WorldWideScience

Sample records for chlorine activation indoors

  1. Indoor Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... so you can do some lifting while you watch TV. Walk around the house when you talk on the phone. Make an extra trip up and down the stairs when you do the laundry. Download the Tip Sheet Indoor Activities (PDF, 739.53 KB) You Might Also Like Sun Safety Have Fun. Be Active with Your Dog! ...

  2. Attendance at chlorinated indoor pools and risk of asthma in adult recreational swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Marcello; Schenk, Kai; Mantovani, William; Papadopoulou, Christina; Posenato, Chiara; Ferrari, Pietro; Poli, Albino; Tardivo, Stefano

    2011-05-01

    To study a potential correlation between attendance at chlorinated indoor pools and the onset of asthma in adult leisure swimmers. 1136 adult swimmers attending indoor pools in the city of Verona completed a modified ECRHS questionnaire. The cumulative time spent in the pools was calculated on the basis of the mean frequency and duration of weekly swim activity for every year of attendance. The median value (320 h) was used to divide participants into 2 groups. Other questions concerned the family history of allergies, the medical diagnosis and the onset of asthma. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms in the study group was compared with that of a general population sample. New-onset asthma, first identified at least 12 months after the start of regular pool attendance, was more prevalent among swimmers characterized by a higher cumulative pool attendance (23/514, 4.5%) than in swimmers who were attending indoor pools less frequently (2/508, 0.4%; ratio 11.1, 95% CI 2.6-47.4). The statistical analysis revealed an independent association between the cumulative lifetime hours spent in indoor swimming pools and new onset asthma (relative risk 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.07). Respiratory symptoms were less frequent in the study population versus a general population sample (prevalence ratio 0.26-0.68). Attendance at chlorinated indoor pools may constitute a risk factor for developing asthma in leisure adult swimmers. Future research and efforts should aim at improving disinfection techniques, hygiene and ventilation in indoor swimming pools in order to provide an unobjectionable ambient for salubrious swim activities. PMID:21257346

  3. Respiratory Function and Changes in Lung Epithelium Biomarkers after a Short-Training Intervention in Chlorinated vs. Ozone Indoor Pools

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Fernández-Luna; Leonor Gallardo; María Plaza-Carmona; Jorge García-Unanue; Javier Sánchez-Sánchez; José Luis Felipe; Pablo Burillo; Ignacio Ara

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Swimming in indoor pools treated with combined chemical treatments (e.g. ozone) may reduce direct exposure to disinfection byproducts and thus have less negative effects on respiratory function compared to chlorinated pools. The aim of this study is to analyze the effects of a short-term training intervention on respiratory function and lung epithelial damage in adults exercising in indoor swimming pool waters treated with different disinfection methods (chlorine vs. ozone with br...

  4. Lung hyperpermeability and asthma prevalence in schoolchildren: unexpected associations with the attendance at indoor chlorinated swimming pools

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Alfred; Carbonnelle, Sylviane; Michel, O; Higuet, S; de Burbure, Claire; Buchet, Jean-Pierre; Hermans, Cédric; Dumont, Xavier; Doyle, I

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To study whether exposure to nitrogen trichloride in indoor chlorinated pools may affect the respiratory epithelium of children and increase the risk of some lung diseases such as asthma. METHODS: In 226 healthy children, serum surfactant associated proteins A and B (SP-A and SP-B), 16 kDa Clara cell protein (CC16), and IgE were measured. Lung specific proteins were measured in the serum of 16 children and 13 adults before and after exposure to NCl(3) in an indoor chlorinated pool. Rela...

  5. A survey of fungi and some indicator bacteria in chlorinated water of indoor public swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, R.; Hirn, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-four water samples, of volume 500 ml, originating from six public indoor fresh water swimming pools were examined for the presence of fungi and some indicator bacteria by a membrane-filter method. Sabouraud-dextrose agar and selective Candida albicans-medium were used for isolation and identification of fungi. In all but one of the samples the free chlorine content was above 0.40 mg/l. No Candida albicans were detected. Molds and unidentified yeasts were isolated from 29 of the samples. The following species were recorded: Acremonium spp., ALternaria sp., Aspergillus spp., Candida guilliermondii, Chaetomium sp., Cladosporium spp., Clasterosporium sp., Fusarium spp., Geotrichium sp., Penicillium spp., Petriellidium boydii and Phoma spp. Their occurrence was sporadic, each species mostly appearing as single colonies only, with a maximum of 5 colonies. Bacterial growth was noticed in 15 samples, but only in the sample of low free chlorine content did this reach significant proportions. The study indicates that the standard of chlorination is, at least in general, an adequate measure against fungal contamination of swimming pool water. However, the spectrum of mold species encountered encourages a further search for possible indicator species among these organisms.

  6. Disinfection of indoor air microorganisms in stack room of university library using gaseous chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Lu, Ming-Chun; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    As with all indoor public spaces in Taiwan, the stack rooms in public libraries should meet the air quality guidelines laid down by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. Accordingly, utilizing a university library in Taiwan for experimental purposes, this study investigates the efficiency of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as a disinfection agent when applied using three different treatment modes, namely a single-daily disinfection mode (SIM), a twice-daily disinfection mode (TWM), and a triple-daily disinfection mode (TRM). For each treatment mode, the ClO2 is applied using an ultrasonic aerosol device and is performed both under natural lighting conditions and under artificial lighting conditions. The indoor air quality is evaluated before and after each treatment session by measuring the bioaerosol levels of bacteria and fungi. The results show that for all three disinfection modes, the application of ClO2 reduces the indoor bacteria and fungi concentrations to levels lower than those specified by the Taiwan EPA (i.e., bacteria <1500 CFU/m(3), fungi <1000 CFU/m(3)), irrespective of the lighting conditions under which the disinfection process is performed. For each disinfection mode, a better disinfection efficiency is obtained under natural lighting conditions since ClO2 readily decomposes under strong luminance levels. Among the three treatment modes, the disinfection efficiencies of the TWM and TRM modes are very similar under natural lighting conditions and are significantly better than that of the SIM mode. Thus, overall, the results suggest that the TWM treatment protocol represents the most cost-effective and efficient method for meeting the indoor air quality requirements of the Taiwan EPA. PMID:25626564

  7. Identification of Chlorinated Solvent Sources in the Indoor Air of Private Residences around Hill Air Force Base, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Andrew Jensen

    2008-01-01

    Volatile chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,2 dichloroethane (1,2 DCA), and perchloroethylene (PCE) have been identified in the indoor air of residences located near Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah. These vapors can originate from either volatilization of contaminates from shallow contaminated groundwater and transport into residences or from sources within the residence. The focus of the thesis was the development of a testing strategy for determining sources of TCE, 1,2...

  8. Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chlorine gas are inhaled. Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) that may be delayed for a few hours ... health problems such as fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) following the initial exposure. How people can protect ...

  9. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  10. Coagulation properties of anelectrochemically prepared polyaluminum chloride containing active chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chengzhi; LIU Huijuan; QU Jiuhui

    2006-01-01

    With high content of the Al13 species and the active chloride, an electrochemically prepared polyaluminum chloride (E-PACl) presents integrated efficiency of coagulation and oxidation. The coagulation properties of E-PACl were systemically investigated through jar tests in the various water quality conditions. The active chlorine in E-PACl can significantly influence the coagulation behavior due to the active chlorine preoxidation, which can change the surface charge characteristic of organic matter (OM) in water. The active chlorine preoxidation could improve the E-PACl coagulation efficiency if the water possessed the characteristics of relatively low OM content (2 mg/L) and high hardness (278 mg CaCO3/L). In the water with medium content of OM (5 mg/L), dosage would be a crucial factor to decide whether the active chlorine in E-PACl aided coagulation process or not. Comparing with alkaline condition, active chlorine would show a more significant influence on the coagulation process in acidic region.

  11. Mathematical models for predicting indoor air quality from smoking activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, W R

    1999-01-01

    Much progress has been made over four decades in developing, testing, and evaluating the performance of mathematical models for predicting pollutant concentrations from smoking in indoor settings. Although largely overlooked by the regulatory community, these models provide regulators and risk assessors with practical tools for quantitatively estimating the exposure level that people receive indoors for a given level of smoking activity. This article reviews the development of the mass balanc...

  12. Indoor 222Rn measurements using an activated charcoal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercially available activated charcoal detector for measuring 222Rn activity concentrations in air was calibrated with known amounts of 222Rn and examined in terms of air luminescence counts and interferences from 220Rn and 219Rn. The results for conditions normally encountered indoor indicate that the detector is simple and reliable. The method has been applied to assay indoor 222Rn activity concentrations in 387 homes in Tokyo and the adjacent four prefectures, which ranged from 0.7 to 140 Bq/m3 and averaged 22.7 Bq/m3

  13. Criteria For Specifikation Of The Indoor Environment Of Active House

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldbjerg, Peter; Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Duer, Karsten; Andersen, Per Arnold

    2011-01-01

    The Active House Alliance has been formed by companies and organisations in the building design, components and construction industry to with the intention to improve the quality of the built environment through a balanced focus on indoor environment, energy and environment – and where the aspects...... of human health and wellbeing will be specifically considered. This paper presents the first version of the Active House specification for indoor environment for residential buildings (where specifications for energy and environment also exist). It is based on the EN 15251 philosophy, and with...... specific requirements to daylight, thermal environment, IAQ and acoustics. Requirements have been tightened compared to EN 15251, and will necessitate performance simulations....

  14. Removal of iodide from water by chlorination and subsequent adsorption on powdered activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Ikari, Mariya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine oxidation followed by treatment with activated carbon was studied as a possible method for removing radioactive iodine from water. Chlorination time, chlorine dose, the presence of natural organic matter (NOM), the presence of bromide ion (Br-), and carbon particle size strongly affected iodine removal. Treatment with superfine powdered activated carbon (SPAC) after 10-min oxidation with chlorine (1 mg-Cl-2/L) removed 90% of the iodine in NOM-containing water (dissolved organic carbo...

  15. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  16. Temperature thresholds for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Drdla, K.; Müller, R.

    2012-01-01

    Low stratospheric temperatures are known to be responsible for heterogeneous chlorine activation that leads to polar ozone depletion. Here, we discuss the temperature threshold below which substantial chlorine activation occurs. We suggest that the onset of chlorine activation is dominated by reactions on cold binary aerosol particles, without the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), i.e. without any significant uptake of HNO3 from the gas phase. Using...

  17. Suppression of chlorine activation on aviation-produced volatile particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Meilinger

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effect of nm-sized aircraft-induced aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4/H2O particles on atmospheric ozone as a function of temperature. Our calculations are based on a previously derived parameterization for the regional-scale perturbations of the sulfate surface area density due to air traffic in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC and a chemical box model. We confirm large scale model results that at temperatures T > 210 K additional ozone loss -- mainly caused by hydrolysis of BrONO2 and N2O5 -- scales in proportion with the aviation-produced increase of the background aerosol surface area. However, at lower temperatures (< 210 K we isolate two effects which efficiently reduce the aircraft-induced perturbation: (1 background particles growth due to H2O and HNO3 uptake enhance scavenging losses of aviation-produced liquid particles and (2 the Kelvin effect efficiently limits chlorine activation on the small aircraft-induced droplets by reducing the solubility of chemically reacting species. These two effects lead to a substantial reduction of heterogeneous chemistry on aircraft-induced volatile aerosols under cold conditions. In contrast we find contrail ice particles to be potentially important for heterogeneous chlorine activation and ozone depletion. These features have not been taken into consideration in previous global studies of the atmospheric impact of aviation. Therefore, to parameterize them in global chemistry and transport models, we propose the following parameterisation: scale the hydrolysis reactions by the aircraft-induced surface area increase, and neglect heterogeneous chlorine reactions on liquid plume particles but not on ice contrails and aircraft induced ice clouds.

  18. Suppression of chlorine activation on aviation-produced volatile particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Meilinger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effect of nanometer-sized aircraft-induced aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4/H2O particles on atmospheric ozone as a function of temperature. Our calculations are based on a previously derived parameterization for the regional-scale perturbations of the sulfate surface area density due to air traffic in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC and a chemical box model. We confirm large scale model results that at temperatures T>210 K additional ozone loss -- mainly caused by hydrolysis of BrONO2 and N2O5 -- scales in proportion with the aviation-produced increase of the background aerosol surface area. However, at lower temperatures (2O and HNO3 uptake enhance scavenging losses of aviation-produced liquid particles and (2 the Kelvin effect efficiently limits chlorine activation on the small aircraft-induced droplets by reducing the solubility of chemically reacting species. These two effects lead to a substantial reduction of heterogeneous chemistry on aircraft-induced volatile aerosols under cold conditions. In contrast we find contrail ice particles to be potentially important for heterogeneous chlorine activation and reductions in ozone levels. These features have not been taken into consideration in previous global studies of the atmospheric impact of aviation. Therefore, to parameterize them in global chemistry and transport models, we propose the following parameterisation: scale the hydrolysis reactions by the aircraft-induced surface area increase, and neglect heterogeneous chlorine reactions on liquid plume particles but not on ice contrails and aircraft induced ice clouds.

  19. Workload comparison between hiking and indoor physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, Luigi; Pittiglio, Giancarlo; Federico, Bruno; Pallicca, Anastasia; Bernardi, Marco; Rodio, Angelo

    2012-10-01

    Walking is a physical activity able to maintain and improve aerobic fitness. This activity can easily be performed in all seasons both outdoors and indoors, but when it is performed in its natural environment, the use of specific equipment is required. In particular, it has been demonstrated that the use of trekking boots (TBs) induces a larger workload than those used indoors. Because an adequate fitness level is needed to practice hiking in safety, it is useful to know the energy demand of such an activity. This research aims at defining the metabolic engagement of hiking on natural paths with specific equipment at several speeds and comparing this with indoor ones (on a treadmill). This can thence be used to define the load that better reflects the one required to walk on natural paths. The walking energy cost (joules per kilogram per meter) at several speeds (0.28, 0.56, 0.84, 1.11, and 1.39 m·s(-1))-on level natural terrain while wearing suitable footwear (TBs) and on a treadmill at various raising slopes (0, 1, 2, 3, 4%) while wearing running shoes-was measured in 14 healthy young men (age 23.9 ± 2.9 years, stature 1.75 ± 0.04 m, and body mass 72.9 ± 6.3 kg). A physiological evaluation of all the subjects was performed before energy cost measurements. The results showed that outdoors, the oxygen uptake was consistently less than the ventilatory threshold at all speeds tested and that a 3% slope on the treadmill best reflects the outdoor walking energy expenditure. These findings will prove useful to plan proper training for hiking activity or mixed (outdoors and indoors) training program. PMID:22158090

  20. Evidence for heterogeneous chlorine activation in the tropical UTLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Hobe

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne in-situ observations of ClO in the tropics were made during the TROCCINOX (Aracatuba, Brasil, February 2005 and SCOUT-O3 (Darwin, Australia, November/December 2005 field campaigns. While during most flights significant amounts of ClO (≈10–20 parts per trillion, ppt were present only in aged stratospheric air, instances of enhanced ClO mixing ratios of up to 40 ppt – significantly exceeding those expected from gas phase chemistry – were observed in air masses of a more tropospheric character. Most of these observations concur with low temperatures or with the presence of cirrus clouds (often both, suggesting that cirrus ice particles and/or liquid aerosol at low temperatures may promote significant heterogeneous chlorine activation in the tropical upper troposphere lower stratosphere (UTLS. In two case studies, particularly high levels of ClO observed were reproduced by chemistry simulations only under the assumption that significant denoxification had occurred in the observed air. At least for one of these flights, a significant denoxification is in contrast to the observed NO levels suggesting that the coupling of chlorine and nitrogen compounds in the tropical UTLS may not be completely understood.

  1. Evidence for heterogeneous chlorine activation in the tropical UTLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Hobe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne in-situ observations of ClO in the tropics were made during the TROCCINOX (Aracatuba, Brazil, February 2005 and SCOUT-O3 (Darwin, Australia, November/December 2005 field campaigns. While during most flights significant amounts of ClO (≈10–20 parts per trillion, ppt were present only in aged stratospheric air, instances of enhanced ClO mixing ratios of up to 40 ppt – significantly exceeding those expected from gas phase chemistry – were observed in air masses of a more tropospheric character. Most of these observations are associated with low temperatures or with the presence of cirrus clouds (often both, suggesting that cirrus ice particles and/or liquid aerosol at low temperatures may promote significant heterogeneous chlorine activation in the tropical upper troposphere lower stratosphere (UTLS. In two case studies, particularly high levels of ClO observed were reproduced by chemistry simulations only under the assumption that significant denoxification had occurred in the observed air. However, to reproduce the ClO observations in these simulations, O3 mixing ratios higher than observed had to be assumed, and at least for one of these flights, a significant denoxification is in contrast to the observed NO levels, suggesting that the coupling of chlorine and nitrogen compounds in the tropical UTLS may not be completely understood.

  2. Bulk chlorine uptake by polyamide active layers of thin-film composite membranes upon exposure to free chlorine-kinetics, mechanisms, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    We studied the volume-averaged chlorine (Cl) uptake into the bulk region of the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine. Volume-averaged measurements were obtained using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with samples prepared at a range of free chlorine concentrations, exposure times, and mixing, rinsing, and pH conditions. Our volume-averaged measurements complement previous studies that have quantified Cl uptake at the active layer surface (top ≈ 7 nm) and advance the mechanistic understanding of Cl uptake by aromatic polyamide active layers. Our results show that surface Cl uptake is representative of and underestimates volume-averaged Cl uptake under acidic conditions and alkaline conditions, respectively. Our results also support that (i) under acidic conditions, N-chlorination followed by Orton rearrangement is the dominant Cl uptake mechanism with N-chlorination as the rate-limiting step; (ii) under alkaline conditions, N-chlorination and dechlorination of N-chlorinated amide links by hydroxyl ion are the two dominant processes; and (iii) under neutral pH conditions, the rates of N-chlorination and Orton rearrangement are comparable. We propose a kinetic model that satisfactorily describes Cl uptake under acidic and alkaline conditions, with the largest discrepancies between model and experiment occurring under alkaline conditions at relatively high chlorine exposures. PMID:24506252

  3. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Eigl, Rosmarie; Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter; Sterba, Johannes H.; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t1/2 = 37.24 min) - accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the 36Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for 36Cl/Cl analysis.

  4. Changes in the Modal Structure of Indoor Aerosol Due to Simulated Indoor Activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glytsos, T.; Ondráček, Jakub; Smolík, Jiří; Lazaridis, M.

    Helsinki : -, 2010, P1F42. ISBN N. [International Aerosol Conference IAC 2010. Helsinki (FI), 29.08.2010-03.09.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : indoor aerosol * modal structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry www.iac2010.fi

  5. Temperature thresholds for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drdla, K.; Müller, R.

    2012-07-01

    Low stratospheric temperatures are known to be responsible for heterogeneous chlorine activation that leads to polar ozone depletion. Here, we discuss the temperature threshold below which substantial chlorine activation occurs. We suggest that the onset of chlorine activation is dominated by reactions on cold binary aerosol particles, without the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), i.e. without any significant uptake of HNO3 from the gas phase. Using reaction rates on cold binary aerosol in a model of stratospheric chemistry, a chlorine activation threshold temperature, TACL, is derived. At typical stratospheric conditions, TACL is similar in value to TNAT (within 1-2 K), the highest temperature at which nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) can exist. TNAT is still in use to parameterise the threshold temperature for the onset of chlorine activation. However, perturbations can cause TACL to differ from TNAT: TACL is dependent upon H2O and potential temperature, but unlike TNAT is not dependent upon HNO3. Furthermore, in contrast to TNAT, TACL is dependent upon the stratospheric sulfate aerosol loading and thus provides a means to estimate the impact on polar ozone of strong volcanic eruptions and some geo-engineering options, which are discussed. A parameterisation of TACL is provided here, allowing it to be calculated for low solar elevation (or high solar zenith angle) over a comprehensive range of stratospheric conditions. Considering TACL as a proxy for chlorine activation cannot replace a detailed model calculation, and polar ozone loss is influenced by other factors apart from the initial chlorine activation. However, TACL provides a more accurate description of the temperature conditions necessary for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere than TNAT.

  6. Temperature thresholds for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drdla, K. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Mueller, R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (DE). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-7)

    2012-07-01

    Low stratospheric temperatures are known to be responsible for heterogeneous chlorine activation that leads to polar ozone depletion. Here, we discuss the temperature threshold below which substantial chlorine activation occurs. We suggest that the onset of chlorine activation is dominated by reactions on cold binary aerosol particles, without the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), i.e. without any significant uptake of HNO{sub 3} from the gas phase. Using reaction rates on cold binary aerosol in a model of stratospheric chemistry, a chlorine activation threshold temperature, T{sub ACL}, is derived. At typical stratospheric conditions, T{sub ACL} is similar in value to T{sub NAT} (within 1-2 K), the highest temperature at which nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) can exist. T{sub NAT} is still in use to parameterise the threshold temperature for the onset of chlorine activation. However, perturbations can cause T{sub ACL} to differ from T{sub NAT}: T{sub ACL} is dependent upon H{sub 2} O and potential temperature, but unlike T{sub NAT} is not dependent upon HNO3. Furthermore, in contrast to T{sub NAT}, T{sub ACL} is dependent upon the stratospheric sulfate aerosol loading and thus provides a means to estimate the impact on polar ozone of strong volcanic eruptions and some geo-engineering options, which are discussed. A parameterisation of T{sub ACL} is provided here, allowing it to be calculated for low solar elevation (or high solar zenith angle) over a comprehensive range of stratospheric conditions. Considering T{sub ACL} as a proxy for chlorine activation cannot replace a detailed model calculation, and polar ozone loss is influenced by other factors apart from the initial chlorine activation. However, T{sub ACL} provides a more accurate description of the temperature conditions necessary for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere than T{sub NAT}. (orig.)

  7. Chlorinated Iridoid Glucosides from Veronica longifolia and their Antioxidant Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Harput, U. Sebnem;

    2010-01-01

    From Veronica longifolia were isolated three chlorinated iridoid glucosides, namely asystasioside E (6) and its 6-O-esters 6a and 6b, named longifoliosides A and B, respectively. The structures of 6a and 6b were proved by analysis of their spectroscopic data and by conversion to the catalpol este......), superoxide (SO), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals....

  8. The enhanced electrocatalytic activity of graphene co-doped with chlorine and fluorine atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene co-doped with fluorine and chlorine was prepared through a one-step synthesis to greatly enhance its electrocatalytic activity and stability for oxygen reduction reaction. - Highlights: • Developed a one-step synthesis of graphene co-doped with different halogen atoms. • The obtained graphene exhibits great electrocatalytic activity in the oxygen reduction reaction. • The chlorine–fluorine co-doped graphene has great stability in methanol crossover effect. • Experiments indicate that there are possible synergetic interactions between halogen dopants. - Abstract: Graphene co-doped with fluorine and chlorine heteroatoms was prepared through a one-step synthesis and was investigated as the oxygen reduction electrocatalysts. Voltammetric measurements show that fluorine and chlorine co-doped graphene has remarkable catalytic activity toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen in alkaline solution. Besides having a high tolerance to methanol crossover effect, the co-doped graphene also showed a better stability than that of commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts and of the chlorine-doped graphene that was prepared by the same approach. The charge transfer resistance of the co-doped graphene was substantially lower than that of the chlorine-doped graphene, suggesting that there may exist a synergistic interaction between fluorine and chlorine dopants. The rapid synthetic method reported here provides an effective approach for future investigation of halogen (co-) doped graphene

  9. Measurements of radon progeny activity on typical indoor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of studies aimed at defining how well radon progeny on surfaces can be measured, information that is needed in order to test physical/mathematical models governing indoor radon progeny behaviour, are described. One experiment compared the decomposition on to different surfaces. Only relatively small differences were found among metal, filter paper, broadcloth, corduroy fabric, vinyl wallpaper, glass, and latex paint, but polyethylene film collected two to four times as much as the others, due most likely to electrostatic charge on the plastic surface. Another experiment compared the gamma and gross alpha count methods of measuring surface activity for metal, filter paper, broadcloth and corduroy surfaces. No difference for the surfaces tested was found from which it is concluded that, even for rougher surfaces, progeny atoms deposit mainly on the outer layers. A final experiment compared in situ and surrogate-surface methods for measuring surface deposition. For most tests, the two methods agreed within 30%, and the average ratio was not significantly different from unity. 210Po is a complication in the in situ method. An unexpected location effect was found in the experiments conducted in houses with high radon concentrations: the deposition on the ceiling was higher than on the surfaces. (author)

  10. Indoor Tracking to Understand Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour: Exploratory Study in UK Office Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Spinney, Richard; Smith, Lee; Ucci, Marcella; Fisher, Abigail; Konstantatou, Marina; Sawyer, Alexia; Wardle, Jane; Marmot, Alexi

    2015-01-01

    Little is known of the patterns of physical activity, standing and sitting by office workers. However, insight into these behaviours is of growing interest, notably in regard to public health priorities to reduce non-communicable disease risk factors associated with high levels of sitting time and low levels of physical activity. With the advent and increasing availability of indoor tracking systems it is now becoming possible to build detailed pictures of the usage of indoor spaces. This pap...

  11. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Thorn, R. M. S.; G.M. Robinson; Reynolds, D M

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard micro...

  12. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J.; De Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutageni...

  13. Characterization of indoor and outdoor pool fires with active calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koski, J.A.; Gill, W.; Gritzo, L.A.; Kent, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wix, S.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A water cooled, 1 m {times} 1 m, vertical calorimeter panel has been used in conjunction with other fire diagnostics to characterize a 6 m {times} 6 m outdoor and three 3 m {times} 3 m indoor JP-4 pool fires. Measurements reported include calorimeter surface heat flux and surface temperatures, flame temperatures, and gas flow velocities in the fire. From the data, effective radiative absorption coefficients for various zones in the fires have been estimated. The outdoor test was conducted at Sandia`s Coyote Canyon test facility, while indoor tests were conducted at the indoor SMokE Reduction Facility (SMERF) at the same location. The measurements provide data useful in calibrating simple analytic fire models intended for the analysis of packages containing hazardous materials.

  14. Characterization of indoor and outdoor pool fires with active calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water cooled, 1 m x 1 m, vertical calorimeter panel has been used in conjunction with other fire diagnostics to characterize a 6 m x 6 m outdoor and three 3 m x 3 m indoor JP-4 pool fires. Measurements reported include calorimeter surface heat flux and surface temperatures, flame temperatures, and gas flow velocities in the fire. From the data, effective radiative absorption coefficients for various zones in the fires have been estimated. The outdoor test was conducted at Sandia's Coyote Canyon test facility, while indoor tests were conducted at the indoor SMokE Reduction Facility (SMERF) at the same location. The measurements provide data useful in calibrating simple analytic fire models intended for the analysis of packages containing hazardous materials

  15. Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with Activated Carbon Fiber (ACF) Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Sidheswaran, Meera

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the potential environmental and energy benefits of using activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters for air cleaning in HVAC systems. The parallel aims for the air cleaning system were to enable reduced indoor exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and to simultaneously allow reduced rates and energy consumption for outdoor-air ventilation. We evaluated the use of ACF media to adsorb VOCs from indoor air during repeated simulated 12-hour to 24-hour periods of occupancy. ...

  16. Heterogeneous chlorine activation on stratospheric aerosols and clouds in the Arctic polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wegner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine activation in the Arctic is investigated by examining different parameterizations for uptake coefficients on stratospheric aerosols, high-resolution in-situ measurements and vortex-wide satellite observations. The parameterizations for heterogeneous chemistry on liquid aerosols are most sensitive to temperature with the reaction rates doubling for every 1 K increase in temperature. However, differences between the currently available parameterizations are negligible. For Nitric Acid Trihydrate particles (NAT the major factors of uncertainty are the number density of nucleated particles and different parameterizations for heterogeneous chemistry. These two factors induce an uncertainty that covers several orders of magnitude on the reaction rate. Nonetheless, since predicted reaction rates on liquid aerosols always exceed those on NAT, the overall uncertainty for chlorine activation is small. In-situ observations of ClOx from Arctic winters in 2005 and 2010 are used to evaluate the heterogeneous chemistry parameterizations. The conditions for these measurements proved to be very different between those two winters with HCl being the limiting reacting partner for the 2005 measurements and ClONO2 for the 2010 measurements. Modeled levels of chlorine activation are in very good agreement with the in-situ observations and the surface area provided by Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs has only a limited impact on modeled chlorine activation. This indicates that the parameterizations give a good representation of the processes in the atmosphere. Back-trajectories started on the location of the observations in 2005 indicate temperatures on the threshold for PSC formation, hence the surface area is mainly provided by the background aerosol. Still, the model shows additional chlorine activation during this time-frame, providing cautionary evidence for chlorine activation even in the absence of PSCs. Vortex-averaged satellite

  17. Characterization of Particulate Matter Concentrations during Controlled Indoor Activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glytsos, T.; Ondráček, Jakub; Ondráčková, Lucie; Kopanakis, I.; Lazaridis, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 12 (2010), s. 1539-1549. ISSN 1352-2310 Grant ostatní: MTDK(XE) CT/2004/513849 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : indoor sources * number size distribution * emission rates Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2010

  18. Removal of iodide from water by chlorination and subsequent adsorption on powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikari, Mariya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine oxidation followed by treatment with activated carbon was studied as a possible method for removing radioactive iodine from water. Chlorination time, chlorine dose, the presence of natural organic matter (NOM), the presence of bromide ion (Br⁻), and carbon particle size strongly affected iodine removal. Treatment with superfine powdered activated carbon (SPAC) after 10-min oxidation with chlorine (1 mg-Cl₂/L) removed 90% of the iodine in NOM-containing water (dissolved organic carbon concentration, 1.5 mg-C/L). Iodine removal in NOM-containing water increased with increasing chlorine dose up to 0.1 mg-Cl₂/L but decreased at chlorine doses of >1.0 mg-Cl₂/L. At a low chlorine dose, nonadsorbable iodide ion (I⁻) was oxidized to adsorbable hypoiodous acid (HOI). When the chlorine dose was increased, some of the HOI reacted with NOM to form adsorbable organic iodine (organic-I). Increasing the chlorine dose further did not enhance iodine removal, owing to the formation of nonadsorbable iodate ion (IO₃⁻). Co-existing Br⁻ depressed iodine removal, particularly in NOM-free water, because hypobromous acid (HOBr) formed and catalyzed the oxidation of HOI to IO₃⁻. However, the effect of Br⁻ was small in the NOM-containing water because organic-I formed instead of IO₃⁻. SPAC (median particle diameter, 0.62 μm) had a higher equilibrium adsorption capacity for organic-I than did conventional PAC (median diameter, 18.9 μm), but the capacities of PAC and SPAC for HOI were similar. The reason for the higher equilibrium adsorption capacity for organic-I was that organic-I was adsorbed principally on the exterior of the PAC particles and not inside the PAC particles, as indicated by direct visualization of the solid-phase iodine concentration profiles in PAC particles by field emission electron probe microanalysis. In contrast, HOI was adsorbed evenly throughout the entire PAC particle. PMID:25462731

  19. Contribution of liquid, NAT and ice particles to chlorine activation and ozone depletion during Antarctic winter and spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kirner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous reactions in the Antarctic stratosphere are the cause of chlorine activation and ozone depletion, but the relative roles of different types of PSCs in chlorine activation is an open question. We use multi-year simulations of the chemistry-climate model EMAC to investigate the impact that the various types of PSCs have on Antarctic chlorine activation and ozone loss. One standard and three sensitivity EMAC simulations have been performed. The results of these simulations show that the significance of heterogeneous reactions on NAT and ice particles, in comparison to liquid particles, is subordinate regarding chlorine activation and ozone depletion in Antarctic winter and spring. The heterogeneous chemistry on liquid particles is sufficient to activate at least 90% of the chlorine reservoir species. With the exception of the upper PSC regions between 10 and 30 hPa where temporarily the ice particles have a relevant contribution to the chlorine activation and during the initial PSC occurrence with short NAT contributions the liquid particles alone are sufficient to activate almost all of the available chlorine. In the model simulations heterogeneous chemistry on liquid particles is responsible for more than 90% of the ozone depletion in Antarctic spring. Only up to 5 DU of column ozone in high southern latitudes is depleted by chlorine activation due to additional heterogeneous chemistry on ice particles and less than 0.5 DU due to additional heterogeneous chemistry on NAT particles.

  20. Chlorine ions effect on photochemical activity of alcoholate complexes of vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photochemical activity of vanadium complexes during alcogolate ion substitution by chlorine is studied. Using the method of electron spectroscopy and ESR photochemical transformations in alcohol solutions, containing alkoxides VO(OR)3, VO(OR)2Cl, VO(OR)Cl2 as well as VOCl3 with additions of HCl and LiCl, are investigated. It is shown that with the increase of chloride-ion concentration in solution the rate of all the stages of photochemical reduction of vanadium increases considerably. It is also found that photoreduction of vanadium (5) in the case of absence of chlorine ions ends at the stage of vanadium (3) complex formation, whereas when chlorine ions are present in solution the process proceeds further to the formation of divalent vanadium complexes

  1. Influence of organophosphorus pesticides on peroxidase and chlorination activity of human myeloperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara; Momić, Tatjana; Radojević, Miloš M; Vasić, Vesna

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitory effects of five organophosphorus pesticides (diazinon, malathion, chlorpyrifos, azinphos-methyl and phorate) and their oxo-analogs on human myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were investigated. While inspecting separately peroxidase and chlorination activity, it was observed that investigated OPs affect peroxidase activity, but not chlorination activity. Among investigated pesticides, malathion and malaoxon have showed the highest power to inhibit MPO peroxidase activity with IC50 values of the order of 3×10(-7) and 5×10(-9) M, respectively. It was proposed that inhibition trend is rendered by molecular structure which invokes steric hindrance for OPs interaction with MPO active center responsible for peroxidase activity. In addition, it was concluded that physiological function of MPO is not affected by any of the investigated OPs. PMID:25149236

  2. Polar Stratospheric Cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modelled by ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nakajima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs by CALIPSO and of HCl, ClO and HNO3 by MLS along air mass trajectories to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels, and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/10 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT and super-cooled ternary solution (STS mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed, and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an airmass encountered PSCs. The observed and modelled dependence of the rate of chlorine activation on the PSC composition class was small. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  3. Active-passive measurements and CFD based modelling for indoor radon dispersion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) play a significant role in indoor pollutant dispersion study. Radon is an indoor pollutant which is radioactive and inert gas in nature. The concentration level and spatial distribution of radon may be affected by the dwelling's ventilation conditions. Present work focus at the study of indoor radon gas distribution via measurement and CFD modeling in naturally ventilated living room. The need of the study is the prediction of activity level and to study the effect of natural ventilation on indoor radon. Two measurement techniques (Passive measurement using pin-hole dosimeters and active measurement using continuous radon monitor (SRM)) were used for the validation purpose of CFD results. The CFD simulation results were compared with the measurement results at 15 points, 3 XY planes at different heights along with the volumetric average concentration. The simulation results found to be comparable with the measurement results. The future scope of these CFD codes is to study the effect of varying inflow rate of air on the radon concentration level and dispersion pattern. - Highlights: • The distribution of radon gas in indoor environment was simulated using CFD modelling. • The distribution of radon was found to be more homogenous in open room condition. • The radon concentration level in open room was low as compare to closed room due to enhanced ventilation rate. • Simulation results are in agreement with active and passive measurements results

  4. The activation of thin film CdTe solar cells using alternative chlorine containing compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniscalco, B., E-mail: B.Maniscalco@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (United Kingdom); Abbas, A.; Bowers, J.W.; Kaminski, P.M.; Bass, K. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (United Kingdom); West, G. [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Walls, J.M. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    The re-crystallisation of thin film cadmium telluride (CdTe) using cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) is a vital process for obtaining high efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, the precise micro-structural mechanisms involved are not well understood. In this study, we have used alternative chlorine-containing compounds to determine if these can also assist the re-crystallisation of the CdTe layer and to understand the separate roles of cadmium and chlorine during the activation. The compounds used were: tellurium tetrachloride (TeCl{sub 4}), cadmium acetate (Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}), hydrochloric acid (HCl) and zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}). TeCl{sub 4} was used to assess the role of Cl and the formation of a Te-rich outer layer which may assist the formation of the back contact. (Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}) and HCl were used to distinguish between the roles of cadmium and chlorine in the process. Finally, ZnCl{sub 2} was employed as an alternative to CdCl{sub 2}. We report on the efficacy of using these alternative Cl-containing compounds to remove the high density of planar defects present in untreated CdTe. - Highlights: • Cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) activation treatment • Alternative chlorine containing compounds • Microstructure analysis and electrical performances.

  5. The activation of thin film CdTe solar cells using alternative chlorine containing compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The re-crystallisation of thin film cadmium telluride (CdTe) using cadmium chloride (CdCl2) is a vital process for obtaining high efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, the precise micro-structural mechanisms involved are not well understood. In this study, we have used alternative chlorine-containing compounds to determine if these can also assist the re-crystallisation of the CdTe layer and to understand the separate roles of cadmium and chlorine during the activation. The compounds used were: tellurium tetrachloride (TeCl4), cadmium acetate (Cd(CH3CO2)2), hydrochloric acid (HCl) and zinc chloride (ZnCl2). TeCl4 was used to assess the role of Cl and the formation of a Te-rich outer layer which may assist the formation of the back contact. (Cd(CH3CO2)2) and HCl were used to distinguish between the roles of cadmium and chlorine in the process. Finally, ZnCl2 was employed as an alternative to CdCl2. We report on the efficacy of using these alternative Cl-containing compounds to remove the high density of planar defects present in untreated CdTe. - Highlights: • Cadmium chloride (CdCl2) activation treatment • Alternative chlorine containing compounds • Microstructure analysis and electrical performances

  6. Indoor and underground radon activity in the northern part of Bangladesh: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors were used to determine the indoor and underground radon activity at three locations in the northern part of Bangladesh. The indoor radon activity at Naogaon was found to be higher than that at Rajshahi and Ruppur. Radon concentration in the mud-built houses at Naogaon was estimated to be ∼ 500 Bq m-3 (14pCi 1-1) which is more than three times the recommended limit. The underground radon emanation at Naogaon was found to be one order of magnitude higher than that at the other two places. (author)

  7. Indoor metallic pollution related to mining activity in the Bolivian Altiplano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental pollution associated with mining and metallurgical activities reaches its greatest extent in several Andean cities and villages. Many locations in this area have accumulated through centuries a large amount of mining wastes, often disregarding the magnitude of this situation. However, in these naturally mineralized regions, there is little information available stating the exact role of mining and metallurgical industries in urban pollution. In this study, we demonstrated that the various metallic elements present in indoor dust (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, Sn, Zn) had a common origin and this contamination was increased by the proximity to the mines. Lead dust concentration was found at concerning levels for public health. In addition, wrong behaviors such as carrying mining workwear home contributed to this indoor dust pollution. Consequently, the constant exposure of the population could represent a potential health hazard for vulnerable groups, especially children. - Highlights: → We measured polymetallic pollution in household indoor dust from a mining town. → Toxic elements (Pb, As, Cd, Sb) in dust are correlated, suggesting a common origin. → The most polluted houses are within a 1 km radius around the mining center. → Carrying mining workwear home increases indoor pollution. → Lead concentrations in dust represent a serious concern for Public Health (600 μg/g). - In a typical Andean mining city, the urban indoor pollution with toxic metallic elements is directly related to the closeness of the mining activities.

  8. Electrochemically activated water as an alternative to chlorine for decentralized disinfection

    KAUST Repository

    Ghebremichael, Kebreab A.

    2011-06-01

    Electrochemically activated (ECA) water is being extensively studied and considered as an alternative to chlorine for disinfection. Some researchers claim that ECA is by and large a chlorine solution, while others claim the presence of reactive oxygen species such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals in addition to chlorine. This study compares sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ECA in terms of disinfection efficacy, trihalomethanes (THMs) formation, stability and composition. The studies were carried out under different process conditions (pH 5,7 and 9, disinfectant concentrations of 2-5 mg/L and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of 2-4 mg/L). The results indicated that in the presence of low DOC (<2 mg/L) ECA showed better disinfection efficacy for Escherichia coli inactivation, formed lower THM and had better stability compared with NaOCl at both pH 5 and 7. Stability studies of stock solutions showed that over a period of 30 days, ECA decayed by only 5% while NaOCl decayed by 37.5% at temperatures of 4 °C. In a fresh ECA of 200 mg/L chlorine, about 5.3 mg/L ozone and 36.9 mg/L ClO2 were detected. The study demonstrates that ECA could be a suitable alternative to NaOCl where decentralized production and use are required. © IWA Publishing 2011.

  9. H.R. 5155: This Act may be cited as the Indoor Air Quality Act of 1990. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, June 26, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bill was introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives on June, 26, 1990 to authorize a national program to reduce the threat to human health posed by exposure to contaminants in indoor air. Recent studies indicate that contaminants in indoor air include radon, asbestos, volatile organic chemicals (including formaldehyde and benzene), combustion by-products (including carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides), metals and gases (including lead, chlorine, and ozone), respirable particulates, tobacco smoke, and other contaminants. Other elements include indoor air quality research; management practices and ventilation standards; indoor air contaminant health advisories; national indoor air quality response strategy; federal building evaluation and remediation program; state and local indoor air quality programs; office of indoor air quality; council on indoor air quality; indoor air quality information clearinghouse; building assessment demonstration; state and federal authority; and authorizations for research and related activities

  10. Measurement of radon activity concentration and determination of inhalatory indoor radiation burden in Hungarian dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon activity concentrations were measured by LR-115 track detectors in 122 residential buildings in Hungary during 2.5 years in 3-month exposure periods. For all the buildings the mean value is 42.1 Bq/m3 and the arithmetic mean is 55.2 Bq/m3. The estimated per capita annual effective dose equivalent is 2.1 mSv based on measurements and on the recommendations of the ICRP 50. The indoor radon levels were also checked for various building materials, location of flats, seasons and geographical position. (author) 11 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  11. Children's Physical Activity Levels during Indoor Recess Dance Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Heather; Koufoudakis, Ryann; Beighle, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children's physical activity (PA) levels remain low, and schools are being asked to assume a leadership role in PA promotion. Research suggests outdoor recess contributes to children's overall PA levels. However, similar research is not available for indoor recess, which occurs frequently due to a variety of factors. The…

  12. Determination of chlorine in high purity materials by charged particle activation analysis using deuteron beam from VEC accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative determination of chlorine by conventional methods viz., AAS, ICP-OES is difficult and erroneous at times due to gaseous nature of elemental chlorine. It is possible to determine chlorine by NAA and charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) producing activation product 38Cl (t1/2 = 37.2 min, 1642 (32.8 %), 2168 keV (44 %)). Fast INAA method has been applied to determine Cl in concentration ranges 10 mgkg-1 in some suitable matrices in PCF of DHRUVA reactor with a neutron flux of 1013 cm-2s-1 with a detection limit of Cl of ∼1 mgkg-1

  13. Vortex-wide chlorine activation by a mesoscale PSC event in the Arctic winter of 2009/10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Tobias; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Tritscher, Ines; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic polar vortex of the 2009/10 winter temperatures were low enough to allow widespread formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). These clouds occurred during the initial chlorine activation phase which provided the opportunity to investigate the impact of PSCs on chlorine activation. Satellite observations of gas-phase species and PSCs are used in combination with trajectory modeling to assess this initial activation. The initial activation occurred in association with the formation of PSCs over the east coast of Greenland at the beginning of January 2010. Although this area of PSCs covered only a small portion of the vortex, it was responsible for almost the entire initial activation of chlorine vortex wide. Observations show HCl (hydrochloric acid) mixing ratios decreased rapidly in and downstream of this region. Trajectory calculations and simplified heterogeneous chemistry modeling confirmed that the initial chlorine activation continued until ClONO2 (chlorine nitrate) was completely depleted and the activated air masses were advected throughout the polar vortex. For the calculation of heterogeneous reaction rates, surface area density is estimated from backscatter observations. Modeled heterogeneous reaction rates along trajectories intersecting with the PSCs indicate that the initial phase of chlorine activation occurred in just a few hours. These calculations also indicate that chlorine activation on the binary background aerosol is significantly slower than on the PSC particles and the observed chlorine activation can only be explained by an increase in surface area density due to PSC formation. Furthermore, there is a strong correlation between the magnitude of the observed HCl depletion and PSC surface area density.

  14. EFFECT OF FLUORINE AND CHLORINE IONS ON THE REACTION SINTERING OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED ZIRCON-ALUMINA MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zamani Foroshani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of fluorine and chlorine ions on the formation of mullite during the reaction sintering of mechanically activated zircon-alumina powder mixture. The results showed that mechanical activation of zirconalumina powder mixture for 20 h led to grain refinement and partial amorphization. In the presence of fluorine and chlorine ions, complete formation of mullite in the mechanically activated sample occurred after 2 h of reaction sintering at 1300oC and 1400oC, respectively. In the sample lacking fluorine and chlorine ions, mullitization was not completed even after 2 h of reaction sintering at 1400oC. It was concluded that presence of fluorine and chlorine ions enhance the dissociation of zircon and formation of mullite during the reaction sintering of mechanically activated zircon-alumina mixture.

  15. Diamagnetic Raman Optical Activity of Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine Gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Kapitán, J.; Pačes, Ondřej; Bouř, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 10 (2016), s. 3504-3508. ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00431S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : angular momentum theory * diamagnetic molecules * excited electronic states * magnetic field * Raman optical activity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 11.261, year: 2014

  16. Photochemical chlorine and bromine activation from artificial saline snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Wren

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The activation of reactive halogen species – particularly Cl2 – from sea ice and snow surfaces is not well understood. In this study, we used a photochemical snow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to investigate the production of Br2, BrCl and Cl2 from NaCl/NaBr-doped artificial snow samples. At temperatures above the NaCl-water eutectic, illumination of samples (λ > 310 nm in the presence of gas phase O3 led to the accelerated release of Br2, BrCl and the release of Cl2 in a process that was significantly enhanced by acidity, high surface area and additional gas phase Br2. Cl2 production was only observed when both light and ozone were present. The total halogen release depended on [O3] and pre-freezing [NaCl]. Our observations support a "halogen explosion" mechanism occurring within the snowpack which is initiated by heterogeneous oxidation, and propagated by Br2 or BrCl photolysis and by recycling of HOBr and HOCl into the snowpack. Our study implicates an important role for active chemistry occurring within the interstitial air of aged (i.e., acidic snow for halogen activation at polar sunrise.

  17. Photochemical chlorine and bromine activation from artificial saline snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Wren

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The activation of reactive halogen species – particularly Cl2 – from sea ice and snow surfaces is not well understood. In this study, we used a photochemical snow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to investigate the production of Br2, BrCl and Cl2 from NaCl/NaBr-doped artificial snow samples. At temperatures above the NaCl-water eutectic, illumination of samples (λ > 310 nm in the presence of gas phase O3 led to the accelerated release of Br2, BrCl and the release of Cl2 in a process that was significantly enhanced by acidity, high surface area and additional gas phase Br2. Cl2 production was only observed when both light and ozone were present. The total halogen release depended on [ozone] and pre-freezing [NaCl]. Our observations support a "halogen explosion" mechanism occurring within the snowpack, which is initiated by heterogeneous oxidation and propagated by Br2 or BrCl photolysis and by recycling of HOBr and HOCl into the snowpack. Our study implicates this important role of active chemistry occurring within the interstitial air of aged (i.e. acidic snow for halogen activation at polar sunrise.

