average onset time of clinical signs of lung injury was 3 years after exposure; the average time from the onset of signs until cardiorespiratory function evaluation was 5.5 years. A second group of 10 dogs had IPB of 110 to 2000 kBq of 239Pu/kg of body mass but no signs of lung injury. A third group of 10 dogs, not exposed to 239Pu, were matched for age and sex. Cardiopulmonary function tests were performed. Only the dogs in group I with signs of lung injury had a mild respiratory function disorder consisting of smaller lung volumes, reduced compliance, increased respiratory frequency and minute volume, and reduced carbon monoxide diffusing capacity. Cardiac function of all three groups was similar. These findings indicate that alpha irradiation of the lungs of man could produce restrictive lung disease at long times after initial exposure

  19. Deletion of Caveolin-1 Protects against Oxidative Lung Injury via Up-Regulation of Heme Oxygenase-1

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Yang; Kim, Hong Pyo; Chi, Minli; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Stefan W. Ryter; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Hyperoxia causes lung injury in animals and humans, and is an established model of ALI. Caveolin-1, a major constituent of caveolae, regulates numerous biological processes, including cell death and proliferation. Here we demonstrate that caveolin-1–null mice (cav-1−/−) were resistant to hyperoxia-induced death and lung injury. Cav-1−/− mice sustained reduced lung injury after hyperoxia as determin...

  20. Membrane translocation of IL-33 receptor in ventilator induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Hsing; Lin, Jau-Chen; Wu, Shu-Yu; Huang, Kun-Lun; Jung, Fang; Ma, Ming-Chieh; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Jow, Guey-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury is associated with inflammatory mechanism and causes high mortality. The objective of this study was to discover the role of IL-33 and its ST2 receptor in acute lung injury induced by mechanical ventilator (ventilator-induced lung injury; VILI). Male Wistar rats were intubated after tracheostomy and received ventilation at 10 cm H2O of inspiratory pressure (PC10) by a G5 ventilator for 4 hours. The hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were collected and analyzed. The morphological changes of lung injury were also assessed by histological H&E stain. The dynamic changes of lung injury markers such as TNF-α and IL-1β were measured in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissue homogenization by ELISA assay. During VILI, the IL-33 profile change was detected in BALF, peripheral serum, and lung tissue by ELISA analysis. The Il-33 and ST2 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining and western blot analysis. The consequence of VILI by H&E stain showed inducing lung congestion and increasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in the lung tissue homogenization, serum, and BALF, respectively. In addition, rats with VILI also exhibited high expression of IL-33 in lung tissues. Interestingly, the data showed that ST2L (membrane form) was highly accumulated in the membrane fraction of lung tissue in the PC10 group, but the ST2L in cytosol was dramatically decreased in the PC10 group. Conversely, the sST2 (soluble form) was slightly decreased both in the membrane and cytosol fractions in the PC10 group compared to the control group. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that ST2L translocation from the cytosol to the cell membranes of lung tissue and the down-expression of sST2 in both fractions can function as new biomarkers of VILI. Moreover, IL-33/ST2 signaling activated by mechanically responsive lung injury may potentially serve as a new therapy target. PMID:25815839

  1. Membrane translocation of IL-33 receptor in ventilator induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hsing Yang

    Full Text Available Ventilator-induced lung injury is associated with inflammatory mechanism and causes high mortality. The objective of this study was to discover the role of IL-33 and its ST2 receptor in acute lung injury induced by mechanical ventilator (ventilator-induced lung injury; VILI. Male Wistar rats were intubated after tracheostomy and received ventilation at 10 cm H2O of inspiratory pressure (PC10 by a G5 ventilator for 4 hours. The hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were collected and analyzed. The morphological changes of lung injury were also assessed by histological H&E stain. The dynamic changes of lung injury markers such as TNF-α and IL-1β were measured in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and lung tissue homogenization by ELISA assay. During VILI, the IL-33 profile change was detected in BALF, peripheral serum, and lung tissue by ELISA analysis. The Il-33 and ST2 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining and western blot analysis. The consequence of VILI by H&E stain showed inducing lung congestion and increasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in the lung tissue homogenization, serum, and BALF, respectively. In addition, rats with VILI also exhibited high expression of IL-33 in lung tissues. Interestingly, the data showed that ST2L (membrane form was highly accumulated in the membrane fraction of lung tissue in the PC10 group, but the ST2L in cytosol was dramatically decreased in the PC10 group. Conversely, the sST2 (soluble form was slightly decreased both in the membrane and cytosol fractions in the PC10 group compared to the control group. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that ST2L translocation from the cytosol to the cell membranes of lung tissue and the down-expression of sST2 in both fractions can function as new biomarkers of VILI. Moreover, IL-33/ST2 signaling activated by mechanically responsive lung injury may potentially serve as a new therapy target.

  2. Spatiotemporal Aeration and Lung Injury Patterns Are Influenced by the First Inflation Strategy at Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, David G; Rajapaksa, Anushi; Zonneveld, C Elroy; Black, Don; Perkins, Elizabeth J; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Lavizzari, Anna; Frerichs, Inéz; Zahra, Valerie A; Davis, Peter G

    2016-02-01

    Ineffective aeration during the first inflations at birth creates regional aeration and ventilation defects, initiating injurious pathways. This study aimed to compare a sustained first inflation at birth or dynamic end-expiratory supported recruitment during tidal inflations against ventilation without intentional recruitment on gas exchange, lung mechanics, spatiotemporal regional aeration and tidal ventilation, and regional lung injury in preterm lambs. Lambs (127 ± 2 d gestation), instrumented at birth, were ventilated for 60 minutes from birth with either lung-protective positive pressure ventilation (control) or as per control after either an initial 30 seconds of 40 cm H2O sustained inflation (SI) or an initial stepwise end-expiratory pressure recruitment maneuver during tidal inflations (duration 180 s; open lung ventilation [OLV]). At study completion, molecular markers of lung injury were analyzed. The initial use of an OLV maneuver, but not SI, at birth resulted in improved lung compliance, oxygenation, end-expiratory lung volume, and reduced ventilatory needs compared with control, persisting throughout the study. These changes were due to more uniform inter- and intrasubject gravity-dependent spatiotemporal patterns of aeration (measured using electrical impedance tomography). Spatial distribution of tidal ventilation was more stable after either recruitment maneuver. All strategies caused regional lung injury patterns that mirrored associated regional volume states. Irrespective of strategy, spatiotemporal volume loss was consistently associated with up-regulation of early growth response-1 expression. Our results show that mechanical and molecular consequences of lung aeration at birth are not simply related to rapidity of fluid clearance; they are also related to spatiotemporal pressure-volume interactions within the lung during inflation and deflation.

  3. Effects of budesonide and N-acetylcysteine on acute lung hyperinflation, inflammation and injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Anne-Helene; Eriksson, Christina; Wang, Xiangdong

    2005-08-01

    Leukocyte activation and production of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species are important in the pathogenesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. The present study investigated acute lung hyperinflation, edema, and lung inflammation 4 h after an intratracheal instillation of LPS (0.5, 2.5, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000, and 5000 microg/ml/kg). Effects of budesonide, an inhaled anti-inflammatory corticosteroids, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, were evaluated in Wistar rats receiving either low (2.5 microg/ml/kg) or high (50 microg/ml/kg) concentrations of LPS. This study demonstrates that LPS in a concentration-dependent pattern induces acute lung hyperinflation measured by excised lung gas volume (25-45% above control), lung injury indicated by increased lung weight (10-60%), and lung inflammation characterized by the infiltration of leukocytes (40-14000%) and neutrophils (80-17000%) and the production of cytokines (up to 2700%) and chemokines (up to 350%) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pretreatment with NAC partially prevented tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) production induced by the low concentration of LPS, while pretreatment with budesonide totally prevented the increased production of TNFalpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractive protein (MCP)-1 after LPS challenge at both low and high concentrations. Budesonide failed to prevent BALF levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (GRO/CINC-1) as well as lung hyperinflation induced by both low and high concentrations of LPS. Pretreatment with budesonide totally prevented the formation of lung edema at the low concentration of LPS and had partial effects on acute lung injury and leukocyte influx at the high concentrations. Thus, our data indicate that therapeutic effects of budesonide and NAC are dependent upon the severity of the disease.

  4. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice

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    Masahiro Hashizume

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI. In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group.

  5. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Mouner, Marc; Chouteau, Joshua M; Gorodnya, Olena M; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V; Wilson, Glenn L; Gillespie, Mark N; Parker, James C

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII) which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP) was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH) and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group. PMID:25153040

  6. Effect of Lung Recruitment Maneuver in Children with Acute Lung Injury

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    Nemat Bilan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Acute lung injury (ALI is defined as PaO2/FiO2 less than 300 with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, without pressure is the top of the left atrium. Early diagnosis and treatment of pediatric ALI and find new cases is very important. Accurate diagnosis and effective steps to treating these patients is essential in the outcome of ALI. This study was conducted to show the impact of recruitment in the treatment of ALI patients. Materials and Methods This clinical trial study was conducted in Pediatric Educational-Medical center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (Tabriz, Iran and 42 patients with ALI were enrolled. All patients were underwent echocardiography. The patients were divided in 2 groups randomly (intervention and control groups consisted of 21 patients for each group. Patients were followed for 6 months to be evaluated in terms of clinical status and mortality. Results Difference on level of PaO2 in intervention group was -26±4 in comparison to the control group which was -4±4 (P

  7. Early administration of IL-6RA does not prevent radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation pneumonia and subsequent radiation lung fibrosis are major dose-limiting complications for patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine and plays important roles in the regulation of immune response and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anti-IL-6 monoclonal receptor antibody (IL-6RA) could ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury in mice. BALB/cAnNCrj mice having received thoracic irradiation of 21 Gy were injected intraperitoneally with IL-6RA (MR16-1) or control rat IgG twice, immediately and seven days after irradiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to examine the plasma level of IL-6 and serum amyloid A (SAA). Lung injury was assessed by histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin or Azan, measuring lung weight, and hydroxyproline. The mice treated with IL-6RA did not survive significantly longer than the rat IgG control. We observed marked up-regulation of IL-6 in mice treated with IL-6RA 150 days after irradiation, whereas IL-6RA temporarily suppressed early radiation-induced increase in the IL-6 release level. Histopathologic assessment showed no differences in lung section or lung weight between mice treated with IL-6RA and control. Our findings suggest that early treatment with IL-6RA after irradiation alone does not protect against radiation-induced lung injury

  8. Early administration of IL-6RA does not prevent radiation-induced lung injury in mice

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    Inoue Takehiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation pneumonia and subsequent radiation lung fibrosis are major dose-limiting complications for patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine and plays important roles in the regulation of immune response and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anti-IL-6 monoclonal receptor antibody (IL-6RA could ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury in mice. Methods BALB/cAnNCrj mice having received thoracic irradiation of 21 Gy were injected intraperitoneally with IL-6RA (MR16-1 or control rat IgG twice, immediately and seven days after irradiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to examine the plasma level of IL-6 and serum amyloid A (SAA. Lung injury was assessed by histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin or Azan, measuring lung weight, and hydroxyproline. Results The mice treated with IL-6RA did not survive significantly longer than the rat IgG control. We observed marked up-regulation of IL-6 in mice treated with IL-6RA 150 days after irradiation, whereas IL-6RA temporarily suppressed early radiation-induced increase in the IL-6 release level. Histopathologic assessment showed no differences in lung section or lung weight between mice treated with IL-6RA and control. Conclusions Our findings suggest that early treatment with IL-6RA after irradiation alone does not protect against radiation-induced lung injury.

  9. Lung-specific loss of the laminin α3 subunit confers resistance to mechanical injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urich, Daniela; Eisenberg, Jessica L; Hamill, Kevin J; Takawira, Desire; Chiarella, Sergio E; Soberanes, Saul; Gonzalez, Angel; Koentgen, Frank; Manghi, Tomas; Hopkinson, Susan B; Misharin, Alexander V; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Jones, Jonathan C R

    2011-09-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix that are secreted by epithelial cells and which are crucial for the normal structure and function of the basement membrane. We have generated a mouse harboring a conditional knockout of α3 laminin (Lama3(fl/fl)), one of the main laminin subunits in the lung basement membrane. At 60 days after intratracheal treatment of adult Lama3(fl/fl) mice with an adenovirus encoding Cre recombinase (Ad-Cre), the protein abundance of α3 laminin in whole lung homogenates was more than 50% lower than that in control-treated mice, suggesting a relatively long half-life for the protein in the lung. Upon exposure to an injurious ventilation strategy (tidal volume of 35 ml per kg of body weight for 2 hours), the mice with a knockdown of the α3 laminin subunit had less severe injury, as shown by lung mechanics, histology, alveolar capillary permeability and survival when compared with Ad-Null-treated mice. Knockdown of the α3 laminin subunit resulted in evidence of lung inflammation. However, this did not account for their resistance to mechanical ventilation. Rather, the loss of α3 laminin was associated with a significant increase in the collagen content of the lungs. We conclude that the loss of α3 laminin in the alveolar epithelium results in an increase in lung collagen, which confers resistance to mechanical injury. PMID:21878500

  10. DNaseI Protects against Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury and Pulmonary Fibrosis Mediated by Mitochondrial DNA

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    Guo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Paraquat (PQ poisoning is a lethal toxicological challenge that served as a disease model of acute lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis, but the mechanism is undetermined and no effective treatment has been discovered. Methods and Findings. We demonstrated that PQ injures mitochondria and leads to mtDNA release. The mtDNA mediated PBMC recruitment and stimulated the alveolar epithelial cell production of TGF-β1 in vitro. The levels of mtDNA in circulation and bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF were elevated in a mouse of PQ-induced lung injury. DNaseI could protect PQ-induced lung injury and significantly improved survival. Acute lung injury markers, such as TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6, and marker of fibrosis, collagen I, were downregulated in parallel with the elimination of mtDNA by DNaseI. These data indicate a possible mechanism for PQ-induced, mtDNA-mediated lung injury, which may be shared by other causes of lung injury, as suggested by the same protective effect of DNaseI in bleomycin-induced lung injury model. Interestingly, increased mtDNA in the BALF of patients with amyopathic dermatomyositis-interstitial lung disease can be appreciated. Conclusions. DNaseI targeting mtDNA may be a promising approach for the treatment of PQ-induced acute lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis that merits fast tracking through clinical trials.

  11. Sodium butyrate protects against severe burn-induced remote acute lung injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Liang

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, a ubiquitous nuclear protein, drives proinflammatory responses when released extracellularly. It plays a key role as a distal mediator in the development of acute lung injury (ALI. Sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has been demonstrated to inhibit HMGB1 expression. This study investigates the effect of sodium butyrate on burn-induced lung injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: 1 sham group, sham burn treatment; 2 burn group, third-degree burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA with lactated Ringer's solution for resuscitation; 3 burn plus sodium butyrate group, third-degree burns over 30% TBSA with lactated Ringer's solution containing sodium butyrate for resuscitation. The burned animals were sacrificed at 12, 24, and 48 h after burn injury. Lung injury was assessed in terms of histologic changes and wet weight to dry weight (W/D ratio. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-8 protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and HMGB1 expression in the lung was determined by Western blot analysis. Pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and malondialdehyde (MDA concentration were measured to reflect neutrophil infiltration and oxidative stress in the lung, respectively. As a result, sodium butyrate significantly inhibited the HMGB1 expressions in the lungs, reduced the lung W/D ratio, and improved the pulmonary histologic changes induced by burn trauma. Furthermore, sodium butyrate administration decreased the TNF-α and IL-8 concentrations in BALF and serum, suppressed MPO activity, and reduced the MDA content in the lungs after severe burn. These results suggest that sodium butyrate attenuates inflammatory responses, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the lungs, and protects against remote ALI induced by severe burn, which is associated with inhibiting HMGB1

  12. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  13. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Audi, Said H; Maleki, Sepideh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Eis, Annie L; Konduri, Girija G; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure.

  14. Early treatment of chlorine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation with corticosteroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonasson, Sofia, E-mail: sofia.jonasson@foi.se [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Umeå (Sweden); Wigenstam, Elisabeth [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Umeå (Sweden); Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden); Koch, Bo [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Umeå (Sweden); Bucht, Anders [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Umeå (Sweden); Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) is an industrial gas that is highly toxic and irritating when inhaled causing tissue damage and an acute inflammatory response in the airways followed by a long-term airway dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether early anti-inflammatory treatment can protect against the delayed symptoms in Cl{sub 2}-exposed mice. BALB/c mice were exposed by nose-only inhalation using 200 ppm Cl{sub 2} during 15 min. Assessment of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage, occurrence of lung edema and lung fibrosis were analyzed 24 h or 14 days post-exposure. A single dose of the corticosteroid dexamethasone (10 or 100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 1, 3, 6, or 12 h following Cl{sub 2} exposure. High-dose of dexamethasone reduced the acute inflammation if administered within 6 h after exposure but treated animals still displayed a significant lung injury. The effect of dexamethasone administered within 1 h was dose-dependent; high-dose significantly reduced acute airway inflammation (100 mg/kg) but not treatment with the relatively low-dose (10 mg/kg). Both doses reduced AHR 14 days later, while lung fibrosis measured as collagen deposition was not significantly reduced. The results point out that the acute inflammation in the lungs due to Cl{sub 2} exposure only partly is associated with the long-term AHR. We hypothesize that additional pathogenic mechanisms apart from the inflammatory reactions contribute to the development of long-term airway dysfunction. By using this mouse model, we have validated early administration of corticosteroids in terms of efficacy to prevent acute lung injury and delayed symptoms induced by Cl{sub 2} exposure. - Highlights: • Inhalation of Cl{sub 2} may lead to a long-standing airway hyperresponsiveness. • The symptoms in Cl{sub 2}-exposed mice are similar to those described for RADS in humans. • Corticosteroids prevent delayed symptoms such as AHR in

  15. Effects of alprostadil and iloprost on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle injury following hindlimb ischemia–reperfusion injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erer, Dilek; Özer, Abdullah; Demirtaş, Hüseyin; Gönül, İpek Işık; Kara, Halil; Arpacı, Hande; Çomu, Faruk Metin; Oktar, Gürsel Levent; Arslan, Mustafa; Küçük, Ayşegül

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of alprostadil (prostaglandin [PGE1] analog) and iloprost (prostacyclin [PGI2] analog) on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle tissues after ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods Wistar albino rats underwent 2 hours of ischemia via infrarenal aorta clamping with subsequent 2 hours of reperfusion. Alprostadil and iloprost were given starting simultaneously with the reperfusion period. Effects of agents on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) tissue specimens were examined. Results Renal medullary congestion, cytoplasmic swelling, and mean tubular dilatation scores were significantly lower in the alprostadil-treated group than those found in the I/R-only group (P<0.0001, P=0.015, and P<0.01, respectively). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary partial destruction, consolidation, alveolar edema, and hemorrhage scores were significantly lower in alprostadil- and iloprost-treated groups (P=0.017 and P=0.001; P<0.01 and P<0.0001). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration scores in skeletal muscle tissue were significantly lower in the iloprost-treated group than the scores found in the nontreated I/R group (P<0.0001). Conclusion Alprostadil and iloprost significantly reduce lung tissue I/R injury. Alprostadil has more prominent protective effects against renal I/R injury, while iloprost is superior in terms of protecting the skeletal muscle tissue against I/R injury. PMID:27601882

  16. Pancreatic enzymes in the gut contributing to lung injury after trauma/hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石汉平; 刘正军; 闻英

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether pancreatic proteolytic enzymes involve in lung injury induced by trauma/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). Results: Lung permeability, pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels and the ratio of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein to plasma protein increased after T/HS, and significantly decreased in intraluminal-ANGD treated but not in intravenous-ANGD treated rats. Histological analysis demonstrated fewer injured villi in the intraluminal-ANGD treated rats compared with those in the control rats. Linear regression analysis revealed that the percentage of injured ileal mucosal villi directly related to pulmonary polymorphic neutrophil sequestration and lung permeability to Evans blue dye. Conclusions: Pancreatic proteolytic enzymes in the ischemic gut may be important toxic factors contributing to lung injury after T/HS.

  17. Protective Effect of Rhubarb on Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春盛; 周景; 桂培春; 何新华

    2001-01-01

    To approach the mechanism of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in causing acute lung injury (ALI) and the protective effect of rhubarb and dexamethasone, lung specimens were examined with macroscopy, microscopy, electron microscopy and the biological markers of ALI including lung wet/dry weight, the rate of neutrophils and protein content in the pulmonary alveolar lavage fluid, pulmonary capillary permeability and pulmonary alveolar permeability index were observed. The mechanism of the ALI is mainly due to direct injury of alveolar epithelium and pulmonary vascular endothelium. Rhubarb and dexamethasone could significantly reduce the edema of the lung tissue, decrease the red blood cell exudation, neutrophil infiltration and plasma protein exudation in the alveoli and all the biological markers in comparison with the ALI model rats, indicating they have protective action on vascular endothelium and alveolar epithelium.

  18. Depletion of resident alveolar macrophages does not prevent Fas-mediated lung injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bem, R. A.; Farnand, A. W.; Wong, V; Koski, A; Rosenfeld, M. E.; Van Rooijen, N.; C. W. Frevert; Martin, T R; Matute-Bello, G.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system in the lungs results in a form of injury characterized by alveolar epithelial apoptosis and neutrophilic inflammation. Studies in vitro show that Fas activation induces apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells and cytokine production in alveolar macrophages. The main goal of this study was to determine the contribution of alveolar macrophages to Fas-induced lung inflammation in mice, by depleting alveolar macrophages using clodronate-containing lip...

  19. The utility of clinical predictors of acute lung injury: towards prevention and earlier recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Levitt, Joseph E.; Matthay, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Despite significant advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury, a lung-protective strategy of mechanical ventilation remains the only therapy with a proven survival advantage. Numerous pharmacologic therapies have failed to show benefit in multicenter clinical trials. The paradigm of early, goal-directed therapy of sepsis suggests greater clinical benefit may derive from initiating therapy prior to the onset of respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventil...

  20. Multislice spiral computed tomography to determine the effects of a recruitment maneuver in experimental lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although recruitment of atelectatic lung is a common aim in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the effects of a recruitment maneuver have not been assessed quantitatively. By multislice spiral CT (MSCT), we analyzed the changes in lung volumes calculated from the changes in the CT values of hyperinflated (VHYP), normally (VNORM), poorly (VPOOR) and nonaerated (VNON) lung in eight mechanically ventilated pigs with saline lavage-induced acute lung injury before and after a recruitment maneuver. This was compared to single slice analysis near the diaphragm. The increase in aerated lung was mainly for VPOOR and the less in VNORM. Total lung volume and intrathoracic gas increased. No differences were found for tidal volumes measured by spirometry or determined by CT. The inspiratory-expiratory volume differences were not different after the recruitment maneuver in VNON (from 62±18 ml to 43±26 ml, P=0.114), and in VNORM (from 216±51 ml to 251±37 ml, P=0.102). Single slice analysis significantly underestimated the increase in normally and poorly aerated lung. Quantitative analysis of lung volumes by whole lung MSCT revealed the increase of poorly aerated lung as the main mechanism of a standard recruitment maneuver. MSCT can provide additional information as compared to single slice CT. (orig.)

  1. Multislice spiral computed tomography to determine the effects of a recruitment maneuver in experimental lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, Dietrich; Rossaint, Rolf [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Anesthesiology Department, Aachen (Germany); Mahnken, Andreas H.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Guenther, Rolf W. [University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen, Clinic of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Kuhlen, Ralf [University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen, Operative Intensive Care Department, Aachen (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Although recruitment of atelectatic lung is a common aim in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the effects of a recruitment maneuver have not been assessed quantitatively. By multislice spiral CT (MSCT), we analyzed the changes in lung volumes calculated from the changes in the CT values of hyperinflated (V{sub HYP}), normally (V{sub NORM}), poorly (V{sub POOR}) and nonaerated (V{sub NON}) lung in eight mechanically ventilated pigs with saline lavage-induced acute lung injury before and after a recruitment maneuver. This was compared to single slice analysis near the diaphragm. The increase in aerated lung was mainly for V{sub POOR} and the less in V{sub NORM}. Total lung volume and intrathoracic gas increased. No differences were found for tidal volumes measured by spirometry or determined by CT. The inspiratory-expiratory volume differences were not different after the recruitment maneuver in V{sub NON} (from 62{+-}18 ml to 43{+-}26 ml, P=0.114), and in V{sub NORM} (from 216{+-}51 ml to 251{+-}37 ml, P=0.102). Single slice analysis significantly underestimated the increase in normally and poorly aerated lung. Quantitative analysis of lung volumes by whole lung MSCT revealed the increase of poorly aerated lung as the main mechanism of a standard recruitment maneuver. MSCT can provide additional information as compared to single slice CT. (orig.)

  2. Protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 on lung injury induced by erythrocyte instillation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Qing-feng; ZHOU Qiao-mei; ZENG Si; DOU Li-dong; JI Yong; ZENG Yin-ming

    2008-01-01

    Background Intratracheal instillation of blood induces self-repaired acute lung injury.However,the mechanism of repair has been unclear.Heme-oxygenase (HO)-1,which catalyzes heine breakdown,acts as an inducible defense against oxidative stress and plays an important role in inflammation.The objective of this study was to test the role of HO-1 in lung injury caused by intratracheal instillation of red cells.Methods Forty healthy,male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups:normal group,saline group,erythrocyte group,erythrocyte+zinc-protoporphyrin (ZnPP,HO-1 inhibitor) group and saline+ZnPP group.At 2 days after intratracheal instillation of red cells,lung tissues and lavage samples were isolated for biochemical determinations and histological measurements.Results Histological analysis revealed that administration of ZnPP worsened the acute lung injury induced by instilled erythrocytes.HO-1 was over-expressed in the erythrocyte group and in the erythrocyte+ZnPP group.Compared with the erythrocyte+ZnPP group,the levels of total protein,lactate dehydrogenase and tumor necrosis factor-α in the lavage were lower (P<0.01),while the level of interleukin-10 was higher in the erythrocyte group (P<0.01).Conclusion HO-1 protects against erythrocyte-induced inflammatory injury in lung.

  3. Consumption of Hydrogen Water Reduces Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulin Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to paraquat leads to acute lung injury and oxidative stress is widely accepted as a contributor to paraquat-induced acute lung injury. Recent studies have reported that consumption of water with dissolved molecular hydrogen to a saturated level (hydrogen water prevents oxidative stress-induced diseases. Here, we investigated whether consumption of saturated hydrogen saline protects rats against paraquat-induced acute lung injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control group; hydrogen water-only group (HW group; paraquat-only group (PQ group; paraquat and hydrogen water group (PQ  +  HW group. The rats in control group and HW group drank pure water or hydrogen water; the rats in PQ group and PQ  +  HW group were intraperitonealy injected with paraquat (35 mg/kg and then provided pure water or hydrogen water. Both biochemical and histological lung alterations were measured. The results showed that hydrogen water ameliorated these alterations, demonstrating that hydrogen water alleviated paraquat-induced acute lung injury possibly by inhibition of oxidative damage.

  4. Consumption of hydrogen water reduces paraquat-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shulin; Liu, Kan; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Wenwu; Xu, Weigang; Denoble, Petar; Tao, Hengyi; Sun, Xuejun

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to paraquat leads to acute lung injury and oxidative stress is widely accepted as a contributor to paraquat-induced acute lung injury. Recent studies have reported that consumption of water with dissolved molecular hydrogen to a saturated level (hydrogen water) prevents oxidative stress-induced diseases. Here, we investigated whether consumption of saturated hydrogen saline protects rats against paraquat-induced acute lung injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control group; hydrogen water-only group (HW group); paraquat-only group (PQ group); paraquat and hydrogen water group (PQ + HW group). The rats in control group and HW group drank pure water or hydrogen water; the rats in PQ group and PQ + HW group were intraperitonealy injected with paraquat (35 mg/kg) and then provided pure water or hydrogen water. Both biochemical and histological lung alterations were measured. The results showed that hydrogen water ameliorated these alterations, demonstrating that hydrogen water alleviated paraquat-induced acute lung injury possibly by inhibition of oxidative damage. PMID:21318114

  5. Autophagy in pulmonary macrophages mediates lung inflammatory injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation during mechanical ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Gongjian; Dull, Randal O; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process by which cells break down their own components. We explored the role of autophagy in the mechanisms of mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory injury. Mice were subjected to low (7 ml/kg) or high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h. Bone marrow-derived macrophages transfected with a scrambled or autophagy-related protein 5 smal...

  6. Postexposure aerosolized heparin reduces lung injury in chlorine-exposed mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zarogiannis, Sotirios G.; Wagener, Brant M.; Basappa, Susanna; Doran, Stephen; Rodriguez, Cilina A.; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Pittet, Jean Francois; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is a highly reactive oxidant gas that, when inhaled, may cause acute lung injury culminating in death from respiratory failure. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exposure of mice to Cl2 causes intra-alveolar and systemic activation of the coagulation cascade that plays an important role in development of lung injury. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to Cl2 (400 for 30 min or 600 ppm for 45 min) in environmental chambers and then returned to room air for 1 or 6 h. Native coa...

  7. Comparison of conventional mechanical ventilation and synchronous independent lung ventilation (SILV) in the treatment of unilateral lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, J M; DeHaven, C B; Branson, R D

    1985-08-01

    Eight patients presenting with severe unilateral pulmonary injury responded poorly to conventional mechanical ventilation. Synchronous independent lung ventilation (SILV) was employed to provide support of ventilation and oxygenation without creating the ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch observed during conventional ventilation. All patients demonstrated improved oxygenation (mean increase, 80 torr) during SILV with the FIO2 unchanged from previous therapy. Invasive hemodynamic monitoring in five of eight patients showed no difference in the commonly measured cardiopulmonary parameters with the two forms of mechanical ventilation. Peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and pressure change secondary to tidal volume delivery to the uninvolved lung were significantly less during SILV. SILV is an effective method of improving oxygenation in patients with severe unilateral pulmonary injury. PMID:3894680

  8. Trauma hemorrhagic shock-induced lung injury involves a gut-lymph-induced TLR4 pathway in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego C Reino

    Full Text Available Injurious non-microbial factors released from the stressed gut during shocked states contribute to the development of acute lung injury (ALI and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS. Since Toll-like receptors (TLR act as sensors of tissue injury as well as microbial invasion and TLR4 signaling occurs in both sepsis and noninfectious models of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, we hypothesized that factors in the intestinal mesenteric lymph after trauma hemorrhagic shock (T/HS mediate gut-induced lung injury via TLR4 activation.The concept that factors in T/HS lymph exiting the gut recreates ALI is evidenced by our findings that the infusion of porcine lymph, collected from animals subjected to global T/HS injury, into naïve wildtype (WT mice induced lung injury. Using C3H/HeJ mice that harbor a TLR4 mutation, we found that TLR4 activation was necessary for the development of T/HS porcine lymph-induced lung injury as determined by Evan's blue dye (EBD lung permeability and myeloperoxidase (MPO levels as well as the induction of the injurious pulmonary iNOS response. TRIF and Myd88 deficiency fully and partially attenuated T/HS lymph-induced increases in lung permeability respectively. Additional studies in TLR2 deficient mice showed that TLR2 activation was not involved in the pathology of T/HS lymph-induced lung injury. Lastly, the lymph samples were devoid of bacteria, endotoxin and bacterial DNA and passage of lymph through an endotoxin removal column did not abrogate the ability of T/HS lymph to cause lung injury in naïve mice.Our findings suggest that non-microbial factors in the intestinal mesenteric lymph after T/HS are capable of recreating T/HS-induced lung injury via TLR4 activation.

  9. Intercellular Adhension Molecule-1 in the Pathogenesis of Heroin-induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周琼; 白明; 邹世清

    2004-01-01

    The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the pathogenesis of heroin-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats was investigated. The model of ALI was established by intravenous injection of heroin into tail vein in rats. Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into heroin-treated groups (1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h and 24 h) and normal control group. Changes in histopathologic morphology and biological markers of ALI were measured. The expression of ICAM-1in lung tissue was detected by using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The results showed that the W/D ratio and protein contents in BALF of the heroin-treated groups were significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.01). The histopathological changes in the lung tissue were more obvious in heroin-treated groups. The ICAM-1 protein and mRNA expression in the lung tissue of heroin-treated groups were significantly increased as compared with that of the control group (P<0.01), and correlated with the ALI parameters in a time-dependent manner. Increasing of ICAM-1 expression was involved in the formation of heroin-induced lung injury. Furthermore, the level of expression was positively correlated with the severity of lung injury.

  10. Acute lung injury and ARDS in acute pancreatitis: Mechanisms and potential intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roland; Andersson

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in acute pancreatitis still represents a substantial problem,with a mortality rate in the range of 30%-40%.The present review evaluates underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in both ALI and ARDS and potential clinical implications.Several mediators and pathophysiological pathways are involved during the different phases of ALI and ARDS.The initial exudative phase is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage,microvascular injury and inf...

  11. Selective inhibition of intra-alveolar p55 TNF receptor attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bertok, Szabolcs; Wilson, Michael R.; Morley, Peter J.; de Wildt, Ruud; Bayliffe, Andrew; Takata, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is upregulated in the alveolar space early in the course of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Studies in genetically modified mice indicate that the two TNF receptors play opposing roles during injurious high-stretch mechanical ventilation, with p55 promoting but p75 preventing pulmonary oedema. Aim To investigate the effects of selective inhibition of intra-alveolar p55 TNF receptor on pulmonary oedema and inflammation during ventilator-induced lu...

  12. Role of C3, C5 and Anaphylatoxin Receptors in Acute Lung Injury and in Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system plays a major role in innate immune defenses against infectious agents, but exaggerated activation of complement can lead to severe tissue injury. Systemic (intravascular) activation of complement can, via C5a, lead to neutrophil (PMN) activation, sequestration and adhesion to the pulmonary capillary endothelium, resulting in damage and necrosis of vascular endothelial cells and acute lung injury (ALI). Intrapulmonary (intraalveolar) activation of complement can cause AL...

  13. Endothelial MKK3 is a critical mediator of lethal murine endotoxemia and acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Mannam, Praveen; Zhang, Xuchen; Shan, Peiying; Zhang, Yi; Shinn, Amanda S.; Zhang, Yitao; Lee, Patty J.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of intensive care unit admissions with high mortality and morbidity. Although outcomes have improved with better supportive care, specific therapies are limited. Endothelial activation and oxidant injury are key events in the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced lung injury. The signaling pathways leading to these events remain poorly defined and need to be studied. We sought to determine the role of MAP kinase kinase 3 (MKK3), a kinase of the p38 group in the pathogenesis...

  14. Effects of overinflation on procollagen type III expression in experimental acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    de Carvalho, Maria-Eudóxia Pilotto; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Meireles, Sibele Inácio; Reis, Luiz Fernando Lima; Martins, Milton Arruda; Deheinzelin, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In acute lung injury (ALI), elevation of procollagen type III (PC III) occurs early and has an adverse impact on outcome. We examined whether different high-inflation strategies of mechanical ventilation (MV) in oleic acid (OA) ALI alter regional expression of PC III. Methods We designed an experimental, randomized, and controlled protocol in which rats were allocated to two control groups (no injury, recruited [alveolar recruitment maneuver after tracheotomy without MV; n = 4 ra...

  15. Effect of partial liquid ventilation on lung function in oleic acid-induced lung injury model of piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-zhuo; LI Ling-ke; ZHANG Yan-bo; LI Gang; XU Yu-lin; ZHU Yao-bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric patients are susceptible to lung injury that does not respond to traditional therapies.Partial liquid ventilation (PLV) has been developed as an alternative ventilatory strategy for treating severe lung injury.The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of PLV on lung function in immature piglets.Methods Acute lung injury was induced in 12 Chinese immature piglets by oleic acid (OA).The animals were randomly assigned to two groups (n=6 each group):(1) conventional mechanical ventilation (MV) group and (2) PLV with FC-77 (10 ml/kg) group.Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP),mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP),central venous pressure (CVP),left atrial pressure (LAP),systemic vascular resistance (SVR),pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR),cardiac output (CO),mean pressure of airway (Paw),dynamic lung compliance (Cydn),and arterial blood gases were measured during the observation period.Results No piglet died in either group with severe lung injury.After four hours of ventilation,pH in the MV group gradually decreased to lower than 7.20,while in the PLV group,pH also gradually decreased but remained higher than 7.20 (P <0.05).Partial pressure of oxygen in artery (PaO2) decreased in both groups,but with a significant difference between the PLV group and MV group (P <0.05).Partial pressure of carbon dioxide in artery (PaCO2) increased in both groups,but with a significant difference between the PLV group and MV group (P <0.05).Paw increased in both groups,but was not significantly different (P >0.05).Cydn decreased in both groups,but without a significant difference (P >0.05).At four hours,heart rate (HR) and MAP in both groups decreased.MPAP in both groups increased,and there was a significant difference between the two groups (P <0.05).CVP was stable in both groups.At four hours,PVR and LAP were increased in both groups.CO was decreased in both groups (P <0.05).SVR was stable during the observation time.Conclusion PLV did not

  16. Regional lung aeration and ventilation during pressure support and biphasic positive airway pressure ventilation in experimental lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Cuevas, Maximiliano; Spieth, Peter M; Carvalho, Alysson R; Hietschold, Volker; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiedemann, Bärbel; Koch, Thea; Pelosi, Paolo; Koch, Edmund

    2010-01-01

    Introduction There is an increasing interest in biphasic positive airway pressure with spontaneous breathing (BIPAP+SBmean), which is a combination of time-cycled controlled breaths at two levels of continuous positive airway pressure (BIPAP+SBcontrolled) and non-assisted spontaneous breathing (BIPAP+SBspont), in the early phase of acute lung injury (ALI). However, pressure support ventilation (PSV) remains the most commonly used mode of assisted ventilation. To date, the effects of BIPAP+SBm...

  17. Biphasic positive airway pressure minimizes biological impact on lung tissue in mild acute lung injury independent of etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Saddy, Felipe; Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Cintia Lourenço; Oliveira, Gisele Pena; Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Baez Garcia, Cristiane Souza Nascimento; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macêdo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Biphasic positive airway pressure (BIVENT) is a partial support mode that employs pressure-controlled, time-cycled ventilation set at two levels of continuous positive airway pressure with unrestricted spontaneous breathing. BIVENT can modulate inspiratory effort by modifying the frequency of controlled breaths. Nevertheless, the optimal amount of inspiratory effort to improve respiratory function while minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury during partial ventilatory assis...

  18. Preventing cleavage of Mer promotes efferocytosis and suppresses acute lung injury in bleomycin treated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ye-Ji [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tissue Injury Defense Research Center, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Hae [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Young-So; Choi, Ji-Yeon [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tissue Injury Defense Research Center, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Keung-Sub [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min-Sun [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jihee Lee, E-mail: jihee@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tissue Injury Defense Research Center, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) regulates macrophage activation and promotes apoptotic cell clearance. Mer activation is regulated through proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. To determine if membrane-bound Mer is cleaved during bleomycin-induced lung injury, and, if so, how preventing the cleavage of Mer enhances apoptotic cell uptake and down-regulates pulmonary immune responses. During bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in mice, membrane-bound Mer expression decreased, but production of soluble Mer and activity as well as expression of disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) were enhanced . Treatment with the ADAM inhibitor TAPI-0 restored Mer expression and diminished soluble Mer production. Furthermore, TAPI-0 increased Mer activation in alveolar macrophages and lung tissue resulting in enhanced apoptotic cell clearance in vivo and ex vivo by alveolar macrophages. Suppression of bleomycin-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, but enhancement of hepatocyte growth factor induction were seen after TAPI-0 treatment. Additional bleomycin-induced inflammatory responses reduced by TAPI-0 treatment included inflammatory cell recruitment into the lungs, levels of total protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in lung tissue. Importantly, the effects of TAPI-0 on bleomycin-induced inflammation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration of specific Mer-neutralizing antibodies. These findings suggest that restored membrane-bound Mer expression by TAPI-0 treatment may help resolve lung inflammation and apoptosis after bleomycin treatment. -- Highlights: ►Mer expression is restored by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►Mer signaling is enhanced by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►TAPI-0 enhances efferocytosis and promotes resolution of lung injury.

  19. Preventing cleavage of Mer promotes efferocytosis and suppresses acute lung injury in bleomycin treated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) regulates macrophage activation and promotes apoptotic cell clearance. Mer activation is regulated through proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. To determine if membrane-bound Mer is cleaved during bleomycin-induced lung injury, and, if so, how preventing the cleavage of Mer enhances apoptotic cell uptake and down-regulates pulmonary immune responses. During bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in mice, membrane-bound Mer expression decreased, but production of soluble Mer and activity as well as expression of disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) were enhanced . Treatment with the ADAM inhibitor TAPI-0 restored Mer expression and diminished soluble Mer production. Furthermore, TAPI-0 increased Mer activation in alveolar macrophages and lung tissue resulting in enhanced apoptotic cell clearance in vivo and ex vivo by alveolar macrophages. Suppression of bleomycin-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, but enhancement of hepatocyte growth factor induction were seen after TAPI-0 treatment. Additional bleomycin-induced inflammatory responses reduced by TAPI-0 treatment included inflammatory cell recruitment into the lungs, levels of total protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in lung tissue. Importantly, the effects of TAPI-0 on bleomycin-induced inflammation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration of specific Mer-neutralizing antibodies. These findings suggest that restored membrane-bound Mer expression by TAPI-0 treatment may help resolve lung inflammation and apoptosis after bleomycin treatment. -- Highlights: ►Mer expression is restored by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►Mer signaling is enhanced by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►TAPI-0 enhances efferocytosis and promotes resolution of lung injury.

