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Sample records for chlorination reactions applied

  1. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  2. Formation kinetics of gemfibrozil chlorination reaction products: analysis and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkosek, Wendy H; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-07-01

    Aqueous chlorination kinetics of the lipid regulator gemfibrozil and the formation of reaction products were investigated in deionized water over the pH range 3 to 9, and in two wastewater matrices. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil was found to be highly dependent on pH. No statistically significant degradation of gemfibrozil was observed at pH values greater than 7. Gemfibrozil oxidation between pH 4 and 7 was best represented by first order kinetics. At pH 3, formation of three reaction products was observed. 4'-C1Gem was the only reaction product formed from pH 4-7 and was modeled with zero order kinetics. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil in two wastewater matrices followed second order kinetics. 4'-C1Gem was only formed in wastewater with pH below 7. Deionized water rate kinetic models were applied to two wastewater effluents with gemfibrozil concentrations reported in literature in order to calculate potential mass loading rates of 4'C1Gem to the receiving water.

  3. New model of chlorine-wall reaction for simulating chlorine concentration in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ian; Kastl, George; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2017-11-15

    Accurate modelling of chlorine concentrations throughout a drinking water system needs sound mathematical descriptions of decay mechanisms in bulk water and at pipe walls. Wall-reaction rates along pipelines in three different systems were calculated from differences between field chlorine profiles and accurately modelled bulk decay. Lined pipes with sufficiently large diameters (>500 mm) and higher chlorine concentrations (>0.5 mg/L) had negligible wall-decay rates, compared with bulk-decay rates. Further downstream, wall-reaction rate consistently increased (peaking around 0.15 mg/dm 2 /h) as chlorine concentration decreased, until mass-transport to the wall was controlling wall reaction. These results contradict wall-reaction models, including those incorporated in the EPANET software, which assume wall decay is of either zero-order (constant decay rate) or first-order (wall-decay rate reduces with chlorine concentration). Instead, results are consistent with facilitation of the wall reaction by biofilm activity, rather than surficial chemical reactions. A new model of wall reaction combines the effect of biofilm activity moderated by chlorine concentration and mass-transport limitation. This wall reaction model, with an accurate bulk chlorine decay model, is essential for sufficiently accurate prediction of chlorine residuals towards the end of distribution systems and therefore control of microbial contamination. Implementing this model in EPANET-MSX (or similar) software enables the accurate chlorine modelling required for improving disinfection strategies in drinking water networks. New insight into the effect of chlorine on biofilm can also assist in controlling biofilm to maintain chlorine residuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical chemistry of the chlorination reactions of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Micco, Georgina

    2007-01-01

    This thesis has contributed towards the knowledge of complex systems.The chlorination reactions are non-catalytic solid-gas heterogeneous reactions which, in addition to the difficulties associated with the reactions occurring in an interface, have the particular features of chlorides compounds and their interactions.The questions arising from this type of study can not be solved by the application of an individual analysis technique.From the experimental point of view it is complicated, and many instrumental techniques need to be applied in order to obtain significant results as well as meaningful interpretations.The system under study is the chlorination of ternary and binary alloys containing Al, Cu and Zn and the pure metals, as these elements belong to the spent nuclear fuel cladding.The aim of the research has been to develop a process that eliminates most of the aluminium, which is the more abundant specie. In this way, the amount of material to be conditioned (vitrified) is reduced.The objectives proposed for each system have been achieved, and the results obtained can also be applied to similar systems for metal recycling [es

  5. Ametryn degradation by aqueous chlorine: Kinetics and reaction influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Bin; Gao Naiyun; Cheng Hefa; Hu Chenyan; Xia Shengji; Sun Xiaofeng; Wang Xuejiao; Yang Shaogui

    2009-01-01

    The chemical oxidation of the herbicide ametryn was investigated by aqueous chlorination between pH 4 and 10 at a temperature of 25 deg. C. Ametryn was found to react very rapidly with aqueous chlorine. The reaction kinetics can be well described by a second-order kinetic model. The apparent second-order rate constants are greater than 5 x 10 2 M -1 s -1 under acidic and neutral conditions. The reaction proceeds much more slowly under alkaline conditions. The predominant reactions were found to be the reactions of HOCl with neutral ametryn and the charged ametryn, with rate constants equal to 7.22 x 10 2 and 1.58 x 10 3 M -1 s -1 , respectively. The ametryn degradation rate increases with addition of bromide and decreases with addition of ammonia during the chlorination process. Based on elementary chemical reactions, a kinetic model of ametryn degradation by chlorination in the presence of bromide or ammonia ion was also developed. By employing this model, we estimate that the rate constants for the reactions of HOBr with neutral ametryn and charged ametryn were 9.07 x 10 3 and 3.54 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 , respectively. These values are 10- to 10 3 -fold higher than those of HOCl, suggesting that the presence of bromine species during chlorination could significantly accelerate ametryn degradation.

  6. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrogen/Chlorine exchange reactions of gaseous carbanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Cooks, R Graham; Meurer, Eduardo C; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2005-12-01

    Gas-phase reactions of three typical carbanions CH(2)NO(2)(-), CH(2)CN(-), and CH(2)S(O)CH(3)(-) with the chloromethanes CH(2)Cl(2), CHCl(3), and CCl(4), examined by tandem mass spectrometry, show a novel hydrogen/chlorine exchange reaction. For example, reaction between the nitromethyl anion CH(2)NO(2)(-) and carbon tetrachloride CCl(4) forms the ion CHClNO(2)(-). The suggested reaction mechanism involves nucleophilic attack by CH(2)NO(2)(-) at the chlorine of CCl(4) followed by proton transfer within the resulting complex [CH(2)ClNO(2) + CCl(3)(-)] to form CHClNO(2)(-) and CHCl(3). Two other carbanions CH(2)CN(-) and CH(2)S(O)CH(3)(-) also undergo the novel hydrogen/chlorine exchange reactions with CCl(4) but to a much smaller extent, their higher nucleophilicities favoring competitive nucleophilic attack reactions. Proton abstraction is the exclusive pathway in the reactions of these carbanions with CHCl(3). While CH(2)CN(-) and CH(2)S(O)CH(3)(-) promote mainly proton abstraction and nucleophilic displacement in reactions with CH(2)Cl(2), CH(2)NO(2)(-) does not react.

  8. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of reaction products from reactions of free chlorine with the lipid-regulator gemfibrozil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkošek, Wendy H; Koziar, Stephen A; White, Robert L; Gagnon, Graham A

    2011-01-01

    High global consumption rates have led to the occurrence of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in wastewater. The use of chlorine to disinfect wastewater prior to release into the environment may convert PhACs into uncharacterized chlorinated by-products. In this investigation, chlorination of a common pharmaceutical, the antihyperlipidemic agent gemfibrozil, was documented. Gemfibrozil (2,2-dimethyl-5-(2,5-dimethylphenoxy)pentanoic acid) was reacted with sodium hypochlorite and product formation was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The incorporation of one, two or three chlorine atoms into the aromatic region of gemfibrozil was demonstrated using negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Further analysis using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy identified the reaction products as 4'-ClGem (5-(4-chloro-2,5-dimethylphenoxy)-2,2-dimethylpentanoic acid) 4',6'-diClGem (5-(4,6-dichloro-2,5-dimethylphenoxy)-2,2-dimethylpentanoic acid), and 3',4',6'-triClGem (5-(3,4,6-trichloro-2,5-dimethylphenoxy)-2,2-dimethylpentanoic acid), products consistent with electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions. The rapid reaction of gemfibrozil with free chlorine at pH conditions relevant to water treatment indicates that a mixture of chlorinated gemfibrozils is likely to be found in wastewater disinfected with chlorine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chlorine dioxide reaction with selected amino acids in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navalon, Sergio; Alvaro, Mercedes; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a hypochlorite alternative disinfectant agent. In this context, we have determined the products formed in the reaction of ClO 2 with selected amino acids as model compounds that can be present in natural waters. The reaction of tryptophane, histidine and tyrosine (10 ppm each) with ClO 2 were studied at molar ratios ranging from 0.25 to 4 in the presence or absence of oxygen. It was found that in the absence of oxygen adding substoichiometric amounts of ClO 2 creates products that are structurally similar to the starting amino acids. Through a series of cascade reactions the initial product distribution gradually evolves toward simple, small carbon chain products that are far from the starting amino acid. The reaction product distribution revealed that chlorine dioxide can attack the electron-rich aromatic moieties as well as the nitrogen atom lone electron pair. Our study is relevant to gain knowledge on the reaction mechanism of ClO 2 with ubiquitous amino acids present in natural waters.

  11. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, P. L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig, S.

    2003-12-11

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most widespread groundwater contaminants in the country, contamination which is also among the most difficult and expensive for remediation. These solvents are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen, but this biodegradation requires both a food source for the organisms (electron donor) and the presence of chlorinated solvent biodegrading organisms. These two requirements are present naturally at some contamination sites, leading to natural attenuation of the solvents. If one or both requirements are absent, then engineered bioremediation either through addition of an external electron donor or through bioaugmentation with appropriate microorganisms, or both, may be used for site remediation. The most difficult case for cleanup is when a large residual of undissolved chlorinated solvents are present, residing as dense -non-aqueous-phase- liquid ( DNAPL). A major focus of this study was on the potential for biodegradation of the solvents when pre sent as DNAPL where concentrations are very high and potential for toxicity to microorganisms exist. Another focus was on a better understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in chlorinated solvent biodegradation . These studies were directed towards the chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). The potential for biodegradation of TCE and PCE DNAPL was clearly demonstrated in this research. From column soil studies and batch studies we found there to be a clear advantage in focusing efforts at bioremediation near the DNAPL. Here, chlorinated solvent concentrations are the highest, both because of more favorable reaction kinetics and because such high solvent concentrations are toxic to microorganisms, such as methanogens, which compete with dehalogenators for the electron donor. Additionally, biodegradation near a PCE DNAPL results in an enhanced dissolution rate for the chlorinated solvent, by factors of

  12. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarty, P. L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig S.

    2003-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most widespread groundwater contaminants in the country, contamination which is also among the most difficult and expensive for remediation. These solvents are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen, but this biodegradation requires both a food source for the organisms (electron donor) and the presence of chlorinated solvent biodegrading organisms. These two requirements are present naturally at some contamination sites, leading to natural attenuation of the solvents. If one or both requirements are absent, then engineered bioremediation either through addition of an external electron donor or through bioaugmentation with appropriate microorganisms, or both, may be used for site remediation. The most difficult case for cleanup is when a large residual of undissolved chlorinated solvents are present, residing as dense -non-aqueous-phase- liquid ( DNAPL). A major focus of this study was on the potential for biodegradation of the solvents when pre sent as DNAPL where concentrations are very high and potential for toxicity to microorganisms exist. Another focus was on a better understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in chlorinated solvent biodegradation . These studies were directed towards the chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). The potential for biodegradation of TCE and PCE DNAPL was clearly demonstrated in this research. From column soil studies and batch studies we found there to be a clear advantage in focusing efforts at bioremediation near the DNAPL. Here, chlorinated solvent concentrations are the highest, both because of more favorable reaction kinetics and because such high solvent concentrations are toxic to microorganisms, such as methanogens, which compete with dehalogenators for the electron donor. Additionally, biodegradation near a PCE DNAPL results in an enhanced dissolution rate for the chlorinated solvent, by factors of

  13. Chlorination and oxidation of sulfonamides by free chlorine: Identification and behaviour of reaction products by UPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Vanessa de Jesus; Cardoso, Vitor Vale; Benoliel, Maria João; Almeida, Cristina M M

    2016-01-15

    Sulfonamides (SAs) are one class of the most widely used antibiotics around the world and have been frequently detected in municipal wastewater and surface water in recent years. Their transformation in waste water treatment plants (WWTP) and in water treatment plants (WTP), as well as, their fate and transport in the aquatic environment are of concern. The reaction of six sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole, sulfapyridine, sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine, sulfathiazole and sulfadiazine) with free chlorine was investigated at a laboratory scale in order to identify the main chlorination by-products. A previously validated method, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, was used to analyse SAs and their chlorination by-products. At room temperature, pH 6-7, reaction times of up to 2 h and an initial concentration of 2 mg/L of free chlorine, the majority of SAs suffered degradation of around 65%, with the exception of sulfamethoxazole and sulfathiazole (20%). The main reaction of SAs with free chlorine occurred in the first minute. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your clothing, rapidly wash your entire body with soap and water, and get medical care as quickly as possible. Removing and disposing of clothing: Quickly take off clothing that has liquid chlorine on it. Any clothing that has to ...

  15. Reaction of chlorine nitrate with hydrogen chloride and water at Antarctic stratospheric temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of heterogeneous reactions important for ozone depletion over Antarctica are reported. The reaction of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) with H2O and HCl on surfacers that simulate polar stratospheric clouds are studied at temperatures relevant to the Antarctic stratosphere. The gaseous products of the resulting reactions, HOCl, Cl2O, and Cl2, could readily photolyze in the Antarctic spring to produce active chlorine for ozone depletion. Furthermore, the additional formation of condensed-phase HNO3 could serve as a sink for odd nitrogen species that would otherwise scavenge the active chlorine.

  16. Investigation of the kinetics and mechanism of the glycerol chlorination reaction using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUN WANG

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As a primary by-product in biodiesel production, glycerol can be used to prepare an important fine chemical, epichlorohydrin, by the glycerol chlorination reaction. Although this process has been applied in industrial production, unfortunately, less attention has been paid to the analysis and separation of the compounds in the glycerol chlorination products. In this study, a convenient and accurate method to determine the products in glycerol chlorination reaction was established and based on the results the kinetic mechanism of the reaction was investigated. The structure of main products, including 1,3--dichloropropan-2-ol, 2,3-dichloropropan-1-ol, 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol, 2-chloro-1,3-propanediol and glycerol was ascertained by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and the isomers of the products were distinguished. Apidic acid was considered as the best catalyst because of its excellent catalytic effect and high boiling point. The mechanism of the glycerol chlorination reaction was proposed and a new kinetic model was developed. Kinetic equations of the process in the experimental range were obtained by data fitting and the activation energies of each tandem reaction were 30.7, 41.8, 29.4 and 49.5 kJ mol-1, respectively. This study revealed the process and mechanism of the kinetics and provides the theoretical basis for engineering problems.

  17. Ion Chromatographic Method with Post-Column Fuchsin Reaction for Measurement of Bromate in Chlorinated Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homer C. Genuino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An ion chromatographic method that employs a post-column reaction with fuchsin and spectrophotometric detection was optimized for measuring bromate (BrO3- in water. BrO3- is converted to Br2 by sodium metabisulfite and then reacted with acidic fuchsin to form a red-colored product that strongly absorbs at 530 nm. The reaction of BrO3- and fuchsin reagent is optimum at pH 3.5 and 65 oC. The method has a limit of quantitation of 4.5 µg L-1 and is linear up to 150 µg L-1 BrO3-. Recoveries from spiked samples were high ranging from 95 to 102 % using external standard calibration and 87 to 103 % using standard addition method. Intra-batch and inter-batch reproducibility studies of the method resulted to RSD values ranging from 0.62 to 2.01 % and percent relative error of 0.12 to 2.94 % for BrO3- concentrations of 10 µg L-1 and 50 µg L-1. This method is free of interferences from common inorganic anions at levels typically found in chlorinated tap drinking water without preconcentration. The optimized method can be applied to trace analysis of bromate in chlorinated tap drinking water samples.

  18. Reaction kinetics and transformation of carbadox and structurally related compounds with aqueous chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amisha D; Kim, Jae-Hong; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2006-12-01

    The potential release of carbadox (CDX), a commonly used antibacterial agent in swine husbandry, into water systems is of a concern due to its carcinogenic and genotoxic effects. Until this study, the reactivity of carbadox (possessing quinoxaline N,N'-dioxide and hydrazone moieties) toward aqueous chlorine has yetto be investigated in depth. Chemical reactivity, reaction kinetics, and transformation pathways of carbadox and structurally related compounds with free chlorine under typical water treatment conditions were determined. This study found that only CDX and desoxycarbadox (DCDX), a main metabolite of CDX with no ring N-oxide groups, react rapidly with free chlorine while other structurally related compounds including olaquindox, quindoxin, quinoxaline N-oxide, quinoxaline, and quinoline N-oxide do not. The reaction kinetics of CDX and DCDX with chlorine are highly pH dependent (e.g., the apparent second-order rate constant, kapp, for CDX ranges from 51.8 to 3.15 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1) at pH 4-11). The high reactivity of CDX and DCDX to chlorine involves deprotonation of their hydrazone N-H moieties where initial chlorine attack results in a reactive intermediate that is further attacked by nucleophiles in the matrix to yield non-chlorinated, hydroxylated, and larger molecular weight byproducts. All of the CDX's byproducts retain their biologically active N-oxide groups, suggesting that they may remain as active antibacterial agents.