  18. Novel chlorinated dibenzofurans isolated from the cellular slime mold, Polysphondylium filamentosum, and their biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Kubohara, Yuzuru; Nguyen, Van Hai; Katou, Yasuhiro; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2013-08-01

    Cellular slime molds are expected to have the huge potential for producing secondary metabolites including polyketides, and we have studied the diversity of secondary metabolites of cellular slime molds for their potential utilization as new biological resources for natural product chemistry. From the methanol extract of fruiting bodies of Polysphondylium filamentosum, we obtained new chlorinated benzofurans Pf-1 (4) and Pf-2 (5) which display multiple biological activities; these include stalk cell differentiation-inducing activity in the well-studied cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, and inhibitory activities on cell proliferation in mammalian cells and gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:23746784

  19. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP. PMID:25465650

  20. Active Houses - development of carbon neutral buildings with healthy indoor comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksen, Kurt Emil (VKR Holding (Denmark)). e-mail: kee@vkr-holding.com

    2009-07-01

    The European Commission and the European Parliament are calling for national strategies for low to zero carbon housing in their proposal for a revision of the EPBD; the European Commission is also recommending to include application of renewable energy sources, use of passive heating and cooling elements and shading in the design of the building and in the design of the building and to ensure indoor air quality and adequate natural light in buildings. A few Member States have already initiated targets on low energy housing, and there are several demonstration projects showing how future housing could be both zero carbon buildings and have a high indoor comfort level. The European and national strategies for low energy housing must focus on energy efficiency and CO{sub 2} reductions, but as people spend approximately 90% of their life inside buildings, future housing also needs to be developed with a focus on healthy indoor comfort. The different national standards for low energy housing have mainly been focusing on energy savings, but some new standards also focus on energy saving in combination with indoor comfort requirements, like the 'Sustainable Home standard' and BOLIG+. At the same time the German energy legislation and the EU Renewable Energy Directive are setting requirements to integrate a proportion of renewable energy into all new buildings and buildings undergoing major renovation, while others like France and England have targets to move towards energy producing houses. Therefore, a new approach, where energy efficiency, indoor climate and integration of renewable energy are included, is needed. A number of partners from the construction sector have initiated the first thoughts and, as they intend to move from passive systems to active systems, the network is named Active Houses.

  1. Indoor Tracking to Understand Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour: Exploratory Study in UK Office Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinney, Richard; Smith, Lee; Ucci, Marcella; Fisher, Abigail; Konstantatou, Marina; Sawyer, Alexia; Wardle, Jane; Marmot, Alexi

    2015-01-01

    Little is known of the patterns of physical activity, standing and sitting by office workers. However, insight into these behaviours is of growing interest, notably in regard to public health priorities to reduce non-communicable disease risk factors associated with high levels of sitting time and low levels of physical activity. With the advent and increasing availability of indoor tracking systems it is now becoming possible to build detailed pictures of the usage of indoor spaces. This paper reports initial results of indoor tracking used in conjunction with the ActivPAL activity monitoring device. In this paper we give an overview of the usage of the tracking system and its installation and illustrate some of the resultant data. We also provide preliminary results that investigate the relationship between location, light physical activity and sitting in a small sample of office workers (n=33) from two separate office environments in order to demonstrate the relevance and explanatory power of the technique. PMID:25993515

  2. Indoor Tracking to Understand Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour: Exploratory Study in UK Office Buildings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Spinney

    Full Text Available Little is known of the patterns of physical activity, standing and sitting by office workers. However, insight into these behaviours is of growing interest, notably in regard to public health priorities to reduce non-communicable disease risk factors associated with high levels of sitting time and low levels of physical activity. With the advent and increasing availability of indoor tracking systems it is now becoming possible to build detailed pictures of the usage of indoor spaces. This paper reports initial results of indoor tracking used in conjunction with the ActivPAL activity monitoring device. In this paper we give an overview of the usage of the tracking system and its installation and illustrate some of the resultant data. We also provide preliminary results that investigate the relationship between location, light physical activity and sitting in a small sample of office workers (n=33 from two separate office environments in order to demonstrate the relevance and explanatory power of the technique.

  3. Enriched concentrations of bromine, chlorine, and iodine in urban rainfall as determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of bromine, chlorine and iodine were determined in bulk rain as part of a detailed urban monitoring program. Instrumental neutron activation gives simultaneous non-destructive analysis of these halogens with detection limits of 2, 30 and 1 ng/g for bromine, chlorine, and iodine, respectively. Results for enrichment factor calculations based on crustal, seawater and lake water reference elements were somewhat contradictory. Elemental ratios of Br/Cl, I/Cl, Br/Pb, and Cl/Pb, together with an analysis of chlorine in urban surface materials, support the suggestions that local anthropogenic sources may cause the high bromine and chlorine concentrations observed in urban precipitation while fractionation from an oceanic source is likely responsible for high iodine concentrations. (author)

  4. Indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Susanne; Recevska, Ieva

     The objective of the 35th specific agreement is to provide support to the EEA activities in Environment and Health (E&H) on the topic of indoor air quality. The specific objectives have been to provide an overview of indoor air related projects in EU and indoor air related policies as well...

  5. Demonstration of a Realtime Active-Tag RFID, Java Based Indoor Localization System using Particle Filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Wendlandt, Kai; Robertson, Patrick; Khider, Mohammed; Angermann, Michael; Sukchaya, Kosawat

    2007-01-01

    To develop and demonstrate accurate indoor pedestrian navigation, we implemented a flexible location framework which is able to use various sensors as positioning sources. In the current setup, the main positioning data is derived from an active long range RFID system which collects RSS values from various RFID tags in the environment. The position is calculated using particle filtering algorithms. The demonstration shows the real time tracking of a person on a remote visualization screen.

  6. Prediction and Simulation the Breakthrough of Residual Chlorine Removal by Granular Activated Carbon Adsorbent Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusul Naseer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study has included two parts. The first part has dealt with carbon production whereas the date Palm was used to produce Granular Activated Carbon (GAC with specific physical characteristics. The new produced of GAC is used to adsorbate the Residual chlorine from water by deep bed filter column. In the second part, the experimental results of the breakthrough of residual chlorine curves is predicted and simulated using artificial neural network with back propagation algorithm whereas the optimum number of neuron was investigated based on RMSE. The removal of residual chlorine has been used as target function in ANN while the other properties of adsorption process such as operation conditions, chlorine concentration in raw water and GAC characteristics has been used as input parameters. The results showed that ANN with back propagation algorithm is a good tool that can be used to predict the best operating parameter for designing GAC layer in multimedia filter whereas 35 neuron gave the best fitting with experimental data. In addition to that, the simulation result was showed that the predictions of breakthrough curve model has been coincided well with the measured values which explained that the depth 25 cm with grain size 1.5 mm of GAC filter bed will be give the optimum removal of residual chlorine from chlorinated water.

  7. Assessments of activated carbon prepared from date stones in adsorption of indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical department (RCD) at Tajoura Nuclear Research Center (TNRC) in Tripoli city is one of the fewest workplaces which have experienced indoor level evaluation. In this present study, it is intended to investigate the efficiency of domestic activated carbons (AC) derived from most locally available agricultural by products date stones (DS) in the adsorption of indoor radon-222 ('222Rn) at different oriented sites of RCD. The average indoor radon concentration values in the study areas varied from (34±3.0) Bq/m3 to (192.7±9.1) Bq/m3, while the values of the annual effective dose varied from (0.355) mSv/y to (0.974) mSv/y. All obtained values were within the recommended action levels of (200 - 300) Bq/m3 and 2.4 mSv/y which are given by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 1993 and 1987 respectively. A designed set up of portable ACDS canisters are proposed to be utilized in other different workplaces such as schools, where educational buildings are considered as locations of ventilation deficiency and high occupancy times for children and such naturally occurring radio-active radon is distinguished as a second leading cause of lung cancer worldwide.(author)

  8. Education for sustainable development using indoor and outdoor activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigon, Lenka

    2016-04-01

    Environmental education became an important part of our development in the last years. We put a lot of effort into a task how to improve students'values, skills, understanding and how to significantly enhance their learning and achievements regarding ecological problems. At the same time we also know that environmental learning is easier when our students have the opportunity to feel, see, touch, taste and smell the nature. Therefore teachers in my school develop regular access to the outdoors as a learning resource. Students understand the impact of their activities on the environment and they also like to participate in the nature protection. My school (Biotechnical Centre)is an example of educational centre where different research and development programes are strongly oriented to the sustainable development. Students are educated to become experts in biotechnology, agronomy, food technology and horticulture. At the same time they are educated how to care for the nature. The institution itself cooperates with different fields of economy (farms, food - baker industry, floristry, country design etc.). For these reasons the environmental education is an essential dimension of basic education focused on a sphere of interaction that lies at the root of personal and social development. We try to develop different outdoor activities through all the school year. These activities are: analyse the water quality; research waste water treatment plants; exploration of new food sources (like aquaponics - where fish and plants grow together); collecting plants with medical activities; care for the plants in the school yard; growing new plants in the poly tunnel; learning about unknown plants - especially when visiting national and regional parks; selling different things in the school shop - also for local citizens; participating in the world wide activity - "Keep the country tidy" etc. Students and teachers enjoy to participate in different outdoor activities; we both

  9. The influence of chlorine on the fate and activity of alkali metals during the gasification of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struis, R.; Scala, C. von; Schuler, A.; Stucki, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Chlorine clearly inhibits the CO{sub 2}-gasification reaction of charcoal at 800{sup o}C. From this and other observations the picture emerges that the reduction in the gasification reactivity of the charcoal is intimately related to the deactivation of the catalytically active alkali metals residing in the wood due to the formation of the chloride salt. It is argued that the heavy metal chlorides will likely transfer the chlorine to the indigenous alkali metals during the pyrolysis stage of the wood. The fate of the thus formed alkali metal chlorides can then be either their removal from the sample (evaporation), or, when present at the gasification stage, re-activation (i.e., de-chlorination) under our gasification conditions. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  10. Determination of trace impurities of chlorine in zirconium-alloy matrices using neutron activation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, H.; Nathaniel, T. Newton [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Sant, V.L. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.; Suryanarayana, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Nuclear Physics Div.; Prajapati, P.M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Reactor Physics Design Div.

    2011-07-01

    Trace impurities of chlorine in the zircaloy-2 and Zr-2.5% Nb alloy matrix have been determined using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and off-line {gamma}-ray spectrometric technique. The results have been compared with the values obtained from pyrohydrolysis-IC and spark source mass spectrometric method. The limit of internal precision error from the neutron activation technique is 6.7% for zircaloy-2 and 9% for Zr-2.5% Nb alloy, which are lower than that of pyrohydrolysis-IC and spark source mass spectrometric measurements respectively. For both alloys the results from present work based on NAA technique are slightly higher than the results based on the other two methods but are comparable within the uncertainty. Read More: http://www.oldenbourg-link.com/doi/abs/10.1524/ract.2011.1863 (orig.)

  11. Effect of indoor activity size distribution of 222Rn progeny in-depth dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the attached and unattached activity size distribution of 222Rn progeny (214Bi and 218Po) were measured indoor. The fraction of attached progeny was collected using a low-pressure Berner cascade-impactor technique. A constructed wire screen diffusion battery was used for collecting the fraction of unattached progeny. Most of the attached activities for 214Bi progeny were associated with the aerosol particles of the accumulation mode. The active median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of this mode for 214Bi was determined to be 350 nm with a geometric standard division (GSD) of 3. The GSD of unattached size distributions for 218Po was 1.3 with an active median aerodynamic diameter (AMTD) of 1.3 nm. Given that dose estimation is sensitive to environmental conditions, an analytical method was introduced to compute the local energy deposition of 218Po alpha particles in a target volume of 1 μm spheres located at different depths in bronchial epithelium. While the depth–dose distributions for nuclides uniformly distributed within the epithelium were found to be practically constant with depth, they decreased in an almost linear fashion with increasing depth for nuclides on the airway surface. - Highlights: • The activity size distribution of short-lived 222Rn progeny in indoor air is determined. • Radiation depth dose in lung from radon progeny is determined experimentally. • Mechanism of 218Po alpha particles deposition in bronchial airways is described. • Dose conversion factors as functions of depth are produced

  12. Chlorine dioxide by-products in drinking water and their control by powdered activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Grabeel, Margaret N.

    1992-01-01

    The concentrations of chlorine dioxide (CI02), chlorine, chlorite (CIO2), and chlorate (CI03) were evaluated following pretreatment of raw water by CI02 at water treatment plants in New Castle, Pennsylvania; Charleston, West Virginia; Skagit, Washington; and Columbus, Georgia. Chlorite and chlorate concentrations were unaffected by any of the water treatment processes and did not vary as a function of time of travel in the distribution system. Chlorine dioxide, which was ana...

  13. Color and chlorinated organics removal from pulp mills wastewater using activated petroleum coke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawwa, A R; Smith, D W; Sego, D C

    2001-03-01

    Delayed petroleum coke, a waste by-product from the oil sand industry, was utilized in the production of activated carbon. The activated carbon was then evaluated for color and chlorinated organics reduction from pulp mill wastewater. The activation of the petroleum coke was evaluated using a fixed bed reactor involving carbonization and activation steps at temperature of 850 degrees C and using steam as the activation medium. The activation results showed that the maximum surface area of the activated coke was achieved at an activation period of 4 h. The maximum surface area occurred at burnoff and water efficiency of 48.5 and 54.3%, respectively. Increasing the activation period to 6 h resulted in a decrease in the surface area. Methylene blue adsorption results indicated that the activation process was successful. Methylene blue adsorbed per 100 g of applied activated coke was 10 times higher than that adsorbed by raw petroleum coke. Adsorption equilibrium results of the bleached wastewater and the activated coke showed that significant color, COD, DOC and AOX removal (> 90%) was achieved when the activated coke dose exceeded 15,000 mg/L. Adsorption isotherms, in terms of COD, DOC, UV and color were developed based on the batch equilibrium data. Based on these isotherms, the amount of activated coke required to achieve certain removal of color and AOX can be predicted. The utilization of the petroleum coke for the production of activated carbon can provide an excellent disposal option for the oil sand industry at the same time would provide a cheap and valuable activated carbon. PMID:11228973

  14. Do sweep rowers symmetrically activate their low back muscles during indoor rowing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Readi, N G; Rosso, V; Rainoldi, A; Vieira, T M M

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates whether sweep rowers activate their low back muscles asymmetrically when exercising on a rowing ergometer. Given that indoor rowing imposes equal loading demands to left and right back muscles, any side differences in activation are expected to reflect asymmetric adaptations resulting from sweep rowing. In addition to trunk kinematics, surface electromyograms (EMGs) were sampled from multiple skin locations along the lumbar spine of six elite, sweep rowers. The distribution of EMG amplitude along the spine was averaged across strokes and compared between sides. Key results indicate a significant effect of trunk side on EMG amplitude and on the low back region where EMG amplitude was greatest. Such side differences were unlikely because of trunk lateral inclination and rotation, which were smaller than 5° for all rowers tested. Moreover, asymmetries manifested differently between participants; there was not a clear predominance of greater EMG amplitude toward the right/left side in portside/starboard rowers. These results suggest that (a) even during indoor rowing, sweep rowers activate asymmetrically their low back muscles; (b) factors other than rowing side might be associated with low back asymmetries; (c) spatial distribution of surface EMG amplitude is sensitive to bilateral changes in back muscles' activation. PMID:25264206

  15. Time location analysis for exposure assessment studies of indoor workers based on active RFID technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fu-Chuan; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Chao, Huan-Ping; Wang, Peng-Yau

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we describe the development of a radio frequency identification exposure monitoring system (RFEMS) suitable for tracking and identifying workers' locations in indoor workplaces. Five workers in southern Taiwan wore the RFEMS integrated into their equipment vests. Location and exposure data were transferred to data analysis software for visualization and tabular analysis in real-time. Data were grouped into seven task activity location categories to determine the time spent and percentage reception in each location. The RFEMS could also synchronously indicate the surrounding conditions using various sensors. Additional experiments were focused on locating of boundaries and determining the instrument stability, power sustainability, and reception efficiency in typical environments. The RFEMS instruments provided adequate range for locating (typically ca. 6-45 m in each zone), allowing us to locate subjects within distinct microenvironments and to distinguish between the activities of a variety of workers, the average time activity pattern (TAP) recording deviation for both human observations and RFEMS was ca. 0.21-1.57%. Power consumption experiments revealed that the system could be sustained for more than 124 h. A pilot field test indicated that the RFEMS offers a new level of accuracy for direct quantification of time activity patterns in exposure assessments of indoor workers over long periods of time. PMID:20145895

  16. Novel silicone-based polymer containing active methylene designed for the removal of indoor formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel silicone-based polymer with active methylene was explored. • Surface tension of liquid paints could be lowered using the polymer. • The polymer was easy to migrate toward the air-coating interface. • Free HCHO could effectively be removed using the polymer. • A lights on HCHO reduction without complicated preparation procedure was shielded. - Abstract: Indoor air pollution is caused inevitably due to complicated home decoration, in which formaldehyde is one of the most typical pollutants. It will be a convenient, economical and effective strategy to remove indoor formaldehyde if imparting a feature of formaldehyde removal to decorative coatings. We have successfully explored a novel silicone-based polymer containing active methylene used as a formaldehyde absorbent in coatings via a straightforward transesterification process using inexpensive and easily available chemicals. The polymer has been characterized by 13C NMR, FTIR, GC and GPC. Formaldehyde removal capacity of the coating films containing different contents of the polymer has been investigated. The results indicated that coatings incorporating 4 wt% of the polymer could make the coating films exhibit significant improvement on formaldehyde removal including purificatory performance (>85%) and durability of purificatory effect (>60%), compared to those consisting of absorbents without any silicon, and improve yellowing resistance performance, while other properties, such as gloss, adhesion, pencil hardness, flexibility and impact resistance, were kept almost unaffected. The chemical absorption process of the silicone-based polymer filled in interior decorative coatings is demonstrated as a promising technology to purify indoor formaldehyde and thus can reduce the harm to individuals

  17. Recent research activities and future subjects on stable- and radio-isotopes of chlorine in environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushita, Kouhei [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report reviews the recent studies on the stable- and radio-isotopes of chlorine from a viewpoint of environmental science, partly including historic references on this element. First, general properties, occurrence, and utilization of chlorine are described. Secondly, current status and research works on chlorine-compounds, which attract special attention in recent years as environmentally hazardous materials, are reported. Thirdly, research works on stable chlorine isotopes, {sup 35}Cl and {sup 37}Cl, are described with a focus laid on the newly-developed techniques; isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Fourthly, recent research works on chlorine radioisotopes, {sup 36}Cl etc., are described, focusing on the development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its application to geochemistry and others. Finally, taking account of the above-mentioned recent works on Cl isotopes, possible future research subjects are discussed. (author)

  18. Recent research activities and future subjects on stable- and radio-isotopes of chlorine in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the recent studies on the stable- and radio-isotopes of chlorine from a viewpoint of environmental science, partly including historic references on this element. First, general properties, occurrence, and utilization of chlorine are described. Secondly, current status and research works on chlorine-compounds, which attract special attention in recent years as environmentally hazardous materials, are reported. Thirdly, research works on stable chlorine isotopes, 35Cl and 37Cl, are described with a focus laid on the newly-developed techniques; isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Fourthly, recent research works on chlorine radioisotopes, 36Cl etc., are described, focusing on the development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its application to geochemistry and others. Finally, taking account of the above-mentioned recent works on Cl isotopes, possible future research subjects are discussed. (author)

  19. Indoor bioaerosol dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaroff, William W

    2016-02-01

    Inhaling indoor air is the primary means by which humans are exposed to bioaerosols. Considering bacteria, fungi, and viruses, this study reviews the dynamic processes that govern indoor concentrations and fates of biological particulate material. Bioaerosol behavior is strongly coupled to particle size; this study emphasizes the range 0.1-10 μm in aerodynamic diameter. The principle of material balance allows concentrations to be determined from knowledge of important source and removal processes. Sources reviewed here include outdoor air introduced by air exchange plus indoor emission from occupants, occupant activities, and moldy materials. Important mechanisms that remove bioaerosols from indoor air include air exchange, deposition onto indoor surfaces, and active filtration. The review summarizes knowledge about size-dependent particle deposition in different regions of the respiratory tract, techniques for measuring indoor bioaerosols, and evidence for diseases caused by airborne exposure to bioaerosols. Future research challenges and opportunities are highlighted. PMID:25483392

  20. Neutron-activated determination of chlorine, using the 35Cl(n,p)35S reaction as the basis, in thin coatings of silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron-activation determination of chlorine in thin coatings of silicon dioxide on silicon has been shown to be possible through the use of the 55Cl(n, P)35S reaction. The detection limit of chlorine is 3 x 10-9 g (5 x 1013 atoms)

  1. Synthesis, Antimycobacterial, Antifungal and Photosynthesis-Inhibiting Activity of Chlorinated N-phenylpyrazine-2-carboxamides †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Kralova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of sixteen pyrazinamide analogues with the -CONH- linker connecting the pyrazine and benzene rings was synthesized by the condensation of chlorides of substituted pyrazinecarboxylic acids with ring-substituted (chlorine anilines. The prepared compounds were characterized and evaluated for their antimycobacterial and antifungal activity, and for their ability to inhibit photosynthetic electron transport (PET. 6-Chloro-N-(4-chlorophenylpyrazine-2-carboxamide manifested the highest activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv (65% inhibition at 6.25 μg/mL. The highest antifungal effect against Trichophyton mentagrophytes, the most susceptible fungal strain tested, was found for 6-chloro-5-tert-butyl-N-(3,4-dichlorophenylpyrazine-2-carboxamide (MIC = 62.5 μmol/L. 6-Chloro-5-tert-butyl-N-(4-chlorophenylpyrazine-2-carboxamide showed the highest PET inhibition in spinach chloroplasts (Spinacia oleracea L. chloroplasts (IC50 = 43.0 μmol/L. For all the compounds, the relationships between the lipophilicity and the chemical structure of the studied compounds as well as their structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  2. Measurements of indoor 222RN activity in dwellings and workplaces of Curitiba (Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Janine N.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Del Claro, Flávia; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F. N.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Denyak, Valeriy

    2014-11-01

    The present work describes the results of systematic measurements of radon (222Rn) in residential environments and workplaces in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba (Paraná State, Brazil) during the period 2004-2012. For radon in air activity measurements, polycarbonate Track Etch Detectors CR-39, mounted in diffusion chambers protected by borosilicate glass fiber filters, were used. After being exposed in air, the CR-39 detectors were submitted to a chemical etching in a 6.25 M NaOH solution at 70 °C for 14 h. The alpha particle tracks were identified and manually counted with an optical microscope, and with the results of previously performed calibrations, the indoor activity concentration of 222Rn was calculated. The calibration of CR-39 and the alpha particle tracks chemical development procedures were performed in collaboration the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS, Japan). The major part of indoor 222Rn concentration in residences was found to be below 100 Bq/m3. In the case of working places, all measurements of 222Rn concentrations were below 100 Bq/m3. These values are considered within the limits set by international regulatory agencies, such as the US EPA and ICRP, which adopt up to 148 and 300 Bq/m3 as upper values for the reference levels for radon gas activity in dwellings, respectively. The latest value of 300 Bq/m3 for radon activity in air is proposed by ICRP considering the upper value for the individual dose reference level for radon exposure of 10 mSv/yr.

  3. Application of microbial biomass and activity measures to assess in situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluating the effectiveness of chlorinated solvent remediation in the subsurface can be a significant problem given uncertainties in estimating the total mass of contaminants present. If the remediation technique is a biological activity, information on the progress and success of the remediation may be gained by monitoring changes in the mass and activities of microbial populations. The in situ bioremediation demonstration at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) is designed to test the effectiveness of methane injection for the stimulation of in sediments. Past studies have shown the potential for degradation by native microbial populations. The design and implementation of the SRS Integrated Demonstration is described in this volume. A control phase without treatment was followed by a phase withdrawing air. The next phase included vacuum extraction plus air injection into the lower horizontal well located below the water table. The next period included the injection of 1% methane in air followed by injection of 4% methane in air. Based on the literature, it was hypothesized that the injection of methane would stimulate methanotrophic populations and thus accelerate biological degradation of TCE. Measuring the success of bioremediation is a complex effort that includes monitoring of changes in microbial populations associated with TCE degradation. These monitoring efforts are described in this paper and in related papers in this volume

  4. Analysis of the sporicidal activity of chlorine dioxide disinfectant against Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain)

    OpenAIRE

    Chatuev, B.A.; Peterson, J W

    2010-01-01

    Routine surface decontamination is an essential hospital and laboratory procedure, but the list of effective, noncorrosive disinfectants that kill spores is limited. We investigated the sporicidal potential of an aqueous chlorine dioxide solution and encountered some unanticipated problems. Quantitative bacteriological culture methods were used to determine the log10 reduction of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) spores following 3 min exposure to various concentrations of aqueous chlorine d...

  5. Indoor radon activity concentrations in Nongstoin town, West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhalation of Radon (222Rn) and its progeny are the major sources of natural background radiation exposure. The present paper reports the result of an indoor Radon study carried out in some dwellings of Nongstoin area of West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya, India using LR-115 type2 Solid State Nuclear Tracks Detectors (SSNTDS) in bare mode. The overall radon activity concentration measured has been found to vary from 11.1 to 389.7 Bq.m-3 with an arithmetic mean value of 61.1±76.5 Bq.m-3 and a geometric mean value of 41.6±2.24 Bq.m-3. The measured dose received by the residents has been found to be well below the limits prescribed by World Health Organization. (author)

  6. Microphysical Modelling of the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter. 2; Chlorine Activation and Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drdla, K.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of a range of assumptions about polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) on ozone depletion has been assessed using at couple microphysical/photochemical model. The composition of the PSCs was varied (ternary solutions, nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dehydrate, or ice), as were parameters that affected the levels of denitrification and dehydration. Ozone depletion was affected by assumptions about PSC freezing because of the variability in resultant nitrification chlorine activation in all scenarios was similar despite the range of assumed PSC compositions. Vortex-average ozone loss exceeded 40% in the lower stratosphere for simulations without nitrification an additional ozone loss of 15-20% was possible in scenarios where vortex-average nitrification reached 60%. Ozone loss intensifies non-linearly with enhanced nitrification in air parcels with 90% nitrification 40% ozone loss in mid-April can be attributed to nitrification alone. However, these effects are sensitive to the stability of the vortex in springtime: nitrification only began to influence ozone depletion in mid-March.

  7. Indoor air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor air pollution is a potential risk to human health. Prolonged exposure to indoor pollutants may cause various infectious, allergic and other diseases. Indoor pollutants can emanate from a broad array of internal and external sources. Internal sources include building and furnishing materials, consumer and commercial products, office equipment, micro-organisms, pesticides and human occupants activities. External sources include soil, water supplies and outside makeup air. The main indoor air pollutants of concern are inorganic gases, formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds, pesticides, radon and its daughters, particulates and microbes. The magnitude of human exposure to indoor pollutants can be estimated or predicted with the help of mathematical models which have been developed using the data from source emission testing and field monitoring of pollutants. In order to minimize human exposure to indoor pollutants, many countries have formulated guidelines / standards for the maximum permissible levels of main pollutants. Acceptable indoor air quality can be achieved by controlling indoor pollution sources and by effective ventilation system for removal of indoor pollutants. (author)

  8. Of the migration of the chlorine activation product in UO2. thermal and α-induced irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In the frame of dry interim storage or geological disposal of nuclear fuel, volatile and long lived radionuclides or activation products such as 129I, 135Cs, 99Tc and 36Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere. 129I and 36Cl dominate annual dose rates at the outlet in most reference and degraded scenarios of spent fuel disposal. Their migration within the fuel rod must be therefore assessed as it will allow better estimation of the instant release fraction. Our study concerns the measurement of the diffusion coefficient of chlorine in UO2. In order to decouple or to differentiate diffusion mechanisms due to 'athermal' processes in the reactor from thermally activated diffusion, two types of experiments were performed either to study diffusion enhanced by induced irradiation defects or to study thermal diffusion. This paper mainly concerns the last point. Natural chlorine is found in the UO2 matrix as an impurity (a few ppm). One possible origin for chlorine is the uranium enrichment process. Results obtained on structural characterization of UO2 by by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) at the PSI and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) at INSA are presented. In order to study chlorine thermal diffusion, 37Cl was implanted at different fluences (from 5 x 1012 to 1015 at/cm2) in UO2 depleted samples supplied by the CEA Cadarache. The samples were then annealed at IPNL in the temperature range of 600 - 1300 deg. C for different annealing times (from 1 to 20 hours). Chlorine profiles were obtained by SIMS at the 'Ecole des Mines' of Fontainebleau. Two main phenomena can be described: whatever the temperature, if the fluence is greater than 5 x 1014 at/cm2, chlorine loss is observed. On the other hand, for fluences as low as 1013 at/cm2, no loss is observed but transport and diffusion processes occur. With a diffusion model based on the Fick's second law, apparent diffusion coefficients were calculated for

  9. Influence of indoor and outdoor activities on progression of myopia during puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öner, Veysi; Bulut, Asker; Oruç, Yavuz; Özgür, Gökhan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether time spent on indoor and outdoor activities or the other possible risk factors including age, gender, parental history, and initial refraction was associated with progression of myopia, during puberty. Fifty eyes of 50 myopic children aged 9-14 years were enrolled in the study. The parents were interviewed to determine the amounts of time in hours per day spent on reading and writing, using computer, watching TV, and outdoor activities (i.e., sports, games, or being outdoor with no activities) on an average day. The annual myopia progression rate (diopters per year) was calculated for each subject and was used in the statistical analyses. The mean initial age of the subjects was 10.9 ± 1.5 (ranging from 9 to 14) years. The mean follow-up period was 33.3 ± 10.3 (ranging from 17 to 55) months. There was a significant increase in the mean myopia value of the subjects after follow-up period (p progression rate. On the other hand, age, gender, parental myopia, and the mean daily times spent on computer use, watching TV, and outdoor activities had no correlations with annual myopia progression rate. The present study showed that myopia progression was associated with time spent on reading and writing and initial refraction value, during puberty. However, myopia progression was not associated with parental myopia, age, gender, and daily times spent on using computer, watching TV, and outdoor activities. PMID:26031792

  10. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogen species in chlorinated saline cooling waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lietzke, M. H.; Haag, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A kinetic model for predicting the composition of chlorinated water discharged from power plants using fresh water for cooling was previously reported. The model has now been extended to be applicable to power plants located on estuaries or on the seacoast where saline water is used for cooling purposes. When chloride is added to seawater to prevent biofouling in cooling systems, bromine is liberated. Since this reaction proceeds at a finite rate there is a competition between the bromine (i.e., hypobromous acid) and the added chlorine (i.e., hypochlorous acid) for halogenation of any amine species present in the water. Hence not only chloramines but also bromamines and bromochloramines will be formed, with the relative concentrations a function of the pH, temperature, and salinity of the water. The kinetic model takes into account the chemical reactions leading to the formation and disappearance of the more important halamines and hypohalous acids likely to be encountered in chlorinated saline water.

  11. Myeloperoxidase-Related Chlorination Activity Is Positively Associated with Circulating Ceruloplasmin in Chronic Heart Failure Patients: Relationship with Neurohormonal, Inflammatory, and Nutritional Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderville Cabassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Heart failure (HF is accompanied by the development of an imbalance between oxygen- and nitric oxide-derived free radical production leading to protein nitration. Both chlorinating and peroxidase cycle of Myeloperoxidase (MPO contribute to oxidative and nitrosative stress and are involved in tyrosine nitration of protein. Ceruloplasmin (Cp has antioxidant function through its ferroxidase I (FeOxI activity and has recently been proposed as a physiological defense mechanism against MPO inappropriate actions. Objective. We investigated the relationship between plasma MPO-related chlorinating activity, Cp and FeOxI, and nitrosative stress, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nutritional biomarkers in HF patients. Methods and Results. In chronic HF patients (n=81, 76 ± 9 years, NYHA Class II (26; Class III (29; Class IV (26 and age-matched controls (n=17, 75 ± 11 years, CTR, plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, FeOxI, nitrated protein, free Malondialdehyde, BNP, norepinephrine, hsCRP, albumin, and prealbumin were measured. Plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, BNP, norepinephrine, and hsCRP were increased in HF versus CTR. FeOxI, albumin, and prealbumin were decreased in HF. MPO-related chlorinating activity was positively related to Cp (r= 0.363, P<0.001, nitrated protein, hsCRP, and BNP and inversely to albumin. Conclusions. Plasma MPO chlorinated activity is increased in elderly chronic HF patients and positively associated with Cp, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nitrosative parameters suggesting a role in HF progression.

  12. Optimum conditions for the formation of Al13 polymer and active chlorine in electrolysis process with Ti/RuO2-TiO2 anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2012-01-01

    A polyaluminum containing a high concentration of Al13 polymer and active chlorine (PACC) was successfully synthesized by a new electrochemical reactor using Ti/RuO2-TiO2 anodes. PACC can potentially be used as a dual-function chemical reagent for water treatment. The obtained results indicated that the formation of Al13 polymer and active chlorine, were the most active components in PACC responsible for coagulation and disinfection respectively. These components were significantly influenced by electrolyte temperature, current density, and stirring rate. It was observed that high electrolyte temperature favored the formation of Al13. Increasing current density and stirring rate resulted in high current efficiency of chlorine evolution, thus favoring the generation of Al13 and active chlorine in PACC. When the PACC (Al(T) = 0.5 mol/L, basicity = 2.3) was prepared at the optimum conditions by electrolysis process, the Al13 polymer and active chlorine in product reached above 70% of Al(T) and 4000 mg/L, respectively. In the pilot scale experiment with raw polyaluminum chloride used as an electrolyte, PACC was successfully prepared and produced a high content of Al13 and active chlorine products. The pilot scale experiment demonstrated a potential industrial approach of PACC preparation. PMID:22655391

  13. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 water direct contact killed food pathogen bacterium, Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus, Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies...

  14. Accelerometer Measured Level of Physical Activity Indoors and Outdoors During Preschool Time in Sweden and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raustorp, A.; Pagels, P.; Boldemann, C.;

    2012-01-01

    boys and girls indoor and outdoor physical activity regarding different intensity levels and sedentary behaviour. METHODS: Accelerometer determined physical activity in 50 children with mean age 52 months, (range 40-67) was recorded during preschool time for 5 consecutive weekdays at four sites. The......BACKGROUND: It is important to understand the correlates of physical activity in order to influence policy and create environments that promote physical activity among preschool children. We compared preschoolers' physical activity in Swedish and in US settings and objectively examined differences...

  15. Indoor radon monitoring in Northern Iran using passive and active measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadad, Kamal [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 7134851154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: hadadk@shirazu.ac.ir; Doulatdar, R. [Shiraz University Nuclear Safety Research Center, Shiraz 7134851154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdizadeh, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 7134851154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    In this work we present the results of a 2-year survey of indoor radon variations in four cities of Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin in North and Northwest Iran. We used both passive and active measurements by solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) with CR-39 polycarbonate and PRASSI Portable radon Gas Surveyor. A total of 1124 samplers in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were installed. Sampling frequency was seasonal and sampling locations were randomly chosen based on dwelling structures, floors, geological formations, elevation and temperature variation parameters. For quality assurance, 281 active measurements and double sampling were carried out. Based on our results and the results of previous surveys, Ardabil and Lahijan have the second and third highest radon concentration in Iran, respectively (Ramsar is first). The average radon concentration during the year in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were 163, 240, 160 and 144 Bq/m{sup 3} with medians of 160, 168, 124 and 133 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively. These concentrations give rise to annual effective doses of 3.43 mSv/y for Lahijan and 5.00 mSv/y for Ardabil. The maximum recorded concentration was 2386 Bq/m{sup 3} during winter in Ardabil and the minimum concentration was 55 Bq/m{sup 3} during spring in Lahijan. Relationships between radon concentration and building materials and room ventilation were also studied. The dosimetry calculations showed that these four cities could be categorized as average natural radiation zones. The correlation coefficients relating warm and cold season radon variation data were obtained.

  16. Indoor radon monitoring in Northern Iran using passive and active measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present the results of a 2-year survey of indoor radon variations in four cities of Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin in North and Northwest Iran. We used both passive and active measurements by solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) with CR-39 polycarbonate and PRASSI Portable radon Gas Surveyor. A total of 1124 samplers in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were installed. Sampling frequency was seasonal and sampling locations were randomly chosen based on dwelling structures, floors, geological formations, elevation and temperature variation parameters. For quality assurance, 281 active measurements and double sampling were carried out. Based on our results and the results of previous surveys, Ardabil and Lahijan have the second and third highest radon concentration in Iran, respectively (Ramsar is first). The average radon concentration during the year in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were 163, 240, 160 and 144 Bq/m3 with medians of 160, 168, 124 and 133 Bq/m3, respectively. These concentrations give rise to annual effective doses of 3.43 mSv/y for Lahijan and 5.00 mSv/y for Ardabil. The maximum recorded concentration was 2386 Bq/m3 during winter in Ardabil and the minimum concentration was 55 Bq/m3 during spring in Lahijan. Relationships between radon concentration and building materials and room ventilation were also studied. The dosimetry calculations showed that these four cities could be categorized as average natural radiation zones. The correlation coefficients relating warm and cold season radon variation data were obtained

  17. In vivo studies on the nitrogen, chlorine, calcium and phosphorus composition of rats by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of neutron activation analysis 'in vivo' to determine the elementary composition of the rat organism is demonstrated. In part one the possibilities offered by certain methods which establish the elementary composition of living organisms are analyzed, together with the contribution and scope of neutron activation analysis. In part two the technical details of the neutron activation of rats in vivo are determined and the problems raised by application of the method considered. This is followed by an application of neutron activation analysis to research on changes in the nitrogen, chlorine, calcium and phosphorus composition of rats during growth (from 30 to 440 days) and important biological events such as puberty in both sexes, reproduction and lactation. Finally a study of the fertility rate and the effects of repeated irradiations on Sprague-Dawley rats are described

  18. Peroxone activated persulfate treatment of 1,4-dioxane in the presence of chlorinated solvent co-contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Dylan; Ball, Raymond; Boving, Thomas B

    2016-02-01

    1,4-dioxane is often found as a co-contaminant with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at solvent release sites such as landfills, solvent recycling facilities, or fire training areas. Historically, soil and groundwater samples were not routinely analyzed for 1,4-dioxane and therefore the number of known 1,4-dioxane sites is still increasing. Due to its co-occurrence with chlorinated compounds, remediation strategies are needed that simultaneously treat both 1,4-dioxane as well as chlorinated VOC co-contaminants. In this proof of concept laboratory study, the fate of 1,4-dioxane was examined during the targeted destruction of aqueous phase VOC, using a peroxone activated persulfate (PAP) chemical oxidation method. Bench-scale experiments were carried out to evaluate the treatability of 1,4-dioxane as both a single-contaminant and in the presence of trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA). Possible dependencies on oxidant concentration and reaction kinetics were studied. The oxidative destruction of 1,4-dioxane, TCE and 1,1,1-TCA in single-contaminant batch systems followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics and even at the most dilute oxidant concentration lasted for at least 13 days. The rate of oxidation for each contaminant increased linearly with increasing persulfate concentration over the range of oxidant concentrations tested. The rate of oxidative destruction, from most easily degraded to least, was: TCE > 1,4-dioxane > 1,1,1-TCA. Oxidation rates were up to 87% slower in a mixture of these three compounds. Although additional tests are necessary, our data suggest that PAP oxidation of 1,4-dioxane might aid in the cleanup of VOC contaminated sites. PMID:26408980

  19. Global emissions of hydrogen chloride and chloromethane from coal combustion, incineration and industrial activities: Reactive Chlorine Emissions Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Archie; Aucott, Michael L.; Benkovitz, Carmen M.; Graedel, Thomas E.; Kleiman, Gary; Midgley, Pauline M.; Li, Yi-Fan

    1999-04-01

    Much if not all of the chlorine present in fossil fuels is released into the atmosphere as hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chloromethane (CH3Cl, methyl chloride). The chlorine content of oil-based fuels is so low that these sources can be neglected, but coal combustion provides significant releases. On the basis of national statistics for the quantity and quality of coal burned during 1990 in power and heat generation, industrial conversion and residential and commercial heating, coupled with information on the chlorine contents of coals, a global inventory of national HCl emissions from this source has been constructed. This was combined with an estimate of the national emissions of HCl from waste combustion (both large-scale incineration and trash burning) which was based on an estimate of the global quantity released from this source expressed per head of population. Account was taken of reduced emissions where flue gases were processed, for example to remove sulphur dioxide. The HCl emitted in 1990, comprising 4.6 ± 4.3 Tg Cl from fossil fuel and 2 ± 1.9 Tg Cl from waste burning, was spatially distributed using available information on point sources such as power generation utilities and population density by default. Also associated with these combustion sources are chloromethane emissions, calculated to be 0.075 ± 0.07 Tg as Cl (equivalent) from fossil fuels and 0.032 ± 0.023 Tg Cl (equivalent) from waste combustion. These were distributed spatially exactly as the HCl emissions, and a further 0.007 Tg Cl in chloromethane from industrial process activity was distributed by point sources.

  20. Indoor aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morawska, L.; Afshari, Alireza; N. Bae, G.;

    2013-01-01

    understanding of the risks posed by personal exposure to indoor aerosols. Limited studies assessing integrated daily residential exposure to just one particle size fraction, ultrafine particles, show that the contribution of indoor sources ranged from 19% to 76%. This indicates a strong dependence on resident...

  1. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Human Activities in Indoor Environments through Mobile Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentow, Thor Siiger

    . The methods are based on large-scale real-time indoor positioning through the use of existing WiFi infrastructures, which allows for easy deployment even in very large building complexes. The methods are designed for real-time operation, which enables them to detect and adjust to changes as they occur...

  2. Evaluation of indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the indoor radon environment, building ventilation and indoor air quality problems are discussed. They take their origin from the building materials, and the ventilation rate, plate-out and recoil rate of radon daughters are effective in evaluating the concentration of indoor radon. The deposition processes depend on the physical properties of the free atoms and activity size distributions of the aerosols. The equilibrium factor, the radon daughter concentrations relative to the radon concentration, are influenced by the room specific parameters. This paper summarizes available information on indoor radon concentrations and on the physical characteristics of radon daughters. For evaluation fo the risk of radon, the measuring results of the degree of radioactive equilibrium, and its time variations, mean size of individual radon daughters are reported. (author)

  3. Benefit-cost analysis of commercially available activated carbon filters for indoor ozone removal in single-family homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, J R; Darling, E; Morrison, G; Siegel, J; Corsi, R L

    2016-06-01

    This study involved the development of a model for evaluating the potential costs and benefits of ozone control by activated carbon filtration in single-family homes. The modeling effort included the prediction of indoor ozone with and without activated carbon filtration in the HVAC system. As one application, the model was used to predict benefit-to-cost ratios for single-family homes in 12 American cities in five different climate zones. Health benefits were evaluated using disability-adjusted life-years and included city-specific age demographics for each simulation. Costs of commercially available activated carbon filters included capital cost differences when compared to conventional HVAC filters of similar particle removal efficiency, energy penalties due to additional pressure drop, and regional utility rates. The average indoor ozone removal effectiveness ranged from 4 to 20% across the 12 target cities and was largely limited by HVAC system operation time. For the parameters selected in this study, the mean predicted benefit-to-cost ratios for 1-inch filters were >1.0 in 10 of the 12 cities. The benefits of residential activated carbon filters were greatest in cities with high seasonal ozone and HVAC usage, suggesting the importance of targeting such conditions for activated carbon filter applications. PMID:25952610

  4. Determination of bromine, chlorine and iodine in environmental aqueous samples by epithermal neutron activation analysis and Compton suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberger, S.; O'Kelly, D. J.; Braisted, J.; Panno, S.

    2006-01-01

    Halides, particularly Br- and Cl-, have been used as indicators of potential sources of Na+ and Cl- in surface water and groundwater with limited success. Contamination of groundwater and surface water by Na+ and Cl- is a common occurrence in growing urban areas and adversely affects municipal and private water supplies in Illinois and other states, as well as vegetation in environmentally sensitive areas. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be effectively used to determine these halogens, but often the elevated concentrations of sodium and chlorine in water samples can give rise to very high detection limits for bromine and iodine due to elevated backgrounds from the activation process. We present a detailed analytical scheme to determine Cl, Br and I in aqueous samples with widely varying Na and Cl concentrations using epithermal NAA in conjunction with Compton suppression. ?? 2006 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  5. A study of RF-over-fibre based active RFID indoor location system

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Location systems developed for indoor environments have attracted increasing interest, as a result of the rapidly growing location and navigation services provided by the Global Positioning System (GPS). Location information of people and objects can be used to cooperate with existing communication or database systems to provide abundant services to system operators and end users. For example, equipment tracking in hospitals ensure that location of the appropriate equipment can...