  20. Dexamethasone pretreatment attenuates lung and kidney injury in cholestatic rats induced by hepatic ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liangyi; Yao, Xiangqing; Chen, Yanling

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) results in mild to severe organ injury, in which tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) seem to be involved. Thus, we aim to assess the influence of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury on remote organs in addition to cholestasis and consider the possible efficacy of steroid pretreatment in reducing the injury. A common bile duct ligation model was done on 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats. After 7 days, the rats were divided randomly into control group, IR group, and dexamethasone (DEX) group. The IR group showed significant increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine levels compared with the control and DEX groups. By ELISA techniques, higher levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in lung and kidney tissues were measured in the IR group than in the control and DEX groups, these were verified by immunohistochemistry. The lung histology of the IR group rats showed neutrophil infiltration, interstitial edema, and alveolar wall thickening. Kidney histology of the IR group rats showed vacuolization of the proximal tubular epithelial cells and tubular dilatation with granular eosinophilic casts. Better morphological aspects were observed in the DEX-pretreated animals. Minimal lesions were observed in the control. The results suggest that hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in cholestatic rats induced lung and kidney injuries. Pretreatment with dexamethasone reduced the IR-induced injury in addition to cholestasis.

  1. Fluorometry of ischemia reperfusion injury in rat lungs in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Jacobs, E. R.; Audi, S.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-02-01

    Previously we demonstrated the utility of optical fluorometry to evaluate lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rats lungs under various chemically-induced respiratory states. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute ischemia on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in vivo using optical fluorometry. Under ischemic conditions, insufficient oxygen supply to the mitochondrial chain should reduce the mitochondrial redox state calculated from the ratio of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavoprotein Adenine Dinucleotide). The chest of anesthetized, and mechanically ventilated Sprague-Dawley rat was opened to induce acute ischemia by clamping the left hilum to block both blood flow and ventilation to one lung for approximately 10 minutes. NADH and FAD fluorescent signals were recorded continuously in a dark room via a fluorometer probe placed on the pleural surface of the left lung. Acute ischemia caused a decrease in FAD and an increase in NADH, which resulted in an increase in the mitochondrial redox ratio (RR=NADH/FAD). Restoration of blood flow and ventilation by unclamping the left hilum returned the RR back to its baseline. These results (increase in RR under ischemia) show promise for the fluorometer to be used in a clinical setting for evaluating the effect of pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in real time.

  2. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Augusto Holms

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES:Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid.METHODS:Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg; acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis.RESULTS:Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups

  3. Quantification of ventilation distribution in regional lung injury by electrical impedance tomography and xenon computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Validation studies of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) based assessment of regional ventilation under pathological conditions are required to prove that EIT can reliably quantify heterogeneous ventilation distribution with sufficient accuracy. The objective of our study was to validate EIT measurements of regional ventilation through a comparison with xenon-multidetector-row computed tomography (XeCT) in an animal model of sub-lobar lung injury. Nine anesthetized mechanically ventilated supine pigs were examined before and after the induction of lung injury in two adjacent sub-lobar segments of the right lung by saline lavage or endotoxin instillation. Regional ventilation was determined in 32 anteroposterior regions of interest in the right and left lungs and the ventilation change quantified by difference images between injury and control. Six animals were included in the final analysis. Measurements of regional ventilation by EIT and XeCT correlated well before (rs = 0.89 right, rs = 0.90 left lung) and after local injury (rs = 0.79 and 0.92, respectively). No bias and narrow limits of agreement were found during both conditions. The ventilation decrease in the right injured lung was correspondingly measured by both modalities (5.5%±1.1% by EIT and 5.4%±1.9% by XeCT, p = 0.94). EIT was inferior to clearly separate the exact anatomical location of the regional injuries. Regional ventilation was overestimated (<2%) in the most ventral and dorsal regions and underestimated (2%) in the middle regions by EIT compared to XeCT. This study shows that EIT is able to reliably discern even small ventilation changes on sub-lobar level. (paper)

  4. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of Tpl2 kinase is protective in a mouse model of ventilator-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kaniaris, Evangelos; Vaporidi, Katerina; Vergadi, Eleni; Theodorakis, Emmanuel E; Kondili, Eumorfia; Lagoudaki, Eleni; Tsatsanis, Christos; Georgopoulos, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical stress induced by injurious ventilation leads to pro-inflammatory cytokine production and lung injury. The extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase, ERK1/2, participates in the signaling pathways activated upon mechanical stress in the lungs to promote the inflammatory response. Tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2) is a MAP3kinase that activates ERK1/2 upon cytokine or TLR signaling, to induce pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The role of Tpl2 in lung inflammation, and spec...

  5. Dissociation between alveolar transmigration of neutrophils and lung injury in hyperoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkowski, Sandra; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Murciano, Juan-Carlos; Arguiri, Evguenia; Solomides, Charalambos C; Albelda, Steven M; Muzykantov, Vladimir; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess changes in cell adhesion molecule (CAM) expression on the pulmonary endothelial surface during hyperoxia and to assess the functional significance of those changes on cellular trafficking and development of oxygen-induced lung injury. Mice were placed in >95% O(2) for 0-72 h, and pulmonary injury and neutrophil (PMN) sequestration were assessed. Specific pulmonary CAM expression was quantified with a dual-radiolabeled MAb technique. To test the role of CAMs in PMN trafficking during hyperoxia, blocking MAbs to murine P-selectin, ICAM-1, or platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) were injected in wild-type mice. Mice genetically deficient in these CAMs and PMN-depleted mice were also evaluated. PMN sequestration occurred within 8 h of hyperoxia, although alveolar emigration occurred later (between 48 and 72 h), coincident with rapid escalation of the lung injury. Hyperoxia significantly increased pulmonary uptake of radiolabeled antibodies to P-selectin, ICAM-1, and PECAM-1, reflecting an increase in their level on pulmonary endothelium and possibly sequestered blood cells. Although both anti-PECAM-1 and anti-ICAM-1 antibodies suppressed PMN alveolar influx in wild-type mice, only mice genetically deficient in PECAM-1 showed PMN influx suppression. Neither CAM blockade, nor genetic deficiency, nor PMN depletion attenuated lung injury. We conclude that early pulmonary PMN retention during hyperoxia is not temporally associated with an increase in endothelial CAMs; however, subsequent PMN emigration into the alveolar space may be supported by PECAM-1 and ICAM-1. Blocking PMN recruitment did not prevent lung injury, supporting dissociation between PMN infiltration and lung injury during hyperoxia in mice. PMID:16815892

  6. Pros and cons of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2010-08-01

    In patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volumes has been associated with reduced mortality. However, such a strategy may result in alveolar collapse, leading to cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli and distal airways. Thus, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have been used to open up collapsed lungs, while adequate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels may counteract alveolar derecruitment during low tidal volume ventilation, improving respiratory function and minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury. Nevertheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the appropriateness of RMs. The most commonly used RM is conventional sustained inflation, associated with respiratory and cardiovascular side effects, which may be minimized by newly proposed strategies: prolonged or incremental PEEP elevation; pressure-controlled ventilation with fixed PEEP and increased driving pressure; pressure-controlled ventilation applied with escalating PEEP and constant driving pressure; and long and slow increase in pressure. The efficiency of RMs may be affected by different factors, including the nature and extent of lung injury, capability of increasing inspiratory transpulmonary pressures, patient positioning and cardiac preload. Current evidence suggests that RMs can be used before setting PEEP, after ventilator circuit disconnection or as a rescue maneuver to overcome severe hypoxemia; however, their routine use does not seem to be justified at present. The development of new lung recruitment strategies that have fewer hemodynamic and biological effects on the lungs, as well as randomized clinical trials analyzing the impact of RMs on morbidity and mortality of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, are warranted. PMID:20658909

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 dependent responses to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Brownlee, Noel A.; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M.; Meredith, J Wayne; McCall, Charles E.; Yoza, Barbara K.

    2009-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that toll-like receptor 2 participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. We hypothesized that the toll-like receptor 4, in a MyD88-dependent manner, may also participate in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinical...

  8. Lung injury after cigarette smoking is particle-related

    Science.gov (United States)

    That specific component responsible and the mechanistic pathway for increased human morbidity and mortality after cigarette smoking have yet to be delineated. We propose that 1) injury and disease following cigarette smoking are associated with exposure and retention of particles...

  9. Edaravone attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury by inhibiting oxidative stress in a canine lung transplantation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jin-zhi; SHEN Bao-zhong; LI Ye; ZHANG Tong; XU Wan-hai; LIU Xiao-wei; LU Hong-guang

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous reports have confirmed that edaravone has protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion(IR) injury of many organs.In this study,we investigated the effect of edaravone on preventing IR injury of the lung in a canine lung transplantation model. Methods Twelve weight-matched pairs of random-bred dogs were randomized into two groups.Within each pair,one dog served as donor and the other as recipient.In the study group,prostaglandin EI(PGEl)(8 μg/kg)was injected into the donor pulmonary artery(PA)before occlusion and the donor lungs were flushed with 1.0L of LPD solution containing edaravone(10mg/kg)and stored in the same LPD solution at a temperature of 1.C for 8 hours.The left single lung transplantation was then performed and recipients received intravenous injection with edaravone l 1 0 mg/kg)at the onset of reperfusion.In the control group,edaravone was substituted by the same volume of sterile saline solution.Another six dogs were obtained as normal control group in which left lungs were dissected after thoracotomy without an IR injury.One hour after repeffusion.or after dissection of the left lung,the right lung was excluded from peffusion and ventilation after which,cardiopulmonary parameters were measured.Wet/dry ratios,malondiaIdehyde(MDA)and myeloperoxidase (MPO)levels were assessed and histological analysis of lung tissue performed at the same time.Results All animals survived until the end of the experiment.The study group showed significantly decreased wet/dry ratios(treated:(74.1±4.2)%vs control:(86.8±5.2)%,P<0.01),MDA levels(treated:0.50±0.08 vs control:0.88±0.15,P <0.01)and MPO activity(treated:0.23±0.05 vs control:0.43±0.07,P

  10. Circulating KL-6, a Biomarker of Lung Injury, in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Lederer, David J.; Jelic, Sanja; Basner, Robert C.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2009-01-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), oxidative stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction in the peripheral circulation. In the lung, oxidative stress can lead to alveolar injury. We hypothesized that patients with obstructive sleep apnea would have biomarker evidence of increased alveolar wall permeability.

  11. Ventilator-induced lung injury is mediated by the NLRP3 inflammasome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Maria T; Aslami, Hamid; Janczy, John R; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F; Vlaar, Alexander P J; Wolthuis, Esther K; Choi, Goda; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Flavell, Richard A; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Bresser, Paul; Leemans, Jaklien C; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J; Wieland, Catharina W

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The innate immune response is important in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) but the exact pathways involved are not elucidated. The authors studied the role of the intracellular danger sensor NLRP3 inflammasome. METHODS: NLRP3 inflammasome gene expression was analyzed in respiratory

  12. Activated protein C in the treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Cornet; G.P. van Nieuw Amerongen; A. Beishuizen; M.J. Schultz; A.R.J. Girbes; A.B.J. Groeneveld

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) frequently necessitate mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit. The syndromes have a high mortality rate and there is at present no treatment specifically directed at the underlying pathogenesis. Central in

  13. The Design of Future Pediatric Mechanical Ventilation Trials for Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Robinder G Khemani; Newth, Christopher J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric practitioners face unique challenges when attempting to translate or adapt adult-derived evidence regarding ventilation practices for acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome into pediatric practice. Fortunately or unfortunately, there appears to be selective adoption of adult practices for pediatric mechanical ventilation, many of which pose considerable challenges or uncertainty when translated to pediatrics. These differences, combined with heterogeneous managemen...

  14. Epidemiology of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome in The Netherlands : A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Jan; Versteegt, Jens; Twisk, Jos; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Bindels, Alexander J. G. H.; Spijkstra, Jan-Jaap; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan

    2007-01-01

    Background: The characteristics, incidence and risk factors for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may depend on definitions and geography. Methods: A prospective, 3-day point-prevalence study was performed by a survey of all intensive care units (ICU) in the Neth

  15. Postexposure aerosolized heparin reduces lung injury in chlorine-exposed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogiannis, Sotirios G; Wagener, Brant M; Basappa, Susanna; Doran, Stephen; Rodriguez, Cilina A; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Pittet, Jean Francois; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-09-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is a highly reactive oxidant gas that, when inhaled, may cause acute lung injury culminating in death from respiratory failure. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exposure of mice to Cl2 causes intra-alveolar and systemic activation of the coagulation cascade that plays an important role in development of lung injury. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to Cl2 (400 for 30 min or 600 ppm for 45 min) in environmental chambers and then returned to room air for 1 or 6 h. Native coagulation (NATEM) parameters such as blood clotting time and clot formation time were measured in whole blood by the viscoelastic technique. D-dimers and thrombin-anti-thrombin complexes were measured in both plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by ELISA. Our results indicate that mice exposed to Cl2 gas had significantly increased clotting time, clot formation time, and D-dimers compared with controls. The thrombin-anti-thrombin complexes were also increased in the BALF of Cl2 exposed animals. To test whether increased coagulation contributed to the development of acute lung injury, mice exposed to Cl2 and returned to room air were treated with aerosolized heparin or vehicle for 20 min. Aerosolized heparin significantly reduced protein levels and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF at 6 h postexposure. These findings highlight the importance of coagulation abnormities in the development of Cl2-induced lung injury. PMID:25038191

  16. Acute lung injury in 2003%2003年度急性肺损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roger G SPRAGG

    2003-01-01

    During the past several decades, clinical investigators world-wide have continued to study the causes,pathophysiology, and treatment strategies for acute lung injury (ALl). This syndrome, which is characterized by nonhydrostatic pulmonary edema and hypoxemia associated with a variety of etiologies, is slowly becoming better understood as a result of these efforts.

  17. Mechanisms and consequences of lung epithelial injury in severe RSV disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van den Berg

    2015-01-01

    The studies in this thesis have examined mechanisms and consequences of lung epithelial injury in severe RSV disease. In this context, they specifically contribute to the knowledge of apoptosis and the formation of pulmonary edema. The results of our studies underscore the complexity of the mechanis

  18. Biomarkers of asbestos-induced lung injury: the influence of fiber characteristics and exposure methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATS 2013 Biomarkers of asbestos-induced lung injury: the influence of fiber characteristics and exposure methodology Urmila P Kodavanti, Debora Andrews, Mette C Schaldweiler, Jaime M Cyphert, Darol E Dodd, and Stephen H Gavett NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC; NIEH...

  19. A model of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury in Landrace-Large White Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace-Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases-stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation-after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace-Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury.

  20. A Model of Hemorrhagic Shock and Acute Lung Injury in Landrace–Large White Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace–Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases—stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation—after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace–Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury. PMID:21535927

  1. Modulation of cytokine and nitric oxide by mesenchymal stem cell transfer in lung injury/fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Jong-Ho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No effective treatment for acute lung injury and fibrosis currently exists. Aim of this study was to investigate the time-dependent effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSCs on bleomycin (BLM-induced acute lung injury and fibrosis and nitric oxide metabolites and inflammatory cytokine production. Methods BMDMSCs were transferred 4 days after BLM inhalation. Wet/dry ratio, bronchoalveolar lavage cell profiles, histologic changes and deposition of collagen were analyzed. Results Nitrite, nitrate and cytokines were measured weekly through day 28. At day 7, the wet/dry ratio, neutrophilic inflammation, and amount of collagen were elevated in BLM-treated rats compared to sham rats (p = 0.05-0.002. Levels nitrite, nitrate, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, TGF-β and VEGF were also higher at day 7 (p p in situ hybridization localized the engrafted cells to areas of lung injury. Conclusion Systemic transfer of BMDMSCs effectively reduced the BLM-induced lung injury and fibrosis through the down-regulation of nitric oxide metabolites, and proinflammatory and angiogenic cytokines.

  2. TGF-beta, radiation-induced pulmonary Injury and lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vujaskovic, Z; Groen, HJM

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether changes in TGF-beta plasma levels during radiation therapy may be useful in predicting radiation-induced pulmonary injury and tumour response in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Materials and methods: Plasma TGF-beta was investigated in 27 patients with stag

  3. Angiopoietin-1 Treatment Reduces Inflammation but Does Not Prevent Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hegeman; M.P. Hennus; M. van Meurs; P.M. Cobelens; A. Kavelaars; N.J. Jansen; M.J. Schultz; A.J. van Vught; G. Molema; C.J. Heijnen

    2010-01-01

    Background: Loss of integrity of the epithelial and endothelial barriers is thought to be a prominent feature of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Based on its function in vascular integrity, we hypothesize that the angiopoietin (Ang)-Tie2 system plays a role in the development of VILI. The pre

  4. Early preventive treatment for severe acute pancreatitis combined with lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘学民; 刘青光; 潘承恩

    2002-01-01

    @@ Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) can cause systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS),which leads to injury or failure of the internal organs and systems.1 Among them,acute respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS)is a severe or fatal complication.In this article,the early preventive treatment for SAP combined with lung injure is studied.

  5. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Attenuate Lung Injury in a Murine Model of Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam, Muhammad; Baveja, Rajiv; Liang, Olin D.; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Lee, Changjin; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Neonatal chronic lung disease, known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), remains a serious complication of prematurity despite advances in the treatment of extremely low birth weight infants.

  6. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Zhang

    Full Text Available It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS.Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP. All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35-60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment.For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg, lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7 and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9 in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1.Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury.

  7. Indium oxide (In2O3) nanoparticles induce progressive lung injury distinct from lung injuries by copper oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jiyoung; Kim, Jeongeun; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Cho, Wan-Seob

    2016-04-01

    Indium is an essential element in the manufacture of liquid crystal displays and other electronic devices, and several forms of indium compounds have been developed, including nanopowders, films, nanowires, and indium metal complexes. Although there are several reports on lung injury caused by indium-containing compounds, the toxicity of nanoscale indium oxide (In2O3) particles has not been reported. Here, we compared lung injury induced by a single exposure to In2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) to that caused by benchmark high-toxicity nickel oxide (NiO) and copper oxide (CuO) NPs. In2O3 NPs at doses of 7.5, 30, and 90 cm(2)/rat (50, 200, and 600 µg/rat) were administered to 6-week-old female Wistar rats via pharyngeal aspiration, and lung inflammation was evaluated 1, 3, 14, and 28 days after treatment. Neutrophilic inflammation was observed on day 1 and worsened until day 28, and severe pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) was observed on post-aspiration days 14 and 28. In contrast, pharyngeal aspiration of NiO NPs showed severe neutrophilic inflammation on day 1 and lymphocytic inflammation with PAP on day 28. Pharyngeal aspiration of CuO NPs showed severe neutrophilic inflammation on day 1, but symptoms were completely resolved after 14 days and no PAP was observed. The dose of In2O3 NPs that produced progressive neutrophilic inflammation and PAP was much less than the doses of other toxic particles that produced this effect, including crystalline silica and NiO NPs. These results suggest that occupational exposure to In2O3 NPs can cause severe lung injury. PMID:25731971

  8. Effect of Sodium Ferulate on Fluidity and Morphology of Cell Membrane in Ozone Induced Lung Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of sodium ferulate (SF), an active component of Radix Angelica, on lung damage induced by ozone (O3). Methods: Mice model of lung injury was induced by ozone inhalation and treated with SF. The level of lipid peroxide and microviscosity in alveolar epithelial cell membrane of the mice was determined, and the structural change of lung cells was observed by microscopy. Results: Ozone could increase the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the microviscosity in alveolar epithelial cell membrane, and induce inflammatory changes in morphologic structure. These abnormal changes were improved after SF administration, which was manifested as alleviation of heightened microviscosity, increase of membrane fluidity, as well as the basically normalized pulmonary cellular structure under microscope. Conclusion: SF has a preventive effect against oxidized pulmonary injury induced by ozone, the action of which could be through scavenging oxygen free radicals, reducing lipid peroxide production, increasing membranous fluidity and mitigating inflammatory changes in cell structure.

  9. [Advances in the study of the relationship between autophagy and sepsis-induced lung injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingtong; Li, Hengyu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-08-01

    Sepsis is one of the most common pathogenetic causes of acute lung injury (ALI), and at present there is still a lack of effective targeted techniques and methods for its prevention and treatment. Autophagy is a homeostatic mecha- nism common to all eukaryotic cells, including adaption to environment, defense against invasion of pathogens, and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Autophagy is also involved in a variety of lung-related diseases. In septic lung injury, autophagy not only serves to dissipate dysfunctional organelles, but also inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines. This review aims at eliciting the role of autophagy in sepsis-induced ALI and further exploring the potential targets of autophagy in inhibiting inflammation, in an effort to provide a new perspective for clinical treatment of sepsis-induced ALI.

  10. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation-induced lung injury in rats is greater after acid instillation than after sepsis-induced acute lung injury, but does not increase systemic inflammation: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuiper Jan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine whether acute lung injury from direct and indirect origins differ in susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI and resultant systemic inflammatory responses. Methods Rats were challenged by acid instillation or 24 h of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture, followed by mechanical ventilation (MV with either a low tidal volume (Vt of 6 mL/kg and 5 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; LVt acid, LVt sepsis or with a high Vt of 15 mL/kg and no PEEP (HVt acid, HVt sepsis. Rats sacrificed immediately after acid instillation and non-ventilated septic animals served as controls. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were monitored. After 4 h, lung wet to dry (W/D weight ratios, histological lung injury and plasma mediator concentrations were measured. Results Oxygenation and lung compliance decreased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. Additionally, W/D weight ratios and histological lung injury scores increased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. MV increased W/D weight ratio and lung injury score, however this effect was mainly attributable to HVt ventilation after acid instillation. Similarly, effects of HVt on oxygenation were only observed after acid instillation. HVt during sepsis did not further affect oxygenation, compliance, W/D weight ratio or lung injury score. Plasma interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α concentrations were increased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis, but plasma intercellular adhesion molecule-1 concentration increased during sepsis only. In contrast to lung injury parameters, no additional effects of HVt MV after acid instillation on plasma mediator concentrations were observed. Conclusions During MV more severe lung injury develops after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. HVt causes VILI after acid instillation, but not during sepsis. However, this differential effect was not observed in the systemic release of

  11. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension augments lung injury and airway reactivity caused by ozone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zychowski, Katherine E; Lucas, Selita N; Sanchez, Bethany; Herbert, Guy; Campen, Matthew J

    2016-08-15

    Ozone (O3)-related cardiorespiratory effects are a growing public health concern. Ground level O3 can exacerbate pre-existing respiratory conditions; however, research regarding therapeutic interventions to reduce O3-induced lung injury is limited. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a frequent comorbidity that is difficult to treat clinically, yet associated with increased mortality and frequency of exacerbations. In this study, we hypothesized that established HPH would confer vulnerability to acute O3 pulmonary toxicity. Additionally, we tested whether improvement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity via rho-kinase inhibition could mitigate pulmonary inflammation and injury. To determine if O3 exacerbated HPH, male C57BL/6 mice were subject to either 3 weeks continuous normoxia (20.9% O2) or hypoxia (10.0% O2), followed by a 4-h exposure to either 1ppm O3 or filtered air (FA). As an additional experimental intervention fasudil (20mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally prior to and after O3 exposures. As expected, hypoxia significantly increased right ventricular pressure and hypertrophy. O3 exposure in normoxic mice caused lung inflammation but not injury, as indicated by increased cellularity and edema in the lung. However, in hypoxic mice, O3 exposure led to increased inflammation and edema, along with a profound increase in airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Fasudil administration resulted in reduced O3-induced lung injury via the enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity. These results indicate that increased pulmonary vascular pressure may enhance lung injury, inflammation and edema when exposed to pollutants, and that enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity may alleviate such vulnerability. PMID:27286659

  12. Role of Kupffer cells in acute hemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis-associated lung injury of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Bin Liu; Nai-Qiang Cui; Dong-Hua Li; Chang Chen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of Kupffer cells (KCs) in acute hemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis-associated lung injury (AHNP-LI).METHODS: Forty-two rats were allocated to four groups [sham operation, AHNP model, gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) pretreatment, GdCl3 control]. In GdCl3pretreatment group, GdCl3 was administered by caudal vein injection 24 h before the AHNP model induction.Blood from the iliac artery, alveolar macrophages and tissues from the pancreas and lung, were collected in six animals per group 3 and 6 h after acute pancreatitis induction. TNF-α, IL-1 of serum, myeloperoxidase (MPO)of lung tissue, NF-κB activation of alveolar macrophages were detected. Serum AST and ALT in sham operation group and GdCl3 control group were tested. In addition,histopathological changes of the pancreas and lung were observed under light microscope.RESULTS: MPO of lung tissue and TNF-α, IL-1 levels of serum were all reduced significantly in GdCl3pretreatment group compared to those in AHNP group(P<0.01). NF-κB activation of alveolar macrophages was also attenuated significantly in GdCl3 pretreatment group compared to that in AHNP group (P<0.01). The pathological injury of the lung was ameliorated obviously in GdCl3 pretreatment group compared to that in AHNP group. Nevertheless, the serum amylase level did not reduce and injury of the pancreas was not prevented in GdCl3 pretreatment group.CONCLUSION: Pulmonary injury induced by AHNP is mediated by KC activation and AHNP-LI can be significantly ameliorated by pretreatment with GdCl3 and KCs play a vital role in AHNP-LI.

  13. XB130 deficiency enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced septic response and acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Hiroaki; Tomankova, Tereza; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Cho, Hae-Ra; Guan, Zhehong; Adeyi, Oyedele A.; Tian, Feng; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    XB130 is a novel oncoprotein that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration. Its physiological function in vivo is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the role of XB130 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic responses and acute lung injury. LPS was intraperitoneally administrated to Xb130 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. There was a significant weight loss in KO mice at Day 2 and significantly higher disease scores during the 7 days of observation. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in the serum were significantly higher in KO mice at Day 2. In KO mice there were a significantly higher lung injury score, higher wet/dry lung weight ratio, more apoptotic cells and less proliferative cells in the lung. Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in the lung of KO mice. There was significantly increased number of p-GSK-3β positive cells in KO mice, which were mainly neutrophils and macrophages. XB130 is expressed in alveolar type I and type II cells in the lung. The expression in these cells was significantly reduced after LPS challenge. XB130 deficiency delayed the recovery from systemic septic responses, and the presence of XB130 in the alveolar epithelial cells may provide protective mechanisms by reducing cell death and promoting cell proliferation, and reducing pulmonary permeability. PMID:27029000

  14. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  15. Lung mechanics in the aging lung and in acute lung injury. Studies based on sinusoidal flow modulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bitzén, Ulrika

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge about lung mechanics is of interest in intensive care to adjust mechanical ventilation and in the lung laboratory for diagnostics and evaluation of patients with various kinds of respiratory diseases. In mechanical ventilation a single inspiratory elastic pressure-volume (Pel/V) curve is difficult to interpret due to continuing re-expansion of collapsed lung units over a large pressure interval. However, the volume shifts between multiple inspiratory Pel/V curves recorded at ...

  16. Strategies to improve oxygenation in experimental acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hartog (Arthur)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOne of the most important clinical syndromes, in which failure of oxygen uptake in the lung leads to severe hypoxia, is the so-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is a complex of clinical signs and symptoms which occur following diverse pulmonary or systemic insults,

  17. Lung stress, strain, and energy load: engineering concepts to understand the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality has not been reduced in over 15 years and remains ~40 %, even with protective low tidal volume (LVt) ventilation. Thus, there is a critical need to develop novel ventilation strategies that will protect the lung and reduce ARDS mortality. Protti et al. have begun to analyze the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung tissue using engineering methods in normal pigs ventilated for 54 h. They used these methods to assess the impact of a mechanical breath on dynamic and static global lung strain and energy load. Strain is the change in lung volume in response to an applied stress (i.e., Tidal Volume-Vt). This study has yielded a number of exciting new concepts including the following: (1) Individual mechanical breath parameters (e.g., Vt or Plateau Pressure) are not directly correlated with VILI but rather any combination of parameters that subject the lung to excessive dynamic strain and energy/power load will cause VILI; (2) all strain is not equal; dynamic strain resulting in a dynamic energy load (i.e., kinetic energy) is more damaging to lung tissue than static strain and energy load (i.e., potential energy); and (3) a critical consideration is not just the size of the Vt but the size of the lung that is being ventilated by this Vt. This key concept merits attention since our current protective ventilation strategies are fixated on the priority of keeping the Vt low. If the lung is fully inflated, a large Vt is not necessarily injurious. In conclusion, using engineering concepts to analyze the impact of the mechanical breath on the lung is a novel new approach to investigate VILI mechanisms and to help design the optimally protective breath. Data generated using these methods have challenged some of the current dogma surrounding the mechanisms of VILI and of the components in the mechanical breath necessary for lung protection. PMID:27316442

  18. Increased intestinal protein permeability in a model of lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Weisbrode, S E; Dorinsky, P M

    1991-11-01

    Multiple nonpulmonary organ failure is a frequent complication of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and contributes significantly to the high mortality rate associated with this disorder. Although previous studies suggest that systemic organ injury may be an integral component of ARDS, little is known about the specific functional alterations that occur in these target organs. The present study was designed, therefore, to test the hypothesis that endothelial damage, as assessed by microvascular permeability changes, develops in systemic organs in a model of acute lung injury. To test this postulate, the microvascular permeability for total protein was estimated using the steady-state relationship between the lymph (CL) to plasma (Cp) protein concentration ratio (i.e., CL/Cp) and lymph flow in autoperfused cat ileum preparations. Specifically, CL/Cp was measured in five cats, 2 h after acute lung injury was induced by intravenously administered phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), 15 micrograms/kg, and the results were compared with those of seven time-matched control animals. Prior to PMA infusion, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 451 +/- 28 in both groups and remained unchanged (486 +/- 26) in the control group. By contrast, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell to 275 +/- 95 after PMA infusion (p less than 0.05). In addition, whereas CL/Cp was 0.099 +/- 0.008 in the control animals, it increased to 0.36 +/- 0.06 in the PMA-injured animals (p less than 0.01). In summary, this study demonstrated that in this model of acute lung injury produced by PMA-induced activation of circulating inflammatory cells, both acute lung injury and systemic organ injury (i.e., morphologic and permeability alterations) occurred.

  19. Enhanced Hsp70 expression protects against acute lung injury by modulating apoptotic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Aschkenasy

    Full Text Available The Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a highly lethal inflammatory lung disorder. Apoptosis plays a key role in its pathogenesis. We showed that an adenovirus expressing the 70 kDa heat shock protein Hsp70 (AdHSP protected against sepsis-induced lung injury. In this study we tested the hypothesis that AdHSP attenuates apoptosis in sepsis-induced lung injury. Sepsis was induced in rats via cecal ligation and double puncture (2CLP. At the time of 2CLP PBS, AdHSP or AdGFP (an adenoviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein were injected into the tracheas of septic rats. 48 hours later, lungs were isolated. One lung was fixed for TUNEL staining and immunohistochemistry. The other was homogenized to isolate cytosolic and nuclear protein. Immunoblotting, gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation were performed in these extracts. In separate experiments MLE-12 cells were incubated with medium, AdHSP or AdGFP. Cells were stimulated with TNFα. Cytosolic and nuclear proteins were isolated. These were subjected to immunoblotting, co-immunoprecipitation and a caspase-3 activity assay. TUNEL assay demonstrated that AdHSP reduced alveolar cell apoptosis. This was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection of caspase 3 abundance. In lung isolated from septic animals, immunoblotting, co-immunoprecipitation and gel filtration studies revealed an increase in cytoplasmic complexes containing caspases 3, 8 and 9. AdHSP disrupted these complexes. We propose that Hsp70 impairs apoptotic cellular pathways via interactions with caspases. Disruption of large complexes resulted in stabilization of lower molecular weight complexes, thereby, reducing nuclear caspase-3. Prevention of apoptosis in lung injury may preserve alveolar cells and aid in recovery.

  20. 肺爆震伤研究进展%Advances in the research of blast lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭凌华; 郭光华

    2016-01-01

    In recent years,a variety of explosive weapons become increasingly common used in regional military conflicts and terrorist bomb attacks.Meanwhile,the incidence of accidental explosion also showed an increase in the industries and daily life.The lung is the most labile organ and it is used to be severely injured organ in blast injury although even no signs of external injury could be observed on chest.Blast injury can present the symptoms such as lung rupture,bleeding,edema and emphysema.Respiratory dysfunction can affect oxygen supply to organs and systemic tissue,resulting in rapid and sustained hypoxemia and high mortality rate.Blast lung injury is characterized by respiratory disturbance and hypoxia.This article summarizes the etiology,pathogenesis,pathophysiological changes,diagnosis,and treatment of blast lung injury,with a hope to provide some useful clinical information.

  1. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2015-12-04

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  2. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  3. Effects of low potassium dextran glucose solution on oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in juvenile piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Feng; LIU Ying-long; LIU Ai-jun; WANG Dong; WANG Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Background Epithelial dysfunction in lungs plays a key role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. The beneficial effects of low potassium dextran glucose solution (LPD) have been reported in lung preservation, and LPD enables injured alveolar pneumocytes to recover. So we hypothesized that systemic administration of LPD may have benefits in treating acute lung injury. We investigated the effects of LPD on arterial blood gas and levels of some cytokines in oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in juvenile piglets.Methods Oleic acid (0.1 ml/kg) was intrapulmonarily administered to healthy anesthetized juvenile piglets. Ten animals were randomly assigned to two groups (n=5 each): oleic acid-induced group (control group) with intravenous infusion of 12.5 ml/kg of lactated Ringer's solution 30 minutes before administration of oleic acid and LPD group with systemic administration of LPD (12.5 ml/kg) 30 minutes before injecting oleic acid. Blood gas variables and concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, endothelin 1 and interleukin 10 were measured before and every 1 hour for 6 hours after initial lung injury.Results Compared with control group, blood pH, partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen ratio,partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide, and mean pulmonary arterial pressure in LPD group were improved (P<0.05or 0.01). Six hours after lung injury, concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha in lung tissue was lower in LPD group than control group (P<0.05). Plasmic concentration of endothelin 1 showed lower in LPD group while plasmic concentration of interleukin 10 showed higher in LPD group (P<0.05).Conclusions Before lung injury, systemic administration of LPD can improve gas exchange, attenuate pulmonary hypertension, decrease plasmic levels of endothelin 1, increase interleukin 10 and decrease concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha in lung tissue in oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in juvenile piglets.

  4. Effects of early bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collected from dogs with smoke inhalation injury on the lungs of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Fa-chuan; SU Dong; YANG Zong-cheng; BI Min; HUANG Yue-sheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Whether early massive bronchoalveolar lavage can remove the harmful substances from the lungs injured with smoke inhalation remains uncertain. This study was designed to observe the effects of early massive bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) on the healthy lungs in rats. Methods: Mongrel dogs were inflicted with severe smoke inhalation injury. The injured lungs were lavaged with large amount of normal saline in the first hour after injury and the BALF was collected. The BALF was injected into the healthy lungs of 30 rats (group C) in the dosage of 5 ml/kg. The functions and pathological changes of the lungs were observed 24 h after perfusion with the BALF. The data were compared with those of 23 rats (group B) whose lungs were perfused with the BALF collected from normal dogs and those of 21 rats (group A)whose lungs were perfused with normal saline. Results: The mortality rate 24 h after lung perfusion was higher in group C than in groups A and B. The survivors of group C exhibited fluctuation of respiratory rate (RR), remarkable decrease of PaO2, significantly higher content of lung water, decrease of total static pulmonary compliance and pulmonary expansion index, and increasse of inflammatory cytokines in the tissues of lungs. Only slight mechanic obstructive effect on the airway was observed in rats of group A and B. The pathological changes of the lungs of the rats in group C were similar to those of the dogs with actual smoke inhalation injury. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the BALF collected from dogs with acute severe smoke inhalation injury in the early stage after injury injured the normal lungs of rats with the bioactive substances in the BALF. These findings show us that it is a valuable therapeutic procedure to apply massive bronchoalveolar fluid lavage in the early stage after inhalation injury.

  5. Adenoviral augmentation of elafin protects the lung against acute injury mediated by activated neutrophils and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, A J; Wallace, W A; Marsden, M E; Govan, J R; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    2001-08-01

    During acute pulmonary infection, tissue injury may be secondary to the effects of bacterial products or to the effects of the host inflammatory response. An attractive strategy for tissue protection in this setting would combine antimicrobial activity with inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE), a key effector of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury. We postulated that genetic augmentation of elafin (an endogenous inhibitor of HNE with intrinsic antimicrobial activity) could protect the lung against acute inflammatory injury without detriment to host defense. A replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected A549 cells against the injurious effects of both HNE and whole activated human neutrophils in vitro. Intratracheal replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected murine lungs against injury mediated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo. Genetic augmentation of elafin therefore has the capacity to protect the lung against the injurious effects of both bacterial pathogens resistant to conventional antibiotics and activated neutrophils. PMID:11466403

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Matthew L.; Sharma, Ashish K.; Zhao, Yunge; Charles, Eric J.; Huerter, Mary E.; Johnston, William F.; Kron, Irving L.; Lynch, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Outcomes for lung transplantation are the worst of any solid organ, and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) limits both short- and long-term outcomes. Presently no therapeutic agents are available to prevent IRI. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates immune function through binding to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5). Although S1P has been shown to attenuate lung IRI, the S1P receptors responsible for protection have not been defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that protection from lung IRI is primarily mediated through S1PR1 activation. Mice were treated with either vehicle, FTY720 (a nonselective S1P receptor agonist), or VPC01091 (a selective S1PR1 agonist and S1PR3 antagonist) before left lung IR. Function, vascular permeability, cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase levels were measured in lungs. After IR, both FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly improved lung function (reduced pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary compliance) vs. vehicle control. In addition, FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly reduced vascular permeability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 p40, CC chemokine ligand-2, and TNF-α), myeloperoxidase levels, and neutrophil infiltration compared with control. No significant differences were observed between VPC01091 and FTY720 treatment groups. VPC01091 did not significantly affect elevated invariant natural killer T cell infiltration after IR, and administration of an S1PR1 antagonist reversed VPC01091-mediated protection after IR. In conclusion, VPC01091 and FTY720 provide comparable protection from lung injury and dysfunction after IR. These findings suggest that S1P-mediated protection from IRI is mediated by S1PR1 activation, independent of S1PR3, and that selective S1PR1 agonists may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent lung IRI. PMID:25910934

  7. The Effects of Dexamethasone and L-NAME on Acute Lung Injury in Rats with Lung Contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozan, Ahmet; Kilic, Nermin; Alacam, Hasan; Guzel, Ahmet; Guvenc, Tolga; Acikgoz, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    The therapeutic efficiency of an anti-inflammatory agent, dexamethasone (DXM), and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), in lung tissue injury after lung contusion was investigated. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), YKL-40, an inflammatory peptide, inducible NOS (iNOS), and Clara cell protein 16 (CC-16) were evaluated. Immunohistochemical analyses were also performed, and the lung tissue was examined histopathologically. The study consisted of eight groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10 in each group), weighing 250-300 g: (1) control, (2) contusion, (3) control + DXM, (4) contusion + DXM, (5) control + L-NAME (6) contusion + L-NAME, (7) control + DXM + L-NAME, and (8) contusion + DXM + L-NAME. A previously developed lung contusion model was used, in addition to the control group. The rats were administered DXM and L-NAME intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 15 and 60 mg/kg/day, respectively. DXM and L-NAME administration decreased the iNOS level in the contusion groups. DXM increased the levels of YKL-40 and IL-10 in both the control and contusion groups, with higher levels in the contusion groups. L-NAME increased the serum level of IL-10 in the lung contusion groups. DXM increased the synthesis of CC-16 in the control and contusion groups. The combined use of a high-dose steroid and NOS inhibitor resulted in the death of the rats. Steroids can increase the level of cytokines, such as YKL-40 and IL-10, and the synthesis of CC-16 and prevent pneumonia, ALI/ARDS, and sepsis in lung contusion.

  8. Strategies to improve oxygenation in experimental acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, Arthur

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOne of the most important clinical syndromes, in which failure of oxygen uptake in the lung leads to severe hypoxia, is the so-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is a complex of clinical signs and symptoms which occur following diverse pulmonary or systemic insults, including sepsis. shock, pneumonia. trauma, liquid aspiration. hematological disorders, smoke inhalation, and many others, In ARDS, the treatments available are still inadequate and morbidity, mort...

  9. Severe lung injuries due to SO/sub 2/ inhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, P.; Leupold, W.; Mittenzwey, K.W.; Rupprecht, E.

    1982-01-01

    By accident a 12 year old boy had to spend 4 hours in a SO/sub 2/-enriched atmosphere (concentration 13.8 mg per cubicmeter = 4.8 ppm). The course of the following intoxication was tetraphasic: 1. acute irritation of the mucous membranes of the upper airways and of the eye: rhinopharyngitis, laryngitis and bronchitis, conjunctivitis and corneal lesions (duration: 5 days), 2. symptom free interval (duration: 3 days), 3. subacute destruction of the low airways and the lung: destructing bronchitis, bronchiolitis, alveolitis, emphysema of the lung, mediastinum and skin, gradual development of bronchiectasis (duration: 9-12 months) and 4. gradual transition into terminal scarification: emphysema of the lung, continuous partial respiratory insufficiency with combined, especially obstructive disturbance of ventilation (without alterations observed during the last 4 years). On occasions of this fateful and therapeutically hardly influenced course recommendations are given for initial general and topical administration of very high doses of corticosteroids in each case of inhalative intoxication as the only measure which probably would have prevented it.