  19. Reaction of Antimony-Uranium Composite Oxide in the Chlorination Treatment of Waste Catalyst - 13521

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi

    2013-01-01

    The effect of oxygen gas concentration on the chlorination treatment of antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst waste was investigated by adding different concentrations of oxygen at 0-6 vol% to its chlorination agent of 0.6 or 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas at 1173 K. The addition of oxygen tended to prevent the chlorination of antimony in the oxide. When 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas was used, the addition of oxygen up to 0.1 vol% could convert the uranium contained in the catalyst to U 3 O 8 without any significant decrease in the reaction rate compared to that of the treatment without oxygen. (authors)

  20. Transformation of ranitidine during water chlorination and ozonation: Moiety-specific reaction kinetics and elimination efficiency of NDMA formation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Dahee; Kim, Jisoo; Shin, Jaedon; Hidayat, Zahra Ramadhany; Na, Soyoung; Lee, Yunho

    2016-11-15

    Ranitidine can produce high yields of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) upon chloramination and its presence in water resources is a concern for water utilities using chloramine disinfection. This study assessed the efficiency of water chlorination and ozonation in transforming ranitidine and eliminating its NDMA formation potential (NDMA-FP) by determining moiety-specific reaction kinetics, stoichiometric factors, and elimination levels in real water matrices. Despite the fact that chlorine reacts rapidly with the acetamidine and thioether moieties of ranitidine (k>10(8)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7), the NDMA-FP decreases significantly only when chlorine reacts with the less reactive tertiary amine (k=3×10(3)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7) or furan moiety (k=81M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7). Ozone reacts rapidly with all four moieties of ranitidine (k=1.5×10(5)-1.6×10(6)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7) and its reaction with the tertiary amine or furan moiety leads to complete elimination of the NDMA-FP. Treatments of ranitidine-spiked real water samples have shown that ozonation can efficiently deactivate ranitidine in water and wastewater treatment, while chlorination can be efficient for water containing low concentration of ammonia. This result can be applied to the other structurally similar, potent NDMA precursors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinetic investigation of the chlorine reduction reaction on electrochemically oxidised ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, M.; Karlsen, C.; Borresen, B.; Tunold, R.

    2006-01-01

    The rate and mechanism of the electroreduction of chlorine on electrooxidised ruthenium has been investigated with focus on the effect of solution pH. Current/potential curves for the reduction process in solutions with constant chloride concentration of 1.0 mol dm -3 and varying H + concentration have been obtained with the use of the rotating disk electrode technique (RDE). It was found that the chlorine reduction rate is highly inhibited in solutions with high H + concentrations and that it can be satisfactorily described by the Erenburg mechanism, previously suggested for the chlorine evolution on RuO 2 and RTO. The expression of the kinetic current as a function of chlorine and H + concentration was obtained by solving the elementary rate equations of the kinetic mechanism. The kinetic constants obtained from the correlation of the kinetic current expression to the experimental data were used to simulate the dependence of the surface coverages and elementary reaction rates on overpotential

  2. Reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine: Implications for herbicide transformation during drinking water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chusaksri, Sarinma; Sutthivaiyakit, Somyote; Sedlak, David L.; Sutthivaiyakit, Pakawadee

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanism of chlorine reaction with phenylurea compounds has been studied. ► It depends on both chlorinating species and substitutents on the compounds. ► Main products were identified using LC–MS/MS and authentic standards. ► Their transformation under normal drinking water disinfection was predicted. - Abstract: Phenylurea herbicides have been known to contaminate surface waters serving as potable supplies. To access the potential for transformation of these compounds during drinking water treatment, reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine at different pHs were investigated. The effect of substitution at the amino-N on the rate of transformation depends upon pH. Under acidic conditions, all of the phenylurea studied except 3,4-dichloro-3′-N-methylphenylurea (3,4-DCMPU) exhibited third-order kinetics, second order with respect to chlorine and first order with respect to phenylurea, while the reactions of 3,4-DCMPU were first order with respect to both chlorine and the organic compound. Under neutral and alkaline conditions, all compounds exhibited second-order kinetics that was first order with respect to chlorine and the organic compound. Apparent second-order rate constants at 25 °C and pH 7 were 0.76 ± 0.16, 0.52 ± 0.11, 0.39 ± 0.02, 0.27 ± 0.04 and 0.23 ± 0.05 M −1 s −1 for phenylurea, 3, 4-dichlorophenylurea, 3, 4-DCMPU, metoxuron and monuron, respectively. Studies of the chlorination products, monitored by LC/MS/MS, under different pH values indicated the reaction to take place at both N atoms and also at ortho- and para- positions of the phenylurea aromatic group. The main chlorinating species were found to be different in different pH ranges. Under conditions typically encountered in drinking water treatment systems, transformation of these compounds by chlorine will be incomplete.

  3. Reaction of Antimony-Uranium Composite Oxide in the Chlorination Treatment of Waste Catalyst - 13521

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Kayo [EcoTopia Science Institute (Japan); Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The effect of oxygen gas concentration on the chlorination treatment of antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst waste was investigated by adding different concentrations of oxygen at 0-6 vol% to its chlorination agent of 0.6 or 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas at 1173 K. The addition of oxygen tended to prevent the chlorination of antimony in the oxide. When 6 vol% hydrogen chloride gas was used, the addition of oxygen up to 0.1 vol% could convert the uranium contained in the catalyst to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} without any significant decrease in the reaction rate compared to that of the treatment without oxygen. (authors)

  4. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions 37 Cl on 40 Ca and 209 Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and 35 Cl, on 209 Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the 31 Cl on 209 Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system 37 Cl on 40 Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction 37 Cl on 40 Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids

  6. Literature information applicable to the reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine to prepare uranium tetrachloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, P.A.

    1992-02-01

    The reaction of uranium oxides and chlorine to prepare anhydrous uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}) are important to more economical preparation of uranium metal. The most practical reactions require carbon or carbon monoxide (CO) to give CO or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as waste gases. The chemistry of U-O-Cl compounds is very complex with valances of 3, 4, 5, and 6 and with stable oxychlorides. Literature was reviewed to collect thermochemical data, phase equilibrium information, and results of experimental studies. Calculations using thermodynamic data can identify the probable reactions, but the results are uncertain. All the U-O-Cl compounds have large free energies of formation and the calculations give uncertain small differences of large numbers. The phase diagram for UCl{sub 4}-UO{sub 2} shows a reaction to form uranium oxychloride (UOCl{sub 2}) that has a good solubility in molten UCl{sub 4}. This appears more favorable to good rates of reaction than reaction of solids and gases. There is limited information on U-O-Cl salt properties. Information on the preparation of titanium, zirconium, silicon, and thorium tetrachlorides (TiCl{sub 4}, ZrCl{sub 4}, SiCl{sub 4}, ThCl{sub 4}) by reaction of oxides with chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and carbon has application to the preparation of UCl{sub 4}.

  7. Literature information applicable to the reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine to prepare uranium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1992-02-01

    The reaction of uranium oxides and chlorine to prepare anhydrous uranium tetrachloride (UCl 4 ) are important to more economical preparation of uranium metal. The most practical reactions require carbon or carbon monoxide (CO) to give CO or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) as waste gases. The chemistry of U-O-Cl compounds is very complex with valances of 3, 4, 5, and 6 and with stable oxychlorides. Literature was reviewed to collect thermochemical data, phase equilibrium information, and results of experimental studies. Calculations using thermodynamic data can identify the probable reactions, but the results are uncertain. All the U-O-Cl compounds have large free energies of formation and the calculations give uncertain small differences of large numbers. The phase diagram for UCl 4 -UO 2 shows a reaction to form uranium oxychloride (UOCl 2 ) that has a good solubility in molten UCl 4 . This appears more favorable to good rates of reaction than reaction of solids and gases. There is limited information on U-O-Cl salt properties. Information on the preparation of titanium, zirconium, silicon, and thorium tetrachlorides (TiCl 4 , ZrCl 4 , SiCl 4 , ThCl 4 ) by reaction of oxides with chlorine (Cl 2 ) and carbon has application to the preparation of UCl 4

  8. EFFECT OF FLUORINE AND CHLORINE IONS ON THE REACTION SINTERING OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED ZIRCON-ALUMINA MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zamani Foroshani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of fluorine and chlorine ions on the formation of mullite during the reaction sintering of mechanically activated zircon-alumina powder mixture. The results showed that mechanical activation of zirconalumina powder mixture for 20 h led to grain refinement and partial amorphization. In the presence of fluorine and chlorine ions, complete formation of mullite in the mechanically activated sample occurred after 2 h of reaction sintering at 1300oC and 1400oC, respectively. In the sample lacking fluorine and chlorine ions, mullitization was not completed even after 2 h of reaction sintering at 1400oC. It was concluded that presence of fluorine and chlorine ions enhance the dissociation of zircon and formation of mullite during the reaction sintering of mechanically activated zircon-alumina mixture.

  9. One step synthesis of chlorine-free Pt/Nitrogen-doped graphene composite for oxygen reduction reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Tamá s; Varga, Á gnes Tí mea; Ballai, Gergő; Haspel, Henrik; Kukovecz, Á kos; Kó nya, Z.

    2018-01-01

    Chlorine-free Platinum/nitrogen-doped graphene oxygen reduction reaction catalysts were synthesized by a one step method of annealing a mixture of platinum acetylacetonate and graphene oxide under ammonia atmosphere. Nanoparticles with close

  10. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study on the chlorination of uranium oxide by gas-solid reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.; Park, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    In order to determine the operating condition of an uranium chlorination process with U 3 O 8 -C-Cl 2 system, the experimental conditions have been evaluated preliminarily by the thermochemical analysis and experimentally confirmed in this study. The dry-type chlorination of U 3 O 8 occurs as irreversible and exothermic reaction and produces many kinds of chloride compounds such as UCl 3 , UCl 4 , UCl 5 , and UCl 6 in the air and humidity controlled argon environment. Taking account of Gibbs free energy and vapor pressure for various chloride compounds, the proper temperature range of chlorination appears to be 863 to 953 K in aspects of increasing reaction rate and the yield of nonvolatile product. In the course of the experimental confirmation the powder of U 3 O 8 is perfectly converted into uranium chlorides within 4 hours above 863 K, and then the maximum fraction of uranium chloride remaining in the reactor is about 30% of total conversion mass. (author)

  11. Kinetics of chlorine--ammonia reactions in seawater. Annual report, June 1, 1977--May 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.D.; Inman, G.W. Jr.

    1978-11-01

    By employing stopped-flow techniques, rate constants were determined for the reactions of hypochlorous acid with bromide and ammonia in solutions at different pH's and salinities. Values for the specific rate constants at 25 0 C are 3.8 x 10 3 and 3.1 x 10 6 liters/mole-s, respectively for the following reactions HOC1 + Br - → HOBr + C1 - and HOC1 + NH 3 → NH 2 C1 + H 2 O. Speciation experiments were done with full strength chlorinated seawater enriched with ammonia. The resultant solutions were analyzed by uv spectroscopy, amperometric titration, and a membrane electrode. At low ammonia nitrogen and high initial chlorine concentrations, hypobromous acid and tribromamine formed. As the ratio of C1 2 to N was decreased, some dibromamine was observed and at ratios less than 1:1, monochloramine formed and eventually predominated. Preliminary experiments were also done to determine a rate constant for the oxidation of bromide by monochloramine. Results showed that even in full strength seawater the reaction was quite slow ;half life approx. 28 hours for [NH 2 C1] 0 2 ). The reaction was found to be pH dependent and yielded an unidentified product with a uv absorbance peak near 220 nm. 22 figures

  12. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the reaction between biological catecholamines and chlorinated methylperoxy radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimić, Dušan S.; Milenković, Dejan A.; Marković, Jasmina M. Dimitrić; Marković, Zoran S.

    2018-05-01

    The antiradical potency of catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, L-DOPA), metabolites of dopamine (homovanillic acid, 3-methoxytyramine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) and catechol towards substituted methylperoxy radicals is investigated. The thermodynamic parameters, together with the kinetic approach, are used to determine the most probable mechanism of action. The natural bond orbital and quantum theory of atoms in molecules are utilised to explain the highest reactivity of trichloromethylperoxy radical. The preferred mechanism is dependent both on the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters . The number of chlorine atoms on radical, the presence of intra-molecular hydrogen bond and number of hydroxy groups attached to the aromatic ring significantly influence the mechanism. The results suggest that sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) is the most probable for reaction with methylperoxy and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) for reaction with trichloromethylperoxy radicals, with a gradual transition between SPLET and HAT for other two radicals. Due to the significant deprotonation of molecules containing the carboxyl group, the respective anions are also investigated. The HAT and SPLET mechanisms are highly competitive in reaction with MP radical, while the dominant mechanism towards chlorinated radicals is HAT. The reactions in methanol and benzene are also discussed.

  13. Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene: how can dual Carbon-Chlorine isotopic measurements help elucidating the underlying reaction mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, Alice; Buttet, Géraldine; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Chlorinated ethenes (CEs) such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) are common persistent groundwater contaminants. Among clean-up strategies applied to sites affected by such pollution, bioremediation has been considered with a growing interest as it represents a cost-effective, environmental friendly approach. This technique however sometimes leads to an incomplete and slow biodegradation of CEs resulting in an accumulation of toxic metabolites. Understanding the reaction mechanisms underlying anaerobic reductive dechlorination would thus help assessing PCE biodegradation in polluted sites. Stable isotope analysis can provide insight into reaction mechanisms. For chlorinated hydrocarbons, carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) isotope data (δ13C and δ37Cl) tend to show a linear correlation with a slope (m ≡ ɛC/ɛCl) characteristic of the reaction mechanism [1]. This study hence aims at exploring the potential of a dual C-Cl isotope approach in the determination of the reaction mechanisms involved in PCE reductive dechlorination. C and Cl isotope fractionation were investigated during anaerobic PCE dechlorination by two bacterial consortia containing members of the Sulfurospirillum genus. The specificity in these consortia resides in the fact that they each conduct PCE reductive dechlorination catalysed by one different reductive dehalogenase, i.e. PceADCE which yields trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and PceATCE which yields TCE only. The bulk C isotope enrichment factors were -3.6±0.3 o for PceATCE and -0.7±0.1o for PceADCE. The bulk Cl isotope enrichment factors were -1.3±0.2 o for PceATCE and -0.9±0.1 o for PceADCE. When applying the dual isotope approach, two m values of 2.7±0.1 and 0.7±0.2 were obtained for the reductive dehalogenases PceATCE and PceADCE, respectively. These results suggest that PCE can be degraded according to two different mechanisms. Furthermore, despite their highly similar protein sequences, each reductive dehalogenase seems

  14. The atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate - reactions with atomic chlorine and with ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canosa-Mas, C.E.; Duffy, J.M.; Thompson, K.C.; Wayne, R.P. [Physical and Theoretical Chemical Lab., Oxford (United Kingdom); King, M.D. [King' s College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-05-01

    Methyl salicylate is one of a number of semiochemicals, signal molecules, emitted by herbivore-infested plants. These signal molecules attract predators of the herbivore, and the chemicals thus act indirectly as part of the defence mechanism of the plant. Previous studies have shown that ozone damage to plants can also elicit the emission of signal molecules. The fate of these signal molecules in the atmosphere is not known. Preliminary studies have been undertaken to examine the atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate for the first time. Rate coefficients for the reaction of methyl salicylate with atomic chlorine and with ozone have been determined; the values are (2.8()+-(0.3)x10{sup -12} and )approx4x10{sup -21} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These results suggest that neither reaction with atomic chlorine nor reaction with ozone will provide important loss routes for methyl salicylate in the atmosphere. The possible importance of photolysis of methyl salicylate in the atmosphere is considered. (Author)

  15. The atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate—reactions with atomic chlorine and with ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa-Mas, Carlos E.; Duffy, Justin M.; King, Martin D.; Thompson, Katherine C.; Wayne, Richard P.