  6. Source apportionment for indoor PM2.5 and elemental concentrations using by a positive matrix factorization and an instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne particulate matters, especially the PM2.5 (aerodynamic equivalent diameter, AED, less than 2.5 μm) fraction has been important. This is because of their potential for deposition on to the human respiratory system being accompanied by many harmful trace metals (such as As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se, and Zn). The indoor air quality has become a great concern since late 1980s, because the population spends a majority of their time in various indoor environments. The indoor particulate matter may be influenced from outdoor environment and indoor sources such as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), combustion devices, cooking, etc. In this study, we undertake the measurements of about 26 elements using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Based on our measurement data, we characterize concentration status and mutual relationship between indoor and adjacent outdoor air quality. Next, sources at indoor/outdoor environment were identified and the contributions of each source were quantified by positive matrix factorization (PMF)

  7. Source apportionment for indoor PM2.5 and elemental concentrations using by a positive matrix factorization and an instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jong Myoung; Moon, Jong Hwa; Chung, Yong Sam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Byoung Won; Lee, Jin Hong [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Airborne particulate matters, especially the PM2.5 (aerodynamic equivalent diameter, AED, less than 2.5 {mu}m) fraction has been important. This is because of their potential for deposition on to the human respiratory system being accompanied by many harmful trace metals (such as As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se, and Zn). The indoor air quality has become a great concern since late 1980s, because the population spends a majority of their time in various indoor environments. The indoor particulate matter may be influenced from outdoor environment and indoor sources such as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), combustion devices, cooking, etc. In this study, we undertake the measurements of about 26 elements using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Based on our measurement data, we characterize concentration status and mutual relationship between indoor and adjacent outdoor air quality. Next, sources at indoor/outdoor environment were identified and the contributions of each source were quantified by positive matrix factorization (PMF)

  8. In vivo neutron activation analysis of sodium and chlorine in tumor tissue after fast neutron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auberger, T; Koester, L; Knopf, K; Weissfloch, L

    1996-01-01

    In 12 patients with recurrences and metastases of different primaries (head and neck cancer, breast cancer, malignant melanoma, and osteosarcoma) who were treated with reactor fission neutrons the photon emission of irradiated tissue was measured after each radiotherapy fraction. Spectral analyses of the decay rates resulted in data for the exchange of sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl) between the irradiated tissue and the body. About 60% of Na and Cl exchanged rapidly with a turnover half-life of 13 +/- 2 min. New defined mass exchange rates for Na and Cl amount to an average of 0.8 mval/min/kg of soft tissue. At the beginning of radiotherapy the turnover of the electrolytes in tissues with large tumor volumes was about twice that in tissues with small tumor volumes. Depending on the dose, neutron therapy led in all cases to variation in the metabolism. A maximum of Cl exchange and a minimum of Na exchange occurred after 10 Gy of neutrons (group of six previously untreated patients) or after 85 Gy (photon equivalent dose) of combined photon-neutron therapy. A significant increase in non-exchangeable fraction of Na from about 40 to 80% was observed in three tumors after a neutron dose of 10 Gy administered in five fractions correlated with a rapid reduction of tissue within 4 weeks after end of therapy. These results demonstrate for the first time the local response of the electrolyte metabolism to radiotherapy. PMID:8949749

  9. Attacks of Asthma due to Chlorinized Water: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Eyup Berdan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma-like symptoms in swimmers has been reported. But, attacks of asthma which is related to chlorinized water is rare. Chlorine, a strong oxidizing agent, is an important toxic gas that the swimmer can breath during swimming and a worker can exposed to chlorine while he or she was using water with chlorine at home. We describe a persistent increase in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness following chronic exposure to strong respiratory irritant with chlorinized water in two subjects with no past history of asthma or atopy. We conclude that airway hyperresponsiveness can develop or increase after chronic inhalation of high concentrations of irritants such as chlorinized water an indoor irritant factor and that these changes may be prolonged. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(1: 87-90

  10. Attacks of Asthma due to Chlorinized Water: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Eyup Berdan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma-like symptoms in swimmers has been reported. But, attacks of asthma which is related to chlorinized water is rare. Chlorine, a strong oxidizing agent, is an important toxic gas that the swimmer can breath during swimming and a worker can exposed to chlorine while he or she was using water with chlorine at home. We describe a persistent increase in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness following chronic exposure to strong respiratory irritant with chlorinized water in two subjects with no past history of asthma or atopy. We conclude that airway hyperresponsiveness can develop or increase after chronic inhalation of high concentrations of irritants such as chlorinized water an indoor irritant factor and that these changes may be prolonged. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000: 87-90

  11. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuxiu; Bai, Jinhe; Ference, Christopher; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yifan; Narciso, Jan; Zhou, Kequan

    2014-07-01

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 direct contact in water killed food pathogen bacterium Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies were conducted using noninoculated berries and berries inoculated with postharvest decay and foodborne pathogens. Berries were inoculated with either E. coli (5.2 log CFU/g) or C. acutatum (3.9 log CFU/g). Inoculated fruit were dried for 2 h at room temperature in a climate-controlled laboratory and packed in perforated commercial clamshells, with or without ClO2 pads, and stored at 10°C for up to 9 days. The effects of ClO2 on microbial populations and fruit firmness were monitored during storage. In the inoculation experiment, treatment with ClO2 reduced populations of E. coli and C. acutatum by 2.2 to 3.3 and 1.3 to 2.0 log CFU/g, respectively. For the noninoculated blueberries, the initial total aerobic bacteria count and the yeast and mold count were 4.2 and 4.1 log CFU/g, respectively. ClO2 treatment reduced total aerobic bacteria count and yeast and mold count by 1.5 to 1.8 and 1.3 to 1.7 log CFU/g, respectively. The firmness of both inoculated and noninoculated blueberries was maintained by ClO2 treatment. Thus, controlled-release ClO2 gas fumigation technology shows promise as an effective and practical antimicrobial agent in commercial clamshell packaging of blueberry and other fruits. PMID:24988018

  12. The Influence of Aerosol Concentration on Changes in the Volumetric Activities of Indoor Radon Short-Term Decay Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Politova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the influence of aerosol concentration on changes in the volumetric activities of indoor radon short-term decay products. The concentration of aerosol in the air, equilibrium factors and unattached fraction were measured under normal living conditions when the concentration of aerosol increases, i.e. burning a candle or frankincense in accommodations, smoke-filled accommodations, a steamy kitchen etc. It has been established that when the concentration of aerosol in the air rises, the number of free atoms of radon short-term decay products attached to aerosol particles also increases, and therefore higher volumetric activity of alpha particles is fixed. A tight positive connection of the correlation between equilibrium factor (F and aerosol particle concentration in the air of accommodations as well as a negative correlation between unattached fraction and an equilibrium factor have been determined.Article in Lithuanian

  13. High-temperature cesium capture using activated kaolinite in the presence of chlorine and volatile heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hee Chul; Kim, Jeoung Guk; Yoo, Jae Hyung; Kim, Joon Hyung [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jong Sung [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    This study investigated the use of porous activated kaolin particles in the size range of 300- 400 {mu}m as high-temperature sorbents for cesium capture in the presence of chlorine and/or in the presence of cadmium and lead. Packed bed sorption tests by passing CsCl-carrying flue gas through the packed bed of activated porous kaolin particles were first performed at the temperature range of 973-1173 K and a CsCl partial pressure range of 7.4-11.1 Pa. The observed structural change of the sorbent mineral at the stage of sorption revealed the characteristics of an irreversible chemical reaction as a major cesium capturing mechanism. In the fully saturated kaolin sorbent, Cs{sub 2}O{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}SiO{sub 2} is present as a sorption reaction product, together with much smaller amount of water-soluble cesium species. The increase in sorbent bed temperature resulted in an increase in the rate of sorption, but it had no effect on maximum cesium uptake. In the presence of other condensable gas-phase metal chlorides such as cadmium and lead, cesium was preferentially adsorbed onto tested activated kaolinite, but a half of cesium appeared to be physically-sorbed cesium species, CsCl.

  14. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking

  15. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  16. Indoor tetrachloroethylene levels and determinants in Paris dwellings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Célina; Kousignian, Isabelle; Ramond, Anna; Momas, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    There is growing public health concern about indoor air quality. Tetrachloroethylene (PERC), a chlorinated volatile organic compound widely used as a solvent in dry cleaning facilities, can be a residential indoor air pollutant. As part of an environmental investigation included in the PARIS (Pollution and asthma Risk: an Infant Study) birth cohort, this study firstly aimed to document domestic PERC levels, and then to identify the factors influencing these levels using standardized questionnaires about housing characteristics and living conditions. Air samples were collected in the child's bedroom over one week using passive devices when infants were 1, 6, 9, and 12 months. PERC was identified and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. PERC annual domestic level was calculated by averaging seasonal levels. PERC was omnipresent indoors, annual levels ranged from 0.6 to 124.2 μg/m3. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models showed that proximity to dry cleaning facilities, do-it-yourself activities (e.g.: photographic development, silverware), presence of air vents, and building construction date (<1945) were responsible for higher domestic levels of PERC. This study, conducted in an urban context, provides helpful information on PERC contamination in dwellings, and identifies parameters influencing this contamination. PMID:23127492

  17. Indoor Air Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selman, Ayser Dawod; Heiselberg, Per

    Overall purpose of the research is to provide an overview of the relevance and importance of various defined Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) parameters in a European perspective. Based on the report it should be possible to prioritize which countries to target for further activities as well as it should...

  18. The impact of heavy metals from environmental tobacco smoke on indoor air quality as determined by Compton suppression neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberger, S; Wu, D

    1995-12-01

    The method of instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been improved for air filter samples in the determination of low level heavy metals in indoor air. By using the techniques of epithermal neutron irradiation in conjunction with Compton suppression, the detection limits of cadmium, arsenic and antimony measurements have been dramatically reduced to 2 ng for Cd, 0.2 ng for As, and 0.03 ng for Sb. The determination of these heavy metals in particulate material generated from cigarette smoking in indoor environments has been conducted. Other elements, Br, Cl, Na, K, Zn were also found at elevated levels. PMID:8560226

  19. Enhanced Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity of Mesoporous Anatase TiO2 Codoped with Nitrogen and Chlorine

    OpenAIRE

    Xiuwen Cheng; Xiujuan Yu; Zipeng Xing; Lisha Yang

    2012-01-01

    Anatase mesoporous titanium dioxide codoped with nitrogen and chlorine (N-Cl-TiO2) photocatalysts were synthesized through simple one-step sol-gel reactions in the presence of ammonium chloride. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflection spectrum (UV-vis DRS). XRD results indicated that codoping with nitrogen and chlorine could effectively reta...

  20. Does participating in physical activity in outdoor natural environments have a greater effect on physical and mental wellbeing than physical activity indoors? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson Coon, J; Boddy, K; Stein, K; Whear, R; Barton, J; Depledge, M H

    2011-03-01

    Our objective was to compare the effects on mental and physical wellbeing, health related quality of life and long-term adherence to physical activity, of participation in physical activity in natural environments compared with physical activity indoors. We conducted a systematic review using the following data sources: Medline, Embase, Psychinfo, GreenFILE, SportDISCUS, The Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index--Science and BIOSIS from inception to June 2010. Internet searches of relevant Web sites, hand searches of relevant journals, and the reference lists of included papers and other review papers identified in the search were also searched for relevant information. Controlled trials (randomized and nonrandomized) were included. To be eligible trials had to compare the effects of outdoor exercise initiatives with those conducted indoors and report on at least one physical or mental wellbeing outcome in adults or children. Screening of articles for inclusion, data extraction, and quality appraisal were performed by one reviewer and checked by a second with discrepancies resolved by discussion with a third if necessary. Due to the heterogeneity of identified studies a narrative synthesis was performed. Eleven trials (833 adults) were included. Most participants (6 trials; 523 adults) were young students. Study entry criteria and methods were sparsely reported. All interventions consisted of a single episode of walking or running indoors with the same activity at a similar level conducted outdoors on a separate occasion. A total of 13 different outcome measures were used to evaluate the effects of exercise on mental wellbeing, and 4 outcome measures were used to assess attitude to exercise. Most trials (n = 9) showed some improvement in mental wellbeing on one or other of the outcome measures. Compared with exercising indoors, exercising in

  1. The response of some health physics instruments to sodium-24 and chlorine-38 activities in polythene man-phantoms and the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements have been made of the response of five commonly used Health Physics instruments when held near polythene man-phantoms filled with aqueous solutions containing sodium-24 and chlorine-38 activities. The instruments discussed are the Type 1413A, 1597A and 1368A ratemeters, the E.M.I. PCM1 contamination monitor and the Type 1021C beta-gamma probe. The ratios of the whole-body chlorine-38 and sodium-24 activities are calculated for various periods of accidental human irradiation by neutrons. These ratios and the phantom results are used to estimate the response of the five instruments when held near the human body at various times after irradiation. The relative contributions of the chlorine-38 and sodium-24 to the instrument indications are listed. The tabulated data enable the instrument readings to be converted to whole-body sodium-24 activity at the time of irradiation. This may be used as a quick estimate of the degree of neutron irradiation. (author)

  2. Suitability of the cellular viability technique as a control tool of the chlorine dosage on the activated sludge of a biological process affected by bulking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work demonstrates the suitability of the cellular viability technique as a control tool of the chlorine dosage on the activated sludge of a biological process affected by the overabundance of the filamentous bacteria (Thiothrix-021N). This technique was used to establish the chlorine dosage according to the observed damages on cellular membranes of both, floc-forming bacteria as well as filamentous bacteria. To identify the filamentous bacteria responsible for the macro-structural alteration of the flocs, several criteria were, met, including morphologic characteristics as well as conventional microbiological stains: Gram, Neisser and polyhydroxy alkanoates. FISH was used to confirm the obtained results, providing a definitive identification of the filamentous bacteria responsible for the alteration. (Author) 11 refs

  3. Kinetic study of neodymium oxide chlorination with gaseous chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, Marta V., E-mail: marta.bosco@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Fouga, Gaston G. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida Bustillo 9500, CP 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Bohe, Ana E. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida Bustillo 9500, CP 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Centro Regional Universitario Bariloche, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, CP 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze the kinetics of the neodymium oxide chlorination reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For temperatures below 425 Degree-Sign C the system is under chemical control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reaction order of 0.40 with respect to chlorine partial pressure was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An activation energy of 161 {+-} 4 kJ mol{sup -1} was determined. - Abstract: The kinetics of the chlorination of neodymium oxide has been investigated by thermogravimetry between 312 Degree-Sign C and 475 Degree-Sign C, and for partial pressures of chlorine ranging from 10 kPa to 50 kPa. The starting temperature for the reaction of neodymium oxide with chlorine was determined to be about 250 Degree-Sign C, leading to neodymium oxychloride as product. The results showed that, for temperatures below 425 Degree-Sign C, the system is under chemical control and the formation of the oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The influence of chlorine mass transport through the bulk gas phase and through the boundary layer on the overall reaction rate was analyzed. In the absence of these two mass-transfer steps, a reaction order of 0.39 with respect to chlorine partial pressure, and an activation energy of 161 {+-} 4 kJ mol{sup -1} were determined. A complete rate equation has been successfully developed.

  4. Transformation of Organophosphorus Pesticides in the Presence of Aqueous Chlorine: Kinetics, Pathways, and Structure-Activity Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fate of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides in the presence of aqueous chlorine was investigated under simulated drinking water treatment conditions. Intrinsic rate coefficients were found for the reaction of hypochlorous acid (kHOCl,OP) and hypochlorite ion (kOCl,OP) for eight...

  5. Monitoring Airborne Fungal Spores in an Experimental Indoor Environment To Evaluate Sampling Methods and the Effects of Human Activity on Air Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Buttner, M P; Stetzenbach, L D

    1993-01-01

    Aerobiological monitoring was conducted in an experimental room to aid in the development of standardized sampling protocols for airborne microorganisms in the indoor environment. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the relative efficiencies of selected sampling methods for the retrieval of airborne fungal spores and to determine the effect of human activity on air sampling. Dry aerosols containing known concentrations of Penicillium chrysogenum spores were generated, and air sam...

  6. Sustainability of the Catalytic Activity of a Silica-Titania Composite (STC) for Long-Term Indoor Air Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    TiO2-assisted photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) is an emerging technology for indoor air quality control and is also being evaluated as an alternative trace contaminant control technology for crew habitats in space exploration. Though there exists a vast range of literature on the development of photocatalysts and associated reactor systems, including catalyst performance and performance-influencing factors, the critical question of whether photocatalysts can sustain their initial catalytic activity over an extended period of operation has not been adequately addressed. For a catalyst to effectively serve as an air quality control product, it must be rugged enough to withstand exposure to a multitude of low concentration volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over long periods of time with minimal loss of activity. The objective of this study was to determine the functional lifetime of a promising photocatalyst - the silica-titania composite (STC) from Sol Gel Solutions, LLC in a real-world scenario. A bench-scale STC-packed annular reactor under continuous irradiation by a UV-A fluorescent black-light blue lamp ((lambda)max = 365 nm) was exposed to laboratory air continuously at an apparent contact time of 0.27 sand challenged with a known concentration of ethanol periodically to assess any changes in catalytic activity. Laboratory air was also episodically spiked with halocarbons (e.g., octafluoropropane), organosulfur compounds (e.g., sulfur hexafluoride), and organosilicons (e.g., siloxanes) to simulate accidental releases or leaks of such VOCs. Total organic carbon (TOC) loading and contaminant profiles of the laboratory air were also monitored. Changes in STC photocatalytic performance were evaluated using the ethanol mineralization rate, mineralization efficiency, and oxidation intermediate (acetaldehyde) formation. Results provide insights to any potential catalyst poisoning by trace halocarbons and organosulfur compounds.

  7. Internal chlorination of Ni-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berztiss, D.; Hennesen, K.; Grabke, H.J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In contrast to internal oxidation, sulfidation and carburization, very little information is available regarding internal chlorination, especially diffusion of chlorine in metallic alloys. This paper describes results of experiments on Ni-Cr alloys (<10 wt% Cr) exposed in an atmosphere containing radioactive HCl. The diffusion of chlorine in the alloy can be determined by measurement of residual {beta}-activity from the sample surface. Successively thin layers (0.5-10 {mu}m) of the alloy were removed by lapping and the surface activity was measured to obtain a depth profile. Both single and polycrystalline materials were tested. Through this work it should be determined if there is in fact solubility and diffusion of chlorine in Ni-based alloys as some authors have proposed or if the ingress of chlorine is mainly a grain boundary phenomenon. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of a multi-user indoor positioning system based on low cost depth vision (Kinect) for monitoring human activity in a smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevrin, Loïc; Noury, Norbert; Abouchi, Nacer; Jumel, Fabrice; Massot, Bertrand; Saraydaryan, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    An increasing number of systems use indoor positioning for many scenarios such as asset tracking, health care, games, manufacturing, logistics, shopping, and security. Many technologies are available and the use of depth cameras is becoming more and more attractive as this kind of device becomes affordable and easy to handle. This paper contributes to the effort of creating an indoor positioning system based on low cost depth cameras (Kinect). A method is proposed to optimize the calibration of the depth cameras, to describe the multi-camera data fusion and to specify a global positioning projection to maintain the compatibility with outdoor positioning systems. The monitoring of the people trajectories at home is intended for the early detection of a shift in daily activities which highlights disabilities and loss of autonomy. This system is meant to improve homecare health management at home for a better end of life at a sustainable cost for the community. PMID:26737415

  9. Indoor Environment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports progress during the year 1992 in the Indoor Environment Program in the Energy and Environment Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Studies in the following areas are reported: energy performance and ventilation in buildings; physical and chemical characterization of indoor air pollutants; indoor radon; indoor air quality; exposure to indoor air pollutants and risk analysis. Pollutants of particular interest include: radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions including environmental tobacco smoke, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides

  10. Assessment of external dose indoors in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper was an assessment of external exposure indoors and its dependence on construction materials and indoor radon concentrations in Lithuanian living houses. Relationship of absorbed dose rate in air indoors and activity indexes of the most commonly used construction materials (wood, concrete and bricks) have been studied using results received in measurements done in >4700 rooms in 1995-2005. Possible connections of dose rate indoors with indoor radon concentrations are also discussed. Findings of this study helped to make an assessment of the mean value of effective dose of Lithuanian population due to external exposure indoors which is equal to 0.58 mSv y-1. The received data might also be used in improvement of quality of personal dosimetric measurements done in premises constructed of different construction materials. (authors)

  11. Technology assessment: Chlorine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine is not just one of many chemical feedstocks which is used in a few definitely harmful products like PVC or CFC but is irrelevant in all other respects. Just the opposite is true: There is hardly any product line of the chemical industry that can do without chlorine, from herbicides and pesticides to dyes, plastics, pharmaceuticals, photographic atricles, and cosmetics. Chlorine is not only a key element of chemical production but also an ubiquitous element of everyday life in civilisation. There are even many who would agree that the volume of chlorine production is an indicator of the competitive strength and national wealth of a modern society. By now, however, it has become evident that the unreflected use of chlorine is no longer ecologically acceptable. The consequences of a chlorine phase-out as compared to the continued chlorine production at the present level were investigated scientifically by a PROGNOS team. They are presented in this book. (orig.)

  12. Outdoor-indoor air pollution in urban environment: challenges and opportunity

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Dennis Y. C.

    2015-01-01

    With the continual improvement in our quality of life, indoor air quality has become an important area of concern in the twenty-first century. Indoor air quality is affected by many factors including the type and running conditions of indoor pollution sources, ventilation conditions, as well as indoor activities. Studies revealed that the outdoor environment is also an important factor that cannot be neglected for indoor air quality studies. In this review, the indoor and outdoor air pollutio...

  13. Influence of indoor factors in dwellings on the development of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    busy roads, and in damp homes where are visible moulds at home. The causing agents of the increased risk of living in damp homes remained uncertain and needs clarification. Exposure to pet-derived allergens and house dust mites are very commonly investigated and thought to be related to asthma onset. The epidemiological evidence is not sufficient to recommend avoidance measures against pet and dust mites as preventive activities against allergies. More research is also needed to clarify the potential risk for exposure to volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds due to renovation activities, phthalates and chlorine chemicals due to cleaning. PMID:20851050

  14. Retrospective assessment of indoor radon exposure by measurements of embedded 210Po activity in glass objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, R. C.; Gusain, G. S.; Prasad, Ganesh

    In most of the epidemiological studies contemporary radon measurements have been used as surrogates for radon concentrations in past decades even though changes in radon levels and residence may have occurred. Short-lived radon progeny may deposit on available surfaces in dwellings thus giving rise over time to a build up of long-lived progeny. Airborne radon decay products can be deposited and implanted through alpha recoil into the glass surfaces. On glass surface, activities of 210Po may arise as a result of the decay of recoil implanted activity following the alpha decay of surface deposited 218Po or 214Po. Measurement of 210Po implanted on a household glass is a method that can be employed to retrospectively determine the historic level of radon in dwellings. This method is based on the assumption that levels of recoil implanted 210Po in the glass provide a measure of time integrated radon concentration in the environment in which the glass has been located. The surface deposited activity of the radon progenies, which then become implanted in the glass by alpha recoil, is believed to reflect past exposure to airborne activity. Such retrospective measurements on glass are valuable in estimating the human dose derived from radon during the time of exposure. In this paper an account is given of the principles and some field applications of a retrospective technique, using the alpha track detectors, CR-39 and LR-115, to measure 210Po implanted in glass surfaces (surface traps). By using this CR-LR difference technique, the cumulative radon exposure in a dwelling in past decades may be estimated. This method provides reliable radon exposure data as a support to epidemiological studies concerning the health effects of radon exposure in the living environment.

  15. Indoor Air Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Korlakunta Divya #1, M.Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of our project is to maintain the indoor air quality.The analysis is done on different parameters like temperature,relativehumidity,CO2,lights,sens ors and air conditioners to maintain the indoor environment.This report provides overview on importance of indoor air quality in an office or any other closed structure. It also discusses about the effects of poor indoor air quality, the various factors that affect the indoor air quality and various methods to assess indoor air qualit...

  16. Impact of Indoor Environmental Conditions on Students Intellectual Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Cătălina, Tiberiu; Banu, Teodor

    2014-01-01

    indoor environmental quality on intellectual performance of students. In order to find out this, several experimental campaigns were necessary. During six tests the indoor conditions were changes from “ideal” comfort to high noise indoor space or low air quality. During each experimental test multiple volunteers students performed intellectual activities. For each test the indoor conditions (sound pressure level, illuminance, air temperature, CO2 level, etc.) were recorded with several equipm...

  17. User-Centric Indoor Air Quality Monitoring on Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yifei; University of Colorado, Boulder; Li, Kun; University of Colorado, Boulder; Piedrahita, Ricardo; University of Colorado, Boulder; Yun, Xiang; University of Michigan; Tian, Lei; University of Colorado, Boulder; Mansata, Omkar M.; University of Michigan; Lv, Qin; University of Colorado, Boulder; Dick, Robert P.; University of Michigan; Hannigan, Michael; University of Colorado, Boulder; Shang, Li; University of Colorado, Boulder

    2013-01-01

    Since people spend a majority of their time indoors, indoor air quality (IAQ) can have a significant impact on human health, safety, productivity, and comfort. Due to the diversity and dynamics of people's indoor activities, it is important to monitor IAQ for each individual. Most existing air quality sensing systems are stationary or focus on outdoor air quality. In contrast, we propose MAQS, a user-centric mobile sensing system for IAQ monitoring. MAQS users carry portable, indoor location ...

  18. In vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of a novel chlorin derivative for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C Y; Zhang, L J; Li, J W; Li, J H; Wu, Z M; Zhang, L X; Chen, N; Yan, Y J; Chen, Z L

    2016-01-01

    In presented paper, a new chlorin derivative 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[(5-N-morpholino)pentyl] chlorin (TMC) was investigated as a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, intracellular location, biodistribution and antitumor effects were studied using human esophageal cancer cells (Eca-109) and human cervical cancer cells (Hela) in vitro and an esophageal cancer model in BALB/c nude mice. Cellular uptake and biodistribution of TMC were measured by fluorescence spectrophotometer. Cytotoxicity of TMC against Eca-109 and Hela cells was determined by MTT assay. The intracellular location of TMC was detected with a confocal microscopy. It was showed that TMC could rapidly accumulate in tumor cells and localize in cytoplasm. TMC was found to be low-toxic in dark but extensively photosensitive in vitro. A fast clearance rate of TMC was observed in Eca-109-bearing mice. In particular, TMC could significantly inhibit the tumor growth and exhibit a notable antitumor efficacy for PDT in vivo. PMID:26639232

  19. Slovak Republic, indoor measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the annual average effective doses from indoor radon exposure were calculated for each district of Slovakia. The population-weighted arithmetic mean of indoor radon concentration was calculated for every district considering different types of houses.

  20. INDOOR AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin

    2010-01-01

    With the development of modern architecture, one of the building's interior decoration, furnishings, appliances and equipment have become increasingly demanding, making construction of the indoor environment of increasing pollution, increasing pollution, indoor environmental pollution hazards to human is also a growing the greater. This thesis summarizes the major indoor air pollution sources and major pollutants. Indoor air pollutants are formaldehyde, radon, ammonia, total volatile org...

  1. Indoor air: Reference bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency initially established the indoor air Reference Bibliography in 1987 as an appendix to the Indoor Air Quality Implementation Plan. The document was submitted to Congress as required under Title IV--Radon Gas and Indoor Air Quality Research of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. The Reference Bibliography is an extensive bibliography of reference materials on indoor air pollution. The Bibliography contains over 4500 citations and continues to increase as new articles appear

  2. Using Human Panels for Subjective Evaluation of Emissions from Indoor Activities and Materials: Principles and State of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cometto-Muñiz, J E

    1995-01-01

    This report addresses the topic of sensory evaluation of indoor air through the use of human subjects. It begins by discussing the chemical senses involved in such evaluation, specifically the senses of smell (olfaction) and chemical sensory irritation (common chemical sense, CCS, now called chemesthesis). An analysis of similarities and differences between these two sensory modalities regarding key measurements and issues follows. Later, the report discusses the quantification of sensory rea...

  3. Persistence and residue activity of deltamethrin on indoor residual spraying surfaces against malaria vectors in southeastern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abtahi Mohammad; Shayeghi Mansoreh; Khoobdel Mehdi; Vatandoost Hasan; Abaei Mohammad Reza; Akbarzadeh Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the efficacy of deltamethrin and find a relation between persistence and residue of this insecticide on the prevalent surfaces against malaria vectors in southeastern Iran. Methods:After indoor residual spraying on prevalent surfaces in studied areas (plaster and mud as absorbent surfaces, wood as non absorbent surface and filter paper as control) for malaria control, conical tests as a bioassay method and chromatographic method as an analytical method were used for evolution of persistence and residue of deltamethrin insecticide. Results were investigated statistically by ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests for determining relations or differences between residue and persistence of deltamethrin. Results:According to the results, there was no significant difference between mortality rates from bioassay tests on different surfaces, and deltamethrin kept its utility to malaria vector control until 120 days after indoor residual spraying on these surfaces. In the case of residue, there was no significant relation between residue amounts and mortality rates on different surfaces, whereas this relation existed between residual amounts on filter papers and mortality rates from bioassay tests. Conclusions: This study shows that measurement of residue in filter papers is a suitable tool for evolution and dictum of efficiency of deltamethrin insecticide in indoor residual spraying for malaria control.

  4. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Fungi and Mycotoxins Associated with Sick Building Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, S. C.; Wu, C; Andriychuk, L. A.; Martin, J. M.; Brasel, T. L.; Jumper, C. A.; Straus, D C

    2005-01-01

    The growth of indoor molds and their resulting products (e.g., spores and mycotoxins) can present health hazards for human beings. The efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas as a fumigation treatment for inactivating sick building syndrome-related fungi and their mycotoxins was evaluated. Filter papers (15 per organism) featuring growth of Stachybotrys chartarum, Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Cladosporium cladosporioides were placed in gas chambers containing chlorine dioxide ga...

  5. Water Treatment Technology - Chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on chlorination provides instructional materials for nine competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purpose and process of chlorination, chlorine…

  6. Chlorine solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorine solar neutrino experiment in the Homestake Gold Mine is described and the results obtained with the chlorine detector over the last fourteen years are summarized and discussed. Background processes producing 37Ar and the question of the constancy of the production rate of 37Ar are given special emphasis

  7. Localization Technologies for Indoor Human Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Da; Yang, Zhuo; Yao, Lin; Zhao, Wenhong

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of wireless localization technologies provides a promising future for serving human beings in indoor scenarios. Their applications include real-time tracking, activity recognition, health care, navigation, emergence detection, and target-of-interest monitoring, among others. Additionally, indoor localization technologies address the inefficiency of GPS (Global Positioning System) inside buildings. Since people spend most of their time in indoor environments, indoor tracking service is in great public demand. Based on this observation, this paper aims to provide a better understanding of state-of-the-art technologies and stimulate new research efforts in this field. For these purposes, existing localization technologies that can be used for tracking individuals in indoor environments are reviewed, along with some further discussions.

  8. Measure of activities and calculation of effective dose of indoor 222Rn in some dwellings and enclosed areas in Morrocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    calculated effective dose in studied houses varies between 0.55 and 2.39 mSv/year with an average value of about 1.41 mSv/year. In enclosed areas it varies between 0.38 and 11.9mSv/year Conclusions The measurements performed in 9 dwellings and 7 enclosed work areas in different regions of Morocco show that: The obtained values of volumic activities of radon in dwellings and in enclosed work areas and the calculated effective dose are comparable to those obtained in the other regions in the word and they are below the action level recommended by the ICRP (3 to 10 mSv/year corresponding to volumic activities 200-600 Bq/m3 for houses and 500-1500 Bq/m3 for workplaces) The relatively higher volumic activities of 222Rn in Youssoufia and khouribga towns are obtained because Youssoufia and khouribga are situated in regions rich in phosphate deposits. 12 The volumic activity of radon increases with depth, this is most probably due to decreased ventilation. This is the case of the geophysical observatory of Berchid where the reached high value of above 1884 Bq/m3 don't present any risk for workers health because they spend only a few minutes by day in cave to control and reregister data. A maximal value of radon volumic activity was measured in winter and a minimal value of this activity was measured in summer. This difference results especially from an important aeration in summer. The use of air conditioners in summer and the possible natural ventilation in winter help to keep concentration levels of indoor radon low. The measured volumic activities of radon depend on some parameters such type of construction, the height of building and the depth of the underground. The radon concentration levels found in this study are below the action level recommended by the ICRP. To protect human health, efforts are always necessary to reach low effective dose for the public as it was recommended by ICPR and HWO

  9. Water Chlorination for human consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beginning from this issue, an initiative of Federgasacqua (Federal association dealing with the gas and the water) takes place through the activities of the Task Forces Water Quality Control and Materials and Processes, which aim is to offer to the water industry operators and updated information concerning some main subjects, emphasizing in particular the technical and management applied topics. The paper deals with the chlorination processes in drinking water treatment. An overview of the italian situation is presented, concerning disinfection as well as other oxidation processes, together with an historical background on chlorination. Concerning the applications, the chemical technologies and the main processes, the disinfectant effectiveness and the byproducts formation have been described. Further, the regulations in force have been reported and discussed on national and international bases

  10. Indoor radon concentration and outdoor/indoor pressure difference correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current approach to the radon issue, the radon risk for people living in a building is estimated based on the average indoor radon concentration. Short-term measurements as usually applied fail to reflect the wide range of radon variations arising from ventilation, radon supply and, in particular, human activities in the building. For this reason, efforts are made to find a new approach to the assessment of the quality of a building as a radon barrier, independent of the weather conditions and residential habits. A simple model of radon volume activity entering the building at a constant rate and simultaneously ventilated at a constant rate is applicable to this task. The rate of radon ingress can be regarded as a parameter making it possible to quantify the leakage of structures provided the barrier against the radon in a soil gas. The ventilation rate, on the other hand, characterizes the leakage of the whole building envelope at a given outdoor/indoor pressure difference. A unique measuring technique called the blower door exists whereby a defined pressure difference between the indoor and outdoor atmosphere can be established. Under such conditions both the ventilation rate and the rate of radon ingress can be measured and expressed as a function of the pressure difference. An analysis of the model of a room with a constant ventilation and constant radon supply is presented and the relationship between radon supply and ventilation rate can be assumed. Some experimental results show how the model can be utilized. The real indoor-outdoor air pressure differences, the indoor-soil air pressure differences, and some effects of different ventilation regimes are given. Other experiments, which have been done by using the blower door method, illustrate the possible effects and some restrictions for a routine application are discussed

  11. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxi...

  12. Indoor air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although official efforts to control air pollution have traditionally focused on outdoor air, it is now apparent that elevated contaminant concentrations are common inside some private and public buildings. Concerns about potential public health problems due to indoor air pollution are based on evidence that urban residents typically spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, concentrations of some contaminants are higher indoors than outdoors, and for some pollutants personal exposures are not characterized adequately by outdoor measurements. Among the more important indoor contaminants associated with health or irritation effects are passive tobacco smoke, radon decay products, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, asbestos fibers, microorganisms and aeroallergens. Efforts to assess health risks associated with indoor air pollution are limited by insufficient information about the number of people exposed, the pattern and severity of exposures, and the health consequences of exposures. An overall strategy should be developed to investigate indoor exposures, health effects, control options, and public policy alternatives

  13. Chlorine trifluoride (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monograph on chlorine trifluoride may be considered as a working tool useful in gaseous diffusion research. It consists of data gathered from the literature and includes furthermore a certain amount of original data. This monograph groups together the physical, chemical and physiological properties of chlorine trifluoride, as well as the preparation and analytical methods. It has been thought wise to add some technological information, and the safety regulations governing its use. (authors)

  14. Zirconia concentrate chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination experiments were conducted in order to study the kinetics of gasification of the zirconium oxide present in the zirconia concentrate. The variables studied are temperature (1173 to 1373 K), percentage of reducing agent (12 to 36%) and porosity (22 to 30%). The results indicated a greater influence of temperature and percentage of reducing agent as well as allowed the conclusion that a balance between the levels of these variables is an important factor in the appropriate chlorination conditions. (author)

  15. Indoor multipath mitigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragünas, Kostas; Borre, Kai

    2010-01-01

    There are many applications that require continuous positioning in combined outdoor urban and indoor environments. GNSS has been used for a long time in outdoor environments, while indoor positioning is still a challenging task. One of the major degradations that GNSS receivers experience indoors...... is the presence of multipath. The current paper analyzes several available multipath mitigation techniques which would be suitable for indoor applications. A few deconvolution based techniques such as the Projection Onto Convex Sets and the Deconvolution Approach are selected for closer investigation...

  16. Occurence of chlorinated aromatic compounds in filter deposits of an incinerator plant for radioactive waste. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic chlorination of chrysene, pyrene and fluoranthene yields complex mixtures of partly isomeric chlorine substituted PAHs. Their distribution resembles that of chlorine compounds previously found in filter deposits of an incineration plant for radioactive waste. In the micro fluctuation test these chlorinated products are strong mutagens to Salmonella typhimurium even without enzymatic activation. Frameshift mutations as well as basepair alterations take place. (Author)

  17. Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... US Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us ... Indoor Air Quality An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality IAQ & Health Causes of IAQ Problems Identifying IAQ ...

  18. Metabolic fate of chlorinated paraffins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposition of three [1-14C]-chlorododecanes (MCDD, PCDD I and PCDD II; 17.4%, 55.9%, and 68.5% chlorination) was studied in C57Bl mice. [1-14C]-lauric acid (LA) was studied as reference compound. Fifty-two percent (MCDD), 32% (PCDD I), and 8% (PCDD II) of the radioactive doses were exhaled as 14CO2 during 12 h after i.v. injection. Similar results were obtained after p.o. administration. In addition to a marked labelling of the liver and fat, the distribution patterns observed at 24 h after administration revealed an uptake of radioactivity in tissues with high cell turnover/high metabolic activity, e.g., intestinal mucosa, bone marrow, salivary glands and thymus. The concentration of radioactivity in these sites and the exhalation of 14CO2, which were inverse to the degree of chlorination, indicate that the chloroalkanes are degraded to metabolites which can be utilized in the intermediary metabolism. A similar, although more pronounced, distribution pattern and 14CO2-exhalation (70% of i.v. dose) was observed after LA administration. The long time retention of heptane-soluble radioactivity in liver and fat (indicating unmetabolized substance) increased with degree of chlorination. On the contrary, the administration of LA and the chlorododecanes MCDD and PCDD I, but not of PCDD II, resulted in a selective labelling of the central nervous system 30-60 days after injection. (orig.)

  19. Indoor biological pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inside buildings - besides the umpteen toxic substances emanating from materials and appliances used daily for the most assorted activities - there are may be a number of different pathogenic micro-organisms able to cause diseases and respiratory system infections. Indoor pollution caused by biological agents may be due not only to living microorganisms, but also to dead ones or to the produce of their metabolism as well as to allergens. The most efficient precautionary measure against biological agents is to ventilate the rooms one lives in. In case of air-conditioning, it's good rule to keep air pipes dry and clean, renewing filters at regular intervals in order to avoid fungi and bacteria from settling in

  20. [Indoor pollution and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, J

    1998-09-01

    The indoor pollution, where the patients pass in general close to 90% of their time, is an important factor to take in consideration if one wants to evaluate suitably the effects of the air pollution on the health. Causes of this kind of pollution are partially linked to the external pollution and the outdoor environment and also are function of human activities and introduced products in the habitat (heating, tabagisme, handywork, products of maintenance, coatings, materials of construction, etc.). The effects on health are as various as the pollutants, going from sharp intoxication to irritations or simply desagreements. In this problem of public health we may not underestimated sensitive persons and risky group as well as long terme effects, and chronic exposition effects. The search of solutions needs multiple competences from the physician, who has to play an essential role. PMID:9805975

  1. Human response to combined indoor environment exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn

    2002-01-01

    Most thermal comfort standards and guidelines presume sedentary, light activity and a neutral overall thermal sensation when predicting local thermal discomfort. In addition, current standards specify criteria for separate aspects of the indoor environment, e.g. thermal climate, air quality or...... thermal discomfort factors were observed. Limited evidence was found of significant interactions between different aspects of the indoor environment. Only for the effect of air temperature and air humidity on sensory air quality were well-estabished relationships available....

  2. The pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, A

    2012-01-31

    Swimming pool sanitation has largely been concerned with the microbiological quality of pool water, which is normally treated using a number of chlorine products. Recent studies have pointed to the potential hazards of chlorine by-products to the respiratory epithelium, particularly in indoor, poorly ventilated, pools. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether chronic exposure to indoor chlorinated swimming pools was associated with an increased likelihood of the development of asthma in boys. METHODS: The subjects were boys aged between 6 and 12 years. Data was collected by means of parental responses to a standardized asthma questionnaire (ISAAC: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood), supplemented with additional questions regarding frequency of attendance, number of years attendance, whether the child is a swimming team member. The questionnaire return rate was 71\\/% (n = 121). 23 boys were excluded on the basis that they had asthma before they started swimming (n = 97). There was a significant association between number of years a boy had been swimming and the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months (p = 0.009; OR = 1.351; 95% CI = 1.077-1.693) and diagnosed asthma (p = 0.046; OR = 1.299; 95% CI = 1.004-1.506). The greater the number the number of years a boy had been attending an indoor, chlorinated pool, the greater the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months or "had asthma". Age, parental smoking habits and being a swimming team member had no association with any of the asthma variables examined. Swimming pool attendance may be a risk factor in asthma in boys.

  3. Activated carbons from flax shive and cotton gin waste as environmental adsorbents for the chlorinated hydrocarbon trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasson, K Thomas; Wartelle, Lynda H; Lima, Isabel M; Marshall, Wayne E; Akin, Danny E

    2009-11-01

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as precursors for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this paper is to show that flax shive and cotton gin waste can serve as a precursor for activated carbon that can be used for adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) from both the liquid and gas phases. Testing was conducted on carbon activated with phosphoric acid or steam. The results show that activated carbon made from flax shive performed better than select commercial activated carbons, especially at higher TCE concentrations. The activation method employed had little effect on TCE adsorption in gas or vapor phase studies but liquid phase studies suggested that steam activation is slightly better than phosphoric acid activation. As expected, the capacity for the activated carbons depended on the fluid phase equilibrium concentration. At a fluid concentration of 2 mg of TCE/L of fluid, the capacity of the steam activated carbon made from flax shive was similar at 64 and 80 mg TCE/g of carbon for the vapor and liquid phases, respectively. Preliminary cost estimates suggest that the production costs of such carbons are $1.50 to $8.90 per kg, depending on activation method and precursor material; steam activation was significantly less expensive than phosphoric acid activation. PMID:19540755

  4. [Schools, office buildings, leisure settings: diversity of indoor air quality issues. Global review on indoor air quality in these settings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandin, C; Derbez, M; Kirchner, S

    2012-07-01

    This review provides a global overview of indoor air quality issues in schools, office buildings and recreational settings. It presents the most recent scientific publications and the on-going work conducted in France in the frame of the indoor air quality Observatory. Monitoring campaigns on indoor air quality in schools have been carried out in the recent years in Europe. However, few studies have specifically addressed the role of exposure in these buildings on children's health. Indoor air quality in office buildings has been little studied so far. However, some specificities, such as emissions from electronic devices, frequent cleaning, impossibility to open windows in high-rise buildings, for example, should be examined and their role on the health and comfort studied. Finally, even if the time spent in recreational settings is short, the quality of indoor air should also be considered because of specific pollution. This is the case of indoor swimming pools (exposure to chlorination byproducts) and ice-rinks (exposure to exhaust from machines used to smooth the ice). PMID:22818262

  5. Indoor Air Quality Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin Union Free School District, NY.

    This manual identifies ways to improve a school's indoor air quality (IAQ) and discusses practical actions that can be carried out by school staff in managing air quality. The manual includes discussions of the many sources contributing to school indoor air pollution and the preventive planning for each including renovation and repair work,…

  6. Indoor Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of indoor pollution ... is known as sick building syndrome. Usually indoor air quality problems only cause discomfort. Most people feel ...

  7. Indoor Climate Quality Assessment -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansaldi, Roberta; Asadi, Ehsan; Costa, José Joaquim;

    This Guidebook gives building professionals useful support in the practical measurements and monitoring of the indoor climate in buildings. It is evident that energy consumption in a building is directly influenced by required and maintained indoor comfort level. Wireless technologies for measure...

  8. Indoor ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation in indoor air is discussed in the perspective of the effective dose equivalents from other sources of radiation. Estimates of effective doses equivalents from indoor radon and its contribution to lung cancer incidence are reviewed. Swedish experiences with cost effective remedial actions are presented. The authors present optimal strategies for screening measurements and remedial actions in cost-benefit perspective. (author.)

  9. Indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor Air Quality is rapidly becoming a major environmental concern because a significant amount of people spend a substantial amount of time in a variety of different indoor environments. Health effects from indoor pollutants fall into two categories: those that are experienced immediately after exposure and those that do not show up until years later. They are: radon, formaldehyde, asbestos, lead and household organic chemicals. The authors presented a source-by-source look at the most common indoor air pollutants, their potential health effects, and ways to reduce their levels in the home. There are three basic strategies to improve indoor air quality: one method is source control, another is through ventilation improvements, and the third is the utilization of some sort of mechanical device such as air cleaners

  10. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Robert H.; Joseph O. Falkinham; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains wer...

  11. Chlorine-containing natural compounds in higher plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    More than 130 chlorine-containing compounds have been isolated from higher plants and ferns; about half are polyacetylenes, thiophenes and sesquiterpene lactones from the Asteraceae. A chlorinated chlorophyll may be an important part of photosystem 1. High biological activity is found in 4...

  12. In-situ measurements of chlorine activation, nitric acid redistribution and ozone depletion in the Antarctic lower vortex aboard the German research aircraft HALO during TACTS/ESMVal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schlage, Romy; Gottschaldt, Klaus-Dirk; Ziereis, Helmut; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Müller, Stefan; Zahn, Andreas; Schlager, Hans; Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurements of stratospheric chlorine compounds are rare and exhibit the potential to gain insight into small scale mixing processes where stratospheric air masses of different origin and history interact. In addition, the relationship with chemically stable trace gases helps to identify regions that have been modified by chemical processing on polar stratospheric clouds. To this end, in-situ measurements of ClONO2, HCl, HNO3, NOy, N2O and O3 have been performed in the Antarctic Polar Vortex in September 2012 aboard the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Rang research aircraft) during the TACTS/ESMVal (Transport and Composition in the UTLS/Earth System Model Validation) mission. With take-off and landing in Capetown, HALO sampled vortex air with latitudes down to 65°S, at altitudes between 8 and 14.3 km and potential temperatures between 340 and 390 K. Before intering the vortex at 350 K potential temperature, HALO additionally sampled mid-latitude stratospheric air. The trace gas distributions at the edge of the Antarctic polar vortex show distinct signatures of processed upper stratospheric vortex air and chemically different lower stratospheric / upper tropospheric air. Diabatic descend of the vortex transports processed air into the lower stratosphere. Here small scale filaments of only a few kilometers extension form at the lower vortex boundary due to shear stress, ultimately leading to transport and irreversible mixing. Comparison of trace gas relationships with those at the beginning of the polar winter reveals substantial chlorine activation, ozone depletion de- and renitrification with high resolution. Furthermore, the measurements are compared to the chemistry climate models EMAC and supported by ECMWF analysis. Finally, we compare the Antarctic measurements with new measurements of ClONO2, HCl and HNO3 aboard HALO obtained during the Arctic mission POLSTRACC (POLar STratosphere in a Changing Climate) based in Kiruna (Sveden

  13. Transfer of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorinated pesticides from mother to pup in relation to cytochrome P450 enzyme activities in harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) from the gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkers, Hans; Burkow, Ivan C; Hammill, Mike O; Lydersen, Christian; Witkamp, Renger F

    2002-01-01

    Congener-specific transfer of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides from female to pup was studied in harp seals from eastern Canada. Possible effects on hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP450) due to contaminant mobilization from blubber lipids in females and ingestion of contaminated milk in pups were studied. Contaminant transfer from blubber to milk in females favored the more polar compounds (lower chlorinated PCBs, toxaphenes, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and hexachlorobenzene) relative to more lipophilic compounds (higher chlorinated PCBs, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane [DDT], chlordane). In spite of substantial contaminant mobilization from blubber in females and ingestion of contaminated milk by pups, CYP450 activities were low in all animals. Possibly, increased plasma estradiol concentrations, involved in breeding after lactation, suppressed CYP450 directly. Although the pups were exposed to contaminants in milk, CYP450 activities were low, resulting in low contaminant metabolism. This was confirmed by similar contaminant patterns in milk and pups. A strong positive relation between CYP1A-like activities and body weight in the pups suggested not yet fully developed CYP1A enzymes. A negative association between CYP3A and pesticides in females and pups was hypothesized to be a result of metabolic inactivation of CYP450. The CYP450 enzyme activities were considered unsuitable indicators for contaminant mobilization and transfer in harp seals. PMID:11804067

  14. An experimental indoor phasing system based on active optics using dispersed Hartmann sensing technology in the visible waveband

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A telescope with a larger primary mirror can collect much more light and resolve objects much better than one with a smaller mirror, and so the larger version is always pursued by astronomers and astronomical technicians. Instead of using a monolithic primary mirror, more and more large telescopes, which are currently being planned or in construction, have adopted a segmented primary mirror design. Therefore, how to sense and phase such a primary mirror is a key issue for the future of extremely large optical/infrared telescopes. The Dispersed Fringe Sensor (DFS), or Dispersed Hartmann Sensor (DHS), is a non-contact method using broadband point light sources and it can estimate the piston by the two-directional spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion and lenslet array. Thus it can implement the combination of co-focusing by Shack-Hartmann technology and phasing by dispersed fringe sensing technologies such as the template-mapping method and the Hartmann method. We introduce the successful design, construction and alignment of our dispersed Hartmann sensor together with its design principles and simulations. We also conduct many successful real phasing tests and phasing corrections in the visible waveband using our existing indoor segmented mirror optics platform. Finally, some conclusions are reached based on the test and correction of experimental results.