  10. A novel, stable and reproducible acute lung injury model induced by oleic acid in immature piglet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yao-bin; LING Feng; ZHANG Yan-bo; LIU Ai-jun; LIU Dong-hai; QIAO Chen-hui; WANG Qiang; LIU Ying-long

    2011-01-01

    Background Young children are susceptible to pulmonary injury,and acute lung injury (ALl) often results in a high mortality and financial costs in pediatric patients.A good ALl model will help us to gain a better understanding of the real pathophysiological picture and to evaluate novel treatment approaches to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) more accurately and liberally.This study aimed to establish a hemodynamically stable and reproducible model with ALl in piglet induced by oleic acid.Methods Six Chinese mini-piglets were used to establish ALl models by oleic acid.Hemodynamic and pulmonary function data were measured.Histopathological assessment was performed.Results Mean blood pressure,heart rate (HR),cardiac output (CO),central venous pressure (CVP) and left atrial pressure (LAP) were sharply decreased after oleic acid given,while the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) was increased in comparison with baseline (P <0.05).pH,arterial partial pressure of O2 (PaO2),PaO2/inspired O2 fraction (FiO2) and lung compliance decreased,while PaCO2 and airway pressure increased in comparison with baseline (P <0.05).The lung histology showed severe inflammation,hyaline membranes,intra-alveolar and interstitial hemorrhage.Conclusion This experiment established a stable model which allows for a diversity of studies on early lung injury.

  11. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 {mu}g/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  12. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seong Ho, E-mail: yoosh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute and Institute of Forensic Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A. [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States); Song, Byoung-Joon, E-mail: bj.song@nih.gov [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  13. Antioxidant effects of selenium on lung injury in paraquat intoxicated rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.S.; Suh, G.J.; Kwon, W.Y.; Kwak, Y.H.; Lee, Kenneth; Lee, H.J.; Jeong, K.Y.; Lee, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Paraquat (PQ) causes lethal intoxication by inducing oxidant injury to the lung. Selenium is a cofactor for glutathione peroxidase (GPx), which is one of the major endogenous antioxidant enzymes. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether selenium post-treatment activates GPx, decreases lung injury, and improves survival in PQ intoxicated rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Spraque-Dawley rats were categorized into three groups: sham (n = 6), PQ (n = 12), and PQ + Se (n = 12). In the PQ and PQ + Se groups, 50 mg/kg of PQ was administered intraperitoneally. After 10 minutes, 60 μg/kg of Se (PQ + Se) or saline (PQ) was administered via the tail vein. Six rats per group were euthanized 6 hours or 24 hours later. Lung tissues were harvested for the measurement of GPx activity, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and for histological analysis. Using separated set of rats, survival of PQ (n = 10) and PQ + Se (n = 10) were observed for 72 hours. RESULTS: GPx activity in the PQ group at the 6-hour and 24-hour time points was lower than in the sham group (p CONCLUSION: Single dose of selenium post-treatment activates GPx and attenuates lipid peroxidation and lung injury early after paraquat intoxication, but does not improve 72 hours of survival.

  14. Parabronchial smooth muscle constitutes an airway epithelial stem cell niche in the mouse lung after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckaert, Thomas; Dill, Erik; Campbell, Alice; Tiozzo, Caterina; Majka, Susan; Bellusci, Saverio; De Langhe, Stijn P

    2011-11-01

    During lung development, parabronchial SMC (PSMC) progenitors in the distal mesenchyme secrete fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), which acts on distal epithelial progenitors to promote their proliferation. β-catenin signaling within PSMC progenitors is essential for their maintenance, proliferation, and expression of Fgf10. Here, we report that this Wnt/Fgf10 embryonic signaling cascade is reactivated in mature PSMCs after naphthalene-induced injury to airway epithelium. Furthermore, we found that this paracrine Fgf10 action was essential for activating surviving variant Clara cells (the cells in the airway epithelium from which replacement epithelial cells originate) located at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions and adjacent to neuroendocrine bodies. After naphthalene injury, PSMCs secreted Fgf10 to activate Notch signaling and induce Snai1 expression in surviving variant Clara cells, which subsequently underwent a transient epithelial to mesenchymal transition to initiate the repair process. Epithelial Snai1 expression was important for regeneration after injury. We have therefore identified PSMCs as a stem cell niche for the variant Clara cells in the lung and established that paracrine Fgf10 signaling from the niche is critical for epithelial repair after naphthalene injury. These findings also have implications for understanding the misregulation of lung repair in asthma and cancer. PMID:21985786

  15. Quantitative study of lung perfusion SPECT scanning and pulmonary function testing for early radiation-induced lung injury in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wei; WANG, JIEZHONG; TANG, MINGDENG; Pan, Jianji; Bai, Penggang; LIN, DUANYU; QIAN, FEIYU; LIN, FENGJIE; YANG, XUEQIN; Zhang, Shengli

    2012-01-01

    Radiation lung injury is a common side-effect of pulmonary radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess early changes in lung perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning and pulmonary function testing (PFT) prior to and after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients suffering from locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LANSCLC). Twenty patients with LANSCLC received lung perfusion SPECT scanning and PFT prior to IMRT and immediat...

  16. Treatment of intractable interstitial lung injury with alemtuzumab after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohno, M; Perch, M; Andersen, E;

    2011-01-01

    transplantation. Routine examination of a lung biopsy, 4 months after transplantation, showed nonspecific, diffuse interstitial inflammation with alveolar septal fibrosis. The patient's clinical status and imaging studies, consistent with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, which was considered as signs of...

  17. Targeted Type 2 Alveolar Cell Depletion. A Dynamic Functional Model for Lung Injury Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Orquidea; Hiatt, Michael J; Lundin, Amber; Lee, Jooeun; Reddy, Raghava; Navarro, Sonia; Kikuchi, Alex; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) are regarded as the progenitor population of the alveolus responsible for injury repair and homeostatic maintenance. Depletion of this population is hypothesized to underlie various lung pathologies. Current models of lung injury rely on either uncontrolled, nonspecific destruction of alveolar epithelia or on targeted, nontitratable levels of fixed AEC2 ablation. We hypothesized that discrete levels of AEC2 ablation would trigger stereotypical and informative patterns of repair. To this end, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the surfactant protein-C promoter drives expression of a mutant SR39TK herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase specifically in AEC2. Because of the sensitivity of SR39TK, low doses of ganciclovir can be administered to these animals to induce dose-dependent AEC2 depletion ranging from mild (50%) to lethal (82%) levels. We demonstrate that specific levels of AEC2 depletion cause altered expression patterns of apoptosis and repair proteins in surviving AEC2 as well as distinct changes in distal lung morphology, pulmonary function, collagen deposition, and expression of remodeling proteins in whole lung that persist for up to 60 days. We believe SPCTK mice demonstrate the utility of cell-specific expression of the SR39TK transgene for exerting fine control of target cell depletion. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that specific levels of type 2 alveolar epithelial cell depletion produce characteristic injury repair outcomes. Most importantly, use of these mice will contribute to a better understanding of the role of AEC2 in the initiation of, and response to, lung injury.

  18. Expression of aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-3 in lung tissue of rat model with ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Song; LI Xiang-nan

    2010-01-01

    @@ End-stage lung diseases are common and frequentlyoccurring diseases which are difficult for clinical treatment. In recent years, lung transplantation has become a widely accepted and effective therapeutic option for patients with the end-stage pulmonary diseases. Early pulmonary edema resulting from ischemia-reperfusion injury accounts for the major part of mortality and morbidity after lung transplantation. The water channel proteins in lung injury have been little studied, and their impact on the formation of pulmonary edema remains unclear. In this study, we established a rat lung ischemia-reperfusion model to study its impact on the expressions of water channel proteins in lung tissue and explore a new approach to lung transplantation in pulmonary edema pathogenesis.

  19. Activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors prevents ventilator-induced lung injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Brégeon

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome is responsible for 40 to 60 percent mortality. An over mortality of about 10 percent could result from additional lung injury and inflammation due to the life-support mechanical ventilation, which stretches the lung. It has been recently demonstrated, in vitro, that pharmacological activation of the alpha 7 nicotinic receptors (α7-nAChR could down regulate intracellular mediators involved in lung cell inflammatory response to stretch. Our aim was to test in vivo the protective effect of the pharmacological activation of the α7-nAChR against ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Anesthetized rats were ventilated for two hours with a high stretch ventilation mode delivering a stroke volume large enough to generate 25-cmH(2O airway pressure, and randomly assigned to four groups: pretreated with parenteral injection of saline or specific agonist of the α7-nAChR (PNU-282987, or submitted to bilateral vagus nerve electrostimulation while pre-treated or not with the α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA. Controls ventilated with a conventional stroke volume of 10 mL/kg gave reference data. Physiological indices (compliance of the respiratory system, lung weight, blood oxygenation, arterial blood pressure and lung contents of inflammatory mediators (IL-6 measured by ELISA, substance P assessed using HPLC were severely impaired after two hours of high stretch ventilation (sham group. Vagal stimulation was able to maintain the respiratory parameters close to those obtained in Controls and reduced lung inflammation except when associated to nicotinic receptor blockade (MLA, suggesting the involvement of α7-nAChR in vagally-mediated protection against VILI. Pharmacological pre-treatment with PNU-282987 strongly decreased lung injury and lung IL-6 and substance P contents, and nearly abolished the increase in plasmatic IL-6 levels. Pathological examination of the lungs confirmed the physiological differences observed

  20. Protective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on glutamate-induced lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li SHEN; Jian-zhong HAN; Chen LI; Shao-jie YUE; Yong LIU; Xiao-qun QIN; Hui-jun LIU; Zi-qiang LUO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To examine the possible protective effect of ginsenoside Rg1, an active component of ginseng, on lung injury caused by glutamate in vivo. Methods: The lungs of mice receiving glutamate (0.5 g/kg) and/or ginsenoside Rg1 (0.03 g/kg) via intraperitoneal administration were collected. The indexes of lung wet weight/body weight ratios (LW/BW), lung wet/dry weight ratios (W/D), heart rate (HR),and breathing rate (BR) were determined. The activity of nitric oxide synthase(NOS), xanthine oxidase (XOD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), the content of NO, and malondialdehyde in the lung homogenate were measured.Results: Treatment with glutamate for 2 h increased LW/BW, W/D, HR, and BR.These changes were nearly abolished by pretreatment with ginsenoside Rg1 for 30 min before glutamate injection. An analysis of the lung homogenate demon-strated the protective effect as evidenced by the inhibition of NOS (12%) and XOD (50%) inactivity, the enhanced activity of SOD (20%) and CAT (25%).Conclusion: Ginsenoside Rg1 has a potential protective role in lung diseases associated with glutamate toxicity.

  1. Pycnogenol, a compound isolated from the bark of pinus maritime mill, attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury through inhibiting NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, YF; Zhang, JH; Xu, ZF; Deng, XM

    2015-01-01

    Background: During mechanical ventilation, high end-inspiratory lung volume results in a permeability type pulmonary oedema, called ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury involves multiple mechanisms, such as excessive inflammation. And pycnogenol is a mixture of flavonoid compounds extracted from pine tree bark that have anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: We investigated the effects of pyncogenol on ventilator-induced lung injury in r...

  2. Recurrent recruitment manoeuvres improve lung mechanics and minimize lung injury during mechanical ventilation of healthy mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Kathleen Reiss

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mechanical ventilation (MV of mice is increasingly required in experimental studies, but the conditions that allow stable ventilation of mice over several hours have not yet been fully defined. In addition, most previous studies documented vital parameters and lung mechanics only incompletely. The aim of the present study was to establish experimental conditions that keep these parameters within their physiological range over a period of 6 h. For this purpose, we also examined the effects of frequent short recruitment manoeuvres (RM in healthy mice. METHODS: Mice were ventilated at low tidal volume V(T = 8 mL/kg or high tidal volume V(T = 16 mL/kg and a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP of 2 or 6 cm H(2O. RM were performed every 5 min, 60 min or not at all. Lung mechanics were followed by the forced oscillation technique. Blood pressure (BP, electrocardiogram (ECG, heart frequency (HF, oxygen saturation and body temperature were monitored. Blood gases, neutrophil-recruitment, microvascular permeability and pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and blood serum as well as histopathology of the lung were examined. RESULTS: MV with repetitive RM every 5 min resulted in stable respiratory mechanics. Ventilation without RM worsened lung mechanics due to alveolar collapse, leading to impaired gas exchange. HF and BP were affected by anaesthesia, but not by ventilation. Microvascular permeability was highest in atelectatic lungs, whereas neutrophil-recruitment and structural changes were strongest in lungs ventilated with high tidal volume. The cytokines IL-6 and KC, but neither TNF nor IP-10, were elevated in the BAL and serum of all ventilated mice and were reduced by recurrent RM. Lung mechanics, oxygenation and pulmonary inflammation were improved by increased PEEP. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent RM maintain lung mechanics in their physiological range during low tidal volume ventilation of healthy mice by

  3. Using bosentan to treat paraquat poisoning-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongchen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paraquat poisoning is well known for causing multiple organ function failure (MODS and high mortality. Acute lung injury and advanced pulmonary fibrosis are the most serious complications. Bosentan is a dual endothelin receptor antagonist. It plays an important role in treating PF. There is no related literature on the use of bosentan therapy for paraquat poisoning. OBJECTIVE: To study the use of bosentan to treat acute lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis as induced by paraquat. METHOD: A total of 120 adult Wister male rats were randomly assigned to three groups: the paraquat poisoning group (rats were intragastrically administered with paraquat at 50 mg/kg body weight once at the beginning; the bosentan therapy group (rats were administered bosentan at 100 mg/kg body weight by intragastric administration half an hour after paraquat was administered, then the same dose was administered once a day; and a control group (rats were administered intragastric physiological saline. On the 3rd, 7th, 14th, and 21st days following paraquat exposure, rats were sacrificed, and samples of lung tissue and venous blood were collected. The levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, endothelin-1 (ET-1, and hydroxyproline (HYP in the plasma and lung homogenate were determined. Optical and electronic microscopes were used to examine pathological changes. RESULT: The TGF-β1, ET-1, and HYP of the paraquat poisoning group were significantly higher than in the control group, and they were significantly lower in the 21st day therapy group than in the paraquat poisoning group on the same day. Under the optical and electronic microscopes, lung tissue damage was observed to be more severe but was then reduced after bosentan was administered. CONCLUSION: Bosentan can reduce inflammation factor release. It has a therapeutic effect on acute lung injury as induced by paraquat.

  4. Protective Effect of Tanshinone Ⅱ A on Lipopolysaccharide-induced Lung Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xue-mei; HUANG Liang; XIONG Sheng-dao; ZHONG Xian-yang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the protective effect of tanshinone Ⅱ A on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury in rats, and possible mechanism. Methods: LPS (O111: B4) was used to produce a rat model of acute lung injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (8 in each group): the control group, the model group (ALl group), and the tanshinone ⅡA treatment group. Expression of adhesion molecule CD18 on the surface of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN-CD18) in venous white blood cells (WBC), and changes in coagulation-anticoagulant indexes were measured 6 h after injection of LPS or normal saline. Changes in malondialdehyde (MDA) content, wet and dry weight (W/D) ratio and morphometry of pulmonary tissue as well as PMN sequestration in the lung were also measured. Results: (1) When compared with the control group, expression of PMN-CD18 and MDA content were enhanced in the ALl group with a hypercoagulable state (all P<0.01) and an increased W/D ratio (P<0.05). Histopathological morphometry in the lung tissue showed higher PMN sequestration, wider alveolar septa; and lower alveolar volume density (Vv) and alveolar surface density (Sv), showing significant difference (P<0.01). (2) When compared with the ALl group, the expression of PMN-CD18, MDA content, and W/D ratio were all lower in Tanshinone ⅡA treatment group (P<0.05)with ameliorated coagulation abnormality (P<0.01). Histopathological morphometry in the lung tissue showed a decrease in the PMN sequestration and the width of alveolar septa (both P<0.01), and an increase in the Vv and Sv (P<0.05, P<0.01). Conclusion: Tan ⅡA plays a protective role in LPS-induced lung injury in rats through improving hypercoagulating state, decreasing PMN-CD18 expression and alleviating migration, reducing lipid peroxidation and alleviating pathological changes.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of montelukast on smoke-induced lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basyigit Ilknur

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To evaluate the effects of montelukast in smoke-induced lung injury. Methods 28 Wistar-Albino rats were enrolled into 4 groups with 7 rats per group. The healthy control group was exposed to fresh air while all rats in the 3 experimental groups were exposed to cigarette smoke for 20 weeks for 2 hours per day. After histopathological verification of smoke induced lung injury, montelukast (0.1 mg/kg dissolved in Na2CO3 was given in one group (MON, Na2CO3 only was given in another group (MON control and placebo was injected in the third group (COPD control intraperitoneally for 21 days. At the end of this period blood samples were obtained for serum TNF-α assessment and light and electron microscopy analyses were performed on the lung tissues of sacrificed rats. Results Serum TNF-α levels in the MON group were significantly lower than in the MON control and COPD control groups (38.84 ± 4.9 pg/ml, 77.5 ± 5.8 pg/ml and 79.2 ± 6.9 pg/ml respectively, p 0.05. Light and electron microscopic evaluation of the lungs demonstrated that the total histopathological damage score of the lung samples was significantly lower in the MON group than in MON controls and COPD controls (5.14 ± 0.5, 8.4 ± 0.6 and 8.7 ± 0.4 respectively, p 0.05. Conclusion These findings suggest that montelukast might have a protective effect on smoke-induced lung injury in rats both from a histopathological and inflammatory point of view.

  6. Periostin Deficiency Causes Severe and Lethal Lung Injury in Mice With Bleomycin Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Hirofumi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Yoshinao; Fukayama, Masashi; Saito, Mitsuru; Kii, Isao; Kudo, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary capillary leakage followed by influx of blood fluid into the air space of lung alveoli is a crucial step in the progression of acute lung injury (ALI). This influx is due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier. The extracellular matrix (ECM) between the capillary and the epithelium would be expected to be involved in prevention of the influx; however, the role of the ECM remains to be addressed. Here, we show that the ECM architecture organized by periostin, a matricellular protein, plays a pivotal role in the survival of bleomycin-exposed mice. Periostin was localized in the alveolar walls. Although periostin-null mice displayed no significant difference in lung histology and air-blood permeability, they exhibited early lethality in a model of bleomycin-induced lung injury, compared with their wild-type counterparts. This early lethality may have been due to increased pulmonary leakage of blood fluid into the air space in the bleomycin-exposed periostin-null mice. These results suggest that periostin in the ECM architecture prevents pulmonary leakage of blood fluid, thus increasing the survival rate in mice with ALI. Thus, this study provides an evidence for the protective role of the ECM architecture in the lung alveoli. PMID:27270966

  7. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Feng

    Full Text Available Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S. aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS and high capacity runner (HCR rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  8. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  9. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5–30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5–30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of...

  10. Prone positioning ventilation for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Mei-juan; HE Xiao-di

    2009-01-01

    Patients who are diagnosed with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) usually have ventilation-perfusion mismatch, severe decrease in lung capacity, and gas exchange abnormalities. Health care work-ers have implemented various strategies in an attempt to compensate for these pathological alterations. By rotating patients with ALI/ARDS between the supine and prone position, it is possible to achieve a significant improvement in PaO2/FiO2, decrease shunting and therefore improve oxy-genation without use of expensive, invasive and experimen-tal procedures.

  11. Aerosolized human extracellular superoxide dismutase prevents hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ching Yen

    Full Text Available An important issue in critical care medicine is the identification of ways to protect the lungs from oxygen toxicity and reduce systemic oxidative stress in conditions requiring mechanical ventilation and high levels of oxygen. One way to prevent oxygen toxicity is to augment antioxidant enzyme activity in the respiratory system. The current study investigated the ability of aerosolized extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD to protect the lungs from hyperoxic injury. Recombinant human EC-SOD (rhEC-SOD was produced from a synthetic cassette constructed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Female CD-1 mice were exposed in hyperoxia (FiO2>95% to induce lung injury. The therapeutic effects of EC-SOD and copper-zinc SOD (CuZn-SOD via an aerosol delivery system for lung injury and systemic oxidative stress at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of hyperoxia were measured by bronchoalveolar lavage, wet/dry ratio, lung histology, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG in lung and liver tissues. After exposure to hyperoxia, the wet/dry weight ratio remained stable before day 2 but increased significantly after day 3. The levels of oxidative biomarker 8-oxo-dG in the lung and liver were significantly decreased on day 2 (P<0.01 but the marker in the liver increased abruptly after day 3 of hyperoxia when the mortality increased. Treatment with aerosolized rhEC-SOD increased the survival rate at day 3 under hyperoxia to 95.8%, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (57.1%, albumin treated group (33.3%, and CuZn-SOD treated group (75%. The protective effects of EC-SOD against hyperoxia were further confirmed by reduced lung edema and systemic oxidative stress. Aerosolized EC-SOD protected mice against oxygen toxicity and reduced mortality in a hyperoxic model. The results encourage the use of an aerosol therapy with EC-SOD in intensive care units to reduce oxidative injury in patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure, including

  12. Apios americana Medik Extract Alleviates Lung Inflammation in Influenza Virus H1N1- and Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Yeon; Cui, Jun; Jang, Ho Hee; Kang, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Jong-Keun; Kim, In-Kyoung; Lee, Deuk-Ki; Choi, Seulgi; Yoon, Il-Sub; Chung, Ji-Woo; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2015-12-28

    Apios americana Medik (hereinafter Apios) has been reported to treat diseases, including cancer, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes. The therapeutic effect of Apios is likely to be associated with its anti-inflammatory activity. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of Apios in animal models of acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus (H1N1). Mice were exposed to LPS or H1N1 for 2-4 days to induce acute lung injury. The treatment groups were administered Apios extracts via oral injection for 8 weeks before LPS treatment or H1N1 infection. To investigate the effects of Apios, we assessed the mice for in vivo effects of Apios on immune cell infiltration and the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and histopathological changes in the lung. After induction of acute lung injury, the numbers of neutrophils and total cells were lower in the Apios-treated groups than in the non-Apios-treated LPS and H1N1 groups. The Apios groups tended to have lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-a and interleukin-6 in BAL fluid. In addition, the histopathological changes in the lungs were markedly reduced in the Apios-treated groups. These data suggest that Apios treatment reduces LPS- and H1N1-induced lung inflammation. These protective effects of Apios suggest that it may have therapeutic potential in acute lung injury.

  13. Ozone Therapy and Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment in Lung Injury in Septic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Yamanel, Umit Kaldirim, Yesim Oztas, Omer Coskun, Yavuz Poyrazoglu, Murat Durusu, Tuncer Cayci, Ahmet Ozturk, Seref Demirbas, Mehmet Yasar, Orhan Cinar, Salim Kemal Tuncer, Yusuf Emrah Eyi, Bulent Uysal, Turgut Topal, Sukru Oter, Ahmet Korkmaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various therapeutic protocols were used for the management of sepsis including hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy. It has been shown that ozone therapy (OT reduced inflammation in several entities and exhibits some similarity with HBO in regard to mechanisms of action. We designed a study to evaluate the efficacy of OT in an experimental rat model of sepsis to compare with HBO. Male Wistar rats were divided into sham, sepsis+cefepime, sepsis+cefepime+HBO, and sepsis+cefepime+OT groups. Sepsis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli; HBO was administered twice daily; OT was set as intraperitoneal injections once a day. The treatments were continued for 5 days after the induction of sepsis. At the end of experiment, the lung tissues and blood samples were harvested for biochemical and histological analysis. Myeloperoxidase activities and oxidative stress parameters, and serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, IL-1β and TNF-α, were found to be ameliorated by the adjuvant use of HBO and OT in the lung tissue when compared with the antibiotherapy only group. Histologic evaluation of the lung tissue samples confirmed the biochemical outcome. Our data presented that both HBO and OT reduced inflammation and injury in the septic rats' lungs; a greater benefit was obtained for OT. The current study demonstrated that the administration of OT as well as HBO as adjuvant therapy may support antibiotherapy in protecting the lung against septic injury. HBO and OT reduced tissue oxidative stress, regulated the systemic inflammatory response, and abated cellular infiltration to the lung demonstrated by findings of MPO activity and histopathologic examination. These findings indicated that OT tended to be more effective than HBO, in particular regarding serum IL-1β, lung GSH-Px and histologic outcome.

  14. Oleic Acid Induces Lung Injury in Mice through Activation of the ERK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Felippe Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oleic acid (OA can induce acute lung injury in experimental models. In the present work, we used intratracheal OA injection to show augmented oedema formation, cell migration and activation, lipid mediator, and cytokine productions in the bronchoalveolar fluids of Swiss Webster mice. We also demonstrated that OA-induced pulmonary injury is dependent on ERK1/2 activation, since U0126, an inhibitor of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, blocked neutrophil migration, oedema, and lipid body formation as well as IL-6, but not IL-1β production. Using a mice strain carrying a null mutation for the TLR4 receptor, we proved that increased inflammatory parameters after OA challenges were not due to the activation of the TLR4 receptor. With OA being a Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, we suggest the possible involvement of this enzyme as an OA target triggering lung inflammation.

  15. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodder R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rick Hodder*Divisions of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada, *Dr Rick Hodder passed away on Tuesday April 17,2012. Please see the Dedication for more information on Dr Hodder.Abstract: Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1 an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2 a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician.Keywords: acute asthma, acute lung injury, ARDS, acute respiratory failure

  16. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. PMID:24577726

  17. A preclinical rodent model of radiation induced lung injury for medical countermeasure screening in accordance with the FDA animal rule

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Isabel L.; Xu, Puting; Hadley, Caroline; Katz, Barry P.; McGurk, Ross; Down, Julian D.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of pre-clinical murine model development is to establish that the pathophysiological outcome of our rodent model of radiation-induced lung injury is sufficiently representative of the anticipated pulmonary response in the human population. This objective is based on concerns that the C57BL/6J strain may not be the most appropriate preclinical model of lethal radiation lung injury in humans. In this study, we assessed this issue by evaluating the relationship between morbidity (pul...

  18. A Case of Fatal Acute Lung Injury after Balloon Valvuloplasty of Pulmonary Stenosis: Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ostovan Mohammad Ali; Kamali Maliheh; Zolghadrasli Abdolali

    2015-01-01

    A newly described immediate complication after percutaneous pulmonary valvuloplasty is acute lung injury. Here we report a case of fatal acute lung injury after pulmonary valvuloplasty.The patient was a 26-year-old woman, referred to a general hospital with the diagnosis of livercirrhosis. In her work-ups severe pulmonary stenosis was detected and so a decision was madeto relieve the valve stenosis. Despite the procedural success, the patient developed severe dyspneaand desaturation a few hou...

  19. Treatment of intractable interstitial lung injury with alemtuzumab after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohno, M; Perch, M; Andersen, E;

    2011-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman underwent left single-lung transplantation for end-stage emphysema due to α1-antitrypsin deficiency in January 2010. Cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone were administered for immunosuppression and antithymocyte globulin for induction therapy at the time of transplanta......A 44-year-old woman underwent left single-lung transplantation for end-stage emphysema due to α1-antitrypsin deficiency in January 2010. Cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone were administered for immunosuppression and antithymocyte globulin for induction therapy at the time of...

  20. Niacinamide abrogates the organ dysfunction and acute lung injury caused by endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Shang-Jyh; Liu, Demeral David; Su, Chain-Fa; Chen, Hsing I

    2007-09-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) synthabse (PARS) or polymerase (PARP) is a cytotoxic enzyme causing cellular damage. Niacinamide inhibits PARS or PARP. The present experiment tests the effects of niacinamide (NCA) on organ dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS was administered to anesthetized rats and to isolated rat lungs. In anesthetized rats, LPS caused systemic hypotension and increased biochemical factors, nitrate/nitrite (NOx), methyl guanidine (MG), tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In isolated lungs, LPS increased lung weight (LW) to body weight ratio, LW gain, protein and dye tracer leakage, and capillary permeability. The insult also increased NOx, MG, TNFalpha, and IL-1beta in lung perfusate, while decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content with an increase in PARP activity in lung tissue. Pathological examination revealed pulmonary edema with inflammatory cell infiltration. These changes were abrogated by posttreatment (30 min after LPS) with NCA. Following LPS, the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression was increased. NCA reduced the iNOS expression. Niacinamide exerts protective effects on the organ dysfunction and ALI caused by endotoxin. The mechanisms may be mediated through the inhibition on the PARP activity, iNOS expression and the subsequent suppression of NO, free radicals, and proinflammatory cytokines with restoration of ATP.

  1. The role of alveolar epithelium in radiation-induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Almeida

    Full Text Available Pneumonitis and fibrosis are major lung complications of irradiating thoracic malignancies. In the current study, we determined the effect of thoracic irradiation on the lungs of FVB/N mice. Survival data showed a dose-dependent increase in morbidity following thoracic irradiation with single (11-13 Gy and fractionated doses (24-36 Gy of (137Cs γ-rays. Histological examination showed a thickening of vessel walls, accumulation of inflammatory cells, collagen deposition, and regional fibrosis in the lungs 14 weeks after a single 12 Gy dose and a fractionated 30 Gy dose; this damage was also seen 5 months after a fractionated 24 Gy dose. After both single and fractionated doses, i] aquaporin-5 was markedly decreased, ii] E-cadherin was reduced and iii] prosurfactant Protein C (pro-SP-c, the number of pro-SP-c(+ cells and vimentin expression were increased in the lungs. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed co-localization of pro-SP-c and α-smooth muscle actin in the alveoli after a single dose of 12 Gy. These data suggest that, i] the FVB/N mouse strain is sensitive to thoracic radiation ii] aquaporin-5, E-cadherin, and pro-SP-c may serve as sensitive indicators of radiation-induced lung injury; and iii] the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

  2. Ligustrazine alleviates acute lung injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Xin Zhang; Sheng-Chun Dang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Acute necrotizing pancreatitis leads to a systemic inlfammatory response characterized by widespread leukocyte activation and, as a consequence, distant lung injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ligustrazine, extracted from Ligusticum wallichii a traditional Chinese medicine, on lung injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). METHODS:A total of 192 rats were randomly divided into three groups: control (C group); ANP without treatment (P group); and ANP treated with ligustrazine (T group). Each group was further divided into 0.5, 2, 6 and 12 hours subgroups. All rats were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of sodium pentobarbital. Sodium taurocholate was infused through the pancreatic membrane to induce ANP. For the T group, sodium taurocholate was infused as above, then 0.6%ligustrazine was administered via the femoral vein. The effects of ligustrazine on the severity of lung injury were assessed by lung wet/dry weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histopathological changes. Pulmonary blood lfow was determined by the radioactive microsphere technique (RMT). RESULTS:The blood lfow in the P group was signiifcantly lower than that of the C group, while the blood lfow in the T group was signiifcantly higher than that of the P group but showed no signiifcant difference from the C group. Compared with C group, the lung wet/dry ratios in both the P and T groups were signiifcantly increased, but there was no signiifcant difference between them. The MPO activity in the P group was greatly increased over that of the C group. In the T group, although the MPO activity was also higher than in the C group, it much less increased than in the P group. Moreover, the difference between P and T groups was signiifcant after 0.5 to 12 hours. After induction of the ANP model, the pancreas showed mild edema and congestion;the longer the time, the more severe this became. The pulmonary pathological changes were

  3. Genetic replacement of surfactant protein-C reduces respiratory syncytial virus induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Glasser, Stephan W.; Senft, Albert P; Melissa D. Maxfield; Ruetschilling, Teah L.; Baatz, John E.; Page, Kristen; Korfhagen, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with deficiencies of pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) develop interstitial lung disease (ILD) that is exacerbated by viral infections including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). SP-C gene targeted mice (Sftpc -/-) lack SP-C, develop an ILD-like disease and are susceptible to infection with RSV. Methods In order to determine requirements for correction of RSV induced injury we have generated compound transgenic mice where SP-C expression can be induced on the Sftpc...

  4. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) deficiency attenuates LPS-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gowda, Satish; Yeang, Calvin; Wadgaonkar, Sunil; Anjum, Fatima; Grinkina, Natalia; Cutaia, Michael; Jiang, Xian-Chen; Wadgaonkar, Raj

    2010-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) catalyzes the synthesis of sphingomyelin (SM) and is required for maintenance of plasma membrane microdomain fluidity. Of the two isoforms of mammalian SMS, SMS1 is mostly present in the trans-Golgi apparatus, whereas SMS2 is predominantly found at the plasma membrane. SMS2 has a role in receptor mediated response to inflammation in macrophages, however, the role of SMS2 in vascular permeability, pulmonary edema, and lung injury have not been investigated. To defi...

  5. Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitors Prolong Survival, Attenuate Inflammation, and Reduce Lung Injury in Murine Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Anuran; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Drakopanayiotakis, Fotios; ANTONOVA, Galina; Snead, Connie; Cannon, Joseph; Venema, Richard C.; Catravas, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Severe sepsis is the leading cause of death for patients in intensive care units. Patients with severe sepsis develop multiple organ failure, including acute lung injury (ALI), resulting from a deregulated inflammatory response. Inhibitors of the ubiquitous chaperone, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), block the activity of certain proinflammatory mediators in vitro. We hypothesized that Hsp90 inhibitors may ameliorate the inflammation and ALI associated with severe sepsis.

  6. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically...

  7. Danaparoid sodium inhibits systemic inflammation and prevents endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Hidaka, Seigo; Hishiyama, Sohei; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Systemic inflammatory mediators, including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), play an important role in the development of sepsis. Anticoagulants, such as danaparoid sodium (DA), may be able to inhibit sepsis-induced inflammation, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. We hypothesised that DA would act as an inhibitor of systemic inflammation and prevent endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in a rat model. Methods We used male Wistar rats. Animals in the intervention ...

  8. The functional comorbidity index had high inter-rater reliability in patients with acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fan Eddy; Gifford Jeneen M; Chandolu Satish; Colantuoni Elizabeth; Pronovost Peter J; Needham Dale M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Functional Comorbidity Index (FCI) was recently developed to predict physical function in acute lung injury patients using comorbidity data. Our objectives were to determine: (1) the inter-rater reliability of the FCI collected using in-patient discharge summaries (primary objective); and (2) the accuracy and predictive validity of the FCI collected using hospital discharge summaries and admission records versus complete chart review (secondary objectives). Methods For...

  9. Spectroscopic Approach to Capillary-Alveolar Membrane Damage Induced Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute (or adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is often associated with a high mortality rate in the critical care population. The term acute lung injury (ALI, a primitive phase of ARDS, was introduced by the European and American consensus groups to provide early diagnoses of ARDS. The pathophysiological characterization of ALI/ARDS – an increased pulmonary capillary-alveolar membrane barrier permeability – is generally not included in current intensive care unit diagnosis criteria.

  10. Red blood cell transfusion and outcomes in patients with acute lung injury, sepsis and shock

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, Elizabeth C.; Hough, Catherine L.; Seymour, Christopher W; Cooke, Colin R.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Watkins, Timothy R

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we sought to determine the association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and outcomes in patients with acute lung injury (ALI), sepsis and shock. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of new-onset ALI patients enrolled in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (2000 to 2005) who had a documented ALI risk factor of sepsis or pneumonia and met shock criteria (mean arterial pressure (MAP) < 60 mmHg or vasopressor ...

  11. Role of Ventilation in Cases of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome /Acute Lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Hemant M Shah; Shilpa B Sutariya; Parul M Bhatt; Nishil Shah; Shweta Gamit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute lung injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by refractory hypoxemia that develops secondary to high-permeability pulmonary edema. These syndromes are gaining more attention as a means of better comprehending the pathophysiology of ARDS and possiblyfor modifying ventilatory management. In this context a study was done to compare role of invasive and non-invasive ventilation in cases of ARDS/ALI. Methods: in this study patients of AR...

  12. A practical protocol for titrating "optimal" PEEP in acute lung injury: recruitment maneuver and PEEP decrement.

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Gee Young; Kwon, O Jung; Yoon, Jong Wook; Park, Sang Joon; Ham, Hyoung Suk; Kang, Soo Jung; Koh, Won-Jung; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Ho Joong

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a practical protocol for titrating positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) involving recruitment maneuver (RM) and decremental PEEP. Seventeen consecutive patients with acute lung injury who underwent PEEP titration were included in the analysis. After baseline ventilation, RM (continuous positive airway pressure, 35 cm H2O for 45 sec) was performed and PEEP was increased to 20 cmH2O or the highest PEEP guaranteeing the mini...

  13. Nanoparticles, lung injury, and the role of oxidant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madl, Amy K; Plummer, Laurel E; Carosino, Christopher; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of engineered nanoscale materials has provided significant advancements in electronic, biomedical, and material science applications. Both engineered nanoparticles and nanoparticles derived from combustion or incidental processes exhibit a range of physical and chemical properties that induce inflammation and oxidative stress in biological systems. Oxidative stress reflects the imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species and the biochemical mechanisms to detoxify and repair the damage resulting from reactive intermediates. This review examines current research on incidental and engineered nanoparticles in terms of their health effects on lungs and the mechanisms by which oxidative stress via physicochemical characteristics influences toxicity or biocompatibility. Although oxidative stress has generally been thought of as an adverse biological outcome, this review also briefly discusses some of the potential emerging technologies to use nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress to treat disease in a site-specific fashion. PMID:24215442

  14. Treatment for Sulfur Mustard Lung Injuries; New Therapeutic Approaches from Acute to Chronic Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Poursaleh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sulfur mustard (SM is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988. It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries.Method:This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment.Results:Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion:Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments.

  15. Treatment for sulfur mustard lung injuries; new therapeutic approaches from acute to chronic phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poursaleh Zohreh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Sulfur mustard (SM is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988. It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries. Method This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment. Results Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments.

  16. Experimental research of prednisolone in new zealand white rabbits with radiation induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the preventive and therapeutic effect of Prednisolone in radiation injury of lungs. Methods: 45 male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups with 15 in each; the blank group (a), the irradiation group (b) and the group with irradiation and Prednisolone (c). Group (a) has no other treatment. Group (b) was given injections Sodium Chloride on the first day of irradiation, with 0.1 ml/kg/d for 4 weeks. Group (c) was given intraperitoneal injections of Prednisolone on the first day of irradiation, with 0.4 mg/kg/d for 4 weeks. CT scanning was performs before irradiation and the 1, 3, 5 months after the irradiation. The animals were killed by cutting off the neck after 1, 3, 5 months of radiation. The right lungs were removed to give HE staining and immunohistochemical staining for the histological evaluation. Results: No significant changes were found in group a in CT scanning. The pathological changes in group c is less than serious than those in group b. Group c is less serious than in pathological changes those in group b. Immunohistochemical results; One, three, and five months after irradiation, the number of positive cells were highest in group b, and was significantly higher in group c than in group a. Conclusion: High dose irradiation of the lung of New Zealand rabbit tissue can successfully abtain the established radiation-induced lung injury animal models. Prednisolon can reduce the radiation-induced lung injury in rabbits New Zealand, and has a certain preventive effect. (authors)

  17. Pathophysiology of lung injury induced by common bile duct ligation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Shikata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver dysfunction and cirrhosis affect vasculature in several organ systems and cause impairment of organ functions, thereby increasing morbidity and mortality. Establishment of a mouse model of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS would provide greater insights into the genetic basis of the disease. Our objectives were to establish a mouse model of lung injury after common bile duct ligation (CBDL and to investigate pulmonary pathogenesis for application in future therapeutic approaches. METHODS: Eight-week-old Balb/c mice were subjected to CBDL. Immunohistochemical analyses and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction were performed on pulmonary tissues. The presence of HPS markers was detected by western blot and microarray analyses. RESULTS: We observed extensive proliferation of CD31-positive pulmonary vascular endothelial cells at 2 weeks after CBDL and identified 10 upregulated and 9 down-regulated proteins that were associated with angiogenesis. TNF-α and MMP-9 were highly expressed at 3 weeks after CBDL and were less expressed in the lungs of the control group. CONCLUSIONS: We constructed a mouse lung injury model by using CBDL. Contrary to our expectation, lung pathology in our mouse model exhibited differences from that of rat models, and the mechanisms responsible for these differences are unknown. This phenomenon may be explained by contrasting processes related to TNF induction of angiogenic signaling pathways in the inflammatory phase. Thus, we suggest that our mouse model can be applied to pulmonary pathological analyses in the inflammatory phase, i.e., to systemic inflammatory response syndrome, acute lung injury, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

  18. Quantifying the roles of tidal volume and PEEP in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Adrian S; Grant, Kara A; Aliyeva, Minara; Allen, Gilman B; Bates, Jason H T

    2011-05-01

    Management of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) rests on achieving a balance between the gas exchanging benefits of mechanical ventilation and the exacerbation of tissue damage in the form of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Optimizing this balance requires an injury cost function relating injury progression to the measurable pressures, flows, and volumes delivered during mechanical ventilation. With this in mind, we mechanically ventilated naive, anesthetized, paralyzed mice for 4 h using either a low or high tidal volume (Vt) with either moderate or zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). The derecruitability of the lung was assessed every 15 min in terms of the degree of increase in lung elastance occurring over 3 min following a recruitment maneuver. Mice could be safely ventilated for 4 h with either a high Vt or zero PEEP, but when both conditions were applied simultaneously the lung became increasingly unstable, demonstrating worsening injury. We were able to mimic these data using a computational model of dynamic recruitment and derecruitment that simulates the effects of progressively increasing surface tension at the air-liquid interface, suggesting that the VILI in our animal model progressed via a vicious cycle of alveolar leak, degradation of surfactant function, and increasing tissue stress. We thus propose that the task of ventilating the injured lung is usefully understood in terms of the Vt-PEEP plane. Within this plane, non-injurious combinations of Vt and PEEP lie within a "safe region", the boundaries of which shrink as VILI develops. PMID:21203845

  19. Risk factors and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in the critically ill : A nested case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Prins, David; van Stein, Danielle; Hofstra, Jorrit J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of critically ill patients. Design: In a retrospective cohort study, patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury were identified using the consensus criteria of acute lung i

  20. Comparison of exogenous surfactant therapy, mechanical ventilation with high end-expiratory pressure and partial liquid ventilation in a model of acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, Anneke; Vazquez de Anda, G.F.; Gommers, Diederik; Kaisers, U; Verbrugge, Serge; Schnabel, R.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe have compared three treatment strategies, that aim to prevent repetitive alveolar collapse, for their effect on gas exchange, lung mechanics, lung injury, protein transfer into the alveoli and surfactant system, in a model of acute lung injury. In adult rats, the lungs were ventilated mechanically with 100% oxygen and a PEEP of 6 cm H2O, and acute lung injury was induced by repeated lung lavage to obtain a PaO2 value < 13 kPa. Animals were then allocated randomly (n = 12 in eac...