    Methyl salicylate is one of a number of semiochemicals, signal molecules, emitted by herbivore-infested plants. These signal molecules attract predators of the herbivore, and the chemicals thus act indirectly as part of the defence mechanism of the plant. Previous studies have shown that ozone damage to plants can also elicit the emission of signal molecules. The fate of these signal molecules in the atmosphere is not known. Preliminary studies have been undertaken to examine the atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate for the first time. Rate coefficients for the reaction of methyl salicylate with atomic chlorine and with ozone have been determined; the values are (2.8±0.3)×10 -12 and ˜4×10 -21 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1. These results suggest that neither reaction with atomic chlorine nor reaction with ozone will provide important loss routes for methyl salicylate in the atmosphere. The possible importance of photolysis of methyl salicylate in the atmosphere is considered.

  16. Temperature dependence on plasma-induced damage and chemical reactions in GaN etching processes using chlorine plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zecheng; Ishikawa, Kenji; Imamura, Masato; Tsutsumi, Takayoshi; Kondo, Hiroki; Oda, Osamu; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2018-06-01

    Plasma-induced damage (PID) on GaN was optimally reduced by high-temperature chlorine plasma etching. Energetic ion bombardments primarily induced PID involving stoichiometry, surface roughness, and photoluminescence (PL) degradation. Chemical reactions under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and chlorine radical exposure at temperatures higher than 400 °C can be controlled by taking into account the synergism of simultaneous photon and radical irradiations to effectively reduce PID.

  17. Kinetics of the hydrogen production reaction in a copper-chlorine water splitting plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2009-01-01

    The exothermic reaction of HCl with particulate Cu occurs during hydrogen production step in the thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) water splitting cycle. In this paper, this chemical reaction is modeled kinetically, and a parametric study is performed to determine the influences of particle size, temperature and molar ratios on the reaction kinetics. It is determined that the residence time of copper particles varies between 10 and 100 s, depending on the operating conditions. The hydrogen conversion at equilibrium varies between 55 and 85%, depending on the reaction temperature. The heat flux at the particle surface, caused by the exothermic enthalpy of reaction, reaches about 3,000 W/m 2 when the particle shrinks to 0.1% from its initial size. A numerical algorithm is developed to solve the moving boundary Stefan problem with a chemical reaction. It predicts the shrinking of copper particles based on the hypothesis that the chemical reaction and heat transfer are decoupled. The model allows for estimation of the temperature of the copper particle, assumed spherical, in the radial direction. The maximum temperature at the interface is higher than the melting point of CuCl by 10-50 o C, depending on the assumed operating conditions. (author)

  18. Factorial analysis of the trihalomethane formation in the reaction of colloidal, hydrophobic, and transphilic fractions of DOM with free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platikanov, Stefan; Tauler, Roma; Rodrigues, Pedro M S M; Antunes, Maria Cristina G; Pereira, Dilson; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2010-09-01

    analysis of the fractions, is important issue in the revealing of the quality and quantity characteristics of DOM. Systematic study composed from DOM fraction investigation and factorial analysis of the responsible parameters in the THM formation reaction can, after an evaluation of the adjustment of the models with the reality, serves well for the evaluation of the spatial and temporal variability in the THM formation in dependence of DOM. However, taking into consideration the natural complexity of DOM, different operations and a strict control of them (like coagulation/flocculation and filtration) has to be used to quantitatively remove DOM from the raw water. Assuming that this study represents a local case study, similar experiments can be easily applied and will supply with relevant information every local water treatment plant meeting problems with THM formation. The coagulation/flocculation and the filtration stages are the main mechanisms to remove DOM, particularly the colloidal DOM fraction. With the objective to minimize THMs generation, different unit operation designed to quantitatively remove DOM from water must be optimized.

  19. Transformation of aminopyrine in the presence of free available chlorine: Kinetics, products, and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Quan; Feng, Li; Zhang, Li-Qiu

    2017-03-01

    Aminopyrine (AMP) has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In this study, the transformation mechanism of AMP by free available chlorine (FAC) oxidation was investigated. The results showed that FAC reacted with AMP rapidly, and a 74% elimination was achieved for 1.30 μM AMP after 2 min at 14.08 μM FAC dose. AMP chlorination was strongly pH-dependent, and its reaction included second- and third-order kinetic processes. Three active FAC species, including chlorine monoxide (Cl 2 O), molecular chlorine (Cl 2 ), and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), were observed to contribute to AMP degradation. The intrinsic rate constants of each FAC species with neutral (AMP 0 ) and cation (AMP + ) species were obtained by kinetic fitting. Cl 2 O exhibited the highest reactivity with AMP 0 (k AMP0, Cl2O  = (4.33 ± 1.4) × 10 9  M -1 s -1 ). In addition, Cl 2 showed high reactivity (10 6 -10 7  M -1 s -1 ) in the presence of chloride, compared with HOCl (k AMP+, HOCl  = (5.73 ± 0.23) × 10 2  M -1 s -1 , k AMP0, HOCl  = (9.68 ± 0.96) × 10 2  M -1 s -1 ). At pH 6.15 and 14.08 μM FAC dose without chloride addition, the contribution of Cl 2 O reached to the maximum (33.3%), but in the whole pH range, HOCl was the main contributor (>66.6%) for AMP degradation. The significance of Cl 2 was noticeable in water containing chloride. Moreover, 11 transformation products were identified, and the main transformation pathways included pyrazole ring breakage, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and halogenation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Citric acid-modified Fenton's reaction for the oxidation of chlorinated ethylenes in soil solution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-06-01

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H2O2 concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H2O2 relative to iron catalysts (Fe2+/H2O2<1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelation in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  1. Action of the chlorine trifluoride on water vapour. Analysis of reaction products. Technical report - 589

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougon, R.

    1961-06-01

    As the separation of uranium 235 from uranium 238 by gaseous diffusion under the form of uranium hexa-fluoride requires the use of materials which may contain some impurities retained by chemical or physical bounds, this report addresses the use of a reactant which would allow these impurities to be removed. Due to its properties (inert with respect to UF 6 ; transforms most of impurities into volatile compounds, and different UF compounds into UF 6 ; strongly reacts on water; all its degradation products are volatile), chlorine trifluoride (ClF 3 ) has been chosen. It is used for the preprocessing of materials for their passivation with respect to UF 6 , and for a post-processing for the regeneration of porous materials by transformation of UF 4 , UO 2 F 2 and UF x into UF 6 . The authors more particularly studied the reaction between ClF 3 and water

  2. Transformation of methylparaben during water chlorination: Effects of bromide and dissolved organic matter on reaction kinetics and transformation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoom, Hoonsik; Shin, Jaedon; Ra, Jiwoon; Son, Heejong; Ryu, Dongchoon; Kim, Changwon; Lee, Yunho

    2018-09-01

    The reaction kinetics, products, and pathways of methylparaben (MeP) during water chlorination with and without bromide (Br - ) were investigated to better understand the fate of parabens in chlorinated waters. During the chlorination of MeP-spiked waters without Br - , MeP was transformed into mono-Cl-MeP and di-Cl-MeP with apparent second-order rate constants (k app ) of 64M -1 s -1 and 243M -1 s -1 at pH7, respectively, while further chlorination of di-Cl-MeP was relatively slower (k app =1.3M -1 s -1 at pH7). With increasing Br - concentration, brominated MePs, such as mono-Br-MeP, Br-Cl-MeP, and di-Br-MeP, became major transformation products. The di-halogenated MePs (di-Cl-MeP, Br,Cl-MeP, and di-Br-MeP) showed relatively low reactivity to chlorine at pH7 (k app =1.3-4.6M -1 s -1 ) and bromine (k app =32-71M -1 s -1 ), which explains the observed high stability of di-halogenated MePs in chlorinated waters. With increasing pH from 7 to 8.5, the transformation of di-halogenated MePs was further slowed due to the decreasing reactivity of di-MePs to chlorine. The formation of the di-halogenated MePs and their further transformation become considerably faster at Br - concentrations higher than 0.5μM (40μg/L). Nonetheless, the accelerating effect of Br - diminishes in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extract (Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)) due to a more rapid consumption of bromine by DOM than chlorine. The effect of Br - on the fate of MeP was less in the tested real water matrices, possibly due to a more rapid bromine consumption by the real water DOM compared to SRHA. A kinetic model was developed based on the determined species-specific second-order rate constants for chlorination/bromination of MeP and its chlorinated and brominated MePs and the transformation pathway information, which could reasonably simulate the transformation of MePs during the chlorination of water in the presence of Br - and selected DOM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  3. Highly selective transformation of ammonia nitrogen to N2 based on a novel solar-driven photoelectrocatalytic-chlorine radical reactions system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Youzhi; Bai, Jing; Li, Jinhua; Luo, Tao; Qiao, Li; Zeng, Qingyi; Zhou, Baoxue

    2017-11-15

    A highly selective method for transforming ammonia nitrogen to N 2 was proposed, based on a novel solar-driven photoelectrocatalytic-chlorine radical reactions (PEC-chlorine) system. The PEC-chlorine system was facilitated by a visible light response WO 3 nanoplate array (NPA) electrode in an ammonia solution containing chloride ions (Cl - ). Under illumination, photoholes from WO 3 promote the oxidation of Cl - to chlorine radical (Cl). This radical can selectively transform ammonia nitrogen to N 2 (79.9%) and NO 3 - (19.2%), similar to the breakpoint chlorination reaction. The ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency increased from 10.6% (PEC without Cl - ) to 99.9% with the PEC-chlorine system within 90 min operation, which can be attributed to the cyclic reactions between Cl - /Cl and the reaction intermediates (NH 2 , NHCl, etc.) that expand the degradation reactions from the surface of the electrodes to the whole solution system. Moreover, Cl is the main radical species contributing to the transformation of ammonia nitrogen to N 2 , which is confirmed by the tBuOH capture experiment. Compared to conventional breakpoint chlorination, the PEC-chlorine system is a more economical and efficient means for ammonia nitrogen degradation because of the fast removal rate, no additional chlorine cost, and its use of clean energy (since it is solar-driven). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MULTICOMPONENT DETERMINATION OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS USING A REACTION-BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR .2. CHEMICAL SPECIATION USING MULTIVARIATE CURVE RESOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tauler, R.; Smilde, A. K.; HENSHAW, J. M.; BURGESS, L. W.; KOWALSKI, B. R.

    1994-01-01

    A new multivariate curve resolution method that can extract analytical information from UV/visible spectroscopic data collected from a reaction-based chemical sensor is proposed. The method is demonstrated with the determination of mixtures of chlorinated hydrocarbons by estimating the kinetic and

  5. Chlorine in solid fuels fired in pulverized fuel boilers sources, forms, reactions, and consequences: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Tillman; Dao Duong; Bruce Miller [Foster Wheeler North America Corp. (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Chlorine is a significant source of corrosion and deposition, both from coal and from biomass, and in PF boilers. This investigation was designed to highlight the potential for corrosion risks associated with once-through units and advanced cycles. The research took the form of a detailed literature investigation to evaluate chlorine in solid fuels: coals of various ranks and origins, biomass fuels of a variety of types, petroleum cokes, and blends of the above. The investigation focused upon an extensive literature review of documents dating back to 1991. The focus is strictly corrosion and deposition. To address the deposition and corrosion issues, this review evaluates the following considerations: concentrations of chlorine in available solid fuels including various coals and biomass fuels, forms of chlorine in those fuels, and reactions - including reactivities - of chlorine in such fuels. The assessment includes consideration of alkali metals and alkali earth elements as they react with, and to, the chlorine and other elements (e.g., sulfur) in the fuel and in the gaseous products of combustion. The assessment also includes other factors of combustion: for example, combustion conditions including excess O{sub 2} and combustion temperatures. It also considers analyses conducted at all levels: theoretical calculations, bench scale laboratory data and experiments, pilot plant experiments, and full scale plant experience. Case studies and plant surveys form a significant consideration in this review. The result of this investigation focuses upon the concentrations of chlorine acceptable in coals burned exclusively, in coals burned with biomass, and in biomass cofired with coal. Values are posited based upon type of fuel and combustion technology. Values are also posited based upon both first principles and field experience. 86 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Chlorine in the stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    VON CLARMANN, T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the various aspects of chlorine compounds in the stratosphere, both their roles as reactants and as tracers of dynamical processes. In the stratosphere, reactive chlorine is released from chlorofluorocarbons and other chlorine-containing organic source gases. To a large extent reactive chlorine is then sequestered in reservoir species ClONO2 and HCl. Re-activation of chlorine happens predominantly in polar winter vortices by heterogeneous reaction in combination with sunlig...

  7. Chlorine Evolution Reaction on RuO2(110): Ab initio Atomistic Thermodynamics Study - Pourbaix Diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exner, Kai S.; Anton, Josef; Jacob, Timo; Over, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Using the method Pourbaix diagram we identified the oxygen covered RuO 2 (110) surface as the catalytically active phase under chlorine evolution reaction (CER) conditions. This active phase is compared with the active phase in the Deacon process, the heterogeneous gas phase counterpart of the CER. - Abstract: Constrained ab initio thermodynamics in the form of a Pourbaix diagram can greatly assist kinetic modeling of a particular electrochemical reaction such as the chlorine evolution reaction (CER) over RuO 2 (110). Pourbaix diagrams reveal stable surface structures, as a function of pH and the potential. The present DFT study indicates that the Pourbaix diagram in the CER potential region above 1.36 V and pH values around zero is dominated by a stable surface structure in which all coordinatively undercoordinated Ru sites (Ru cus ) are capped by on-top oxygen (O ot ). This oxygen saturated RuO 2 (110) surface is considered to serve as the catalytically active phase in the CER, quite in contrast to the heterogeneously catalyzed HCl oxidation (Deacon process), for which the active RuO 2 (110) surface is mainly covered by on-top chlorine. The active sites in the CER are suggested to be Ru cus O ot surface complexes, while in the Deacon process both undercoordinated surface Ru and oxygen sites must be available for the activation of HCl molecules

  8. Heterogeneous chemical reaction of chlorine nitrate and water on sulfuric-acid surfaces at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The use of H2SO4 as a catalyst for aerosol production of chlorine compounds in the chemistry of the antarctic stratosphere was investigated in laboratory trials. The experiments involved the gas surface collision rate of a molecule on a given surface during its residence time in a Knudsen cell in molecular flow conditions. Chlorine nitrate gas was made to flow through a chamber exposed to a container holding a 95.6 pct H2SO4 solution. Gas leaving the cell was scanned with a mass spectrometer. A sticking coefficient of 0.00032 was found for the chlorine nitrate, a value five times that previously reported.

  9. Chlorine Dioxide-Iodide-Methyl Acetoacetate Oscillation Reaction Investigated by UV-Vis and Online FTIR Spectrophotometric Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laishun Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the chemical oscillatory behavior and mechanism of a new chlorine dioxide-iodide ion-methyl acetoacetate reaction system, a series of experiments were done by using UV-Vis and online FTIR spectrophotometric method. The initial concentrations of methyl acetoacetate, chlorine dioxide, potassium iodide, and sulfuric acid and the pH value have great influence on the oscillation observed at wavelength of 289 nm. There is a preoscillatory or induction period, and the amplitude and the number of oscillations are associated with the initial concentration of reactants. The equations for the triiodide ion reaction rate changing with reaction time and the initial concentrations in the oscillation stage were obtained. Oscillation reaction can be accelerated by increasing temperature. The apparent activation energies in terms of the induction period and the oscillation period were 26.02 KJ/mol and 17.65 KJ/mol, respectively. The intermediates were detected by the online FTIR analysis. Based upon the experimental data in this work and in the literature, a plausible reaction mechanism was proposed for the oscillation reaction.