  15. An experimental indoor phasing system based on active optics using dispersed Hartmann sensing technology in the visible waveband

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhang; Gen-Rong Liu; Yue-Fei Wang; Ye-Ping Li; Ya-Jun Zhang; Liang Zhang; Yi-Zhong Zeng; Jie Zhang

    2011-01-01

    A telescope with a larger primary mirror can collect much more light and resolve objects much better than one with a smaller mirror,and so the larger version is always pursued by astronomers and astronomical technicians.Instead of using a monolithic primary mirror,more and more large telescopes,which are currently being planned or in construction,have adopted a segmented primary mirror design.Therefore,how to sense and phase such a primary mirror is a key issue for the future of extremely large optical/infrared telescopes.The Dispersed Fringe Sensor (DFS),or Dispersed Hartmann Sensor (DHS),is a non-contact method using broadband point light sources and it can estimate the piston by the two-directional spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion and lenslet array.Thus it can implement the combination of co-focusing by Shack-Hartmann technology and phasing by dispersed fringe sensing technologies such as the template-mapping method and the Hartmann method.We introduce the successful design,construction and alignment of our dispersed Hartmann sensor together with its design principles and simulations.We also conduct many successful real phasing tests and phasing corrections in the visible waveband using our existing indoor segmented mirror optics platform.Finally,some conclusions are reached based on the test and correction of experimental results.

  16. Effects of Starvation on Physiological Activity and Chlorine Disinfection Resistance in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    OpenAIRE

    Lisle, John T.; Broadaway, Susan C.; Prescott, Annette M.; Pyle, Barry H.; Fricker, Colin; McFeters, Gordon A.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 can persist for days to weeks in microcosms simulating natural conditions. In this study, we used a suite of fluorescent, in situ stains and probes to assess the influence of starvation on physiological activity based on membrane potential (rhodamine 123 assay), membrane integrity (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit), respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-di-4-tolyl-tetrazolium chloride assay), intracellular esterase activity (ScanRDI assay), and 16S rRNA content. Growth-dependent as...

  17. Phosphate valorization by dry chlorination route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanari N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the extraction of phosphorus chlorinated compounds from phosphate materials using chlorination with gaseous chlorine. An industrial sample of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, after transformation into calcium pyrophosphate (Ca2P2O7, is subjected to reactions with Cl2+CO+N2 and Cl2+C+N2 at temperatures ranging from 625 to 950°C using boat experiments. Gathering results of the thermodynamic predictions and TG/DT analysis with those of SEM and XRD examinations of the chlorinated residues allowed the interpretation of phenomena and reactions mechanism occurring during the calcium pyrophosphate carbochlorination. Reaction rate of Ca2P2O7 by Cl2+CO+N2 at 950°C is slowed down due to the formation of a CaCl2 liquid layer acting as a barrier for the diffusion of the reactive gases and further reaction progress. While, the carbochlorination with Cl2+C+N2 led to almost full chlorination of Ca2P2O7 at 750°C and the process proceeds with an apparent activation energy of about 104 kJ/mol between 625 and 750°C. Carbochlorination technique can be considered as an alternative and selective route for the valorization of low grade phosphates and for the phosphorus extraction from its bearing materials.

  18. Research review: Indoor air quality control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques for controlling the concentration of radon, formaldehyde, and combustion products in the indoor air are reviewed. The most effective techniques, which are generally based on limiting or reducing indoor pollutant source strengths, can decrease indoor pollutant concentrations by a factor of 3 to 10. Unless the initial ventilation rate is unusually low, it is difficult to reduce indoor pollutant concentrations more than approximately 50% by increasing the ventilation rate of an entire building. However, the efficiency of indoor pollutant control by ventilation can be enhanced through the use of local exhaust ventilation near concentrated sources of pollutants, by minimizing short circuiting of air from supply to exhaust when pollutant sources are dispersed and, in some situations, by promoting a displacement flow of air and pollutants toward the exhaust. Active air cleaning is also examined briefly. Filtration and electrostatic air cleaning for removal of particles from the indoor air are the most practical and effective currently available techniques of air cleaning. 49 refs., 7 figs

  19. Catalytic Role Of Palladium And Relative Reactivity Of Substituted Chlorines During Adsorption And Treatment Of PCBs On Reactive Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adsorption-mediated dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a unique feature of reactive activated cabon (RAC). Here, we address the RAC system, containing a tunable amount of Fe as a primary electron donor coupled with Pd as an electrochemical catalyst to pote...

  20. On the chemical nature of boundary lubrication of stainless steel by chlorine - and sulfur-containing EP-additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Christensen, Erik; Bergqvist, Rene Stig; Møller, Poul Bildsøe; Bjerrum, Niels; Høj, Jakob Weiland; Kann, G.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    paraffin was equally active with iron, chromium and nickel. The better lubrication performance demonstrated by chlorinated paraffin compared to dialkylpolysulfides was attributed to the chemical activity of the chlorinated paraffin with all the main components of stainless steel. The depth profiles of the...... the Me-powder (where Me = iron, chromium or nickel)-dialkylpolysulfide (or chlorinated paraffin) mixtures have shown that dialkylpolysulfide was chemically active with iron and nickel (the highest activity was with nickel). Chromium was practically nonactive with dialkylpolysulfide. Chlorinated...

  1. Exposure to 27 polychlorinated biphenyls in the indoor environment of a workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Ebbehøj, N E; Göen, T;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the exposure to a broad-spectrum of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs) from the indoor environment through bio-monitoring of people working in a building with PCB-containing materials and elevated PCB levels in the indoor air. METHODS: A cross-sectional study comparing the...... plasma concentration of 27 PCB congeners in 15 people working in a PCB-contaminated building and 30 matched controls. RESULTS: Median concentration of eight low-chlorinated PCB congeners was significantly higher in the exposed than in the control group. The sum of median concentrations of tri + tetra......-chlorinated PCB was almost ten times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed, and sums of dioxin-like and non-dioxin-like PCB were both relatively increased by 60 % in the exposed group. CONCLUSIONS: The occupational indoor environment may significantly add to PCB exposure, especially to the lower...

  2. Towards Mobile Information Systems for Indoor Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of Internet of things (IOT and indoor positioning technologies such as Wi-Fi and RFID, indoor mobile information systems have become a new research hotspot. Based on the unique features of indoor space and urgent needs on indoor mobile applications, in this paper we analyze some key issues in indoor mobile information systems, including positioning technologies in indoor environments, representation models for indoor spaces, query processing techniques for indoor moving objects, and index structures for indoor mobile applications. Then, we present an indoor mobile information management system named IndoorDB. Finally, we give some future research topics about indoor mobile information systems.

  3. Great Indoors Awards 2007

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Hollandis Maastrichtis jagati 17. XI esimest korda rahvusvahelist auhinda The Great Indoors Award. Aasta sisekujundusfirmaks valiti Masamichi Katayama asutatud Wonderwall. Auhinna said veel Zaha Hadid, Heatherwick Studio, Ryui Nakamura Architects ja Item Idem

  4. Indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rising energy prices, among other factors, have generated an incentive to reduce ventilation rates and thereby reduce the cost of heating and cooling buildings. Reduced ventilation in buildings may significantly increase exposure to indoor air pollution and perhaps have adverse effects on occupant health and comfort. Preliminary findings suggest that reduced ventilation may adversely affect indoor air quality unless appropriate control strategies are undertaken. The strategies used to control indoor air pollution depend on the specific pollutant or class of pollutants encountered, and differ somewhat depending on whether the application is to an existing building or a new building under design and construction. Whenever possible, the first course of action is prevention or reduction of pollutant emissions at the source. In most buildings, control measures involve a combination of prevention, removal, and suppression. Common sources of indoor air pollution in buildings, the specific pollutants emitted by each source, the potential health effects, and possible control techniques are discussed

  5. Indoor Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of indoor pollution include Mold and pollen Tobacco smoke Household products ...

  6. [Indoor environments, work and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbritti, G

    2004-01-01

    Nowadays, the activities of most of the working population are carried out in confined, non-industrial environments such as offices, hospitals, libraries, social and leisure centres and means of transport. Sub-optimal air quality in these confined spaces can lead to discomfort, ailments and even diseases. The impact and diffusion of these effects have led to the organisation and funding of large-scale epidemiological investigations in many countries and the nomination of working parties by governments, health agencies and international scientific societies. Over the past 20 years studies on indoor environments have identified sources of risk of various pollutants, established the levels of potentially dangerous concentrations and, for most of them, have provided effective measures. However, the effects of many biological agents and chemical mixtures still remain to be defined and effective guidelines are needed for high quality indoor air. Identifying and managing indoor risk factors presupposes a specific methodology: the specialist in occupational medicine can play a key role in risk assessment, in the early diagnosis of building-related illnesses and in the prevention of both short- and long-term effects. PMID:15584444

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... desired rate of discharge, provided the air or gas is oil-free and thoroughly dried by passing it over activated aluminum oxide, silica gel, or other acceptable drying agent, and provided the supply pressure is...-resistant to chlorine in either the gas or liquid phase. Cast or malleable iron shall not be used....

  8. INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Soysal; Yucel Demiral

    2007-01-01

    The existance of hazardious materials including biological, chemical, and physical agents such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, radon, volotile organic compounds, microorganisms in houses and the other non-industrilized buildings have been defined as “indoor air pollution”. Indoor air pollutants could possible arised from inside or outside environment and categorized into six subgroups. Almost 80% Turkish population have living in the urban areas...

  9. Indoor air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor air pollution after being a neglected subject for a number of years, is attracting attention recently because it is a side effect of energy crisis. About 50% of world's 6 billion population, mostly in developing countries, depend on biomass and coal in the form of wood, dung and crop residues for domestic energy because of poverty. These materials are burnt in simple stoves with incomplete combustion and infants, children and women are exposed to high levels of indoor air pollution for a considerable period, approximately between 2-4 hours daily. Current worldwide trade in wood fuel is over US $7 billion and about 2 million people are employed full time in production and marketing it. One of the most annoying and common indoor pollutant in both, developing and developed countries, is cigarette smoke. Children in gas-equipped homes had higher incidences of respiratory disease. Babies' DNA can be damaged even before they are born if their mothers breathe polluted air. Exposure to indoor air pollution may be responsible for nearly 2 million excess deaths in developing countries and for 4% of the global burden of the disease. Only a few indoor pollutants have been studied in detail. Indoor air pollution is a major health threat on which further research is needed to define the extent of the problem more precisely and to determine solutions by the policy-makers instead of neglecting it because sufferers mostly belong to Third World countries. (author)

  10. Expanded uncertainties of preconcentration neutron activation measurements of extractable organo-chlorine, bromine and iodine compounds in bovine milk lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milk is known to contain organohalogen compounds. A mixture of hexane and isopropanol was used to extract lipids from bovine milk and neutron activation analysis (NAA) was employed to measure extractable organohalogens in the lipids. The samples were irradiated in a neutron flux of 2.5 × 1011 cm2 s-1 for 10 min, allowed to decay for 2 min, and counted for 10 min. Uncertainties associated with the preconcentration NAA measurements were investigated in detail. The mass fractions of halogens in mg kg-1 and their relative expanded uncertainties in percent in bovine milk lipids were: 32 (8.4 %), 2.65 (9.8 %) and 0.211 (6.6 %) for Cl, Br and I, respectively. (author)

  11. Characterization of a multi-user indoor positioning system based on low cost depth vision (Kinect) for monitoring human activity in a smart home

    OpenAIRE

    Sevrin, Loïc; Noury, Norbert; Abouchi, Nacer; Jumel, Fabrice; Massot, Bertrand; Saraydaryan, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    International audience An increasing number of systems use indoor positioning for many scenarios such as asset tracking, health care, games, manufacturing, logistics, shopping, and security. Many technologies are available and the use of depth cameras is becoming more and more attractive as this kind of device becomes affordable and easy to handle. This paper contributes to the effort of creating an indoor positioning system based on low cost depth cameras (Kinect). A method is proposed to...

  12. Microbial and molecular techniques to evaluate and to implement in-situ biodegradation potential and activity at sites contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karg, F. [HPC Envirotec / France and HPC AG (Germany); Henkler, Ch. [Planreal (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    Intrinsic bio-remediation harnesses the ability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade contaminants that are present in soil and groundwater. Over the past decade many environmental regulatory agencies especially in Europe have come to recognize the importance of these natural processes in contaminant attenuation. In order to use in-situ bio-remediation to clean up a site successfully it is necessary to investigate the indigenous microbial population and its potential activity to degrade the contaminants of concern (COCs). The evaluation of naturally-occurring degradative activity in initial screening of soil and groundwater samples using recently developed molecular and microbial methods may allow for the implementation of a contaminant reduction and management program without the need for fully engineered remediation intervention. Limited engineering approaches (nutrient delivery etc.) can be implemented to support naturally-occurring bio-restoration processes to achieve a controlled, dynamic attenuation of COCs. Techniques for monitoring pollutant-degrading microorganisms were previously limited to standard culturing techniques. More recently, techniques based upon detection of genetic elements and metabolic activities have been developed in collaboration with university partners Europe, especially in France. The modern techniques are more sensitive for monitoring microbial populations, metabolic activity and the genetic potential to degrade the COCs, and avoid the need for cultivation of microbes under artificial conditions in the laboratory. Especially the application of PCR-Tests (Polymerase Chain Reaction) are able to quantify the Genetic Potential of Pollutant Microbiological Degradation on a contaminated site. This enables to use very economic in-situ site rehabilitation strategies as for example (Dynamic Natural Attenuation). For this modern application of these new strategies PLANREAL created with HPC Envirotec and together with a French University

  13. Microbial and molecular techniques to evaluate and to implement in-situ biodegradation potential and activity at sites contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrinsic bio-remediation harnesses the ability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade contaminants that are present in soil and groundwater. Over the past decade many environmental regulatory agencies especially in Europe have come to recognize the importance of these natural processes in contaminant attenuation. In order to use in-situ bio-remediation to clean up a site successfully it is necessary to investigate the indigenous microbial population and its potential activity to degrade the contaminants of concern (COCs). The evaluation of naturally-occurring degradative activity in initial screening of soil and groundwater samples using recently developed molecular and microbial methods may allow for the implementation of a contaminant reduction and management program without the need for fully engineered remediation intervention. Limited engineering approaches (nutrient delivery etc.) can be implemented to support naturally-occurring bio-restoration processes to achieve a controlled, dynamic attenuation of COCs. Techniques for monitoring pollutant-degrading microorganisms were previously limited to standard culturing techniques. More recently, techniques based upon detection of genetic elements and metabolic activities have been developed in collaboration with university partners Europe, especially in France. The modern techniques are more sensitive for monitoring microbial populations, metabolic activity and the genetic potential to degrade the COCs, and avoid the need for cultivation of microbes under artificial conditions in the laboratory. Especially the application of PCR-Tests (Polymerase Chain Reaction) are able to quantify the Genetic Potential of Pollutant Microbiological Degradation on a contaminated site. This enables to use very economic in-situ site rehabilitation strategies as for example (Dynamic Natural Attenuation). For this modern application of these new strategies PLANREAL created with HPC Envirotec and together with a French University

  14. Radioactivity in the indoor building environment in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of activity concentrations of radionuclides in building materials and radon in indoor space is important in the assessment of population exposures, as most individuals spend 80 % of their time indoors. This paper presents the results of activity concentration measurements of: radon emanated from the soil, radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in the soil, indoor radon in the city of Novi Sad (the capital city of Vojvodina) using charcoal canisters and indoor radon in the Vojvodina region using alpha-track detectors and the radioactivity of some building materials. Influences of floor level, space under the rooms, boarding, and the heating system on indoor radon accumulation in the Vojvodina province, situated in the northern part of Serbia, are also presented in this paper. The total effective dose and the activity concentration index are calculated applying the dose criteria recommended by the European Union for building materials. (authors)

  15. Rush-hour aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons in selected subway stations of Shanghai, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanli Zhang; Chunlei Li; Xinming Wang; Hai Guo; Yanli Feng; Jianmin Chen

    2012-01-01

    Air samples were collected simultaneously at platform,mezzanine and outdoor in five typical stations of subway system in Shanghai,China using stainless steel canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD) after cryogenic preconcentration.Benzene,toluene,ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) at the platforms and mezzanines inside the stations averaged (10.3± 2.1),(38.7 ± 9.0),(19.4 ± 10.1) and (30.0 ± 11.1) μg/m3,respectively; while trichloroethylene (TrCE),tetrachloroethylene (TeCE)and para-dichlorobenzene (pDCB),vinyl chloride and carbon tetrachloride were the most abundant chlorinated hydrocarbons inside the stations with average levels of (3.6 ± 1.3),(1.3 ± 0.5),(4.1 ± 1.1),(2.2 ± 1.1) and (1.2 ± 0.3) μg/m3,respectively.Mean levels of major aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons were higher indoor (platforms and mezzanines) than outdoor with average indoor/outdoor (I/O)ratios of 1.1-9.5,whereas no significant indoor/outdoor differences were found except for benzene and TrCE.The highly significant mutual correlations (p < 0.01) for BTEX between indoor and outdoor and their significant correlation (p < 0.05) with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE),a marker of traffic-related emission without other indoor and outdoor sources,indicated that BTEX were introduced into the subway stations from indoor/outdoor air exchange and traffic emission should be their dominant source.TrCE and pDCB were mainly from indoor emission and TeCE might have both indoor emission sources and contribution from outdoor air,especially in the mezzanines.

  16. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of degrading short chain chlorinated paraffins over reduced graphene oxide/CoFe2O4/Ag nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Zhao, Qidong; Li, Xinyong; Wang, Dong

    2016-10-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins have recently attracted great attention because of their environmental persistence and biological toxicity as an important organic pollutant. In this work, reduced graphene oxide/CoFe2O4/Ag (RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag) nanocomposite was prepared and employed for photocatalytic degradation of short chain chlorinated paraffins. The process of photocatalytic degradation of short chain chlorinated paraffins over RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag under visible light (λ>400nm) was investigated by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the related mechanisms were proposed. An apparent degradation ratio of 91.9% over RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag could be obtained under visible light illumination of 12h, while only about 21.7% was obtained with commercial P25 TiO2 under the same experimental conditions, which demonstrates that the RGO/CoFe2O4/Ag nanocomposite is a potential candidate for effective photocatalytic removal of short chain chlorinated paraffins. PMID:27376973

  17. IEA EBC Annex 59 - Possibilities, limitations and capacities of indoor terminal units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    Indoor terminal units can be defined as the building elements that use different heat transfer mechanisms and media to emit and remove heat or moisture from indoor spaces (e.g. hydronic radiant heating and cooling systems, fan-coil units, active beams). Indoor temperature and humidity fields depe...

  18. Chlorination of zirconyte concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination experiments with zirconyte concentrate were carried out in order to study the effects of temperature, percentage of reducing agent and porosity on the gasification of ZrO2 for 10 and 20 minutes of reaction. Factorial analysis was applied and the results indicated that temperature and percentage of reducing agent were the two only variables effecting the ZrO2 gasification. (author)

  19. Foliage Plants for Improving Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.

    1988-01-01

    NASA's research with foliage houseplants during the past 10 years has produced a new concept in indoor air quality improvement. This new and exciting technology is quite simple. Both plant leaves and roots are utilized in removing trace levels of toxic vapors from inside tightly sealed buildings. Low levels of chemicals such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde can be removed from indoor environments by plant leaves alone, while higher concentrations of numerous toxic chemicals can be removed by filtering indoor air through the plant roots surrounded by activated carbon. The activated carbon absorbs large quantities of the toxic chemicals and retains them until the plant roots and associated microorganisms degrade and assimilate these chemicals.

  20. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the ...

  1. The chlorination of cooling water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After reviewing the means of fighting biological pollution of cooling water circuits in nuclear power stations, the authors describe the chlorination treatment methods used by EDF. This deals with the massive shock chlorination of the cooling towers and the continuous low-level chlorination of coastal nuclear power stations. In both areas, the Research and Development Board of EDF has carried out and encouraged research with the aim of improving circuit protection, while still protecting the aquatic eco-system against damage that might be caused by waste chlorinated water

  2. Indoor wayfinding and navigation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Due to the widespread use of navigation systems for wayfinding and navigation in the outdoors, researchers have devoted their efforts in recent years to designing navigation systems that can be used indoors. This book is a comprehensive guide to designing and building indoor wayfinding and navigation systems. It covers all types of feasible sensors (for example, Wi-Fi, A-GPS), discussing the level of accuracy, the types of map data needed, the data sources, and the techniques for providing routes and directions within structures.

  3. Bluetooth Indoor Positioning System using Fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Christian; Jensen, Casper Svenning; Luckow, Kasper Søe;

    2011-01-01

    Indoor Positioning has been an active research area in the last decade, but so far, commercial Indoor Positioning Systems (IPSs) have been sparse. The main obstacle towards widely available IPSs has been the lack of appropriate, low cost technologies, that enable indoor positioning. While Wi-Fi...... infrastructures are ubiquitous, consumer-oriented Wi-Fi enabled mobile phones have been missing. Conversely, while Bluetooth technology is present in the vast majority of consumer mobile phones, Bluetooth infrastructures have been missing. Bluetooth infrastructures have typically been installed as part...... of complete hardware/software IPSs that often incur a substantial hardware cost. Furthermore, Bluetooth has low power consumption compared to Wi-Fi devices, which promotes longer battery life-time on mobile phones. In this paper, we present a Bluetooth IPS based entirely on commodity-grade products...

  4. Antiradiation effectiveness of the chlorine C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present ever more attention of the experimenters in the field of search of high-effective antiray means - is directed to development of preparations from bio-active substances of a natural origin. In this connection all greater interest is caused by researches of antiray activity of these compounds, distinguished, as a rule, from known preparations of synthetic manufacture of low toxicity, absence of expressed collateral effects and possibility of course application. It has biological (antiray) activity in dozes 5-10 mg/kg and chlorine C which is derivative of chlorophil A. At present it passes tests in oncology. Porphyrines (synthetic and natural) are recently subjected to wide study as potential medicinal means, due to their ability to be accumulated in bodies of the reticulo-endothelial system and proliferous tissues, as well as their physical-chemical characteristics (fluorescence, photosensitizing action, colouring). All this testifies for the benefit of perspective use of porphyrin for treatment and diagnostics of tumors. According to the above described properties of porphyrines there is that fact, that for some of them radioprotective properties are revealed during the injections as well as before and after radiation treatment. The above said has formed the basis for study of antiray properties of the chlorine C during the experiments on small-sized laboratory animals. Antiradiation effectivity of chlorine C was studied on the mice (CBA x C57 B1) F1. Chlorine C was applied in a wide range of dozes with its' use in 3 variants: before radiation treatment, after radiation treatment, combined (before and after radiation treatment). Radioprotective activity of chlorine C reduces at an increase of a time of the injection before radiation treatment and at other ways of injection (intramuscularly, subcutaneously, per os). Studies of medical activity of chlorine C in experiments on mice have shown, that the compound does not possess medical activity. The death of

  5. Rush-hour aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons in selected subway stations of Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Li, Chunlei; Wang, Xinming; Guo, Hai; Feng, Yanli; Chen, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Air samples were collected simultaneously at platform, mezzanine and outdoor in five typical stations of subway system in Shanghai, China using stainless steel canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD) after cryogenic preconcentration. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) at the platforms and mezzanines inside the stations averaged (10.3 +/- 2.1), (38.7 +/- 9.0), (19.4 +/- 10.1) and (30.0 +/- 11.1) microg/m3, respectively; while trichloroethylene (TrCE), tetrachloroethylene (TeCE) and para-dichlorobenzene (pDCB), vinyl chloride and carbon tetrachloride were the most abundant chlorinated hydrocarbons inside the stations with average levels of (3.6 +/- 1.3), (1.3 +/- 0.5), (4.1 +/- 1.1), (2.2 +/- 1.1) and (1.2 +/- 0.3) microg/m3, respectively. Mean levels of major aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons were higher indoor (platforms and mezzanines) than outdoor with average indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios of 1.1-9.5, whereas no significant indoor/outdoor differences were found except for benzene and TrCE. The highly significant mutual correlations (p tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a marker of traffic-related emission without other indoor and outdoor sources, indicated that BTEX were introduced into the subway stations from indoor/outdoor air exchange and traffic emission should be their dominant source. TrCE and pDCB were mainly from indoor emission and TeCE might have both indoor emission sources and contribution from outdoor air, especially in the mezzanines. PMID:22783624

  6. Indoor air quality research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various types of pollutant found in indoor air are introduced and the effects on the health of the occupants of buildings summarized. The ''sick'' building syndrome is described in detail and the need for further investigation into its causes and remedies is stressed. 8 tabs

  7. Indoor multipath mitigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragünas, Kostas

    2010-01-01

    is the presence of multipath. The current paper analyzes several available multipath mitigation techniques which would be suitable for indoor applications. A few deconvolution based techniques such as the Projection Onto Convex Sets and the Deconvolution Approach are selected for closer investigation...

  8. Structural Insights into Regioselectivity in the Enzymatic Chlorination of Tryptophan

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; De Laurentis, Walter; Leang, Khim; Herrmann, Julia; Ihlefeld, Katja; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2009-01-01

    The regioselectively controlled introduction of chlorine into organic molecules is an important biological and chemical process. This importance derives from the observation that many pharmaceutically active natural products contain a chlorine atom. Flavin-dependent halogenases are one of the principal enzyme families responsible for regioselective halogenation of natural products. Structural studies of two flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases (PrnA and RebH) have generated important ins...

  9. Chlorine-containing natural compounds in higher plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    More than 130 chlorine-containing compounds have been isolated from higher plants and ferns; about half are polyacetylenes, thiophenes and sesquiterpene lactones from the Asteraceae. A chlorinated chlorophyll may be an important part of photosystem 1. High biological activity is found in 4-chloro......-chloroindoleacetic acid from pea and in the cancerostatic maytansinoids. Many compounds are chlorohydrins isolated along with the related epoxides. Some compounds, like gibberellin A6 hydrochloride from bean, are perhaps artefacts....

  10. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Indoor Air Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Indoor Air....

  11. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Indoor Air

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Indoor Air....

  12. Indoor Subspacing to Implement Indoorgml for Indoor Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, H.; Lee, J.

    2015-10-01

    According to an increasing demand for indoor navigation, there are great attempts to develop applicable indoor network. Representation for a room as a node is not sufficient to apply complex and large buildings. As OGC established IndoorGML, subspacing to partition the space for constructing logical network is introduced. Concerning subspacing for indoor network, transition space like halls or corridors also have to be considered. This study presents the subspacing process for creating an indoor network in shopping mall. Furthermore, categorization of transition space is performed and subspacing of this space is considered. Hall and squares in mall is especially defined for subspacing. Finally, implementation of subspacing process for indoor network is presented.

  13. INDOOR SUBSPACING TO IMPLEMENT INDOORGML FOR INDOOR NAVIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available According to an increasing demand for indoor navigation, there are great attempts to develop applicable indoor network. Representation for a room as a node is not sufficient to apply complex and large buildings. As OGC established IndoorGML, subspacing to partition the space for constructing logical network is introduced. Concerning subspacing for indoor network, transition space like halls or corridors also have to be considered. This study presents the subspacing process for creating an indoor network in shopping mall. Furthermore, categorization of transition space is performed and subspacing of this space is considered. Hall and squares in mall is especially defined for subspacing. Finally, implementation of subspacing process for indoor network is presented.

  14. The chlorination kinetics of zirconium dioxide mixed with carbon black

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, the effects of chlorine gas at different chlorine partial pressures and carbon concentrations on the carbochlorination of zirconia were studied. It was found that in briquettes containing 18.7 %wt carbon, in a chlorine partial pressure range of 0.25-0.75 atm and for a reacted fraction of less than 0.7, the chemical reaction model was dominant for the carbochlorination process of zirconia. The order of reaction into chlorine gas (n) in this situation was 0.57. Moreover, the best weight ratio of carbon to zirconia was 40/60. In this case, the activation energy of the reaction was 209.9 kJ mol-1 in a temperature range of 1023-1223 K, and the dominant model was the chemical reaction model.

  15. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA's regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA's lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants

  16. Study of indoor radon distribution using measurements and CFD modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement and/or prediction of indoor radon (222Rn) concentration are important due to the impact of radon on indoor air quality and consequent inhalation hazard. In recent times, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling has become the cost effective replacement of experimental methods for the prediction and visualization of indoor pollutant distribution. The aim of this study is to implement CFD based modeling for studying indoor radon gas distribution. This study focuses on comparison of experimentally measured and CFD modeling predicted spatial distribution of radon concentration for a model test room. The key inputs for simulation viz. radon exhalation rate and ventilation rate were measured as a part of this study. Validation experiments were performed by measuring radon concentration at different locations of test room using active (continuous radon monitor) and passive (pin-hole dosimeters) techniques. Modeling predictions have been found to be reasonably matching with the measurement results. The validated model can be used to understand and study factors affecting indoor radon distribution for more realistic indoor environment. - Highlights: • Indoor radon distribution has been studied using active and passive measurements and CFD simulation. • At low ventilation, non-uniformity of radon concentration was observed. • Measured wall radon flux and ventilation rate has been used in simulations. • CFD simulation results were found to be close to measurements

  17. Studies with solid chlorine chemical for chlorination of sea water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination is one of the conventional methods to control biofouling of condenser cooling water systems using either river water, reservoir water or sea water. However, there are many safety concerns associated with handling, storage and application of gaseous chlorine. Studies were carried out with suitable alternative chlorine chemical compounds which do not involve majority of these concerns but meet the functional requirement of gas chlorine. Trichloroisocyanuric Acid (TCCA) is one of the suitable alternatives to Gas chlorine. TCCA is a chlorine stabilized compound, stabilized with Cyanuric acid, thus similar to Gas Chlorine in its functions except that it is available in solid form. Release of chlorine is a gradual process in TCCA unlike Gaseous chlorine. Field studies with TCCA indicated gradual and near uniform release rate of chlorine, for longer duration with the requisite free residual chlorine levels (FRC). Thus, use of TCCA could be considered as a suitable alternative for gas chlorine for regular chlorination requirements. (author)

  18. Radiochemical analysis of chlorine-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to propose a radiochemical separation method of chlorine-36 from other beta-gamma emitters based on an oxidation technique where chlorine is trapped by NaOH. Chlorine-36 beta emissions are measured by liquid scintillation counting by the dual label technique in order to avoid the contamination produced by carbon-14 which is also trapped by NaOH and it is the main contaminant present in graphite samples. The sensitivity of this radiochemical method is high enough to achieve the needed thresholds for the radiological characterization of the radioactive materials in which this method can be applied

  19. Indoor Air Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk R Smith

    2003-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution in developing-country cities is difficult to overlook. Indoor air pollution caused by burning such traditional fuels as wood, crop residues, and dung is less evident, yet it is responsible for a significant part of country and global disease burdens. The main groups affected are poor women and children in rural areas and urban slums as they go about their daily activi...

  20. The Automobiles as Indoors.

    OpenAIRE

    Songul Acar Vaizoglu; Bekir Kaplan; Cagatay Guler

    2010-01-01

    In this review we aimed to attract attention to toxic chemicals in cars and their effect on health. People spend most of their times in indoors such as houses, workplaces, malls, sport centers, train, transportation vehicles (train, plane, cars). In US, citizens spend nearly 100 minutes in cars per day. There are safety problems in cars except than seatbelt and airbag. Some of these are seats, furnishing, cushions for arm and head, floor covering, accessories and plastic parts. In a study con...

  1. Bacterial responses to reactive chlorine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research. PMID:23768204

  2. The synergistic effect of Escherichia coli inactivation by sequential disinfection with low level chlorine dioxide followed by free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Dong; Zhu, Sui-Yi; Chen, Bo-Yan; Huo, Ming-Xin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there was little information available on pathogen removal using low level disinfectant followed by free chlorine in sequential disinfection (SD). This study investigated Escherichia coli inactivation by four types of disinfection: single step disinfection (SSD), SD, traditional sequential disinfection (TSD) and mixed disinfectant disinfection (MDD). Results indicated that SD had higher ability to inactivate E. coli than the others, indicating there was a positive synergistic effect on chlorine disinfection by prior dosing with a low level of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). The ONPG assay suggested that the permeability of cell wall rather than the viability of E. coli were changed under 0.02 mg/l ClO(2) treatment. The coexistence of residual ClO(2) and free chlorine also plays an active synergistic effect. Additionally, temperature had a positive effect on E. coli inactivation in SD, while inactivation was reduced in alkaline compared to neutral and acidic conditions. PMID:23165713

  3. Chlorination and Carbochlorination of Cerium Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorination and carbochlorination of cerium oxide were studied by thermogravimetry under controlled atmosphere (TG) in the 7000C 9500C temperature range.Both reactants and products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (RX), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Thermodynamic calculations were performed by computer assisted software.The chlorination starts at a temperature close to 8000C.This reaction involves the simultaneous formation and evaporation of CeCl3.Both processes control the reaction rate and their kinetic may not be easily separated.The apparent chlorination activation energy in the 8500C-9500C temperature range is 172 to 5 kJ/ mole.Carbon transforms the CeO2-Cl2 into a more reactive system: CeO2-C-Cl2, where the effects of the carbon content, total flow rate and temperature were analyzed.The carbochlorination starting temperature is 7000C.This reaction is completed in one step controlled by mass transfer with an apparent activation energy of 56 to 5 kJ/mole in the 8500C-9500C temperature range

  4. Graph Model Based Indoor Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Lu, Hua; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    The tracking of the locations of moving objects in large indoor spaces is important, as it enables a range of applications related to, e.g., security and indoor navigation and guidance. This paper presents a graph model based approach to indoor tracking that offers a uniform data management...... infrastructure for different symbolic positioning technologies, e.g., Bluetooth and RFID. More specifically, the paper proposes a model of indoor space that comprises a base graph and mappings that represent the topology of indoor space at different levels. The resulting model can be used for one or several...... indoor positioning technologies. Focusing on RFID-based positioning, an RFID specific reader deployment graph model is built from the base graph model. This model is then used in several algorithms for constructing and refining trajectories from raw RFID readings. Empirical studies with implementations...

  5. Heated indoor swimming pools, infants, and the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a neurogenic hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    McMaster Marianne E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In a case-control study a statistically significant association was recorded between the introduction of infants to heated indoor swimming pools and the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In this paper, a neurogenic hypothesis is formulated to explain how toxins produced by chlorine in such pools may act deleteriously on the infant's immature central nervous system, comprising brain and spinal cord, to produce the deformity of AIS. Presentation of the hy...

  6. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in indoor and outdoor air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, Ruthann A.; Perovich, Laura J.

    The past 50 years have seen rapid development of new building materials, furnishings, and consumer products and a corresponding explosion in new chemicals in the built environment. While exposure levels are largely undocumented, they are likely to have increased as a wider variety of chemicals came into use, people began spending more time indoors, and air exchange rates decreased to improve energy efficiency. As a result of weak regulatory requirements for chemical safety testing, only limited toxicity data are available for these chemicals. Over the past 15 years, some chemical classes commonly used in building materials, furnishings, and consumer products have been shown to be endocrine disrupting chemicals - that is they interfere with the action of endogenous hormones. These include PCBs, used in electrical equipment, caulking, paints and surface coatings; chlorinated and brominated flame retardants, used in electronics, furniture, and textiles; pesticides, used to control insects, weeds, and other pests in agriculture, lawn maintenance, and the built environment; phthalates, used in vinyl, plastics, fragrances, and other products; alkylphenols, used in detergents, pesticide formulations, and polystyrene plastics; and parabens, used to preserve products like lotions and sunscreens. This paper summarizes reported indoor and outdoor air concentrations, chemical use and sources, and toxicity data for each of these chemical classes. While industrial and transportation-related pollutants have been shown to migrate indoors from outdoor sources, it is expected that indoor sources predominate for these consumer product chemicals; and some studies have identified indoor sources as the predominant factor influencing outdoor ambient air concentrations in densely populated areas. Mechanisms of action, adverse effects, and dose-response relationships for many of these chemicals are poorly understood and no systematic screening of common chemicals for endocrine disrupting

  7. Indoor Air Pollution (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Students to Environmental Health Information Menu Home Air Pollution Air Pollution Home Indoor Air Pollution Outdoor Air Pollution ... Pollution Indoor Air Pollution Print this Page Air Pollution Air Pollution Home Indoor Air Pollution Outdoor Air Pollution ...

  8. Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: Combustion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This environmental information handbook was prepared to assist both the non-technical reader (i.e., homeowner) and technical persons (such as researchers, policy analysts, and builders/designers) in understanding the current state of knowledge regarding combustion sources of indoor air pollution. Quantitative and descriptive data addressing the emissions, indoor concentrations, factors influencing indoor concentrations, and health effects of combustion-generated pollutants are provided. In addition, a review of the models, controls, and standards applicable to indoor air pollution from combustion sources is presented. The emphasis is on the residential environment. The data presented here have been compiled from government and privately-funded research results, conference proceedings, technical journals, and recent publications. It is intended to provide the technical reader with a comprehensive overview and reference source on the major indoor air quality aspects relating to indoor combustion activities, including tobacco smoking. In addition, techniques for determining potential concentrations of pollutants in residential settings are presented. This is an update of a 1985 study documenting the state of knowledge of combustion-generated pollutants in the indoor environment. 191 refs., 51 figs., 71 tabs.

  9. The association between high recreational physical activity and physical activity as a part of daily living in adolescents and availability of local indoor sports facilities and sports clubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niclasen, B.; Petzold, M.; Schnohr, Christina Warrer

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine how vigorous physical activity (recreational physical activity) (VPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity as a part of daily life (MVPA) is associated with structural characteristics (availability of sports facilities and sports clubs with child...

  10. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  11. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O Omarova

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane, applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters.

  12. Healthy indoors : achieving healthy indoor environments in Canada : Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large proportion of the lives of Canadians is spent indoors, whether in vehicles, restaurants, shopping malls, offices or houses. The health of people working and living in those indoor settings might be damaged a a result, despite best efforts. Indoor pollution has been identified as one of the most serious risks to human health, according to numerous leading authorities, among them the American Lung Association, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). A large number of cancer deaths are attributed to indoor pollution each year in the United States, as well as respiratory health problems. A causal link between certain indoor exposures and the development and provocation of asthma was established recently in a report on asthma and indoor air quality published by the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine. Exposure to indoor pollutants has also resulted in thousands of children experiencing elevated blood lead levels. Not enough attention is paid in Canada to pollution in buildings by government agencies, corporations and other non-governmental organizations and citizens. Not much seems to have changed in the past thirty years. An ambitious strategy by Pollution Probe was described in this document, listing the initial goals and measures required to achieve those goals. The creation of Healthy Indoors Partnership (HIP) was proposed to regroup all the stakeholders under the same umbrella. refs., tabs

  13. Indoor Thermal Environment in Tropical Climate Residential Building

    OpenAIRE

    Jamaludin Nazhatulzalkis; Khamidi Mohd Faris; Abdul Wahab Suriani Ngah; Klufallah Mustafa M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Indoor thermal environment is one of the criteria in sustainable building. This criterion is important in ensuring a healthy indoor environment for the occupants. The consideration of environmental concerns at the early design stage would effectively integrate the sustainability of the building environment. Global climate changes such as global warming do affect human comfort since people spend most of their time and activities in the building. The increasing of urban population required addi...

  14. Integration of Indoor Ski Slopes into the Urban Recreation System

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Urbonaitė

    2011-01-01

    Indoor ski slope is an innovative type of active indoor recreation. This new urban character is simulating the concept of mountain ski resort and is considered to be a strong attraction point all year-round. Due to a big scale and complexity, sustainable integration into an urban context should be very carefully considered. Economical, social, environmental and aesthetic impact on surrounding territories is an important factor to be evaluated. International practice shows that the appropriate...

  15. Indoor radon mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action limit for indoor radon concentration in Finnish dwellings is 400 Bq/m3 which is exceeded in 50.000 dwellings. In these dwellings indoor radon mitigation is needed. The most important reason for high concentration is the soil air with high radon concentrations that flows into living spaces through openings and gaps in the building foundation. Slab on ground is the most prevalent type of foundation in Finnish single family houses. Without preventive measures, this type of foundation promotes the flow of radon-bearing soil air into living spaces. In the second popular foundation type, semi-basement houses, the flow of soil air through the walls in contact with soil still increases radon leakages. The key aim of indoor radon mitigation is to prevent or decrease the harmful flows of radon-bearing soil air into dwellings. This guide gives the basic information on Finnish regulations on indoor radon, leakage routes, effect of air exchange and under-pressure as well as pre-mitigation studies of houses. The results on the efficiency of various mitigation methods are based on a questionnaire study in 400 Finnish dwellings and on-site studies in numerous houses. In the case of sub slab suction, the Finnish guide published by the Ministry of Environment has also been utilized. Best mitigation efficiency has been achieved using sub slab suction and radon well. Typical indoor radon reduction factors for both methods are 70 - 90%, and the best results are above 95%. Sub slab suction can be implemented through both floor slab and foundation wall. An exhaust fan coupled to suction pit and exhaust piping creates underpressure and ventilation beneath the slab. In case of a radon well an exhaust fan sucks air from the soil and ventilates the soil air volume through a well construction placed outside the house. The depth of a radon well is 4 - 5 metres. A single radon well can reduce radon concentration in many dwellings at the distance up to 20 - 30 metres. Mitigation work

  16. Surface-catalyzed chlorine and nitrogen activation: mechanisms for the heterogeneous formation of ClNO, NO, NO2, HONO, and N2O from HNO3 and HCl on aluminum oxide particle surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2012-05-31

    It is well-known that chlorine active species (e.g., Cl(2), ClONO(2), ClONO) can form from heterogeneous reactions between nitrogen oxides and hydrogen chloride on aerosol particle surfaces in the stratosphere. However, less is known about these reactions in the troposphere. In this study, a potential new heterogeneous pathway involving reaction of gaseous HCl and HNO(3) on aluminum oxide particle surfaces, a proxy for mineral dust in the troposphere, is proposed. We combine transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate changes in the composition of both gas-phase and surface-bound species during the reaction under different environmental conditions of relative humidity and simulated solar radiation. Exposure of surface nitrate-coated aluminum oxide particles, from prereaction with nitric acid, to gaseous HCl yields several gas-phase products, including ClNO, NO(2), and HNO(3), under dry (RH 20%), NO and N(2)O are the only gas products observed. The experimental data suggest that, in the presence of adsorbed water, ClNO is hydrolyzed on the particle surface to yield NO and NO(2), potentially via a HONO intermediate. NO(2) undergoes further hydrolysis via a surface-mediated process, resulting in N(2)O as an additional nitrogen-containing product. In the presence of broad-band irradiation (λ > 300 nm) gas-phase products can undergo photochemistry, e.g., ClNO photodissociates to NO and chlorine atoms. The gas-phase product distribution also depends on particle mineralogy (Al(2)O(3) vs CaCO(3)) and the presence of other coadsorbed gases (e.g., NH(3)). These newly identified reaction pathways discussed here involve continuous production of active ozone-depleting chlorine and nitrogen species from stable sinks such as gas-phase HCl and HNO(3) as a result of heterogeneous surface reactions. Given that aluminosilicates represent a major fraction of mineral dust aerosol, aluminum oxide can be used as a model

  17. Indoor Positioning System using Bluetooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Puri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This Paper on Bluetooth Indoor Positioning System is the intersection of Bluetooth Technology and Indoor Positioning Systems. Almost every smartphone today is Bluetooth enabled, making the use of the technology more flexible. We aim at using the RSSI value of Bluetooth signals to track the location of a device.

  18. Indoor Positioning System using Bluetooth

    OpenAIRE

    Sahil Puri

    2015-01-01

    This Paper on Bluetooth Indoor Positioning System is the intersection of Bluetooth Technology and Indoor Positioning Systems. Almost every smartphone today is Bluetooth enabled, making the use of the technology more flexible. We aim at using the RSSI value of Bluetooth signals to track the location of a device.

  19. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-01

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data. PMID:23710630

  20. a Review of Recent Research in Indoor Modelling & Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, M.; Isikdag, U.; Basaraner, M.

    2016-06-01

    Indoor modeling and mapping has been an active area of research in last 20 years in order to tackle the problems related to positioning and tracking of people and objects indoors, and provides many opportunities for several domains ranging from emergency response to logistics in micro urban spaces. The outputs of recent research in the field have been presented in several scientific publications and events primarily related to spatial information science and technology. This paper summarizes the outputs of last 10 years of research on indoor modeling and mapping within a proper classification which covers 7 areas, i.e. Information Acquisition by Sensors, Model Definition, Model Integration, Indoor Positioning and LBS, Routing & Navigation Methods, Augmented and Virtual Reality Applications, and Ethical Issues. Finally, the paper outlines the current and future research directions and concluding remarks.

  1. Indoor Location Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on the special challenges posed by accurately pinpointing a location indoors, this volume reflects the distance we have come in the handful of decades since the germination of GPS technology. Not only can we locate a signal to within a meter’s accuracy, but we now have this technology in the most basic mobile phone. Tracing recent practical developments in positioning technology and in the market it supplies, the author examines the contributions of the varied research—in silicon, signal and image processing, radio communications and software—to a fast-evolving field. The book looks forward to a time when, in addition to directing your road journey, positioning systems can peer indoors and guide you to an available photocopier in your office building. Featuring standalone chapters each dealing with a specific aspect of the subject, including treatments of systems such as Zebra, Awarepoint, Aeroscout, IEEE 802.11, etc. This study has all the detail needed to get up to speed on a key modern techn...

  2. Indoor radon mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action limit for indoor radon concentration in Finnish dwellings is 400 Bq/m3 which is exceeded in 50.000 dwellings. In these dwellings indoor radon mitigation is needed. The most important reason for high concentration is the soil air with high radon concentrations that flows into living spaces through openings and gaps in the building foundation. Slab on-ground is the most prevalent type of foundation in Finnish single family houses. Without preventive measures, this type of foundation promotes the flow of radon-bearing soil air into living spaces. In the second popular foundation type, hill-side houses, the flow of soil air through the walls backing soil still increases radon leakages. The key aim of indoor radon mitigation is to prevent or decrease the harmful flows of radon-bearing soil air into dwellings. This guide gives the basic information on Finnish regulations on indoor radon, leakage routes, effect of air exchange and underpressure as well as pre-mitigation studies of houses. The results on the efficiency of various mitigation methods are based on a questionnaire study in 400 Finnish dwellings and on-site studies in numerous houses. In the case of sub-slab-suction the Finnish guide published by the Ministry of Environment has also been utilized. Best mitigation efficiency has been achieved using sub-slab-suction and radon well. Typical reduction factors for both methods are 70-90%, and the best results are above 95%. Sub-slab-suction can be implemented through both floor slab and foundation wall. An exhaust fan coupled to suction pit and exhaust piping creates underpressure and ventilation beneath the slab. In case of a radon well an exhaust fan sucks air from the soil and ventilates the soil air volume through a well construction placed outside the house. The depth of a radon well is 3-5 metres. A single radon well can reduce radon concentration in many dwellings at the distance up to 20-30 metres. Mitigation work based on ventilation aims at

  3. Indoor mold and Children's health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzel; Rylander

    1999-06-01

    some countries may not be aware of the serious reactions mold exposure can provoke in some children. Individual physicians may have difficulty handling the patients because of the lack of recognition of the relationship between the often complex symptoms and the indoor environment (paragraph) The workshop was organized to develop a basis for risk assessment and formulation of recommendations, particularly for diagnostic purposes and prevention, and to formulate priorities for future research. The participants were all active researchers with current experience in child health, molds, and respiratory disease. They were engaged in free and intensive discussions on a scientific basis throughout the duration of the 3-day workshop (paragraph) This monograph contains peer-reviewed papers based on individual presentations at the workshop as well as the workshop conclusions. They are offered to the public health community, administrators, research agencies, physicians, particularly pediatricians, nurses and health workers as information and encouragement to engage themselves in this health problem of importance for the next generation in our population. (paragraph) Acknowledgments: The workshop received financial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Center for Environmental Assessment at the U.S. EPA, the Vardal Foundation (Sweden), Astra Corp (Sweden), the Committee on Organic Dusts, International Commission on Occupational Health. The printing of this document was made possible by a grant from the Center for Indoor Air Research (U.S.). Yvonne Peterson, research secretary, provided excellent and invaluable assistance in the organization and publication efforts. PMID:10346994

  4. Measurement and improvement of indoor air quality in an information technology classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Tomić Mladen A.; Milutinović Biljana B.; Živković Predrag M.; Đekić Petar S.; Boričić Aleksandra D.