  1. Alveolar macrophages regulate neutrophil recruitment in endotoxin-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes Livia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages play an important role during the development of acute inflammatory lung injury. In the present study, in vivo alveolar macrophage depletion was performed by intratracheal application of dichloromethylene diphosphonate-liposomes in order to study the role of these effector cells in the early endotoxin-induced lung injury. Methods Lipopolysaccharide was applied intratracheally and the inflammatory reaction was assessed 4 hours later. Neutrophil accumulation and expression of inflammatory mediators were determined. To further analyze in vivo observations, in vitro experiments with alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages were performed. Results A 320% increase of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was observed in macrophage-depleted compared to macrophage-competent lipopolysaccharide-animals. This neutrophil recruitment was also confirmed in the interstitial space. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was significantly increased in the absence of alveolar macrophages. This phenomenon was underlined by in vitro experiments with alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Neutralizing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the airways diminished neutrophil accumulation. Conclusion These data suggest that alveolar macorphages play an important role in early endotoxin-induced lung injury. They prevent neutrophil influx by controlling monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production through alveolar epithelial cells. Alveolar macrophages might therefore possess robust anti-inflammatory effects.

  2. DAP12 expression in lung macrophages mediates ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil extravasation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Jessica H; Li, Wenjun; Bribriesco, Alejandro C; Liu, Jie; Shen, Hua; Ibricevic, Aida; Pan, Jie-Hong; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Brody, Steven L; Goldstein, Daniel R; Krupnick, Alexander S; Gelman, Andrew E; Miller, Mark J; Kreisel, Daniel

    2015-04-15

    Neutrophils are critical mediators of innate immune responses and contribute to tissue injury. However, immune pathways that regulate neutrophil recruitment to injured tissues during noninfectious inflammation remain poorly understood. DAP12 is a cell membrane-associated protein that is expressed in myeloid cells and can either augment or dampen innate inflammatory responses during infections. To elucidate the role of DAP12 in pulmonary ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), we took advantage of a clinically relevant mouse model of transplant-mediated lung IRI. This technique allowed us to dissect the importance of DAP12 in tissue-resident cells and those that infiltrate injured tissue from the periphery during noninfectious inflammation. Macrophages in both mouse and human lungs that have been subjected to cold ischemic storage express DAP12. We found that donor, but not recipient, deficiency in DAP12 protected against pulmonary IRI. Analysis of the immune response showed that DAP12 promotes the survival of tissue-resident alveolar macrophages and contributes to local production of neutrophil chemoattractants. Intravital imaging demonstrated a transendothelial migration defect into DAP12-deficient lungs, which can be rescued by local administration of the neutrophil chemokine CXCL2. We have uncovered a previously unrecognized role for DAP12 expression in tissue-resident alveolar macrophages in mediating acute noninfectious tissue injury through regulation of neutrophil trafficking.

  3. Dihydro-Resveratrol Ameliorates Lung Injury in Rats with Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ze-Si; Ku, Chuen Fai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Hong-Qi; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  4. [Protective effect of curcumin on oleic-induced acute lung injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui-fang; Zhou, Min; He, Jian-lin; Ding, Fu-yun; Yu, Shu-qin; Xu, Guang-lin

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the effect of curcumine on acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rat and the possible mechanism of action. The rats were divided into 6 groups randomly: normal group, control group, curcumine groups (5, 10, 20 mg x kg(-1)) and dexamethasone group (1 mg x kg(-1)). During the experiment, acute lung injury was induced by oleic acid in rat. The changes of dynamic lung compliance were recorded by anrise 2005 pulmonary function test apparatus, light microscope was used to examine histological changes and lung index as well as wet to dry weight ratio was calculated by weighting method. Lung vascular permeability and protein level in BALF were detected by ultraviolet spectrophotometry, and the concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 in BALF were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The result showed that the changes of pulmonary compliance were inhibited and pulmonary function was improved by curcumine. The OA-induced elevation of lung index was restrained, as well as wet to dry weight ratio, lung vascular permeability, protein level, TNF-alpha (250.4 +/- 21.6 vs. 172.53 +/- 14.88, 122.2 +/- 10.98, 108.69 +/- 3.39) ng x L(-1), IL-6 (763.6 +/- 88.33 vs. 207.41 +/- 15.55, 172.13 +/- 21.91, 142.92 +/- 4.32) ng x L(-1) in BALF in curcumine groups, IL-10 (98.90 +/- 2.99 vs. 208.44 +/- 16.30, 218.43 +/- 6.23, 252.70 +/- 20.58) ng x L(-1) in BALF was increased, respectively significantly. Light microscope findings shown that the impairment in curcumine groups was far less severe than that in model groups. Pretreatment of curcumine showed beneficial effect on acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rats. The mediation of both proinflammatory factor and anti-inflammatory factor by curcumine may be involved in mechanism of action of curcumine effects. PMID:19066061

  5. Injury to the lung from cancer therapy: Clinical syndromes, measurable endpoints, and potential scoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxicity of the respiratory system is a common side effect and complication of anticancer therapy that can result in significant morbidity. The range of respiratory compromise can extend from acute lethal events to degrees of chronic pulmonary decompensation, manifesting years after the initial cancer therapy. This review examines the anatomic-histologic background of the lung and the normal functional anatomic unit. The pathophysiology of radiation and chemotherapy induced lung injury is discussed as well as the associated clinical syndromes. Radiation tolerance doses and volumes are assessed in addition to chemotherapy tolerance and risk factors and radiation-chemotherapy interactions. There are a variety of measurable endpoints for detection and screening. Because of the wide range of available quantitative tests, it would seem that the measurement of impaired lung function is possible. The development of staging systems for acute and late toxicity is discussed and a new staging system for Late Effects in Normal Tissues (LENT) is proposed

  6. [Independent lung ventilation for asymmetric injury: case report as a demonstration of common challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedinskiĭ, K M; Artiukov, D A; Borisov, M V; Gromova, T A; Slivin, O A

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with a case of conventional mechanical ventilation in 75 y.o. woman with the background of uncompensated diabetes mellitus, suffering from bilateral pneumonia with predominantly left-sided lesion and severe sepsis. The conventional mechanical ventilation with high pressure levels led to arterial hypoxemia with P/F ratio 52. Independent lung ventilation immediately increased oxygenation up to P/F ratio 225 and evidently improved left lung aeration. The case demonstrates that while applying high pressures to open alveoli, we could not only provoke ventilator-induced lung injury and low cardiac output, but also "squeeze out" pulmonary perfusion from ventilated areas to non-ventilated ones with less intraalveolar pressure levels. PMID:25549491

  7. Influence of lung injury on cardiac output measurement using transpulmonary ultrasound dilution: a validation study in neonatal lambs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrancken, S.L.A.G.; Boode, W.P. de; Hopman, J.C.W.; Looijen-Salamon, M.G.; Liem, K.D.; Heijst, A.F. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: /st> Transpulmonary ultrasound dilution (TPUD) is a promising method for cardiac output (CO) measurement in severely ill neonates. The incidence of lung injury in this population is high, which might influence CO measurement using TPUD because of altered lung perfusion. We evaluated t

  8. Apneic oxygenation combined with extracorporeal arteriovenous carbon dioxide removal provides sufficient gas exchange in experimental lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Nielsen, Jakob Koefoed;

    In this porcine lung injury model, apneic oxygenation with arteriovenous CO2 removal provided sufficient gas exchange and stable hemodynamics, indicating that the method might have a potential in the treatment of severe ARDS.   Acknowledgements The membrane lungs were kindly provided by Novalung GmbH, Germany....

  9. Protective effects of pretreatment with Radix Paeoniae Rubra on acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/ reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang; ZHANG Fan; XIA Zhong-yuan; LIN Hui; MO An-sheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of pretreatment with Radix Paeoniae Rubra (RPR) on acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats and its protective mechanism.Methods:n lung tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry and morphometry computer image analysis. Arterial blood gas analysis, lung permeability index, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) contents in lungs were measured. The histological changes of lung tissue were observed under light microscope.Results:The expression of HO-1 in RPR-pretreatment group and hemin group was obviously higher than that in sham-operation group and I/R group (P < 0.01). The level of MDA and lung permeability index in RPR-pretreatment and hemin group were significantly lower than those in I/R group (P<0.01 or P<0.05), while the activity of SOD in RPR-pretreatment and hemin group was obviously higher than that in I/R group (P<0.01 ). Under light microscope, the pathologic changes induced by I/R were significantly attenuated by RPR.Conclusion : Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion may result in acute lung injury and pretreatment with RPR injection can attenuate the injury. The protective effect of RPR on the acute lung injury is related to its property of inducing HO-1 expression and inhibiting lipid peroxidation.

  10. Impact of mechanical ventilation on the pathophysiology of progressive acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Gary F; Gatto, Louis A; Habashi, Nader M

    2015-12-01

    The earliest description of what is now known as the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was a highly lethal double pneumonia. Ashbaugh and colleagues (Ashbaugh DG, Bigelow DB, Petty TL, Levine BE Lancet 2: 319-323, 1967) correctly identified the disease as ARDS in 1967. Their initial study showing the positive effect of mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on ARDS mortality was dampened when it was discovered that improperly used mechanical ventilation can cause a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), thereby greatly exacerbating ARDS mortality. This Synthesis Report will review the pathophysiology of ARDS and VILI from a mechanical stress-strain perspective. Although inflammation is also an important component of VILI pathology, it is secondary to the mechanical damage caused by excessive strain. The mechanical breath will be deconstructed to show that multiple parameters that comprise the breath-airway pressure, flows, volumes, and the duration during which they are applied to each breath-are critical to lung injury and protection. Specifically, the mechanisms by which a properly set mechanical breath can reduce the development of excessive fluid flux and pulmonary edema, which are a hallmark of ARDS pathology, are reviewed. Using our knowledge of how multiple parameters in the mechanical breath affect lung physiology, the optimal combination of pressures, volumes, flows, and durations that should offer maximum lung protection are postulated. PMID:26472873

  11. Surfactant therapy restores gas exchange in lung injury due to paraquat intoxication in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, K L; de Buijzer, E; Gommers, D; Kaisers, U; van Genderen, P J; Lachmann, B

    1998-08-01

    Paraquat is a weed killer which causes often fatal lung damage in humans and other animals. There is evidence that the pulmonary surfactant system is involved in the pathophysiology of respiratory failure after paraquat intoxication and, therefore, the possible therapeutic effect of intratracheal surfactant administration on gas exchange in rats with progressive lung injury induced by paraquat poisoning was studied. In one group of rats, the time course of the development of lung injury due to paraquat intoxication was characterized. In a second group of rats, 72 h after paraquat intoxication, the animals underwent mechanical ventilation and only those animals in which the arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction (Pa,O2/FI,O2) decreased to below 20 kPa (150 mmHg) received exogenous surfactant (200 mg x kg(-1) body weight). Within 3 days the rats in group 1 developed progressive respiratory failure, demonstrated not only by impaired gas exchange and lung mechanics but also by increased minimal surface tension and increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In group 2, intratracheal surfactant administration increased Pa,O2/FI,O2 significantly within 5 min (14.4+/-2.4 kPa (108+/-18 mmHg)) to (55.2+/-53 kPa (414+/-40 mmHg)) and sustained this level for at least 2 h. It is concluded that intratracheal surfactant administration is a promising approach in the treatment of severe respiratory failure caused by paraquat poisoning. PMID:9727775

  12. Expression of ICAM-1 in mice with radiation induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in mice with radiation induced lung injury and to study the function of ICAM-1. Methods: The thoraces of C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either sham irradiation or single fraction of 12 Gy. Two groups were defined as received sham-irradiation (C group) and underwent irradiation (X group). Mice were sacrificed at hours 1, 24, 72 and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 after irradiation. The lung tissues were removed and processed for definitive analysis, including HE and Masson staining, the hydroxyproline content, the immunohistochemistry and the real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Compared with C group, there was a significant histological and pathologic change in X group. And there was a significantly elevated level of positive cell counts of ICAM-1 and inflammatory cells in X group (P<0.01). Similarly, there was a significantly elevated level of hydroxyproline in X group(P<0.05). Moreover, the results of real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed that the relative mRNA expression of cytokine ICAM-1 in X group was significantly higher than that of C group(P<0.01). Conclusions: As an important cytokine in radiation-induced lung injury, ICAM-1 can not only mediate the inflammation cells adherence and infiltration, but also be involved in radiation induced lung fibrosis. (authors)

  13. Regional pulmonary inflammation in an endotoxemic ovine acute lung injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Bustamante, A; Easley, R B; Fuld, M; Mulreany, D; Chon, D; Lewis, J F; Simon, B A

    2012-08-15

    The regional distribution of inflammation during acute lung injury (ALI) is not well known. In an ovine ALI model we studied regional alveolar inflammation, surfactant composition, and CT-derived regional specific volume change (sVol) and specific compliance (sC). 18 ventilated adult sheep received IV lipopolysaccharide (LPS) until severe ALI was achieved. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from apical and basal lung regions were obtained at baseline and injury time points, for analysis of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β), BAL protein and surfactant composition. Whole lung CT images were obtained in 4 additional sheep. BAL protein and IL-1β were significantly higher in injured apical vs. basal regions. No significant regional surfactant composition changes were observed. Baseline sVol and sC were lower in apex vs. base; ALI enhanced this cranio-caudal difference, reaching statistical significance only for sC. This study suggests that apical lung regions show greater inflammation than basal ones during IV LPS-induced ALI which may relate to differences in regional mechanical events.

  14. GSN antibody pretreatment aggravates radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced lung injury is one of the main dose limiting factors for thoracic radiation therapy. Gelsolin (GSN) is a widespread, multifunctional regulator of cellular structure and metabolism. In this work, the roles of GSN in radiation-induced lung injury in Balb/c mice were studied. The GSN levels in plasma reduced progressively in 72 hours after irradiation, and then increased gradually. GSN contents in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid increased after thoracic irradiation, whereas mRNA levels of GSN in the lung tissue decreased significantly within 24 hours after irradiation and then increased again. Mice were intravenously injected with 50 μg GSN antibody 0.5 hour before 20 Gy of thoracic irradiation. GSN antibody pretreatment increased lung inflammation, protein concentration in the BAL fluid and leukocytes infiltration in the irradiated mice. The activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) in the plasma and the BAL fluid in irradiated mice injected with GSN antibody were less than that of control groups, whereas the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased. These results suggest that pretreatment of GSN antibody may aggravate radiation-induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  15. Osteopontin protects against hyperoxia-induced lung injury by inhibiting nitric oxide synthases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiang-feng; LIU Shuang; ZHOU Yu-jie; ZHU Guang-fa; Hussein. D Foda

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure of adult mice to more than 95% O_2 produces a lethal injury by 72 hours. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of murine hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein produced principally by macrophages. OPN inhibits inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which generates large amounts of nitric oxide production. However, the relationship between nitric oxide and endogenous OPN in lung tissue during hyperoxia-induced ALI has not yet been elucidated, thus we examined the role that OPN plays in the hyperoxia-induced lung injury and its relationships with NOS.Methods One hundred and forty-four osteopontin knock-out (KO) mice and their matched wild type background control (WT) were exposed in sealed cages >95% oxygen or room air for 24-72 hours, and the severity of lung injury was assessed; expression of OPN, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and iNOS mRNA in lung tissues at 24,48 and 72 hours of hyperoxia were studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed for the detection of iNOS, eNOS, and OPN protein in lung tissues.Results OPN KO mice developed more severe acute lung injury at 72 hours of hyperoxia. The wet/dry weight ratio increased to 6.85±0.66 in the KO mice at 72 hours of hyperoxia as compared to 5.31±0.92 in the WT group (P<0.05). iNOS mRNA (48 hours: 1.04±0.08 vs. 0.63±0.09, P<0.01; 72 hours: 0.89±0.08 vs. 0.72±0.09, P<0.05) and eNOS mRNA (48 hours: 0.62±0.08 vs. 0.43±0.09, P<0.05; 72 hours: 0.67±0.08 vs. 0.45±0.09, P<0.05) expression was more significantly increased in OPN KO mice than their matched WT mice when exposed to hyperoxia. IHC study showed higher expression of iNOS (20.54±3.18 vs. 12.52±2.46, P <0.05) and eNOS (19.83±5.64 vs. 9.45±3.82, P <0.05) in lung tissues of OPN KO mice at 72 hours of hyperoxia. Conclusion OPN can protect against hyperoxia-induced lung

  16. Neutralization of Osteopontin Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yohei; Aziz, Monowar; Yang, Weng-Lang; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Osteopontin (OPN), a glycoprotein secreted from immune-reactive cells, plays a deleterious role in various inflammatory diseases. Considering OPN as a pro-inflammatory molecule, we hypothesize that the treatment with its neutralizing antibody (anti-OPN Ab) protects mice against intestinal I/R-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Intestinal I/R was induced in mice by superior mesenteric artery occlusion with a vascular clip. After 45 min of occlusion, the clip was removed and anti-OPN Ab (25 μg/mouse) or normal IgG isotype control (25 μg/mouse) was immediately administrated intravenously. Blood, small intestine, and lung tissues were collected at 4 h after reperfusion for various analyses. After intestinal I/R, mRNA and protein levels of OPN were significantly induced in the small intestine, lungs, and blood relative to sham-operated animals. Compared with the IgG control group, treatment of anti-OPN Ab significantly reduced plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (IL-6 and MIP-2) and organ injury markers (AST, ALT, and LDH). The histological architecture of the gut and lung tissues in anti-OPN Ab-treated intestinal I/R-induced mice showed significant improvement versus the IgG control mice. The lung inflammation measured by the levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2 was also significantly downregulated in the anti-OPN Ab-treated mice as compared with the IgG control mice. Besides, the lung MPO and neutrophil infiltration in anti-OPN Ab-treated mice showed significant reduction as compared with the IgG control animals. In conclusion, we have demonstrated beneficial outcomes of anti-OPN Ab treatment in protecting against ALI, implicating a novel therapeutic potential in intestinal I/R. PMID:26974422

  17. Effects of sigh during pressure control and pressure support ventilation in pulmonary and extrapulmonary mild acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Cíntia Lourenco; Santos, Raquel Souza; Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Saddy, Felipe; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Silva, Pedro Leme; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sigh improves oxygenation and lung mechanics during pressure control ventilation (PCV) and pressure support ventilation (PSV) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, so far, no study has evaluated the biological impact of sigh during PCV or PSV on the lung and distal organs in experimental pulmonary (p) and extrapulmonary (exp) mild acute lung injury (ALI). Methods In 48 Wistar rats, ALI was induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide either intratrachea...

  18. VDR Attenuates Acute Lung Injury by Blocking Ang-2-Tie-2 Pathway and Renin-Angiotensin System

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Juan; Zhu, Xiangdong; Shi, Yongyan; Liu, Tianjing; Chen, Yunzi; Bhan, Ishir; Zhao, Qun; Thadhani, Ravi; Li, Yan Chun

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a hallmark of systemic inflammation associated with high mortality. Although the vitamin D receptor (VDR) is highly expressed in the lung, its role in lung physiology remains unclear. We investigated the effect of VDR deletion on ALI using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis model. After LPS challenge VDR-null mice exhibited more severe ALI and higher mortality compared with wild-type (WT) counterparts, manifested by increased pulmonary vascular leakiness, pul...

  19. Unfractionated heparin and enoxaparin reduce high-stretch ventilation augmented lung injury: a prospective, controlled animal experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li-Fu; Huang, Chung-Chi; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Quinn, Deborah A; Liao, Shuen-Kuei

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Dysregulation of coagulation and local fibrinolysis found in patients with acute lung injury often results in the need for the support of mechanical ventilation. High-tidal-volume mechanical ventilation can increase lung damage and suppression of fibrinolytic activity, but the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that subcutaneous injections of unfractionated heparin and enoxaparin would decrease neutrophil infiltration, lung edema, and plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1...

  20. Pharyngeal oxygen administration increases the time to serious desaturation at intubation in acute lung injury: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Engström, Joakim; Hedenstierna, Göran; Larsson, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Endotracheal intubation in critically ill patients is associated with severe life-threatening complications in about 20%, mainly due to hypoxemia. We hypothesized that apneic oxygenation via a pharyngeal catheter during the endotracheal intubation procedure would prevent or increase the time to life-threatening hypoxemia and tested this hypothesis in an acute lung injury animal model. Methods Eight anesthetized piglets with collapse-prone lungs induced by lung lavage were ventila...

  1. Increased cardiac index due to terbutaline treatment aggravates capillary-alveolar macromolecular leakage in oleic acid lung injury in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Briot, Raphael; Bayat, Sam; Anglade, Daniel; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Grimbert, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We assessed the in vivo effects of terbutaline, a beta2-agonist assumed to reduce microvascular permeability in acute lung injury. Methods We used a recently developed broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) technique to repeatedly measure (every 15 min. for 4 hours) the time-course of capillary-alveolar leakage of a macromolecule (fluorescein-labeled dextran) in 19 oleic acid (OA) lung injured dogs. BAL was performed in a closed lung sampling site, using a bronchoscope fitted with an infl...

  2. Biomarkers for oxidative stress in acute lung injury induced in rabbits submitted to different strategies of mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative damage has been said to play an important role in pulmonary injury, which is associated with the development and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to identify biomarkers to determine the oxidative stress in an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) using ...

  3. Early biomarkers and potential mediators of ventilation-induced lung injury in very preterm lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Peter G

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is closely associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI in very preterm infants. The greatest risk of VILI may be in the immediate period after birth, when the lungs are surfactant deficient, still partially filled with liquid and not uniformly aerated. However, there have been very few studies that have examined this immediate post-birth period and identified the initial injury-related pathways that are activated. We aimed to determine if the early response genes; connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, cysteine rich-61 (CYR61 and early growth response 1 (EGR1, were rapidly induced by VILI in preterm lambs and whether ventilation with different tidal volumes caused different inflammatory cytokine and early response gene expression. Methods To identify early markers of VILI, preterm lambs (132 d gestational age; GA, term ~147 d were resuscitated with an injurious ventilation strategy (VT 20 mL/kg for 15 min then gently ventilated (5 mL/kg for 15, 30, 60 or 120 min (n = 4 in each. To determine if early response genes and inflammatory cytokines were differentially regulated by different ventilation strategies, separate groups of preterm lambs (125 d GA; n = 5 in each were ventilated from birth with a VT of 5 (VG5 or 10 mL/kg (VG10 for 135 minutes. Lung gene expression levels were compared to levels prior to ventilation in age-matched control fetuses. Results CTGF, CYR61 and EGR1 lung mRNA levels were increased ~25, 50 and 120-fold respectively (p CTGF, CYR61, EGR1, IL1-β, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels compared to control levels. CTGF, CYR61, IL-6 and IL-8 expression levels were higher in VG10 than VG5 lambs; although only the IL-6 and CYR61 mRNA levels reached significance. Conclusion CTGF, CYR61 and EGR1 may be novel early markers of lung injury and mechanical ventilation from birth using relatively low tidal volumes may be less injurious than using higher tidal volumes.

  4. Recurrent Recruitment Manoeuvres Improve Lung Mechanics and Minimize Lung Injury during Mechanical Ventilation of Healthy Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Lucy Kathleen; Kowallik, Anke; Uhlig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation (MV) of mice is increasingly required in experimental studies, but the conditions that allow stable ventilation of mice over several hours have not yet been fully defined. In addition, most previous studies documented vital parameters and lung mechanics only incompletely. The aim of the present study was to establish experimental conditions that keep these parameters within their physiological range over a period of 6 h. For this purpose, we also examined t...

  5. Loss of the intestinal mucus layer in the normal rat causes gut injury but not toxic mesenteric lymph nor lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Susan M; Qin, Xiaofa; Lu, Qi; Feketeova, Eleonora; Palange, David C; Dong, Wei; Sheth, Sharvil U; Lee, Marlon A; Reino, Diego; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2010-11-01

    There is substantial evidence that gut barrier failure is associated with distant organ injury and systemic inflammation. After major trauma or stress, the factors and mechanisms involved in gut injury are unknown. Our primary hypothesis is that loss of the intestinal mucus layer will result in injury of the normal gut that is exacerbated by the presence of luminal pancreatic proteases. Our secondary hypothesis is that the injury produced in the gut will result in the production of biologically active mesenteric lymph and consequently distant organ (i.e., lung) injury. To test this hypothesis, five groups of rats were studied: 1) uninstrumented naive rats; 2) control rats in which a ligated segment of distal ileum was filled with saline; 3) rats with pancreatic proteases placed in their distal ileal segments; 4) rats with the mucolytic N-acetylcysteine (NAC) placed in their distal ileal segments; and 5) rats exposed to NAC and pancreatic proteases in their ileal segments. The potential systemic consequences of gut injury induced by NAC and proteases were assessed by measuring the biological activity of mesenteric lymph as well as gut-induced lung injury. Exposure of the normal intestine to NAC, but not saline or proteases, led to increased gut permeability, loss of mucus hydrophobicity, a decrease in the mucus layer, as well as morphological evidence of villous injury. Although proteases themselves did not cause gut injury, the combination of pancreatic proteases with NAC caused more severe injury than NAC alone, suggesting that once the mucus barrier is impaired, luminal proteases can injure the now vulnerable gut. Because comparable levels of gut injury caused by systemic insults are associated with gut-induced lung injury, which is mediated by biologically active factors in mesenteric lymph, we next tested whether this local model of gut injury would produce active mesenteric lymph or lead to lung injury. It did not, suggesting that gut injury by itself may not

  6. Loss of the intestinal mucus layer in the normal rat causes gut injury but not toxic mesenteric lymph nor lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Susan M; Qin, Xiaofa; Lu, Qi; Feketeova, Eleonora; Palange, David C; Dong, Wei; Sheth, Sharvil U; Lee, Marlon A; Reino, Diego; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2010-11-01

    There is substantial evidence that gut barrier failure is associated with distant organ injury and systemic inflammation. After major trauma or stress, the factors and mechanisms involved in gut injury are unknown. Our primary hypothesis is that loss of the intestinal mucus layer will result in injury of the normal gut that is exacerbated by the presence of luminal pancreatic proteases. Our secondary hypothesis is that the injury produced in the gut will result in the production of biologically active mesenteric lymph and consequently distant organ (i.e., lung) injury. To test this hypothesis, five groups of rats were studied: 1) uninstrumented naive rats; 2) control rats in which a ligated segment of distal ileum was filled with saline; 3) rats with pancreatic proteases placed in their distal ileal segments; 4) rats with the mucolytic N-acetylcysteine (NAC) placed in their distal ileal segments; and 5) rats exposed to NAC and pancreatic proteases in their ileal segments. The potential systemic consequences of gut injury induced by NAC and proteases were assessed by measuring the biological activity of mesenteric lymph as well as gut-induced lung injury. Exposure of the normal intestine to NAC, but not saline or proteases, led to increased gut permeability, loss of mucus hydrophobicity, a decrease in the mucus layer, as well as morphological evidence of villous injury. Although proteases themselves did not cause gut injury, the combination of pancreatic proteases with NAC caused more severe injury than NAC alone, suggesting that once the mucus barrier is impaired, luminal proteases can injure the now vulnerable gut. Because comparable levels of gut injury caused by systemic insults are associated with gut-induced lung injury, which is mediated by biologically active factors in mesenteric lymph, we next tested whether this local model of gut injury would produce active mesenteric lymph or lead to lung injury. It did not, suggesting that gut injury by itself may not

  7. Paraquat poisoning: an experimental model of dose-dependent acute lung injury due to surfactant dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F.R. Silva

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the most characteristic feature of paraquat poisoning is lung damage, a prospective controlled study was performed on excised rat lungs in order to estimate the intensity of lesion after different doses. Twenty-five male, 2-3-month-old non-SPF Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups, received paraquat dichloride in a single intraperitoneal injection (0, 1, 5, 25, or 50 mg/kg body weight 24 h before the experiment. Static pressure-volume (PV curves were performed in air- and saline-filled lungs; an estimator of surface tension and tissue works was computed by integrating the area of both curves and reported as work/ml of volume displacement. Paraquat induced a dose-dependent increase of inspiratory surface tension work that reached a significant two-fold order of magnitude for 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight (P<0.05, ANOVA, sparing lung tissue. This kind of lesion was probably due to functional abnormalities of the surfactant system, as was shown by the increase in the hysteresis of the paraquat groups at the highest doses. Hence, paraquat poisoning provides a suitable model of acute lung injury with alveolar instability that can be easily used in experimental protocols of mechanical ventilation

  8. Mitigating Role of Quercetin Against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora A. Asry

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin (Qur, a polyphenolic flavonoid compound present in large amounts in vegetables and fruits, plays important roles in human health through its antioxidant activity. This study was conducted to investigate the possible modulatory effect of Qur against cyclophosphamide (CP-induced lung oxidative damage and to highlight the underlying mechanisms of such effect. Male Sprague-Dawely rats were divided into four groups. Group I was control. Group II received Qur (100 mg/kg/d. p.o. for 14 consecutive days. Group III was injected once with CP (150 mg/kg, i.p.. Group IV received Qur for 7 consecutive days, before and after CP injection.A single i.p. injection of CP markedly increased the level of serum biomarkers; total protein, LDH. Cyclophosphamide significantly increased the lung content of lipid peroxides and decreased levels of reduced glutathione. Treatment of rats with Qur for 7 days prior to and 7 days after cyclophosphamide significantly ameliorated the alterations in lung and serum biomarkers associated with inflammatory reactions. Moreover, Qur attenuated the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α in rat serum. In addition, Qur slightly ameliorated CP-induced histopathological changes in lung tissue. Our results suggest that Qur produces a protective effect against CP-induced lung injury and suggest a role of oxidative stress and inflammation in the pathogenesis.

  9. Triptolide inhibits NF-κB activation and reduces injury of donor lung induced by ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-kang HE; Shu-dong YU; Hong-Jun ZHU; Jun-chao WU; Zhen-ghong QIN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective effect of triptolide (TRI) on ischemia/reperfusion- induced injury of transplanted rabbit lungs and to investigate the mechanisms underlying the actions of TRI. Methods: We established the rabbit lung trans- plantation model and studied lung injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion and the inhibitory effect of TRI on NF-r,B. The severity of lung injury was determined by a gradual decline in PvO2, the degree of lung edema, the increase in the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the ultrastructural changes of transplanted lungs. The activation of NF-r,B was measured by immunohistochemistry. The increase in intercellular adhesion molecule- 1 (ICAM- 1), which is the target gene of NF-κB, was evaluated by ELISA. Results: After reperfusion, there was a gradual decline in the PvO2 level in the control group (group I). The level of PvO2 in the group treated with lipopolysaccharide (group Ⅱ) was significantly decreased, whereas that of the group treated with TRI (group Ⅲ) was markedly improved (P<0.01). In group Ⅲ, the activity of MPO was downregulated, and the pulmonary edema did not become severe and the ultrastructure of the donor lung remained normal. The activity of NF-κB and the expression of ICAM-1 was significantly increased in the donor lungs. TRI blocked NF-κB activation and ICAM-1 expression. Conclusion: The effects of TRI on reducing injury to donor lungs induced by ischemia/reperfusion may possibly be mediated by inhibiting the activity of NF-κB and the expression of the NF-rd3 target gene ICAM-1. Thus, TRI could be used in lung transplantations for improving the function of donor lungs.

  10. The role of the acute phase protein PTX3 in the ventilator-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Real

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is an acute phase proinflammatory protein produced by fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 is a key modulator of inflammation. Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life saving therapeutic approach for patients with acute lung injury that, nevertheless could lead to an inflammatory response and tissue injury (ventilator-induced lung injury: VILI, representing a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive units. Our objective was to investigate the role of PTX3 in VILI. PTX3 transgenic, knockout and Wt control mice (n = 12/group were ventilated (45ml·kg–1 until respiratory system Elastance increased 50% (Ers150%, an indicator of VILI. Histological analysis demonstrated that using a Ers150% was appropriate for our analysis since identical degrees of inflammation were observed in Tg, KO and Wt mice as assessed by leukocyte infiltration, oedema, alveolar collapse and number of breaks in alveolar septa. However, Tg mice reached Ers150% faster than Wt controls (p = 0.0225. We also showed that the lack of PTX3 does not abolish the occurrence of VILI in KOs. Gene expression profile of PTX3, IL-1beta, IL-6, KC, IFNgamma, TGFbeta and PCIII were investigated by QPCR. MV drastically up modulated PTX3 as well as IL-1beta, IL-6, IFNgamma and KC. Alternatively, mice were ventilated for 20, 40 and 60 min. The faster kinetics of Tg mice to reach Ers150% was accompanied by an earlier augmentation of IL-1b and PTX3 expression. The kinetics of local PTX3 expression in the lungs of ventilated mice strongly suggests the involvement of this pentraxin in the pathogenesis of VILI.

  11. Regulation on the expression of Clara cell secretory protein in the lungs of the rats with acute lung injury by growth hormone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Jia; LUO Fo-quan; ZHAO Wei-lu

    2012-01-01

    Background Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) is an important lung derived protective factor and may play an important role on the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALl) induced by endotoxemia.Growth hormone (GH) is an important anabolism hormone secreted by GH cells of the hypophysis.Pravious research showed that GH would significantly exacerbate ALl induced by endotoxemia,but the mechanism is not very clear yet.Whether the effects are related to CC16 or not is undetermined.Methods One hundred and twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into an ALl group and a GH group.The rats in the two groups were subdivided into seven subgroups,according to injection with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or not,then according to different intervals of time after LPS injection; 0 hour (pre-injection of LPS,acted as control group),0.5 hour,1 hour,2 hours,4 hours,6 hours and 24 hours for subgroups.Pulmonary alveolar septa area density (PASAD) and ploymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in the lungs were analyzed morphometrically.The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 6 (1L-6) were determined by radioimmunoassay.To analyze the expression and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB),the numbers of NF-kB positive cells in lungs were counted after immunofluorescence staining.and the levels of NF-KB inhibitory protein-α (1KB-α) in lung homogenates of rats were detected by Western blotting.The expression levels of CC16 mRNA in lungs of the rats with ALl were determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).The levels of CC16 protein in lung homogenates were detected by Western blotting.Results Half an hour after LPS injury both the PASAD and PMN numbers in lungs of the rats with ALl began to increase significantly and peaked at 6-hour post-injury.They then began to recover and reached normal levels at 24-hour post-injury.Both the PASAD and PMN numbers in the GH group increased more significantly than those in the ALl group

  12. The Role of Nitric Oxide in Hyperoxic Lung Injury in Premature Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常立文; 马丽亚; 张晓慧; 陈晔

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in hyperoxic lung injury, the 3-day-old preterm rats were randomly assigned to four groups: group I (hyperoxia group), group Ⅱ (hyperoxia+Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) group), group Ⅲ (air group), and group Ⅳ (air+L-NAME) group. Group Ⅰ and Ⅱ were exposed to ≥90 % O2 for 3 or 7 days. Group Ⅱ and Ⅳ received subcutaneous L-NAMEy on daily basis (20 mg/kg). After 3 day or 7 day exposure, the lung wet weight/dry weight ratio (W/D), total protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung pathology were examined in all groups. NO content, expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) in lungs were measured in group Ⅰ and Ⅲ. Our results showed that after 3 day exposure, group Ⅰ appeared acute lung injury characterized by the increase of MDA content (P<0.01) and the presence of hyperaemia, red cell extravasation and inflammatory infiltration; after 7 day exposure, except MDA, total protein and W/D were also increased in comparison with group Ⅲ (P<0.01, 0.05), pathological changes were more severe than those after 3 day exposure. After 3 and 7 day exposure, total protein in group Ⅱ was significantly increased as compared with group Ⅰ (P<0.01 for both). The pulmonary acute inflammatory changes were more obvious in group Ⅱ than in group Ⅰ. Occasionally, mild hemorrhage was detected in the lungs of group Ⅳ. BALF protein content in group IV was higher than that in group Ⅲ after 7 day exposure (P<0.01). After 3 and 7 day exposure, NO content in BALF were all significantly elevated in group Ⅰ as compared with group Ⅲ (P<0.01 for all). In the lungs of group Ⅰ, strong immunostaining for iNOS was observed in airway and alveolar epithelia, inflammatory cells, which were stronger than those in group Ⅲ. Expression of iNOS in rats after 7 day hyperoxic exposure was stronger than that after 3 day exposure. Shortly after 7 day exposure

  13. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue Weisheng [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang Guilin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: glzhang@sinap.ac.cn; Liu Ping; Sun Jianqi [Key Laboratory of Systems Biomedicine, Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Hwu Yeukuang [Institute of Physics, Acamemia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei (China); Je, Jung Ho [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Tan Mingguang [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li Yan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: liyan@sinap.ac.cn

    2007-09-15

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM{sub 2.5}, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM{sub 2.5} samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM{sub 2.5} samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  14. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Weisheng; Zhang, Guilin; Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan

    2007-09-01

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM2.5, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM2.5 samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM2.5 samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  15. Different imaging methods in the assessment of radiation-induced lung injury following hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have characterized the radiation-induced lung-injury on serial chest X-rays, CTs and ultralow field MRs and evaluated the clinical value and cost/benefit ratio of the different imaging methods in 30 patients receiving high-dose hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma. Lung injury was severe in all patients, but non-specific and essentially as described in text-books. CT provided no clinically relevant, cost effective diagnostic advantage over conventional X-rays in the detection of early or late radiation-induced lung injury, but it was necessary for the evaluation of the disease status of the mesothelioma. The possible advantage of MR over CT could not be evaluated and needs further studies. Optimal time-points for imaging CTs or MRs to detect early radiation-induced lung injury following high dose hemithorax irradiation were during the latter part of the treatment or very shortly after the end of the irradiation. Late injury or irreversible fibrosis develop rapidly after 6 months and was clearly documented by chest X-rays. The authors recommend serial chest X-rays at 1-2, 6 and 12 months following radiotherapy as a cost-effective method for the detection of radiation-induced lung injury with additional CTs to document the stage of mesothelioma, when needed. (author). 31 refs.; 4 figs

  16. 17β-Estradiol administration attenuates seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qixin; Zhao, Pengtao; Li, Jiahuan; Xie, Xiaoyan; Xu, Min; Zhang, Yong; Mu, Deguang; Li, Wangping; Sun, Ruilin; Liu, Wei; Nan, Yandong; Zhang, Bo; Jin, Faguang; Li, Zhichao

    2011-12-01

    There is very little evidence on the value of administering estrogen in cases of seawater drowning which can induce acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Therefore, this study aimed to investigate whether 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment can attenuate seawater aspiration-induced ALI in rats. In the experiment, ALI was induced by endotracheal instillation of seawater (4mL/kg) and the rats were then given intraperitoneal injection of E2 (5mg/kg) 20min after seawater instillation. Finally, the changes of arterial blood gases which contained hydrogen ion concentration (pH), arterial oxygen tension (PaO(2)) and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO(2)) were measured and the measurement of extravascular lung water (EVLW) was observed. The pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin stain. The expression of aquaporins (AQPs) 1, AQP5, and estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) was measured by western blotting and immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that compared with normal saline water, seawater aspiration induced more serious ALI in rats which was markedly alleviated by E2 treatment. Meanwhile, the ERβ in lung tissues was activated after E2 administration. The seawater aspiration group also presented with severe pulmonary edema which was paralleled with over expressed AQP1 and AQP5. However, the up-regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 was suppressed by the administration of E2, resulting in an attenuation of lung edema. In conclusion, E2 treatment could effectively attenuate seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury in rats by the down-regulation of AQP1 and AQP5.

  17. Inositol-trisphosphate reduces alveolar apoptosis and pulmonary edema in neonatal lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Stefanie; Stadelmann, Sabrina; Omam, Friede D; Scheiermann, Julia; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; von Bismarck, Philipp; Knerlich-Lukoschus, Friederike; Lex, Dennis; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Wesch, Daniela; Held-Feindt, Janka; Uhlig, Stefan; Schütze, Stefan; Krause, Martin F

    2012-08-01

    D-myo-inositol-1,2,6-trisphosphate (IP3) is an isomer of the naturally occurring second messenger D-myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate, and exerts anti-inflammatory and antiedematous effects in the lung. Myo-inositol (Inos) is a component of IP3, and is thought to play an important role in the prevention of neonatal pulmonary diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and neonatal acute lung injury (nALI). Inflammatory lung diseases are characterized by augmented acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) activity leading to ceramide production, a pathway that promotes increased vascular permeability, apoptosis, and surfactant alterations. A novel, clinically relevant triple-hit model of nALI was developed, consisting of repeated airway lavage, injurious ventilation, and lipopolysaccharide instillation into the airways, every 24 hours. Thirty-five piglets were randomized to one of four treatment protocols: control (no intervention), surfactant alone, surfactant + Inos, and surfactant + IP3. After 72 hours of mechanical ventilation, lungs were excised from the thorax for subsequent analyses. Clinically, oxygenation and ventilation improved, and extravascular lung water decreased significantly with the S + IP3 intervention. In pulmonary tissue, we observed decreased aSMase activity and ceramide concentrations, decreased caspase-8 concentrations, reduced alveolar epithelial apoptosis, the reduced expression of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β1, and amphiregulin (an epithelial growth factor), reduced migration of blood-borne cells and particularly of CD14(+)/18(+) cells (macrophages) into the airspaces, and lower surfactant surface tensions in S + IP3-treated but not in S + Inos-treated piglets. We conclude that the admixture of IP3 to surfactant, but not of Inos, improves gas exchange and edema in our nALI model by the suppression of the governing enzyme aSMase, and that this treatment deserves clinical evaluation. PMID:22403805

  18. Hydrogen sulfide donor regulates alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in rats with acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen-li; LIU Zhi-wei; LI Tian-shui; WANG Cong; ZHAO Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALl) is a common syndrome associated with high morbidity and mortality in emergency medicine.Cell apoptosis plays a key role in the pathogenesis of ALl.Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays a protective role during acute lung injury.We designed this study to examine the role of H2S in the lung alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in rats with ALl.Methods Sixty-nine male Sprague Dawley rats were used.ALl was induced by intra-tail vein injection of oleic acid (OA).NaHS solution was injected intraperitonally 30 minutes before OA injection as the NaHS pretreatment group.Single sodium hydrosulfide pretreatment group and control group were designed.Index of quantitative assessment (IQA),wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio and the percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined.H2S level in lung tissue was measured by a sensitive sulphur electrode.Apoptosis was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and Fas protein was measured by immunohistochemical staining.Results The level of endogenous H2S in lung tissue decreased with the development of ALl induced by OA injection.Apoptosis and Fas protein in alveolar epithelial cells increased in the ALl of rats but NaHS lessened apoptosis and Fas protein expression in alveolar epithelial cells of rats with ALl.Conclusion Endogenous H2S protects rats from oleic acid-induced ALl,probably by inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  19. Regional Lung Kinetics of Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury and Protective-Ventilation Strategies Studied by Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, João Batista

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation in itself can harm the lung and cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), which can induce or aggravate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Much debate remains over pivotal concepts regarding the pathophysiology of VILI, especially about the precise contribution, kinetics, and primary role of potential VILI mechanisms. Consequently, it remains largely unknown how best to design a well-timed and full-bodied mechanical ventilation strategy. Little is known also...