  10. Chlorination of zirconyte concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Chlorination experiments with zirconyte concentrate were carried out in order to study the effects of temperature, percentage of reducing agent and porosity on the gasification of ZrO 2 for 10 and 20 minutes of reaction. Factorial analysis was applied and the results indicated that temperature and percentage of reducing agent were the two only variables effecting the ZrO 2 gasification. (author) [pt

  11. Kinetic study of the reaction of chlorine atoms with hydroxyacetone in gas-phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeffler, Clara; Joly, Lilian; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Bruyant, Aurélien; Roth, Estelle; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-12-01

    function of temperature (233-298 K) were performed by Dillon et al. [7]. An experimental (laser photolysis/FIL) and theoretical approach (quantum calculation) were realized. This study showed that the oxidation of HA by OH-radicals has a negative temperature coefficient which is explained by an intermediate complex formation. Another study as a function of temperature was conducted by Butkovskaya et al. using the technique of a turbulent flow reactor coupled with a mass spectrometer chemical ionization [8]. This work was purely mechanistic and it shows that the mechanism of this reaction changes with temperature: a temperature increase favors the production yields of methanoic and ethanoic acids and reduces the formation yield of methylglyoxal [8]. Our work is motivated by the fact that the kinetic studies of the reaction of HA with chlorine radicals are rare in comparison with the kinetic studies of the reaction of HA with OH radicals. So far, only one such kinetic study is reported in the literature. It has been carried out by Orlando et al. at 294 K [6]. To the best of our knowledge, this reaction has not yet been studied as a function of temperature. Therefore, to enrich kinetic data concerning this compound, the study of HA with Cl atoms reaction as a function of temperature has been undertaken. Experiments are carried out using the relative technique in a simulation chamber coupled with an infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) spectrometer and a quantum cascade laser in external cavity (ECQCL) at 1 bar with the temperature ranging 277-350 K. Using both FTIR and ECQCL techniques allows comparing the measurements sensitivity and improving the kinetic precision determination. The FTIR spectroscopy is widely used to perform kinetic measurements whereas the ECQCL spectrometer is quite original in kinetic studies. Laser spectrometry indeed presents advantages such as high sensitivity, high resolution, and fast acquisition time compared to the FTIR spectrometer. The ECQCL

  12. Full Kinetics from First Principles of the Chlorine Evolution Reaction over a RuO2 (110) Model Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, Kai S; Anton, Josef; Jacob, Timo; Over, Herbert

    2016-06-20

    Current progress in modern electrocatalysis research is spurred by theory, frequently based on ab initio thermodynamics, where the stable reaction intermediates at the electrode surface are identified, while the actual energy barriers are ignored. This approach is popular in that a simple tool is available for searching for promising electrode materials. However, thermodynamics alone may be misleading to assess the catalytic activity of an electrochemical reaction as we exemplify with the chlorine evolution reaction (CER) over a RuO2 (110) model electrode. The full procedure is introduced, starting from the stable reaction intermediates, computing the energy barriers, and finally performing microkinetic simulations, all performed under the influence of the solvent and the electrode potential. Full kinetics from first-principles allows the rate-determining step in the CER to be identified and the experimentally observed change in the Tafel slope to be explained. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Reaction of diazepam and related benzodiazepines with chlorine. Kinetics, transformation products and in-silico toxicological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteiro, Inmaculada; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the reaction of four benzodiazepines (diazepam, oxazepam, nordazepam and temazepam) during water chlorination was studied by means of liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS). For those compounds that showed a significant degradation, i.e. diazepam, oxazepam and nordazepam, parameters affecting to the reaction kinetics (pH, chlorine and bromide level) were studied in detail and transformation products were tentatively identified. The oxidation reactions followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with rate constants in the range of 1.8-42.5 M -1  s -1 , 0.13-1.16 M -1  s -1 and 0.04-20.4 M -1  s -1 corresponding to half-life values in the range of 1.9-146 min, 1.8-87 h and 2.5-637 h for oxazepam, nordazepam and diazepam, respectively, depending of the levels of studied parameters. Chlorine and pH affected significantly the reaction kinetics, where an increase of the pH resulted into a decrease of the reaction rate, whereas higher chlorine dosages led to faster kinetics, as expected in this case. The transformation of the studied benzodiazepines occurs mainly at the 1,4-diazepine 7-membered-ring, resulting in ring opening to form benzophenone derivatives or the formation of a 6-membered pyrimidine ring, leading to quinazoline derivatives. The formation of these by-products was also tested in real surface water samples observing kinetics of oxazepam degradation slower in river than in creek water, while the degradation of the two other benzodiazepines occurred only in the simpler sample (creek water). Finally, the acute and chronical toxicity and mutagenicity of precursors and transformation products were estimated using quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) software tools: Ecological Structure Activity Relationships (ECOSAR) and Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST), finding that some transformation products could be more toxic/mutagenic than the precursor drug, but additional test would be needed

  14. Practical applications of the Fenton reaction to the removal of chlorinated aromatic pollutants. Oxidative degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detomaso, Antonia; Lopez, Antonio; Lovecchio, Giangiuseppe; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Curci, Ruggero

    2003-01-01

    Chlorophenols (CPs) constitute a group of organic pollutants that are introduced into the environment as a result of several man-made activities, such as uncontrolled use of pesticides and herbicides, and as byproducts in the paper pulp bleaching. Promising removal technologies of chlorinated aromatics consist in the application of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) that can provide an almost total degradation of a variety of contaminants. Among these, wide application find Fenton systems based on generation of reactive species having a high oxidizing power, such as hydroxyl radical HO*. Our objective was that of determining the overall degradation efficiency of the model compound 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) by thermal Fenton-type oxidation systems with a view toward defining in more details relevant process parameters, the effect of reaction temperature and of co-catalyst Cu2+. Reaction conditions were similar to those generally adopted as optimal in many practical applications, i.e. pollutant/Fe2+ (as FeSO4) ratio ca. 20, Fe2+/Cu2+ (co-catalyst) 2:1, pH adjusted and controlled at pH 3, and H2O2 in excess (up to four-fold over the stoichiometric amount required for complete mineralization). The results demonstrate that it is advantageous to carry out the reaction at a temperature markedly higher (70 degrees C) than ambient. The stepwise addition of H2O2 in aliquots yields an efficient transformation, while allowing a convenient control of the reaction exothermicity. Under these conditions, the essentially complete removal of the initial DCP is accomplished using just one equiv of H2O2 during 15 min; excess H2O2 (5 equivalents) yields extensive substrate mineralization. Also relevant, at 70 degrees C dechlorination of the initial DCP (and of derived reaction intermediates) is remarkably extensive (3-5% residual TOX), already with the addition of 1 equiv of H2O2. At the end of the reaction, IC and IC-MS analyses of the solution reveal that only low-molecular weight

  15. Pervaporation applied for dewatering of reaction mixture during esterification

    OpenAIRE

    Krasiński Andrzej; Wierzba Patrycja; Grudzień Agata; Hajmowicz Halina; Zawada Krzysztof; Synoradzki Ludwik

    2016-01-01

    In this work the esterification of diethyl tartrate was studied. The research was focused on the enhancement of reversible reaction yield, which is accomplished by dewatering of the reaction mixture. The removal of water shifts the equilibrium towards the main product. Pervaporation was applied for this purpose, and results were compared to distillation. The advantages and limitations of both processes are discussed. The experimental part consists of dewatering of mixture after the reaction h...

  16. Experimental Study of Closed System in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodide-Sulfuric Acid Reaction by UV-Vis Spectrophotometric Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mole ratio r(r=[I−]0/[ClO2]0 has great influence on ClO2-I−-H2SO4 closed reaction system. By changing the initiate concentration of potassium iodide, the curve of absorbance along with the reaction time was obtained at 350 nm and 297 nm for triiodide ion, and 460 nm for iodine. The changing point of the absorbance curve's shape locates at r=6.00. For the reaction of ClO2-I− in the absence of H2SO4, the curve of absorbance along with the reaction time can be obtained at 350 nm for triiodide ion, 460 nm for iodine. The mole ratio r is equal to 1.00 is the changing point of the curve's shape no matter at which wavelength to determine the reaction. For the reaction of ClO2-I−-H+ in different pH buffer solution, the curve of absorbance along with the reaction time was recorded at 460 nm for iodine. When r is greater than 1.00, the transition point of the curve's shape locates at pH 2.0, which is also the point of producing chlorite or chloride for chlorine dioxide at different pH. When r is less than 1.00, the transition point locates at pH 7.0.

  17. Solidification of metal chloride waste from pyrochemical process via dechlorination-chlorination reaction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.S.; Cho, I.H.; Lee, K.R.; Choi, J.H.; Eun, H.C.; Kim, I.T.; Park, G.I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    The metal chloride wastes generated from the pyro-chemical process to recover uranium and TRUs has been considered as a problematic waste due to the high volatility and low compatibility with conventional silicate glass. Our research group has suggested the dechlorination approach for the solidification of this kind of waste by using a synthetic composite, SAP (SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}). During the dechlorination, metal elements are chemically interacted with the inorganic composite, SAP, while chlorine is vaporized as gaseous chlorine. Metal elements in the salt were immobilized into phosphate and silicate glass which are uniformly distributed in tens of nm scale. During the dechlorination, gaseous chlorine is captured by Li{sub 2}O-Li{sub 2}O{sub 2} composite that can be converted into metal chloride (LiCl). About 98wt% of oxide composite was converted into LiCl that can be used as an electrolyte in the electrochemical process. The method suggested in this study can provide a chance to minimize the waste volume for the final disposal of salt wastes from a pyro-chemical process. (author)

  18. Reaction of bromine and chlorine with phenolic compounds and natural organic matter extracts--Electrophilic aromatic substitution and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Rodriguez, Eva M; Allard, Sebastien; Wellauer, Sven; Salhi, Elisabeth; Joll, Cynthia A; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-11-15

    Phenolic compounds are known structural moieties of natural organic matter (NOM), and their reactivity is a key parameter for understanding the reactivity of NOM and the disinfection by-product formation during oxidative water treatment. In this study, species-specific and/or apparent second order rate constants and mechanisms for the reactions of bromine and chlorine have been determined for various phenolic compounds (phenol, resorcinol, catechol, hydroquinone, phloroglucinol, bisphenol A, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, hesperetin and tannic acid) and flavone. The reactivity of bromine with phenolic compounds is very high, with apparent second order rate constants at pH 7 in the range of 10(4) to 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The highest value was recorded for the reaction between HOBr and the fully deprotonated resorcinol (k = 2.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The reactivity of phenolic compounds is enhanced by the activating character of the phenolic substituents, e.g. further hydroxyl groups. With the data set from this study, the ratio between the species-specific rate constants for the reactions of chlorine versus bromine with phenolic compounds was confirmed to be about 3000. Phenolic compounds react with bromine or chlorine either by oxidation (electron transfer, ET) or electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS) processes. The dominant process mainly depends on the relative position of the hydroxyl substituents and the possibility of quinone formation. While phenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and bisphenol A undergo EAS, hydroquinone, catechol, gallic acid and tannic acid, with hydroxyl substituents in ortho or para positions, react with bromine by ET leading to quantitative formation of the corresponding quinones. Some compounds (e.g. phloroglucinol) show both partial oxidation and partial electrophilic aromatic substitution and the ratio observed for the pathways depends on the pH. For the reaction of six NOM extracts with bromine, electrophilic aromatic substitution

  19. Dose and temperature criteria for radiation chlorination of ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasil, Z.

    1979-01-01

    General criteria determining the region of dose rates and temperatures at which a radiation-induced chain reaction proceeds are applied to a series of subsequent and competitive chain reactions of the chlorination of ethane and its derivatives. The calculations presume that the reactions proceed in an ideal through-flow chemical reactor with a piston flow. (M.S.)

  20. Reaction to fire of ETICS applied on wood particle board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonati Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As well known the ETICS are diffusely used both for energy saving and thermal insulation reasons. They have been applied recently in wood buildings and in regions of southern Europe too due to green building and sustainability reasons. ITC-CNR has tested a lot of building materials and developed good knowledge about reaction to fire since the 1980 and currently, ETICS fixed directly to particle wood panels have been investigated with several SBI tests. In the case study are presented the main factors that can influence the fire reaction results when applied on wood structure are highlighted: the thickness of the insulating material, the presence of accidental damage, the flame attack from the inside. From the results obtained by tests on samples prepared with simulated accidental damages and fire from inside, some considerations are made about the hazard due to this specific construction technology and others on limits of the type of actually used standards product classification.

  1. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  2. One step synthesis of chlorine-free Pt/Nitrogen-doped graphene composite for oxygen reduction reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Tamás

    2018-03-14

    Chlorine-free Platinum/nitrogen-doped graphene oxygen reduction reaction catalysts were synthesized by a one step method of annealing a mixture of platinum acetylacetonate and graphene oxide under ammonia atmosphere. Nanoparticles with close to the ideal particle size for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were formed, i.e., with diameter of 3–4 nm (500 and 600 °C) and 6 nm (700 °C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the successful introduction of both pyridinic and pyrrolic type nitrogen moieties into the graphene layers, which indicates a strong interaction between the nanoparticles and the graphene layers. The electrocatalytic activity of glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with the synthesized Pt/NG samples for oxygen reduction was compared to that of a platinum/carbon black catalyst modified electrode in acidic and alkaline media. Based on the measured limiting current densities and calculated electron transfer number, the highest activity was measured in acidic and alkaline media on the samples annealed at 600 and 700 °C, respectively.

  3. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and structurally related amines by chlorine dioxide: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; He, Yi-Liang; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a group of widely prescribed antibiotics and have been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven FQs (ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL), lomefloxacin (LOM), pipemidic acid (PIP) and flumequine (FLU)) and three structurally related amines (1-phenylpiperazine (PP), N-phenylmorpholine (PM) and 4-phenylpiperidine (PD)) toward chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) were investigated to elucidate the behavior of FQs during ClO(2) disinfection processes. The reaction kinetics are highly pH-dependent, can be well described by a second-order kinetic model incorporating speciation of FQs, and follow the trend of OFL > ENR > CIP ∼ NOR ∼ LOM > > PIP in reactivity. Comparison among FQs and related amines and product characterization indicate that FQs' piperazine ring is the primary reactive center toward ClO(2). ClO(2) likely attacks FQ's piperazinyl N4 atom followed by concerted fragmentation involving piperazinyl N1 atom, leading to dealkylation, hydroxylation and intramolecular ring closure at the piperazine moiety. While FQs with tertiary N4 react faster with ClO(2) than FQs with secondary N4, the overall reactivity of the piperazine moiety also depends strongly on the quinolone ring through electronic effects. The reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to model the decay of CIP by ClO(2) in surface water samples, but overestimate the decay in wastewater samples. Overall, transformation of FQs, particularly for those with tertiary N4 amines, could be expected under typical ClO(2) disinfection conditions. However, the transformation may not eliminate antibacterial activity because of little destruction at the quinolone ring. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Locking of Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction with one-dimensional spatial periodic forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnik, Milos; Bánsági, Tamás; Ansari, Sama; Valent, Ivan; Epstein, Irving R

    2011-07-21

    We use the photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system to study wavenumber locking of Turing patterns with spatial periodic forcing. Wavenumber-locked stripe patterns are the typical resonant structures that labyrinthine patterns exhibit in response to one-dimensional forcing by illumination when images of stripes are projected on a working medium. Our experimental results reveal that segmented oblique, hexagonal and rectangular patterns can also be obtained. However, these two-dimensional resonant structures only develop in a relatively narrow range of forcing parameters, where the unforced stripe pattern is in close proximity to the domain of hexagonal patterns. Numerical simulations based on a model that incorporates the forcing by illumination using an additive term reproduce well the experimental observations. These findings confirm that additive one-dimensional forcing can generate a two-dimensional resonant response. However, such a response is considerably less robust than the effect of multiplicative forcing. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  5. Pervaporation applied for dewatering of reaction mixture during esterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasiński Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the esterification of diethyl tartrate was studied. The research was focused on the enhancement of reversible reaction yield, which is accomplished by dewatering of the reaction mixture. The removal of water shifts the equilibrium towards the main product. Pervaporation was applied for this purpose, and results were compared to distillation. The advantages and limitations of both processes are discussed. The experimental part consists of dewatering of mixture after the reaction had reached the equilibrium, and was subsequently fed to the test rig equipped with a single zeolite membrane purchased from Pervatech B.V. Results show a significant conversion increase as a result of water removal by pervaporation. Compared to distillation no addition of organics is necessary to efficiently remove water above the azeotrope. Nevertheless, some limitations and issues which call for optimisation are pointed out. A simple numerical model is proposed to support design and sizing of the pervaporation system. Various modes of integrated system operation are also briefly discussed.