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of information technology equipment and its use in the teaching and learning activities, the working environment (especially indoor air quality) in which students and pupils spend a great deal of time in educational institutions has been changing. Therefore, special attention must be paid to indoor air quality and comfort. It is of great importance to maintain indoor air quality in an object, such as information technology classro...

  5. Indoor Air Quality in Selected Samples of Primary Schools in Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuki Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Studies have found out that indoor air quality affects human especially children and the elderly more compared to ambient atmospheric air. This study aims to investigate indoor air pollutants concentration in selected vernacular schools with different surrounding human activities in Kuala Terengganu, the administrative and commercial center of Terengganu state. Failure to identify and establish indoor air pollution status can increase the chance of long-term and short-term health problems for...

  6. Personal, indoor and outdoor air pollution levels among pregnant women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembari, Anna; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; de Nazelle, Audrey; Dadvand, Payam; Vrijheid, Martine; Cirach, Marta; Martinez, David; Figueras, Francesc; Querol, Xavier; Basagaña, Xavier; Eeftens, Marloes; Meliefste, Kees; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    AimThe aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between pregnant women's personal exposures to NOx, NO2, PM2.5 concentration and absorbance as a marker for black carbon and their indoor and outdoor concentration levels at their residence, and also to identify predictors of personal exposure and indoor levels using questionnaire and time activity data. MethodWe recruited 54 pregnant women in Barcelona who carried a personal PM2.5 sampler for two days and NOx/NO2 passive badges for one week, while indoor and outdoor PM2.5 and NOx/NO2 levels at their residence were simultaneously measured. Time activity and house characteristics were recorded. Gravimetry determinations for PM2.5 concentration and absorbance measurements were carried out on the PM2.5 filter samples. ResultsLevels of personal exposure to NOx, PM2.5 and absorbance were slightly higher than indoor and outdoor levels (geometric mean of personal NOx = 61.9 vs indoor NOx = 60.6 μg m-3), while for NO2 the indoor levels were slightly higher than the personal ones. Generally, there was a high statistically significant correlation between personal exposure and indoor levels (Spearman's r between 0.78 and 0.84). Women spent more than 60% of their time indoors at home. Ventilation of the house by opening the windows, the time spent cooking and indicators for traffic intensity were re-occurring statistically significant determinants of the personal and indoor pollutants levels with models for NOx explaining the 55% and 60% of the variability respectively, and models for NO2 explaining the 39% and 16% of the variability respectively. Models for PM2.5 and absorbance explained the least of the variability. ConclusionOur findings improve the current understanding of the characterization and inter-associations between personal, indoor and outdoor pollution levels among pregnant women. Variability in personal and indoor NOx and to a lesser extent NO2 levels could be explained well, but not the variability

  7. Inactivation of Spores of Bacillus anthracis Sterne, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis by Chlorination

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, E W; Adcock, N. J.; Sivaganesan, M; Rose, L. J.

    2005-01-01

    Three species of Bacillus were evaluated as potential surrogates for Bacillus anthracis for determining the sporicidal activity of chlorination as commonly used in drinking water treatment. Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis were found to be an appropriate surrogate for spores of B. anthracis for use in chlorine inactivation studies.

  8. Biomonitoring of human exposures to chlorinated derivatives and structural analogs of bisphenol A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andra, Syam S; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Arora, Manish; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Makris, Konstantinos C

    2015-01-01

    The high reactivity of bisphenol A (BPA) with disinfectant chlorine is evident in the instantaneous formation of chlorinated BPA derivatives (ClxBPA) in various environmental media that show increased estrogen-activity when compared with that of BPA. The documented health risks associated with BPA e

  9. Sodium and chlorine concentrations in mixed saliva of healthy and cystic fibrosis children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium and chlorine concentrations in mixed saliva were simultaneously measured by neutron activation analysis in nine normal children and in nine patients with cystic fibrosis. Sodium levels showed a significant difference (P < 0.01) between patients and controls. The concentration of chlorine was similar in both the control and the cystic fibrosis groups. (author)

  10. Studies on the Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship of Toxicity of Chlorophenol Serial Compounds in the ab initio Methods and Substitutive Position of Chlorine Atom (NPCS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Qing; WANG Lian-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    20 Quantum chemical parameters of chlorophenol compounds were fully optimized by using B3LYP method on both 6-31G* and 6-311G* basis sets. These structural parameters are taken as theoretical descriptors, and the experimental data of 20 compounds' aquatic photogen toxicity(-1gEC50) are used to perform stepwise regression in order to obtain two predicted -lgEC50 correlation models whose correlation coefficients R2 are respectively 0.9186 and 0.9567. In addition, parameters of chlorine atom's substitutive positions and their correlations (NPCs) are taken as descriptors to obtain another predicted -1gEC50 model with the correlation coefficient R2 of 0.9444. Correlation degree of each independent variable in the three models is verified by using variance inflation factors (VIF) and t value. In the cross-validation method, cross-validation coefficients q2 of 3 models are respectively 0.8748, 0.9119 and 0.8993, which indicates that the relativity and prediction ability of this model are superior to those of the model obtained by topological and BLYP methods.

  11. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  12. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized

  13. Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates in indoor Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolkoff, Peder; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The amount of Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) in the particle fraction of floor dust sampled from 7 selected public buildings varied between 34 and 1500 microgram per gram dust, while the contents of the fibre fractions generally were higher with up to 3500 microgram LAS/g dust. The use of a...... cleaning agent with LAS resulted in an increase of the amount of LAS in the floor dust after floor wash relative to just before floor wash. However, the most important source of LAS in the indoor floor dust appears to be residues of detergent in clothing. Thus, a newly washed shirt contained 2960 microgram...... LAS/g. The analysis of the office dust samples indicated that LAS (and probably other tensides) might be of importance for the indoor environment. However, more knowledge is required about how low concentrations of surface-active agents in combination with other compounds may affect the eye tear film...

  14. Indoor radon survey in the Vojvodina region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an indoor radon survey in the Vojvodina region (Serbia) are presented. Long-term average radon measurements in an existing building can be measured relatively simply and inexpensively using a passive device, such as an alpha track detector. Houses in the suburbs were chosen as the target locations of the present investigations. Indoor radon concentrations were measured with CR-39 alpha track detectors at ∼1000 locations in Vojvodina during the winter period. Effect of floor level, space under the rooms, boarding and the heating system on radon accumulation are discussed in this paper. For the dwellings typical of such regions, we measure a mean annual radon activity concentration of 112 Bq/m3 (747 measurements using the alpha track detector CR-39). (authors)

  15. Effects of Chlorine on Enterovirus RNA Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary mechanism of disinfection of waterborne pathogens by chlorine has always been believed to be due to the alteration of proteins by free chlorine and subsequent disruption of their biological structure.

  16. D Modelling of AN Indoor Space Using a Rotating Stereo Frame Camera System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J.; Lee, I.

    2016-06-01

    Sophisticated indoor design and growing development in urban architecture make indoor spaces more complex. And the indoor spaces are easily connected to public transportations such as subway and train stations. These phenomena allow to transfer outdoor activities to the indoor spaces. Constant development of technology has a significant impact on people knowledge about services such as location awareness services in the indoor spaces. Thus, it is required to develop the low-cost system to create the 3D model of the indoor spaces for services based on the indoor models. In this paper, we thus introduce the rotating stereo frame camera system that has two cameras and generate the indoor 3D model using the system. First, select a test site and acquired images eight times during one day with different positions and heights of the system. Measurements were complemented by object control points obtained from a total station. As the data were obtained from the different positions and heights of the system, it was possible to make various combinations of data and choose several suitable combinations for input data. Next, we generated the 3D model of the test site using commercial software with previously chosen input data. The last part of the processes will be to evaluate the accuracy of the generated indoor model from selected input data. In summary, this paper introduces the low-cost system to acquire indoor spatial data and generate the 3D model using images acquired by the system. Through this experiments, we ensure that the introduced system is suitable for generating indoor spatial information. The proposed low-cost system will be applied to indoor services based on the indoor spatial information.

  17. Indoor and outdoor poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in Korea determined by passive air sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite concerns to their increasing contribution to ecological and human exposure, the atmospheric levels of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been determined mainly in Europe and North America. This study presents the indoor and outdoor air concentrations of volatile PFASs [fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), and perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides/sulfonamidoethanols/sulfonamide ethyl acetate (FOSAs/FOSEs/FOSEA)] for the first time in Korean cities. In contrast to the good agreement observed for indoor FTOHs levels in Korea and Europea/North America, FOSAs/FOSEs levels were 10–100-fold lower in Korean indoor air, representing a cultural difference of indoor source. Korean outdoor air contained higher PFAS levels than indoor air, and additionally showed different PFAS composition profile from indoor air. Thus, indoor air would not likely be a main contributor to atmospheric PFAS contamination in Korea, in contrast to western countries. Inhalation exposure of volatile PFASs was estimated to be a minor contributor to PFOA and PFOS exposure in Korea. - Highlights: ► Volatile PFASs were measured in indoor and outdoor airs of Korea, for the first time. ► Cultural difference in indoor source was observed for Korea v.s. western countries. ► Furthermore, PFASs concentrations were higher in indoor air than outdoor air. ► Indoor air was not a major contributor to atmospheric PFASs contamination in Korea. ► Release from industrial activities was considered a possible source. - Korean outdoor air showed not only different PFAS composition profile but higher PFAS levels than indoor airs, indicating indoor air would not be a main source to Korean atmospheric PFASs.

  18. Problems In Indoor Mapping and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatanova, S.; Sithole, G.; Nakagawa, M.; Zhu, Q.

    2013-11-01

    Research in support of indoor mapping and modelling (IMM) has been active for over thirty years. This research has come in the form of As-Built surveys, Data structuring, Visualisation techniques, Navigation models and so forth. Much of this research is founded on advancements in photogrammetry, computer vision and image analysis, computer graphics, robotics, laser scanning and many others. While IMM used to be the privy of engineers, planners, consultants, contractors, and designers, this is no longer the case as commercial enterprises and individuals are also beginning to apply indoor models in their business process and applications. There are three main reasons for this. Firstly, the last two decades have seen greater use of spatial information by enterprises and the public. Secondly, IMM has been complimented by advancements in mobile computing and internet communications, making it easier than ever to access and interact with spatial information. Thirdly, indoor modelling has been advanced geometrically and semantically, opening doors for developing user-oriented, context-aware applications. This reshaping of the public's attitude and expectations with regards to spatial information has realised new applications and spurred demand for indoor models and the tools to use them. This paper examines the present state of IMM and considers the research areas that deserve attention in the future. In particular the paper considers problems in IMM that are relevant to commercial enterprises and the general public, groups this paper expects will emerge as the greatest users IMM. The subject of indoor modelling and mapping is discussed here in terms of Acquisitions and Sensors, Data Structures and Modelling, Visualisation, Applications, Legal Issues and Standards. Problems are discussed in terms of those that exist and those that are emerging. Existing problems are those that are currently being researched. Emerging problems are those problems or demands that are

  19. How indoor environment affects performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David Peter; Wargocki, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    , in the form of answers to 40 frequently asked questions. Our answers are based on the results of behavioral experiments conducted to date. We offer no opinions on long-term health effects of indoor environmental quality. We provide some references to relevant sources, but there is not enough space......As experienced researchers in the effects of thermal comfort and indoor air quality on performance, we are often asked to give our best estimate of how, and to what extent, performance is affected by different aspects of indoor climate. This article provides a brief summary of our personal opinions...

  20. Indoor environmental quality in French dwellings and building characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Sarka; Ramalho, Olivier; Derbez, Mickaël; Ribéron, Jacques; Kirchner, Severine; Mandin, Corinne

    2016-03-01

    A national survey on indoor environmental quality covering 567 residences in mainland France was performed during 2003-2005. The measured parameters were temperature, relative humidity, CO2, and the indoor air pollutants: fourteen individual volatile organic compounds (VOC), four aldehydes and particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5. The measured indoor concentrations were analyzed for correlations with the building characteristics: type of dwelling, period of construction, dwelling location, type of ventilation system, building material, attached garage and retrofitting. The median night time air exchange rate (AER) for all dwellings was 0.44 h-1. The night time AER was higher in apartments (median = 0.49 h-1) than in single-family houses (median = 0.41 h-1). Concentration of formaldehyde was approximately 30% higher in dwellings built after 1990 compared with older ones; it was higher in dwellings with mechanical ventilation and in concrete buildings. The VOC concentrations depended on the building characteristics to various extents. The sampling season influenced the majority of the indoor climate parameters and the concentrations of the air pollutants to a higher degree than the building characteristics. Multivariate linear regression models revealed that the indoor-outdoor difference in specific humidity, a proxy for number of occupants and their indoor activities, remained a significant predictor for most gaseous and particulate air pollutants. The other strong predictors were outdoor concentration, smoking, attached garage and AER (in descending order).

  1. Lead and cadmium in indoor air and the urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was conducted to find potential terrestrial biomonitors for heavy metals in indoor air in an urban environment. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 were collected in three retirement facilities in the urban area of Vienna. In addition, particulate matter and soil, vegetation, and isopods (Porcellio scaber L.) were collected in the adjacent garden areas. Aerosols were sampled with a low-volume air sampler. The sampled materials were wet ashed and total lead and cadmium contents were determined. Water-soluble heavy metal concentrations were measured in aqueous extracts from air exposed filters, soil, and vegetation. Lead and cadmium were analyzed by graphite furnace AAS. Lead contents in the vegetation were inferred from water-soluble lead in soils. Lead in isopods generally reflected the contents in vegetation. Cadmium in plants probably derived from soil solutions as well as from atmospheric input. Isopods reflected the total cadmium contents in soils. Particulate matter was dominated by PM2.5, both with respect to mass concentrations and to heavy metal contents. The indoor aerosol was found to be influenced by human activity, indoor sources, and outdoor particles. Relationships between indoor airborne heavy metals and the contents in vegetation (lead and cadmium: positive) and isopods (lead: negative) were identified to have the potential for biomonitoring indoor air quality. - Urban vegetation and isopods are potential indicators for indoor aerial heavy metals

  2. Sustainable indoor lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Mercatelli, Luca; Farini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Encompassing a thorough survey of the lighting techniques applied to internal illumination characterized by high efficiency, optimized color and architectural integration, a consolidated summary of the latest scientific, technical and architectural research is presented in order to give the reader an overview of the different themes with their interactions and mutual effects.   This book describes light principles, methodologies and realisations for indoor illumination at low consumption. Power efficiency, color characteristics and architectural aspects are analyzed in terms of their  practical application, with the interactions between scientific, technological and architectural features considered in order to supply a complete overview, which can be read both at technical level and at user level. Introducing photometric and radiometric quantities and laws, the book first discusses tests and measurements assessing lighting and color characteristics before examining in detail artificial light sources with p...

  3. Contaminación del aire interior y del agua de baño en piscinas cubiertas de Guipúzcoa Indoor air and bathing water pollution in indoor swimming pools in Guipúzcoa (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Santa Marina

    2009-04-01

    combined chlorine and trihalomethane levels were measured in the water, while total chlorine and chloroform levels were measured in the air. Carbon dioxide (CO2 was measured as an indicator of air renewal. Results: The average chlorine level in the air was 0.4mg/m³ and that of chloroform was 22µg/m³. In all the swimming pools, free and combined chlorine levels were within the permitted values. The average chloroform level in bathing water was 13.7µg/l. Chloroform levels in the air could be reasonably predicted (R²=0.85, the predictive factors being chloroform levels in the water, CO2 concentrations, and the number of bathers on the day of measurement. Conclusions: Levels of pollutants in the water and in the air of swimming pools in Guipúzcoa were lower than those reported in other studies. However, 20% of the installations exceeded the concentration of total chlorine in the air proposed as a reference value to protect swimmers carrying out intense activities (0.5mg/m³.

  4. Ferromagnetic behaviour of anthropogenic multi-walled carbon nanotubes trapped in spider web indoor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkar, Sumit Kumar; Tripathi, Kumud Malika; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2014-03-01

    Black carbon (BC) (as partly burnt black particulate matter) present indoor are deposited on interior surfaces of the indoors (easily visualize over the blades of electric fan/exhausts and over domestic spider webs) are known to be a potential indoor pollution problem. We detect with the help of indoor spider webs the floating BC contains a significant amount of defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) possessing room temperature ferromagnetism. Microscopic studies shows a lot of internal and surfacial defects in these indoor-MWCNTs. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) showed the presence of very stable carbon centred radicals in these indoor-MWCNTs. Room temperature ferromagnetism most importantly originated by the presence of a large amount of unpaired spin frustrated carbon centred radicals (trapped in defects, junctions and fractures) which are inadvertently formed during the pyrolysis of carbonaceous materials through routine domestic activities. PMID:24745259

  5. An indoor air quality assessment for vulnerable populations exposed to volcanic vog from Kilauea Volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Bernadette M; Yang, Wei; Green, Joshua B; Longo, Anthony A; Harris, Merylin; Bibilone, Renwick

    2010-01-01

    The Ka'u District of Hawaii is exposed to sulfurous air pollution called vog from the ongoing eruption of Kilauea Volcano. Increased volcanic activity in 2008 prompted an indoor air quality assessment of the district's hospital and schools. All indoor sulfur dioxide concentrations were above the World Health Organization's average 24-hour recommendation. Indoor penetration ratios were up to 94% of ambient levels and dependent upon building construction or the use of air-conditioning. Health-promotion efforts for vulnerable populations at the hospital and schools are under way to improve indoor air quality and respond to those affected by vog exposure. PMID:20010002

  6. Indoor radon levels and their relationship with radon exhalation rates from building surface in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The indoor radon concentrations of more than 60 sites in Hong Kong is measured using activated charcoal canisters to identify the underlying distribution pattern. The strong relationship between the indoor radon concentrations and the radon exhalation rate from building surface has been investigated. It has been found that the indoor radon comes mainly from radium in building materials, and that the radon concentration depends on the radon exhalation rate from indoor building surface and on the ventilation. It is also asserted that the radioactivity level of building materials used in Hong Kong is increasing

  7. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    OpenAIRE

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N. A.; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactiv...

  8. Workplace Safety: Indoor Environmental Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Workplace Safety & Health Topics Indoor Environmental Quality Health Hazard ... Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact ...

  9. Measurement of indoor radon levels in Bhubaneshwar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One dominant and almost inevitable natural source of airborne activity is Radon (222Rn) which is produced as a result of decay of U in the earth crust. Measurements of indoor radon are of importance because of the radiation dose to human population due to the inhalation of radon and its daughters, constitutes more than 50% of the total dose, including that from the natural sources [UNSCEAR, 1988]. The radon concentration in the environment depends upon the source term, ventilation rate and weather. India is so vast in extent and so varied geological formations that wide variations can be expected in indoor radon concentration levels. So it may be desirable to make extensive measurements of radon levels at various parts of the country. An attempt has been made to study the seasonal and geological variation of radon levels at various locations of Bhubaneshwar city using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The ongoing preliminary measurements of indoor radon exposure to population were discussed. Radon passive dosimeters loaded with CR-39 films have been used in this study. The minimum and maximum values of radon measured were 8.46 and 42.64 Bq/m3. A discussion of some results obtained is presented in the paper. (author). 4 refs., 1 tab

  10. Reducing chlorination of niobium pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of cylindric briquettes of Nb2O5 and carbon are presented. The effects of chlorine flow, dimension of the briquettes, porosity, percentage of the reducing agent in the mixture and temperature are analysed. The volatilization aspect of Nb2O5 by the briquettes and the structural transformations of the samples are described. (M.A.C.)

  11. Novel chlorinated derivatives of BODIPY

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Moreno, I.; Costela González, Ángel; Chiara, José Luis; Duran-Sampedro, G.; Ortiz, M. J.; Rodríguez Agarrabeitia, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to the use of novel dyes with a BODIPY structure, characterised in that they contain at least one chlorine atom bound to the carbons of the boradiazaindacene system, to the use thereof as laser dyes and fluorescent markers, and to a method for obtaining some of these compounds.

  12. Health effects of indoor odorants.

    OpenAIRE

    Cone, J E; Shusterman, D

    1991-01-01

    People assess the quality of the air indoors primarily on the basis of its odors and on their perception of associated health risk. The major current contributors to indoor odorants are human occupant odors (body odor), environmental tobacco smoke, volatile building materials, bio-odorants (particularly mold and animal-derived materials), air fresheners, deodorants, and perfumes. These are most often present as complex mixtures, making measurement of the total odorant problem difficult. There...

  13. Environmental Enrichment for Indoor Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Herron, Meghan E.; Buffington, C. A. Tony

    2010-01-01

    Recommendations to cat owners to house their cats indoors confer the responsibility to provide conditions that ensure good health and welfare. Cats maintain their natural behaviors, such as scratching, chewing, and elimination, while living indoors, and they may develop health and behavior problems when deprived of appropriate environmental outlets for these behaviors. This article divides the environment into five basic “systems” to enable identification of features that may benefit from imp...

  14. Composition of Indoor Particulate Matter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolík, Jiří; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Dohányosová, Pavla

    -: -, 2006 - (Fernandes, D.), s. 283-286. (Indoor Climate. II). [Healthy Buildings 2006. Lisboa (PT), 04.06.2006-08.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/04/1190; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/03/1560 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : indoor particulate matter * chemical composition Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  15. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%. PMID:24534637

  16. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  17. Effect of sulfur dioxide on indium(3) sulfate chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of thermodynamic calculations and kinetic investigations of In2(SO4)3 interaction with gaseous Cl2 and equimolar Cl2 and SO2 mixture at 127-800 deg C are presented. It is found that acceleration of chlorination rate takes place in the presence of SO2, while the temperature of its beginning and activation energy decrease

  18. Electrochemical chlorine evolution at rutile oxide (110) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heine Anton; Man, Isabela Costinela; Studt, Felix;

    2010-01-01

    function of the oxygen binding energy, giving rise to a Sabatier volcano. By combining the surface phase diagram and the volcano describing the catalytic activity, we find that the reaction mechanism differs depending on catalyst material. The flexibility in reaction path means that the chlorine evolution...

  19. Effect of silica fume addition on the PGNAA measurement of chlorine in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Research, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Garwan, M.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nagadi, M.M. [Center for Engineering Research, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Raashid, M.; Khateeb-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-03-15

    Pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash (FA), silica fume (SF), and blast furnace slag (BFS) are added to Portland cement in concrete to prevent reinforcement steel corrosion in concrete. Further preventive measure against reinforcement steel corrosion require monitoring of chloride salts concentration in concrete using non-destructive techniques, such as the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique. Due to interferences between gamma-rays from chlorine and calcium in PGNAA technique, detection limit of chlorine in concrete strongly depends upon calcium concentration in concrete. SF mainly contains silica and its addition to cement concrete reduces overall concentration of calcium in concrete. This may result in an improvement in detection limit of chlorine in SF-based concrete in PGNAA studies. Particularly for chlorine detection using 6.11 and 6.62 MeV prompt gamma-rays that strongly interfere with 6.42 MeV prompt gamma-rays from calcium. In this study, SF was added to Portland cement to prevent concrete reinforcement steel from corrosion. The chlorine concentration in SF cement concrete specimens containing 0.2-3.0 wt% chlorine was measured through yield of 1.16, 1.95, 6.11, 6.62, 7.41, 7.79, and 8.58 MeV chlorine gamma-rays using PGNAA technique. An excellent agreement was noted between the experimental yield of the prompt gamma-rays and the gamma-ray yield calculated through the Monte Carlo simulations. Further the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of chlorine in SF cement concrete was calculated and compared with the MDC values of chlorine in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement. The MDC of chlorine in SF-based concrete through 6.11 MeV, and 6.62 MeV chlorine gamma-rays was found to be improved as compared to those in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement.

  20. Effect of silica fume addition on the PGNAA measurement of chlorine in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash (FA), silica fume (SF), and blast furnace slag (BFS) are added to Portland cement in concrete to prevent reinforcement steel corrosion in concrete. Further preventive measure against reinforcement steel corrosion require monitoring of chloride salts concentration in concrete using non-destructive techniques, such as the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique. Due to interferences between gamma-rays from chlorine and calcium in PGNAA technique, detection limit of chlorine in concrete strongly depends upon calcium concentration in concrete. SF mainly contains silica and its addition to cement concrete reduces overall concentration of calcium in concrete. This may result in an improvement in detection limit of chlorine in SF-based concrete in PGNAA studies. Particularly for chlorine detection using 6.11 and 6.62 MeV prompt gamma-rays that strongly interfere with 6.42 MeV prompt gamma-rays from calcium. In this study, SF was added to Portland cement to prevent concrete reinforcement steel from corrosion. The chlorine concentration in SF cement concrete specimens containing 0.2-3.0 wt% chlorine was measured through yield of 1.16, 1.95, 6.11, 6.62, 7.41, 7.79, and 8.58 MeV chlorine gamma-rays using PGNAA technique. An excellent agreement was noted between the experimental yield of the prompt gamma-rays and the gamma-ray yield calculated through the Monte Carlo simulations. Further the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of chlorine in SF cement concrete was calculated and compared with the MDC values of chlorine in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement. The MDC of chlorine in SF-based concrete through 6.11 MeV, and 6.62 MeV chlorine gamma-rays was found to be improved as compared to those in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement.

  1. Radiation enhanced thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work concerns the study of the thermal and radiation enhanced diffusion of 36Cl in uranium dioxide. It is a contribution to PRECCI programme (research programme on the long-term behaviour of the spent nuclear fuel). 36Cl is a long lived volatile activation product (T = 300 000 years) able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction in geological disposal conditions. We simulated the presence of 36Cl by implanting a quantity of 37Cl comparable to the impurity content of chlorine in UO2. In order to evaluate the diffusion properties of chlorine in the fuel and in particular to assess the influence of the irradiation defects, we performed two kinds of experiments: - the influence of the temperature was studied by carrying out thermal annealings in the temperature range 900 - 1300 deg. C; we showed that implanted chlorine was mobile from temperatures as low as 1000 deg. C and determined a thermal diffusion coefficient D1000deg.C around 10-16 cm2s-1 and deduced an activation energy of 4.3 eV. This value is one of lowest compared to that of volatile fission products such as iodine or the xenon. These parameters reflect the very mobile behaviour of chlorine; - the irradiation effects induced by fission products were studied by irradiating the samples with 127I (energy of 63.5 MeV). We showed that the implanted chlorine diffusion in the temperature range 30 - 250 deg. C is not purely athermal. In these conditions, the diffusion coefficient D250deg.C for the implanted chlorine is around 10-14 cm2s-1 and the activation energy is calculated to be 0.1 eV. Moreover, at 250 deg. C, we observed an important transport of the pristine chlorine from the bulk towards the surface. This chlorine comes from a zone where the defects are mainly produced by the nuclear energy loss process at the end of iodine range. We showed the importance of the implantation and irradiation defects as preferential paths for a fast chlorine transport. We carried out ab initio

  2. Effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols have many significant effects on the reactivity of oxido-reduction. The effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate were evaluated through different kinetics studies. Since chlorine was an electron withdrawing atom, the substitution of chlorine on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by σ-electron withdrawing conductive effect; at the same time, the substitution of chlorine at ortho or para position on the aromatic ring increased the oxidation rate constant by π-electron donating conjugative effect, and the conjugative effect could counteract the negative impact of the conductive effect to some extent. On the other hand, the substitution of chlorine at ortho position on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by steric hindrance effect. The oxidation rate constants of phenol and chlorinated phenols studied decreased as follow order: 4-chlorophenol>2,4-dichlorophenol>phenol>2,6-dichlorophenol.

  3. The Automobiles as Indoors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songul Acar Vaizoglu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review we aimed to attract attention to toxic chemicals in cars and their effect on health. People spend most of their times in indoors such as houses, workplaces, malls, sport centers, train, transportation vehicles (train, plane, cars. In US, citizens spend nearly 100 minutes in cars per day. There are safety problems in cars except than seatbelt and airbag. Some of these are seats, furnishing, cushions for arm and head, floor covering, accessories and plastic parts. In a study conducted in Japan, more than 160 volatile organic compounds (VOC had been determined in new cars and a three years old car. Some of the pollutants are formaldehyde, toluen, xylene, ethylbenzene and styrene. Also Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, which may be degradated by sunshine in hot seasons are measured within the outomobiles. There is a big gap of studies about the pollutants in cars and researches have to be conducted. Manufacturers should use nonhazardous material or less toxic chemicals to reduce exposure of VOCs, PBDEs and phthalates. Drivers can reduce the these chemicals by using solar reflectors and avoiding to park under sunlight. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(6.000: 665-672

  4. Indoor Microgravity Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secco, Richard A.; Sukara, Reynold E.

    2016-04-01

    There are many lab exercises for upper-level school students and freshman undergraduates to measure the value of the local acceleration due to gravity (g) near Earth's surface. In these exercises, the value of g is usually taken to be constant. The approach is often based on measuring the period of a pendulum that is inversely proportional to the square root of g. Traditional measurements of the period of a simple or inclined pendulum involve use of a stopwatch to measure the time required to complete a number of oscillations, but other more sophisticated measurement techniques for greater accuracy, such as a photogate timing system, measuring the time-dependent tension on the string, or using a stepper motor connected to a conical pendulum have been described. Using video imaging, the mechanics of objects dropped from some height has also been used to determine g. In physics courses where physical principles are applied to Earth problems, however, the goal is usually to measure a change in a potential field, such as Earth's gravitational field, in order to determine anomalous subsurface characteristics. In this paper, we describe an indoor exercise to measure the local change in g resulting from a large anomalous mass near the observation location.

  5. Indoor Thermal Environment in Tropical Climate Residential Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamaludin Nazhatulzalkis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoor thermal environment is one of the criteria in sustainable building. This criterion is important in ensuring a healthy indoor environment for the occupants. The consideration of environmental concerns at the early design stage would effectively integrate the sustainability of the building environment. Global climate changes such as global warming do affect human comfort since people spend most of their time and activities in the building. The increasing of urban population required additional housing for households, as well as places to shop, office and other facilities. Occupants are now more conscious the importance of sustainability for a better quality of life. Good thermal environment is essential for human wellness and comfort. A residential environment will influence residents’ health and safety. The global warming increase the earth’s temperature and greenhouse emission to the atmosphere cause adverse effects to the outdoor environment. Residential developments modify the materials, structure and energy balance in urban climate effects of human economic activities. As an indoor environment is influenced by the outdoor condition, the factors affecting indoor thermal environment are crucial in improving a comfortable and healthy environment in residential building. The microclimatic of a site such as temperature and relative humidity, and wind movement led to the variation of indoor thermal environment in the building.

  6. Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil - A combined modelling and experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelius, Malin; Svensson, Teresia; Lourino-Cabana, Beatriz; Thiry, Yves; Bastviken, David

    2016-06-01

    Much of the total pool of chlorine (Cl) in soil consists of naturally produced organic chlorine (Clorg). The chlorination of bulk organic matter at substantial rates has been experimentally confirmed in various soil types. The subsequent fates of Clorg are important for ecosystem Cl cycling and residence times. As most previous research into dechlorination in soils has examined either single substances or specific groups of compounds, we lack information about overall bulk dechlorination rates. Here we assessed bulk organic matter chlorination and dechlorination rates in coniferous forest soil based on a radiotracer experiment conducted under various environmental conditions (additional water, labile organic matter, and ammonium nitrate). Experiment results were used to develop a model to estimate specific chlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl(-) transformed to Clorg per time unit) and specific dechlorination (i.e., fraction of Clorg transformed to Cl(-) per time unit) rates. The results indicate that chlorination and dechlorination occurred simultaneously under all tested environmental conditions. Specific chlorination rates ranged from 0.0005 to 0.01 d(-1) and were hampered by nitrogen fertilization but were otherwise similar among the treatments. Specific dechlorination rates were 0.01-0.03d(-1) and were similar among all treatments. This study finds that soil Clorg levels result from a dynamic equilibrium between the chlorination and rapid dechlorination of some Clorg compounds, while another Clorg pool is dechlorinated more slowly. Altogether, this study demonstrates a highly active Cl cycling in soils. PMID:26950634

  7. Chlorine/UV Process for Decomposition and Detoxification of Microcystin-LR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinran; Li, Jing; Yang, Jer-Yen; Wood, Karl V; Rothwell, Arlene P; Li, Weiguang; Blatchley Iii, Ernest R

    2016-07-19

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is a potent hepatotoxin that is often associated with blooms of cyanobacteria. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the chlorine/UV process for MC-LR decomposition and detoxification. Chlorinated MC-LR was observed to be more photoactive than MC-LR. LC/MS analyses confirmed that the arginine moiety represented an important reaction site within the MC-LR molecule for conditions of chlorination below the chlorine demand of the molecule. Prechlorination activated MC-LR toward UV254 exposure by increasing the product of the molar absorption coefficient and the quantum yield of chloro-MC-LR, relative to the unchlorinated molecule. This mechanism of decay is fundamentally different than the conventional view of chlorine/UV as an advanced oxidation process. A toxicity assay based on human liver cells indicated MC-LR degradation byproducts in the chlorine/UV process possessed less cytotoxicity than those that resulted from chlorination or UV254 irradiation applied separately. MC-LR decomposition and detoxification in this combined process were more effective at pH 8.5 than at pH 7.5 or 6.5. These results suggest that the chlorine/UV process could represent an effective strategy for control of microcystins and their associated toxicity in drinking water supplies. PMID:27338715

  8. Indoor Positioning System Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mehmood

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Location knowledge in indoor environment using Indoor Positioning Systems (IPS has become very useful and popular in recent years. A number of Location Based Services (LBS have been developed, which are based on IPS, these LBS include asset tracking, inventory management and security based applications. Many next-generation LBS applications such as social networking, local search, advertising and geo-tagging are expected to be used in urban and indoor environments where GNSS either underperforms in terms of fix times or accuracy, or fails altogether. To develop an IPS based on Wi-Fi Received Signal Strength (RSS using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN, which should use already available Wi-Fi infrastructure in a heterogeneous environment. Approach: This study discussed the use of ANN for IPS using RSS in an indoor wireless facility which has varying human activity, material of walls and type of Wireless Access Points (WAP, hence simulating a heterogeneous environment. The proposed system used backpropogation method with 4 input neurons, 2 output neurons and 4 hidden layers. The model was trained with three different types of training data. The accuracy assessment for each training data was performed by computing the distance error and average distance error. Results: The results of the experiments showed that using ANN with the proposed method of collecting training data, maximum accuracy of 0.7 m can be achieved, with 30% of the distance error less than 1 m and 60% of the distance error within the range of 1-2 m. Whereas maximum accuracy of 1.01 can be achieved with the commonly used method of collecting training data. The proposed model also showed 67% more accuracy as compared to a probabilistic model. Conclusion: The results indicated that ANN based IPS can provide accuracy and precision which is quite adequate for the development of indoor LBS while using the already available Wi-Fi infrastructure, also the proposed method

  9. Infant swimming in chlorinated pools and the risks of bronchiolitis, asthma and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, C; Sardella, A; Marcucci, F; Bernard, A

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that swimming in chlorinated pools during infancy may increase the risks of lower respiratory tract infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of swimming in chlorinated pools on the risks of bronchiolitis and its late consequences. A total of 430 children (47% female; mean age 5.7 yrs) in 30 kindergartens were examined. Parents completed a questionnaire regarding the child's health history, swimming practice and potential confounders. Attendance at indoor or outdoor chlorinated pools ever before the age of 2 yrs was associated with an increased risk of bronchiolitis (OR 1.68; 95% CI 1.08-2.68; p = 0.03), which was exposure-dependent for both types of pool (p-value for trend 20 h spent in chlorinated pools during infancy. Infant swimmers who developed bronchiolitis also showed higher risks of asthma and respiratory allergies later in childhood. Swimming pool attendance during infancy is associated with a higher risk of bronchiolitis, with ensuing increased risks of asthma and allergic sensitisation. PMID:20075053

  10. Actividad mutagénica de aguas de consumo humano antes y después de clorar en la planta de Villa Hermosa, Medellín Mutagenic activity of human drinking water before and after chlorination in Villa Hermosa treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Salazar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se encontró que la contaminación y la cloración influyen en la mutagenicidad de las aguas tratadas en la planta de Villa Hermosa. Para evaluar la actividad mutagénica se utilizó el test de Ames con las cepas TA-100 y TA-98 de Salmonella typhimurium. Se observó que la contaminación es la responsable de la alta mutagenicidad indirecta observada en el agua que entra a la planta de tratamiento de Villa Hermosa. El tratamiento de las aguas antes de clorar deja pasar aproximadamente un 30% de los mutágenos indirectos formados por contaminación, los cuales pueden agregarse o potenciar los nuevos mutágenos formados por la cloración del agua (zona 6. La alta mutagenicidad directa en la cepa TA-100 obtenida de esta agua clorada concuerda con el patrón de mutagenicidad producido por los trihalometanos formados en aguas cloradas. We found that pollution and chlorination have effects on mutagenicity of water from Villa Hermosa purification plant. In order to evaluate the mutagenic activity we used Ames‘ test with Salmonella strains TA-100 and TA-98. We observed that anthropogenic pollution and dental industry residues are the origin of the high indirect mutagenicity observed in water which gets into Villa Hermosa treatment plant and that before chlorination water treated in this plant (zone 5 retains about 70% of mutagens derived from pollution, Mutagens that were not retained by treatment may be added or potentiate the new mutagens formed by chlorination of drinking water (zone 6. The very high direct mutagenicity with TA-100 obtained from this chlorinated water is consistent with the type of mutagenicity of thrihalomethanes formed in chlorinated water.

  11. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  12. Manual on indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-12-01

    This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

  13. Manual on indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues

  14. CFD simulation research on residential indoor air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Ye, Miao; He, Bao-Jie

    2014-02-15

    Nowadays people are excessively depending on air conditioning to create a comfortable indoor environment, but it could cause some health problems in a long run. In this paper, wind velocity field, temperature field and air age field in a bedroom with wall-hanging air conditioning running in summer are analyzed by CFD numerical simulation technology. The results show that wall-hanging air conditioning system can undertake indoor heat load and conduct good indoor thermal comfort. In terms of wind velocity, air speed in activity area where people sit and stand is moderate, most of which cannot feel wind flow and meet the summer indoor wind comfort requirement. However, for air quality, there are local areas without ventilation and toxic gases not discharged in time. Therefore it is necessary to take effective measures to improve air quality. Compared with the traditional measurement method, CFD software has many advantages in simulating indoor environment, so it is hopeful for humans to create a more comfortable, healthy living environment by CFD in the future. PMID:24365517

  15. Monocular Vision SLAM for Indoor Aerial Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Koray Çelik; Arun K. Somani

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel indoor navigation and ranging strategy via monocular camera. By exploiting the architectural orthogonality of the indoor environments, we introduce a new method to estimate range and vehicle states from a monocular camera for vision-based SLAM. The navigation strategy assumes an indoor or indoor-like manmade environment whose layout is previously unknown, GPS-denied, representable via energy based feature points, and straight architectural lines. We experimentally ...

  16. Exploring requirements for indoor navigation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Chunxiao

    2013-01-01

    Indoor navigation has been a subject in ubiquitous computing domain in the past decade. Recently many studies focus on exploring user requirements for indoor navigation systems and make effort in developing effective interactive systems to support indoor navigation. This study aims to find which kind of spatial representation and what orientation cues common users prefer to use for indoor navigation. An experiment was performed to examine the navigation effectiveness and user satisfaction wit...

  17. Workgroup Report: Indoor Chemistry and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Weschler, Charles J.; Wells, J R; Poppendieck, Dustin; Hubbard, Heidi; Pearce, Terri A.

    2005-01-01

    Chemicals present in indoor air can react with one another, either in the gas phase or on surfaces, altering the concentrations of both reactants and products. Such chemistry is often the major source of free radicals and other short-lived reactive species in indoor environments. To what extent do the products of indoor chemistry affect human health? To address this question, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health sponsored a workshop titled “Indoor Chemistry and Health” on...

  18. INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL COMFORT IN MALAYSIAN URBAN HOUSING

    OpenAIRE

    Yaik-Wah Lim

    2013-01-01

    In Malaysia, terraced houses have been rapidly constructed since 50 years ago and account for 44% of the existing urban housings. However, these houses have very limited use of natural ventilation and daylighting due to openings with small window-to-floor ratio. The deep plan design causes gloomy indoor spaces, low air change rate and poor indoor air quality. Studies showed that indoor environments have major impact on occupantsâ well-being. Thereby this study evaluates the effects of indoor ...

  19. Semivolatile organic compounds in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2008-01-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are ubiquitous in indoor environments, redistributing from their original sources to all indoor surfaces. Exposures resulting from their indoor presence contribute to detectable body burdens of diverse SVOCs, including pesticides, plasticizers, and flame...... retardants. This paper critically examines equilibrium partitioning of SVOCs among indoor compartments. It proceeds to evaluate kinetic constraints on sorptive partitioning to organic matter on fixed surfaces and airborne particles. Analyses indicate that equilibrium partitioning is achieved faster for...

  20. Controlling Indoor Air Pollution from Moxibustion

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Yen Lu; Sy-Yuan Kang; Shu-Hui Liu; Cheng-Wei Mai; Chao-Heng Tseng

    2016-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) control of hospitals plays a critical role in protecting both hospital staffs and patients, particularly those who are highly susceptible to the adverse effects of indoor noxious hazards. However, moxibustion in outpatient departments (OPDs) of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) may be a source of indoor air pollution in hospitals. Some studies have investigated indoor air pollution during moxibustion in Chinese medicine clinics (CMCs) and moxibustion rooms, demonstra...

  1. Capturing Hotspots For Constrained Indoor Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Finding the hotspots in large indoor spaces is very important for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation and guidance. The tracking data coming from indoor tracking are huge in volume and not readily available for finding hotspots. This paper presents a graph-based model for constrained indoor movement that can map the tracking records into mapping records which represent the entry and exit times of an object in a particular location. Then it discusses the...

  2. Finding dense locations in indoor tracking data

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation, and guidance. Indoor tracking data can be very large and are not readily available for finding dense locations. This paper presents a graph-based model forsemi-constrained indoor movement, and then uses this to map raw tracking records into mapping records representing object entry and exit times in particular locations. Then, an efficient indexing...

  3. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M.E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent

  4. Managing Indoor Air Quality in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolums, Jennifer

    This publication examines the causes and effects of poor indoor air quality and provides information for reducing exposure to indoor contaminants in schools. It discusses the various indoor pollutants found in schools, including dust, chemical agents, gases, and volatile organic compounds; where they are found in schools; and their health effects…

  5. Climate change consequences for the indoor environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariës, M.B.C.; Bluyssen, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Scientists warn us about climate change and its effects on the outdoor environment. These effects can have significant consequences for the indoor environment, also in the Netherlands. Climate changes will affect different aspects of the indoor environment as well as the stakeholders of that indoor

  6. Capturing Hotspots For Constrained Indoor Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Finding the hotspots in large indoor spaces is very important for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation and guidance. The tracking data coming from indoor tracking are huge in volume and not readily available for finding hotspots. This paper presents a graph...

  7. Environmental enrichment for indoor cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Meghan E; Buffington, C A Tony

    2010-12-01

    Recommendations to cat owners to house their cats indoors confer the responsibility to provide conditions that ensure good health and welfare. Cats maintain their natural behaviors, such as scratching, chewing, and elimination, while living indoors, and they may develop health and behavior problems when deprived of appropriate environmental outlets for these behaviors. This article divides the environment into five basic "systems" to enable identification of features that may benefit from improvement. It also addresses practical means of meeting cats' needs in each of these systems. PMID:21882164

  8. Indoor Positioning Using GPS Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Blunck, Henrik; Godsk, Torben;

    2010-01-01

    It has been considered a fact that GPS performs too poorly inside buildings to provide usable indoor positioning. We analyze results of a measurement campaign to improve on the understanding of indoor GPS reception characteristics. The results show that using state-of-the-art receivers GPS...... availability is good in many buildings with standard material walls and roofs. The measured root mean squared 2D positioning error was below five meters in wooden buildings and below ten meters in most of the investigated brick and concrete buildings. Lower accuracies, where observed, can be linked to either...

  9. Fracturing graphene by chlorination: a theoretical viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Ijäs, M.; Havu, P.; Harju, A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent photochlorination experiment [B. Li et al., ACS Nano 5, 5957 (2011)], we study theoretically the interaction of chlorine with graphene. In previous theoretical studies, covalent binding between chlorine and carbon atoms has been elusive upon adsorption to the graphene basal plane. Interestingly, in their recent experiment, Li et al. interpreted their data in terms of chemical bonding of chlorine on top of the graphene plane, associated with a change from sp2 to sp3 in ...

  10. Integration of Indoor Ski Slopes into the Urban Recreation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Urbonaitė

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Indoor ski slope is an innovative type of active indoor recreation. This new urban character is simulating the concept of mountain ski resort and is considered to be a strong attraction point all year-round. Due to a big scale and complexity, sustainable integration into an urban context should be very carefully considered. Economical, social, environmental and aesthetic impact on surrounding territories is an important factor to be evaluated. International practice shows that the appropriate integration of the above mentioned typology into urban parks increase their popularity and use of the recreation zone. On the other hand, the alien architecture and egocentric dominance of complexes can cause conflict with the existing urban territories and natural environment. Having indoor ski slopes in mind at the stages of regional and town territorial planning is an important point. Only complex development can bring positive results for sustainable town development, town economy, tourism and social life. Article in Lithuanian

  11. Lichens as biomonitors at indoor environments of primary schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biomonitoring study, using transplanted lichens Flavoparmelia caperata, was conducted to assess the indoor air quality in primary schools in urban (Lisbon) and rural (Ponte de Sor) Portuguese sites. The lichens exposure period occurred between April and June 2010 and two types of environments of the primary schools were studied: classrooms and outdoor/courtyard. Afterwards, the lichen samples were processed and analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to assess a total of 20 chemical elements. Accumulated elements in the exposed lichens were assessed and enrichment factors (EF) were determined. Indoor and outdoor biomonitoring results were compared to evaluate how biomonitors (as lichens) react at indoor environments and to assess the type of pollutants that are prevalent in those environments. (author)

  12. Participant evaluation results for two indoor air quality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After two surveys for indoor air pollutants (radon and other chemicals) the homeowners were surveyed for their reactions. The results of these participant evaluation surveys, assuming that the participants that responded to the survey were representative, indicate that homeowners will accept a significant level of monitoring activity as part of an indoor air quality field study. Those participants completing surveys overwhelmingly enjoyed being in the studies and would do it again. We believe that the emphasis placed on positive homeowner interactions and efforts made to inform participants throughout our studies were positive factors in this result. There was no substantial differences noted in the responses between the 70-house study, which included a homeowner compensation payment of $100, and the 300-house study, which did not include a compensation payment. These results provide encouragement to conduct future complex, multipollutant indoor air quality studies when they are scientifically sound and cost effective

  13. Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sterilization under Square-Wave Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Jeng, David K.; Woodworth, Archie G.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to study chlorine dioxide (CD) gas sterilization under square-wave conditions. By using controlled humidity, gas concentration, and temperature at atmospheric pressure, standard biological indicators (BIs) and spore disks of environmental isolates were exposed to CD gas. The sporicidal activity of CD gas was found to be concentration dependent. Prehumidification enhanced the CD activity. The D values (time required for 90% inactivation) of Bacillus subtilis subsp. ni...