  20. Respiratory compliance but not gas exchange correlates with changes in lung aeration after a recruitment maneuver: an experimental study in pigs with saline lavage lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Henzler, Dietrich; Pelosi, Paolo; Dembinski, Rolf; Ullmann, Annette; Mahnken, Andreas H; Rossaint, Rolf; Kuhlen, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Atelectasis is a common finding in acute lung injury, leading to increased shunt and hypoxemia. Current treatment strategies aim to recruit alveoli for gas exchange. Improvement in oxygenation is commonly used to detect recruitment, although the assumption that gas exchange parameters adequately represent the mechanical process of alveolar opening has not been proven so far. The aim of this study was to investigate whether commonly used measures of lung mechanics better detect lu...

  1. The biological effects of higher and lower positive end-expiratory pressure in pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute lung injury with intra-abdominal hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Cíntia Lourenco; Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Raquel Souza; dos Santos Samary, Cynthia; Silva, Johnatas Dutra; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Capelozzi, Vera Lucia; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Schanaider, Alberto; Silva, Pedro Leme; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been used in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), but the role of PEEP in minimizing lung injury remains controversial. We hypothesized that in the presence of acute lung injury (ALI) with IAH: 1) higher PEEP levels improve pulmonary morphofunction and minimize lung injury; and 2) the biological effects of higher PEEP are more effective in extra...

  2. Deletion of Caveolin-1 Protects against Oxidative Lung Injury via Up-Regulation of Heme Oxygenase-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yang; Kim, Hong Pyo; Chi, Minli; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Hyperoxia causes lung injury in animals and humans, and is an established model of ALI. Caveolin-1, a major constituent of caveolae, regulates numerous biological processes, including cell death and proliferation. Here we demonstrate that caveolin-1–null mice (cav-1−/−) were resistant to hyperoxia-induced death and lung injury. Cav-1−/− mice sustained reduced lung injury after hyperoxia as determined by protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histologic analysis. Furthermore, cav-1−/− fibroblasts and endothelial cells and cav-1 knockdown epithelial cells resisted hyperoxia-induced cell death in vitro. Basal and inducible expression of the stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were markedly elevated in lung tissue or fibroblasts from cav-1−/− mice. Hyperoxia induced the physical interaction between cav-1 and HO-1 in fibroblasts assessed by co-immunoprecipitation studies, which resulted in attenuation of HO activity. Inhibition of HO activity with tin protoporphyrin-IX abolished the survival benefits of cav-1−/− cells and cav-1−/− mice exposed to hyperoxia. The cav-1−/− mice displayed elevated phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p38β expression in lung tissue/cells under basal conditions and during hyperoxia. Treatment with SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, decreased hyperoxia-inducible HO-1 expression in wild-type and cav-1−/− fibroblasts. Taken together, our data demonstrated that cav-1 deletion protects against hyperoxia-induced lung injury, involving in part the modulation of the HO-1–cav-1 interaction, and the enhanced induction of HO-1 through a p38 MAPK–mediated pathway. These studies identify caveolin-1 as a novel component involved in hyperoxia-induced lung injury. PMID:18323531

  3. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d–28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS+ and cyclooxygenase-2+) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1+ and galectin-3+) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 ×/day, 1 d–3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ► Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ► Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ► Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute lung injury induced by

  4. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaviya, Rama; Venosa, Alessandro [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Hall, LeRoy [Drug Safety Sciences, Johnson and Johnson, Raritan, NJ 08869 (United States); Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Department of Pharmaceutics, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d–28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS{sup +} and cyclooxygenase-2{sup +}) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1{sup +} and galectin-3{sup +}) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 ×/day, 1 d–3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ► Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ► Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ► Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute

  5. Can albumin administration relieve lung injury in trauma/hemorrhagic shock?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo-Bing Chen; Zi-Wei Wang; Chen-Yan Ding; Jian-Hua Yan; Yuan Gao; Yun Zhang; Lin-Mei Ni; Yong-Qing Zhou

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To study the effect of albumin administration on lung injury in trauma/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS).METHODS:Sixty experimental animals were randomly divided into three groups: rats undergoing laparotomy without shock (T/SS); rats with T/HS and resuscitation with blood plus twice the volume of shed blood as Ringer's lactate (RL), and rats with T/HS and resuscitation with blood plus additional 3 Ml of 50 g/L human albumin.Expression of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) CD11b/CD18, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) of jugular vein blood and the severity of lung injuries [determined mainly by measuring activity of lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lung injury score (LIS)] were measured after a 3-h recovery period.RESULTS:All three groups showed a significant difference in the expressions of CD11b/CD18, ICAM-1,and severity of lung injury. The expressions of CD11b/CD18 in T/SS group, T/HS + RL group, T/HS + albumin group were 17.76% ± 2.11%, 31.25% ± 3.48%,20.36% ± 3.21%, respectively (F = 6.25, P < 0.05).The expressions of ICAM-1 (U/Ml) in T/SS group, T/HS + RL group, T/HS + albumin group were 258.76 ±98.23, 356.23 ± 65.6, 301.01 ± 63.21, respectively (F =5.86, P < 0.05). The expressions of MPO (U/g)) in T/SS group, T/HS + RL group, T/HS + albumin group were 2.53 ± 0.11, 4.63 ± 1.31, 4.26 ± 1.12, respectively (F= 6.26, P < 0.05). Moreover, LTS in T/HS + RL group,T/HS + albumin group was 2.62 ± 0.23, 1.25 ± 0.24,respectively. The expressions of CD11b/CD18, ICAM-1 and MPO in T/HS + RL group were significantly increased compared to T/SS group (P = 0.025, P = 0.036, P = 0.028,respectively). However, administration of 3 Ml of 50 g/L albumin significantly down-regulated the expressions of CD11b/CD18, ICAM-1 and lung injury index (MPO and LIS) when compared with the T/HS + RL rats (P = 0.035,P = 0.046, P = 0.038, P = 0.012, respectively).CONCLUSION:The infusion of albumin during resuscitation period can protect lung from injury and decrease the

  6. Influence of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) inhibition on lung epithelial cell injury: role of oxidative stress and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Marianne E; Boshier, Piers R; Wakabayashi, Kenji; Keun, Hector C; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Kirkham, Paul A; Adcock, Ian M; Barton, Paul J; Takata, Masao; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-06-15

    Oxidant-mediated tissue injury is key to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are important detoxifying enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with toxic oxidant compounds and are associated with acute and chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We hypothesized that attenuation of cellular GST enzymes would augment intracellular oxidative and metabolic stress and induce lung cell injury. Treatment of murine lung epithelial cells with GST inhibitors, ethacrynic acid (EA), and caffeic acid compromised lung epithelial cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. These inhibitors also potentiated cell injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), tert-butyl-hydroperoxide, and hypoxia and reoxygenation (HR). SiRNA-mediated attenuation of GST-π but not GST-μ expression reduced cell viability and significantly enhanced stress (H2O2/HR)-induced injury. GST inhibitors also induced intracellular oxidative stress (measured by dihydrorhodamine 123 and dichlorofluorescein fluorescence), caused alterations in overall intracellular redox status (as evidenced by NAD(+)/NADH ratios), and increased protein carbonyl formation. Furthermore, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely prevented EA-induced oxidative stress and cytotoxicity. Whereas EA had no effect on mitochondrial energetics, it significantly altered cellular metabolic profile. To explore the physiological impact of these cellular events, we used an ex vivo mouse-isolated perfused lung model. Supplementation of perfusate with EA markedly affected lung mechanics and significantly increased lung permeability. The results of our combined genetic, pharmacological, and metabolic studies on multiple platforms suggest the importance of GST enzymes, specifically GST-π, in the cellular and whole lung response to acute oxidative and metabolic stress. These may have important clinical implications. PMID:26078397

  7. Influence of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) inhibition on lung epithelial cell injury: role of oxidative stress and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Marianne E; Boshier, Piers R; Wakabayashi, Kenji; Keun, Hector C; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Kirkham, Paul A; Adcock, Ian M; Barton, Paul J; Takata, Masao; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-06-15

    Oxidant-mediated tissue injury is key to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are important detoxifying enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with toxic oxidant compounds and are associated with acute and chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We hypothesized that attenuation of cellular GST enzymes would augment intracellular oxidative and metabolic stress and induce lung cell injury. Treatment of murine lung epithelial cells with GST inhibitors, ethacrynic acid (EA), and caffeic acid compromised lung epithelial cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. These inhibitors also potentiated cell injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), tert-butyl-hydroperoxide, and hypoxia and reoxygenation (HR). SiRNA-mediated attenuation of GST-π but not GST-μ expression reduced cell viability and significantly enhanced stress (H2O2/HR)-induced injury. GST inhibitors also induced intracellular oxidative stress (measured by dihydrorhodamine 123 and dichlorofluorescein fluorescence), caused alterations in overall intracellular redox status (as evidenced by NAD(+)/NADH ratios), and increased protein carbonyl formation. Furthermore, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely prevented EA-induced oxidative stress and cytotoxicity. Whereas EA had no effect on mitochondrial energetics, it significantly altered cellular metabolic profile. To explore the physiological impact of these cellular events, we used an ex vivo mouse-isolated perfused lung model. Supplementation of perfusate with EA markedly affected lung mechanics and significantly increased lung permeability. The results of our combined genetic, pharmacological, and metabolic studies on multiple platforms suggest the importance of GST enzymes, specifically GST-π, in the cellular and whole lung response to acute oxidative and metabolic stress. These may have important clinical implications.

  8. Radiation injuries to bones of the thorax after irradiation of carcinoma of the breast and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the state of 396 patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the breast and carcinoma of the lung gave the following results. During treatment of carcinoma of the breast, radiation injuries, mainly of the ribs and clavicle, were found in 11 of 158 patients treated (7.0 +/- 2.0 percent), more frequently after x-ray therapy (in nine of 70 cases, 12.9 +/- 4.0 percent). In the case of x-ray therapy, the minimal focal dose causing radiation injury to bone was 4,500 rads. The larger the dose and the shorter the course of treatment, the more frequently these changes were found. During treatment of carcinoma of the lung, radiation injuries were discovered in the ribs in ten patients and in the spine in one (of 238 patients treated). The frequency was 4.6 +/- 1.4 percent. They occurred after treatment on a linear accelerator with a frequency of 5.1 +/- 1.6 percent, and after treatment on the γ-ray apparatus in 1 of 27 patients. The minimal focal dose causing injury to bone when a linear accelerator was used was 5,000 rad. If the skin above the region of injury remained intact, clinical manifestations of the lesion were minimal. Repeated observations over a course of several years showed that the changes developed slowly and that consolidation of a radiation fracture can take place. On the whole, the course of the process is directly dependent on the size of the dose given

  9. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26884314

  10. Effect of lung injuries on [14C]urea permeability-surface area product in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether [14C]urea permeability-surface area product (PS) is a reliable indicator of changes in permeability in various injuries and its relationship to indicator-dilution and gravimetric lung water contents, we studied six groups of anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated dogs (5 animals each). The groups consisted of control dogs, those injured by intravenous alloxan, oleic acid, or glass beads, and those exposed to acute hypoxia or increased left atrial pressure from volume loading (Pla). Interanimal variation of PS was large (3.0-15.0 ml/s), but successive hourly values in individual animals were stable for 2 h in experimental groups and for 4 h in controls. The PS increased after alloxan, elevated Pla, and 2 h of hypoxia; PS decreased after oleic acid and micremboli. The gravimetric lung water increased after alloxan, oleic acid, and microemboli, and indicator-dilution lung water increased only after alloxan. We conclude (1) that intersubject variability requires normalization to enable detection of significant deviation from base line, and (2) that decreased PS after oleic acid and microvascular injury occurred because vascular obstruction, which decreased surface area, masked probable coexisting increases in capillary permeability

  11. Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase-4 during Pneumococcal Pneumonia Reduces Inflammation and Lung Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Luciana P; Garcia, Cristiana C; Vago, Juliana P; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Galvão, Izabela; David, Bruna A; Rachid, Milene A; Silva, Patrícia M R; Russo, Remo C; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2016-07-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. The inflammatory response to bacteria is necessary to control infection, but it may also contribute to tissue damage. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, such as rolipram (ROL), effectively reduce inflammation. Here, we examined the impact of ROL in a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model. Mice were infected intranasally with 10(5)-10(6) CFU of Streptococcus pneumoniae, treated with ROL in a prophylactic or therapeutic schedule in combination, or not, with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Inflammation and bacteria counts were assessed, and ex vivo phagocytosis assays were performed. ROL treatment during S. pneumoniae infection decreased neutrophil recruitment into lungs and airways and reduced lung injury. Prophylactic ROL treatment also decreased cytokine levels in the airways. Although modulation of inflammation by ROL ameliorated pneumonia, bacteria burden was not reduced. On the other hand, antibiotic therapy reduced bacteria without reducing neutrophil infiltration, cytokine level, or lung injury. Combined ROL and ceftriaxone treatment decreased lethality rates and was more efficient in reducing inflammation, by increasing proresolving protein annexin A1 (AnxA1) expression, and bacterial burden by enhancing phagocytosis. Lack of AnxA1 increased inflammation and lethality induced by pneumococcal infection. These data show that immunomodulatory effects of phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors are useful during severe pneumococcal pneumonia and suggest their potential benefit as adjunctive therapy during infectious diseases. PMID:26677751

  12. Pulmonary clearance of radiotracers after positive end-expiratory pressure or acute lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In anesthetized rabbits we measured clearance from lung to blood of eight aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled compounds: diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA); cytochrome c; myoglobin; a myoglobin polymer; albumin; and anionic, cationic, and neutral dextrans of equivalent molecular size. We investigated the effect of applying positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and, on a subsequent occasion, of injecting oleic acid intravenously to produce acute lung injury on the pulmonary clearance rate. Base-line clearance rates were monoexponential and varied with the molecular weights of the radiotracers. For each tracer the rate of clearance was increased a similar degree by either PEEP or oleic acid. However, with PEEP, clearance remained monoexponential, whereas after oleic acid, smaller molecular-weight radiotracers had multiexponential clearance curves. This suggests that after oleic acid the alveolar epithelium breaks down in a nonuniform fashion. We conclude that differentiation of the effect of PEEP from that of severe lung injury caused by oleic acid is not readily accomplished by either increasing the size of the tracer molecule or by varying the molecular charge

  13. Prevention of LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice by mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing angiopoietin 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Shirley H. J; McCarter, Sarah D.; Yupu Deng; Parker, Colleen H; Conrad Liles, W.; Duncan J Stewart

    2007-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Critically ill people who have had an injury to their lungs, for example through pneumonia, trauma, or an immune response to infection, may end up developing a serious complication in the lung termed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In ARDS, inflammation develops in the lung, and fluid builds up in the alveoli (the air sacs resembling “bunches of grapes” at the ends of the network of tubes in the lung). This buildup of fluid prevents oxygen from being c...

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Models of Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling; He, Hongli; Liu, Airan; Xu, Jingyuan; Han, Jibin; Chen, Qihong; Hu, Shuling; Xu, Xiuping; Huang, Yingzi; Guo, Fengmei; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer a promising therapy for acute lung injury (ALI). However, whether the same MSC treatments possess similar potential for different ALI models is not fully clear. The present study evaluated the distribution and therapeutic effects of intravenous MSC administration for the treatment of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intrapulmonary ALI and intravenous LPS/zymosan-induced extrapulmonary ALI, matched with lung injury severity, at 30 min and 1, 3, and 7 days. We found that MSC transplantation attenuated lung injury and inhibited lung inflammation in both ALI models. The benefits of MSCs were more significant in the intrapulmonary ALI mice. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging showed that MSCs primarily homed into the lung. However, more MSCs were recruited into the lungs of the intrapulmonary ALI mice than those of the extrapulmonary ALI mice over the time course. A few MSCs were also detected in the liver and spleen at days 3 and 7. In addition, the two ALI models showed different extrapulmonary organ dysfunction. A lower percentage of cell apoptosis and SDF-1α levels was found in the liver and spleen of the intrapulmonary ALI mice than in those of the extrapulmonary ALI mice. These results suggested that the two ALI models were accompanied with different degrees of extrapulmonary organ damage, which resulted in differences in the trafficking and accumulation of MSCs to the injured lung and consequently accounted for different therapeutic effects of MSCs for lung repair in the two ALI models. These data suggest that intravenous administration of MSCs has a greater potential for the treatment of intrapulmonary ALI than extrapulmonary ALI matched with lung injury severity; these differences were due to more recruitment of MSCs in the lungs of intrapulmonary ALI mice than those of extrapulmonary ALI mice. This finding may contribute to the clinical use of MSCs for the treatment of ALI. PMID

  15. PI3K-AKT Signaling via Nrf2 Protects against Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury, but Promotes Inflammation Post-Injury Independent of Nrf2 in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsa M Reddy

    Full Text Available Lung epithelial and endothelial cell death accompanied by inflammation contributes to hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (ALI. Impaired resolution of ALI can promote and/or perpetuate lung pathogenesis, including fibrosis. Previously, we have shown that the transcription factor Nrf2 induces cytoprotective gene expression and confers protection against hyperoxic lung injury, and that Nrf2-mediated signaling is also crucial for the restoration of lung homeostasis post-injury. Although we have reported that PI3K/AKT signaling is required for Nrf2 activation in lung epithelial cells, significance of the PI3K/AKT-Nrf2 crosstalk during hyperoxic lung injury and repair remains unclear. Thus, we evaluated this aspect using Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2(-/- and wild-type (Nrf2(+/+ mouse models. Here, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling increased lung inflammation and alveolar permeability in Nrf2(+/+ mice, accompanied by decreased expression of Nrf2-target genes such as Nqo1 and Hmox1. PI3K/AKT inhibition dampened hyperoxia-stimulated Nqo1 and Hmox1 expression in lung epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Contrasting with its protective effects, PI3K/AKT inhibition suppressed lung inflammation in Nrf2(+/+ mice during post-injury. In Nrf2(-/- mice exposed to room-air, PI3K/AKT inhibition caused lung injury and inflammation, but it did not exaggerate hyperoxia-induced ALI. During post-injury, PI3K/AKT inhibition did not augment, but rather attenuated, lung inflammation in Nrf2(-/- mice. These results suggest that PI3K/AKT-Nrf2 signaling is required to dampen hyperoxia-induced lung injury and inflammation. Paradoxically, the PI3K/AKT pathway promotes lung inflammation, independent of Nrf2, during post-injury.

  16. Protective effects of erythropoietin against acute lung injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of exogenous erythropoietin (EPO) administration on acute lung injury (ALI) in an experimental model of sodium taurodeoxycholateinduced acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP).METHODS: Forty-seven male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 7 groups: sham group (n = 5),3 ANP groups (n = 7 each) and 3 EPO groups (n = 7each). ANP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurodeoxycholate into the common bile duct.Rats in EPO groups received 1000 U/kg intramuscular EPO immediately after induction of ANP. Rats in ANP groups were given 1 mL normal saline instead. All animals were sacrificed at postoperative 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. Serum amilase, IL-2, IL-6 and lung tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured. Pleural effusion volume and lung/body weight (LW/BW) ratios were calculated. Tissue levels of TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-6 were screened immunohistochemically. Additionally, ox-LDL accumulation was assessed with immune-fluorescent staining. Histopathological alterations in the lungs were also scored.RESULTS: The mean pleural effusion volume, calculated LW/BW ratio, serum IL-6 and lung tissue MDA levels were significantly lower in EPO groups than in ANP groups. No statistically significant difference was observed in either serum or tissue values of IL-2 among the groups. The level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)and IL-6 and accumulation of ox-LDL were evident in the lung tissues of ANP groups when compared to EPO groups, particularly at 72 h. Histopathological evaluation confirmed the improvement in lung injury parameters after exogenous EPO administration, particularly at 48 h and 72 h.CONCLUSION: EPO administration leads to a significant decrease in ALI parameters by inhibiting polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) accumulation,decreasing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in circulation, preserving microvascular endothelial cell integrity and reducing oxidative stress-associated lipid peroxidation and therefore, can be

  17. Simvastatin reduces endotoxin-induced acute lung injury by decreasing neutrophil recruitment and radical formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Grommes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI remains an unsolved problem in intensive care medicine. As simvastatin exerts protective effects in inflammatory diseases we explored its effects on development of ALI and due to the importance of neutrophils in ALI also on neutrophil effector functions. METHODS: C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to aerosolized LPS (500 µg/ml for 30 min. The count of alveolar, interstitial, and intravasal neutrophils were assessed 4 h later by flow cytometry. Lung permeability changes were assessed by FITC-dextran clearance and albumin content in the BAL fluid. In vitro, we analyzed the effect of simvastatin on neutrophil adhesion, degranulation, apoptosis, and formation of reactive oxygen species. To monitor effects of simvastatin on bacterial clearance we performed phagocytosis and bacterial killing studies in vitro as well as sepsis experiments in mice. RESULTS: Simvastatin treatment before and after onset of ALI reduces neutrophil influx into the lung as well as lung permeability indicating the protective role of simvastatin in ALI. Moreover, simvastatin reduces the formation of ROS species and adhesion of neutrophils without affecting apoptosis, bacterial phagocytosis and bacterial clearance. CONCLUSION: Simvastatin reduces recruitment and activation of neutrophils hereby protecting from LPS-induced ALI. Our results imply a potential role for statins in the management of ALI.

  18. Protective Effect of Isorhamnetin on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Ping; Ni, Yun-Feng; Du, Hong-Yin; Wang, Rong; Li, Ming-Jiang; Wang, Wen-Chen; Li, Ming-Ming; Wang, Xu-Hui; Li, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Isorhamnetin has been reported to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-proliferative effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of isorhamnetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice by inhibiting the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The effects of isorhamnetin on LPS-induced lung pathological damage, wet/dry ratios and the total protein level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inflammatory cytokine release, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) level were examined. In addition, the COX-2 activation in lung tissues was detected by Western blot. Isorhamnetin pretreatment improved the mice survival rates. Moreover, isorhamnetin pretreatment significantly attenuated edema and the pathological changes in the lung and inhibited protein extravasation in BALF. Isorhamnetin also significantly decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines in BALF. In addition, isorhamnetin markedly prevented LPS-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment significantly suppressed LPS-induced activation of COX-2. Isorhamnetin has been demonstrated to protect mice from LPS-induced ALI by inhibiting the expression of COX-2. PMID:26276127

  19. Microcirculation disturbance affects rats with acute severe pancreatitis following lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Min Liu; Qing-Guang Liu; Jun Xu; Cheng-En Pan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of microcirculation disturbance(MD) on rats with acute severe pancreatitis (ASP).METHODS: We developed ASP rat models, and anatomized separately after 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 h. We took out blood and did hemorrheologic examination and erythrocyte osmotic fragility test, checked up the water content, capillary permeability, and genetic expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in lung tissues, examined the apoptosis degree of blood vessel endothelium while we tested related gene expression of Bax and Bcl-2in lung tissues. We did the same examination in control group.RESULTS: The viscosity of total blood and plasma, the hematocrit, and the erythrocyte osmotic fragility were all increased. Fibrinogen was decreased. The water content in lung tissues and capillary permeability were increased.Apoptosis degree of blood vessel endothelium was increased too. ICAM-1 genetic expression moved up after1 h and reached its peak value after 9 h.CONCLUSION: MD plays an important role in ASP following acute lung injury (ALI). The functional damage of blood vessel endothelium, the apoptosis of capillary vessel endothelium, WBC edging-concentration and the increasing of erythrocyte fragility are the main reasons of ALI.

  20. NPC 15669 blocks neutrophil CD18 increase and lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Bator

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, neutrophils become activated due to contact with extracorporeal surfaces and binding of complement fragments C3a and C5a, leading to extravasation and subsequent tissue damage. In this study, the effects of the leumedin NPC 15669 (N [9H - (2,7 dimethylfluorenyl - 9 - methoxy car bonyl]-L-leucine, a leukocyte recruitment inhibitor, were evaluated in a pig model of CPB. NPC 15669 caused significant inhibition of CPB associated increase in CD18 upregulation, lung tissue myeloperoxidase content, and percentage wet weight compared to controls. Lung histology revealed clear airways and minimal neutrophil infiltration in treated animals vs. significant oedema and cellular infiltration in controls. It is concluded that CPB causes a dramatic increase in neutrophil CD18, and that leumedins are effective in inhibiting neutrophil activation and subsequent tissue injury when administered during CPB.

  1. Ginkgolide B functions as a determinant constituent of Ginkgolides in alleviating lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fugen; Shi, Wei; Zhou, Guojun; Yao, Hongyi; Xu, Chengyun; Xiao, Weiqiang; Wu, Junsong; Wu, Ximei

    2016-07-01

    Ginkgolides are the major bioactive components of Ginkgo biloba extracts, however, the exact constituents of Ginkgolides contributing to their pharmacological effects remain unknown. Herein, we have determined the anti-inflammatory effects of Ginkgolide B (GB) and Ginkgolides mixture (GM) at equivalent dosages against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. RAW 264.7 cell culture model and mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury were used to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of GB and GM, respectively. In RAW 264.7 cells, GB and GM at equivalent dosages exhibit an identical capacity to attenuate LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein expression and subsequent NO production. Likewise, GB and GM possess almost the same potency in attenuating LPS-induced expression and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (p65) and subsequent increases in tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA levels. In LPS-induced pulmonary injury, GB and GM at the equivalent dosages have equal efficiency in attenuating the accumulation of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages, and in improving the histological damage of lungs. Moreover, GB and GM at equivalent dosages decrease the exudation of plasma protein to the same degree, whereas GM is superior to GB in alleviating myeloperoxidase activities. Finally, though GB and GM at equivalent dosages appear to reduce LPS-induced IL-1β mRNA and protein levels and IL-10 protein levels to the same degree, GM is more potent than GB to attenuate the IL-10 mRNA levels. Taken together, this study demonstrates that GB functions as the determinant constituent of Ginkgolides in alleviating LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:27261579

  2. Systematic review and meta-analysis of nasal potential difference in hypoxia-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenlei; Zhu, Lili; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Runzhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-08-04

    Nasal potential difference (NPD), a well-established in vivo clinical test for cystic fibrosis, reflects transepithelial cation and anion transport in the respiratory epithelium. To analyze whether NPD can be applied to diagnose hypoxic lung injury, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Ovid MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, and analyzed data retrieved from eleven unbiased studies for high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) using the software RevMan and R. There was a significant reduction in overall basal (WMD -5.27 mV, 95% CI: -6.03 to -4.52, P < 0.00001, I(2) = 42%), amiloride-sensitive (ENaC) (-2.87 mV, 95% CI: -4.02 to -1.72, P < 0.00001, I(2) = 51%), and -resistant fractions (-3.91 mV, 95% CI: -7.64 to -0.18, P = 0.04, I(2) = 95%) in lung injury patients. Further analysis of HAPE and RDS separately corroborated these observations. Moreover, SpO2 correlated with ENaC-associated NPD positively in patients only, but apparently related to CFTR-contributed NPD level inversely. These correlations were confirmed by the opposite associations between NPD values and altitude, which had a negative regression with SpO2 level. Basal NPD was significantly associated with amiloride-resistant but not ENaC fraction. Our analyses demonstrate that acute lung injury associated with systemic hypoxia is characterized by dysfunctional NPD.

  3. Maternal PUFA ω-3 Supplementation Prevents Neonatal Lung Injuries Induced by Hyperoxia in Newborn Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyuti Sharma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is one of the most common complications of prematurity, occurring in 30% of very low birth weight infants. The benefits of dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 (PUFA ω-3 during pregnancy or the perinatal period have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation on lung injuries in newborn rats exposed to prolonged hyperoxia. Pregnant female Wistar rats (n = 14 were fed a control diet (n = 2, a PUFA ω-6 diet (n = 6, or a PUFA ω-3 diet (n = 6, starting with the 14th gestation day. At Day 1, female and newborn rats (10 per female were exposed to hyperoxia (O2, n = 70 or to the ambient air (Air, n = 70. Six groups of newborns rats were obtained: PUFA ω-6/O2 (n = 30, PUFA ω-6/air (n = 30, PUFA ω-3/O2 (n = 30, PUFA ω-3/air (n = 30, control/O2 (n = 10, and control/air (n = 10. After 10 days, lungs were removed for analysis of alveolarization and pulmonary vascular development. Survival rate was 100%. Hyperoxia reduced alveolarization and increased pulmonary vascular wall thickness in both control (n = 20 and PUFA ω-6 groups (n = 60. Maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation prevented the decrease in alveolarization caused by hyperoxia (n = 30 compared to PUFA ω-6/O2 (n = 30 or to the control/O2 (n = 10, but did not significantly increase the thickness of the lung vascular wall. Therefore, maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation may protect newborn rats from lung injuries induced by hyperoxia. In clinical settings, maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation during pregnancy and during lactation may prevent BPD development after premature birth.

  4. Pleiotropic Effects of Levofloxacin, Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics, against Influenza Virus-Induced Lung Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Enoki

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO are major pathogenic molecules produced during viral lung infections, including influenza. While fluoroquinolones are widely used as antimicrobial agents for treating a variety of bacterial infections, including secondary infections associated with the influenza virus, it has been reported that they also function as anti-oxidants against ROS and as a NO regulator. Therefore, we hypothesized that levofloxacin (LVFX, one of the most frequently used fluoroquinolone derivatives, may attenuate pulmonary injuries associated with influenza virus infections by inhibiting the production of ROS species such as hydroxyl radicals and neutrophil-derived NO that is produced during an influenza viral infection. The therapeutic impact of LVFX was examined in a PR8 (H1N1 influenza virus-induced lung injury mouse model. ESR spin-trapping experiments indicated that LVFX showed scavenging activity against neutrophil-derived hydroxyl radicals. LVFX markedly improved the survival rate of mice that were infected with the influenza virus in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the LVFX treatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the level of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (a marker of oxidative stress and nitrotyrosine (a nitrative marker in the lungs of virus-infected mice, and the nitrite/nitrate ratio (NO metabolites and IFN-γ in BALF. These results indicate that LVFX may be of substantial benefit in the treatment of various acute inflammatory disorders such as influenza virus-induced pneumonia, by inhibiting inflammatory cell responses and suppressing the overproduction of NO in the lungs.

  5. Airway CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Lung Injury during Infant Viral Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Thomas J; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Bickham, Kara L; Gordon, Claire L; Zhang, Feifan; Levin, Bruce; Baird, John S; Farber, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    Infants and young children are disproportionately susceptible to severe complications from respiratory viruses, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Recent studies show that the T cell response in the lung is important for protective responses to respiratory infections, although details on the infant/pediatric respiratory immune response remain sparse. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the local versus systemic immune response in infants and young children with respiratory failure from viral respiratory tract infections and its association to disease severity. Daily airway secretions were sampled from infants and children 4 years of age and younger receiving mechanical ventilation owing to respiratory failure from viral infection or noninfectious causes. Samples were examined for immune cell composition and markers of T cell activation. These parameters were then correlated with clinical disease severity. Innate immune cells and total CD3(+) T cells were present in similar proportions in airway aspirates derived from infected and uninfected groups; however, the CD8:CD4 T cell ratio was markedly increased in the airways of patients with viral infection compared with uninfected patients, and specifically in infected infants with acute lung injury. T cells in the airways were phenotypically and functionally distinct from those in blood with activated/memory phenotypes and increased cytotoxic capacity. We identified a significant increase in airway cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in infants with lung injury from viral respiratory tract infection that was distinct from the T cell profile in circulation and associated with increasing disease severity. Airway sampling could therefore be diagnostically informative for assessing immune responses and lung damage. PMID:26618559

  6. Alveolar Overdistension as a Cause of Lung Injury: Differences among Three Animal Species

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel García-Delgado; Inés Navarrete-Sánchez; Virginia Chamorro-Marín; Juan Carlos Díaz-Monrové; Javier Esquivias; Enrique Fernández-Mondéjar

    2012-01-01

    This study analyses characteristics of lung injuries produced by alveolar overdistension in three animal species. Mechanical ventilation at normal tidal volume (10 mL/Kg) and high tidal volume (50 mL/Kg) was applied for 30 min in each species. Data were gathered on wet/dry weight ratio, histological score, and area of alveolar collapse. Five out of six rabbits with high tidal volume developed tension pneumothorax, and the rabbit results were therefore not included in the histological analysis...

  7. Acute Lung Injury Induced by Lipopolysaccharide Is Independent of Complement Activation1

    OpenAIRE

    Rittirsch, Daniel; Flierl, Michael A; Day, Danielle E.; Nadeau, Brian A.; McGuire, Stephanie R.; Hoesel, Laszlo M.; Ipaktchi, Kyros; Zetoune, Firas S.; Sarma, J. Vidya; Leng, Lin; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Neff, Thomas A.; Bucala, Richard; Ward, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Although acute lung injury (ALI) is an important problem in humans, its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Airway instillation of bacterial LPS, a known complement activator, represents a frequently used model of ALI. In the present study, pathways in the immunopathogenesis of ALI were evaluated. ALI was induced in wild-type, C3–/–, and C5–/– mice by airway deposition of LPS. To assess the relevant inflammatory mediators, bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were evaluated by ELISA analyses and vari...

  8. Reproduction of a model of lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation in canine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bin; Duan, Yun-You; He, Wen-Bo; Feng, Hua-Song; Ning, Hao-Yong; Ju-yi WEN; Yang, Zhi-Hua; Xiu-jie PAN; Zhen-shan CAO; Mao-xiang ZHU; Xu, Qin-Zhi; Ping-kun ZHOU; Xin-min DING

    2011-01-01

    Objective To reproduce a canine model of subacute lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation.Methods Twenty-six dogs were randomized into the control group(CG,n=6),low-dose group(LG,n=10).and high-dose group(HG,n=10).All of them underwent tracheal intubation.In control group,0.2ml/kg of normal saline was intratracheally given.In low dosage group,10mg/kg of depleted uranium(LG),and in high dose group 100mg/ml of depleted uranium(HG) was introduced.The survival time of animals was obser...

  9. Nitric oxide synthase 3 contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Vaporidi, Katerina; Francis, Roland C; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) depletion or inhibition reduces ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), but the responsible mechanisms remain incompletely defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of endothelial NOS, NOS3, in the pathogenesis of VILI in an in vivo mouse model. Wild-type and NOS3-deficient mice were ventilated with high-tidal volume (HVT; 40 ml/kg) for 4 h, with and without adding NO to the inhaled gas. Additional wild-type mice were pretreated with tetrahydrobiopter...

  10. Suspected Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury Improving following Administration of Tranexamic Acid: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Ryniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old woman with craniofacial injury developed severe acute respiratory failure under the primary reconstructive surgical procedure requiring several units of blood and plasma. A transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI was suspected and supportive treatment was initiated. Because of the severity of symptoms, acute extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO was planned. During preparation for ECMO, a single intravenous dose, 1 g of tranexamic acid, was administered and a remarkable improvement was observed shortly thereafter. The patient was placed on ECMO for 16 hours. The further course was uncomplicated and the patient was discharged from ICU on the 6th day after admission fully and she recovered. A clinical improvement was observed in a timely fashion following the administration of tranexamic acid. The handling of a suspected TRALI and potential benefit from administration of tranexamic acid are discussed in this case report.

  11. I-FABP as biomarker for the early diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia and resultant lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel G Khadaroo

    Full Text Available Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI is a life-threatening condition that can result in multiple organ injury and death. A timely diagnosis and treatment would have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality in high-risk patient population. The purpose of this study was to investigate if intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP and α-defensins can be used as biomarkers for early AMI and resultant lung injury. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to intestinal ischemia by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. A time course of intestinal ischemia from 0.5 to 3 h was performed and followed by reperfusion for 2 h. Additional mice were treated with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC at 300 mg/kg given intraperitoneally prior to reperfusion. AMI resulted in severe intestinal injury characterized by neutrophil infiltrate, myeloperoxidase (MPO levels, cytokine/chemokine levels, and tissue histopathology. Pathologic signs of ischemia were evident at 1 h, and by 3 h of ischemia, the full thickness of the intestine mucosa had areas of coagulative necrosis. It was noted that the levels of α-defensins in intestinal tissue peaked at 1 h and I-FABP in plasma peaked at 3 h after AMI. Intestinal ischemia also resulted in lung injury in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with NAC decreased the levels of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP, as well as lung MPO and cytokines. In summary, the concentrations of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP predicted intestinal ischemia prior to pathological evidence of ischemia and I-FABP directly correlated with resultant lung injury. The antioxidant NAC reduced intestinal and lung injury induced by AMI, suggesting a role for oxidants in the mechanism for distant organ injury. I-FABP and α-defensins are promising biomarkers, and may guide the treatment with antioxidant in early intestinal and distal organ injury.

  12. Heme oxygenase-1, a critical arbitrator of cell death pathways in lung injury and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Danielle; Lin, Ling; Choi, Augustine M K; Ryter, Stefan W

    2009-07-01

    Increases in cell death by programmed (i.e., apoptosis, autophagy) or nonprogrammed mechanisms (i.e., necrosis) occur during tissue injury and may contribute to the etiology of several pulmonary or vascular disease states. The low-molecular-weight stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) confers cytoprotection against cell death in various models of lung and vascular injury by inhibiting apoptosis, inflammation, and cell proliferation. HO-1 serves a vital metabolic function as the rate-limiting step in the heme degradation pathway and in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. The transcriptional induction of HO-1 occurs in response to multiple forms of chemical and physical cellular stress. The cytoprotective functions of HO-1 may be attributed to heme turnover, as well as to beneficial properties of its enzymatic reaction products: biliverdin-IXalpha, iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 or CO inhibits stress-induced extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in vitro. A variety of signaling molecules have been implicated in the cytoprotection conferred by HO-1/CO, including autophagic proteins, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, nuclear factor-kappaB, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt, and others. Enhanced HO-1 expression or the pharmacological application of HO end-products affords protection in preclinical models of tissue injury, including experimental and transplant-associated ischemia/reperfusion injury, promising potential future therapeutic applications.

  13. Lysine acetylsalicylate ameliorates lung injury in rats acutely exposed to paraquat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wei-dong; WANG Jie-zan; LU Yuan-qiang; DI Ya-min; JIANG Jiu-kun; ZHANG Qin

    2011-01-01

    Background Paraquat (PQ), an effective and widely used herbicide, has been proven to be safe when appropriately applied to eliminate weeds. However, PQ poisoning is an extremely frustrating clinical condition with a high mortality and with a lack of effective treatments in humans. PQ mainly accumulates in the lung, and the main molecular mechanism of PQ toxicity is based on redox cycling and intracellular oxidative stress generation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether lysine acetylsalicylate (LAS) could protect the lung from the damage of PQ poisoning and to study the mechanisms of protection.Methods A model of PQ poisoning was established in 75 Sprague-Dawley rats by intragastric administration of 50 mg/kg PQ, followed by treatment with 200 mg/kg of LAS. The rats were randomly divided into sham, PQ, and PQ+LAS groups, with 25 in each group. We assessed and compared the malonaldehyde (MDA) content, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathion peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT) in serum and lung and the hydroxyproline (HYP)content, pathological changes, apoptosis and expression of Bcl-2/Bax protein in lung of rats on days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21after PQ poisoning and LAS treatment.Results Compared to the PQ group rats, early treatment with LAS reduced the MDA and HYP contents, and increased the SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT activities in the serum and lung on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after PQ poisoning (all P<0.05).After early LAS treatment, the apoptotic rate and Bax expression of lung decreased, the Bcl-2 expression increased, and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio increased, compared to the PQ group rats. Furthermore, the pathological results of lungs revealed that after LAS treatment, early manifestations of PQ poisoning, such as hemorrhage, edema and inflammatory-cell infiltration, were improved to some degree, and collagen fibers in the pulmonary interstitium were also obviously reduced.Conclusion In this rat model of PQ poisoning, LAS effectively ameliorated the lung

  14. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation-induced lung injury in rats is greater after acid instillation than after sepsis-induced acute lung injury, but does not increase systemic inflammation: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Kuiper Jan; Plötz Frans B; Groeneveld AB Johan; Haitsma Jack J; Jothy Serge; Vaschetto Rosanna; Zhang Haibo; Slutsky Arthur S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To examine whether acute lung injury from direct and indirect origins differ in susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and resultant systemic inflammatory responses. Methods Rats were challenged by acid instillation or 24 h of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture, followed by mechanical ventilation (MV) with either a low tidal volume (Vt) of 6 mL/kg and 5 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; LVt acid, LVt sepsis) or with a high Vt of 15 ...