  6. Chlorination and chloramines formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Lim Fang; Mohd Pauzi Abdullah; Sadia Ata; Abbas Abdullah; Basar IShak; Khairul Nidzham

    2008-01-01

    Chlorination is the most important method of disinfection in Malaysia which aims at ensuring an acceptable and safe drinking water quality. The dosing of chlorine to surface water containing ammonia and nitrogen compounds may form chloramines in the treated water. During this reaction, inorganic and organic chloramines are formed. The recommended maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for chloramines in drinking water is 3000 μg/L. The production of monochloramine, dichloramine and trichloramine is highly dependent upon pH, contact time and the chlorine to ammonia molar ratio. The purpose of this study is to examine the formation of chloramines that occur upon the chlorination during the treatment process. Chloramines were determined using the N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD) colorimetric method. The influences of ammonia, pH and chlorine dosage on the chloramines formation were also studied. This paper presents a modeling approach based on regression analysis which is designed to estimate the formation of chloramines. The correlation between the concentration of chloramines and the ammonia, pH and chlorine dosage was examined. In all cases, the quantity of chloramines formed depended linearly upon the amount of chlorine dosage. On the basis of this study it reveals that the concentration of chloramines is a function of chlorine dosage and the ammonia concentration to the chlorination process. PH seems to not significantly affect the formation of chloramines. (author)

  7. Solvent effects on the kinetics of the chlorine isotopic exchange reaction between chloride ion and O,O-diphenyl phosphorochloridate or O,O-diphenyl phosphorchloridothioate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolajczyk, M.; Slebocka-Tilk, H.; Reimschussel, W.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of solvent on the kinetics of the chlorine isotopic exchange reaction between 36 Cl- ions and O,O-diphenyl phosphorochloridate or O,O-diphenyl phosphorochloridothioate has been investigated in nitromethane, acetonitrile, propylene carbonate, benzonitrile, nitrobenzene, and hexamethyl-phosphoric triamide. The rate constants decrease with increasing electrophilicity of the solvent. A good correlation between the logarithm of the rate constants and acceptor number (AN) of the solvent was obtained with identical slopes for reactions with phosphoryl and thiophosporyl compounds. The slopes for the dependence of ΔH or TΔS vs. AN for chlorine isotopic exchange in (PHO) 2 pace are opposite those for the exchange reaction in (PHO) 2 PSCl, so a constant ratio of k/sub p=O//k/sub p=s/ is observed, resulting from compensation of ΔH by ΔS. The effect of solvent on the initial state (from solubility measurements) and the transition state of the reaction between (PhO) 2 PSCl and the Cl- ion was evaluated. Changes of solvation of (PHO) 2 PSCE have practically no effect on the kinetics of the reactions. Changes of solvation of the chloride ion and of the transition state primarily influence the rate constants and activation parameters of the investigated isotopic-exchange reaction

  8. Universal ligation-detection-reaction microarray applied for compost microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romantschuk Martin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Composting is one of the methods utilised in recycling organic communal waste. The composting process is dependent on aerobic microbial activity and proceeds through a succession of different phases each dominated by certain microorganisms. In this study, a ligation-detection-reaction (LDR based microarray method was adapted for species-level detection of compost microbes characteristic of each stage of the composting process. LDR utilises the specificity of the ligase enzyme to covalently join two adjacently hybridised probes. A zip-oligo is attached to the 3'-end of one probe and fluorescent label to the 5'-end of the other probe. Upon ligation, the probes are combined in the same molecule and can be detected in a specific location on a universal microarray with complementary zip-oligos enabling equivalent hybridisation conditions for all probes. The method was applied to samples from Nordic composting facilities after testing and optimisation with fungal pure cultures and environmental clones. Results Probes targeted for fungi were able to detect 0.1 fmol of target ribosomal PCR product in an artificial reaction mixture containing 100 ng competing fungal ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS area or herring sperm DNA. The detection level was therefore approximately 0.04% of total DNA. Clone libraries were constructed from eight compost samples. The LDR microarray results were in concordance with the clone library sequencing results. In addition a control probe was used to monitor the per-spot hybridisation efficiency on the array. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the LDR microarray method is capable of sensitive and accurate species-level detection from a complex microbial community. The method can detect key species from compost samples, making it a basis for a tool for compost process monitoring in industrial facilities.

  9. Reduction reactions applied for synthesizing different nano-structured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque Brocchi, Eduardo de; Correia de Siqueira, Rogério Navarro [Department of Materials Engineering, PUC-Rio, Rua Marquês de São Vicente, 225, Gávea, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Motta, Marcelo Senna [Basck Ltd. (United Kingdom); Moura, Francisco José, E-mail: moura@puc-rio.br [Department of Materials Engineering, PUC-Rio, Rua Marquês de São Vicente, 225, Gávea, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Solórzano-Naranjo, Ivan Guillermo [Department of Materials Engineering, PUC-Rio, Rua Marquês de São Vicente, 225, Gávea, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Different materials have been synthesized by alternative routes: nitrates thermal decomposition to prepare oxide or co-formed oxides and reduction by hydrogen or graphite to obtain mixed oxides, composites or alloys. These chemical-based synthesis routes are described and thermodynamics studies and kinetics data are presented to support its feasibility. In addition, selective reduction reactions have been applied to successfully produce metal/ceramic composites, and alloys. Structural characterization has been carried out by X-ray Diffraction and, more extensively, Transmission Electron Microscopy operating in conventional diffraction contrast (CTEM) and high-resolution mode (HRTEM), indicated the possibility of obtaining oxide and alloy crystals of sizes ranging between 20 and 40 nm. - Highlights: • The viability in obtaining Ni–Co, Cu–Al, Mn–Al co-formed nano oxides was evaluated. • Partial and complete H{sub 2} reduction were used to produce alloy, composite and Spinel. • XRD, TEM and HREM techniques were used to characterize the obtained nanostructures.

  10. Formation of trihalomethanes from the halogenation of 1,3-dihydroxybenzenes in dilute aqueous solution: synthesis of 2-13C-resorcinol and its reaction with chlorine and bromine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyce, S.D.; Barefoot, A.C.; Britton, D.R.; Hornig, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    As part of this study, the reaction of bromine with resorcinol and structurally related substrates to produce bromoform was examined. Preliminary results suggest that the chlorination and bromination of dihydroxybenzenes proceeded by similar reaction pathways. This chapter describes the successful synthesis of 2- 13 C-1, 3-dihydroxybenzene. Treatment of the isotopically labelled substrate with chlorine and bromine in dilute aqueous solution has elucidated many important details of the sequence of reactions leading to the production of chloroform (CHCl 3 ) and bromoform (CHBr 3 ). The 13 C-enriched products and intermediates formed during these reactions were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

  11. Applying reaction condition index to predict sandstone type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gongxin; Liu Jinhui; Cheng Hai

    2002-01-01

    On the basic of the explanation of reaction condition index, the deduction of reaction condition index calculation principle, the hydrogeological setting in Gongpoquan basin in Baishan, Gansu province and the study of reaction condition index of its water source point, the north Luotuoquan area in Gongpoquan basin seems to be a favourable place for sandstone type uranium deposit, and the prospect area for sandstone type uranium deposit is delimitated

  12. Development of a comprehensive analytical method for the determination of chlorinated paraffins in spruce needles applied in passive air sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iozza, Saverio; Schmid, Peter; Oehme, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Conifer needles are used for the monitoring of atmospheric persistent organic pollutants. The objective of the present study was to develop a method for the detection of airborne chlorinated paraffins (CPs) using spruce needles as a passive sampler. The method is based on liquid extraction of the cuticular wax layer followed by chromatographic fractionation and detection of CPs using two different GCMS techniques. Total CP concentrations (sum of short (SCCP), medium (MCCP) and long chain CPs (LCCP)) were determined by EI-MS/MS. SCCP and MCCP levels as well as congener group patterns (n-alkane chain length, chlorine content) could be evaluated using ECNI-LRMS. For the first time, data on environmental airborne CPs on spruce needles taken within the Monitoring Network in the Alpine Region for Persistent and other Organic Pollutants (MONARPOP) are presented providing evidence that spruce needles are a suitable passive sampling system for the monitoring of atmospheric CPs. - A developed method for chlorinated paraffins (CPs) provided evidence that spruce needles are a suitable passive sampling system for the monitoring of atmospheric CPs.

  13. Sintering with a chemical reaction as applied to uranium monocarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accary, A.; Caillat, R.

    1960-01-01

    The present paper provides a survey of different investigations whose aim was the preparation and fabrication of uranium monocarbide for nuclear use. If a chemical reaction takes place in the sample during the sintering operation, it may be expected that the atom rearrangements involved in this reaction should favour the sintering process and thereby lower the temperature needed to yield a body of a given density. With this hypothesis in mind, the following methods have been studied: - Sintering of U-C mixtures; - Sintering of UO 2 -C mixtures; - Hot pressing of U-C mixtures; - Extrusion of U-C mixtures. To generalize our result, it could be said that a chemical reaction does not lead to high densification, if one depends on a simple contact between discrete particles. On the contrary, a chemical reaction can help sintering if, as our hot pressing experiments shows, the densification can be achieved prior to the reaction. (author) [fr

  14. Kinetics of molybdenum and chlorine interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Nazarov, Yu.N.; Sarkarov, T.Eh.; Tulyakov, N.V.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics is studied of molybdenite chlorination with gaseous chlorine. The time dependences of the depth and degree of molybdenite chlorination are given along with the dependence on chlorine concentration of molybdenite chlorination rate. Active interaction is shown to take place at 450-470 deg C. At 350-435 deg C, chlorination occurs in the kinetic range, the apparent activation energy being equal to 22.2 kcal/mole and the order of reaction by chlorine to 0.77. At 435-610 deg C, the process takes place in the diffusion range and is restricted by dissipation of the reaction products (activation energy - 4.05 kcal/mole; order of reaction by chlorine - 0.6)

  15. Investigating Ionic Effects Applied to Water Based Organocatalysed Aldol Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua P. Delaney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Saturated aqueous solutions of various common salts were examined for their effect on aqueous aldol reactions catalysted by a highly active C2-symmetric diprolinamide organocatalyst developed in our laboratory. With respect to the aldol reaction between cyclohexanone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, deionised water was always a superior medium to salt solutions though some correlation to increasing anion size and depression in enantiomeric excess could be observed. Additionally, the complete inhibition of catalyst activity observed when employing tap water could be alleviated by the inclusion of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA into the aqueous media prior to reaction initiation. Extension of these reaction conditions demonstrated that these ionic effects vary on a case-to-case basis depending on the ketone/aldehyde combination.

  16. Advances in heterogeneous autocatalytic reactions applied to uranium dissolution - 5317

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marc, P.; Magnaldo, A.; Godard, J.; Schaer, E.

    2015-01-01

    Dissolution and the solubilization of the chemical elements is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes. When dissolving spent nuclear fuels, additional constraints are added due to the permanent need to strictly control and limit the hold-up. Thus the need for kinetic modeling concerning the dissolution of spent nuclear fuels in nitric acid. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physical-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric medium. It has been documented that the nitric acid attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites. This non uniform attack leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks can lead to the solid cleavage. In this case, we show that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the time required for the complete cleavage of the solid. These points motivated the measurements of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. A comparison of the measured kinetics with the diffusion kinetics by the mean of the external resistance fraction allows discriminating between measured kinetics corresponding to the chemical reaction or mass-transport limitation. This capability to measure, for the very first time, the 'true' chemical kinetics of the reaction has enabled the confirmation of the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction, and first evaluation of the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws. These data are fundamental to set the kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions in a future model of the dissolution of uranium dioxide sintered pellets. (authors)

  17. Chlorination Revisited: Does Cl- Serve as a Catalyst in the Chlorination of Phenols?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephanie S; Abraham, Sonali M; Roberts, A Lynn

    2016-12-20

    The aqueous chlorination of (chloro)phenols is one of the best-studied reactions in the environmental literature. Previous researchers have attributed these reactions to two chlorine species: HOCl (at circum-neutral and high pH) and H 2 OCl + (at low pH). In this study, we seek to examine the roles that two largely overlooked chlorine species, Cl 2 and Cl 2 O, may play in the chlorination of (chloro)phenols. Solution pH, chloride concentration, and chlorine dose were systematically varied in order to assess the importance of different chlorine species as chlorinating agents. Our findings indicate that chlorination rates at pH pH 6.0 and a chlorine dose representative of drinking water treatment, Cl 2 O is predicted to have at best a minor impact on chlorination reactions, whereas Cl 2 may contribute more than 80% to the overall chlorination rate depending on the (chloro)phenol identity and chloride concentration. While it is not possible to preclude H 2 OCl + as a chlorinating agent, we were able to model our low-pH data by considering Cl 2 only. Even traces of chloride can generate sufficient Cl 2 to influence chlorination kinetics, highlighting the role of chloride as a catalyst in chlorination reactions.

  18. Determination of chlorine in graphite by combustion-ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lianzhong; Watanabe, Kazuo; Itoh, Mitsuo.

    1995-09-01

    A combustion/ion chromatographic method has been studied for the sensitive determination of chlorine in graphite. A graphite sample was burnt at 900degC in a silica reaction tube at an oxygen flow rate of 200 ml/min. Chlorine evolved was absorbed in 20 ml of a 0.1 mM sodium carbonate solution. The solution was evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved with a small volume of water. Chlorine in the solution was determined using ion chromatography. The method was applied to JAERI graphite certified reference materials and practical graphite materials. The detection limit was about 0.8 μgCl/g for a 2.0 g sample. The precision was about 2.5% (relative standard deviation) for samples with chlorine content of 70 μg/g level. The method is also usable for coal samples. (author)

  19. Synthesis and chlorination of manganese-columbine by means of a solid-gas reaction. Determination of crystalline structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, J.; Ruiz, M. del C.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. The synthesis of mangano-columbite was carried out as follows: Mixing of N B 203 and Mn Cl 2 with an 10% weight excess of the latter in order to compensate for losses due to volatilization; grinding of the mixture in an agate mortar with agate handle in order to achieve close contact between the two solids; calcination of the sample in a quartz crucible at temperatures between 610 and 620 C (fusion temperature for Mn Cl2) in N2 current for six hours. After this time, temperature was increased at a eat of 50 C/h until reaching 800 C. This temperature was maintained for two hours in order to eliminate Mn Cl2 excess; cooling of the obtained product in N2 current. XRD analysis showed that the obtained products is a mangano-columbite. The mineral in natural state presents and orthorhombic structure. The structure of the synthesized product, though corresponding to mangano-columbite according to DRX, should be confirmed by means of an additional technique such as EXAFS. Th mangano-columbite obtained was subsequently chlorinated at 900 deg C for two hours to obtain conversions close to 50%, at 101 kPa, with a chlorine molar fraction of 1 and a flow of 50 cm3/min. By XRD it can be observed that the chlorination residue presents unreacted mangano-columbite and niobium oxide in an unknown phase, whose crystalline structure is currently under study. Measurements to be performed by means Synchrotron Radiation (EXAFS and XANES) might help elucidate this new structure. (author)

  20. Variational methods applied to problems of diffusion and reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Strieder, William

    1973-01-01

    This monograph is an account of some problems involving diffusion or diffusion with simultaneous reaction that can be illuminated by the use of variational principles. It was written during a period that included sabbatical leaves of one of us (W. S. ) at the University of Minnesota and the other (R. A. ) at the University of Cambridge and we are grateful to the Petroleum Research Fund for helping to support the former and the Guggenheim Foundation for making possible the latter. We would also like to thank Stephen Prager for getting us together in the first place and for showing how interesting and useful these methods can be. We have also benefitted from correspondence with Dr. A. M. Arthurs of the University of York and from the counsel of Dr. B. D. Coleman the general editor of this series. Table of Contents Chapter 1. Introduction and Preliminaries . 1. 1. General Survey 1 1. 2. Phenomenological Descriptions of Diffusion and Reaction 2 1. 3. Correlation Functions for Random Suspensions 4 1. 4. Mean Free ...