  14. The continuous chlorination of plutonium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, M.J.

    1959-08-14

    Previous reports on the chlorination of plutonium dioxide describe numerous small-scale experiments and a few fair-sized batch preparations. The chemistry of chlorination by numerous reagents is covered, but no process had received sufficient study for large-scale preparation of anhydrous plutonium trichloride. The literature search revealed no extensive studies on chlorination rates, exhaust gas filtering, atmospheric requirements, reactor materials, etc. A program was undertaken to select a chlorination process, to develop the necessary information for defining operating conditions and equipment specifications, and then to demonstrate the operation of the process.

  15. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl2–N2 mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated

  16. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated.

  17. Design and evaluation of representative indoor radon surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a procedure to design and evaluate representative indoor radon surveys. The procedure is based on random sampling of a population of houses and careful statistical analysis of measured indoor radon concentrations. The method is designed to estimate the fraction of houses in which annual average 222Rn activity concentration may exceed a certain reference level. Measurements of annual average indoor 222Rn activity concentration were done in sleeping rooms at pillow level using etched track type radon detectors. We applied the above procedure in an old fashioned village and in a fast developing small city in Transylvania, Romania. In the village almost all houses were single floor wooden made houses without cellar built with traditional technology on a geologically uniform area. The distribution of indoor 222Rn activity concentration in a sample of 115 houses can almost perfectly be fitted with log-normal probability density function. The correlation coefficient of linear fitting on linearized scales was k = -0.9980. The percentages of houses expected to have annual average 222Rn activity concentration higher than 400 Bq m-3 is less than 1 %, and of those higher than 600 Bq m-3 can be estimated to be around 0.1 %. The small city, on the other hand lies on a geologically inhomogeneous area, and house construction technology has also changed dramatically in past decades. The resulting distribution of measured indoor 222Rn activity concentration in a sample of 116 houses cannot be fitted with any simple probability density function. Therefore the prediction of the fraction of houses in which the annual average 222Rn activity concentration may exceed a certain reference level could not be done adequately. With certain assumptions we estimated that the percentages of houses expected to have annual average 222Rn activity concentration higher than 400 Bq m-3 is between 3 and 7 %, and of those higher than 600 Bq m-3 can be estimated to be between 1 and 3

  18. Alpha scintillation cell for direct measurement of indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large volume (1500 cm3) alpha scintillation cell to measure indoor radon is described. Air is sampled directly into the cell and gross alpha activity is measured after three hours. The cells are suitable for concentrations higher than 10-20 Bq/m3. They were successfully used for randon measurements in kindergartens in Nova Gorica. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Impact of operating wood-burning stoves on indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Alireza; Jensen, Ole Michael; Bergsøe, Niels Christian; Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    A field study on the impact of operating and reloading wood-burning stoves on the indoor air quality was carried out during two consecutive winters. In contrast to the majority of recent studies, which focussed on the ambient air quality and the penetration of particles to the indoor air, this...... study aims to understand to what extent the operation of a stove contributes to the generation of concentration of ultrafine particles in the indoor air. Therefore, different stoves were ignited in one session by the owner of the stove and in a subsequent session by an expert on wood-burning stoves. The...... study was conducted in seven typical Danish detached houses without other indoor activities taking place. In each house the average air change rate during one week was measured (using passive tracer gas technique) and the indoor and outdoor temperature and relative humidity were recorded continuously...

  20. Short-term dynamics of indoor and outdoor endotoxin exposure: Case of Santiago, Chile, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, Francisco; Jorquera, Héctor; Heyer, Johanna; Palma, Wilfredo; Edwards, Ana María; Muñoz, Marcelo; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Montoya, Lupita D

    2016-01-01

    Indoor and outdoor endotoxin in PM2.5 was measured for the very first time in Santiago, Chile, in spring 2012. Average endotoxin concentrations were 0.099 and 0.094 [EU/m(3)] for indoor (N=44) and outdoor (N=41) samples, respectively; the indoor-outdoor correlation (log-transformed concentrations) was low: R=-0.06, 95% CI: (-0.35 to 0.24), likely owing to outdoor spatial variability. A linear regression model explained 68% of variability in outdoor endotoxins, using as predictors elemental carbon (a proxy of traffic emissions), chlorine (a tracer of marine air masses reaching the city) and relative humidity (a modulator of surface emissions of dust, vegetation and garbage debris). In this study, for the first time a potential source contribution function (PSCF) was applied to outdoor endotoxin measurements. Wind trajectory analysis identified upwind agricultural sources as contributors to the short-term, outdoor endotoxin variability. Our results confirm an association between combustion particles from traffic and outdoor endotoxin concentrations. For indoor endotoxins, a predictive model was developed but it only explained 44% of endotoxin variability; the significant predictors were tracers of indoor PM2.5 dust (Si, Ca), number of external windows and number of hours with internal doors open. Results suggest that short-term indoor endotoxin variability may be driven by household dust/garbage production and handling. This would explain the modest predictive performance of published models that use answers to household surveys as predictors. One feasible alternative is to increase the sampling period so that household features would arise as significant predictors of long-term airborne endotoxin levels. PMID:27065310

  1. Synergetic Effect between Lighting Efficiency Enhancement and Building Energy Reduction Using Alternative Thermal Operating System of Indoor LED Lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Byung-Lip Ahn; Ji-Woo Park; Seunghwan Yoo; Jonghun Kim; Hakgeun Jeong; Seung-Bok Leigh; Cheol-Yong Jang

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the synergetic effect between light-emitting diode (LED) lighting efficiency and building energy savings in heating and cooling using an alternative thermal operating system (ATOS) of indoor LED lighting integrated with the ventilation system of a building as an active cooling device. The heat generated from LED lighting and the indoor lighting illuminance were experimentally determined. The indoor heat gains in cooling and heating periods were determined using measurement dat...

  2. Ventilation influence upon indoor air radon level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levels of indoor radon in air are studied by a continuous electrostatic radon monitor under normal living conditions to evaluate the influence of air conditioned ventilation on indoor air radon level. Results show that the indoor air radon concentrations are not much more than those without household conditioner living condition, although using household conditioner requires a sealed room which should lead to a higher radon level. Turning on air conditioner helps lower indoor radon level. Therefore, the total indoor air Rn levels are normal > ventilation > exhaust or in-draft > exhaust plus in-draft

  3. VENTILATION INFLUENCE UPON INDOOR AIR RADON LEVEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田德源

    1995-01-01

    Levels of indoor radon in air are studied by a continuous electrostatic radon monitor under normal living conditions to evaluate the influence of air conditioned ventilation on indoor air radon level.Results show that the indoor air radon concentrations are not much more than those without household conditioner living condition.although using household conditioner requires a sealed room which should lead to a higher radon level.Turning on air conditioner helps lower indoor radon level.Therefore.the total indoor air Rn levels are normal>ventilation>exhaust or indraft> exhaust plus indraft.

  4. Law and features of TVOC and Formaldehyde pollution in urban indoor air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chenchen; Chen, Weidong; Guo, Min; Weng, Mili; Yan, Gang; Shen, Xueyou

    2016-05-01

    There are several categories of indoor air pollutants. Organic pollutants are the most common ones. This study chooses TVOC and Formaldehyde, two of the typical pollutants, as indicators of evaluating household indoor air pollution and improves the TVOC concentration prediction model through the samples of indoor air taken from 3122 households. This study also categorizes and explains the features of household indoor air pollution based on the TVOC and Formaldehyde models as well as a large amount of sample measurement. Moreover, this study combines the TVOC model with the Formaldehyde model to calculate and verify the critical values of each type of indoor air pollution. In this study, indoor air pollution is categorized into three types: decoration pollution, consumption pollution and transition pollution. During the first 12 months after decoration, decoration pollution is the primary pollution type, both TVOC and Formaldehyde are highly concentrated while sometimes seriously over the standard. Pollutants mainly come from volatile sources. After the first 12 month but before 24 months the indoor air pollution is transition pollution. Both decoration materials and human activates affect the indoor air quality. 24 months after decoration, it transits into consumption pollution. In this stage, the main pollutants come from combustion sources, and concentration of pollutants fluctuates with the appearance and disappearance of the sources.

  5. Mind Your Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Lily

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to excelling in the classroom, it turns out the air students are breathing is just as important as the lessons they are learning. Studies show poor indoor air quality (IAQ) can lessen the comfort of students as well as staff--affecting concentration, attendance and student performance. It can even lead to lower IQs. What's more, poor…

  6. Indoor Domestic environment and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadimitriou E.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Genesis and development of asthma are greatly affected by the indoor environmental quality. Duringrecent years, it is noted an important increase in asthma cases worldwide which is mainly caused by the effects ofpollutants in indoor environments. Purpose: In this study, there has been an effort to show the impact of indoorenvironment on asthma development. Methodology: Reviewing bibliography by information retrieval from thePubmed and TRIP Database.Conclusion: Indoor air pollution is an interdisciplinary subject. The great number ofpollutants, their variety on structure and action, the conditions under which they are developed as well as theirdifferent and disparate ways of treatment and control require knowledge from many scientific fields. By assuming newdimensions in world climate changes, increasing sensitization in allergens, using respiratory irritants, such aspesticides and compounds and chemicals of industrial origin, and at the same time the poor home indoor air qualityand the family history of asthma lead to new asthma cases worldwide. An important number of asthma cases in afamily could be avoided by implementing a better environmental policy inside our homes. Finally, by understandingbetter the link between environment and asthma as well as by explaining the involved gene action, they will bedelivered more effective prevention and treatment programs.

  7. Indoor Tanning Is Not Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the weather, latitude, altitude, and more. Statistics Studies have shown consistently that indoor tanning increases a person’s risk of getting skin cancer, including melanoma. A meta-analysis (a research study that looks at data from other studies) by ...

  8. INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATION UNIT CONVERSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion (VI). Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors, which can migrate through subsurface soils and may enter the indoor air of overlying buil...

  9. Aerodynamic Simulation of Indoor Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leon, Nelson; De Leon, Matthew N.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a two-dimensional flight simulator for lightweight (less than 10 g) indoor planes. The simulator consists of four coupled time differential equations describing the plane CG, plane pitch and motor. The equations are integrated numerically with appropriate parameters and initial conditions for two planes: (1) Science Olympiad and (2)…

  10. Behavior of chlorine in lake water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water from monsoon fed Sagre lake is being used as a source of raw water for Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS--1 and 2). The raw water from the lake is initially pumped to Sagre water treatment plant (SWTP) operated by Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation (MIDC) from where, the processed water is sent to cater the needs of both the units of TAPS-1 and 2, townships of TAPS and MIDC, and the nearby villages. At the SWTP the raw water is treated with alum to remove the turbidity, filtered and chlorinated using bleaching powder. All these years the raw water is chlorinated in such a way whereby a residual chlorine level of 0.5-1.0 mg/l, is maintained at the outlet of water treatment plant. The adequacy of the current chlorination practice was investigated, at the request of the NPC-500 MWe group during 1990, so that the future requirements of raw water for TAPP-3 and 4, can be met from the expanded SWTP. In this connection experiments on chlorine dose -- residual chlorine relationship and the decay pattern of chlorine with time was carried out in the lake water (with low value of total dissolved solids and total hardness 3 sample at the site. The total bacterial count in the raw water observed to be 107 counts/ml originally came down to 103 counts/ml at the end of one-hour exposure time to chlorine. It was found that the chlorine demand of the water was around 6 mg/l. In addition Jar test to evaluate the aluminum dose was also carried out. Based on these experiments a chlorine dose of 6 mg/l for one hour contact time was arrived at. The experimental findings were in agreement with the current chlorination practices. (author)

  11. Chlorine dioxide and by-products in water distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Francisco Cardoso

    1991-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is used as both a pre-oxidant and/or a post-disinfectant in several water treatment plants in the United States. Chlorine dioxide is associated with its byproducts chlorite and chlorate. Chlorine dioxide, chlorine, chlori te and chlorate were sampled in four distribution systems where chlorine dioxide is used for disinfection purposes: Charleston, WV, Columbus, GA, New Castle, PA, and Skagit, WA. The fate of chlorine dioxide and its by-products in dist...

  12. Prompt gamma ray evaluation for chlorine analysis in blended cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single prompt gamma ray energy has been evaluated to measure chlorine concentration in fly ash (FA), Super-Pozz (SPZ) and blast furnace slag (BFS) cement concrete specimens using a portable neutron generator-based Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) setup. The gamma ray yield data from chloride concentration measurement in FA, SPZ and BFS cement concretes for 2.86–3.10, 5.72 and 6.11 MeV chlorine gamma rays were analyzed to identify a gamma ray with common slope (gamma ray yield/Cl conc. wt%) for the FA, BFS and SPZ cement concretes. The gamma ray yield data for FA and SPZ cement concretes with varying chloride concentration were measured previously using a portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup. In the current study, new data have been measured for chlorine detection in the BFS cement concrete using a portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup for 2.86–3.10, 5.72, and 6.11 MeV chlorine gamma rays. The minimum detection limit of chlorine in BFS cement concrete (MDC) was found to be 0.034±0.010, 0.032±0.010, 0.033±0.010 for 2.86–3.10, 5.72 and 6.11 MeV gamma ray, respectively. The new BFS cement concrete data, along with the previous measurements for FA and SPZ cement concretes, have been utilized to identify a gamma ray with a common slope to analyze the Cl concentration in all of these blended cement concretes. It has been observed that the 6.11 MeV chlorine gamma ray has a common slope of 5295±265 gamma rays/wt % Cl concentration for the portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup. The minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of chlorine in blended cement concrete was measured to be 0.033±0.010 wt % for the portable neutron generator-based PGNAA. Thus, the 6.11 MeV chlorine gamma ray can be used for chlorine analysis of blended cement concretes. - Highlights: • New data on chlorine measurements in BFS cement concrete is presented. • Single chlorine gamma ray was evaluated for chlorine analysis in blended cement concrete. • 6.11 Me

  13. Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-07-01

    The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

  14. Session 6: The catalytic oxidation of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oszczudlowski, J. [Institute of Chemistry, Swietokrzyska Academy, Kielce (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The catalytic oxidation of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons was investigated in the presence of natural zeolites modified with 3M HCl and chromium and lanthanum from aqueous solutions. Natural zeolites of the structure of clinoptilolite or mordenite possess unique physical and chemical properties such as high sorptive capacity and ion-exchange selectivity, relatively high heat and mechanical resistance. The activation of samples of natural zeolites was carried out in a 3M aqueous solution of HCl using a Soxhlet apparatus, whereas the ion exchange from aqueous solutions of chromium (III) and lanthanum (III) nitrates. Samples of activated zeolites were calcinated at 500 C with a programmable temperature increase within 4 hours The amounts of Cr and La on zeolite were 3,0 % wt and 4,5 % wt, respectively. Catalytic tests were conducted in a micro-reactor coupled with a gas chromatograph. The conditions of reaction were as follows: temperature range: 473-723 K, substrate composition: chlorinated hydrocarbon (1000-10000 ppm), steam (0-10000 ppm) and air. Under standard conditions volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons were introduced into a gas flux as vapours, whereas low-volatile ones in a mixture with n-hexane or cyclohexane. The quantity of the deposits on the surface of a catalyst was analysed by the thermogravimetric and GC-MS methods. The composition of oxidation products of chlorinated hydrocarbons was chromatographically analysed indirectly with the techniques SPME-GC-ECD and SPME-GCFID. The total quantity of the products was stored in gas containers-Tedlars and the quantitative and qualitative composition was analysed by the method SPME-HS-GC-ECD (solid phase micro-extraction-headspace-gas chromatography-electron capture detector). The total oxidation of CCl{sub 4} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6} in the presence of the Cr/zeolite catalyst occurs at 400 C. The conversion of the catalytic oxidation of chloro-olefins in the presence of the La/zeolite catalyst increases within

  15. Inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine.

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, D.; Hoff, J C

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine were studied at 5 degrees C with a purified preparation of single virions and a preparation of cell-associated virions. Inactivation of the virus preparations with chlorine and chlorine dioxide was studied at pH 6 and 10. The monochloramine studies were done at pH 8. With 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter at pH 6, more than 4 logs (99.99%) of the single virions were inactivated in less than 15 s...

  16. Evaluating the behavior of indoor radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The indoor behavior of the radon decay products were evaluated considering the relative activity particle size distribution and also the activity concentration. It is evident from the present study activity concentration as well as the particle size distribution varies considerably. Relatively high radon concentrations were observed at homes with a widen shape of the particle size distribution but in the case of workplaces, low F value is obtained as the decay product did not grow sufficiently due to the large interchange of air through personnel movement and adequate ventilation. The estimated average effective dose for work place and home also found to be much lower than the dose referred in UNSCEAR report 1993 as 1.2 mSv. (N.C.)

  17. a Framework of Cognitive Indoor Navigation Based on Characteristics of Indoor Spatial Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, R.; Arikawa, M.

    2015-05-01

    People are easy to get confused in indoor spatial environment. Thus, indoor navigation systems on mobile devices are expected in a wide variety of application domains. Limited by the accuracy of indoor positioning, indoor navigating systems are not common in our society. However, automatic positioning is not all about location-based services (LBS), other factors, such as good map design and user interfaces, are also important to satisfy users of LBS. Indoor spatial environment and people's indoor spatial cognition are different than those in outdoor environment, which asks for different design of LBS. This paper introduces our design methods of indoor navigation system based on the characteristics of indoor spatial environment and indoor spatial cognition.

  18. Precise determination of stable chlorine isotopic ratios in low-concentration natural samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenheim, A. J.; Spivack, A. J.; Volpe, C.; Ransom, B.

    1994-07-01

    Investigation of stable chlorine isotopes in geological materials has been hindered by large sample requirements and/or lack of analytical precision. Here we describe precise methods for the extraction, isolation, and isotopic analysis of low levels of chlorine in both silicate and aerosol samples. Our standard procedure uses 2 μg of Cl for each isotopic analysis. External reproducibility (1 σ) is 0.25%. for the 37Cl /35Cl measurements. Chlorine is extracted from silicate samples (typically containing at least 20 μg of Cl) via pyrohydrolysis using induction heating and water vapor as the carrier, and the volatilized chlorine is condensed in aqueous solution. Atmospheric aerosols collected on filters are simply dissolved in water. Prior to isotopic measurement, removal of high levels of SO 42-, F -, and organic compounds is necessary for the production of stable ion beams. Sulfate is removed by BaSCO 4 precipitation, F - by CaF 2 precipitation, and organic compounds are extracted with activated carbon. Chlorine is converted to stoichiometric CsCl by cation exchange, and isotopic ratios are determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of Cs 2Cl +. We demonstrate that the sensitivity and precision of this method allow resolution of natural variations in chlorine isotopic composition, and thereby provide insight to some fundamental aspects of chlorine geochemistry.

  19. Factors affecting trihalomethane formation and speciation during chlorination of reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Defang; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid process with membrane bioreactor (MBR) and powdered activated carbon (PAC), PAC/MBR, was used for real municipal wastewater treatment and reuse. The roles of chlorine dose, contact time, pH and bromide in trihalomethane (THM) formation and speciation during chlorination of the reclaimed water were investigated. Total trihalomethane (TTHM) yield exponentially increased to maximum with increasing chlorine dose (correlation coefficient R2=0.98). Prolonging substrate chlorine contact time significantly promoted TTHM formation. Less than 40% of THMs formed in the first 24 h, indicating that the PAC/MBR effluent organic matters were mostly composed of slow-reacting precursors. Increasing pH and bromide concentration facilitated THM formation. Higher chlorine dose and contact time enhanced chloro-THM formation. The bromo-THM formation was favored at near neutral condition. Despite the variation of chlorine dose, contact time and pH, the yield of THM species in order was usually CHCl3>CHBrCl2>CHBr2Cl>CHBr3. However, THM speciation shifted from chlorinated species to brominated species with increasing bromide concentration. PMID:26247761

  20. Indoorgml - a Standard for Indoor Spatial Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ki-Joune

    2016-06-01

    With recent progress of mobile devices and indoor positioning technologies, it becomes possible to provide location-based services in indoor space as well as outdoor space. It is in a seamless way between indoor and outdoor spaces or in an independent way only for indoor space. However, we cannot simply apply spatial models developed for outdoor space to indoor space due to their differences. For example, coordinate reference systems are employed to indicate a specific position in outdoor space, while the location in indoor space is rather specified by cell number such as room number. Unlike outdoor space, the distance between two points in indoor space is not determined by the length of the straight line but the constraints given by indoor components such as walls, stairs, and doors. For this reason, we need to establish a new framework for indoor space from fundamental theoretical basis, indoor spatial data models, and information systems to store, manage, and analyse indoor spatial data. In order to provide this framework, an international standard, called IndoorGML has been developed and published by OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium). This standard is based on a cellular notion of space, which considers an indoor space as a set of non-overlapping cells. It consists of two types of modules; core module and extension module. While core module consists of four basic conceptual and implementation modeling components (geometric model for cell, topology between cells, semantic model of cell, and multi-layered space model), extension modules may be defined on the top of the core module to support an application area. As the first version of the standard, we provide an extension for indoor navigation.

  1. Indoor aerosol size distributions in a gymnasium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Amaya; Calvo, Ana I; Alves, Célia; Alonso-Blanco, Elisabeth; Coz, Esther; Marques, Liliana; Nunes, Teresa; Fernández-Guisuraga, Jose Manuel; Fraile, Roberto

    2015-08-15

    In this study, an indoor/outdoor monitoring program was carried out in a gymnasium at the University of Leon, Spain. The main goal was a characterization of aerosol size distributions in a university gymnasium under different conditions and sports activities (with and without magnesia alba) and the study of the mass fraction deposited in each of the parts of the respiratory tract. The aerosol particles were measured in 31 discrete channels (size ranges) using a laser spectrometer probe. Aerosol size distributions were studied under different conditions: i) before sports activities, ii) activities without using magnesia alba, iii) activities using magnesia alba, iv) cleaning procedures, and v) outdoors. The aerosol refractive index and density indoors were estimated from the aerosol composition: 1.577-0.003i and 2.055 g cm(-3), respectively. Using the estimated density, the mass concentration was calculated, and the evolution of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 for different activities was assessed. The quality of the air in the gymnasium was strongly influenced by the use of magnesia alba (MgCO3) and the number of gymnasts who were training. Due to the climbing chalk and the constant process of resuspension, average PM10 concentrations of over 440 μg m(-3) were reached. The maximum daily concentrations ranged from 500 to 900 μg m(-3). Particle size determines the place in the respiratory tract where the deposition occurs. For this reason, the inhalable, thoracic, tracheobronchial and respirable fractions were assessed for healthy adults and high risk people, according to international standards. The estimations show that, for healthy adults, up to 300 μg m(-3) can be retained by the trachea and bronchi, and 130 μg m(-3) may reach the alveolar region. The different physical activities and the attendance rates in the sports facility have a significant influence on the concentration and size distributions observed. PMID:25897726

  2. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.300 Chlorine...

  3. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  4. Chlorine demand and residual chlorine decay kinetics of Kali river water at Kaiga project area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power plant at Kaiga would use Kali river water for condenser cooling. This necessitated studies on the chemistry of chlorination such as chlorine demand, kinetics of chlorination and other water characteristics aimed at obtaining base line data. The study revealed significant seasonal variation of chlorine demand ranging from 0.5 ppm to 1.7 ppm (3.0 ppm dose, 30 min contact time) and total consumption of 5.0 ppm (10.0 ppm dose, 48 hours contact time). The reaction follows first order kinetics in chlorine. High correlation of chlorine demand with chlorophyll a, suspended matter, turbidity, silica, nitrite, phosphate and sulphate indicated that chlorine demand is greatly influenced by water quality. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  5. POSSIBLE ROLE OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS IN BACK-DRAFTING RESIDENTIAL COMBUSTION APPLIANCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The article gives results of a computational sensitivity analysis conducted to identify conditions under which residential active soil depressurization (ASD) systems for indoor radon reduction might contribute to or create back-drafting of natural draft combustion appliances. Par...

  6. Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Updates Subscribe Listen Page last reviewed April ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Download page Subscribe to RSS Get email ...

  7. Disinfection of football protective equipment using chlorine dioxide produced by the ICA TriNova system

    OpenAIRE

    DuBois John D; Newsome Anthony L; Tenney Joel D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Backround Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreaks have occurred in individuals engaged in athletic activities such as wrestling and football. Potential disease reduction interventions include the reduction or elimination of bacteria on common use items such as equipment. Chlorine dioxide has a long history of use as a disinfectant. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the ability of novel portable chlorine dioxide generation devices to ...

  8. A stigmergic approach to indoor localization using bluetooth low energy beacons

    OpenAIRE

    Palumbo, Filippo; Barsocchi, Paolo; Chessa, Stefano; Augusto, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Localization of people and devices is one of the main building blocks of context aware systems since the user position represents the core information for detecting user's activities, devices activations, proximity to points of interest, etc. While for outdoor scenarios Global Positioning System (GPS) constitutes a reliable and easily available technology, for indoor scenarios GPS is largely unavailable. In this paper we present a range-based indoor localization system that exploits the Recei...

  9. Functionalized alkynyl-chlorogermanes: hydrometallation, Ge-Cl bond activation, Ge-H bond formation and chlorine-tert-butyl exchange via a transient germyl cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honacker, Christian; Qu, Zheng-Wang; Tannert, Jens; Layh, Marcus; Hepp, Alexander; Grimme, Stefan; Uhl, Werner

    2016-04-14

    Treatment of alkynyl-arylchlorogermanes ArylnGe(Cl)(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-(t)Bu)3-n (n = 1, 2) with HM(t)Bu2 (M = Al, Ga) yielded mixed Al or Ga alkenyl-alkynylchlorogermanes via hydrometallation reactions. Intramolecular interactions between the Lewis-basic Cl atoms and the Lewis-acidic Al or Ga atoms afforded MCGeCl heterocycles. The endocyclic M-Cl distances were significantly lengthened compared to the starting compounds and indicated Ge-Cl bond activation. Dual hydrometallation succeeded only with HGa(t)Bu2. One Ga atom of the product was involved in a Ga-Cl bond, while the second one had an interaction to a C-H bond of a phenyl group. In two cases treatment of chlorogermanes with two equivalents of HAl(t)Bu2 resulted in hydroalumination of one alkynyl group and formation of unprecedented Ge-H functionalized germanes, Aryl-Ge(H)(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-(t)Bu)[C(Al(t)Bu2)[double bond, length as m-dash]C(H)-(t)Bu] (Aryl = mesityl, triisopropylphenyl). The Al atoms of these compounds interacted with the α-C atoms of the alkynyl groups. Ph(Cl)Ge(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-(t)Bu)[C(Al(t)Bu2}[double bond, length as m-dash]C(H)-(t)Bu] reacted in an unusual Cl/(t)Bu exchange to yield the tert-butylgermane Ph((t)Bu)Ge(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-(t)Bu)[C{Al((t)Bu)(Cl)}[double bond, length as m-dash]C(H)-(t)Bu]. Quantum chemical calculations suggested the formation of a germyl cation as a transient intermediate. PMID:26610394

  10. Contribution from indoor sources to particle number and mass concentrations in residential houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Hitchins, Jane; Gilbert, Dale

    As part of a large study investigating indoor air in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia, the purpose of this work was to quantify emission characteristics of indoor particle sources in 15 houses. Submicrometer particle number and approximation of PM 2.5 concentrations were measured simultaneously for more than 48 h in the kitchen of all the houses by using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a photometer (DustTrak), respectively. In addition, characterizations of particles resulting from cooking conducted in an identical way in all the houses were measured by using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and a DustTrak. All the events of elevated particle concentrations were linked to indoor activities using house occupants diary entries, and catalogued into 21 different types of indoor activities. This enabled quantification of the effect of indoor sources on indoor particle concentrations as well as quantification of emission rates from the sources. For example, the study found that frying, grilling, stove use, toasting, cooking pizza, cooking, candle vaporizing eucalyptus oil and fan heater use, could elevate the indoor submicrometer particle number concentration levels by more than five times, while PM 2.5 concentrations could be up to 3, 30 and 90 times higher than the background levels during smoking, frying and grilling, respectively.

  11. Indoor plants as air cleaners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela Cruz, Majbrit; Christensen, Jan H.; Müller, Renate

    2015-01-01

    experiments is not directly transferrable to real life settings. The largest problem is the use of closed chambers where there is no air exchange. This also results in a declining VOC concentration over time. Due to this limitation, we constructed a new experimental system which among others can allow for air......Plants have been used decoratively indoors for centuries. For the last 25-30 years, their beneficial abilities to reduce the levels of harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the indoor air have also been investigated. Previous studies have shown that VOCs are removed by the plant itself...... exchange and a constant VOC concentration. With the new system it was found that removal rates obtained in chambers with air exchange and constant VOC concentration were significantly higher than removal rates obtained in closed chambers. This means that removal rates obtained in closed chambers may be an...

  12. Indoor geolocation for wireless networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Shahid

    2011-01-01

    An ever growing demand for ‘location based services’ and the unprecedented growth of wireless local area networks (WLAN) has, in the past few years, attracted the focus of the research community to investigate and develop accurate indoor geolocation systems. Performance of any geolocation system is based upon the reported distance error . The accuracy required varies from application to application. For example an accurate geolocation system is required to appre...

  13. Indoor air pollution and health

    OpenAIRE

    World Heath Organization (WHO)

    2005-01-01

    Metadata only record This is a fact sheet summarizing the indoor air pollution problem. The risk factors include health impacts such as respiratory infections and lung cancer. The fact sheet explains that women and children in developing nations are most vulnerable to the pollutants. It links Millennium Development Goals 1, 3, 4 and 7 (eradicate extreme poverty, empowering women, reducing child mortality, and ensure environmental sustainability) with the need for action. The fact sheet end...

  14. Fingerprint Indoor Position System Based

    OpenAIRE

    José Antonio Gómez Martin; Ana Verónica Medina Rodríguez; Enrique Dorronzoro Zubiete; Octavio Rivera Romero; Sergio Martín Guillén

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a research and a development of a fingerprint-indoor-positioning system using the Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) of a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). The WSN implementation is based on two different protocol stacks: BitCloud and OpenMAC, a certified ZigBee Compliant Platform (ZCP) and an IEEE 802.15.4 embedded software implementation respectively, both from Atmel, and the system uses two different fingerprint algorithms, Simple and Centroid. A comparative analys...

  15. Indoor air problems in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory disease and mortality due to indoor air pollution are amongst the greatest environmental threats to health in the developing countries of Asia. World-wide, acute respiratory infection is the cause of death of at least 5 million children under the age of 5 every year. The World Bank has claimed that smoke from biomass fuels resulted in an estimated 4 million deaths annually amongst infants and children. Most of these deaths occur in developing countries. Combustion in its various forms must head the list of pollution sources in Asia. Combustion of various fuels for domestic heating, lighting and cooking comprises the major source of internally generated pollutants and combustion in industrial plants, power generation and transportation is the major cause of externally generated pollutants. The products of pyrolysis and combustion include many compounds with well-known adverse health effects. These include gases such as CO, CO2, NOx and SO2, volatile organic compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and nitroamines as well as respirable particulates of variable composition. The nature and magnitude of the health risks posed by these materials vary with season, climate, location housing, method of ventilation, culture and socio-economic status. The most important cause of lung cancer in non-smokers in Northern Asia is the domestic combustion of smoky coal. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning is common in many Asian countries. Roads traffic exhaust pollution is worse in the major cities of South East Asia than almost anywhere else in the world and this externally generated air pollution forms the indoor air for the urban poor. Despite all these major problems there has been a tendency for international agencies to focus attention and resources on the more trivial problems of indoor air encountered in the affluent countries of the West. Regulatory agencies in Asia have been too frequently persuaded that their problems of indoor air pollution are

  16. Search of a prompt gamma ray for chlorine analysis in a Portland cement sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompt Gamma Ray analysis of chlorine contaminated Portland cement samples have been carried out using an accelerator-based Prompt Gamma ray Neutron Activation Analysis setup. The chlorine concentration was measured over a range of 0.25-4 wt% using 1.165 MeV capture γ-rays from chlorine. The experimental results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations and an excellent agreement was observed between the two results. Further theoretical study has shown that yield of the 1.165 MeV prompt γ-rays from chlorine is not very sensitive to variation in moisture contents of the Portland sample. An order of magnitude increase in sample moisture content resulted in only 16-20% increase in yield of 1.165 MeV prompt γ-rays

  17. Search of a prompt gamma ray for chlorine analysis in a Portland cement sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Center for Applied Physical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Box 1815, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: annaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia); Kidwai, S. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khateeb-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia); Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2004-11-11

    Prompt Gamma Ray analysis of chlorine contaminated Portland cement samples have been carried out using an accelerator-based Prompt Gamma ray Neutron Activation Analysis setup. The chlorine concentration was measured over a range of 0.25-4 wt% using 1.165 MeV capture {gamma}-rays from chlorine. The experimental results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations and an excellent agreement was observed between the two results. Further theoretical study has shown that yield of the 1.165 MeV prompt {gamma}-rays from chlorine is not very sensitive to variation in moisture contents of the Portland sample. An order of magnitude increase in sample moisture content resulted in only 16-20% increase in yield of 1.165 MeV prompt {gamma}-rays.

  18. Improved membrane filtration method incorporating catalase and sodium pyruvate for detection of chlorine-stressed coliform bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Calabrese, J P; Bissonnette, G K

    1990-01-01

    In vitro pure culture studies were conducted on three different strains of Escherichia coli (K-12, EPA 00244, and SWEI) to determine the effect of chlorination on catalase activity. In each case, stationary-phase cells exhibited significant (P less than 0.001) reductions in enzyme activity following exposure to chlorine. Mean differences in activity between control and chlorine-stressed cells ranged from 8.8 to 20.3 U/mg of protein for E. coli SWEI and EPA 00244, respectively. Following initi...

  19. A correlation study between indoor radon-thoron concentration and soil exhalation rates from Indian dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements of indoor radon and thoron concentration in some north Indian dwellings were carried out using pin hole based radon thoron dosimeters. The inhalation doses were calculated by ICRP recommendations. The radon and thoron exhalation rates from the soil collected from the same dwellings area were also carried out with closed chamber technique using active measurement by scintillation radon monitor and scintillation thoron monitor. The indoor radon and thoron concentration varied from 12 to 90 Bq/m3 and 20 to 140 Bq/m3 respectively. A good positive correlation was found between indoor radon thoron concentration and their exhalation rates. (author)

  20. Indoor and soil radon measurements in the Hyblean Foreland (South-East Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alessandro

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Indoor radon behavior in two sites of SE Sicily was studied as a function of the soil radon concentration. The chosen locations were Ragusa and Modica towns, placed in the Hyblean Plateau (northern margin of the African Plate. Soil samples were analysed by gamma spectrometry to determine the amount of radionuclides. Indoor air and soil gas radon measurements were simultaneously performed in both sites using active detectors. Radon in soil was measured one meter deep. A positive correlation was obtained between indoor radon concentration and the soil gas concentration.

  1. EML indoor radon workshop, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop on indoor radon, held at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) on November 30 and December 1, 1982, covered recent developments in radon daughter research and development. Thirty papers were presented dealing with standardization and quality assurance measurement methods, surveys, measurements strategy, physical mechanisms of radon and radon daughter transport and development of guidance standards for indoor exposures. The workshop concluded with a planning session that identified the following needs: (1) national and international intercomparisons of techniques for measuring radon and radon daughter concentrations, working level and radon exhalation flux density; (2) development and refinement of practical measurement techniques for thoron and its daughter products; (3) quantitative definition of the sources of indoor radon and the mechanisms of transport into structures; (4) better knowledge of the physical properties of radon daughters; (5) more complete and accurate data on the population exposure to radon, which can only be met by broadly based surveys; and (6) more international cooperation and information exchange among countries with major research programs

  2. Indoor radon concentration in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary survey of Rn concentration indoors by means of track detectors and y-ray dose rate with the use of TLD in almost 500 homes in selected areas of Poland was performed in the late 1980s. It was concluded that radon contributes 1.16 mSv i.e. about 46 per cent of the total natural environment ionizing radiation dose to the Polish population. Comparison of the average radon concentrations in 4 seasons of a year and in 3 groups of buildings: masonry, concrete and wood, revealed that the ground beneath the building structure is likely the dominant source of radon indoors. Since the National Atomic Energy Agency in its regulations of 1988-03-31 set up the permissible limit of the equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon in new buildings (equal 100 Bq/m3), the nation-scale survey project for radon in buildings has been undertaken. These regulations were supposed to take effect in 1995-01-01. The project has 3 objectives: to estimate the radiation exposure due to radon daughters received by Polish population to identify radon-prone areas in Poland to investigate dependence of the indoor radon concentrations on such parameters as: type of construction material, presence (or absence) of cellar under the building, number of floor

  3. Residential indoor air quality guideline : ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozone (O3) is a colourless gas that reacts rapidly on surfaces and with other constituents in the air. Sources of indoor O3 include devices sold as home air cleaners, and some types of office equipment. Outdoor O3 is also an important contributor to indoor levels of O3, depending on the air exchange rate with indoor environments. This residential indoor air quality guideline examined factors that affect the introduction, dispersion and removal of O3 indoors. The health effects of prolonged exposure to O3 were discussed, and studies conducted to evaluate the population health impacts of O3 were reviewed. The studies demonstrated that there is a significant association between ambient O3 and adverse health impacts. Exposure guidelines for residential indoor air quality were discussed. 14 refs.

  4. Air filtration and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Demands for better indoor air quality are increasing, since we spend most of our time indoors and we are more and more aware of indoor air pollution. Field studies in different parts of the world have documented that high percentage of occupants in many offices and buildings find the indoor air...... decent ventilation and air cleaning/air filtration, high indoor air quality cannot be accomplished. The need for effective air filtration has increased with increasing evidence on the hazardous effects of fine particles. Moreover, the air contains gaseous pollutants, removal of which requires various air...... cleaning techniques. Supply air filter is one of the key components in the ventilation system. Studies have shown that used ventilation filters themselves can be a significant source of indoor air pollution with consequent impact on perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance...

  5. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building`s occupants while maintaining the building`s energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building`s occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  6. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building's occupants while maintaining the building's energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building's occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  7. Residential indoor air quality guideline : carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a tasteless, odourless, and colourless gas that can be produced by both natural and anthropogenic processes, but is most often formed during the incomplete combustion of organic materials. In the indoor environment, CO occurs directly as a result of emissions from indoor sources or as a result of infiltration from outdoor air containing CO. Studies have shown that the use of specific sources can lead to increased concentrations of CO indoors. This residential indoor air quality guideline examined the factors influencing the introduction, dispersion and removal of CO indoors. The health effects of exposure to low and higher concentrations of CO were discussed. Residential maximum exposure limits for CO were presented. Sources and concentrations in indoor environments were also examined. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Indoor air pollution: a public health perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although official efforts to control air pollution have traditionally focused on outdoor air, it is now apparent that elevated contaminant concentrations are common inside some private and public buildings. Concerns about potential public health problems due to indoor air pollution are based on evidence that urban residents typically spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, concentrations of some contaminants are higher indoors than outdoors, and for some pollutants personal exposures are not characterized adequately by outdoor measurements. Among the more important indoor contaminants associated with health or irritation effects are passive tobacco smoke, radon decay products, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, asbestos fibers, microorganisms, and aeroallergens. Efforts to assess health risks associated with indoor air pollution are limited by insufficient information about the number of people exposed, the pattern and severity of exposures, and the health consequences of exposures. An overall strategy should be developed to investigate indoor exposures, health effects, control options, and public policy alternatives

  9. Rose-like monodisperse bismuth subcarbonate hierarchical hollow microspheres: One-pot template-free fabrication and excellent visible light photocatalytic activity and photochemical stability for NO removal in indoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Rose-like monodisperse hierarchical nitrogen doped (BiO)2CO3 hollow microspheres fabricated by a one-pot template-free method exhibit excellent visible light photocatalytic activity and photochemical stability in the removal of NO in indoor air. The special hierarchical microstructure, the high charge separation efficiency and two-band-gap structure in all contribute to the outstanding photocatalytic performance. Highlights: → Rose-like monodisperse hierarchical (BiO)2CO3 hollow microspheres are fabricated. → The (BiO)2CO3 microspheres are self-assembled of single-crystalline nanosheets. → Nitrogen is in situ doped into the lattice of hierarchical (BiO)2CO3 microspheres. → The (BiO)2CO3 microspheres exhibit outstanding visible light activity for NO removal. → The (BiO)2CO3 microspheres also exhibit high photochemical stability. - Abstract: Rose-like monodisperse hierarchical (BiO)2CO3 hollow microspheres are fabricated by a one-pot template-free method for the first time based on hydrothermal treatment of ammonia bismuth citrate and urea in water. The microstructure and band structure of the as-prepared (BiO)2CO3 superstructure are characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The monodisperse hierarchical (BiO)2CO3 microspheres are constructed by the self-assembly of single-crystalline nanosheets. The aggregation of nanosheets result in the formation of three dimensional hierarchical framework containing mesopores and macropores, which is favorable for efficient transport of reaction molecules and harvesting of photo-energy. The result reveals the existence of special two-band-gap structure (3.25 and 2.0 eV) for (BiO)2CO3. The band gap of 3.25 eV is intrinsic and the formation of smaller band gap of

  10. Recommended concentration limits of indoor air pollution indicators for requirement of acceptable indoor air quality

    OpenAIRE

    Wang J., Zhang X.

    2010-01-01

    Object and goals of indoor air pollution control with ventilation may influence improvement of indoor air quality, building energy consumption and even carbon emissions. Indicators of indoor air pollution caused by occupants-related sources and building-related sources were chosen based on sources emitting characteristics, pollutants composition, indicator choosing principles and indoor air pollution situation in China. Then the recommended concentration limits of indicators were given for un...

  11. Indoor Climate and Productivity in Offices

    OpenAIRE

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The scientific literature shows that the temperature, indoor air quality and venti¬lation, noise and light, and the possibility to control them individually does affect human performance. For cost-benefit analysis it is not sufficient to have information demonstrating a statistically-significant effect of the indoor environmental quality on health and work performance, the dose response relationship of the effect must be quantified. For the temperature, ventilation and indoor air quality was...

  12. Indoor Air Quality in Primary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Maria do Carmo; Canha, Nuno; Martinho, Maria; Almeida-Silva, Marina; Almeida, Susana Marta; Pegas, Priscilla; Alves, Célia; Pio, Casimiro; Trancoso, Maria; Sousa, Rita; Mouro, Filomena; Contreiras, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Clean air is a basic requirement of life (World Health Organization, 2010). The Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has been the object of several studies due to an increasing concern within the scientific community on the effects of indoor air quality upon health, especially as people tend to spend more time indoors than outdoors (Franck et al., 2011; Canha et al., 2010; WHO, 2010; Environmental Protection Agency, 2010; Saliba et al., 2009; Fraga et al., 2008; Fromme et al., 2007; Guo et al., 2004; ...

  13. Moisture Buffering in the Indoor Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Svennberg, Kaisa

    2006-01-01

    Moisture buffering in the indoor environment is the ability, through absorption and desorption, of surface materials to attenuate the moisture variations of the indoor air. Moisture buffering plays an important role in understanding the risks for biological growth in surface materials in the indoor environment, e.g., mold growth on walls and house dust mites in beds, and thereby also have an impact on the health of the inhabitants. Apart from the health aspects, moisture buffering is also imp...

  14. Evaluating GPS Data in Indoor Environments

    OpenAIRE

    MOTTE, H.; WYFFELS, J.; Strycker, L.; GOEMAERE, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    With the latest generation of ultra-sensitive GPS-receivers, satellite signals can often be picked up even indoors, resulting in (inaccurate) indoor GPS-localization. A covered position will therefore no longer be characterized by the absence of satellite signals, creating the need for another way of categorizing this data as potentially inaccurate. This paper describes the use of GPS-based localization in an indoor environment. Only high level, generally available, GPS-data (NMEA-0183 GN...

  15. Indoor Positioning System Using Artificial Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Mehmood; Tripathi, Nitin K.; Taravudh Tipdecho

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Location knowledge in indoor environment using Indoor Positioning Systems (IPS) has become very useful and popular in recent years. A number of Location Based Services (LBS) have been developed, which are based on IPS, these LBS include asset tracking, inventory management and security based applications. Many next-generation LBS applications such as social networking, local search, advertising and geo-tagging are expected to be used in urban and indoor environments where G...

  16. Measurement of indoor radon and natural/fall out radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon and natural radioactivity measurement surveys were carried out in various parts of the Punjab, Khyber Pakhtoonkha, FATA, Azad Jammu and Kashmir and Gilgit Baltistan using CR-39 based radon detectors. The annual effective dose, mean effective dose and exhalation rate were calculated for the general public. Indoor radon activity concentrations in the surveyed houses ranged from 12 +- 5 to 169 +- 9 Bq m/sup -3/ with an overall average value of 57 +- 30 Bq m/sup -3/ which is more than the world average of 40 Bq m/sup -3/. The indoor radon levels were maximum in winter and minimum during summer season and were within the recommended limits. Besides indoor radon and natural radioactivity measurements, uranium contents were determined in samples of drinking water collected from natural springs of Hatian Bala using fission track technique. Except in a few cases, the measured uranium concentration was found within the safe limit of 30 gL/sup -1/. (Orig./A.B.)

  17. Indoor air quality in urban nurseries at Porto city: Particulate matter assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, P. T. B. S.; Alvim-Ferraz, M. C. M.; Martins, F. G.; Sousa, S. I. V.

    2014-02-01

    Indoor air quality in nurseries is an interesting case of study mainly due to children's high vulnerability to exposure to air pollution (with special attention to younger ones), and because nursery is the public environment where young children spend most of their time. Particulate matter (PM) constitutes one of the air pollutants with greater interest. In fact, it can cause acute effects on children's health, as well as may contribute to the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases like asthma. Thus, the main objectives of this study were: i) to evaluate indoor concentrations of particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5, PM10 and PMTotal) on different indoor microenvironments in urban nurseries of Porto city; and ii) to analyse those concentrations according to guidelines and references for indoor air quality and children's health. Indoor PM measurements were performed in several class and lunch rooms in three nurseries on weekdays and weekends. Outdoor PM10 concentrations were also obtained to determine I/O ratios. PM concentrations were often found high in the studied classrooms, especially for the finer fractions, reaching maxima hourly mean concentrations of 145 μg m-3 for PM1 and 158 μg m-3 PM2.5, being often above the limits recommended by WHO, reaching 80% of exceedances for PM2.5, which is concerning in terms of exposure effects on children's health. Mean I/O ratios were always above 1 and most times above 2 showing that indoor sources (re-suspension phenomena due to children's activities, cleaning and cooking) were clearly the main contributors to indoor PM concentrations when compared with the outdoor influence. Though, poor ventilation to outdoors in classrooms affected indoor air quality by increasing the PM accumulation. So, enhancing air renovation rate and performing cleaning activities after the occupancy period could be good practices to reduce PM indoor air concentrations in nurseries and, consequently, to improve children's health and welfare.