  15. In vivo anti-inflammatory action of eugenol on lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Clarissa B; Riva, Douglas R; DePaula, Leonardo J; Brando-Lima, Aline; Koatz, Vera Lúcia G; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique; Zin, Walter A; Faffe, Débora S

    2010-04-01

    Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, suppresses cyclooxygenase-2 expression, while eugenol dimers prevent nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and inflammatory cytokine expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Our aim was to examine the in vivo anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline [0.05 ml intratracheally (it), control (Ctrl) and eugenol (Eug) groups] or Escherichia coli LPS (10 microg it, LPS and LPSEug groups). After 6 h, mice received saline (0.2 ml ip, Ctrl and LPS groups) or eugenol (160 mg/kg ip, Eug and LPSEug groups). Twenty-four hours after LPS injection, pulmonary resistive (DeltaP1) and viscoelastic (DeltaP2) pressures, static elastance (E(st)), and viscoelastic component of elastance (DeltaE) were measured. Lungs were prepared for histology. In parallel mice, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected 24 h after LPS injection. TNF-alpha was determined by ELISA. Lung tissue expression of NF-kappaB was determined by EMSA. DeltaP1, DeltaP2, E(st), and DeltaE were significantly higher in the LPS group than in the other groups. LPS mice also showed significantly more alveolar collapse, collagen fibers, and neutrophil influx and higher TNF-alpha levels and NF-kappaB expression than the other groups. Eugenol treatment reduced LPS-induced lung inflammation, improving lung function. Our results suggest that eugenol exhibits in vivo anti-inflammatory action in LPS-induced lung injury.

  16. Sustained inflation at birth did not alter lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated fetal lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah H Hillman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sustained inflations (SI are used with the initiation of ventilation at birth to rapidly recruit functional residual capacity and may decrease lung injury and the need for mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. However, a 20 second SI in surfactant-deficient preterm lambs caused an acute phase injury response without decreasing lung injury from subsequent mechanical ventilation. HYPOTHESIS: A 20 second SI at birth will decrease lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated preterm fetal lambs. METHODS: The head and chest of fetal sheep at 126±1 day GA were exteriorized, with tracheostomy and removal of fetal lung fluid prior to treatment with surfactant (300 mg in 15 ml saline. Fetal lambs were randomized to one of four 15 minute interventions: 1 PEEP 8 cmH2O; 2 20 sec SI at 40 cmH2O, then PEEP 8 cmH2O; 3 mechanical ventilation with 7 ml/kg tidal volume; or 4 20 sec SI then mechanical ventilation at 7 ml/kg. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for the intervention and for 30 min after the intervention. RESULTS: SI recruited a mean volume of 6.8±0.8 mL/kg. SI did not alter respiratory physiology during mechanical ventilation. Heat shock protein (HSP 70, HSP60, and total protein in lung fluid similarly increased in both ventilation groups. Modest pro-inflammatory cytokine and acute phase responses, with or without SI, were similar with ventilation. SI alone did not increase markers of injury. CONCLUSION: In surfactant treated fetal lambs, a 20 sec SI did not alter ventilation physiology or markers of lung injury from mechanical ventilation.

  17. Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS): the mechanism, present strategies and future perspectives of therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Luh, Shi-Ping; Chiang, Chi-huei

    2006-01-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), which manifests as non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, respiratory distress and hypoxemia, could be resulted from various processes that directly or indirectly injure the lung. Extensive investigations in experimental models and humans with ALI/ARDS have revealed many molecular mechanisms that offer therapeutic opportunities for cell or gene therapy. Herein the present strategies and future perspectives of the treatment for ALI/AR...

  18. Efficacy of Tiotropium Bromide and Rehabilitation Treatment on Pulmonary Function of Patients With Sulfur Mustard Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic pulmonary complication is the most common delayed toxic effect of sulfur mustard (SM) and it has no treatment so far. Objectives: To evaluate short-term therapeutic effects of inhaled tiotropium bromide and pulmonary rehabilitation on pulmonary function of patients with SM induced lung injury. Patients and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, using convenient sampling method, 54 patients with chronic lung disease due to SM exposure were recruited in Baqiyatallah Genera...

  19. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells reduce systemic inflammation and attenuate LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats

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    Li Jianjun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess potent immunomodulatory properties and simultaneously lack the ability to illicit immune responses. Hence, MSCs have emerged as a promising candidate for cellular therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. Within the context of this study, we investigated whether human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs could ameliorate lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute lung injury (ALI in a rat model. Methods ALI was induced via injection of LPS. Rats were divided into three groups: (1 saline group(control, (2 LPS group, and (3 MSC + LPS group. The rats were sacrificed at 6, 24, and 48 hours after injection. Serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and lungs were collected for cytokine concentration measurements, assessment of lung injury, and histology. Results UC-MSCs increased survival rate and suppressed LPS-induced increase of serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 without decreasing the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The MSC + LPS group exhibited significant improvements in lung inflammation, injury, edema, lung wet/dry ratio, protein concentration, and neutrophil counts in the BALF, as well as improved myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the lung tissue. Furthermore, UC-MSCs decreased malondialdehyde (MDA production and increased Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1 protein production and activity in the lung tissue. Conclusion UC-MSCs noticeably increased the survival rate of rats suffering from LPS-induced lung injury and significantly reduced systemic and pulmonary inflammation. Promoting anti-inflammatory homeostasis and reducing oxidative stress might be the therapeutic basis of UC-MSCs.

  20. A new therapeutic strategy for lung tissue injury induced by influenza with CR2 targeting complement inhibitior

    OpenAIRE

    Tomlinson Stephen; Qiao Fei; Huang Liuyu; Sun Yansong; Wang Yong; Yang Yutao; Jia Leili; Xu Yuanyong; Zhang Chuanfu; Liu Xuelin; Zhou Yusen; Song Hongbin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Influenza is a respiratory disease that seriously threatens human health. In fact, influenza virus itself does not make critical contribution to mortality induced by influenza, but "cytokine storm" produced by the excessive immune response triggered by the virus can result in inflammatory reaction of lung tissues and fatal lung tissue injury, and thus increase influenza mortality. Therefore, besides antiviral drugs, immunosuppression drugs should also be included in infect...

  1. Inhibitors of inflammation and endogenous surfactant pool size as modulators of lung injury with initiation of ventilation in preterm sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Polglase Graeme R; Nitsos Ilias; Pillow J Jane; Kallapur Suhas G; Hillman Noah H; Ikegami Machiko; Jobe Alan H

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in tracheal aspirates correlate with the development of BPD in preterm infants. Ventilation of preterm lambs increases pro-inflammatory cytokines and causes lung inflammation. Objective We tested the hypothesis that selective inhibitors of pro-inflammatory signaling would decrease lung inflammation induced by ventilation in preterm newborn lambs. We also examined if the variability in injury response was explained by variations in the e...

  2. Comparative analysis between the alveolar recruitment maneuver and breath stacking technique in patients with acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Porto, Elias Ferreira; Tavolaro, Kelly Cristiani; Kumpel, Claudia; Oliveira, Fernanda Augusta; Sousa, Juciaria Ferreira; de Carvalho, Graciele Vieira; de Castro, Antonio Adolfo Mattos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of the alveolar recruitment maneuver and the breath stacking technique with respect to lung mechanics and gas exchange in patients with acute lung injury. Methods Thirty patients were distributed into two groups: Group 1 - breath stacking; and Group 2 - alveolar recruitment maneuver. After undergoing conventional physical therapy, all patients received both treatments with an interval of 1 day between them. In the first group, the breath stacking techniq...

  3. Rituximab induced lung injury in a case of NHL: Diagnosis and follow up on FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram [Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre, Worli (United States); Saikia, Tapan [Prince Aly Khan Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2012-09-15

    Rituximab induced lung injury is a rare but serious side effect of this agent. We describe the valuable role played by 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography (FDG PET CT)in the diagnosis and follow up of this condition in a patient with non Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)receiving rituximab. Abnormal uptake of FDG in lungs of patients receiving this drug should be care fully evaluated to diagnose this potentially fatal side effect.

  4. Effect of positive end-expiratory pressure and tidal volume on lung injury induced by alveolar instability

    OpenAIRE

    Halter, Jeffrey M; Steinberg, Jay M; Gatto, Louis A; DiRocco, Joseph D; Pavone, Lucio A; Schiller, Henry J.; Albert, Scott; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Carney, David; Nieman, Gary F.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction One potential mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is due to shear stresses associated with alveolar instability (recruitment/derecruitment). It has been postulated that the optimal combination of tidal volume (Vt) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) stabilizes alveoli, thus diminishing recruitment/derecruitment and reducing VILI. In this study we directly visualized the effect of Vt and PEEP on alveolar mechanics and correlated alveolar stability with lung ...

  5. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Benjamin T Suratt; Kallen, Caleb B.; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese m...

  6. Role of TNFR1 in lung injury and altered lung function induced by the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung toxicity induced by sulfur mustard is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. To elucidate mechanisms mediating pulmonary damage, we used 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. Male mice (B6129) were treated intratracheally with CEES (3 or 6 mg/kg) or control. Animals were sacrificed 3, 7 or 14 days later and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue collected. Treatment of mice with CEES resulted in an increase in BAL protein, an indication of alveolar epithelial damage, within 3 days. Expression of Ym1, an oxidative stress marker also increased in the lung, along with inducible nitric oxide synthase, and at 14 days, cyclooxygenase-2 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, inflammatory proteins implicated in tissue injury. These responses were attenuated in mice lacking the p55 receptor for TNFα (TNFR1-/-), demonstrating that signaling via TNFR1 is key to CEES-induced injury, oxidative stress, and inflammation. CEES-induced upregulation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and MnSOD was delayed or absent in TNFR1-/- mice, relative to WT mice, suggesting that TNFα mediates early antioxidant responses to lung toxicants. Treatment of WT mice with CEES also resulted in functional alterations in the lung including decreases in compliance and increases in elastance. Additionally, methacholine-induced alterations in total lung resistance and central airway resistance were dampened by CEES. Loss of TNFR1 resulted in blunted functional responses to CEES. These effects were most notable in the airways. These data suggest that targeting TNFα signaling may be useful in mitigating lung injury, inflammation and functional alterations induced by vesicants.

  7. The functional comorbidity index had high inter-rater reliability in patients with acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Eddy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Functional Comorbidity Index (FCI was recently developed to predict physical function in acute lung injury patients using comorbidity data. Our objectives were to determine: (1 the inter-rater reliability of the FCI collected using in-patient discharge summaries (primary objective; and (2 the accuracy and predictive validity of the FCI collected using hospital discharge summaries and admission records versus complete chart review (secondary objectives. Methods For reliability, we evaluated the FCI’s intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC among trained research staff performing data collection for 421 acute lung injury patients enrolled in a prospective cohort study. For validity and accuracy, we compared the detection of FCI comorbidities across three types of inpatient medical records, and the association of the respective FCI scores obtained with patients’ SF-36 physical function subscale (PFS scores at 1-year follow-up. Results Inter-rater reliability was near-perfect (ICC 0.91; 95% CI 0.89-0.94. Hospital admission records and discharge summaries (vs. complete chart review significantly underestimated the total FCI score. However, using multivariable linear regression, FCI scores collected using each of the three types of inpatient medical records had similar associations with PFS, suggesting similar predictive value. Conclusions Data collection using in-patient discharge summaries represents a reliable and valid method for collecting FCI comorbidity information.

  8. Roles of transforming growth factor β in hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Mao, Y F; Zheng, J; Liu, K; Han, C H; Liu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxia induced lung injury (HILI) refers to the acute lung injury secondary to prolonged exposure to hyperoxia at elevated partial pressure. With the advent of efficient systems for delivery of high concentrations of oxygen in hospitals, the population at risk for this condition has been markedly increased. Although numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the pathogenesis of HILI, the specific mechanism is still poorly understood and some hypotheses have been proposed. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a secreted protein that controls proliferation, cellular differentiation and other functions in most cells and is a type of cytokine that plays a role in many diseases. In this mini-review, we summarize the role of TGF-β in HILI according to its relationships with reactive oxygen species (ROS), pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell apoptosis and pulmonary fibrosis. We hope it may help the understanding of pathogenesis of HILI and provide a greater understanding for the target therapy of HILI. PMID:27416690

  9. Proteasome inhibitor ameliorates severe acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Chen; Shun-Le Li; Tao Wu; Ji-Dong Liu

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To observe the effect of proteasome inhibitor MG-132 on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and associated lung injury of rats.METHODS:Male adult SD rats were randomly divided into SAP group,sham-operation group,and MG-132 treatment group.A model of SAP was established by injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliarypancreatic duct of rats.The MG-132 group was pretreated with 10 mg/kg MG-132 intraperitoneally (ip) 30 rnin before the induction of pancreatitis.The changes in serum amylase,myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of pancreatic and pulmonary tissue were measured.The TNF-α level in pancreatic cytosolic fractions was assayed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit.Meanwhile,the pathological changes in both pancreatic and pulmonary tissues were also observed.RESULTS:MG-132 significantly decreased serum amylase,pancreatic weight/body ratio,pancreatic TNF-α level,pancreatic and pulmonary MPO activity (P < 0.05).Histopathological examinations revealed that pancreatic and pulmonary samples from rats pretreated with MG-132 demonstrated milder edema,cellular damage,and inflammatory activity (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION:The proteasome inhibitor MG-132shows a protective effect on severe acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury of rats.

  10. Role of Iron in Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury: One Step Forward in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Ahmadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increased oxidative stress in patients under treatment with high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia is considered to be one of the major mechanisms of lung injury. Between different mediators, transition metal ions especially iron, by generation of very reactive free radicals play an important role in oxidative stress process. Disruption of normal iron hemostasis has been reported in hyperoxic conditions. So we hypothesized that chelation of iron can reduce hyperoxia- induced lung injury.Methods: Mechanically ventilated patients, who received oxygen with FiO > 0.5 for at least 3 days, underwent bronchoscopy at baseline and 72 hours thereafter. Data from external control cases were collected prospectively to provide a comparative reference group.Iron and Iron-related proteins were measured in lavage fluid and plasma.Results: In 24 patients and in comparison with the results of previous study, Iron concentration decreased significantly in lavage fluid (P<0.001. Reduction of ferritin was not significant in lavage fluid (P: 0.7.Transferrin decreased significantly in plasma (P: 0.01. Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II (P: 0.006 score decreased significantly after 7 days of follow-up. Conclusion: Deferasirox did not change Iron and Iron-related protein in hyperoxic condition and it just only could be considered along with other supportive measures for better toleration of oxygen therapy.

  11. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies related to lung injury in a preterm lamb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Fantini, Prue M; Rajapaksa, Anushi E; Oakley, Regina; Tingay, David G

    2016-05-23

    Preterm newborns often require invasive support, however even brief periods of supported ventilation applied inappropriately to the lung can cause injury. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qPCR) has been extensively employed in studies of ventilation-induced lung injury with the reference gene 18S ribosomal RNA (18S RNA) most commonly employed as the internal control reference gene. Whilst the results of these studies depend on the stability of the reference gene employed, the use of 18S RNA has not been validated. In this study the expression profile of five candidate reference genes (18S RNA, ACTB, GAPDH, TOP1 and RPS29) in two geographical locations, was evaluated by dedicated algorithms, including geNorm, Normfinder, Bestkeeper and ΔCt method and the overall stability of these candidate genes determined (RefFinder). Secondary studies examined the influence of reference gene choice on the relative expression of two well-validated lung injury markers; EGR1 and IL1B. In the setting of the preterm lamb model of lung injury, RPS29 reference gene expression was influenced by tissue location; however we determined that individual ventilation strategies influence reference gene stability. Whilst 18S RNA is the most commonly employed reference gene in preterm lamb lung studies, our results suggest that GAPDH is a more suitable candidate.

  12. Effects of resolvin D1 on inflammatory responses and oxidative stress of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Yuan Ruixia; Yao Chengyue; Wu Qingping; Marie Christelle; Xie Wanli; Zhang Xingcai

    2014-01-01

    Background A variety of inflammatory mediators and effector cells participate together in acute lung injury,and lead to secondary injury that is due to an inflammatory cascade and secondary diffuse lung parenchyma injury.Inflammation is associated with an oxidative stress reaction,which is produced in the development of airway inflammation,and which has positive feedback on inflammation itself.Resolvin D1 can reduce the infiltration of neutrophils,regulate cytokine levels and reduce the inflammation reaction,and thereby promote the resolution of inflammation.The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of resolvin D1 on an inflammatory response and oxidative stress during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury.Methods LPS (3 mg/kg) was used to induce the acute lung injury model.Pretreatment resolvin D1 (100 ng/mouse) was given to mice 30 minutes before inducing acute lung injury.Mice were observed at 6 hours,12 hours,1 day,2 days,3 days,4 days and 7 days after LPS was administrated,then they were humanely sacrificed.We collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lung tissues for further analysis.Paraffin section and HE staining of the lung tissues were made for histopathology observations.Parts of the lung tissues were evaluated for wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio.tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α,inter leukin (IL)-1β,IL-10 and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).A lipid peroxidation malondialdehyde (MDA) assay kit was used to detect MDA.A total superoxide dismutase assay kit with WST-1 was used to analyze superoxide dismutase (SOD).We determined the apoptosis of neutrophils by Flow Cytometry.A real-time quantitative PCR Detecting System detected the expression of mRNA for heme oxygenase (HO)-1.Results Pretreatment with resolvin D1 reduced the pathological damage in the lung,decreased the recruitment of neutrophils and stimulated their apoptosis.It markedly decreased the expressions of TNF

  13. Role of p53–fibrinolytic system cross-talk in the regulation of quartz-induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silica is the major component of airborne dust generated by wind, manufacturing and/or demolition. Chronic occupational inhalation of silica dust containing crystalline quartz is by far the predominant form of silicosis in humans. Silicosis is a progressive lung disease that typically arises after a very long latency and is a major occupational concern with no known effective treatment. The mechanism of silicosis is not clearly understood. However, silicosis is associated with increased cell death, expression of redox enzymes and pro-fibrotic cytokines and chemokines. Since alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) death and disruption of alveolar fibrinolysis is often associated with both acute and chronic lung injuries, we explored whether p53-mediated changes in the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system contributes to silica-induced lung injury. We further sought to determine whether caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide (CSP), which inhibits p53 expression, mitigates lung injury associated with exposure to silica. Lung tissues and AECs isolated from wild-type (WT) mice exposed to silica exhibit increased apoptosis, p53 and PAI-1, and suppression of uPA expression. Treatment of WT mice with CSP inhibits PAI-1, restores uPA expression and prevents AEC apoptosis by suppressing p53, which is otherwise induced in mice exposed to silica. The process involves CSP-mediated inhibition of serine-15 phosphorylation of p53 by inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A-C (PP2A-C) interaction with silica-induced caveolin-1 in AECs. These observations suggest that changes in the p53–uPA fibrinolytic system cross-talk contribute to lung injury caused by inhalation of silica dust containing crystalline quartz and is protected by CSP by targeting this pathway. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to quartz dusts is a major cause of lung injury and silicosis. • The survival of patients with silicosis is bleak due to lack of effective treatments. • This study defines a new role of

  14. Role of p53–fibrinolytic system cross-talk in the regulation of quartz-induced lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandary, Yashodhar P.; Shetty, Shwetha K.; Marudamuthu, Amarnath S. [Texas Lung Injury Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, 11937 US Highway 271, Tyler, TX 75708 (United States); Fu, Jian [Texas Lung Injury Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, 11937 US Highway 271, Tyler, TX 75708 (United States); Center for Research on Environmental Disease and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Pinson, Barbara M. [Occupational Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, 11937 US Highway 271, Tyler, TX 75708 (United States); Center for Research on Environmental Disease and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Levin, Jeffrey [Occupational Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, 11937 US Highway 271, Tyler, TX 75708 (United States); Shetty, Sreerama, E-mail: sreerama.shetty@uthct.edu [Texas Lung Injury Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, 11937 US Highway 271, Tyler, TX 75708 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Silica is the major component of airborne dust generated by wind, manufacturing and/or demolition. Chronic occupational inhalation of silica dust containing crystalline quartz is by far the predominant form of silicosis in humans. Silicosis is a progressive lung disease that typically arises after a very long latency and is a major occupational concern with no known effective treatment. The mechanism of silicosis is not clearly understood. However, silicosis is associated with increased cell death, expression of redox enzymes and pro-fibrotic cytokines and chemokines. Since alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) death and disruption of alveolar fibrinolysis is often associated with both acute and chronic lung injuries, we explored whether p53-mediated changes in the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system contributes to silica-induced lung injury. We further sought to determine whether caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide (CSP), which inhibits p53 expression, mitigates lung injury associated with exposure to silica. Lung tissues and AECs isolated from wild-type (WT) mice exposed to silica exhibit increased apoptosis, p53 and PAI-1, and suppression of uPA expression. Treatment of WT mice with CSP inhibits PAI-1, restores uPA expression and prevents AEC apoptosis by suppressing p53, which is otherwise induced in mice exposed to silica. The process involves CSP-mediated inhibition of serine-15 phosphorylation of p53 by inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A-C (PP2A-C) interaction with silica-induced caveolin-1 in AECs. These observations suggest that changes in the p53–uPA fibrinolytic system cross-talk contribute to lung injury caused by inhalation of silica dust containing crystalline quartz and is protected by CSP by targeting this pathway. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to quartz dusts is a major cause of lung injury and silicosis. • The survival of patients with silicosis is bleak due to lack of effective treatments. • This study defines a new role of

  15. Positive end-expiratory pressure and surfactant decrease lung injury during initiation of ventilation in fetal sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Hillman, Noah H.; Nitsos, Ilias; Berry, Clare; Jane Pillow, J.; Suhas G Kallapur; Alan H Jobe

    2011-01-01

    The initiation of ventilation in preterm, surfactant-deficient sheep without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) causes airway injury and lung inflammation. We hypothesized that PEEP and surfactant treatment would decrease the lung injury from initiation of ventilation with high tidal volumes. Fetal sheep at 128-day gestational age were randomized to ventilation with: 1) no PEEP, no surfactant; 2) 8-cmH2O PEEP, no surfactant; 3) no PEEP + surfactant; 4) 8-cmH2O PEEP + surfactant; or 5) co...

  16. Gastric pH and motility in a porcine model of acute lung injury using a wireless motility capsule

    OpenAIRE

    Rauch, Stefan; Muellenbach, Ralf M.; Johannes, Amélie; Zollhöfer, Bernd; Roewer, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Evaluation of gastric pH and motility in a porcine model of acute lung injury using a novel, wireless motility capsule. Material/Methods A motility capsule was applied into the stomach of 7 Pietrain pigs with acute lung injury induced by high volume saline lavage. Wireless transmission of pH, pressure and temperature data was performed by a recorder attached to the animal’s abdomen. Gastric motility was evaluated using pH and pressure values, and capsule location was confir...

  17. A Hyperoxic Lung Injury Model in Premature Rabbits: The Influence of Different Gestational Ages and Oxygen Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Manzano, Roberta Munhoz; Mascaretti, Renata Suman; Carrer, Valéria; Haddad, Luciana Branco; Fernandes, Aline Rabelo; Ana M A Reyes; Rebello, Celso Moura

    2014-01-01

    Background Many animal models have been developed to study bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The preterm rabbit is a low-cost, easy-to-handle model, but it has a high mortality rate in response to the high oxygen concentrations used to induce lung injury. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality rates of two models of hyperoxia-induced lung injury in preterm rabbits. Methods Pregnant New Zealand white rabbits were subjected to caesarean section on gestational day 28 or 29 (full term...

  18. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling: Evidence for Its Protective Role in Endotoxin Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the protective role of the sonic hedgehog (SHH signaling associated with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI in a mouse model.Male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS-cyclopamine group and cyclopamine group. ALI was induced by LPS ip injection (5 mg/kg. The sonic hedgehog inhibitor cyclopamine (50 mg/kg was given to the LPS-cyclopamine group at 30 min after LPS injection as well as normal mice as control. Lung injury was observed histologically in hematoxylin and eosin (HE stained tissue sections, semi-quantified by lung tissue injury score, and the lung tissue mass alteration was measured by wet to dry weight ratio (W/D. mRNA expression levels of TNF-α, SHH, Patched (PTC and GLI1 in lung tissue were studied with real time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR, while the protein expression of SHH and GLI1 was determined by western blot analysis.Lung tissue injury score, thickness of alveolar septa, W/D, and TNF-α mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in the ALI mice than the normal mice (P<0.05. The mRNA expression levels of SHH, PTC, and GLI1 in the ALI mice were significantly higher at 12h and 24h after LPS injection, but not at the 6h time point. Protein production of SHH and GLI1 at 6h, 12h, and 24h in the lungs of ALI mice significantly increased, in a time-dependent manner, compared with that in normal mice. Cyclopamine alone has no effect on pathological changes in normal mice. Intervention with cyclopamine in ALI mice led to a reduction in mRNA levels of SHH, PTC, and GLI1 as well as SHH and GLI1 protein levels; meanwhile, the pathological injury scores of lung tissues, thickness of alveolar septa, W/D, and mRNA expression levels of TNF-α increased compared with mice receiving LPS only.The SHH signaling pathway was activated in response to LPS-induced ALI, and up-regulation of SHH expression could alleviate lung injury and be involved in the repair of injured lung

  19. Differences in regional pulmonary pressure–impedance curves before and after lung injury assessed with a novel algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global pressure–volume (PV) curves are an adjunct measure to describe lung characteristics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). There is convincing evidence that high peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) cause barotrauma, while optimized positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) helps avoid mechanical injury to the lungs by preventing repeated alveolar opening and closing. The optimal values of PIP and PEEP are deduced from the shape of the PV curve by the identification of so-called lower and upper inflection points. However, it has been demonstrated using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) that the inflection points vary across the lung. This study employs a simple curve-fitting technique to automatically define inflection points on both pressure–volume (PV) and pressure–impedance (PI) curves to asses the differences between global PV and regional PI estimates in animals before and after induced lung injury. The results demonstrate a clear increase in lower inflection point (LIP) along the gravitational axis both before and after lung injury. Moreover, it is clear from comparison of the local EIT-derived LIPs with those derived from global PV curves that a ventilation strategy based on the PV curve alone may leave dependent areas of the lung collapsed. EIT-based PI curve analysis may help choosing an optimal ventilation strategy

  20. Identification of oxidative stress and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling as a key pathway of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yumiko; Kuba, Keiji; Neely, G Greg; Yaghubian-Malhami, Rubina; Perkmann, Thomas; van Loo, Geert; Ermolaeva, Maria; Veldhuizen, Ruud; Leung, Y H Connie; Wang, Hongliang; Liu, Haolin; Sun, Yang; Pasparakis, Manolis; Kopf, Manfred; Mech, Christin; Bavari, Sina; Peiris, J S Malik; Slutsky, Arthur S; Akira, Shizuo; Hultqvist, Malin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Nicholls, John; Jiang, Chengyu; Binder, Christoph J; Penninger, Josef M

    2008-04-18

    Multiple lung pathogens such as chemical agents, H5N1 avian flu, or SARS cause high lethality due to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here we report that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mutant mice display natural resistance to acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI). We show that TLR4-TRIF-TRAF6 signaling is a key disease pathway that controls the severity of ALI. The oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) OxPAPC was identified to induce lung injury and cytokine production by lung macrophages via TLR4-TRIF. We observed OxPL production in the lungs of humans and animals infected with SARS, Anthrax, or H5N1. Pulmonary challenge with an inactivated H5N1 avian influenza virus rapidly induces ALI and OxPL formation in mice. Loss of TLR4 or TRIF expression protects mice from H5N1-induced ALI. Moreover, deletion of ncf1, which controls ROS production, improves the severity of H5N1-mediated ALI. Our data identify oxidative stress and innate immunity as key lung injury pathways that control the severity of ALI.

  1. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5-30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5-30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of clinical factors and dose-volume parameters with Grade ≥2 RILI was analyzed. The median follow-up was 12.3 months; 18 (21.7%) cases of Grade 2 RILI, seven (8.4%) of Grade 3 and two (2.4%) of Grade 4 were observed. Univariate analysis revealed the located lobe of the primary tumor. V5, V10, V20, MLD of the ipsilateral lung, V5, V10, V20, V30 and MLD of the bilateral lung, and AVS5 and AVS10 of the ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI (P lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI (P = 0.010, OR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.102-0.729). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated Grade ≥2 RILI could be predicted using AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung (area under curve, 0.668; cutoff value, 564.9 cm(3); sensitivity, 60.7%; specificity, 70.4%). The incidence of Grade ≥2 RILI was significantly lower with AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung ≥564.9 cm(3) than with AVS5 lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI, and AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI for lung cancer after IMRT. PMID:26454068

  2. Reproduction of a model of lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation in canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin ZHANG

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce a canine model of subacute lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation.Methods Twenty-six dogs were randomized into the control group(CG,n=6,low-dose group(LG,n=10.and high-dose group(HG,n=10.All of them underwent tracheal intubation.In control group,0.2ml/kg of normal saline was intratracheally given.In low dosage group,10mg/kg of depleted uranium(LG,and in high dose group 100mg/ml of depleted uranium(HG was introduced.The survival time of animals was observed in one month after intratracheal introduction of various agents,and chest CT scan was performed in the survived animals.They were sacrificed for pathological examination of lung tissues on the 31st day post of them intratracheal introduction of various agents.Results During the observation period,no animal died in CG,one dog in LG died on the 22nd day and 9 of them survived longer than 30 days.All the animals in HG group died within 30 days with a mean survival time of 11.2±8.9 days(median=12d.In comparison with the HG,significant difference on survival time was found between LG and CG,while no significant difference was found between the latter 2 groups(P=0.439.Pathologically,changes were noted in lung tissue of LG,such as escape of inflammatory cells into alveoli,hemorrhage and hyaline membrane formation in alveolar space,dilatation and congestion of alveolar capillaries,and infiltration of inflammatory cells in interstitial tissue.CT scanning revealed patchy effusion and solid consolidation in the left lung.Conclusion The canine model of subacute lung injury induced by a dose of 2mg/kg depleted uranium introduced through tracheal intubation is suitable for the study of subacute toxicity induced by depleted uranium.

  3. A trial of nebulised heparin to limit lung injury following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, B; Smith, R; Santamaria, J D; Orford, N R; Wakefield, B J; Ives, K; McKenzie, R; Zhang, B; Yap, C H

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass triggers an acute inflammatory response in the lungs. This response gives rise to fibrin deposition in the microvasculature and alveoli of the lungs. Fibrin deposition in the microvasculature increases alveolar dead space, while fibrin deposition in alveoli causes shunting. We investigated whether prophylactic nebulised heparin could limit this form of lung injury. We undertook a single-centre double-blind randomised trial. Forty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were randomised to prophylactic nebulised heparin (50,000 U) or placebo. The primary endpoint was the change in arterial oxygen levels over the operative period. Secondary endpoints included end-tidal CO₂, the alveolar dead space fraction and bleeding complications. We found nebulised heparin did not improve arterial oxygen levels. Nebulised heparin was, however, associated with a lower alveolar dead space fraction (P heparin was not associated with bleeding complications. In conclusion, prophylactic nebulised heparin did not improve oxygenation, but was associated with evidence of better alveolar perfusion and CO₂elimination at the end of surgery.

  4. Injury to the lung from cancer therapy: Clinical syndromes, measurable endpoints, and potential scoring systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, S.; Rubin, P. [Univ. of Rochester Cancer Center, NY (United States); Phillips, T.L. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and other

    1995-03-30

    Toxicity of the respiratory system is a common side effect and complication of anticancer therapy that can result in significant morbidity. The range of respiratory compromise can extend from acute lethal events to degrees of chronic pulmonary decompensation, manifesting years after the initial cancer therapy. This review examines the anatomic-histologic background of the lung and the normal functional anatomic unit. The pathophysiology of radiation and chemotherapy induced lung injury is discussed as well as the associated clinical syndromes. Radiation tolerance doses and volumes are assessed in addition to chemotherapy tolerance and risk factors and radiation-chemotherapy interactions. There are a variety of measurable endpoints for detection and screening. Because of the wide range of available quantitative tests, it would seem that the measurement of impaired lung function is possible. The development of staging systems for acute and late toxicity is discussed an a new staging system for Late Effects in Normal Tissues :(LENT) is proposed. 115 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Derecruitment Test and Surfactant Therapy in Patients with Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Smetkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A recruitment maneuver (RM may improve gas exchange in acute lung injury (ALI. The aim of our study was to assess the predictive value of a derecruitment test in relation to RM and to evaluate the efficacy of RM combined with surfactant instillation in patients with ALI. Materials and Methods. Thirteen adult mechanically ventilated patients with ALI were enrolled into a prospective pilot study. The patients received protective ventilation and underwent RM followed by a derecruitment test. After a repeat RM, bovine surfactant (surfactant group, n=6 or vehicle only (conventional therapy group, n=7 was instilled endobronchially. We registered respiratory and hemodynamic parameters, including extravascular lung water index (EVLWI. Results. The derecruitment test decreased the oxygenation in 62% of the patients. We found no significant correlation between the responses to the RM and to the derecruitment tests. The baseline EVLWI correlated with changes in SpO2 following the derecruitment test. The surfactant did not affect gas exchange and lung mechanics but increased EVLWI at 24 and 32 hrs. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated no predictive value of the derecruitment test regarding the effects of RM. Surfactant instillation was not superior to conventional therapy and might even promote pulmonary edema in ALI.

  6. Potential Effects of Medicinal Plants and Secondary Metabolites on Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniely Cornélio Favarin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a life-threatening syndrome that causes high morbidity and mortality worldwide. ALI is characterized by increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary membrane, edema, uncontrolled neutrophils migration to the lung, and diffuse alveolar damage, leading to acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Although corticosteroids remain the mainstay of ALI treatment, they cause significant side effects. Agents of natural origin, such as medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites, mainly those with very few side effects, could be excellent alternatives for ALI treatment. Several studies, including our own, have demonstrated that plant extracts and/or secondary metabolites isolated from them reduce most ALI phenotypes in experimental animal models, including neutrophil recruitment to the lung, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, edema, and vascular permeability. In this review, we summarized these studies and described the anti-inflammatory activity of various plant extracts, such as Ginkgo biloba and Punica granatum, and such secondary metabolites as epigallocatechin-3-gallate and ellagic acid. In addition, we highlight the medical potential of these extracts and plant-derived compounds for treating of ALI.

  7. Recruitment maneuver: RAMP versus CPAP pressure profile in a model of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, D R; Contador, R S; Baez-Garcia, C S N; Xisto, D G; Cagido, V R; Martini, S V; Morales, M M; Rocco, P R M; Faffe, D S; Zin, W A

    2009-10-31

    We examined whether recruitment maneuvers (RMs) with gradual increase in airway pressure (RAMP) provide better outcome than continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Wistar rats received saline intraperitoneally (0.5 mL, CTRL) or paraquat (15 mg/kg, ALI). Twenty-four hours later lung mechanics [static elastance, viscoelastic component of elastance, resistive, viscoelastic and total pressures] were determined before and after recruitment with 40cmH2O CPAP for 40s or 40-s-long slow increase in pressure up to 40cmH2O (RAMP) followed by 0 or 5 cmH2O PEEP. Fractional area of alveolar collapse and PCIII mRNA were determined. All mechanical parameters and the fraction area of alveolar collapse were higher in ALI compared to CTRL. Only RAMP-PEEP maneuver significantly improved lung mechanics and decreased PCIII mRNA expression (53%) compared with ALI, while both RMs followed by PEEP decreased alveolar collapse. In conclusion, in the present experimental ALI model, RAMP followed by 5cm H2O PEEP yields a better outcome. PMID:19712760

  8. Therapeutic modulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, Sara C; Bastarache, Julie A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2011-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI) are characterized by excessive intraalveolar fibrin deposition, driven, at least in part by inflammation. The imbalance between activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis in patients with ALI/ARDS favors fibrin formation and appears to occur both systemically and in the lung and airspace. Tissue factor (TF), a key mediator of the activation of coagulation in the lung, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. As such, there have been numerous investigations modulating TF activity in a variety of experimental systems in order to develop new therapeutic strategies for ALI/ARDS. This review will summarize current understanding of the role of TF and other proteins of the coagulation cascade as well the fibrinolysis pathway in the development of ALI/ARDS with an emphasis on the pathways that are potential therapeutic targets. These include the TF inhibitor pathway, the protein C pathway, antithrombin, heparin, and modulation of fibrinolysis through plasminogen activator- 1 (PAI-1) or plasminogen activators (PA). Although experimental studies show promising results, clinical trials to date have proven unsuccessful in improving patient outcomes. Modulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis has complex effects on both hemostasis and inflammatory pathways and further studies are needed to develop new treatment strategies for patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:21401517

  9. Eupatorium lindleyanum DC. flavonoids fraction attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chunjun; Yao, Shi; Chen, Jinglei; Wei, Xiaochen; Xia, Long; Chen, Daofeng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Eupatorium lindleyanum DC., "Ye-Ma-Zhui" called by local residents in China, showed anti-inflammatory activity and is used to treat tracheitis. We had isolated and identified the flavonoids, diterpenoids and sesquiterpenes compounds from the herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of the flavonoids fraction of E. lindleyanum (EUP-FLA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible underlying mechanisms of action. EUP-FLA could significantly decrease lung wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio, nitric oxide (NO) and protein concentration in BALF, lower myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and down-regulate the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Additionally, EUP-FLA attenuated lung histopathological changes and significantly reduced complement deposition with decreasing the levels of Complement 3 (C3) and Complement 3c (C3c) in serum. These results demonstrated that EUP-FLA may attenuate LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of pro-inflammatory mediators, decreasing the level of complement and affecting the NO, SOD and MPO activity. PMID:27398612

  10. The effect of low level laser therapy on ventilator-induced lung injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabari, Margit V.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Hariri, Lida P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Musch, Guido; Stroh, Helene; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is necessary to support gas exchange in critically ill patients, it can contribute to the development of lung injury and multiple organ dysfunction. It is known that high tidal volume (Vt) MV can cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in healthy lungs and increase the mortality of patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated whether LLLT could alleviate inflammation from injurious MV in mice. Adult mice were assigned to 2 groups: VILI+LLLT group (3 h of injurious MV: Vt=25-30 ml/kg, respiratory rate (RR)=50/min, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)=0 cmH20, followed by 3 h of protective MV: Vt=9 ml/kg, RR=140/min, PEEP=2 cmH20) and VILI+no LLLT group. LLLT was applied during the first 30 min of the MV (810 nm LED system, 5 J/cm2, 1 cm above the chest). Respiratory impedance was measured in vivo with forced oscillation technique and lung mechanics were calculated by fitting the constant phase model. At the end of the MV, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and inflammatory cells counted. Lungs were removed en-bloc and fixed for histological evaluation. We hypothesize that LLLT can reduce lung injury and inflammation from VILI. This therapy could be translated into clinical practice, where it can potentially improve outcomes in patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the operating room or in the intensive care units.

  11. A new therapeutic strategy for lung tissue injury induced by influenza with CR2 targeting complement inhibitior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomlinson Stephen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza is a respiratory disease that seriously threatens human health. In fact, influenza virus itself does not make critical contribution to mortality induced by influenza, but "cytokine storm" produced by the excessive immune response triggered by the virus can result in inflammatory reaction of lung tissues and fatal lung tissue injury, and thus increase influenza mortality. Therefore, besides antiviral drugs, immunosuppression drugs should also be included in infection treatment. Presentation of the hypothesis Complement is the center of inflammatory reaction. If complement system is over activated, the body will have strong inflammatory reaction or tissue injury, resulting in pathological process. Many studies have proved that, inflammatory injury of lung tissues caused by influenza virus is closely related to complement activation. Therefore, inhibiting complement activation can significantly reduce inflammatory injury in lung tissues. As complement is both a physiological defense and pathological damage medium, systematic inhibition may result in side effects including infection. Therefore, we design targeting complement inhibitors for complement activation sites, i.e. with CR2 as targeting vector, complement inhibitors like CD59 and Crry are targeted to inflammatory sites to specially inhibit the complement activation in local injury, thus local inflammatory reaction is inhibited. Testing the hypothesis CR2-CD59 and CR2-Crry targeting complement inhibitors are fusion-expressed, and their biological activity is examined via in vivo and in vitro tests. CR2 targeting complement inhibitors are used to treat mouse influenza viral pneumonia model, with PBS treatment group as the control. The survival and lung tissue injury of the mice is observed and the effect of CR2 targeting complement inhibitors on pneumonia induced by influenza virus is evaluated. Implications of the hypothesis CR2 targeting complement inhibitors

  12. Ventilator „Chirana Aura V“ In Two Models Of Neonatal Acute Lung Injury - A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomclkova L.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In severe respiratory insufficiency, neonatal and pediatric patients should be ventilated artificially by a ventilator. Aim of this experimental study was to evaluate whether the newly developed ventilator Chirana Aura V may effectively ventilate the lungs of animals with two different models of acute lung injury: acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS induced by repetitive saline lavage and meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS induced by intratracheal instillation of neonatal meconium. The experiments were performed on 10 adult rabbits (New Zealand white. In ARDS group (n=5, the lungs were repetitively lavaged with saline (30 ml/kg until partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 in arterial blood was under 26.7 kPa at inspiratory fraction of oxygen FiO2=1.0. In MAS group (n=5, animals were instilled 4 ml/kg of suspension of human meconium (25 mg/ml. When the model of acute lung injury was developed, animals were ventilated for additional 2 hours with pressure control ventilation (PCV regime by ventilator Chirana Aura V. Ventilatory parameters, blood gases, acid-base balance, end-tidal CO2, O2 saturation of hemoglobin, oxygenation indexes, ventilation efficiency index, dynamic lung compliance, and right-to-left pulmonary shunts were measured and calculated in regular time intervals. In both experimental groups, used ventilatory settings provided acceptable gas exchange within the period of observation. Thus, the results indicate that ventilator Chirana Aura V might be suitable for ventilation of animal models of acute lung injury. However, further pre-clinical investigation is needed before its use may be recommended in neonatal and/or pediatric patients with acute lung injury.