  1. Ultrasonic and densimetric titration applied for acid-base reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakowski, Andrzej; Gliński, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Classical acoustic acid-base titration was monitored using sound speed and density measurements. Plots of these parameters, as well as of the adiabatic compressibility coefficient calculated from them, exhibit changes with the volume of added titrant. Compressibility changes can be explained and quantitatively predicted theoretically in terms of Pasynski theory of non-compressible hydrates combined with that of the additivity of the hydration numbers with the amount and type of ions and molecules present in solution. It also seems that this development could be applied in chemical engineering for monitoring the course of chemical processes, since the applied experimental methods can be carried out almost independently on the medium under test (harmful, aggressive, etc.).

  2. Allylic chlorination of terpenic olefins using a combination of MoCl{sub 5} and NaOCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boualy, Brahim; Firdoussi, Larbi El; Ali, Mustapha Ait; Karim, Abdellah, E-mail: elfirdoussi@ucam.ac.m [Universite Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco). Faculte des Sciences Semlalia. Lab. de Chimie de Coordination

    2011-07-01

    MoCl{sub 5} is applied as efficient agent in allylic chlorination of terpenic olefins in the presence of NaOCl as chlorine donor. Various terpenes are converted to the corresponding allylic chlorides in moderate to good yield under mild and optimized reaction conditions. Different molybdenum precursors are also studied. Among them, MoO{sub 3} gives good yield, but after a longer reaction time. (author)

  3. Inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by chlorination and sequential UV/chlorination disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju, E-mail: jjgeng@nju.edu.cn; Ren, Hongqiang, E-mail: hqren@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2015-04-15

    This study investigated disinfection methods including chlorination, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and sequential UV/chlorination treatment on the inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). ARGs including sul1, tetX, tetG, intI1, and 16S rRNA genes in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluent were examined. The results indicated a positive correlation between the removal of ARGs and chlorine dosage (p = 0.007–0.014, n = 6),as well as contact time (p = 0.0001, n = 10). Greater free chlorine (FC) dosage leads to higher removal for all the genes and the maximum removal (1.30–1.49 logs) could be achieved at FC dosage of 30 mg L{sup −1}. The transformation kinetic data for ARGs removal (log C{sub 0} / C) followed the second-order reaction kinetic model with FC dosage (R{sup 2} = 0.6829–0.9999) and contact time (R{sup 2} = 0.7353–8634), respectively. Higher ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}–N) concentration was found to lead to lower removal of ARGs at the same chlorine dosage. When the applied Cl{sub 2}:NH{sub 3}–N ratio was over 7.6:1, a significant reduction of ARGs (1.20–1.49 logs) was achieved. By using single UV irradiation, the log removal values of tetX and 16Ss rRNA genes were 0.58 and 0.60, respectively, while other genes were 0.36–0.40 at a fluence of 249.5 mJ cm{sup −2}, which was observed to be less effective than chlorination. With sequential UV/chlorination treatment, 0.006 to 0.31 log synergy values of target genes were observed under different operation parameters. - Highlights: • Chlorine is more effective than UV irradiation in removing ARGs from MWTP effluent. • The chlorination reaction followed the second-order reaction kinetic model. • Higher NH{sub 3}–N contents result in lower ARGs removal in the chlorination process. • FC is more effective than CC on the inactivation of ARGs. • UV irradiation followed by chlorination shows high efficiency in removing ARGs.

  4. Chlorine poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gas) Gas released when opening a partially filled industrial container of chlorine tablets that have been sitting ... change in acid level of the blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of the ...

  5. Combining Low-Energy Electrical Resistance Heating with Biotic and Abiotic Reactions for Treatment of Chlorinated Solvent DNAPL Source Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    particles. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2000, 34, 1794-1805. Atlas , R.M., and R. Bartha . 1987. Microbial Ecology : Fundamentals and Applications. The... microbial processes ( Atlas , 1987; Empadinhas, 2004; Suyama, 2002), and for reductive dechlorination reactions in particular (Kohring, 1989; Holliger...dissolution of DNAPLs, but biological reaction rates also increase with increasing temperature Microbial activity is a function of temperature, and for

  6. Aspects of chlorination and its potential to produce niobium pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocchi, E.A.; Jeffes, J.H.E.

    1984-01-01

    Reduction chlorination of niobium pentoxide were carried out under different experimental conditions in order to study the effects of some variables of the process. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the recovery of niobium pentoxide which could be obtained as condensed material a group of experiments were also carried out with pyrochlore concentrate. The results showed that a balance of factors such as temperature, percentage of carbon in the initial charge and porosity cause the progress of the reaction to be controlled by different mechanisms and indicate that chlorination can be used to produce niobium pentoxide-especially if applied on rich starting material. (Author) [pt

  7. Chlorination leaching of cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, E.; Pajak, I.; Bojanowska, A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the investigations on chlorination leaching of cadmium from dust coming from dry dust collector of sinter belt, that is leaching with water saturated with gaseous chlorine and leaching with solutions of ammonium chloride and sodium chloride were given. The optimum conditions for these processes were established. It was found, that the method of leaching in the presence of gaseous chlorine is more effective, as it allows to report into the solution over 90% cadmium contained in dust. Owing to technical difficulties, environmental protection and safety conditions more advantageous seems to be the use as leaching agent of the ammonium chloride solutions. When applying 20% NH 4 Cl and temperature of 60 0 C, the time of 2 hours and the ratio of solid to liquid of 1:5, 70% cadmium contained in the dust can be reported into the solution. (auth.)

  8. Splendor and misery of the distorted wave method applied to heavy ions transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    The success and failure of the Distorted Wave Method (DWM) applied to heavy ion transfer reactions are illustrated by few examples: one and multi-nucleon transfer reactions induced by 15 N and 18 O on 28 Si target nucleus performed on the vicinity of Coulomb barrier respectively at 44 and 56 MeV incident energy

  9. Reduction reaction of chlorine gas in an Al-Cl2 chemical cell composed of molten chloride salts; Enkabutsu yoyuenkei Al-Cl2 kagaku denchi ni okeru enso gas no kangen hanno kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konda, S.; Sasaki, T.; Ishikawa, T. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-05

    The molten salt system electrochemical cycle was proposed to reproduce pure Al from scrap Al. The cycle is composed of production of rough AlCl3 by chlorination of scrap Al, refining of rough AlCl3 mainly by sublimation, and electrolytic reproduction of pure Al from refined AlCl3. In production of AlCl3, the Al-Cl2 molten salt system cell composed of anode dissolution reaction of Al and cathode reduction reaction of chlorine gas can generate electric power for the electrolytic reproduction. Chlorine gas can be recycled as anode product. Various experiments were carried out to improve molten salt system cells. In analysis of cell output, voltage drop from open circuit voltage was divided into that due to electrolytic bath resistance, and that due to reaction resistance. The electrolytic bath resistance could be determined from transient characteristics of voltage change just after cutoff of output current. The product of the obtained reaction resistance and a meniscus length was constant regardless of a meniscus length, and useful to predict scale-up cell performance. Output characteristics dependent on meniscus position were also obtained. 16 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Effect of the reaction time on the microstructure and porous texture of carbon materials obtained by chlorination of Ti(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})Cl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo-Pérez, D.J. [Centro de Investigación en Micro y Nanotecnología, Universidad Veracruzana, 94294, Boca del Río, Veracruz (Mexico); González-García, P., E-mail: pedro.gonzalez@cidesi.edu.mx [CONACYT Research Fellow – Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial, 76130, Querétaro, Querétaro (Mexico); Poisot, M. [Instituto de Química Aplicada, Universidad del Papaloapan, 68301, San Juan Bautista Tuxtepec, Oaxaca (Mexico); García-González, L. [Centro de Investigación en Micro y Nanotecnología, Universidad Veracruzana, 94294, Boca del Río, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Carbon materials have been obtained by the chlorination reaction of Ti(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} at 900 °C, varying the reaction time at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min. The average microstructure, studied by X ray powder diffraction, suggest that these materials consist mainly of disordered carbon with low graphitization degree (from 13.5 to 16.5%). These results are in agreement with the Raman data since the D band (at ≈ 1350 cm{sup −1}) indicates that disordered carbon networks have appeared. The calculated in-plane correlation length increases from 4.04 to 4.70 nm as the chlorination time increases from 30 to 120 min. The textural analyses reveal adsorption isotherms type 1 with hysteresis H4, microporous areas as high as 855 m{sup 2}/g and pore volume of 0.55 cm{sup 3}/g. Additionally, an important contribution of mesoporosity, around 3.6 nm, was also detected. - Highlights: • Micro-mesoporous carbon materials were obtained by chlorination of Ti(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2} at 900 °C. • The effect of chlorination exposure time on the microstructure and textural properties was studied. • Microstructural analysis by XRD and Raman showed that carbon samples are mainly disordered. • N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms showed isotherms type 1 with hysteresis H4. • Micropore size increases at longer chlorination time; in contrast, pore volume decreases.

  11. Spectral properties of chlorines and electron transfer with their participation in the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchupak, E. E.; Ivashin, N. V.

    2014-02-01

    Structural factors that provide localization of excited states and determine the properties of primary donor and acceptor of electron in the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII RC) are studied. The results of calculations using stationary and time-dependent density functional theory indicate an important role of protein environments of chlorophylls PA, PB, BA, and BB and pheophytins HA and HB in the area with a radius of no greater than ≤10 Å in the formation of excitonic states of PSII RC. When the neighboring elements are taken into account, the wavelength of long-wavelength Q y transition of chlorophyll molecules is varied by about 10 nm. The effect is less developed for pheophytin molecules (Δλ ≅ 2 nm). The following elements strongly affect energy of the transition: HisA198 and HisD197 amino-acid residues that serve as ligands of magnesium atoms affect PA and PB, respectively; MetA183 affects PA; MetA172 and MetD198 affect BA; water molecules that are located above the planes of the BA and BB macrocycles form H bonds with carbonyl groups; and phytol chains of PA and PB affect BA, BB, HA, and HB. The analysis of excitonic states, mutual positions of molecular orbitals of electron donors and acceptors, and matrix elements of electron transfer reaction shows that (i) charge separation between BA and HA and PB and BA is possible in the active A branch of cofactors of PSII RC and (ii) electron transfer is blocked at the BB - HB fragment in inactive B branch of PSII RC.

  12. A theoretical study of the mechanism of the atmospherically relevant reaction of chlorine atoms with methyl nitrate, and calculation of the reaction rate coefficients at temperatures relevant to the troposphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2015-03-21

    The reaction between atomic chlorine (Cl) and methyl nitrate (CH3ONO2) is significant in the atmosphere, as Cl is a key oxidant, especially in the marine boundary layer, and alkyl nitrates are important nitrogen-containing organic compounds, which are temporary reservoirs of the reactive nitrogen oxides NO, NO2 and NO3 (NOx). Four reaction channels HCl + CH2ONO2, CH3OCl + NO2, CH3Cl + NO3 and CH3O + ClNO2 were considered. The major channel is found to be the H abstraction channel, to give the products HCl + CH2ONO2. For all channels, geometry optimization and frequency calculations were carried out at the M06-2X/6-31+G** level, while relative electronic energies were improved to the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level. The reaction barrier (ΔE(‡)0K) and reaction enthalpy (ΔH(RX)298K) of the H abstraction channel were computed to be 0.61 and -2.30 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS//M06-2X/6-31+G** level. Reaction barriers (ΔE(‡)0K) for the other channels are more positive and these pathways do not contribute to the overall reaction rate coefficient in the temperature range considered (200-400 K). Rate coefficients were calculated for the H-abstraction channel at various levels of variational transition state theory (VTST) including tunnelling. Recommended ICVT/SCT rate coefficients in the temperature range 200-400 K are presented for the first time for this reaction. The values obtained in the 200-300 K region are particularly important as they will be valuable for atmospheric modelling calculations involving reactions with methyl nitrate. The implications of the results to atmospheric chemistry are discussed. Also, the enthalpies of formation, ΔHf,298K, of CH3ONO2 and CH2ONO2 were computed to be -29.7 and 19.3 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level.

  13. Chlorination of cooling water: a source of chlorine-containing organic compounds with possible environmental significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Gehrs, C.W.; Pitt, W.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Chlorination of cooling waters may be a source of environmentally significant pollutants. Many water-soluble chlorine-containing organic compounds of low volatility were found in a sample of cooling water chlorinated to a 2-mg/l chlorine concentration in the laboratory. The compounds were separated and detected using a coupled 36 Cl-tracer--high-resolution liquid chromatographic technique developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for determination of chlorinated organics in process effluents. For a chlorination contact time of 75 min at 25 0 C, the yield of chlorine in the form of chloro-organics amounted to 0.78% of the chlorine dosage. It is estimated that the yield is about 0.5% under typical reaction conditions in the electric power plant cooling system chosen for study. Because chlorine is commonly used to remove slime films from the cooling systems of electric power plants, as a means of maintaining high operational efficiency, it is estimated that several hundred tons of chlorinated organics are produced annually in the nation by this antifoulant process. The chromatographic elution positions of some of the separated constituents correspond to those of compounds separated and partially identified from chlorinated sewage treatment plant effluents. The results of this study indicate the formation of chloro-organics during the chlorination of cooling waters should be thoroughly examined, particularly with respect to their identification and determination of possible toxicological properties

  14. Data for comparison of chlorine dioxide and chlorine disinfection power in a real dairy wastewater effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Akhlaghi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Disinfection of water refers to a special operation that is doing to kill or disable causative organisms (i.e. Pathogens and in particular, intestinal bacteria. The aim of this pilot study is comparison of disinfection power of Chlorine dioxide and chlorine in a real dairy wastewater effluent. In this regard, firstly prepared two 220-l tanks made of polyethylene as reaction tanks and filled by effluent of a dairy wastewater treatment plant. Both tanks were equipped with mechanical stirrer. Then a Diaphragm dosing pumps with the maximum capacity of 3.9 l per hour were used for the chlorine dioxide and chlorine (Calcium hypochlorite 0.5 up to 3 ppm injection. Residual level of Chlorine dioxide and Chlorine were measured by portable photometric method DT4B kit, Germany. Finally, the Multiple-Tube Fermentation, Brilliant Green Bile Broth (BGB and Eosin methylene blue Agar (EMB technique was used for microbial analysis and the results were reported as the most probable number index (MPN respectively. The data showed that the residual of chlorine dioxide could stood more active than residual of chlorine in the aqueous environment significantly. Therefore, Use of chlorine dioxide is more effective than chlorine for removal fecal and total coliform from dairy wastewater effluent. Keywords: Disinfection, Chlorine dioxide, Chlorine, Total coliform, Fecal coliform

  15. Manganese dioxide nanosheets as an optical probe for photometric determination of free chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Haili; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    We report on a colorimetric assay for free chlorine using MnO 2 nanosheets as an optical probe. In the absence of free chlorine, the addition of ascorbic acid (AA) causes the chemical dissolution of MnO 2 nanosheets via a redox reaction to result in low absorbance. However, if a solution containing free chlorine is added to the system, AA will be oxidized by free chlorine and the MnO 2 nanosheets will not longer be dissolved. Hence, the AA-induced decoloration will not take place and solution will remain yellow. Under optimized experimental conditions, there is a linear relationship between the change in absorbance at 370 nm and the concentration of free chlorine in the 0.2 to 10 μM concentration range, with an 80 nM detection limit. The detection limit for visual evaluation is 8.0 μM. The assay is fairly selective for free chlorine over common inorganic ions and small organic substances. It was applied to the determination of free chlorine in tap water using the standard addition method. (author)

  16. Chlorine demand and residual chlorine decay kinetics of Kali river water at Kaiga project area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Bhat, D.; Prakash, T.R.; Thimme Gowda, B.; Sherigara, B.S.; Khader, A.M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear power plant at Kaiga would use Kali river water for condenser cooling. This necessitated studies on the chemistry of chlorination such as chlorine demand, kinetics of chlorination and other water characteristics aimed at obtaining base line data. The study revealed significant seasonal variation of chlorine demand ranging from 0.5 ppm to 1.7 ppm (3.0 ppm dose, 30 min contact time) and total consumption of 5.0 ppm (10.0 ppm dose, 48 hours contact time). The reaction follows first order kinetics in chlorine. High correlation of chlorine demand with chlorophyll a, suspended matter, turbidity, silica, nitrite, phosphate and sulphate indicated that chlorine demand is greatly influenced by water quality. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  17. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Larry B.; Hladik, Michelle L.; Vajda, Alan M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin C.; Douville, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m 3 d −1 design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L −1 ; n = 5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L −1 ), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L −1 ) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative

  18. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Larry B. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Hladik, Michelle L. [U.S. Geological Survey, 6000 J Street Placer Hall, Sacramento, CA 95819 (United States); Vajda, Alan M. [University of Colorado, Department of Integrative Biology, CB 171, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); Fitzgerald, Kevin C. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine St., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); AECOM, 500 West Jefferson St., Ste. 1600, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Douville, Chris [City of Boulder, 4049 75th Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m{sup 3} d{sup −1} design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L{sup −1}; n = 5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L{sup −1}), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L{sup −1}) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had

  19. Action of the chlorine trifluoride on water vapour. Analysis of reaction products. Technical report - 589; Action du trifluorure de chlore sur la vapeur d'eau. Analyses des produits de reaction. Rapport technique - 589

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougon, R.