  18. Chlorine disinfection by-products in wastewater effluent: Bioassay-based assessment of toxicological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, K; Shaw, G; Leusch, F D L; Knight, N L

    2012-11-15

    The potential ecological impact of disinfection by-products (DBPs) present in chlorinated wastewater effluents is not well understood. In this study, the chlorinated effluent of traditional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and advanced water reclamation plants (AWRPs) supplying highly-treated recycled water were analyzed for nitrosamines and trihalomethanes (THMs), and a battery of bioassays conducted to assess effluent toxicity. An increase in general toxicity from DBPs was revealed for all wastewaters studied using an in vitro bioluminescence assay. Examples of androgenic activity and estrogenic activity arising from DBPs at specific sampling sites were also observed. The in vivo model (Artemia franciscana) was generally not adversely affected by exposure to DBPs from any of the chlorinated wastewaters studied. The observed toxicity could not be related to the concentrations of THMs and nitrosamines present, indicating that DBPs not monitored in this study were responsible for this. This work highlights the complexity of DBPs mixtures formed in chlorinated wastewaters, illustrating that toxicity of wastewater DBPs cannot be predicted by chemical monitoring of THMs and nitrosamines. The results suggest bioassays may be particularly useful monitoring tools in assessing toxicity arising from DBPs of these complex waters. The research concludes that DBPs formed in the chlorinated wastewaters studied can be toxic and may have a deleterious impact on aquatic organisms that are exposed to them, and therefore, that chlorination or chlorination/dechlorination may not be adequate treatment strategies for the protection of receiving waters. Chlorinated wastewater toxicity (from DBPs) is not well-understood in the Australian context, and this study serves to advise regulators on this issue. PMID:22981491

  19. Environmental Behavior, Sources, and Effects of Chlorinated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohura

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental sources and behaviors of chlorinated 2- to 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs. ClPAHs are ubiquitous contaminants found in urban air, vehicle exhaust gas, snow, tap water, and sediments. The concentrations of ClPAHs in each of these environments are generally higher than those of dioxins but markedly lower than the concentrations of the parent compounds, PAHs. Environmental data and emission sources analysis for ClPAHs reveal that the dominant process of generation is by reaction of PAHs with chlorine in pyrosynthesis. This secondary reaction process also occurs in aquatic environments. Certain ClPAHs show greater toxicity, such as mutagenicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity, than their corresponding parent PAHs. Investigation of the sources and environmental behavior of ClPAHs is of great importance in the assessment of human health risks.

  20. Contribution of indoor-generated particles to residential exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaxon, C.; Gudmundsson, A.; Nordin, E. Z.; Lönnblad, L.; Dahl, A.; Wieslander, G.; Bohgard, M.; Wierzbicka, A.

    2015-04-01

    The majority of airborne particles in residences, when expressed as number concentrations, are generated by the residents themselves, through combustion/thermal related activities. These particles have a considerably smaller diameter than 2.5 μm and, due to the combination of their small size, chemical composition (e.g. soot) and intermittently very high concentrations, should be regarded as having potential to cause adverse health effects. In this study, time resolved airborne particle measurements were conducted for seven consecutive days in 22 randomly selected homes in the urban area of Lund in southern Sweden. The main purpose of the study was to analyze the influence of human activities on the concentration of particles in indoor air. Focus was on number concentrations of particles with diameters Correlations between these particles and soot mass concentration in total dust were also investigated. It was found that candle burning and activities related to cooking (using a frying pan, oven, toaster, and their combinations) were the major particle sources. The frequency of occurrence of a given concentration indoors and outdoors was compared for ultrafine particles. Indoor data was sorted into non-occupancy and occupancy time, and the occupancy time was further divided into non-activity and activity influenced time. It was found that high levels (above 104 cm-3) indoors mainly occur during active periods of occupancy, while the concentration during non-activity influenced time differs very little from non-occupancy time. Total integrated daily residential exposure of ultrafine particles was calculated for 22 homes, the contribution from known activities was 66%, from unknown activities 20%, and from background/non-activity 14%. The collected data also allowed for estimates of particle source strengths for specific activities, and for some activities it was possible to estimate correlations between the number concentration of ultrafine particles and the mass

  1. Indoor air pollution and airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegi, G.; Simoni, M.; Scognamiglio, A.; Baldacci, S.; Pistelli, F.; Carrozzi, L.; Annesi-Maesano, I. [CNR, Pisa (Italy). Inst. of Clinical Physiology

    2004-12-15

    Growing scientific evidence has shown that because people generally spend the majority of their time indoors, indoor pollution plays a significant role in affecting health and is thus an important health issue. Common indoor pollutants are environmental tobacco smoke, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and biological allergens. In developing countries, relevant sources of indoor pollution include biomass and coal burning for cooking and heating. Concentrations of these pollutants can be many times higher indoors than outdoors. Indoor air pollution may increase the risk of irritation phenomena, allergic sensitisation, acute and chronic respiratory disorders and lung function impairment. Recent conservative estimates have shown that 1.5-2 million deaths per year worldwide could be attributed to indoor air pollution. Approximately 1 million of these deaths occur in children aged under 5 years due to acute respiratory infections and significant proportions of deaths occur due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer in women. Today, indoor air pollution ranks tenth among preventable risk factors contributing to the global burden of disease. Further research is necessary to better evaluate the respiratory health effects of indoor pollution and to implement protective programmes for public health.

  2. Indoor air quality: a UK perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outdoor air quality has generally improved in the UK over the last 2 decades but during this period changing conditions within the home have tended to reduce ventilation and increase the opportunity for accumulation of undesirable levels of indoor air pollutants. Information obtained from laboratory and epidemiological studies suggest that indoor air pollutants are an important cause of avoidable morbidity and mortality in the UK. This paper reviews the major indoor air pollutants of concern in the UK and considers some of the special issues relevant to indoor environment. (author) 3 figs., 37 refs

  3. Finding dense locations in indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation, and guidance. Indoor tracking data can be very large and are not readily available for finding dense locations. This paper presents a graph-based model...... the mapping table, along with associated construction, query processing, and pruning techniques. The DLT-Index supports very efficient aggregate point queries, interval queries, and dense location queries. A comprehensive experimental study with real data shows that the proposed techniques can...... efficiently find dense locations in large amounts of indoor tracking data....

  4. Leveraging Spatial Model to Improve Indoor Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Xu, W.; Penard, W.; Zlatanova, S.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we leverage spatial model to process indoor localization results and then improve the track consisting of measured locations. We elaborate different parts of spatial model such as geometry, topology and semantics, and then present how they contribute to the processing of indoor tracks. The initial results of our experiment reveal that spatial model can support us to overcome problems such as tracks intersecting with obstacles and unstable shifts between two location measurements. In the future, we will investigate more exceptions of indoor tracking results and then develop additional spatial methods to reduce errors of indoor tracks.

  5. Individually Controlled Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    The thermal environment and inhaled air quality in buildings to which occupants are exposed has an effect on their health, comfort, performance and productivity. Heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) of buildings today is designed to provide a uniform environment. However, large...... individual differences in physiological and psychological response, clothing insulation, activity, preference for air temperature and movement, etc., exist between people. Environmental conditions acceptable for most of the occupants in buildings may be achieved by providing each occupant with the...

  6. Advances in indoor Location

    OpenAIRE

    Barceló, F.; Evennou, F.; De Nardis, L.; Tomé, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the research activities carried out within the scope of the Liaison project. Most of the work has been performed on WiFi location. WiFi is nowadays widely deployed in buildings such as hotels, hospitals, airports, train stations, public buildings, etc. Using this infrastructure to locate terminals connected to the wireless LAN is expected to have a low cost. Methods presented in this paper include fingerprinting and tracking through particle filter constrained on a Voronoi...

  7. A comparison of the virucidal properties of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, G R; Butler, M

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine were compared with chlorine as virucidal agents. Under optimal conditions all disinfectants were effective at low concentrations, but each disinfectant responded differently to acidity and alkalinity. Disinfection by chlorine was impaired by the presence of ammonia, but the other disinfectants retained much of their potency. Disinfection of poliovirus by iodine resulted in structural changes in the virions as seen by electron micrroscopy, but the ...

  8. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    OpenAIRE

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M. E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent formation of less desirable side-products. For example, mixtures of chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons are still formed as by-products in industrial processes such as the production of vinyl chlor...

  9. Formation of Chloroform and Other Chlorinated Byproducts by the Chlorination of Antibacterial Products

    OpenAIRE

    Fiss, Edward Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Triclosan is a widely used antibacterial agent found in many personal hygiene products. While it has been established that pure triclosan and free chlorine readily react, interactions between triclosan-containing products and free chlorine have not previously been analyzed. Sixteen double-blinded solutions including both triclosan-containing (1.14-3.12 mg triclosan/g product) and triclosan-free products were contacted with free chlorine. Products detected included (chlorophenoxy)phenols, ...

  10. Chlorine demand studies: a need for optimisation of chlorine doses for biofouling control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on chlorine demand, chlorine decay, rate of HOBr formation and speciation of chlorine residuals of cooling water from Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) were carried out. April to September was found to be a high demand period. The rate of reaction is faster and also initial demand is relatively high for this seawater as compared to other sea areas. Decay occurs in two phases, the first being instantaneous and the second being very slow. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  11. Combined toxicity effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton. Progress report, February 1, 1975--September 15, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J. H.; Goldman, J. C.

    1975-10-01

    Research on the combined effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton have been carried out for 7/sup 1///sub 2/ months. Continuous-flow bioassay units have been constructed for larval species, juvenile fish, and phytoplankton. A detailed study on lobster (Homarus americanus) larvae and other studies on killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) larvae and juveniles, and juvenile scup (Stenotomus versicolor) and winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) have been performed. Results to date indicate that there is an apparent and, as yet undetermined, chlorine demand of seawater; there is a differential toxic effect of chlorine and chloramines--lobsters were more sensitive to chloramines, whereas the fish species were more affected by free chlorine; respiration results indicate that significant stress occurs at toxicant levels below the onset of mortality, thus raising questions regarding the applicability of standard bioassay data; temperature elevation exerts a strong synergistic effect on chlorine-chloramine toxicity; and effects of exposure to halogen toxicity appear irreversible as revealed by persistent reductions in metabolic activity. It appears that chlorine toxicity to marine biota can occur even though chlorine residuals cannot be detected by current analytical techniques. These results support the findings of others that chlorine toxicity is a serious environmental pollutant. (auth)

  12. Chlorination of organic material in different soil types

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavsson, Malin

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that formation of chlorinated organic matter occurs naturally and that organic chlorine is as abundant as the chloride ion in organic soils. A large number of organisms are known to convert inorganic chloride (Clin) to organic chlorine (Clorg) (e.g. bacteria, lichen, fungi and algae) and some enzymes associated to these organisms are capable of chlorinating soil organic matter. The aim with the study was to compare organic matter chlorination rates in soils from several dif...

  13. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  14. Smartphone-Based Indoor Pedestrian Tracking Using Geo-Magnetic Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Sungnam Lee; Yohan Chon; Hojung Cha

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread use of smartphones, the use of location-based services (LBS) with smartphones has become an active research issue. The accurate measurement of user location is necessary to provide LBS. While outdoor locations are easily obtained with GPS, indoor location information is difficult to acquire. Previous work on indoor location tracking systems often relied on infrastructures that are influenced by environmental changes and temporal differences. Several studies have proposed i...

  15. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear reactor, 35Cl present as an impurity in the nuclear fuel is activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of the nuclear fuel, 36Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute significantly to the 'instant release fraction'. In order to elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This paper deals with the thermal diffusion of chlorine in depleted UO2. For this purpose, sintered UO2 pellets were implanted with 37Cl at an ion fluence of 1013cm-2 and successively annealed in the 1175-1475K temperature range. The implanted chlorine is used to simulate the behaviour of the displaced one due to recoil and to interactions with the fission fragments during reactor operation. The behaviour of the pristine and the implanted chlorine was investigated during thermal annealing. SIMS and μ-XAS (at the Cl-K edge) analyses show that: (1) the thermal migration of implanted chlorine becomes significant at 1275K; this temperature and the calculated activation energy of 4.3eV points out the great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO2 at relatively low temperatures; (2) the behaviour of the implanted chlorine which aggregates into 'hot spots' during annealing before its effusion is clearly different from that of the pristine one which remains homogenously distributed after annealing; (3) the 'hot spot' and the pristine chlorine seem to be in different structural environments. Both types of chlorine are assumed to have a valence state of -I; (4) the comparison between an U2O2Cl5 reference compound and the pristine chlorine environment shows a contribution of the U2O2Cl5 to the pristine chlorine

  16. 杀虫剂复配对小菜蛾幼虫的室内毒力测定%Toxicity Determination of Compound Pesticides on Indoor Activity of Plutella xylostella Larvae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程英; 金剑雪; 李忠英; 李凤良

    2011-01-01

    The indoor activity of 4th P. Xylosiella larvae treated with different compound pesticides was determined to discuss the effect of compound pesticides on contact toxicity of P. Xylostella larvae. The results showed that trichlorfon and emamectin benzoate mixture and fipronil and cypermethrin mixture both had synergistic effect on contact toxicity of P. Xylostella larvae. Hexaflumuron and emamectin benzoate (10 : 1) mixture, diflubenzuron and emamectin benzoate (5 : 1) and diflubenzuron and bifenthrin (I'D mixture all had synergistic effect on contact toxicity of P. Xylostella larvae. Hexaflumuron and chlorpyrifos mixture had antagonism effect on contact toxicity of P. Xylostella larvae.%为了探讨杀虫剂复配对小菜蛾幼虫的触杀效果,用几种杀虫剂按不同比例二元复配,对小菜蛾4龄幼虫的室内毒力进行了测定.结果表明,敌百虫与甲维盐和氟虫腈与高效氯氰菊酯复配对小菜蛾幼虫都表现为增效作用,氟铃脲与甲维盐、灭幼脲与甲维盐、灭幼脲与联苯菊酯的复配比分别为10:1、5:1和1:1,对小菜蛾幼虫表现为增效作用,氟铃脲与毒死蜱复配表现为拮抗作用.

  17. Study of Fungal Contamination of Indoor Public Swimming Pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Nanbakhsh

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are found in different environments with variable distribution patterns depending on various factors. The aim of this study was determination of fungal contaminants in public swimming pools in Uromia, Iran. The fungal contaminations of four indoor swimming pools were studied by using membrane filtration and swab sampling method. Samples were collected by a manual plastic pump, in a 200 ml sterilized bottle. All samples were collected within 2 hours and then transferred to the laboratory. A total of 384 samples including water and environmental surfaces were collected and tested for the presence of fungi in different seasons within one year. In addition to the above information, some physical and chemical parameters such as temperature, residual chlorine, pH, turbidity of water and the number of swimmers were studied. Findings indicated that, the average temperature, pH, residual chlorine and turbidity of water in the swimming pools within one year were: 29.9°C, 8.1, 0.6 ppm and 0.8 NTU respectively. The most common fungi recovered were as follows: Asepergillus Spp. 56.25%, Candida spp. 22.9%, Rhizopus spp. 4.16 %, other filamentous fungi 16.6% and other yeast species 2.8%. The fungi such as Alternaria, Cladosporium, Philophora and Trichophyton mentagrophytis were isolated from dressing room, bathing room and other places out of pools. According to these results and previous studies on pools, it has been indicated that contamination by fungi in the pools is not significant in water and environment. Presence of dermatophytic fungus from dressing room is probably due to human contact.

  18. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Radiolytic removal of trihalomethane in chlorinated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling is one of the major operational problems in seawater cooling systems. It is controlled by application of chlorine based biocides in the range of 0.5-2.0 mg L-1. The bromide in seawater reacts with the added chlorine and forms hypobromous acid. The brominated residual biocides react with natural organic matter present in the seawater, resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) such as bromoform (CHBr3), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl) bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2). Though THMs represent a small fraction of the added chlorine, they are relatively more persistent than residual chlorine, and hence pose a potential hazard to marine life because of their reported mutagenicity. There have been few reports on removal of THMs from chlorinated seawater. In this work, the efficacy of gamma irradiation technique for the removal of THMs from chlorine-dosed seawater was investigated. Experiments were carried out using seawater collected from Kalpakkam. Irradiation study was conducted in chlorinated (1, 3, and 5 mg L-1 of Cl2) seawater by applying various dosages (0.4-5.0 kGy) of gamma radiation using a 60Co Gamma Chamber 5000. Bromoform showed a faster rate of degradation as compared to other halocarbons like bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane. This shows the change in total THM concentration with variation in the radiation dose and initial Cl2 dosing. When the percentage degradation of all the three trihalomethane species was compared with applied doses, it was found that the maximum reduction occurred at a dose of 2.5 kGy. The reduction was almost similar for all the three doses (1, 3, 5 ppm of Cl2) used for chlorination. With a further increase in radiation dose to 5.0 kGy, a slight increase in reduction was observed

  20. Position, Location, Place and Area: AN Indoor Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithole, George; Zlatanova, Sisi

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, harnessing the commercial potential of smart mobile devices in indoor environments has spurred interest in indoor mapping and navigation. Users experience indoor environments differently. For this reason navigational models have to be designed to adapt to a user's personality, and to reflect as many cognitive maps as possible. This paper presents an extension of a previously proposed framework. In this extension the notion of placement is accounted for, thereby enabling one aspect of the `personalised indoor experience'. In the paper, firstly referential expressions are used as a tool to discuss the different ways of thinking of placement within indoor spaces. Next, placement is expressed in terms of the concept of Position, Location, Place and Area. Finally, the previously proposed framework is extended to include these concepts of placement. An example is provided of the use of the extended framework. Notable characteristics of the framework are: (1) Sub-spaces, resources and agents can simultaneously possess different types of placement, e.g., a person in a room can have an xyz position and a location defined by the room number. While these entities can simultaneously have different forms of placement, only one is dominant. (2) Sub-spaces, resources and agents are capable of possessing modifiers that alter their access and usage. (3) Sub-spaces inherit the modifiers of the resources or agents contained in them. (4) Unlike conventional navigational models which treat resources and obstacles as different types of entities, in the proposed framework there are only resources and whether a resource is an obstacle is determined by a modifier that determines whether a user can access the resource. The power of the framework is that it blends the geometry and topology of space, the influence of human activity within sub-spaces together with the different notions of placement in a way that is simple and yet very flexible.

  1. Effect of silica fume addition on the PGNAA measurement of chlorine in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; Garwan, M A; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B; Raashid, M; Khateeb-ur-Rehman

    2010-03-01

    Pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash (FA), silica fume (SF), and blast furnace slag (BFS) are added to Portland cement in concrete to prevent reinforcement steel corrosion in concrete. Further preventive measure against reinforcement steel corrosion require monitoring of chloride salts concentration in concrete using non-destructive techniques, such as the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique. Due to interferences between gamma-rays from chlorine and calcium in PGNAA technique, detection limit of chlorine in concrete strongly depends upon calcium concentration in concrete. SF mainly contains silica and its addition to cement concrete reduces overall concentration of calcium in concrete. This may result in an improvement in detection limit of chlorine in SF-based concrete in PGNAA studies. Particularly for chlorine detection using 6.11 and 6.62 MeV prompt gamma-rays that strongly interfere with 6.42 MeV prompt gamma-rays from calcium. In this study, SF was added to Portland cement to prevent concrete reinforcement steel from corrosion. The chlorine concentration in SF cement concrete specimens containing 0.2-3.0 wt% chlorine was measured through yield of 1.16, 1.95, 6.11, 6.62, 7.41, 7.79, and 8.58 MeV chlorine gamma-rays using PGNAA technique. An excellent agreement was noted between the experimental yield of the prompt gamma-rays and the gamma-ray yield calculated through the Monte Carlo simulations. Further the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of chlorine in SF cement concrete was calculated and compared with the MDC values of chlorine in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement. The MDC of chlorine in SF-based concrete through 6.11 MeV, and 6.62 MeV chlorine gamma-rays was found to be improved as compared to those in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement. PMID:20042342

  2. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics on building construction floor area from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, the total floor area of building construction started in Japan in 2007 was 160,991 thousand square meters, or 14.8% less than the area of the previous year, and the reduction was the first reduction in the past five years. The office markets in Tokyo and Nagoya were active, as represented by the supplies of skyscrapers, and energy saving measures, such as the adoption of high efficiency lighting equipment, the control for initial stage illuminance, daylight harvesting, and the use of occupancy sensors, were well established. In the field of public construction, including museums, multi-purpose halls, and religious buildings, the total area of the new construction was 10.8% less than the total for the previous year, and this reduction was a continuation of an eleven-year trend. In spaces with high ceiling, the innovation for easy replacement of light sources used with reflection mirror systems and optical fibers was noted. Hospitals adapted to the expectation for improved services in their selection of lighting facilities to improve the residential environment for patients while taking into consideration the needs of the aging population, by their use of devices in corridors to help maintain a continuity of light. In libraries, a pendant system was developed to illuminate both ceilings and book shelves. In the field of theaters and halls, the time limit for repairing existing systems had come for the large facilities that were opened during the theater and hall construction boom of the 1960s through 1980s, and around 26 renovations were done. Almost all the renovations were conversions to intelligent dimming systems and lighting control desks. In the field of stores and commercial facilities, the atmosphere and glitter of the selling floor was produced by new light sources, such as ceramic metal halide lamps and LEDs, which have high

  3. Halogenated volatile organic compounds from the use of chlorine-bleach-containing household products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Mustafa

    2008-03-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and many organic chemicals contained in household cleaning products may react to generate halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Halogenated VOC emissions from eight different chlorine bleach containing household products (pure and diluted) were investigated by headspace experiments. Chloroform and carbon tetrachloride were the leading compounds along with several halogenated compounds in the headspace of chlorine bleach products. One of the most surprising results was the presence of carbon tetrachloride (a probable human carcinogen and a powerful greenhouse gas that was banned for household use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration) in very high concentrations (up to 101 mg m(-3)). By mixing surfactants or soap with NaOCl, it was shown that the formation of carbon tetrachloride and several other halogenated VOCs is possible. In addition to quantitatively determined halogenated VOCs (n = 15), several nitrogen-containing (n = 4), chlorinated (n = 10), oxygenated compounds (n = 22), and hydrocarbons (n = 14) were identified in the headspace of bleach products. Among these, 1,1-dichlorobutane and 2-chloro-2-nitropropane were the most abundant chlorinated VOCs, whereas trichloronitromethane and hexachloroethane were the most frequently detected ones. Indoor air halogenated VOC concentrations resulting from the use of four selected household products were also measured before, during, and 30 min after bathroom, kitchen, and floor cleaning applications. Chloroform (2.9-24.6 microg m(-3)) and carbon tetrachloride (0.25-459 microg m(-3)) concentrations significantly increased during the use of bleach containing products. During/ before concentration ratios ranged between 8 and 52 (25 +/- 14, average +/- SD) for chloroform and 1-1170 (146 +/- 367, average +/- SD) for carbon tetrachloride, respectively. These results indicated that the bleach use can be important in terms of inhalation exposure to carbon tetrachloride, chloroform and

  4. Manganese chlorins immobilized on silica as oxidation reaction catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Kelly A D F; Pires, Sónia M G; Ribeiro, Marcos A; Simões, Mário M Q; Neves, M Graça P M S; Schreiner, Wido H; Wypych, Fernando; Cavaleiro, José A S; Nakagaki, Shirley

    2015-07-15

    Synthetic strategies that comply with the principles of green chemistry represent a challenge: they will enable chemists to conduct reactions that maximize the yield of products with commercial interest while minimizing by-products formation. The search for catalysts that promote the selective oxidation of organic compounds under mild and environmentally friendly conditions constitutes one of the most important quests of organic chemistry. In this context, metalloporphyrins and analogues are excellent catalysts for oxidative transformations under mild conditions. In fact, their reduced derivatives chlorins are also able to catalyze organic compounds oxidation effectively, although they have been still little explored. In this study, we synthesized two chlorins through porphyrin cycloaddition reactions with 1.3-dipoles and prepared the corresponding manganese chlorins (MnCHL) using adequate manganese(II) salts. These MnCHL were posteriorly immobilized on silica by following the sol-gel process and the resulting solids were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UVVIS spectroscopy, FTIR, XPS, and EDS. The catalytic activity of the immobilized MnCHL was investigated in the oxidation of cyclooctene, cyclohexene and cyclohexane and the results were compared with the ones obtained under homogeneous conditions. PMID:25841060

  5. Passive sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in indoor air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Mayer, Philipp

    PCBs were widely used in construction materials in the 1906s and 1970s, a period of high building activity in Denmark. The objective of this study was therefore to use passive sampling techniques to develop a simple and cost-effective screening tool for PCBs in indoor air. The study proceeded in...... three phases combining a literature review, laboratory experiments and measurements in buildings potentially containing PCBs in indoor air. The laboratory experiments showed a strong influence of air velocity on the PCB partitioning between air and the passive sampler. Based on the results of the first...... two phases and comments from experts in the field of PCB containing construction materials, a kinetic sampler (petri dish with silicone) and a potential equilibrium sampler (silicone-coated paper) were tested in buildings. Calibration and validation were based on conventional active sampling, for both...

  6. [Acoustic discomfort in non-industrial indoor environments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianniello, C; Marciano, E

    2004-01-01

    The number of working activities carried out in non-industrial indoor environments that can cause acoustic discomfort is so high that it is impossible to deal with all of them here satisfactorily. Therefore, following a briefing discussion of the known effects of noise on man, this paper will review the current legislation regarding the prevention of occupational noise effects in our country today (D.Lgs. 15 Agosto 1991, N. 277), in the light of important changes introduced by the EU directive 2003/10/CE. Finally we will discuss the problems deriving from exposure to noise on subjects working in offices, in schools, in indoor environments for leisure time activities, and in the performance of professional music. PMID:15584449

  7. Comparing AAL indoor localization systems

    OpenAIRE

    Barsocchi, Paolo; Potort?, Francesco; Furfari, Francesco; Medrano Gil, Alejandro M.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) systems is challenging due to the complexity and variety of solutions adopted and services offered. EvAAL is an international competition aimed to address this problem by evaluating and assessing the AAL systems components, services and platforms. In 2011 took place the first edition of EvAAL on the special theme of Indoor Localization and Tracking for AAL. This paper describes the technical aspects of the first edition of EvAAL and draws a roadmap for...

  8. Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for Pennsylvania Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Robert S., Jr.

    This report provides information and practical guidance on how to prevent indoor air quality (IAQ) problems in schools, and it describes how to implement a practical plan of action using a minimal amount of resources. It includes general guidelines to prevent or help resolve IAQ problems, guidelines on specific indoor contaminants, recommendations…

  9. Photostability of different chlorine photosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report the photodegradation of three different chlorine photosensitizers (Photoditazine®, Radachlorin®, and Foscan®). The photosensitizer degradation was analyzed by changes in the fluorescence spectrum during illumination. The rate of fluorescence variation was normalized to the solution absorption and the photon energy resulting in the determination of the necessary number of photons to be absorbed to induce photosensitizer photodegradation. The parameter for rate of the molecules decay, the photon fluence rate and optical properties of the solution allow us to determine the photosensitizer stability in solution during illumination. The results show that the order of susceptibility for photodegradation rate is: Radachlorin® < Photoditazine® < Foscan®. This difference in the photodegradation rate for Foscan can be explained by the high proportion of aggregates in solution that inhibit the photo-oxidative process that impede the singlet oxygen formation. We hypothesize that there is a correlation between photodegradation rate and photodynamic efficacy witch is governed by the singlet oxygen formation responsible for the most relevant reaction of the cell death photodynamic induction. Then its is important to know the photostability of different types of drugs since the photodegradation rate, the photodegradation as well as the photodynamic efficacy are strong correlated to the oxygen concentration in the tissue

  10. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maas, Z G; Hinkle, K

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H$^{35}$Cl at 3.69851 $\\mu$m. The high resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m telescope. The average [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with --0.72$<$[Fe/H]$<$0.20 is [$^{35}$Cl/Fe]=(--0.10$\\pm$0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16$\\pm$0.15) dex. The [$^{35}$Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of $\\sim$0.35 dex above model predictions suggesting chemical evolution models are under producing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and \\ion{H}{2} regions. In one star where both H$^{35}$Cl a...

  11. SCENARIOS EVALUATION TOOL FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENT MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell

    2006-08-16

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  12. Indoor location for safety application using wireless networks

    OpenAIRE

    Barceló-Arroyo, F.; Ciurana, M.; Watt, I; F. Evenou; De Nardis, L.; Tomé, P

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the indoor positioning research activities carried out within the scope of the Liaison project. Most of the work has been performed on WiFi location. WiFi is nowadays widely deployed in buildings such as hotels, hospitals, airports, train stations, public buildings, etc. Using this infrastructure to locate terminals connected to the wireless LAN is expected to have a low cost. Methods presented in this paper include fingerprinting with particle filter constrained on a Voro...

  13. Phytoscreening of BTEX and chlorinated solvents by tree coring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Broholm, Mette Martina; Trapp, Stefan;

    chlorinated solvents. The method was applied at various European sites contaminated with PCE/TCE or BTEXs due to former site activities (industrial production, gas stations, air base or gas plant). Tree core samples were collected in fall 2013 and analyzed by HS-GC/MS. Results were used to map the plume...... level in the subsurface and plumes may be mapped. Various plants can be used for phytoscreening, however trees are preferable to smaller plants as their large root system can absorb chemicals from a broader and deeper area. Approach/Activities. In this study tree coring is tested for fuel components and...

  14. Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economicbenefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

    2007-06-01

    This paper summarizes the current scientific evidence that improved indoor environmental quality can improve work performance and health. The review indicates that work and school work performance is affected by indoor temperature and ventilation rate. Pollutant source removal can sometimes improve work performance. Based on formal statistical analyses of existing research results, quantitative relationships are provided for the linkages of work performance with indoor temperature and outdoor air ventilation rate. The review also indicates that improved health and related financial savings are obtainable from reduced indoor tobacco smoking, prevention and remediation of building dampness, and increased ventilation. Example cost-benefit analyses indicate that many measures to improve indoor temperature control and increase ventilation rates will be highly cost effective, with benefit-cost ratios as high as 80 and annual economic benefits as high as $700 per person.

  15. Accurate estimation of indoor travel times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentow, Thor Siiger; Blunck, Henrik; Stisen, Allan;

    2014-01-01

    the InTraTime method for accurately estimating indoor travel times via mining of historical and real-time indoor position traces. The method learns during operation both travel routes, travel times and their respective likelihood---both for routes traveled as well as for sub-routes thereof. InTraTime...... allows to specify temporal and other query parameters, such as time-of-day, day-of-week or the identity of the traveling individual. As input the method is designed to take generic position traces and is thus interoperable with a variety of indoor positioning systems. The method's advantages include...... a minimal-effort setup and self-improving operations due to unsupervised learning---as it is able to adapt implicitly to factors influencing indoor travel times such as elevators, rotating doors or changes in building layout. We evaluate and compare the proposed InTraTime method to indoor adaptions...

  16. Spatial Database Modeling for Indoor Navigation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlib, Dariusz; Gnat, Miłosz

    2013-12-01

    For many years, cartographers are involved in designing GIS and navigation systems. Most GIS applications use the outdoor data. Increasingly, similar applications are used inside buildings. Therefore it is important to find the proper model of indoor spatial database. The development of indoor navigation systems should utilize advanced teleinformation, geoinformatics, geodetic and cartographical knowledge. The authors present the fundamental requirements for the indoor data model for navigation purposes. Presenting some of the solutions adopted in the world they emphasize that navigation applications require specific data to present the navigation routes in the right way. There is presented original solution for indoor data model created by authors on the basis of BISDM model. Its purpose is to expand the opportunities for use in indoor navigation.

  17. Indoor climate in the 21th century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field studies have shown that in many buildings there are people who are annoyed by poor indoor climate even if the buildings satisfy all standards and guidelines. This is because the present requirements are quite mild. A shift of paradigm is foreseen to take place in the 21th century - from a mediocre to an excellent indoor climate. The article proposes five principles as elements of a new philosophy about the optimum indoor climate: (1) Improved indoor air quality increases productivity and decreases sick building syndrome symptoms, (2) Unnecessary indoor pollution sources should be avoided, (3) The air should be served cool and dry to the occupants, (4) Personalized air, that is, a small amount of clean air, should be served gently, close to the breathing zone of each person, (5) Individual control of the thermal environment should be provided. The principles are compatible with energy efficiency and sustainability

  18. Characterizing the source of radon indoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  19. Identifying Typical Movements Among Indoor Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radaelli, Laura; Sabonis, Dovydas; Lu, Hua; Jensen, Christian S.

    With the proliferation of mobile computing, positioning systems are becoming available that enable indoor location-based services. As a result, indoor tracking data is also becoming available. This paper puts focus on one use of such data, namely the identification of typical movement patterns...... among indoor moving objects. Specifically, the paper presents a method for the identification of movement patterns. Leveraging concepts from sequential pattern mining, the method takes into account the specifics of spatial movement and, in particular, the specifics of tracking data that captures indoor...... movement. For example, the paper’s proposal supports spatial aggregation and utilizes the topology of indoor spaces to achieve better performance. The paper reports on empirical studies with real and synthetic data that offer insights into the functional and computational aspects of its proposal....

  20. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of landfills as an in situ biological treatment system represents an alternative for source area remediation with a significant cost saving. The specific objective of this research is to investigate the intrinsic bioattenuation capacity of the landfill ecosystem for chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The research was conducted in two complementary systems: simulated landfill bioreactors and batch degradation experiment in serum bottles. Refuse samples excavated from a landfill were tested in laboratory bioreactors designed and operated to facilitate refuse decomposition under landfilling conditions. Each bioreactor was operated with leachate recirculation and gas collection. Target CAHs, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), were added to selected reactors and maintained at 20 μM each in leachate to simulate the effect of long-term exposure of refuse microorganisms to CAHs on the degradation potential of these chemicals in landfills. At two different stages of refuse decomposition, active refuse decomposition representing young landfills and maturation phase representing aged landfills, anaerobic microbial cultures were derived from selected bioreactors and tested in serum bottles for their abilities to biodegrade target CAHs. Results of this study suggest that landfills have an intrinsic reductive dechlorination capacity for PCE and TCE. The decomposition of refuse, a source of complex organics, enhances reductive dechlorination by the refuse cultures tested in this study. In addition, the test results suggest that it may be possible to develop engineering strategies to promote both CAHs degradation and refuse decomposition in landfills. (author)

  1. An experimental method for quantitatively evaluating the elemental processes of indoor radioactive aerosol behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental method for quantitatively evaluating the elemental processes governing the indoor behaviour of naturally occurring radioactive aerosols was proposed. This method utilises transient response of aerosol concentrations to an artificial change in aerosol removal rate by turning on and off an air purifier. It was shown that the indoor-outdoor exchange rate and the indoor deposition rate could be estimated by a continuous measurement of outdoor and indoor aerosol number concentration measurements and by the method proposed in this study. Although the scatter of the estimated parameters is relatively large, both the methods gave consistent results. It was also found that the size distribution of radioactive aerosol particles and hence activity median aerodynamic diameter remained not largely affected by the operation of the air purifier, implying the predominance of the exchange and deposition processes over other processes causing change in the size distribution such as the size growth by coagulation and the size dependence of deposition. (authors)

  2. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in indoor and outdoor air in a community in Guangzhou, a megacity of southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nan; Wang, Tao; Chen, She-Jun; Yu, Mei; Zhu, Zhi-Cheng; Tian, Mi; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-05-01

    Indoor environments contribute a significant portion of human exposure to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) because of their extensive use in various household products. This study investigates the occurrence of a number of BFRs in the indoor and outdoor air in a megacity in southern China, in which little information on indoor BFRs contamination is available. The estimated total PBDE concentrations ranged from 1.43 to 57 pg/m(3) indoors and from 1.21 to 1522 pg/m(3) outdoors. The indoor concentrations of lower brominated PBDEs that are mainly derived from the technical penta- and octa-BDE mixtures were higher than or comparable to the outdoors, while the indoor levels of DecaBDEs and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were apparently lower than the outdoors. The seasonal variations of BFR concentrations indicated that evaporation from old indoor products is the primary source of Penta- and OctaBDEs in the air, whereas most DecaBDEs and DBDPE concentrations showing weak temperature-dependence are largely released from industrial activities. The PBDE congener profiles in the air were generally similar, which were dominated by BDE209, 28, and 47; whereas the appreciable indoor-outdoor differences in the compositions are possibly due to emission sources, photochemical degradation, or congener-specific transport of BFRs in the indoor and outdoor air. Significant correlations between the indoor and outdoor BFRs were observed suggesting the exchange of BFRs between the two compartments, which are more noticeable for PentaBDEs and DecaBDEs with strong indoor and outdoor emission sources, respectively. This study provides significant insights into the sources of BFRs in urban air in China. PMID:26952274

  3. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection. PMID:23591108

  4. Indoor radon and childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises the epidemiological literature on domestic exposure to radon and risk for childhood leukaemia. The results of 12 ecological studies show a consistent pattern of higher incidence and mortality rates for childhood leukaemia in areas with higher average indoor radon concentrations. Although the results of such studies are useful to generate hypotheses, they must be interpreted with caution, as the data were aggregated and analysed for geographical areas and not for individuals. The seven available case - control studies of childhood leukaemia with measurement of radon concentrations in the residences of cases and controls gave mixed results, however, with some indication of a weak (relative risk < 2) association with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The epidemiological evidence to date suggests that an association between indoor exposure to radon and childhood leukaemia might exist, but is weak. More case - control studies are needed, with sufficient statistical power to detect weak associations and based on designs and methods that minimise misclassification of exposure and provide a high participation rate and low potential selection bias. (authors)

  5. Indoor radon in Tunisian spas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in four well-known spas of Tunisia using nuclear track detectors. The radon concentrations in these spas were found to be in the range of 19 - 870 Bq.m-3. The equilibrium factor F between radon and its progeny was found to vary in the range of 0.2 - 0.5, depending upon the ventilation rates within the buildings of the spas. Using the exposure-dose conversion factor, the effective doses to patients and workers were estimated and the dose was found to vary in the range 3.7 x 10-3 - 12.5 x 10-3 mSv.y-1 and 0.45 - 1.5 mSv.y-1 for patients and workers, respectively. These values are well inside the limit recommended for the annual dose limit of 20 mSv.y-1 for an occupational worker. The radium content in the groundwater of all four spas was measured and the results showed no correlation between the 226Ra concentration in water and radon concentration in indoor air of the investigated spas. (authors)

  6. Determination of intrinsic kinetics parameters for MoO{sub 3} chlorination with Cl{sub 2} gas between 798 and 873 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Micco, G., E-mail: demiccog@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (C.N.E.A.), Avenida Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Instituto Balseiro, Avenida Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Carignan, M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (C.N.E.A.), Avenida Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Canavesio, C.A. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Bohe, A.E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (C.N.E.A.), Avenida Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Centro Regional Universitario Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetics of chlorination of MoO{sub 3} was studied by thermogravimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The starting temperature for the reaction is determined at about 770 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An average activation energy of 211 kJ mol{sup -1} for the chlorination was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reaction order of 1 with respect to chlorine partial pressure was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A complete reaction rate equation was formulated for two MoO{sub 3} sample morphologies. - Abstract: In this work the kinetics of the chlorination of molybdenum trioxide has been studied by thermogravimetry between 798 and 873 K. The starting temperature for the reaction of MoO{sub 3} with chlorine is determined at about 770 K. The influence of gaseous flow rate, sample mass, temperature, and chlorine partial pressure in the reaction rate is analyzed for two MoO{sub 3} samples having different particle size and morphology. The experimental conditions for chemical control of the reaction rate were established for both types of samples. An average activation energy of 211 kJ mol{sup -1} and a reaction order of 1 with respect to chlorine partial pressure were determined for the chlorination of MoO{sub 3} with gaseous chlorine. A complete rate equation was formulated that describes the reaction evolution of each type of solid.

  7. Indoor air quality issues related to the acquisition of conservation in commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, M.C.; Hadley, D.L.; Marseille, T.J.

    1990-09-01

    The quality of indoor air in commercial buildings is dependent on the complex interaction between sources of indoor pollutants, environmental factors within buildings such as temperature and humidity, the removal of air pollutants by air-cleaning devices, and the removal and dilution of pollutants from outside air. To the extent that energy conservation measures (ECMs) may affect a number of these factors, the relationship between ECMs and indoor air quality is difficult to predict. Energy conservation measures may affect pollutant levels in other ways. Conservation measures, such as caulking and insulation, may introduce sources of indoor pollutants. Measures that reduce mechanical ventilation may allow pollutants to build up inside structures. Finally, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may provide surface areas for the growth of biogenic agents, or may encourage the dissemination of pollutants throughout a building. Information about indoor air quality and ventilation in both new and existing commercial buildings is summarized in this report. Sick building syndrome and specific pollutants are discussed, as are broader issues such as ventilation, general mitigation techniques, and the interaction between energy conservation activities and indoor air quality. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this review to aid the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in its assessment of potential environmental effects resulting from conservation activities in commercial buildings. 76 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

  8. Characterization of indoor aerosol temporal variations for the real-time management of indoor air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuzas, Darius; Prasauskas, Tadas; Krugly, Edvinas; Sidaraviciute, Ruta; Jurelionis, Andrius; Seduikyte, Lina; Kauneliene, Violeta; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2015-10-01

    The study presents the characterization of dynamic patterns of indoor particulate matter (PM) during various pollution episodes for real-time IAQ management. The variation of PM concentrations was assessed for 20 indoor activities, including cooking related sources, other thermal sources, personal care and household products. The pollution episodes were modelled in full-scale test chamber representing a standard usual living room with the forced ventilation of 0.5 h-1. In most of the pollution episodes, the maximum concentration of particles in exhaust air was reached within a few minutes. The most rapid increase in particle concentration was during thermal source episodes such as candle, cigarette, incense stick burning and cooking related sources, while the slowest decay of concentrations was associated with sources, emitting ultrafine particle precursors, such as furniture polisher spraying, floor wet mopping with detergent etc. Placement of the particle sensors in the ventilation exhaust vs. in the centre of the ceiling yielded comparable results for both measured maximum concentrations and temporal variations, indicating that both locations were suitable for the placement of sensors for the management of IAQ. The obtained data provides information that may be utilized considering measurements of aerosol particles as indicators for the real-time management of IAQ.

  9. Determining indoor air quality and identifying the origin of odour episodes in indoor environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Gallego; Xavier Roca; Jose Francisco Perales; Xavier Guardino

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for identifying volatile organic compounds (VOC) and determining air quality of indoor air has been developed. The air samples are collected using pump samplers by the inhabitants when they perceive odorous and/or discomfort episodes. Glass multi-sorbent tubes are connected to the pump samplers for the retention of VOC. The analysis is performed by automatic thermal desorption (ATD) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This methodology can be applied in cases of sick building syndrome (SBS) evaluation, in which building occupants experience a series of varied symptoms that appear to be linked to time spent in the building. Chemical pollutants concentrations (e.g., VOC) have been described to contribute to SBS. To exemplify the methodology, a qualitative determination and an evaluation of VOC present were performed in a dwelling where the occupants experienced the SBS symptoms. Higher total VOC (TVOC) value was detected in episodes in indoor air (1.33 ( 1.53 mg/m3) compared to outdoor air (0.71 ( 0.46 mg/m3). The concentrations of individual VOCs, such as ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, 1-butanol, acetic acid, acetonitrile and 1-metoxy-2-propanol, were also higher than the expected for a standard dwelling. The external source of VOC was found to be a not declared activity of storage and manipulation of solvents located at the bottom of a contiguous building.

  10. Influencing factors and degradation products of antipyrine chlorination in water with free chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiquan Cai; Liqiu Zhang; Fei Qi; Li Feng

    2013-01-01

    Owing to its low cost,free chlorine is one of the most common disinfectants for wastewater and drinking water treatment.However,the formation of disinfection byproducts has been found to occur after free chlorine disinfection in recent decades.Antipyrine (ANT),an anti-inflammatory analgesic,has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment.In this work.the removal efficiency of ANT by free chlorine oxidation in ultrapure water was investigated with batch experiments.The influencing factors on the removal of ANT were explored at initial concentrations of ANT from 0.04 to 0.64 mg/L,free chlorine dosage from 0.30 to 1.31 mg/L,and pH from 1.5 to 9.0.The main degradation products were identified by solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.The results showed that ANT reacted rapidly with free chlorine in ultrapure water systems and up to 90.6% removal efficiency of ANT was achieved after 25 sec (initial free chlorine 1 mg/L,ANT 0.5 mg/L,pH 7.0).Higher oxidant dosage,lower ANT initial concentration and low pH favor the ANT removal.The main degradation product in ANT chlorination was a monochlorine substitution product (4-chloro-l,2-dihydro1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-one),which can be further chlorinated by free chlorine.In addition,the total organic carbon result indicated that ANT is difficult to be mineralized using chlorine.

  11. JV Task 86 - Identifying the Source of Benzene in Indoor Air Using Different Compound Classes from TO-15 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2007-04-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) data that had already been collected using EPA method TO-15 at four different sites under regulatory scrutiny (a school, strip mall, apartment complex, and business/residential neighborhood) were evaluated to determine whether the source of indoor air benzene was outdoor air or vapor intrusion from contaminated soil. Both the use of tracer organics characteristic of different sources and principal component statistical analysis demonstrated that the source of indoor air at virtually all indoor sampling locations was a result of outdoor air, and not contaminated soil in and near the indoor air-sampling locations. These results show that proposed remediation activities to remove benzene-contaminated soil are highly unlikely to reduce indoor air benzene concentrations. A manuscript describing these results is presently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

  12. 3.6. Chlorination of alumina containing waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination of alumina containing waste products is considered in this article. Based on conducted studies following optimal conditions of chlorination of alumina containing waste products with reducer - coal were found: temperature - 750-850 deg C, chlorination duration -1-1,5 hours, quantity of reducer - 30% and size of particles - 0,1 mm. Based on conducted studies following optimal conditions of chlorination of alumina containing waste products with reducer - natural gas were found: temperature - 650-750 deg C, chlorination duration - 2 hours, chlorine to methane ratio is 4:1 and size of particles - 0,2-0,3 mm.