  13. Application of the analytical methods REM/EDX, AES and SNMS to a chlorine induced aluminium corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Scheithauer, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy - SEM - with energy dispersive X-ray detection - EDX -, Auger electron spectroscopy - AES - and sputtered neutral mass spectrometry - SNMS - have been used to characterize a chlorine induced corrosion of an aluminium metallisation. SEM/EDX detects the characteristic X-rays that are emitted from the first few micrometers beneath the specimens surface after inner shell ionisation by the primary electrons. AES detects the alternatively ejected Auger electrons that ar...

  14. Traumatic lung injury attributed to tornadic activity-induced barometric pressure changes in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Brandy N; Dugat, Danielle R; Snider, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old castrated male Italian Greyhound (dog 1) and an approximately 1-year-old female Labrador Retriever (dog 2) were evaluated because of respiratory distress 8 and 10 days, respectively, after a tornado. CLINICAL FINDINGS No obvious external injuries were identified auscultation revealed decreased bronchovesicular sounds in the affected hemithorax of both dogs. Clinicopathologic changes were mild, with evidence of inflammation in both dogs. Thoracic radiography of both dogs revealed pneumothorax and pleural effusion with effacement of the diaphragm; findings on CT included severe pulmonary atelectasis of affected lung lobes with normal bronchial tree configurtion and no evidence of diaphragmatic hernia. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Exploratory thoracotomy of both dogs confirmed CT findings Pulmonary parenchymal damage consistent with a large rupture was found in both patients. A large hematoma was adhered to the ruptured lung lobe of dog 1. Grossly affected lung tissue was removed; histologic examination revealed atelectasis, pulmonary fib osis, thrombosis, and minimal (dog 1) to marked (dog 2) inflammation Microbial culture of lung tissue yielded no growth for dog 1 and Streptococcus spp and Escherichia coli susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for dog 2. Dog 1 had a recurrence of pneumothorax treated by drainage with a thoracostomy tube 1 month after surgery. Eighteen months after surgery, both dogs were reportedly doing well. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Development of clinical signs after a tornado, together with clinical, diagnostic imaging, surgical, and histologic findings led to a presumptive diagnosis of pulmonary barotrauma for both dogs. Long-term outcome for these dogs, treated at a referral hospital, was good. PMID:27172344

  15. Matrine Attenuates COX-2 and ICAM-1 Expressions in Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Prevents Acute Lung Injury in LPS-Induced Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chian-Jiun Liou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrine is isolated from Sophora flavescens and shows anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages. Here we evaluated matrine’s suppressive effects on cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 expressions in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated human lung epithelial A549 cells. Additionally, BALB/c mice were given various matrine doses by intraperitoneal injection, and then lung injury was induced via intratracheal instillation of LPS. In LPS-stimulated A549 cells, matrine inhibited the productions of interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and IL-6 and decreased COX-2 expression. Matrine treatment also decreased ICAM-1 protein expression and suppressed the adhesion of neutrophil-like cells to inflammatory A549 cells. In vitro results demonstrated that matrine significantly inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and decreased nuclear transcription factor kappa-B subunit p65 protein translocation into the nucleus. In vivo data indicated that matrine significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration and suppressed productions of tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6 in mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum. Analysis of lung tissue showed that matrine decreased the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, COX-2, and ICAM-1. Our findings suggest that matrine improved lung injury in mice and decreased the inflammatory response in human lung epithelial cells.

  16. Matrine Attenuates COX-2 and ICAM-1 Expressions in Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Prevents Acute Lung Injury in LPS-Induced Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, You-Rong; Chen, Ya-Ling; Chang, Yi-Hsien; Li, Zih-Ying; Huang, Wen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Matrine is isolated from Sophora flavescens and shows anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages. Here we evaluated matrine's suppressive effects on cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressions in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated human lung epithelial A549 cells. Additionally, BALB/c mice were given various matrine doses by intraperitoneal injection, and then lung injury was induced via intratracheal instillation of LPS. In LPS-stimulated A549 cells, matrine inhibited the productions of interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and IL-6 and decreased COX-2 expression. Matrine treatment also decreased ICAM-1 protein expression and suppressed the adhesion of neutrophil-like cells to inflammatory A549 cells. In vitro results demonstrated that matrine significantly inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and decreased nuclear transcription factor kappa-B subunit p65 protein translocation into the nucleus. In vivo data indicated that matrine significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration and suppressed productions of tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6 in mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum. Analysis of lung tissue showed that matrine decreased the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, COX-2, and ICAM-1. Our findings suggest that matrine improved lung injury in mice and decreased the inflammatory response in human lung epithelial cells.

  17. Ventilator-induced lung injury upregulates and activates gelatinases and EMMPRIN: attenuation by the synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, Prinomastat (AG3340).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, H D; Rollo, E E; Drews, M; Conner, C; Appelt, K; Shalinsky, D R; Zucker, S

    2001-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation has become an indispensable therapeutic modality for patients with respiratory failure. However, a serious potential complication of MV is the newly recognized ventilator-induced acute lung injury. There is strong evidence suggesting that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in the development of acute lung injury. Another factor to be considered is extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN). EMMPRIN is responsible for inducing fibroblasts to produce/secrete MMPs. In this report we sought to determine: (1) the role played by MMPs and EMMPRIN in the development of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in an in vivo rat model of high volume ventilation; and (2) whether the synthetic MMP inhibitor Prinomastat (AG3340) could prevent this type of lung injury. We have demonstrated that high volume ventilation caused acute lung injury. This was accompanied by an upregulation of gelatinase A, gelatinase B, MT1-MMP, and EMMPRIN mRNA demonstrated by in situ hybridization. Pretreatment with the MMP inhibitor Prinomastat attenuated the lung injury caused by high volume ventilation. Our results suggest that MMPs play an important role in the development of VILI in rat lungs and that the MMP-inhibitor Prinomastat is effective in attenuating this type of lung injury. PMID:11726397

  18. Effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ on sepsis induced acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Cairui; Zhou Guopeng; Zeng Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are the first steps in the development of multiple organ failure induced by sepsis.A systemic excessive inflammatory reaction is currently the accepted mechanism of the pathogenesis of sepsis.Several studies have suggested a protective role of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-β/δ (PPAR-β/δ) in related inflammatory diseases.But the role of PPARβ/δ in ALI remains uncertain.The aim of this study was to investigate the role and possible mechanism of PPARβ/δ in ALI induced by sepsis.Methods Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used as a sepsis model.Rats were randomly divided into four groups,the control group (CON,n=6),sham-operation group (SHAM,n=12),cecal ligation and puncture group (CLP,n=30),GW501516 group (CLP+GW,n=25),which underwent CLP and were subcutaneously injected with the PPAR-β/δ agonist GW501516 (0.05 mg/100 g body weight).Survival was monitored to 24 hours after operation.Blood pressure,serum creatinine,blood urea nitrogen,aspartate aminotrasferase and alanine aminotrasferase were measured after CLP.Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β in serum were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits.Lung tissue samples were stained with H&E and scored according to the degree of inflammation.Bacterial colonies were counted in the peritoneal fluid.Alveolar macrophages were cultured and incubated with GW501516 (0.15 μmol/L) and PPARβ/δ adenovirus and then treated with Lipopolysaccharide (2 μg/ml) for 2 hours.The TNF-α,IL-1β and IL-6 RNA in lung and alveolar macrophages were determined by real-time PCR.Phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in lung and alveolar macrophages was detected by Western blotting.Results GW501516 significantly increased the survival of septic rats,decreased histological damage of the lungs,reduced inflammatory cytokines in serum and

  19. Involvement of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway in burns-induced lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xu-lin; XIA Zhao-fan; WEI Duo; WANG Yong-jie; WANG Chang-rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Acute lung injury (ALI) is a leading complication in extensively burned patients, especially those with inhalation injury.1 It can cause hypoxia resulting in injury of remote organs and dysfunction. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) is a stress activated protein kinase in the MAPK family.2 Most of the previous studies have demonstrated that p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway mediated ALI in rats with acute severe pancreatitis, sepsis etc.3-5 However, there is little information regarding the role of p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway in ALI after severe burn trauma.

  20. A comparison of biologically variable ventilation to recruitment manoeuvres in a porcine model of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rector Edward S

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologically variable ventilation (return of physiological variability in rate and tidal volume using a computer-controller was compared to control mode ventilation with and without a recruitment manoeuvre – 40 cm H2O for 40 sec performed hourly; in a porcine oleic acid acute lung injury model. Methods We compared gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, and measured bronchoalveolar fluid for inflammatory cytokines, cell counts and surfactant function. Lung injury was scored by light microscopy. Pigs received mechanical ventilation (FIO2 = 0.3; PEEP 5 cm H2O in control mode until PaO2 decreased to 60 mm Hg with oleic acid infusion (PaO2/FIO2 2O was added after injury. Animals were randomized to one of the 3 modes of ventilation and followed for 5 hr after injury. Results PaO2 and respiratory system compliance was significantly greater with biologically variable ventilation compared to the other 2 groups. Mean and mean peak airway pressures were also lower. There were no differences in cell counts in bronchoalveolar fluid by flow cytometry, or interleukin-8 and -10 levels between groups. Lung injury scoring revealed no difference between groups in the regions examined. No differences in surfactant function were seen between groups by capillary surfactometry. Conclusions In this porcine model of acute lung injury, various indices to measure injury or inflammation did not differ between the 3 approaches to ventilation. However, when using a low tidal volume strategy with moderate levels of PEEP, sustained improvements in arterial oxygen tension and respiratory system compliance were only seen with BVV when compared to CMV or CMV with a recruitment manoeuvre.

  1. Protective effect of raloxifene on lipopolysaccharide and acid- induced acute lung injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-ju ZHOU; Hong ZHANG; Sheng-de ZHI; Guo-ping JIANG; Jing WANG; Mao ZHANGI; Jian-xin GAN; Shao-wen XU; Guan-yu JIANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the protective effect of oral raloxifene on acute lung injury.Methods: Thirty adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats each weighing 180-210 g were used and divided into 3 groups: the raloxifene-lipopolysacchadde (LPS)-HC1 group(n=10), the LPS-raloxifene-HCl group (n=10), and the placebo group (n=10). All the rats were injected intraperitoneally (ip) with 5 mg/kg LPS, and raloxifene (30mg/kg) was orally administered 1 h before and 14 h after LPS injection into the raloxifene-LPS-HCl and the LPS-raloxifene-HCl groups, respectively; the placebo group received nothing. Sixteen hours after LPS injection, all the animals were anesthetized and the femoral artery was cannulated. All the rats received a direct intratracheal (IT) injection ofHCl (pH 1.2; 0.5 mL/kg). The mean arterial pressure(MAP) and blood gas concentrations were measured. Fifteen rats (5 in each group, respectively) underwent a micro positron emission to mography (microPET)scan of the thorax 4 h after HC1 instillation. The wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio determination and histopathological examination were also performed. Results:The rats in the LPS-raloxifene-HC1 group had a lower [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake compared with the rats in the placebo group (4.67±1.33 vs 9.01±1.58,respectively, P<0.01). The rats in the LPS-raloxifene-HC1 group also had a lower histological lung injury score (8.20±1.23 vs 12.6±0.97, respectively, P<0.01) and W/D weight ratio (5.335±0.198 vs 5.886±0.257, respectively, P<0.01) compared to the placebo group. The rats in this group also showed better pulmonary gas exchange and more stable mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared to the placebo group. Conclusion: Raloxifene provides a significant protective effect on acute lung injury in rats induced first by LPS ip injection and then by HC1 IT instillation.

  2. IL-17 response mediates acute lung injury induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1)Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenggang Li; Chen Wang; Zhongwei Chen; Li Xing; Chong Tang; Xiangwu Ju; Feng Guo; Jiejie Deng; Yan Zhao; Peng Yang; Jun Tang; Penghui Yang; Huanling Wang; Zhongpeng Zhao; Zhinan Yin; Bin Cao; Xiliang Wang; Chengyu Jiang; Yang Sun; Taisheng Li; Chen Wang; Zhong Wang; Zhen Zou; Yiwu Yan; Wei Wang

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 flu pandemic involved the emergence of a new strain of a swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus(S-OIV H1N1)that infected almost every country in the world.Most infections resulted in respiratory illness and some severe cases resulted in acute lung injury.In this report,we are the first to describe a mouse model of S-OIV virus infection with acute lung injury and immune responses that reflect human clinical disease.The clinical efficacy of the antiviral oseltamivir(Tamiflu)administered in the early stages of S-OIV H1N1 infection was confirmed in the mouse model.Moreover,elevated levels of IL-17,Th-17 mediators and IL-17-responsive cytokines were found in serum samples of S-OIV-infected patients in Beijing.IL-17 deficiency or treatment with monoclonal antibodies against IL-17-ameliorated acute lung injury induced by the S-OIV H1N1 virus in mice.These results suggest that IL-17 plays an important role in S-OIV-induced acute lung injury and that monoclonal antibodies against IL-17 could be useful as a potential therapeutic remedy for future S-OIV H1N1 pandemics.

  3. DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title: DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT THE SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?M. C. Schladweiler, BS 1, P. S. Gilmour, PhD 2, D. L. Andrews, BS 1, D. L. Costa, ScD 1, A. D. Ledbetter, BS 1, K. E. Pinkerton, PhD 3 and U. P. Kodavanti, ...

  4. TCM Therapeutic Strategy on Acute Lung Injury Caused by Infectious Atypical Pneumonia and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐光华

    2003-01-01

    @@ Infectious atypical pneumonia (IAP) is also called severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) by WHO. In its development, around 20% of SARS can develop into the stage of acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), active and effective treatment of it constitutes the important basis for lowering mortality and reducing secondary pulmonary function impairment and pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  6. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM. PMID:26841848

  7. Serine/threonine kinase-protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase regulate ventilator-induced pulmonary fibrosis after bleomycin-induced acute lung injury: a prospective, controlled animal experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li-Fu; Liao, Shuen-Kuei; Huang, Chung-Chi; Hung, Ming-Jui; Quinn, Deborah A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Lung fibrosis, reduced lung compliance, and severe hypoxemia found in patients with acute lung injury often result in a need for the support of mechanical ventilation. High-tidal-volume mechanical ventilation can increase lung damage and fibrogeneic activity but the mechanisms regulating the interaction between high tidal volume and lung fibrosis are unclear. We hypothesized that high-tidal-volume ventilation increased pulmonary fibrosis in acute lung injury via the serine/threon...

  8. Visualization of neonatal lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation using x-ray dark-field radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Pritzke, Tina; Koschlig, Markus; Kamgari, Nona; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; Auweter, Sigrid; Hellbach, Katharina; Reiser, Maximilian; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz; Hilgendorff, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) and supplementation of oxygen-enriched gas, often needed in postnatal resuscitation procedures, are known to be main risk factors for impaired pulmonary development in the preterm and term neonates. Unfortunately, current imaging modalities lack in sensitivity for the detection of early stage lung injury. The present study reports a new imaging approach for diagnosis and staging of early lung injury induced by MV and hyperoxia in neonatal mice. The imaging method is based on the Talbot-Lau x-ray grating interferometry that makes it possible to quantify the x-ray small-angle scattering on the air-tissue interfaces. This so-called dark-field signal revealed increasing loss of x-ray small-angle scattering when comparing images of neonatal mice undergoing hyperoxia and MV-O2 with animals kept at room air. The changes in the dark field correlated well with histologic findings and provided superior differentiation than conventional x-ray imaging and lung function testing. The results suggest that x-ray dark-field radiography is a sensitive tool for assessing structural changes in the developing lung. In the future, with further technical developments x-ray dark-field imaging could be an important tool for earlier diagnosis and sensitive monitoring of lung injury in neonates requiring postnatal oxygen or ventilator therapy.

  9. Effect of short-term stainless steel welding fume inhalation exposure on lung inflammation, injury, and defense responses in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many welders have experienced bronchitis, metal fume fever, lung function changes, and an increase in the incidence of lung infection. Questions remain regarding the possible mechanisms associated with the potential pulmonary effects of welding fume exposure. The objective was to assess the early effects of stainless steel (SS) welding fume inhalation on lung injury, inflammation, and defense responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to gas metal arc-SS welding fume at a concentration of 15 or 40 mg/m3 x 3 h/day for 1, 3, or 10 days. The control group was exposed to filtered air. To assess lung defense responses, some animals were intratracheally inoculated with 5 x 104Listeria monocytogenes 1 day after the last exposure. Welding particles were collected during exposure, and elemental composition and particle size were determined. At 1, 4, 6, 11, 14, and 30 days after the final exposure, parameters of lung injury (lactate dehydrogenase and albumin) and inflammation (PMN influx) were measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, particle-induced effects on pulmonary clearance of bacteria and macrophage function were assessed. SS particles were composed of Fe, Cr, Mn, and Ni. Particle size distribution analysis indicated the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the generated fume to be 0.255 μm. Parameters of lung injury were significantly elevated at all time points post-exposure compared to controls except for 30 days. Interestingly, no significant difference in lung PMNs was observed between the SS and control groups at 1, 4, and 6 days post-exposure. After 6 days post-exposure, a dramatic increase in lung PMNs was observed in the SS group compared to air controls. Lung bacteria clearance and macrophage function were reduced and immune and inflammatory cytokines were altered in the SS group. In summary, short-term exposure of rats to SS welding fume caused significant lung damage and suppressed lung defense responses to bacterial infection, but

  10. Effects and mechanism analysis of combined infusion by levosimendan and vasopressin on acute lung injury in rats septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuebing; Ma, Shaolin; Liu, Yang; Xu, Wei; Li, Zhanxia

    2014-12-01

    This research is aimed to discover the influence and underling mechanism of combined infusion of arginine vasopressin with levosimendan on acute lung injury in rat septic shock with norepinephrine supplemented. The traditional fecal peritonitis-induced septic shock model was undergone in rats for study. It is observed that the combined infusion supplemented with norepinephrine brought about a lower mean pulmonary artery pressure; lower high-mobility group box 1 levels, pulmonary levels of interleukin-6, and arterial total nitrate/nitrite; lower apoptotic cells scores and total histological scores; but higher pulmonary gas exchange when compared with the separate infusion group and norepinephrine group. This therapy shows potential clinical beneficial assistance in sepsis-induced acute lung injury. The results suggest the mechanism of such effect is through abating pulmonary artery pressure, and more importantly suppressing inflammatory responses in lung when compared with norepinephrine infusion group and the separate infusion of levosimendan or vasopressin alone. PMID:25002345

  11. Isorhamnetin Attenuates Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Lung Cell Injury by Inhibiting Alpha-Hemolysin Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanxiang; Li, Hongen; Wang, Laiying; Song, Zexin; Shi, Lei; Li, Wenhua; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, like other gram-positive pathogens, has evolved a large repertoire of virulence factors as a powerful weapon to subvert the host immune system, among which alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a secreted pore-forming cytotoxin, plays a preeminent role. We observed a concentration-dependent reduction in Hla production by S. aureus in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of isorhamnetin, a flavonoid from the fruits of Hippophae rhamnoides L., which has little antibacterial activity. We further evaluate the effect of isorhamnetin on the transcription of the Hla-encoding gene hla and RNAIII, an effector molecule in the agr system. Isorhamnetin significantly down-regulated RNAIII expression and subsequently inhibited hla transcription. In a co-culture of S. aureus and lung cells, topical isorhamnetin treatment protected against S. aureus-induced cell injury. Isorhamnetin may represent a leading compound for the development of anti-virulence drugs against S. aureus infections. PMID:26643966

  12. Systematic review and meta-analysis of nasal potential difference in hypoxia-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenlei; Zhu, Lili; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Runzhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Nasal potential difference (NPD), a well-established in vivo clinical test for cystic fibrosis, reflects transepithelial cation and anion transport in the respiratory epithelium. To analyze whether NPD can be applied to diagnose hypoxic lung injury, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Ovid MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, and analyzed data retrieved from eleven unbiased studies for high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) using the software RevMan and R. There was a significant reduction in overall basal (WMD -5.27 mV, 95% CI: -6.03 to -4.52, P hypoxia is characterized by dysfunctional NPD. PMID:27488696

  13. Angiotensin II is related to the acute aortic dissection complicated with lung injury through mediating the release of MMP9 from macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiyong; Ruan, Yongle; Chang, Jinxing; Li, Bowen; Ren, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute aortic dissection (AAD) patients usually show concurrent lung injury mainly featured by hyoxemia. To date, no effective treatment method has been established for the AAD complicated with acute lung injury (ALI). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially MMP2 and MMP9, have been considered to be closely related to the onset of aortic disease including AAD. To investigate the roles of MMP in the pathogenesis of AAD complicated with ALI, we determined the expression of MMP2 and MMP9 in serum and lung tissues of AAD patients. In addition, a new rat model of AAD complicated with ALI was established to investigate the pathogenesis of such complicated conditions. Methods and results: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and MMP9 were up-regulated in the AAD complicated with ALI patients compared to those of the AAD without ALI patients, normal individuals and the patients with non-ruptured aneurysm. Besides, massive macrophages with MMP9 expression was noticed in the lung tissues in the AAD complicated with ALI patients. On this basis, AAD complicated with ALI rat model was established based on BAPN feeding and infusion of Ang II. Obvious lung injury was observed in the BAPN+Ang II group compared to that of the BAPN group, together with macrophage accumulation in lung tissues, as well as over-expression of MMP9 in lung tissues. After interference of MMP antagonist, a large number of macrophages were still accumulated in the lung tissues, but the lung injury was obviously attenuated. After the interference of AT1 receptor, the number of macrophages in the lung tissues was obviously decreased and the lung injury was obviously relieved. Conclusions: Ang II is closely related to the lung injury at the early stage of AAD through mediating the release of MMP9 in the macrophages in the lung tissues. PMID:27186269

  14. Intra-Peritoneal Administration of Mitochondrial DNA Provokes Acute Lung Injury and Systemic Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lemeng; Deng, Songyun; Zhao, Shuangping; Ai, Yuhang; Zhang, Lina; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Tan, Hongyi; Wu, Dongdong

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of sepsis is complex. Mitochondrial dysfunction, which is responsible for energy metabolism, intrinsic apoptotic pathway, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammatory responses, is closely related with severe sepsis induced death. Mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) contain un-methylated cytosine phosphate guanine (CpG) motifs, which exhibit immune stimulatory capacities. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanism of mtDNA release on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic inflammation. Following LPS injection, plasma mtDNA copies peak at 8 h. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, mtDNA in toll like receptor 4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were significantly decreased. MtDNA intra-peritoneal administration causes apparent ALI as demonstrated by increased lung injury score, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) total protein and wet/dry (W/D) ratio; mtDNA injection also directly provokes systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by increased IL-1β, IL-6, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) level; while nuclear DNA (nDNA) could not induce apparent ALI and systemic inflammation. However, compared with WT mice, TLR4 KO could not protect from mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation. Specific TLR9 inhibitor, ODN 2088 pretreatment can significantly attenuate mtDNA induced ALI and systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by improved lung injury score, decreased lung wet/dry ratio, BALF total protein concentration, and decreased systemic level of IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1. MtDNA administration activates the expression of p-P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in lung tissue and specific TLR9 inhibitor pretreatment can attenuate this activation. Thus, LPS-induced mtDNA release occurs in a TLR4-dependent manner, and mtDNA causes acute lung injury and systemic inflammation in a TLR9-dependent and TLR4-independent manner. PMID:27589725

  15. Inhibitors of inflammation and endogenous surfactant pool size as modulators of lung injury with initiation of ventilation in preterm sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polglase Graeme R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in tracheal aspirates correlate with the development of BPD in preterm infants. Ventilation of preterm lambs increases pro-inflammatory cytokines and causes lung inflammation. Objective We tested the hypothesis that selective inhibitors of pro-inflammatory signaling would decrease lung inflammation induced by ventilation in preterm newborn lambs. We also examined if the variability in injury response was explained by variations in the endogenous surfactant pool size. Methods Date-mated preterm lambs (n = 28 were operatively delivered and mechanically ventilated to cause lung injury (tidal volume escalation to 15 mL/kg by 15 min at age. The lambs then were ventilated with 8 mL/kg tidal volume for 1 h 45 min. Groups of animals randomly received specific inhibitors for IL-8, IL-1, or NF-κB. Unventilated lambs (n = 7 were the controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and lung samples were used to quantify inflammation. Saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC was measured in BALF fluid and the data were stratified based on a level of 5 μmol/kg (~8 mg/kg surfactant. Results The inhibitors did not decrease the cytokine levels or inflammatory response. The inflammation increased as Sat PC pool size in BALF decreased. Ventilated lambs with a Sat PC level > 5 μmol/kg had significantly decreased markers of injury and lung inflammation compared with those lambs with Conclusion Lung injury caused by high tidal volumes at birth were decreased when endogenous surfactant pool sizes were larger. Attempts to decrease inflammation by blocking IL-8, IL-1 or NF-κB were unsuccessful.

  16. Pulmonary microRNA expression profiling in an immature piglet model of cardiopulmonary bypass-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlei; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jinping; Wang, Xu; Li, Shoujun

    2015-04-01

    After surgery performed under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), severe lung injury often occurs in infants. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potentially involved in diverse pathophysiological processes via regulation of gene expression. The objective of this study was to investigate differentially expressed miRNAs and their potential target genes in immature piglet lungs in response to CPB. Fourteen piglets aged 18.6 ± 0.5 days were equally divided into two groups that underwent sham sternotomy or CPB. The duration of aortic cross-clamping was 2 h, followed by 2 h reperfusion. Lung injury was evaluated by lung function indices, levels of cytokines, and histological changes. We applied miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis to determine miRNA expression. Meanwhile, qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for validation of predicted mRNA targets. The deterioration of lung function and histopathological changes revealed the piglets' lungs were greatly impaired due to CPB. The levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and interleukin 10 increased in the lung tissue after CPB. Using miRNA microarray, statistically significant differences were found in the levels of 16 miRNAs in the CPB group. Up-regulation of miR-21 was verified by PCR. We also observed down-regulation in the levels of miR-127, miR-145, and miR-204, which were correlated with increases in the expression of the products of their potential target genes PIK3CG, PTGS2, ACE, and IL6R in the CPB group, suggesting a potential role for miRNA in the regulation of inflammatory response. Our results show that CPB induces severe lung injury and dynamic changes in miRNA expression in piglet lungs. Moreover, the changes in miRNA levels and target gene expression may provide a basis for understanding the pathogenesis of CPB-induced injury to immature lungs. PMID:25347932

  17. Pulmonary microRNA expression profiling in an immature piglet model of cardiopulmonary bypass-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlei; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jinping; Wang, Xu; Li, Shoujun

    2015-04-01

    After surgery performed under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), severe lung injury often occurs in infants. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potentially involved in diverse pathophysiological processes via regulation of gene expression. The objective of this study was to investigate differentially expressed miRNAs and their potential target genes in immature piglet lungs in response to CPB. Fourteen piglets aged 18.6 ± 0.5 days were equally divided into two groups that underwent sham sternotomy or CPB. The duration of aortic cross-clamping was 2 h, followed by 2 h reperfusion. Lung injury was evaluated by lung function indices, levels of cytokines, and histological changes. We applied miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis to determine miRNA expression. Meanwhile, qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for validation of predicted mRNA targets. The deterioration of lung function and histopathological changes revealed the piglets' lungs were greatly impaired due to CPB. The levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and interleukin 10 increased in the lung tissue after CPB. Using miRNA microarray, statistically significant differences were found in the levels of 16 miRNAs in the CPB group. Up-regulation of miR-21 was verified by PCR. We also observed down-regulation in the levels of miR-127, miR-145, and miR-204, which were correlated with increases in the expression of the products of their potential target genes PIK3CG, PTGS2, ACE, and IL6R in the CPB group, suggesting a potential role for miRNA in the regulation of inflammatory response. Our results show that CPB induces severe lung injury and dynamic changes in miRNA expression in piglet lungs. Moreover, the changes in miRNA levels and target gene expression may provide a basis for understanding the pathogenesis of CPB-induced injury to immature lungs.

  18. Prone position prevents regional alveolar hyperinflation and mechanical stress and strain in mild experimental acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria Cristina E; Garcia, Cristiane S N B; Xisto, Débora G; Nagato, Lilian K S; Lassance, Roberta M; Prota, Luiz Felipe M; Ornellas, Felipe M; Capelozzi, Vera L; Morales, Marcelo M; Zin, Walter A; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2009-06-30

    Prone position may delay the development of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), but the mechanisms require better elucidation. In experimental mild acute lung injury (ALI), arterial oxygen partial pressure (Pa O2), lung mechanics and histology, inflammatory markers [interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1 beta], and type III procollagen (PCIII) mRNA expressions were analysed in supine and prone position. Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups. In controls, saline was intraperitoneally injected while ALI was induced by paraquat. After 24-h, the animals were mechanically ventilated for 1-h in supine or prone positions. In ALI, prone position led to a better blood flow/tissue ratio both in ventral and dorsal regions and was associated with a more homogeneous distribution of alveolar aeration/tissue ratio reducing lung static elastance and viscoelastic pressure, and increasing end-expiratory lung volume and Pa O2. PCIII expression was higher in the ventral than dorsal region in supine position, with no regional changes in inflammatory markers. In conclusion, prone position may protect the lungs against VILI, thus reducing pulmonary stress and strain.

  19. Propofol pretreatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats by activating the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L.L. [Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Hu, G.C. [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhu, S.S. [Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, J.F. [Department of Anesthesiology, Tengzhou Central People' s Hospital, Liaocheng, Shandong Province (China); Liu, G.J. [Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2014-10-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of propofol pretreatment on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and the role of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) pathway in this procedure. Survival was determined 48 h after LPS injection. At 1 h after LPS challenge, the lung wet- to dry-weight ratio was examined, and concentrations of protein, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined using the bicinchoninic acid method or ELISA. Lung injury was assayed via lung histological examination. PI3K and p-Akt expression levels in the lung tissue were determined by Western blotting. Propofol pretreatment prolonged survival, decreased the concentrations of protein, TNF-α, and IL-6 in BALF, attenuated ALI, and increased PI3K and p-Akt expression in the lung tissue of LPS-challenged rats, whereas treatment with wortmannin, a PI3K/Akt pathway specific inhibitor, blunted this effect. Our study indicates that propofol pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced ALI, partly by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  20. Ibuprofen Protects Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury by Downregulating Rho-Kinase Activity in Rats

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    Liang-Ti Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ventilator-induced lung injury-(VILI- induced endothelial permeability is regulated through the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Ibuprofen inhibits Rho activation in animal models of spinal-cord injury and Alzheimer’s disease. The study aims to investigate ibuprofen effects on high tidal volume associated VILI. Methods. Twenty-eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive a ventilation strategy with three different interventions for 2 h: (1 a high-volume zero-positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP (HVZP group; (2 an HVZP + ibuprofen 15 mg/kg group; and (3 an HVZP + ibuprofen 30 mg/kg group. A fourth group without ventilation served as the control group. Rho-kinase activity was determined by ratio of phosphorylated ezrin, radixin, and moesin (p-ERM, substrates of Rho-kinase, to total ERM. VILI was characterized by increased pulmonary protein leak, wet-to-dry weight ratio, cytokines level, and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF-H1, RhoA activity, p-ERM/total ERM, and p-myosin light chain (MLC protein expression. Results. Ibuprofen pretreatment significantly reduced the HVZP ventilation-induced increase in pulmonary protein leak, wet-to-dry weight ratio, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid interleukin-6 and RANTES levels, and lung GEF-H1, RhoA activity, p-ERM/total ERM, and p-MLC protein expression. Conclusion. Ibuprofen attenuated high tidal volume induced pulmonary endothelial hyperpermeability. This protective effect was associated with a reduced Rho-kinase activity.

  1. The role of the endothelin system in experimental acute lung injury : With special reference to the formation of extra-vascular lung water

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Patrik

    2006-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a major clinical challenge in the intensive care unit. Sepsis is the most frequent underlying cause of this pulmonary syndrome, which contains inflammation- induced diffuse alveolar damage and early stage high permeability edema. In spite of extensive research few therapies have reached the clinical arena, a fact that calls for additional interventional strategies. The role of the endothelin system in pulmonary disease has been established, and recen...

  2. PAMAM Nanoparticles Promote Acute Lung Injury by Inducing Autophagic Cell Death through the Akt-TSC2-mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenggang Li; Haolin Liu; Yang Sun; Hongliang Wang; Feng Guo; Shuan Rao; Jiejie Deng; Yanli Zhang; Yufa Miao; Chenying Guo; Jie Meng; Xiping Chen; Limin Li; Dangsheng Li; Haiyan Xu; Heng Wang; Bo Li; Chengyu Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an important and emerging industry with a projected annual market of around one trillion US dollars by 2011–2015. Concerns about the toxicity of nanomaterials in humans, however, have recently been raised. Although studies of nanoparticle toxicity have focused on lung disease the molecular link between nanoparticle exposure and lung injury remained unclear. In this report, we show that cationic Starburst polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM), a class of nanomaterials that are being widely developed for clinical applications can induce acute lung injury in vivo. PAMAM triggers autophagic cell death by deregulating the Akt-TSC2-mTOR signaling pathway. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine rescued PAMAM dendrimer-induced cell death and ameliorated acute lung injury caused by PAMAM in mice. Our data provide a molecular explanation for nanoparticle-induced lung injury, and suggest potential remedies to address the growing concerns of nanotechnology safety.

  3. β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase gene therapy upregulates tight junctions to rescue lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X; Barravecchia, M; Kothari, P; Young, J L; Dean, D A

    2016-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are associated with diverse disorders and characterized by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leakage of edema fluid into the lung, and substantial inflammation leading to acute respiratory failure. Gene therapy is a potentially powerful approach to treat ALI/ARDS through repair of alveolar epithelial function. Herein, we show that delivery of a plasmid expressing β1-subunit of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) alone or in combination with epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) α1-subunit using electroporation not only protected from subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated lung injury, but also treated injured lungs. However, transfer of α1-subunit of ENaC (α1-ENaC) alone only provided protection benefit rather than treatment benefit although alveolar fluid clearance had been remarkably enhanced. Gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, but not α1-ENaC, not only enhanced expression of tight junction protein zona occludins-1 (ZO-1) and occludin both in cultured cells and in mouse lungs, but also reduced pre-existing increase of lung permeability in vivo. These results demonstrate that gene transfer of β1-Na(+),K(+)-ATPase upregulates tight junction formation and therefore treats lungs with existing injury, whereas delivery of α1-ENaC only maintains pre-existing tight junction but not for generation. This indicates that the restoration of epithelial/endothelial barrier function may provide better treatment of ALI/ARDS. PMID:26910760

  4. Changes in liquid clearance of alveolar epithelium after oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶军; 杨天德; 陈祥瑞; 黄河

    2004-01-01

    Objective:Impaired active fluid transport of alveolar epithelium may involve in the pathogenesis and resolution of alveolar edema. Thc objective of this study was to explore the changes in alveolar epithelial liquid clearance during lung edema following acute lung injury induced by oleic acid. Methods:Forty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups, I.e. , injured, amiloride, ouabain, amiloride plus ouabain and terbutaline groups. Twenty- four hours after the induction of acute lung injury by intravenous oleic acid (0.25 ml/kg), 5% albumin solution with 1.5 μCi 125Ⅰ-labeled albumin (5 ml/kg) was delivered into both lungs via trachea. Alveolar liquid clearance (ALC), extravascular lung water ( EVLW ) content and arterial blood gases were measured one hour thereafter.Results: At 24 h after the infusion of oleic acid, the rats developed pulmonary edema and severe hypoxemia, with EVLW increased by 47.9% and ALC decreased by 49.2%. Addition of either 2 × 10-3 M amiloride or 5 × 10-4 M ouabain to the instillation further reduced ALC and increased EVLW. ALC increased by approximately 63.7% and EVLW decreased by 46.9% with improved hypoxemia in the Terbutaline (10-4 M) group, compared those in injured rats. A significant negative correlation was found between the increment of EVLW and the reduction of ALC. Onclusions:Active fluid transport of alveolar epithelium might play a role in the pathogenesis of lung edema in acute lung injury.

  5. Enhanced Resolution of Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury as a result of Aspirin Triggered Resolvin D1 Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ruan; Phillips, Oluwakemi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Arias, Stephen; Cho, Young; Lockey, Richard F; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2015-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), which presents as acute respiratory failure, is a major clinical problem that requires aggressive care, and patients who require prolonged oxygen exposure are at risk of developing this disease. Although molecular determinants of ALI have been reported, the molecules involved in disease catabasis associated with oxygen toxicity have not been well studied. It has been reported that lung mucosa is rich in omega-3 fatty acid dicosahexanoic acid (DHA), which has antiinflammatory properties. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) is a potent proresolution metabolite of DHA that can curb the inflammatory effects in various acute injuries, yet the effect of AT-RvD1 on hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) or in the oxygen toxicity setting in general has not been investigated. The effects of AT-RvD1 on HALI were determined for the first time in 8- to 10-week-old C57BL/6 mice that were exposed to hyperoxia (≥95% O2) for 48 hours. Mice were given AT-RvD1 (100 ng) in saline or a saline vehicle for 24 hours in normoxic (≈21% O2) conditions after hyperoxia. Lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected for analysis associated with proinflammatory signaling and lung inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in reduced oxidative stress, increased glutathione production, and significantly decreased tissue inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment also significantly reduced the lung wet/dry ratio, protein in BAL fluid, and decreased apoptotic and NF-κB signaling. These results show that AT-RvD1 curbs oxygen-induced lung edema, permeability, inflammation, and apoptosis and is thus an effective therapy for prolonged hyperoxia exposure in this murine model. PMID:25647402

  6. Unusual progression and subsequent improvement in cystic lung disease in a child with radiation-induced lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Michael S. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Chadha, Ashley D. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Carroll, Clinton M.; Borinstein, Scott C. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Young, Lisa R. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Radiation-induced lung disease is a known complication of therapeutic lung irradiation, but the features have not been well described in children. We report the clinical, radiologic and histologic features of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in a 4-year-old child who had previously received lung irradiation as part of successful treatment for metastatic Wilms tumor. Her radiologic abnormalities and clinical symptoms developed in an indolent manner. Clinical improvement gradually occurred with corticosteroid therapy. However, the observed radiologic progression from interstitial and reticulonodular opacities to diffuse cystic lung disease, with subsequent improvement, is striking and has not been previously described in children. (orig.)

  7. Unusual progression and subsequent improvement in cystic lung disease in a child with radiation-induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced lung disease is a known complication of therapeutic lung irradiation, but the features have not been well described in children. We report the clinical, radiologic and histologic features of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in a 4-year-old child who had previously received lung irradiation as part of successful treatment for metastatic Wilms tumor. Her radiologic abnormalities and clinical symptoms developed in an indolent manner. Clinical improvement gradually occurred with corticosteroid therapy. However, the observed radiologic progression from interstitial and reticulonodular opacities to diffuse cystic lung disease, with subsequent improvement, is striking and has not been previously described in children. (orig.)

  8. Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx Flavonoids Fraction Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

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    Chun-jun Chu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara, belonging to the Labiatae family, is widely used as an anti-inflammatory and antitumor drug for the treatment of different inflammations and cancers. Aim of the Study. To investigate therapeutic effects and possible mechanism of the flavonoids fraction of Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara (RJFs in acute lung injury (ALI mice induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Materials and Methods. Mice were orally administrated with RJFs (6.4, 12.8, and 25.6 mg/kg per day for 7 days, consecutively, before LPS challenge. Lung specimens and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were isolated for histopathological examinations and biochemical analysis. The level of complement 3 (C3 in serum was quantified by a sandwich ELISA kit. Results. RJFs significantly attenuated LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of the level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, and significantly reduced complement deposition with decreasing the level of C3 in serum, which was exhibited together with the lowered myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and nitric oxide (NO and protein concentration in BALF. Conclusions. RJFs significantly attenuate LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of proinflammatory mediators, decreasing the level of complement, and reducing radicals.

  9. Alveolar Overdistension as a Cause of Lung Injury: Differences among Three Animal Species

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    Manuel García-Delgado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses characteristics of lung injuries produced by alveolar overdistension in three animal species. Mechanical ventilation at normal tidal volume (10 mL/Kg and high tidal volume (50 mL/Kg was applied for 30 min in each species. Data were gathered on wet/dry weight ratio, histological score, and area of alveolar collapse. Five out of six rabbits with high tidal volume developed tension pneumothorax, and the rabbit results were therefore not included in the histological analysis. Lungs from the pigs and rats showed minimal histological lesions. Pigs ventilated with high tidal volume had significantly greater oedema, higher neutrophil infiltration, and higher percentage area of alveolar collapse than rats ventilated with high tidal volume. We conclude that rabbits are not an appropriate species for in vivo studies of alveolar overdistension due to their fragility. Although some histological lesions are observed in pigs and rats, the lesions do not appear to be relevant.

  10. Acute lung injury induced by H9N2 virus in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan; Shan Yunfeng; Chi Ying; Wen Tian; Han Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Background H9N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) have repeatedly caused infections in mammals even humans in many countries.The purpose of our study was to evaluate the acute lung injury (ALI) caused by H9N2 viral infection in mice.Methods Six-to eight-week-old female SPF C57BL/6 mice were infected intranasally with 1x104 MID50 of A/HONG KONG/2108/2003 [H9N2 (HK)] virus.Clinical signs,pathological changes,virus titration in tissues of mice,arterial blood gas,and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum were observed at different time points after AIV infection.Results H9N2-AIV-infected mice exhibited severe respiratory syndrome,with a mortality rate of 50%.Lung histopathological changes in infected mice included diffuse pneumonia,alveolar damage,inflammatory cellular infiltration,interstitial and alveolar edema,and hemorrhage.In addition,H9N2 viral infection resulted in severe progressive hypoxemia,lymphopenia,and a significant increase in interleukin 1,interleukin 6,tumor necrosis factor,and interferon in BALF and serum.Conclusions The results suggest that H9N2 viral infection induces a typical ALl in mice that resembles the common features of ALl.Our data may facilitate the future studies of potential avian H9N2 disease in humans.