    1961-06-15

    As the separation of uranium 235 from uranium 238 by gaseous diffusion under the form of uranium hexa-fluoride requires the use of materials which may contain some impurities retained by chemical or physical bounds, this report addresses the use of a reactant which would allow these impurities to be removed. Due to its properties (inert with respect to UF{sub 6}; transforms most of impurities into volatile compounds, and different UF compounds into UF{sub 6}; strongly reacts on water; all its degradation products are volatile), chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) has been chosen. It is used for the preprocessing of materials for their passivation with respect to UF{sub 6}, and for a post-processing for the regeneration of porous materials by transformation of UF{sub 4}, UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and UF{sub x} into UF{sub 6}. The authors more particularly studied the reaction between ClF{sub 3} and water.

  20. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Hladik, Michelle; Vajda, Alan M.; Fitzgerald, Kevin C.; Douville, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m3 d−1 design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration = 2.7 μg L−1; n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 4.5 μg L−1), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration = 1.4 μg L−1) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative

  1. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated.

  2. Applying some methods to process the data coming from the nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleymanov, M.K.; Abdinov, O.B.; Belashev, B.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Full text : The methods of a posterior increasing the resolution of the spectral lines are offered to process the data coming from the nuclear reactions. The methods have applied to process the data coming from the nuclear reactions at high energies. They give possibilities to get more detail information on a structure of the spectra of particles emitted in the nuclear reactions. The nuclear reactions are main source of the information on the structure and physics of the atomic nuclei. Usually the spectrums of the fragments of the reactions are complex ones. Apparently it is not simple to extract the necessary for investigation information. In the talk we discuss the methods of a posterior increasing the resolution of the spectral lines. The methods could be useful to process the complex data coming from the nuclear reactions. We consider the Fourier transformation method and maximum entropy one. The complex structures were identified by the method. One can see that at lest two selected points are indicated by the method. Recent we presented a talk where we shown that the results of the analyzing the structure of the pseudorapidity spectra of charged relativistic particles with ≥ 0.7 measured in Au+Em and Pb+Em at AGS and SPS energies using the Fourier transformation method and maximum entropy one. The dependences of these spectra on the number of fast target protons were studied. These distribution shown visually some plateau and shoulder that was at least three selected points on the distributions. The plateaus become wider in PbEm reactions. The existing of plateau is necessary for the parton models. The maximum entropy method could confirm the existing of the plateau and the shoulder on the distributions. The figure shows the results of applying the maximum entropy method. One can see that the method indicates several clean selected points. Some of them same with observed visually ones. We would like to note that the Fourier transformation method could not

  3. Chlorine gas processing of oxide nuclear fuel particles containing thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knotik, K.; Bildstein, H.; Falta, G.; Wagner, H.

    Experimental studies on the chloride extraction and separation of U and Th from coated Th--U oxide particles are reported. After a description of the chlorination equipment and the experimental procedures, the results are discussed. The yield of U is determined as a function of the reaction temperature. The results of a thermogravimetric analysis of the chlorination of uranium carbide and thorium carbides are reported and used to establish the reaction mechanism for the chlorination

  4. Surto de reações hemolíticas associado a residuais de cloro e cloraminas na água de hemodiálise Outbreak of hemolytic reactions associated with chlorine and chloramine residuals in hemodialysis water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel VV Calderaro

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar o processo de investigação da contaminação da água e a conseqüente avaliação do surto ocorrido no serviço de hemodiálise. MÉTODOS: Em setembro de 2000, 16 pacientes sob terapia de hemodiálise de um hospital em Minas Gerais apresentaram reações hemolíticas compatíveis a sintomas de intoxicação por cloro e cloramina em água. Foi feita a medição das concentrações de cloro e cloramina em amostras coletadas em diversos pontos do sistema de tratamento e distribuição de água do serviço inspecionado. A identificação dos casos ocorridos durante o período de estudo foi feita pela revisão das anotações de prontuários dos pacientes. Foi feita a revisão dos procedimentos da equipe técnica, médica e de enfermagem por meio de entrevistas. RESULTADOS: A taxa de sintomas foi significativamente alta (pOBJECTIVE: To investigate the process of water contamination and to assess the subsequent outbreak in the hemodialysis center. METHODS: In September 2000, sixteen patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis at a dialysis center in Minas Gerais, Brazil, experienced hemolytic reactions compatible with toxic symptoms due to chlorine and chloramine water contamination. Chlorine and chloramine concentrations in samples obtained from various sites of the dialysis center's water treatment and distribution system were measured. Case-patients were identified by reviewing medical records and nursing notes for all dialysis sessions carried out during the study period. Interviews with technicians, nursing and medical staff members were conducted. RESULTS: Reaction rate was significantly higher (p£0.5 mg/L for chlorine and £ 0.1 mg/L for chloramine. Individuals exposed to high chlorine and chloramine concentrations presented a relative risk of 2.58 (1.0-6.28 of having hemolytic reactions. CONCLUSION: There is a need to observe surveillance procedures to secure that the maximum allowable concentrations of regulated substances

  5. A study on chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, H.C.; Kim, T.J.; Jang, J.H.; Kim, G.Y.; Lee, S.J.; Hur, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride (NH 4 Cl) was conducted to derive an easy and simple uranium chloride production method without impurities. In thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, it was predicted that only uranium chlorides can be produced by the reactions between uranium metal and NH 4 Cl. Experimental conditions for the chlorination of uranium metal were determined using a chlorination test of cerium metal using NH 4 Cl. It was confirmed that UCl 3 and UCl 4 in the form of particles as uranium chlorination products can be obtained from the chlorination method using NH 4 Cl. (author)

  6. Atmospheric chemistry of isoflurane, desflurane, and sevoflurane: kinetics and mechanisms of reactions with chlorine atoms and OH radicals and global warming potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Nielsen, Ole J; Karpichev, Boris; Wallington, Timothy J; Sander, Stanley P

    2012-06-21

    The smog chamber/Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique was used to measure the rate coefficients k(Cl + CF(3)CHClOCHF(2), isoflurane) = (4.5 ± 0.8) × 10(-15), k(Cl + CF(3)CHFOCHF(2), desflurane) = (1.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-15), k(Cl + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F, sevoflurane) = (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(-13), and k(OH + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F) = (3.5 ± 0.7) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) in 700 Torr of N(2)/air diluent at 295 ± 2 K. An upper limit of 6 × 10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) was established for k(Cl + (CF(3))(2)CHOC(O)F). The laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) technique was employed to determine hydroxyl radical rate coefficients as a function of temperature (241-298 K): k(OH + CF(3)CHFOCHF(2)) = (7.05 ± 1.80) × 10(-13) exp[-(1551 ± 72)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1); k(296 ± 1 K) = (3.73 ± 0.08) × 10(-15) cm(3) molecule(-1), and k(OH + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F) = (9.98 ± 3.24) × 10(-13) exp[-(969 ± 82)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1); k(298 ± 1 K) = (3.94 ± 0.30) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1). The rate coefficient of k(OH + CF(3)CHClOCHF(2), 296 ± 1 K) = (1.45 ± 0.16) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) was also determined. Chlorine atoms react with CF(3)CHFOCHF(2) via H-abstraction to give CF(3)CFOCHF(2) and CF(3)CHFOCF(2) radicals in yields of approximately 83% and 17%. The major atmospheric fate of the CF(3)C(O)FOCHF(2) alkoxy radical is decomposition via elimination of CF(3) to give FC(O)OCHF(2) and is unaffected by the method used to generate the CF(3)C(O)FOCHF(2) radicals. CF(3)CHFOCF(2) radicals add O(2) and are converted by subsequent reactions into CF(3)CHFOCF(2)O alkoxy radicals, which decompose to give COF(2) and CF(3)CHFO radicals. In 700 Torr of air 82% of CF(3)CHFO radicals undergo C-C scission to yield HC(O)F and CF(3) radicals with the remaining 18% reacting with O(2) to give CF(3)C(O)F. Atmospheric oxidation of (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F gives (CF(3))(2)CHOC(O)F in a molar yield of 93 ± 6% with CF(3)C(O)CF(3) and HCOF as minor products. The IR

  7. Aqueous chemistry of chlorine: chemistry, analysis, and environmental fate of reactive oxidant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, R.L.; Carpenter, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    This report reviews (1) the chemistry of chlorine relative to its reactions in fresh, estuarine, and marine waters and the formation of reactive oxidant species; (2) the current status of chemical analysis of reactive chlorine species and chlorine-produced oxidant species relative to analysis of low concentrations (microgram-per-liter range) and determination of accuracy and precision of methods; and (3) the environmental fate of chlorine and chlorine-produced oxidant species.

  8. Resonating group method as applied to the spectroscopy of α-transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotin, V. B.; Semjonov, V. M.; Gridnev, K. A.; Hefter, E. F.

    1983-10-01

    In the conventional approach to α-transfer reactions the finite- and/or zero-range distorted-wave Born approximation is used in liaison with a macroscopic description of the captured α particle in the residual nucleus. Here the specific example of 16O(6Li,d)20Ne reactions at different projectile energies is taken to present a microscopic resonating group method analysis of the α particle in the final nucleus (for the reaction part the simple zero-range distorted-wave Born approximation is employed). In the discussion of suitable nucleon-nucleon interactions, force number one of the effective interactions presented by Volkov is shown to be most appropriate for the system considered. Application of the continuous analog of Newton's method to the evaluation of the resonating group method equations yields an increased accuracy with respect to traditional methods. The resonating group method description induces only minor changes in the structures of the angular distributions, but it does serve its purpose in yielding reliable and consistent spectroscopic information. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE 16O(6Li,d)20Ne; E=20 to 32 MeV; calculated B(E2); reduced widths, dσdΩ extracted α-spectroscopic factors. ZRDWBA with microscope RGM description of residual α particle in 20Ne; application of continuous analog of Newton's method; tested and applied Volkov force No. 1; direct mechanism.

  9. Study for the chlorination of zirconium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, E.S.M.; Takiishi, H.; Paschoal, J.O.A.; Andreoli, M.

    1990-12-01

    In the development of new ceramic and metallic materials the chlorination process constitutes step in the formation of several intermediate compounds, such as metallic chlorides, used for the production of high, purity raw materials. Chlorination studies with the aim of fabrication special zirconium-base alloys have been carried out at IPEN. Within this program the chlorination technique has been used for zirconium tetrachloride production from zirconium oxide. In this paper some relevant parameters such as: time and temperature of reaction, flow rate of chloride gas and percentage of the reducing agent which influence the efficiency of chlorination of zirconium oxide are evaluated. Thermodynamical aspects about the reactions involved in the process are also presented. (author)

  10. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents Using RT3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Christian D.; Truex, Michael J.; Clement, T P.

    2006-07-25

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a reactive transport code that can be applied to model solute fate and transport for many different purposes. This document specifically addresses application of RT3D for modeling related to evaluation and implementation of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA). Selection of MNA as a remedy requires an evaluation process to demonstrate that MNA will meet the remediation goals. The U.S. EPA, through the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Directive 9200.4?17P, provides the regulatory context for the evaluation and implementation of MNA. In a complementary fashion, the context for using fate and transport modeling as part of MNA evaluation is described in the EPA?s technical protocol for chlorinated solvent MNA, the Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA, and in this document. The intent of this document is to describe (1) the context for applying RT3D for chlorinated solvent MNA and (2) the attenuation processes represented in RT3D, (3) dechlorination reactions that may occur, and (4) the general approach for using RT3D reaction modules (including a summary of the RT3D reaction modules that are available) to model fate and transport of chlorinated solvents as part of MNA or for combinations of MNA and selected types of active remediation.

  11. Degradation of sulfamethoxazole using ozone and chlorine dioxide - Compound-specific stable isotope analysis, transformation product analysis and mechanistic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willach, Sarah; Lutze, Holger V; Eckey, Kevin; Löppenberg, Katja; Lüling, Michelle; Terhalle, Jens; Wolbert, Jens-Benjamin; Jochmann, Maik A; Karst, Uwe; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2017-10-01

    The sulfonamide antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a widely detected micropollutant in surface and groundwaters. Oxidative treatment with e.g. ozone or chlorine dioxide is regularly applied for disinfection purposes at the same time exhibiting a high potential for removal of micropollutants. Especially for nitrogen containing compounds such as SMX, the related reaction mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we systematically investigated reaction stoichiometry, product formation and reaction mechanisms in reactions of SMX with ozone and chlorine dioxide. To this end, the neutral and anionic SMX species, which may occur at typical pH-values of water treatment were studied. Two moles of chlorine dioxide and approximately three moles of ozone were consumed per mole SMX degraded. Oxidation of SMX with ozone and chlorine dioxide leads in both cases to six major transformation products (TPs) as revealed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Tentatively formulated TP structures from other studies could partly be confirmed by compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA). However, for one TP, a hydroxylated SMX, it was not possible by HRMS alone to identify whether hydroxylation occurred at the aromatic ring, as suggested in literature before, or at the anilinic nitrogen. By means of CSIA and an analytical standard it was possible to identify sulfamethoxazole hydroxylamine unequivocally as one of the TPs of the reaction of SMX with ozone as well as with chlorine dioxide. H-abstraction and electron transfer at the anilinic nitrogen are suggested as likely initial reactions of ozone and chlorine dioxide, respectively, leading to its formation. Oxidation of anionic SMX with ozone did not show any significant isotopic fractionation whereas the other reactions studied resulted in a significant carbon isotope fractionation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chlorination of irradiated polyethylene single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    The chlorination of electron beam-irradiation polyethylene (PE) single crystals was studied for a range of irradiation doses, temperatures, and chlorine interaction times. The results presented show that PE chlorination was quite extensive, even in unirradiated PE single crystals at 25 0 C in the dark. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR, EPR) was used in this study in order to determine the alkyl radical concentration, decay constant, and diffusivity for (unchlorinated) specimens. An alkyl radical diffusivity D/sub a/ = 1.6 x 10 -17 cm 2 /sec at 25 0 C was estimated from ESR data and alkyl radical migration as one-dimensional unsteady-state diffusion process. In irradiated PE, chlorination occurred mainly via chain reactions which were initiated by the irradiation-produced free radicals. Chlorine content values were determined by X-ray Energy Spectroscopy (XES). It was found that the magnitude of the chlorine uptake increased with increasing dose, and decreased with decreasing temperature at constant dose. Otherwise the observed PE chlorination phenomena was quite similar for all of the doses and temperatures studied here, consisting of a two step mechanism: a fast uptake which occurred between time tCl 2 = 0 - 5 minutes and a slower, approximately first-order rate of uptake which occurred between times tCl 2 = 5 - 120 minutes. Chlorination was essentially complete by time tCl 2 = 120 minutes. The rapid uptake probably occurred in the amorphous surface zones where Cl 2 is relatively high and the second, slower step was probably attributable to Cl 2 diffusion into the crystalline regions and subsequent chlorination there. Inasmuch as the PE density decreases with increasing dose (for 1-600 Mrad), Cl 2 diffusivity was enhanced, resulting in higher chlorine uptake values at higher doses

  13. Comparative studies for different proximity potentials applied to sub-barrier fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, G.L. [Beihang University, School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beijing (China); Beihang University, Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Beijing (China); Qu, W.W. [Medical College of Soochow University, School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow (China); Guo, M.F.; Qian, J.Q. [Beihang University, School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhang, H.Q. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Wolski, R. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS, Cracow (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    Coulomb barrier heights calculated by using 14 different versions of proximity potentials are studied and applied for experimental data of fusion in terms of a recently proposed energy scaling approach. The results show that the descriptions of proximity potentials 77 and 88 for the barrier heights seem to be closest to the values required by the systematics. On the basis of proximity potential 77, the parameterized formulas of the barrier height and radius are obtained. These formulas can calculate the barrier positions and barrier heights reasonably well within the error, respectively. Thus it provides a simple and direct way to calculate the barrier positions and barrier heights for heavy-ion fusion reactions. (orig.)