  13. Indoor air-assessment: Indoor concentrations of environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the report, indoor concentration data are presented for the following general categories of air pollutants: radon-222, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), asbestos, gas phase organic compounds, formaldehyde, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pesticides, and inorganic compounds. These pollutants are either known or suspect carcinogens (i.e., radon-222, asbestos) or more complex mixtures or classes of compounds which contain known or suspect carcinogens. Concentration data for individual carcinogenic compounds in complex mixtures are usually far from complete. The data presented for complex mixtures often include compounds which are not carcinogenic or for which data are insufficient to evaluate carcinogenicity. Their inclusion is justified, however, by the possibility that further work may show them to be carcinogens, cocarcinogens, initiators or promotors, or that they may be employed as markers (e.g., nicotine, acrolein) for the estimation of exposure to complex mixtures

  14. Prediction of Indoor Air Exposure from Outdoor Air Quality Using an Artificial Neural Network Model for Inner City Commercial Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avril Challoner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available NO2 and particulate matter are the air pollutants of most concern in Ireland, with possible links to the higher respiratory and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity rates found in the country compared to the rest of Europe. Currently, air quality limits in Europe only cover outdoor environments yet the quality of indoor air is an essential determinant of a person’s well-being, especially since the average person spends more than 90% of their time indoors. The modelling conducted in this research aims to provide a framework for epidemiological studies by the use of publically available data from fixed outdoor monitoring stations to predict indoor air quality more accurately. Predictions are made using two modelling techniques, the Personal-exposure Activity Location Model (PALM, to predict outdoor air quality at a particular building, and Artificial Neural Networks, to model the indoor/outdoor relationship of the building. This joint approach has been used to predict indoor air concentrations for three inner city commercial buildings in Dublin, where parallel indoor and outdoor diurnal monitoring had been carried out on site. This modelling methodology has been shown to provide reasonable predictions of average NO2 indoor air quality compared to the monitored data, but did not perform well in the prediction of indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Hence, this approach could be used to determine NO2 exposures more rigorously of those who work and/or live in the city centre, which can then be linked to potential health impacts.

  15. Derivation of a radionuclide inventory for irradiated graphite-chlorine-36 inventory determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation of materials in nuclear reactors results in neutron activation of component elements. Irradiated graphite wastes arise from their use in UK gas-cooled research and commercial reactor cores, and in fuel element components, where the graphite has acted as the neutron moderator. During irradiation the residual chlorine, which was used to purify the graphite during manufacture, is activated to chlorine-36. This isotope is long-lived and poorly retarded by geological barriers, and may therefore be a key radionuclide with respect to post-closure disposal facilities performance. United Kingdom Nirex Limited, currently responsible for the development of a disposal route for intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK, carried out a major research programme to support an overall assessment of the chlorine-36 activity of all wastes including graphite reactor components. The various UK gas cooled reactors reactors have used a range of graphite components made from diverse graphite types; this has necessitated a systematic programme to cover the wide range of graphite and production processes. The programme consisted of: precursor measurements - on the surface and/or bulk of representative samples of relevant materials, using specially developed methods; transfer studies - to quantify the potential for transfer of Cl-36 into and between waste streams during irradiation of graphite; theoretical assessments - to support the calculational methodology; actual measurements - to confirm the modelling. For graphite, a total of 458 measurements on samples from 57 batches were performed, to provide a detailed understanding of the composition of nuclear graphite. The work has resulted in the generation of probability density functions (PDF) for the mean chlorine concentration of three classes of graphite: fuel element graphite; Magnox moderator and reflector graphite and AGR reflector graphite; AGR moderator graphite. Transfer studies have shown that a significant

  16. Relation Between Acid and Catalytic Properties of Chlorinated Gamma-Alumina. a 31p Mas Nmr and Ftir Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume D.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the effect of chlorine on the surface properties of gamma-alumina, especially on their acid properties. The use of FTIR spectroscopy and 31P MAS NMR of adsorbed trimethylphosphine allows to propose a chlorination mechanism. To correlate the surface properties of these chlorinated gamma-alumina with their catalytic properties, we have used a model reaction, the cracking of n-heptane under reforming conditions. The analysis of the correlation between acid properties determined by 31P MAS NMR and the catalytic results (in terms of activities and selectivities allows to identify which sites are involved in the cracking reaction.

  17. Research of indoor smoke warning and air purification equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wangronglong; Zhaoyexing; Fuyunhua

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce indoor smoke concentration and improve indoor air quality,we put forward the intelligent indoor smoke warning and air purification device. This device can quickly reduce the concentration of indoor smoke by the air purification and fire alarm function. It provides a suitable living environment for people.

  18. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, W.N. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. They probably entered the water as leachates from chemical waste dumps and as effluents from manufacturing. Hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorobenzene are commonly present in Herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from the Great Lakes, and some of the isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene are occasionally detected at low concentrations. Hexachlorobenzene, which was formerly used as a fungicide, has been the most thoroughly studied chlorinated benzene, and has been detected in many species. Its use as a fungicide in the United States was canceled in 1984. Since about 1975 hexachlorobenzene has been formed mainly in the production of chlorinated solvents. It is highly persistent in the environment and some species are poisoned by hexachlorobenzene at very low chronic dietary exposures. As little as 1 ppm in the diet of mink (Mustela vison) reduced the birth weights of young, and 5 ppm in the diet of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) caused slight liver damage. This paper describes a long-term (26 wk) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to length of exposure and three 8 wk experiments relating concentration to the concentration in soil the soil organic matter content, and the degree of chlorination. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Indoor radon levels in primary schools of Patras (Greece))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon activity concentrations have been measured in 53 from a total of 66 public primary schools throughout of Patras (Greece)), during December 1999 to May 2000 using solid-state nuclear track detectors (LR-115 II). The indoor radon levels in the classrooms were generally low, ranging from 10 to 89 Bqm-3. The mean (arithmetic mean) indoor concentration was 35 ± 17 Bq m-3 and an estimated annual effective dose of 0.1 ± 0.1 mSv y-1 was calculated for students and 0.2 ± 0.1 mSv y-1 for teachers, assuming an equilibrium factor of 0.4 and occupancy factor of 12 and 14%, respectively. The research was also focused on parameters affecting radon concentration levels such as floor number of the classrooms and the age of the buildings in relation to building materials. (authors)

  20. Indoor Airflow Simulation inside Lecture Room: A CFD Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S.; Tee, B. T.; Tan, C. F.

    2015-09-01

    Indoor air flow distribution is important as it will affect the productivity of the occupants. Poor air flow distribution not only cause discomfort to the occupants but also influence their ability to conduct their activities. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the indoor air flow inside lecture rooms through CFD simulation approach. Two types of air-conditioning configuration system in lecture rooms have been selected for this study which includes the split unit and centralized system. The air flow distribution between these two systems are analyzed and compared. Physical measurement is conducted using a velocity meter for validation purpose. CFD simulation is developed by using ANSYS Fluent software. The results specifically the air velocity and temperature data are compared and validated. Based on the findings, design recommendation is proposed with the aim to improve on the current air flow distribution in the lecture rooms.

  1. A STUDY OF INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN UNIVERSITY LABORATORY BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADE ASMI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a study of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ of laboratory in university buildings at faculty of civil and environmental engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM. This study assessed the existing indoor air quality in two selected laboratory buildings, which equipped with natural ventilation. The importantIAQ parameters considered in this study are temperature, relative humidity, air movement, and airborne particles. However, airborne particles were categorized based on its size characterization concentration of particles ≥ 0.3 μm and particles ≥ 5.0 μm. The measurements were carried out during the peak hours within these laboratories using Met One GT-521 particle counter and Anemometer. Ultimately, area, time of measurement conducted, the number of activities, ventilation, air movement, and materials, were found as the major contributors to the IAQ performance in these laboratories.

  2. Controlling Indoor Air Pollution from Moxibustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yen Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Indoor air quality (IAQ control of hospitals plays a critical role in protecting both hospital staffs and patients, particularly those who are highly susceptible to the adverse effects of indoor noxious hazards. However, moxibustion in outpatient departments (OPDs of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM may be a source of indoor air pollution in hospitals. Some studies have investigated indoor air pollution during moxibustion in Chinese medicine clinics (CMCs and moxibustion rooms, demonstrating elevated air pollutants that pose a threat to the health of medical staff and patients. Our study investigated the indoor air pollutants of indoor carbon dioxide (CO2, carbon monoxide (CO, formaldehyde (HCHO, total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs, airborne particulate matter with a diameter of ≤10 µm (PM10 and ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5 during moxibustion in an acupuncture and moxibustion room of the OPD in a hospital in Taipei. To evaluate the different control strategies for indoor air pollution from moxibution, a comparison of air pollutants during moxibution among the methods of using alternative old moxa wools, local exhaust ventilation and an air cleaner was conducted. In this study, burning alternative old moxa wools for moxibustion obviously reduced all gaseous pollutants except for aerosols comparing burning fresh moxa wools. Using local exhaust ventilation reduced most of the aerosols after burning moxa. We also found that using an air cleaner was inefficient for controlling indoor air pollutants, particularly gaseous pollutants. Therefore, combining replacing alternative old moxa wools and local exhaust ventilation could be a suitable design for controlling indoor air pollution during moxibustion therapy.

  3. Controlling Indoor Air Pollution from Moxibustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chung-Yen; Kang, Sy-Yuan; Liu, Shu-Hui; Mai, Cheng-Wei; Tseng, Chao-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) control of hospitals plays a critical role in protecting both hospital staffs and patients, particularly those who are highly susceptible to the adverse effects of indoor noxious hazards. However, moxibustion in outpatient departments (OPDs) of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) may be a source of indoor air pollution in hospitals. Some studies have investigated indoor air pollution during moxibustion in Chinese medicine clinics (CMCs) and moxibustion rooms, demonstrating elevated air pollutants that pose a threat to the health of medical staff and patients. Our study investigated the indoor air pollutants of indoor carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), formaldehyde (HCHO), total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs), airborne particulate matter with a diameter of ≤10 µm (PM10) and ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5) during moxibustion in an acupuncture and moxibustion room of the OPD in a hospital in Taipei. To evaluate the different control strategies for indoor air pollution from moxibution, a comparison of air pollutants during moxibution among the methods of using alternative old moxa wools, local exhaust ventilation and an air cleaner was conducted. In this study, burning alternative old moxa wools for moxibustion obviously reduced all gaseous pollutants except for aerosols comparing burning fresh moxa wools. Using local exhaust ventilation reduced most of the aerosols after burning moxa. We also found that using an air cleaner was inefficient for controlling indoor air pollutants, particularly gaseous pollutants. Therefore, combining replacing alternative old moxa wools and local exhaust ventilation could be a suitable design for controlling indoor air pollution during moxibustion therapy. PMID:27331817

  4. Antifungal properties of silver nanoparticles against indoor mould growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogar, Anna; Tylko, Grzegorz; Turnau, Katarzyna

    2015-07-15

    The presence of moulds in indoor environments causes serious diseases and acute or chronic toxicological syndromes. In order to inhibit or prevent the growth of microorganisms on building materials, the disruption of their vital processes or the reduction of reproduction is required. The development of novel techniques that impair the growth of microorganisms on building materials is usually based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). It makes them an alternative to other biocides. AgNPs have proven antibacterial activity and became promising in relation to fungi. The aim of the study was to assess growth and morphology of mycelia of typical indoor fungal species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium cladosporoides, Chaetomium globosum and Stachybotrys chartarum as well as Mortierella alpina, cultured on agar media. The antifungal activity of AgNPs was also tested in relation to C. globosum and S. chartarum grown on the surface of gypsum drywall. It was found that the presence of AgNPs in concentrations of 30-200mg/l significantly decreased the growth of fungi. However, in the case of M. alpina, AgNPs stimulated its growth. Moreover, strong changes in moulds morphology and colour were observed after administration of AgNPs. Parameters of conidiophores/sporangiophores varied depending on mould region and changed significantly after treatment with AgNPs. The experiments have shown antifungal properties of AgNPs against common indoor mould species. Their application to building materials could effectively protect indoor environments from mould development. However, consideration must be given to the fact that the growth of some fungal strains might be stimulated by AgNPs. PMID:25847174

  5. SURVEY IN KRASNOKAMENSK CITY ON THE CONTENT OF INDOOR RADON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Marennyi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Survey of dwellings and enterprises of the Krasnokamensk city on the indoor radon content were performed. The radon volume activity measurements were carried out by integral method with the help of track chambers. Chambers were exhibited in the heating and the warm periods of the year for the 3-4 months in the same premises. The values of equivalent equilibrium volume activity of radon and doses from radon were obtained. It is shown, that the situation with the radon irradiation of the population of Krasnokamensk city in general meets the requirements of the radiation safety standards. Seasonal relations of volume radon activity in the premises are presented.

  6. Indoor Air Quality in Brazilian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Jurado, Sonia R.; Bankoff, Antônia D. P.; Andrea Sanchez

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the indoor air quality in Brazilian universities by comparing thirty air-conditioned (AC) (n = 15) and naturally ventilated (NV) (n = 15) classrooms. The parameters of interest were indoor carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature, relative humidity (RH), wind speed, viable mold, and airborne dust levels. The NV rooms had larger concentration of mold than the AC rooms (1001.30 ± 125.16 and 367.00 ± 88.13 cfu/m3, respectively). The average indoor airborne dust concentration exceed...

  7. Enabling Indoor Location-Based Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radaelli, Laura

    Indoor spaces have always attracted interest from different scientific disciplines. Relatively recent interest in indoor settings by computer scientists is driven in part by the increasing use of smartphones, which serve as a platform for service delivery and can generate extensive volumes...... positioning system. Second, we propose an implementation of the vision in the form of a prototype that integrates Wi-Fi and video cameras for positioning. Aggregation or abstraction are needed to be able to explore large volumes of indoor trajectory data. We present two contributions to extracting information...

  8. Assessment of indoor environment of buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Y.; Kovanen, K. [VTT Building Technology, Espoo (Finland). Indoor Environment and Systems

    1995-12-31

    The synthetical assessment of indoor environment has become world-wide topic in recent years. Many research evidences have shown that the quality of indoor air is a multi-factor influenced issue. Building Research Establishment (BRE) in United Kingdom has worked out a series of assessing methods for different kinds of buildings. Whereas, in Finland, National Building Code of Finland has been used for many years. The comparison between the two approaches in assessing indoor air quality will be addressed in this presentation. Each issue considered in the above two approaches is discussed by referring the recent research highlights. (author)

  9. Simulation Analysis of Indoor Gas Explosion Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱新明; 陈林顺; 冯长根

    2003-01-01

    The influence factors and process of indoor gas explosion are studied with AutoReaGas explosion simulator. The result shows that venting pressure has great influence on the indoor gas explosion damage. The higher the venting pressure is, the more serious the hazard consequence will be. The ignition location has also evident effect on the gas explosion damage. The explosion static overpressure would not cause major injury to person and serious damage to structure in the case of low venting pressure (lower than 2 kPa). The high temperature combustion after the explosion is the major factor to person injury in indoor gas explosion accidents.

  10. Indoor Climate of Large Glazed Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Ole Juhl; Madsen, Christina E.; Heiselberg, Per;

    In recent years large glazed spaces has found increased use both in connection with renovation of buildings and as part of new buildings. One of the objectives is to add an architectural element, which combines indoor- and outdoor climate. In order to obtain a satisfying indoor climate it is crui...... it is cruicial at the design stage to be able to predict the performance regarding thermal comfort and energy consumption. This paper focus on the practical implementation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and the relation to other simulation tools regarding indoor climate....

  11. Indoor radon related to uranium in granitoids of the Central Bohemian plutonic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study is based on the indoor radon data (one year measurements, Kodak LR 115 track etch detectors), vectorized geological maps 1:50000, vectorized coordinates of dwellings and uranium data for granitoid types of the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex (CBPC). Using ArcGis 8.2 programme, the position of 16145 dwellings was linked to a geological database covering the CBPC (approx. 3200 km2), and the type of underlying rock type was specified for each house. The resulting databases enabled us to calculate the mean EEC indoor Rn data for particular granitoid types and to study the relationship between the indoor Rn and the U concentrations. The petrogenetically variable CBPC was emplaced during Variscan orogenesis (330-350 Ma) and is among the most radioactive rock types within the Bohemian Massif. A long-term process of CBPC genesis resulted in more than 20 granitoid types, differing by their petrogenetic characteristics as well as mineralogical and chemical composition, including uranium concentration. The relation between the mean indoor radon values and uranium concentrations in particular rock types was examined. A positive regression between indoor Rn and uranium as the source of Rn soil gas clearly demonstrates how regional geology influences the indoor radon activity concentration in dwellings. The highest indoor Rn concentrations were observed in the Sedlcany granodiorite and Certovo bremeno syenite, where also the highest gamma dose rates (150-210 nGy.h-1) within all granitoid types in the Czech Republic were observed. The two rock types differ from other granitoids by a relatively high zircon concentration, which is the main source of U and subsequently of soil gas Rn being released from the bedrock. The lower indoor Rn values of Certovo bremeno syenite which do not correspond with the high U concentrations can be explained by a relatively low permeability of its clayey weathering crust. This feature was also observed for soil gas radon concentration

  12. An intercomparison of indoor radon data using NTD and different dynamic recording systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor radon data monitored with several different recording systems in a controlled cellar were analyzed. The one-room cellar is carved into volcanic rock and presents an almost constant radon emanation throughout the year. Measurements were performed using the AlphaGUARD®, Sun Nuclear® 1027, DOSEman® and RAD7® radon monitors, and CR-39 Lantrack® in a passive integrating detector. The radon concentrations measured by the active detection systems and averaged over the three-month measurement period ranged from 533 to 805 Bq m−3. The response of the passive detector system was a linear function for exposure times of one, two and three months. The data are discussed as a function of changes in the distribution of radon within the cellar and the response characteristics of the detection devices. - Highlights: ► Indoor radon dynamic and Nuclear Tracks passive systems. ► Different systems but close average values for indoor radon measurements. ► Different recording Indoor radon systems. ► Controlled closed room (cellar) to calibrate indoor radon systems. ► Response characteristics of different indoor radon systems

  13. Indoor localisation with Android devices

    OpenAIRE

    Magaz Graça, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    This project analyses WiFiSLAM, an indoor positioning system for mobile phones that tries to estimate the position by analysing WiFi signals. Este proyecto analiza WiFiSLAM, un sistema de posicionamiento en interiores para teléfonos móviles que trata de estimar la posición mediante el análisis de señales WiFi. Aquest projecte analitza WiFiSLAM, un sistema de posicionament en interiors per a telèfons mòbils que tracta d'estimar la posició mitjançant l'anàlisi de senyals WiFi.

  14. Separation of niobium from ferroniobium by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation of niobium from ferroniobium by chlorine metallurgy were investigated. The chlorination of ferroniobium by chlorine gas was carried out under several thermodynamic conditions and the effective conditions were determined. Preliminary separation of niobium pentachloride from ferric chloride is possible by selective condensation with temperature gradient techniques. Selective reduction of ferric chloride to ferrous chloride by iron powder was done to separate niobium pentachloride by their volatility difference. Separation of niobium pentachloride from ferric chloride using organic solvent was tested. The niobium pentachloride with high purity could be separated effectively from ferroniobium chlorides by selective reduction of ferric chloride and selective dissolution of niobium pentachloride in organic solvent. A new dry process which has the possibility of industrial application is presented. (Author

  15. Investigation of molybdenum pentachloride interaction with chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Raman spectra of molybdenum pentachloride solutions in liquid chlorine lines were recorded in case of 397, 312, 410, 217 and 180 cm-1 vibrations of ν1(A1'), ν2(A1'), ν5(E'), ν6(E') and ν8(E'') monomer (symmetry D3h) molecules of MoCl5. Interaction of molten molybdenum pentachloride with chlorine at increased (up to 6 MPa) pressures of Cl2 was studied. In Raman spectra of its vapour distillation in liquid chlorine alongside with MoCl5 lines appearance of new lines at 363 and 272 cm-1, similar in their frequency to the ones calculated for the vibrations ν1(A1g) and ν2(Eg) of MoCl6 molecules (symmetry Oh), was observed

  16. A TGA study on the chlorination reaction kinetics of Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorination reaction kinetics of Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls were investigated using a home-made thermogravimetric analysis for a hull chlorination (TGA-HC) system. The reproducibility of the TGA-HC system was verified by repeated measurements at an identical condition, which showed only 6.6% of maximum difference. The effect of total flow rate (Q) was investigated for Q of 120 and 240 mL/min, and it was revealed that the reaction rate is not influenced in this condition. Using the Sharp–Hancock plot, the volumetric contraction model was identified as the most suitable model for the Zircaloy-4 chlorination reaction. The influence of chlorine partial pressure was studied at 9.21, 16.9, and 23.4 kPa of Cl2 partial pressure conditions, and it was identified that the reaction rate is proportional to the chlorine partial pressure on the order of (0.669). The effect of reaction temperature was investigated for 300–450 °C, and it was revealed that the chlorination reaction exhibits an activation energy of 26.2 kJ/mol. Using the experimental and fitting results, the reaction rate equation for the Zircaloy-4 chlorination reaction was achieved, but the equation was valid only until the conversion fraction (α) reaches up to (0.60). When α is higher than 0.60, the volumetric contraction model was not applicable. A second-order reaction rate equation was suggested for the 0.6 < α region, although it needs further investigation

  17. Oxidation of pharmaceuticals by chlorine dioxide in biologically treated wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Hey, G.; Grabic, R.; Ledin, A.; la Cour Jansen, J; Andersen, H R

    2012-01-01

    Biologically treated wastewater spiked with a mixture of 56 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) was treated with 0–20mg/L chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution in laboratory-scale experiments. Wastewater effluents were collected from two wastewater treatment plants in Sweden, one with extended nitrogen removal (low COD) and one without (high COD). About one third of the tested APIs resisted degradation even at the highest ClO2 dose (20mg/L), while others were reduced by more than 90% at the l...

  18. Future chlorine-bromine loading and ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Michael J.; Ibrahim, Abdel Moneim; Sasaki, Toru; Stordal, Frode; Visconti, Guido

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of future ozone requires three elements: (1) a scenario for the net emissions of chemically and radiatively active trace gases from the land and oceans; (2) a global atmospheric model that projects the accumulation of these gases; and (3) a chemical transport model that describes the distribution of ozone for a prescribed atmospheric composition and climate. This chapter, of necessity, presents models for all three elements and focuses on the following: (1) atmospheric abundance of chlorine and bromine in the form of halocarbons; and (2) the associated perturbations to stratospheric ozone.

  19. Simultaneous chlorination and sulphation of calcined limestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukata, M.; Takeda, K.; Miyatain, T.; Ueyama, K. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-06-01

    In order to analyze HCl and SO{sub 2} retention in fluidized bed combustors of coal and wastes, chlorination and sulphation of calcined limestone were investigated at 1023 K and atmospheric pressure using thermogravimetry. The rate of chlorination of calcined limestone slightly depended on its particle size and was kept almost constant against the progress of chlorination. In contrast, the rate of sulphation increased with decreasing particle size and steeply decreased with the progress of sulphation as commonly reported. It was found that the sulphation was markedly accelerated in the presence of HCl. Such acceleration of sulphation was remarkable for larger limestone. The level of conversion of CaO to (CaSO{sub 4} + CaCl{sub 2}) always approached 100% in the simultaneous absorption of HCl and SO{sub 2}. It was observed by SEM that in the chlorination a number of spherical aggregates and large voids were formed on the surface of limestone and that large aggregates with very flat surface and large voids have been formed in the course of the simultaneous chlorination and sulphation. The chlorination behavior and the acceleration of SO{sub 2} absorption in the presence of HCl can be due both to the formation of a mobile Cl{sup -} ion-containing phase and to the formation of voids playing a role of the diffusion paths for HCl and SO{sub 2} toward the interior of a limestone particle. Melting of a eutectic mixture of CaCl{sub 2} and CaSO{sub 4} might largely contribute to the promotion of SO{sub 2} absorption in the case of simultaneous absorption of HCl and SO{sub 2}. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, Maria M; Olsen, Jorn; Villeneuve, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF).......To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF)....

  1. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water

  2. Review of chlorination of zirconium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of chlorination zirconium dioxide is presented.used semi batch process with vertical reactor, horizontal reactor and fluidized reactor. The feed were zircon dioxide from Aldrich, direct zircon sand and briquette of zircon sand. From the study it is obtained that the best reactor is vertical reactor.It needs modification of chlorination reactor and sublimator to obtain the larger conversion. It is come to reality that zirconium tetrachloride preparation by process is significant with zirconium tetrachloride from Aldrich. It needs the sequel research to get the best result of process. (author)

  3. Chlorinated organic compounds produced by Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize, not only reduces grain yield and degrades quality but also produces mycotoxins in the infected grain. Focus has been on mycotoxins because of the human and animal health hazards associated with them. In addition to work done on mycotoxins, chemical profiling of F. graminearum to identify other compounds produced by this fungus remains critical. With chemical profiling of F. graminearum the entire chemistry of this fungus can be understood. The focus of this work was to identify chlorinated compounds produced by F. graminearum. Various chlorinated compounds were detected and their role in F. graminearum is yet to be understood. PMID:27165533

  4. Electronic properties, doping and defects in chlorinated silicon nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    de Carvalho, A.; Öberg, S; Rayson, M. J.; Briddon, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals with diameters between 1 and 3 nm and surfaces passivated by chlorine or a mixture of chlorine and hydrogen were modeled using density functional theory, and their properties compared with those of fully hydrogenated nanocrystals. It is found that fully and partially chlorinated nanocrystals are stable, and have higher electron affinity, higher ionization energy and lower optical absorption energy threshold. As the hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals, chlorinated silicon na...

  5. Attacks of Asthma due to Chlorinized Water: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Eyup Berdan; Ercan Gocgeldi; Sami Ozturk; Ali Kutlu

    2008-01-01

    The presence of a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma-like symptoms in swimmers has been reported. But, attacks of asthma which is related to chlorinized water is rare. Chlorine, a strong oxidizing agent, is an important toxic gas that the swimmer can breath during swimming and a worker can exposed to chlorine while he or she was using water with chlorine at home. We describe a persistent increase in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness following chronic exposure ...

  6. Immunofluorescence and morphology of Giardia lamblia cysts exposed to chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Sauch, J F; Berman, D

    1991-01-01

    Giardia cyst-like objects detected by immunofluorescence in chlorinated water samples often cannot be positively identified by their morphological appearance. To determine the effect of chlorine on cyst immunofluorescence and morphology, Giardia lamblia cysts were exposed to chlorine for 48 h. The majority of cysts exposed to chlorine concentrations of 1 to 11 mg/liter at 5 and 15 degrees C lost their internal morphological characteristics necessary for identification, but most of them were s...

  7. Indoor Positioning using Wi-Fi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Krarup, Mads Vering; Stisen, Allan;

    The past decade has witnessed substantial research on methods for indoor Wi-Fi positioning. While much effort has gone into achieving high positioning accuracy and easing fingerprint collection, it is our contention that the general problem is not sufficiently well understood, thus preventing...... deployments and their usage by applications to become more widespread. Based on our own and published experiences on indoor Wi-Fi positioning deployments, we hypothesize the following: Current indoor Wi-Fi positioning systems and their utilization in applications are hampered by the lack of understanding...... of the requirements present in the real-world deployments. In this paper, we report findings from qualitatively studying organisational requirements for indoor Wi-Fi positioning. The studied cases and deployments cover both company and public-sector settings and the deployment and evaluation of several types...

  8. Monocular Vision SLAM for Indoor Aerial Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Çelik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel indoor navigation and ranging strategy via monocular camera. By exploiting the architectural orthogonality of the indoor environments, we introduce a new method to estimate range and vehicle states from a monocular camera for vision-based SLAM. The navigation strategy assumes an indoor or indoor-like manmade environment whose layout is previously unknown, GPS-denied, representable via energy based feature points, and straight architectural lines. We experimentally validate the proposed algorithms on a fully self-contained microaerial vehicle (MAV with sophisticated on-board image processing and SLAM capabilities. Building and enabling such a small aerial vehicle to fly in tight corridors is a significant technological challenge, especially in the absence of GPS signals and with limited sensing options. Experimental results show that the system is only limited by the capabilities of the camera and environmental entropy.

  9. Comprehensive Smokefree Indoor Air PDF Slides

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the comprehensive smokefree indoor air slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found at:...

  10. Comparing a microbial biocide and chlorine as zebra mussel control strategies in an Irish drinking water treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Meehan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A need exists for an environmentally friendly mussel control method to replace chlorine and other traditional control methods currentlyutilised in drinking water plants and other infested facilities. Zequanox® is a newly commercialised microbial biocide for zebra and quaggamussels comprised of killed Pseudomonas fluorescens CL145A cells. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of adevelopmental formulation of Zequanox (referred to as MBI 401 FDP and chlorine treatments on adult and juvenile zebra mussels byrunning a biobox trial in conjunction with chlorine treatments at an infested Irish drinking water treatment plant. Since 2009, the plantmanagement has used a residual chlorine concentration of 2 mg/L in autumn to control both adult zebra mussels and juvenile settlement intheir three concrete raw water chambers. Juvenile mussel settlement was monitored in three bioboxes as well as in three treatment chambersin the plant for three months prior to treatment. Adult mussels were seeded into the chambers and bioboxes four days before treatment. InOctober 2011, the bioboxes were treated with MBI 401 FDP at 200 mg active substance/L, while chlorine treatment took place in the waterchambers. The MBI 401 FDP treatment lasted only 8 hours while chlorine treatment lasted seven days. Juvenile numbers were reduced tozero in both the bioboxes and treated chambers within seven days. Adult mussel mortality reached 80% for both the chlorine and MBI 401FDP treatment; however, mortality was achieved faster in the chlorine treatment. These results provided important insights into zebra musselcontrol alternatives to chlorine and supported further development of the now commercial product, Zequanox.

  11. Predicting indoor pollutant concentrations, and applications to air quality management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzetti, David M.

    2002-10-01

    Because most people spend more than 90% of their time indoors, predicting exposure to airborne pollutants requires models that incorporate the effect of buildings. Buildings affect the exposure of their occupants in a number of ways, both by design (for example, filters in ventilation systems remove particles) and incidentally (for example, sorption on walls can reduce peak concentrations, but prolong exposure to semivolatile organic compounds). Furthermore, building materials and occupant activities can generate pollutants. Indoor air quality depends not only on outdoor air quality, but also on the design, maintenance, and use of the building. For example, ''sick building'' symptoms such as respiratory problems and headaches have been related to the presence of air-conditioning systems, to carpeting, to low ventilation rates, and to high occupant density (1). The physical processes of interest apply even in simple structures such as homes. Indoor air quality models simulate the processes, such as ventilation and filtration, that control pollutant concentrations in a building. Section 2 describes the modeling approach, and the important transport processes in buildings. Because advection usually dominates among the transport processes, Sections 3 and 4 describe methods for predicting airflows. The concluding section summarizes the application of these models.

  12. The Study on Using Passive RFID Tags for Indoor Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Ting

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency identification (RFID is the technology that put an RFID tag on objects or people, so that they can be identified, tracked, and managed automatically. With its wide application in the automobile assembly industry, warehouse management and the supply chain network, RFID has been recognized as the next promising technology in serving the positioning purpose. Existing positioning technologies such as GPS are not available indoors as the terminal cannot get the signal from satellites. To enhance the availability of the positioning systems for indoors, the development of RFID positioning system for locating objects or people have became a hot topic in recent research. Compared with conventional active and high‐cost solutions, this paper studied the feasibility of using passive RFID tags for indoor positioning and object location detection to provide real time information for tracking movement. Results of experiment show that readability of the passive RFID positioning system is satisfactory, and it is a more cost effective solution when compared with other positioning technologies.

  13. Chlorine solubility in evolved alkaline magmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Carroll

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies of Cl solubility in trachytic to phonolitic melts provide insights into the capacity of alkaline magmas to transport Cl from depth to the earth?s surface and atmosphere, and information on Cl solubility variations with pressure, temperature and melt or fluid composition is crucial for understanding the reasons for variations in Cl emissions at active volcanoes. This paper provides a brief review of Cl solubility experiments conducted on a range of trachytic to phonolitic melt compositions. Depending on the experimental conditions the melts studied were in equilibrium with either a Cl-bearing aqueous fluid or a subcritical assemblage of low- Cl aqueous fluid + Cl-rich brine. The nature of the fluid phase(s was identified by examination of fluid inclusions present in run product glasses and the fluid bulk composition was calculated by mass balance. Chlorine concentrations in the glass increase with increasing Cl molality in the fluid phase until a plateau in Cl concentration is reached when melt coexists with aqueous fluid + brine. With fluids of similar Cl molality, higher Cl concentrations are observed in peralkaline phonolitic melts compared with peraluminous phonolitic melts; overall the Cl concentrations observed in phonolitic and trachytic melts are approximately twice those found in calcalkaline rhyolitic melts under similar conditions. The observed negative pressure dependence of Cl solubility implies that Cl contents of melts may actually increase during magma decompression if the magma coexists with aqueous fluid and Cl-rich brine (assuming melt-vapor equilibrium is maintained. The high Cl contents (approaching 1 wt% Cl observed in some melts/glasses from the Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei areas suggest saturation with a Cl-rich brine prior to eruption.

  14. Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones, Robert MD

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:151-156.

  15. Blends of caprolactam/caprolactone copolymers and chlorinated polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberda van Ekenstein, G.O.R.; Deuring, H.; ten Brinke, G.; Ellis, T.S.

    1997-01-01

    The phase behaviour of blends of chlorinated polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and chlorinated PVC with random copolymers of caprolactone and caprolactam has been investigated and the results correlated with a binary interaction model. The known miscibility of polycaprolactone in the chlorinate

  16. Indoor Navigation Using an iPhone

    OpenAIRE

    Emilsson, André

    2010-01-01

    Indoor navigation could be used in many applications to enhance performance in its specific area. Anything from serious life critical tasks like aiding firefighters or coordinating military attacks to more simple every day use like finding a desired shop in a large supermarket could be considered. Smartphones of today introduce an interesting platform with capabilities like existing, more clumsy, indoor navigation systems. The iPhone 3GS is a powerful smartphone that lets the programmer use i...

  17. Indoor climate in air-supported structure

    OpenAIRE

    Volkov, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    The air supported structure is quite modern type of building for sport purposes. The main advantages of this structure are low cost and multigrade function. Such benefits allow to consider this type of sport facility as a perspective and modern decision for sport industry in northern countries. But what about quality of indoor climate in air domes? Does the condition of indoor environment allow to use these facilities for performing of workouts and even the sport competition? The main aim...

  18. Solutions for Indoor Light Energy Harvesting

    OpenAIRE

    Vignati, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Energy harvesting (EH) was born few decades ago and evolved during the years, however only recently has found more applications thanks to the advent of wireless sensor networks and the developments in microchips technology. This thesis investigates energy harvesting potentialities, in particular those related to solar harvesting in indoor applications. Some of the most common challenges are discussed such as: the best maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm for indoor systems; or the ef...

  19. Education of indoor enviromental engineering technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kic, P.; Zajíček, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, Spec. 1 (2011), s. 83-90. ISSN 1406-894X. [Biosystems Engineering 2011. Tartu, 12.05.2011-13.05.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Biosystems engineering * indoor environment * study * programs Subject RIV: AM - Education http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/VS/zajicek- education of indoor enviromental engineering technology .pdf

  20. LEVERAGING SPATIAL MODEL TO IMPROVE INDOOR TRACKING

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, L; Xu, W.; Penard, W.; S. Zlatanova

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we leverage spatial model to process indoor localization results and then improve the track consisting of measured locations. We elaborate different parts of spatial model such as geometry, topology and semantics, and then present how they contribute to the processing of indoor tracks. The initial results of our experiment reveal that spatial model can support us to overcome problems such as tracks intersecting with obstacles and unstable shifts between two location measurement...

  1. Dechlorination pathways of diverse chlorinated aromatic pollutants conducted by Dehalococcoides sp. strain CBDB1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Gui-Ning [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tao, Xue-Qin [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering, Guangzhou 510225 (China); Huang, Weilin [Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Dang, Zhi, E-mail: chzdang@scut.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Li, Zhong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Liu, Cong-Qiang [The State Key Lab of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic pollutants (CAPs) has become a major issue in recent decades. This paper reported a theoretical indicator for predicting the reductive dechlorination pathways of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), chlorobenzenes and chlorophenols transformed by Dehalococcoides sp. strain CBDB1. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level for all related CAPs and Mulliken atomic charges on chlorine atoms (Q{sub Cl(n)}) were adopted as the probe of the dechlorination reaction activity. Q{sub Cl(n)} can consistently indicate the main dechlorination daughter products of PCDDs, chlorobenzenes and chlorophenols conducted by strain CBDB1. The dechlorination reaction favors elimination of the chlorine atoms having greater Q{sub Cl(n)} values. The chlorine atom with the greatest Q{sub Cl(n)} value tends preferentially to be eliminated, whereas the chlorine atom with the smallest Q{sub Cl(n)} value tends unlikely to be eliminated or does not react at all. For a series of compounds having similar structure, the maximal Q{sub Cl(n)} of each molecular can be used to predict the possibility of its daughter product(s). In addition, the difference ({Delta}Q{sub Cl(n)}) between the maximal Q{sub Cl(n)} and the next maximal Q{sub Cl(n)} of the same molecule can be used to assess the possibility of formation of multiple dechlorination products.

  2. Evaluating the effects of granular and membrane filtrations on chlorine demand in drinking water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veeriah Jegatheesan; Seung Hyun Kim; C. K. Joo; GAO Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    In this study, chlorine decay experiments were conducted for the raw water from Nakdong river that is treated by Chilseo Water Treatment Plant (CWTP) situated in Haman, Korea as well as the effluents from sand and granular activated carbon (GAC) filters of CWTP and fitted using a chlorine decay model. The model estimated the fast and slow reacting nitrogenous as well as organic/inorganic compounds that were present in the water. It was found that the chlorine demand due to fast and slow reacting (FRA and SRA) organic/inorganic substances was not reduced significantly by sand as well as GAC filters. However, the treated effluents from those filters contained FRA and SRA that are less reactive and had small reaction rate constants. For the effluents from microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and nanofiltration the chlorine demand due to FRA and SRA were further reduced but the reaction rate constants were larger compared to those of sand and GAC filter effluents. This has implications in the formation of disinfection by products (DBPs). If DBPs are assumed to form due to the interactions between chlorine and SRA, then it is possible that the DBP formation potential in the effluents from membrane filtrations could be higher than that in the effluents from granular media filters.

  3. The Sonodynamic Effects of Chlorin e6 on S180 Sarcoma in Mice%Chlorin e6声动力对小鼠S180肉瘤生长的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘端; 张为民; 王晓怀; 陈蓓; 郑静娴

    2012-01-01

    Objective The sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a promising new approach for cancer therapy by activating a tumor-localizing sonosensitizer with ultrasound. The purpose of this study was to explore whether Chlorin e6, a sonosensitizer, can accumulate selectively in the SI 80 sarcoma of mice and to assess its antitumor effects of SD I. Methods After intraperitoneal injection of Chlorin e6, the concentration of Chlorin e6 in tumor and muscle was measured by laser scan confocal microscope (LSCM) at different time points. 18 h later, the 1. 0 MHz ultrasound irradiation was treated for 180 s. The tumor size was recorded every 2 days and the tumor was weighted on the 15th day after treatment. Results After intraperitoneal injection of Chlorin e6, the concentrations of Chlorin e6 in tumor and muscle tissue reached to a peak at 18 h. The difference of Chlorin e6 concentration between tumor and muscle tissue was greatest at 18 h, which suggested that it was the optimal timing for SDT. Both ultrasound(0. 4-1. 6 W/cm2 )or Chlorin e6 (10-40 mg/kg)alone had no significant antitumor effects. However, the combination of ultrasound with Chlorin e6 (SDT) exerted significant antitumor effects. This antitumor effects was intensity-dependent for ultrasound and dose-dependent for Chlorin e6. Conclusions Chlorin e6 can accumulate selectively in the S180 sarcoma of mice and exerted antitumor effects as a sonosensitizer activated by ultrasound.%目的 声动力治疗(sonodynamic therapy,SDT)是通过超声波激活肿瘤细胞内聚集的声敏剂治疗肿瘤的一种新方法.本实验用Chlorin e6为声敏剂,观测其在S180肉瘤荷瘤小鼠肿瘤组织的富集情况及联合超声对S180肉瘤的杀伤作用.方法 S180肉瘤荷瘤小鼠腹腔注射Chlorin e6后,共聚焦显微镜观测其在肿瘤的富集情况,18 h后超声处理(1.0 MHz,180 s),每2天测量肿瘤大小,第15天剥离肿瘤进行质量比较.结果 腹腔给药后18h,Chlorin e6在肿瘤组织和肌肉组织含量达

  4. Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  5. NFC internal: an indoor navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdenizci, Busra; Coskun, Vedat; Ok, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    Indoor navigation systems have recently become a popular research field due to the lack of GPS signals indoors. Several indoors navigation systems have already been proposed in order to eliminate deficiencies; however each of them has several technical and usability limitations. In this study, we propose NFC Internal, a Near Field Communication (NFC)-based indoor navigation system, which enables users to navigate through a building or a complex by enabling a simple location update, simply by touching NFC tags those are spread around and orient users to the destination. In this paper, we initially present the system requirements, give the design details and study the viability of NFC Internal with a prototype application and a case study. Moreover, we evaluate the performance of the system and compare it with existing indoor navigation systems. It is seen that NFC Internal has considerable advantages and significant contributions to existing indoor navigation systems in terms of security and privacy, cost, performance, robustness, complexity, user preference and commercial availability. PMID:25825976

  6. Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  7. INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL COMFORT IN MALAYSIAN URBAN HOUSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaik-Wah Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, terraced houses have been rapidly constructed since 50 years ago and account for 44% of the existing urban housings. However, these houses have very limited use of natural ventilation and daylighting due to openings with small window-to-floor ratio. The deep plan design causes gloomy indoor spaces, low air change rate and poor indoor air quality. Studies showed that indoor environments have major impact on occupants’ well-being. Thereby this study evaluates the effects of indoor comforts on occupants’ perceived health in Malaysian typical terraced houses. Survey of terraced houses in Johor Bahru, Malaysia was conducted using questionnaire. Various terraced houses were studied to identify the critical comfort and health issues in terraced housing. The relationships among occupants’ perceived comforts, health and behavior were studied. The variance of types of terraced house was also analyzed. The findings demonstrated significant linear relationships between indoor comfort and health. However, occupants’ behavior did not give significant impact on thermal comfort. This study concludes that it is very essential to improve indoor comfort in Malaysian typical terraced houses through tropical design strategies to enhance occupants’ well-being.

  8. NFC Internal: An Indoor Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busra Ozdenizci

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Indoor navigation systems have recently become a popular research field due to the lack of GPS signals indoors. Several indoors navigation systems have already been proposed in order to eliminate deficiencies; however each of them has several technical and usability limitations. In this study, we propose NFC Internal, a Near Field Communication (NFC-based indoor navigation system, which enables users to navigate through a building or a complex by enabling a simple location update, simply by touching NFC tags those are spread around and orient users to the destination. In this paper, we initially present the system requirements, give the design details and study the viability of NFC Internal with a prototype application and a case study. Moreover, we evaluate the performance of the system and compare it with existing indoor navigation systems. It is seen that NFC Internal has considerable advantages and significant contributions to existing indoor navigation systems in terms of security and privacy, cost, performance, robustness, complexity, user preference and commercial availability.

  9. Chlorinated tyrosine derivatives in insect cuticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    2004-01-01

    , not-yet sclerotized cuticle of adult femur and tibia, the amounts increased rapidly during the first 24 h after ecdysis and more slowly during the next two weeks. Control analyses using stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry have confirmed that the chlorinated tyrosines are not artifacts formed...

  10. Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

  11. Anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of wastewaters from chlorine and total chlorine-free bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidal, G.; Soto, M.; Field, J.; Mendez-Pampin, R.; Lema, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Chlorine bleaching effluents are problematic for anaerobic wastewater treatment due to their high methanogenic toxicity and low biodegradability. Presently, alternative bleaching processes are being introduced, such as elemental chlorine-free (ECF) and total chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching. The methan

  12. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested o...

  13. Use of chlorination, ozonization and GAC adsorption to eliminate triazine pesticides in water supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is focused on the research made between Facsa and Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain) related to the oxidation techniques application by chlorination and ozonization, and their combination with granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption of mineral origin, in order to control triazine pesticides in water supplies. Experiments are carried out is a pilot plant. Although the chlorination or ozonization can partially degrade pesticides under study (atrazine, simazine, terbutilazine and bromacil), their passing through an adsorption column with GAC mineral, achieves their total removal when their initial concentrations are about 500 ng/l. These concentrations are obtained by fortification of studied sample. (Author) 9 refs

  14. Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Nai-Qiang Yan-Zan Qu Yao Chi Shao-Hua Qiao Ray Dod Shih-Ger Chang Charles

    2008-01-01

    Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue...

  15. Reaction products of aquatic humic substances with chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J D; Christman, R F; Norwood, D L; Millington, D S

    1982-01-01

    A major concern of the chlorination of aquatic humic materials is the ubiquitous production of trihalomethanes. A large number of other chlorinated organic compounds, however, have been shown to be formed by chlorine's reaction with humic substances. In this study, humic material was concentrated from a coastal North Carolina lake and chlorinated at a chlorine to carbon mole ratio of 1.5 at pH 12. A high pH was necessary for complete dissolution of the humic material and for production of ade...

  16. Transfer of chlorine from the environment to agricultural foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors governing chlorine transfer from Phaeozem and Greyzem soils to various important crop species (foodstuff and forage) were determined in natural conditions in the Kiev region of Ukraine. The stable chlorine concentration ratio (CR) values were the lowest in apple (0.5 ± 0.3) and strawberry (2 ± 1), higher in vegetables (5 ± 3), seeds (15 ± 7) and reached a maximum in straw (187 ± 90). The average CR values of 36Cl were estimated for the most important crops using all experimental data on 36Cl and stable chlorine transfer into plants from various soils. It was experimentally shown that boiling potatoes in water leads to an equilibrium between 36Cl specific content in the water and moisture in the cooked potato. The 36Cl processing factor (PF) for boiling various foodstuffs is equal to the ratio of water mass in the cooked foodstuff to the total water mass (in the food and the decoction). 36Cl PF for cereal flour can be estimated as 1. The 36Cl processing factor for dairy products is equal to the ratio of residual water mass in the product to initial water mass in milk. At a 36Cl specific activity in soil of 1 Bq kg-1, the estimated annual dietary 36Cl intake into human organism (adult man) is about 10 kBq. Sixty to seventy percent of the above amount will be taken in via milk and dairy products, 7-16% via meat, 14-16% via bread and bakery items and 8-12% via vegetables. The highest annual 36Cl intake, 10.7 kBq, is predicted for 1-year-old children. The expected effective doses from annual 36Cl intake are higher for younger age groups, increasing from 0.008 mSv in adults to 0.12 mSv in 1-year-old children

  17. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Boev, Blazo; Zunic, Zora S; Ivanova, Kremena; Ristova, Mimoza; Tsenova, Martina; Ajka, Sorsa; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso; Bossew, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m(3) for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported. PMID:26943159

  18. Controlling Mold on Library Materials with Chlorine Dioxide: An Eight-Year Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver-Meyers, Pat L.; Kowaleski, Barbara; Stolt, Wilbur A.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with mold growth at the University of Oklahoma libraries and describes the results of using chlorine dioxide in aqueous and gaseous forms. Highlights include toxicity compared to other preservation treatments; environmental controls; and explanations of a preference for the use of a self-activating gas packet.…

  19. Application of PGNAA to preincineration assay of combustible waste for chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Pawelko, R.J.; Greenwood, R.C. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis method is being developed for on-stream pre-incineration assay of low level radioactive combustible waste for it`s chlorine content. The assay system consists of three californium 252 sources and a germanium or scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer.

  20. Removal of pharmaceuticals in biologically treated wastewater by chlorine dioxide or peracetic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, G.; Ledin, Anna; La Cour Jansen, Jes;

    2012-01-01

    Removal of six active pharmaceutical ingredients in wastewater was investigated using chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and peracetic acid (PAA) as chemical oxidants. Four non-steroidal anti -inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, and mefenamic acid) and two l ipid regulating agents (gemfibro...