  11. Inhibition of endogenous glucocorticoid synthesis aggravates lung injury triggered by septic shock in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incerpi, Erika K; Oliveira, Luiz M; Pereira, Elisângela M; Soncini, Roseli

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of previous administration of metyrapone (met) on the acute lung injury (ALI) induced by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and to explore met's relationship with endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs) as measured by inflammatory, oxidative and functional parameters. One hundred and thirty-five Wistar rats were divided into three main groups: Control (Naïve), Sham and CLP. The animals received pretreatment one hour before surgery. The Naïve group did not undergo any procedure or pretreatment. The Sham group only had the caecum exposed and was pretreated with saline. The CLP group was divided into three pretreatments: metyrapone (CLP met 50 mg/kg i.p.), dexamethasone (CLP dex 0.5 mg/kg i.p.) or saline (CLP sal equivalent volume of 0.9% NaCl). Analyses were performed after 6 and 24 h of sepsis. Previous administration of met significantly increased inflammatory cells, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung tissue and alveolar collapsed area, with consequent impairment of respiratory mechanics being observed compared to Sham and Naïve; CLP sal exhibited similar results to those of met. The met reduced corticosterone (CCT) levels and dramatically increased hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels in the lung tissue compared to CLP sal. Our results suggest that previous administration of met may have contributed to increased pulmonary oxidative stress and increased mortality by mechanisms dependent of endogenous GC. PMID:25664386

  12. Protective effects of BMSCs in combination with erythropoietin in bronchopulmonary dysplasia-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao-Hua; Pan, Yan-Yan; Jing, Rui-Sheng; Luan, Yun; Zhang, Luan; Sun, Chao; Kong, Feng; Li, Kai-Lin; Wang, Yi-Biao

    2016-08-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common type of chronic lung disease in infancy, for which no effective therapy is currently available. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in combination with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) on BPD‑induced mouse lung injury, and discuss the underlying mechanism. The BPD model was established by the exposure of neonatal mice to continuous high oxygen exposure for 14 days, following which 1x106 BMSCs and 5,000 U/kg rHuEPO were injected into the mice 1 h prior to and 7 days following exposure to hyperoxia. The animals received four treatments in total (n=10 in each group). After 14 days, the body weights, airway structure, and levels of matrix metalloproteinase‑9 (MMP‑9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were detected using histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The effect on cell differentiation was observed by examining the presence of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) and VEGF using immunofluorescence. Compared with the administration of BMSCs alone, the body weight, airway structure, and the levels of MMP‑9 and VEGF were significantly improved in the BMSCs/rHuEPO group. The results of the present study demonstrated that the intravenous injection of BMSCs significantly improved lung damage in the hyperoxia‑exposed neonatal mouse model. Furthermore, the injection of BMSCs in combination with intraperitoneal injection of rHuEPO had a more marked effect, compared with BMSCs alone, and the mechanism may be mediated by the promoting effects of BMSCs and EPO. The results of the present study provided information, which may assist in future clinical trials. PMID:27279073

  13. Arginase 1: an unexpected mediator of pulmonary capillary barrier dysfunction in models of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eLucas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G- and G+ bacterial toxins, such as LPS and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms - arginase 1 (cytosolic and arginase 2 (mitochondrial - both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate L-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting ROS generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  14. Angiopoietin-1 treatment reduces inflammation but does not prevent ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Hegeman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss of integrity of the epithelial and endothelial barriers is thought to be a prominent feature of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Based on its function in vascular integrity, we hypothesize that the angiopoietin (Ang-Tie2 system plays a role in the development of VILI. The present study was designed to examine the effects of mechanical ventilation on the Ang-Tie2 system in lung tissue. Moreover, we evaluated whether treatment with Ang-1, a Tie2 receptor agonist, protects against inflammation, vascular leakage and impaired gas exchange induced by mechanical ventilation. METHODS: Mice were anesthetized, tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated for 5 hours with either an inspiratory pressure of 10 cmH2O ('low' tidal volume ∼7.5 ml/kg; LVT or 18 cmH2O ('high' tidal volume ∼15 ml/kg; HVT. At initiation of HVT-ventilation, recombinant human Ang-1 was intravenously administered (1 or 4 µg per animal. Non-ventilated mice served as controls. RESULTS: HVT-ventilation influenced the Ang-Tie2 system in lungs of healthy mice since Ang-1, Ang-2 and Tie2 mRNA were decreased. Treatment with Ang-1 increased Akt-phosphorylation indicating Tie2 signaling. Ang-1 treatment reduced infiltration of granulocytes and expression of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1 and interleukin (IL-1β caused by HVT-ventilation. Importantly, Ang-1 treatment did not prevent vascular leakage and impaired gas exchange in HVT-ventilated mice despite inhibition of inflammation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Ang-2 expression. CONCLUSIONS: Ang-1 treatment downregulates pulmonary inflammation, VEGF and Ang-2 expression but does not protect against vascular leakage and impaired gas exchange induced by HVT-ventilation.

  15. Arginase 1: an unexpected mediator of pulmonary capillary barrier dysfunction in models of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rudolf; Czikora, Istvàn; Sridhar, Supriya; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Oseghale, Aluya; Circo, Sebastian; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Chakraborty, Trinad; Fulton, David J; Caldwell, Robert W; Romero, Maritza J

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G(-) and G(+) bacterial toxins, such as lipopolysaccharide and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms - arginase 1 (cytosolic) and arginase 2 (mitochondrial) - both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate l-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting reactive oxygen species generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:23966993

  16. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene deletion alters bleomycin-induced lung injury, but not development of pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habgood, Anthony N; Tatler, Amanda L; Porte, Joanne; Wahl, Sharon M; Laurent, Geoffrey J; John, Alison E; Johnson, Simon R; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive, fatal disease with limited treatment options. Protease-mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of lung fibrosis. Protease activity in the lung is tightly regulated by protease inhibitors, particularly secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). The bleomycin model of lung fibrosis was used to determine the effect of increased protease activity in the lungs of Slpi(-/-) mice following injury. Slpi(-/-), and wild-type, mice received oropharyngeal administration of bleomycin (30 IU) and the development of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed. Pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were measured. Lung fibrosis was determined by collagen subtype-specific gene expression, hydroxyproline concentration, and histological assessment. Alveolar TGF-β activation was measured using bronchoalveolar lavage cell pSmad2 levels and global TGF-β activity was assessed by pSmad2 immunohistochemistry. The active-MMP-9 to pro-MMP-9 ratio was significantly increased in Slpi(-/-) animals compared with wild-type animals, demonstrating enhanced metalloproteinase activity. Wild-type animals showed an increase in TGF-β activation following bleomycin, with a progressive and sustained increase in collagen type I, alpha 1 (Col1α1), III, alpha 1(Col3α1), IV, alpha 1(Col4α1) mRNA expression, and a significant increase in total lung collagen 28 days post bleomycin. In contrast Slpi(-/-) mice showed no significant increase of alveolar TGF-β activity following bleomycin, above their already elevated levels, although global TGF-β activity did increase. Slpi(-/-) mice had impaired collagen gene expression but animals demonstrated minimal reduction in lung fibrosis compared with wild-type animals. These data suggest that enhanced proteolysis does not further enhance TGF-β activation, and inhibits sustained Col1α1, Col3α1, and Col4α1 gene expression

  17. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene deletion alters bleomycin-induced lung injury, but not development of pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habgood, Anthony N; Tatler, Amanda L; Porte, Joanne; Wahl, Sharon M; Laurent, Geoffrey J; John, Alison E; Johnson, Simon R; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive, fatal disease with limited treatment options. Protease-mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of lung fibrosis. Protease activity in the lung is tightly regulated by protease inhibitors, particularly secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). The bleomycin model of lung fibrosis was used to determine the effect of increased protease activity in the lungs of Slpi(-/-) mice following injury. Slpi(-/-), and wild-type, mice received oropharyngeal administration of bleomycin (30 IU) and the development of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed. Pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were measured. Lung fibrosis was determined by collagen subtype-specific gene expression, hydroxyproline concentration, and histological assessment. Alveolar TGF-β activation was measured using bronchoalveolar lavage cell pSmad2 levels and global TGF-β activity was assessed by pSmad2 immunohistochemistry. The active-MMP-9 to pro-MMP-9 ratio was significantly increased in Slpi(-/-) animals compared with wild-type animals, demonstrating enhanced metalloproteinase activity. Wild-type animals showed an increase in TGF-β activation following bleomycin, with a progressive and sustained increase in collagen type I, alpha 1 (Col1α1), III, alpha 1(Col3α1), IV, alpha 1(Col4α1) mRNA expression, and a significant increase in total lung collagen 28 days post bleomycin. In contrast Slpi(-/-) mice showed no significant increase of alveolar TGF-β activity following bleomycin, above their already elevated levels, although global TGF-β activity did increase. Slpi(-/-) mice had impaired collagen gene expression but animals demonstrated minimal reduction in lung fibrosis compared with wild-type animals. These data suggest that enhanced proteolysis does not further enhance TGF-β activation, and inhibits sustained Col1α1, Col3α1, and Col4α1 gene expression

  18. Protective effects of hyperbaric oxygen and iloprost on ischemia/reperfusion-induced lung injury in a rabbit model

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    Bozok Ş

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of multiorgan damage in the mortality caused by ischemic limb injury is still not clarified. The objective of this study was to examine the potential protective effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO and iloprost (IL therapy on lung damage induced by limb ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rabbit model, using both biochemical and histopathological aspects. Methods Forty New Zealand white rabbits were randomly allocated into one of five study groups: HBO group (single session of HBO treatment; IL group (25 ng/kg/min infusion of IL; HBO + IL group (both HBO and IL; Control group (0.9% saline only; and a sham group. Acute hind limb ischemia-reperfusion was established by clamping the abdominal aorta for 1 h. HBO treatment and IL infusion were administrated during 60 min of ischemia and 60 min of reperfusion period. Blood pH, partial pressure of oxygen, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and levels of bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and tumor necrosis factor alpha were determined at the end of the reperfusion period. Malondialdehyde was measured in the plasma and lung as an indicator of free radicals. After sacrifice, left lungs were removed and histopathological examination determined the degree of lung injury. Results In the control group, blood partial pressure of oxygen and bicarbonate levels were significantly lower and creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly higher than those of the HBO group, IL group, HBO + IL group and sham group. Similarly, the malondialdehyde levels in the lung tissue and plasma levels were significantly lower in the treatment groups compared with the control group. The extent of lung injury according to the histological findings was significantly higher in the control group. Conclusions These results suggest that both HBO and IL therapies and their combination might be

  19. RC-3095, a Selective Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist, Does Not Protect the Lungs in an Experimental Model of Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

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    Vera L. Oliveira-Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RC-3095, a selective GRPR antagonist, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in different models of inflammation. However, its protective effect on lungs submitted to lung ischemia-reperfusion injury has not been addressed before. Then, we administrated RC-3095 intravenously before and after lung reperfusion using an animal model of lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI by clamping the pulmonary hilum. Twenty Wistar rats were subjected to an experimental model in four groups: SHAM, ischemia-reperfusion (IR, RC-Pre, and RC-Post. The final mean arterial pressure significantly decreased in IR and RC-Pre compared to their values before reperfusion (P<0.001. The RC-Post group showed significant decrease of partial pressure of arterial oxygen at the end of the observation when compared to baseline (P=0.005. Caspase-9 activity was significantly higher in the RC-Post as compared to the other groups (P<0.013. No significant differences were observed in eNOS activity among the groups. The groups RC-Pre and RC-Post did not show any significant decrease in IL-1β (P=0.159 and TNF-α (P=0.260, as compared to IR. The histological score showed no significant differences among the groups. In conclusion, RC-3095 does not demonstrate a protective effect in our LIRI model. Additionally, its use after reperfusion seems to potentiate cell damage, stimulating apoptosis.

  20. Systemic Inflammatory Responses and Lung Injury following Hip Fracture Surgery Increases Susceptibility to Infection in Aged Rats

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    Hao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections frequently occur following hip fracture surgery in aged patients. However, the underlying reasons are not fully understood. The present study investigates the systemic inflammatory response and pulmonary conditions following hip fracture surgery as a means of identifying risk factors for lung infections using an aged rodent model. Aged, male Sprague-Dawley rats (8 animals per group underwent a sham procedure or hip fracture plus femoral intramedullary pinning. Animals were sacrificed 1, 3, and 7 days after the injury. Markers of systemic inflammation and pulmonary injury were analyzed. Both sham-operated and injured/surgical group animals underwent intratracheal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1, 3, and 7 days after surgery. P. aeruginosa counts in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and survival rates were recorded. Serum TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10 levels and markers of pulmonary injury were significantly increased at 1 and 3 days following hip fracture and surgery. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa at 1 and 3 days after injury had a significantly decreased survival rate and more P. aeruginosa recovered from blood and BAL fluid. This study shows that hip fracture and surgery in aged rats induced a systemic inflammatory response and lung injury associated with increased susceptibility to infection during the acute phase after injury and surgery.

  1. α1-ANTITRYPSIN ATTENUATES ENDOTOXIN-INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY IN RABBITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    揭志军; 蔡映云; 杨文兰; 金美玲; 朱威; 祝慈芳

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether pretreatment with α1-AT can attenuate acute lung injury (ALI) in rabbits induced with endotoxin. Methods Thirty-two New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups(n=8):1.Infusion of endotoxin(Lipopolysaccharide,LPS 500μg/kg)without α1-AT (group LPS).2.Infusion α1-AT 120mg/kg at 15min before challenge with LPS(group LAV).3.Infusion of α1-AT 120mg/kg(group AAT).4 Infusion of saline 4ml/kg as control (group NS).Arterial blood gases,peripheral leukocyte counts and airway pressure were recorded every 1h.Physiologic intrapulmonary shunting (Qs/Qt) was measured every 4h.After 8h the bloods were collected for measurement of plasma concentration and activity of α1-AT.Then bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF)was collected for measurement of concentrations of total protein (TP),interleukin-8(IL-8),tumor necrosis factor(TNF-α),the activities of elastase-like and α1-AT,total phospholipids(TPL) and disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC).In addition,the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio(W/D) was measured. Results After infusion of endotoxin,it was observed that PaO2,peripheral luekocyte counts,total respiratory compliance progressively decreased and Ppeak and Qs/Qt increased comparing with the baseline values.In contrast to group NS,the increased plasma concentration but reduced activity of α1-AT was found in group LPS.In the BALF,the activity of α1-AT,TPL,DSPC/TPL were lower,but the concentrations of albumin,IL-8,TNF-α,and the activity of NE were higher.The ratio of W/D also increased.The pretreatment of α1-AT attenuated the deterioration of oxygenation,the reduction of compliance and the deterioration of other physiological,biochemical parameters mentioned above. Conclusion Pretreatment with α1-AT could attenuate endotoxin-induced lung injury in rabbits.Those beneficial effects of α1-AT might be due in part to the inhibitory effect on neutrophil elastase.

  2. The role of ferrous sulfate in coal dust induced lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung Chi Chen; Xi Huang; Chun Yi Wu; Zalma, R.; Pezerat, H.; Qing Shan Qu [New York University Medical Center Tuxedo, NY (United States). Nelson Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    1996-07-01

    Inhalation of coal dust has been shown to produce pneumoconiosis and chronic obstructive bronchopneumopathy. The active compounds responsible for these diseases have not yet been identified. Coal dust induced lung injury could be related to exposures of coal workers to aerosols capable of producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the lung. This study, investigated whether coal dusts could produce ROS in aqueous medium and the biological significance of ROS production. Filtrates of coal dusts are capable of oxidizing formate anion in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or O{sub 2} and are able to suppress the elastase inhibitory activity of alpha-1-antitrypsin ({alpha}1-AT). To confirm the role of FeSO{sub 4} in coal dust induced lung injury, the pulmonary response of guinea pigs exposed to coal dust or carbon black enriched with FeSO{sub 4} was examined. Guinea pigs were exposed to filtered air, 5 mg/m{sup 3} of pulverized Illinois No. 6 coal (COAL). FeSO{sub 4} enriched Illinois 6 coal (COAL + Fe, 5% FeSO{sub 4}{center_dot}7H{sub 2}O by weight), Illinois 6 coal wetted in distilled deionized water (WETTED COAL), Illinois 6 coal washed twice with distilled deionized water (WASHED COAL), carbon black (CARBON), or FeSO{sub 4} enriched carbon (CARBON + Fe, 5% FeSO{sub 4}{center_dot}7H{sub 2}O by weight) for 3 hours, and killed 24 hours after the end of the exposure. COAL+Fe induced a decrease in the phagocytic activities, while COAL itself had no effect. Similarly, CARBON has no effect on phagocytosis while CARBON+Fe significantly depressed it. The concentration of ROS in the macrophages of animals exposed to the COAL+Fe decreased while ROS increased in animals exposed to CARBON+Fe. WETTED-COAL had similar effects to that of COAL+Fe, WASHED-COAl produced no change. These results clearly show that FeSO{sub 4} enrichment enhances the pulmonary response of guinea pigs to coal dust exposure. 30 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. High-inflation pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure. Injurious to the lung? No.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, L D

    1996-07-01

    Survival rates in ARDS with conventional ventilation using high oxygen fractions and low PEEP levels have been reported to be less than 10%. In three prospective evaluations of ARDS in the 1980s, mortality rates remained greater than 60%. Early studies using high-level PEEP therapy in severe ARDS by Douglas, Downs, Kirby, and Civetta showed improved survival rates with ranges between 60% and 80%. In 1979 Gallagher reviewed 59 patients with ARDS who were treated with PEEP greater than 15 cm H2O titrated to improve FRC by achieving an intrapulmonary shunt fraction of 15%. The overall survival was 65%, with only 5% of the patients dying secondary to respiratory failure. In the more recent study by Miller in trauma patients and later by DiRusso in a variety of surgical patients, the overall mortality rate for those patients receiving PEEP greater than 15 cm H2O was 20% to 30%. Of the 14 patients who died, only seven (10% of the total) succumbed to respiratory failure. The remaining patients died from the primary underlying disease with normal oxygenation or after significant weaning from high PEEP levels. By using a goal-oriented approach to the management of patients with severe ARDS, we have found that high-level PEEP therapy was effective in lowering the intrapulmonary shunt and improving the SaO2 at acceptable levels of inspired oxygen. All of these patients were ventilated with traditional high tidal volumes (10 to 15 mL/kg) and therefore exhibited high peak inspiratory airway pressures. This support method did not seem to cause lung injury or an excessive amount of barotrauma in these patients, but in fact, was associated with a lower mortality rate (30%) than reported in other studies of patients with lesser degrees of lung oxygenation dysfunction and extrapulmonary organ system dysfunction. Currently available information indicates that increases in mean airway pressure (induced with PEEP or other modes of ventilatory support to restore losses in FRC that occur

  4. Early-age-related changes in proteostasis augment immunopathogenesis of sepsis and acute lung injury.

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    Manish Bodas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The decline of proteasomal activity is known to be associated with the age-related disorders but the early events involved in this process are not apparent. To address this, we investigated the early-age-related (pediatric vs. adult mechanisms that augment immunopathogenesis of sepsis and acute lung injury. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The 3-weeks (pediatric and 6-months (adult old C57BL/6 mice were selected as the study groups. Mice were subjected to 1×20 cecal ligation and puncture (CLP mediated sepsis or intratracheal Psuedomonas aeruginosa (Pa-LPS induced acute lung injury (ALI.We observed a significant increase in basal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-6 and neutrophil activity marker, myeloperoxidase (MPO in the adult mice compared to the pediatric indicating the age-related constitutive increase in inflammatory response. Next, we found that age-related decrease in PSMB6 (proteasomal subunit expression in adult mice results in accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins that triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR. We identified that Pa-LPS induced activation of UPR modifier, p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein in the adult mice lungs correlates with increase in Pa-LPS induced NFκB levels. Moreover, we observed a constitutive increase in p-eIF2α indicating a protective ER stress response to accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins. We used MG-132 treatment of HBE cells as an in vitro model to standardize the efficacy of salubrinal (inhibitor of eIF2α de-phosphorylation in controlling the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the NFκB levels. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of salubrinal to correct proteostasis-imbalance in the adult mice based on its ability to control CLP induced IL-6 secretion or recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate the critical role of early-age-related proteostasis-imbalance as a novel mechanism that augments the NFκB mediated

  5. Humidifier Disinfectants Are a Cause of Lung Injury among Adults in South Korea: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-Hyuk Park; Hwa Jung Kim; Geun-Yong Kwon; Jin Gwack; Young-Joon Park; Seung-Ki Youn; Jun-Wook Kwon; Byung-Guk Yang; Moo-Song Lee; Miran Jung; Hanyi Lee; Byung-Yool Jun; Hyun-Sul Lim

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds An outbreak of lung injury among South Korean adults was examined in a hospital-based case-control study, and the suspected cause was exposure to humidifier disinfectant (HD). However, a case-control study with community-dwelling controls was needed to validate the previous study’s findings, and to confirm the exposure-response relationship between HD and lung injury. Methods Each case of lung injury was matched with four community-dwelling controls, according to age (±3 years), s...

  6. Effects of N-acetylcysteine and pentoxifylline on remote lung injury in a rat model of hind-limb ischemia/reperfusion injury

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    Hamed Ashrafzadeh Takhtfooladi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC and pentoxifylline in a model of remote organ injury after hind-limb ischemia/reperfusion (I/R in rats, the lungs being the remote organ system. Methods : Thirty-five male Wistar rats were assigned to one of five conditions (n = 7/group, as follows: sham operation (control group; hind-limb ischemia, induced by clamping the left femoral artery, for 2 h, followed by 24 h of reperfusion (I/R group; and hind-limb ischemia, as above, followed by intraperitoneal injection (prior to reperfusion of 150 mg/kg of NAC (I/R+NAC group, 40 mg/kg of pentoxifylline (I/R+PTX group, or both (I/R+NAC+PTX group. At the end of the trial, lung tissues were removed for histological analysis and assessment of oxidative stress. Results : In comparison with the rats in the other groups, those in the I/R group showed lower superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels, together with higher malondialdehyde levels and lung injury scores (p 0.05 for all. Conclusions : Our results suggest that NAC and pentoxifylline both protect lung tissue from the effects of skeletal muscle I/R. However, their combined use does not appear to increase the level of that protection.

  7. Effects of N-acetylcysteine and pentoxifylline on remote lung injury in a rat model of hind-limb ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Hesaraki, Saeed; Razmara, Foad; Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Hajizadeh, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and pentoxifylline in a model of remote organ injury after hind-limb ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in rats, the lungs being the remote organ system. Methods : Thirty-five male Wistar rats were assigned to one of five conditions (n = 7/group), as follows: sham operation (control group); hind-limb ischemia, induced by clamping the left femoral artery, for 2 h, followed by 24 h of reperfusion (I/R group); and hind-limb ischemia, as above, followed by intraperitoneal injection (prior to reperfusion) of 150 mg/kg of NAC (I/R+NAC group), 40 mg/kg of pentoxifylline (I/R+PTX group), or both (I/R+NAC+PTX group). At the end of the trial, lung tissues were removed for histological analysis and assessment of oxidative stress. Results : In comparison with the rats in the other groups, those in the I/R group showed lower superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels, together with higher malondialdehyde levels and lung injury scores (p 0.05 for all). Conclusions : Our results suggest that NAC and pentoxifylline both protect lung tissue from the effects of skeletal muscle I/R. However, their combined use does not appear to increase the level of that protection. PMID:26982035

  8. Preventive Effects of Dexmedetomidine on the Liver in a Rat Model of Acid-Induced Acute Lung Injury

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    Velat Şen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine whether dexmedetomidine improves acute liver injury in a rat model. Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats weighing 300–350 g were allocated randomly to four groups. In group 1, normal saline (NS was injected into the lungs and rats were allowed to breathe spontaneously. In group 2, rats received standard ventilation (SV in addition to NS. In group 3, hydrochloric acid was injected into the lungs and rats received SV. In group 4, rats received SV and 100 µg/kg intraperitoneal dexmedetomidine before intratracheal HCl instillation. Blood samples and liver tissue specimens were examined by biochemical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical methods. Acute lung injury (ALI was found to be associated with increased malondialdehyde (MDA, total oxidant activity (TOA, oxidative stress index (OSI, and decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC. Significantly decreased MDA, TOA, and OSI levels and significantly increased TAC levels were found with dexmedetomidine injection in group 4 (P<0.05. The highest histologic injury scores were detected in group 3. Enhanced hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression and reduced CD68 expression were found in dexmedetomidine group compared with the group 3. In conclusion, the presented data provide the first evidence that dexmedetomidine has a protective effect on experimental liver injury induced by ALI.

  9. Preventive effects of dexmedetomidine on the liver in a rat model of acid-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Velat; Güzel, Abdulmenap; Şen, Hadice Selimoğlu; Ece, Aydın; Uluca, Unal; Söker, Sevda; Doğan, Erdal; Kaplan, İbrahim; Deveci, Engin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether dexmedetomidine improves acute liver injury in a rat model. Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats weighing 300-350 g were allocated randomly to four groups. In group 1, normal saline (NS) was injected into the lungs and rats were allowed to breathe spontaneously. In group 2, rats received standard ventilation (SV) in addition to NS. In group 3, hydrochloric acid was injected into the lungs and rats received SV. In group 4, rats received SV and 100 µg/kg intraperitoneal dexmedetomidine before intratracheal HCl instillation. Blood samples and liver tissue specimens were examined by biochemical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical methods. Acute lung injury (ALI) was found to be associated with increased malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant activity (TOA), oxidative stress index (OSI), and decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Significantly decreased MDA, TOA, and OSI levels and significantly increased TAC levels were found with dexmedetomidine injection in group 4 (P < 0.05). The highest histologic injury scores were detected in group 3. Enhanced hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and reduced CD68 expression were found in dexmedetomidine group compared with the group 3. In conclusion, the presented data provide the first evidence that dexmedetomidine has a protective effect on experimental liver injury induced by ALI. PMID:25165710

  10. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  11. Plantamajoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via suppressing NF-κB and MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haichong; Zhao, Gan; Jiang, Kangfeng; Chen, Xiuying; Zhu, Zhe; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    Despite developments in the knowledge and therapy of acute lung injury in recent decades, mortality remains high, and there is usually a lack of effective therapy. Plantamajoside, a major ingredient isolated from Plantago asiatica L. (Plantaginaceae), has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of plantamajoside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice has not been investigated. The present study aimed to reveal the potential mechanism responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of plantamajoside on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. The results of histopathological changes as well as the lung wet-to-dry ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity showed that plantamajoside ameliorated the lung injury that was induced by LPS. qPCR and ELISA assays demonstrated that plantamajoside suppressed the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. TLR4 is an important sensor in LPS infection. Molecular studies showed that the expression of TLR4 was inhibited by plantamajoside administration. Further study was conducted on nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) using pathways using western blots. The results showed that plantamajoside inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, JNK and ERK. All results indicated that plantamajoside has protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. Thus, plantamajoside may be a potential therapy for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation.

  12. Plantamajoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via suppressing NF-κB and MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haichong; Zhao, Gan; Jiang, Kangfeng; Chen, Xiuying; Zhu, Zhe; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    Despite developments in the knowledge and therapy of acute lung injury in recent decades, mortality remains high, and there is usually a lack of effective therapy. Plantamajoside, a major ingredient isolated from Plantago asiatica L. (Plantaginaceae), has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of plantamajoside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice has not been investigated. The present study aimed to reveal the potential mechanism responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of plantamajoside on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. The results of histopathological changes as well as the lung wet-to-dry ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity showed that plantamajoside ameliorated the lung injury that was induced by LPS. qPCR and ELISA assays demonstrated that plantamajoside suppressed the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. TLR4 is an important sensor in LPS infection. Molecular studies showed that the expression of TLR4 was inhibited by plantamajoside administration. Further study was conducted on nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) using pathways using western blots. The results showed that plantamajoside inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, JNK and ERK. All results indicated that plantamajoside has protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. Thus, plantamajoside may be a potential therapy for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation. PMID:27089391

  13. Mechanical ventilation modulates TLR4 and IRAK-3 in a non-infectious, ventilator-induced lung injury model

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    Casula Milena

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous experimental studies have shown that injurious mechanical ventilation has a direct effect on pulmonary and systemic immune responses. How these responses are propagated or attenuated is a matter of speculation. The goal of this study was to determine the contribution of mechanical ventilation in the regulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling and interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase-3 (IRAK-3 during experimental ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study using male, healthy adults Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 300-350 g. Animals were anesthetized and randomized to spontaneous breathing and to two different mechanical ventilation strategies for 4 hours: high tidal volume (VT (20 ml/kg and low VT (6 ml/kg. Histological evaluation, TLR2, TLR4, IRAK3 gene expression, IRAK-3 protein levels, inhibitory kappa B alpha (IκBα, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL6 gene expression in the lungs and TNF-α and IL-6 protein serum concentrations were analyzed. Results High VT mechanical ventilation for 4 hours was associated with a significant increase of TLR4 but not TLR2, a significant decrease of IRAK3 lung gene expression and protein levels, a significant decrease of IκBα, and a higher lung expression and serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusions The current study supports an interaction between TLR4 and IRAK-3 signaling pathway for the over-expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines during ventilator-induced lung injury. Our study also suggests that injurious mechanical ventilation may elicit an immune response that is similar to that observed during infections.

  14. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B-induced microRNA-155 targets SOCS1 to promote acute inflammatory lung injury.

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    Rao, Roshni; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2014-07-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) causes food poisoning in humans. It is considered a biological weapon, and inhalation can trigger lung injury and sometimes respiratory failure. Being a superantigen, SEB initiates an exaggerated inflammatory response. While the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in immune cell activation is getting increasing recognition, their role in the regulation of inflammatory disease induced by SEB has not been studied. In this investigation, we demonstrate that exposure to SEB by inhalation results in acute inflammatory lung injury accompanied by an altered miRNA expression profile in lung-infiltrating cells. Among the miRNAs that were significantly elevated, miR-155 was the most overexpressed. Interestingly, miR-155(-/-) mice were protected from SEB-mediated inflammation and lung injury. Further studies revealed a functional link between SEB-induced miR-155 and proinflammatory cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Through the use of bioinformatics tools, suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), a negative regulator of IFN-γ, was identified as a potential target of miR-155. While miR-155(-/-) mice displayed increased expression of Socs1, the overexpression of miR-155 led to its suppression, thereby enhancing IFN-γ levels. Additionally, the inhibition of miR-155 resulted in restored Socs1expression. Together, our data demonstrate an important role for miR-155 in promoting SEB-mediated inflammation in the lungs through Socs1 suppression and suggest that miR-155 may be an important target in preventing SEB-mediated inflammation and tissue injury. PMID:24778118

  15. Immunization protected well nourished mice but not undernourished ones from lung injury in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection

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    da Cunha Maria

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-resistant (MRSA has been frequently isolated from endotracheal and lung puncture aspirates in malnourished children with pneumonia. In this work we evaluated the susceptibility of undernourished BALB/c mice and its ability to mount a protective immunity against MRSA with emphasis on the lung involvement. Results BALB/c mice submitted to a 20% dietary restriction during 20 days presented a significant decrease in body weight, lymphocyte number and also atrophy in thymus and intestinal epithelium. Determination of bacterial load by the number of colony forming units (CFU indicated a similar susceptibility whereas the findings of Gram stain clearly suggested a higher amount of bacteria in the lungs of normal mice than in the undernourished ones. Immunization reduced bacterial growth in the lungs of normal mice but not in the undernourished ones. Histopathological analysis showed that inflammation appeared in the lungs from normal mice only after infection and that immunization prevented this pulmonary inflammatory process. On the other hand, undernourished mice presented lung inflammation even before infection. In addition, the degree of this inflammatory process did not change with infection or previous immunization. Conclusion Our results indicated that lung injury during MRSA infection is prevented by previous immunization in well nourished but not in undernourished mice.

  16. Effect of resveratrol on microcirculation disorder and lung injury following severe acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Meng; Mei Zhang; Jun Xu; Xue-Min Liu; Qing-Yong Ma

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of resveratrol underlying the microcirculation disorder and lung injury following severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).METHODS: Twenty-four rats were divided into 3 groups (SAP, sham and resveratrol groups) randomly. SAP model was established by injecting 4% sodium taurocholate 1 mL/kg through puncturing pancreatic ducts. Sham (control) group (8 rats) was established by turning over the duodenum.Resveratrol was given at 0.1 mg/kg b.m. intraperitoneally.Rats were sacrificed 9 h after SAP was induced. Blood samples were obtained for hemorrheological examination.Lung tissues were used for pathological observation, and examination of microvascular permeability, dry/wet ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Gene expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was detected by RT-PCR.RESULTS: Compared with SAP group, resveratrol relieved the edema and infiltration of leukocytes in the lungs. Resveratrol improved markers of hemorrheology:high VTB (5.77±1.18 mPas vs9.49±1.34 mPas), low VTB (16.12±3.20 mPas vs30.91±7.28 mPas), PV (4.69±1.68 mPas vs8.00±1.34 mPas), BSR (1.25±0.42 mm/h vs 0.03±0.03mm/h), VPC (54.67±3.08% vs 62.17±3.39%), fibrinogen (203.2±87.8 g/L vs 51.3±19.1 g/L), original hemolysis (0.45±0.02 vs 0.49±0.02), and complete hemolysis (0.41±0.02 vs0.43±0.02) (P<0.05). Resveratrol decreased the OD ratio of ICAM-1 gene (0.800±0.03 vs 1.188±0.10),dry/wet ratio (0.74±0.02 vs 0.77±0.03), microvascular permeability (0.079±0.006 vs 0.112±0.004) and MPO activity (4.42±0.32 vs 5.03±0.51) significantly (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Resveratrol can improve the microcirculation disorder of the lung by decreasing leukocyte-endothelial interaction, reducing blood viscosity, improving the decrease of blood flow, and stabilizing erythrocytes in SAP rats. It may be a potential candidate to treat SAP and its severe complications (ALI).

  17. Spatial and temporal expression of surfactant proteins in hyperoxia-induced neonatal rat lung injury

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    Walther Frans J

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a complex chronic lung disease in premature children in which oxidative stress and surfactant deficiency play a crucial role, is characterized by arrested alveolar and vascular development of the immature lung. The spatial and temporal patterns of expression of surfactant proteins are not yet fully established in newborn infants and animal models suffering from BPD. Methods We studied the mRNA expression of surfactant proteins (SP A, -B, -C and -D and Clara cell secretory protein (CC10 with RT-PCR and in situ hybridization and protein expression of CC10, SP-A and -D with immunohistochemistry in the lungs of a preterm rat model, in which experimental BPD was induced by prolonged oxidative stress. Results Gene expression of all surfactant proteins (SP-A, -B, -C and -D was high at birth and initially declined during neonatal development, but SP-A, -B, and -D mRNA levels increased during exposure to hyperoxia compared to room-air controls. Peak levels were observed in adult lungs for SP-A, SP-C and CC10. Except for SP-A, the cellular distribution of SP-B, -C, -D and CC10, studied with in situ hybridization and/or immunohistochemistry, did not change in room air nor in hyperoxia. Exposure to normoxia was associated with high levels of SP-A mRNA and protein in alveolar type 2 cells and low levels in bronchial Clara cells, whereas hyperoxia induced high levels of SP-A expression in bronchial Clara cells. Conclusion The increased expression of SP-A mRNA under hyperoxia can be attributed, at least in part, to an induction of mRNA and protein expression in bronchial Clara cells. The expanded role of Clara cells in the defence against hyperoxic injury suggests that they support alveolar type 2 cell function and may play an important role in the supply of surfactant proteins to the lower airways.

  18. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  19. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  20. Sildenafil attenuates pulmonary inflammation and fibrin deposition, mortality and right ventricular hypertrophy in neonatal hyperoxic lung injury

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    Boersma Hester

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition with sildenafil has been used to treat severe pulmonary hypertension and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, a chronic lung disease in very preterm infants who were mechanically ventilated for respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Sildenafil treatment was investigated in 2 models of experimental BPD: a lethal neonatal model, in which rat pups were continuously exposed to hyperoxia and treated daily with sildenafil (50–150 mg/kg body weight/day; injected subcutaneously and a neonatal lung injury-recovery model in which rat pups were exposed to hyperoxia for 9 days, followed by 9 days of recovery in room air and started sildenafil treatment on day 6 of hyperoxia exposure. Parameters investigated include survival, histopathology, fibrin deposition, alveolar vascular leakage, right ventricular hypertrophy, and differential mRNA expression in lung and heart tissue. Results Prophylactic treatment with an optimal dose of sildenafil (2 × 50 mg/kg/day significantly increased lung cGMP levels, prolonged median survival, reduced fibrin deposition, total protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, inflammation and septum thickness. Treatment with sildenafil partially corrected the differential mRNA expression of amphiregulin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, fibroblast growth factor receptor-4 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in the lung and of brain and c-type natriuretic peptides and the natriuretic peptide receptors NPR-A, -B, and -C in the right ventricle. In the lethal and injury-recovery model we demonstrated improved alveolarization and angiogenesis by attenuating mean linear intercept and arteriolar wall thickness and increasing pulmonary blood vessel density, and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH. Conclusion Sildenafil treatment, started simultaneously with exposure to hyperoxia after birth, prolongs survival, increases pulmonary cGMP levels, reduces the pulmonary

  1. Partial liquid ventilation decreases tissue and serum tumor necrosis factor-α concentrations in acute lung injury model of immature piglet induced by oleic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yao-bin; FAN Xiang-ming; LI Xiao-feng; LI Zhi-qiang; WANG Qiang; SUN Li-zhong; LIU Ying-long

    2012-01-01

    Background Pediatric patients are susceptible to lung injury.Acute lung injury in children often results in high mortality.Partial liquid ventilation (PLV) has been shown to markedly improve oxygenation and reduce histologic evidence of injury in a number of lung injury models.This study was designed to examine the hypothesis that PLV would attenuate the production of local and systemic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in an immature piglet model of acute lung injury induced by oleic acid (OA).Methods Twelve Chinese immature piglets were induced acute lung injury by OA.The animals were randomly assigned to two groups of six animals,(1) conventional mechanical ventilation (MV) group and (2) PLV with 10 ml/kg FC-77 group.Results Compared with MV group,the PLV group had better cardiopulmonary variables (P <0.05).These variables included heart rate,mean blood pressure,blood pH,partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2),PaO2/inspired O2 fraction (FiO2) and partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2).PLV reduced TNF-α levels both in plasma and tissue compared with MV group (P <0.05).Conclusion PLV provides protective effects against TNF-a response in OA-induced acute lung injury in immature piglets.

  2. Inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase improves gas exchange in ventilator-induced lung injury after pneumonectomy

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    Suborov Evgeny V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes may cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI and enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO. We demonstrated in sheep that pneumonectomy followed by injurious ventilation promotes pulmonary edema. We wished both to test the hypothesis that neuronal NOS (nNOS, which is distributed in airway epithelial and neuronal tissues, could be involved in the pathogenesis of VILI and we also aimed at investigating the influence of an inhibitor of nNOS on the course of VILI after pneumonectomy. Methods Anesthetized sheep underwent right pneumonectomy, mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes (VT of 6 mL/kg and FiO2 0.5, and were subsequently randomized to a protectively ventilated group (PROTV; n = 8 keeping VT and FiO2 unchanged, respiratory rate (RR 25 inflations/min and PEEP 4 cm H2O for the following 8 hrs; an injuriously ventilated group with VT of 12 mL/kg, zero end-expiratory pressure, and FiO2 and RR unchanged (INJV; n = 8 and a group, which additionally received the inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (NI 1.0 mg/kg/h intravenously from 2 hours after the commencement of injurious ventilation (INJV + NI; n = 8. We assessed respiratory, hemodynamic and volumetric variables, including both the extravascular lung water index (EVLWI and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI. We measured plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx levels and examined lung biopsies for lung injury score (LIS. Results Both the injuriously ventilated groups demonstrated a 2–3-fold rise in EVLWI and PVPI, with no significant effects of NI. In the INJV group, gas exchange deteriorated in parallel with emerging respiratory acidosis, but administration of NI antagonized the derangement of oxygenation and the respiratory acidosis significantly. NOx displayed no significant changes and NI exerted no significant effect on LIS in the INJV group. Conclusion Inhibition of nNOS improved gas exchange

  3. Effects of intestinal lymph on expression of neutrophil adhesion factors and lung injury after trauma-induced shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo-Bing Chen; Shu-Sen Zheng; Gao Yuan; Chen-Yan Ding; Yun Zhang; Xue-Hong Zhao; Lin-Mei Ni

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study how intestinal lymph after trauma-induced shock (TIS) interferes with expression of neutrophil adhesion factors (CD11b and CD18) and causes lung injury.METHODS: Thirty-two adult healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups. Groups 1and 2 included rats with TIS caused by hitting the midupper part of both side femoral bones with a 2 500 kg rawiron, and with or without ligation of mesenteric lymph duct.Groups 3 and 4 included rats with sham-TIS and with or without ligation of mesenteric lymph duct. Expression of neutrophil CD18 and CD11b in at 1 and 3 h after a 90-min TIS/sham-TIS was evaluated. These rats were killed at 3 h after TIS/sham-TIS, and lungs were taken immediately.The main lung injury indexes (the MPO activity and lung injury score) were measured.RESULTS: The expressions of CD18 and CD11b at 1 and 3 h after a 90-min TIS and the main lung injury indexes were significantly increased compared with those in the shamTIS groups (P<0.05). Moreover, at 1 and 3 h after TIS, the expressions of CD18 (32.12±1.25 and 33.46±0.98) and CD11b (29.56±1.35 and 30.56±1.85) were significantly decreased in rats with ligation of mesenteric lymph duct,compared with those (52.3±1.12 and 50.21±1.25, and 42.24±1.24 and 42.81±1.12, respectively) in those without the ligation (all P<0.05). The main lung injury indexes in rats with TIS with ligation of mesenteric lymph duct (0.96±0.12 and 6.54±0.35) were als