  14. Relation between chlorine with the quality of crude water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Fang Yee; Mohd Pauzi Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    Chlorine as disinfection agent in drinking water was used widely since it was successfully been practiced in drinking water in Jersey City, 1908. Mostly, water treatment plants in Malaysia were using chlorine as disinfection agent to kill pathogen and contaminated materials that can be dangerous to consumer. Because of chlorine was a strongly disinfection agent, it also can react with another chemical components such as manganese, hydrogen, sulfides, ammonia and phenol in water. These reactions happen very fast, and chlorine will not react as disinfection agent unless all the organic and inorganic substitution presented in water reacts with chlorine. These reactions between components will increase demand of chlorine in water. The demand of chlorine in water must be filled before the free radical chlorine occurred. These free radical chlorine will decay into hypochlorous acid and hypochlorite ion that so important in disinfection process to kill pathogens and pollutants in water. Most of water treatment plant to maintain free chlorine up to 0.2 mg/ L in distribution system to consumer. These researches involved determination of parameters that can be trusted to react with the chlorine in nine sampling station along Semenyih River and four stations in water treatment plants. These parameters were determined from ammonia, cyanides, sulfides, phenol, phosphorus, nitrite, manganese, iron and sum of organic carbons. Overall, these researches concluded that ammonia and sum of organic carbons were the most compounds that react with the chlorine to produce tryhalometane and chloramines. Besides that, the concentration of cyanides compounds, sulfide, phenol, phosphorus, nitrite, manganese and iron also decrease after the chlorination process. Results can used to evaluate demanding levels of chlorine in Semenyih River. (author)

  15. Technology assessment: Chlorine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, H.; Alwast, H.; Buttgereit, R.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorine is not just one of many chemical feedstocks which is used in a few definitely harmful products like PVC or CFC but is irrelevant in all other respects. Just the opposite is true: There is hardly any product line of the chemical industry that can do without chlorine, from herbicides and pesticides to dyes, plastics, pharmaceuticals, photographic atricles, and cosmetics. Chlorine is not only a key element of chemical production but also an ubiquitous element of everyday life in civilisation. There are even many who would agree that the volume of chlorine production is an indicator of the competitive strength and national wealth of a modern society. By now, however, it has become evident that the unreflected use of chlorine is no longer ecologically acceptable. The consequences of a chlorine phase-out as compared to the continued chlorine production at the present level were investigated scientifically by a PROGNOS team. They are presented in this book. (orig.) [de

  16. Chlorine attack in copper/cupronickel heat exchangers tubes in service water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hortiguela, Ruben; Corchon, Fernando; Villesccas, Gilberto

    2012-09-01

    Santa Maria de Garona is a nuclear power plant design BWR type 3 with an open cooling circuit without cooling towers which outlets to the Ebro river. In November 2006, the presence of zebra mussels was found upstream of the plant intake. The recommended option for the service water system was to install a chlorination treatment using liquid sodium hypochlorite. This recommendation was based primarily on the need to have an effective mitigation system in place at Garona in the summer of 2007. The recommendation was to apply continuous or semi-continuous addition of chlorine to the service water system, preventing any primary attachment of zebra mussels to the service water piping. The chlorine injection system was designed to deliver approximately 0,3 to 0,5 ppm Total Residual Chlorine (TRC) to the service water on continuous basis. The chlorine injection pumps located at the start of the service water system are controlled by the output of a chlorine analyzer located at the end of the service water system just prior to discharge. After four years injecting NaClO, numerous cases of tube failures in heat exchangers made of copper and cupronickel alloys have been detected. The reactions involved are as follows: Corrosion Reactions in Cupronickel alloys Cl 2 + Ni → NiCl 2 E=1.610 V (Pitting Initiator), Cl 2 + Cu → CuCl 2 E=1.023 V. Corrosion Reactions in Copper tubes Cl 2 + Cu → CuCl 2 E=1.023 V. A close examination by optical microscope of the internal wall of the tubes has shown the typical crystals created from chorine corrosion such as: Cu (OH) 2 , CuCl 2 . (2H 2 O),NiCl 2 , [CuCl 3 ] -1 and [CuCl 4 ] -2 Conclusions: The degradation of the material is due to a combination of the following items: - Ageing of material after many years of operation; - Erosion due to poor quality of river water (silica particles, silts, sediments, etc); - Attack from chlorination to base material; The solutions that have been implemented are mainly: - Reduction of chlorine

  17. Regiospecific synthesis of polychlorinated dibenzofurans with chlorine-37 excess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoonseok Chang; Deinzer, M.L.; Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of regiospecifically chlorine-37 labeled di-and trichlorodibenzofurans is described. The strategy for introducing a chlorine-37 label regiospecifically has been to reduce the nitro derivative to the corresponding amine. The amine is converted to the diazonium salt with t-butyl nitrite, and this product is converted to the final product via the Sandmeyer reaction with chlorine-37 labeled cuprous chloride. (author)

  18. Transformation of cefazolin during chlorination process: Products, mechanism and genotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liping, E-mail: lisaleercees807@yahoo.cn; Wei, Dongbin, E-mail: weidb@rcees.ac.cn; Wei, Guohua, E-mail: wgh@rcees.ac.cn; Du, Yuguo, E-mail: duyuguo@rcees.ac.cn

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Base-catalyzed electrophilic substitution occurred in cefazolin chlorination. • Oxidation of thioether in cefazolin was found in chlorination process. • The pH conditions impacted on the occurrence of reaction types. • Genotoxicity had an elevation after chlorination of cefazolin. • Reaction pathways of cefazolin chlorination were replayed in surface water matrix. -- Abstract: Large quantities of cephalosporins have entered into aquatic environment in recent years, posing potential adverse effect to human health and ecological safety. In this study, cefazolin, one of widely used cephalosporins, was targeted to explore its transformation behaviors in chlorination disinfection process. With the help of ultra high performance liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectroscopy, one chlorinated product and four oxidation products were detected in cefazolin chlorination system. The corresponding transformation pathways of cefazolin were proposed. Two kinds of reactions occurred in chlorination system, one was oxidation of thioether-sulfur to sulfoxide and di-sulfoxide, and the other was base-catalyzed electrophilic substitution of alpha-H of amide by chlorine atom. The pH value determined the occurrence of reaction types, and increasing chlorine dose promoted transformation of cefazolin. More importantly, genotoxicity in SOS/umu assay had an elevation after chlorination, which might be attributed to the formation of chlorinated product and sulfoxide during chlorination process.

  19. Transformation of cefazolin during chlorination process: Products, mechanism and genotoxicity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Liping; Wei, Dongbin; Wei, Guohua; Du, Yuguo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Base-catalyzed electrophilic substitution occurred in cefazolin chlorination. • Oxidation of thioether in cefazolin was found in chlorination process. • The pH conditions impacted on the occurrence of reaction types. • Genotoxicity had an elevation after chlorination of cefazolin. • Reaction pathways of cefazolin chlorination were replayed in surface water matrix. -- Abstract: Large quantities of cephalosporins have entered into aquatic environment in recent years, posing potential adverse effect to human health and ecological safety. In this study, cefazolin, one of widely used cephalosporins, was targeted to explore its transformation behaviors in chlorination disinfection process. With the help of ultra high performance liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectroscopy, one chlorinated product and four oxidation products were detected in cefazolin chlorination system. The corresponding transformation pathways of cefazolin were proposed. Two kinds of reactions occurred in chlorination system, one was oxidation of thioether-sulfur to sulfoxide and di-sulfoxide, and the other was base-catalyzed electrophilic substitution of alpha-H of amide by chlorine atom. The pH value determined the occurrence of reaction types, and increasing chlorine dose promoted transformation of cefazolin. More importantly, genotoxicity in SOS/umu assay had an elevation after chlorination, which might be attributed to the formation of chlorinated product and sulfoxide during chlorination process

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF ENALAPRIL AND RANITIDINE CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/HIGH-RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY AND THEIR TOXICITY EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Jehár Oliveira Quintão

    Full Text Available Due to its low cost, its capability for disinfection and oxidation, chlorination using gaseous chlorine or hypochlorite salts, has also been commonly applied in water treatment plants for oxidation and disinfection purposes. Little is known about the identity and toxicity of by-products resulting from the chlorination of pharmaceutical micropollutants, such as enalapril (ENA and ranitidine (RAN. ENA and RAN chlorination by-products were characterized in this study by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC/HRMS and their toxicity were assessed by MTT assay. Chlorination experiments with ENA and RAN solutions (10 mg L-1 indicate degradation efficiencies of 100% for both compounds after only 5 min of exposure to chlorine at concentration of 9.53 mg Cl2 L-1. On the other hand mineralization rates were lower than 3%, thereby indicating there was accumulation of degradation by-products in all experiments. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed, at all times of reaction after the addition of hypochlorite, the presence of 1-(2-((4-(chlorophenyl-1-ethoxy-1-oxobutan-2-ylaminopropanoylpyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (enalapril by-product and N-chloro-N-(2-(((chloro-5-((dimethylaminomethylfuran-2-ylmethylsulfinylethyl-N-methyl-2-nitroethene 1,1-diamine (ranitidine by-product. Despite the formation of oxidized chlorinated by-products in all chlorination assays, the treated solutions were nontoxic to HepG2 cells by the MTT assay. It has been observed that chlorination (10 mg L-1, 5 min of ENA and RAN solutions exhibited high degradation efficiencies of the target compounds and low mineralization rates. Based on the mass spectrometry data, the routes for ENA and RAN successive oxidation by chlorine has been proposed.

  1. Alternative methods for chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiessinger, F; Rook, J J; Duguet, J P

    1985-12-01

    Existing disinfectants are oxidative agents which all present negative effects on subsequent treatment processes. None of them has decisive advantages over chlorine, although chlorine-dioxide and chloramines might at times be preferable. Optimum treatment practices will improve the removal of organic precursors before final disinfection which could then consist in a light chlorine addition. A philosophy of radical change in water treatment technology encompassing physical treatment without chemicals such as membrane filtration, solid disinfectants is presented.

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Atmosphereic Inorganic Chlorine Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randall R.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last five years substantial progress has been made in defining the realm of new chlorine chemistry in the polar stratosphere. Application of existing experimental techniques to potentially important chlorine-containing compounds has yielded quantitative kinetic and spectroscopic data as well as qualitative mechanistic insights into the relevant reactions.

  3. Chlorination of organophosphorus pesticides in natural waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acero, Juan L. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Energetica, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)], E-mail: jlacero@unex.es; Benitez, F. Javier; Real, Francisco J.; Gonzalez, Manuel [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Energetica, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2008-05-01

    Unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of three organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon) with chlorine were determined in the present study, and the influence of pH and temperature was established. It was found that an increase in the pH provides a negative effect on the pesticides degradation rates. Apparent second-order rate constants at 20 {sup o}C and pH 7 were determined to be 110.9, 0.004 and 191.6 M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon, respectively. A higher reactivity of chlorine with the phosphorothioate group (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) than with the phosphate moiety (chlorfenvinfos) could explain these results. Intrinsic rate constant for the elementary reactions of chlorine species with chlorpyrifos and diazinon were also calculated, leading to the conclusion that the reaction between hypochlorous acid and the pesticide is predominant at neutral pH. The elimination of these pesticides in surface waters was also investigated. A chlorine dose of 2.5 mg L{sup -1} was enough to oxidize chlorpyrifos and diazinon almost completely, with a formation of trihalomethanes below the EU standard for drinking water. However, the removal of chlorfenvinfos was not appreciable. Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for the removal of organophosphorus pesticides with phosphorothioate group during oxidation and disinfection processes, but not for the elimination of pesticides with phosphate moiety.

  4. Chlorination of organophosphorus pesticides in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, Juan L.; Benitez, F. Javier; Real, Francisco J.; Gonzalez, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of three organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon) with chlorine were determined in the present study, and the influence of pH and temperature was established. It was found that an increase in the pH provides a negative effect on the pesticides degradation rates. Apparent second-order rate constants at 20 o C and pH 7 were determined to be 110.9, 0.004 and 191.6 M -1 s -1 for chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon, respectively. A higher reactivity of chlorine with the phosphorothioate group (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) than with the phosphate moiety (chlorfenvinfos) could explain these results. Intrinsic rate constant for the elementary reactions of chlorine species with chlorpyrifos and diazinon were also calculated, leading to the conclusion that the reaction between hypochlorous acid and the pesticide is predominant at neutral pH. The elimination of these pesticides in surface waters was also investigated. A chlorine dose of 2.5 mg L -1 was enough to oxidize chlorpyrifos and diazinon almost completely, with a formation of trihalomethanes below the EU standard for drinking water. However, the removal of chlorfenvinfos was not appreciable. Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for the removal of organophosphorus pesticides with phosphorothioate group during oxidation and disinfection processes, but not for the elimination of pesticides with phosphate moiety

  5. Accurate Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction Quantification of Challenging Samples Applying Inhibitor-Tolerant DNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidstedt, Maja; Romsos, Erica L; Hedell, Ronny; Ansell, Ricky; Steffen, Carolyn R; Vallone, Peter M; Rådström, Peter; Hedman, Johannes

    2017-02-07

    Digital PCR (dPCR) enables absolute quantification of nucleic acids by partitioning of the sample into hundreds or thousands of minute reactions. By assuming a Poisson distribution for the number of DNA fragments present in each chamber, the DNA concentration is determined without the need for a standard curve. However, when analyzing nucleic acids from complex matrixes such as soil and blood, the dPCR quantification can be biased due to the presence of inhibitory compounds. In this study, we evaluated the impact of varying the DNA polymerase in chamber-based dPCR for both pure and impure samples using the common PCR inhibitor humic acid (HA) as a model. We compared the TaqMan Universal PCR Master Mix with two alternative DNA polymerases: ExTaq HS and Immolase. By using Bayesian modeling, we show that there is no difference among the tested DNA polymerases in terms of accuracy of absolute quantification for pure template samples, i.e., without HA present. For samples containing HA, there were great differences in performance: the TaqMan Universal PCR Master Mix failed to correctly quantify DNA with more than 13 pg/nL HA, whereas Immolase (1 U) could handle up to 375 pg/nL HA. Furthermore, we found that BSA had a moderate positive effect for the TaqMan Universal PCR Master Mix, enabling accurate quantification for 25 pg/nL HA. Increasing the amount of DNA polymerase from 1 to 5 U had a strong effect for ExTaq HS, elevating HA-tolerance four times. We also show that the average Cq values of positive reactions may be used as a measure of inhibition effects, e.g., to determine whether or not a dPCR quantification result is reliable. The statistical models developed to objectively analyze the data may also be applied in quality control. We conclude that the choice of DNA polymerase in dPCR is crucial for the accuracy of quantification when analyzing challenging samples.

  6. SOME ASPECTS REGARING CHLORINE DECAY IN WATER DISTRIBUTION NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANA IOANA VUŢĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A major objective of drinking water treatment is to provide microbiologically safe drinking water. The combination of conventional drinking water treatment and disinfection has proved to be one of the major public health advances in modern times. The quality of drinking water delivered to the customer’s tap is influenced by a number of processes; namely water treatment, disinfection and changes during transport of treated water via the distribution system. All natural waters and even treated drinking water exerts disinfectant demand due to the reactions with NOM and other constituents in water. Therefore, the applied disinfectant dose must be sufficient to meet the inherent demand in the treated water, to provide sufficient protection against microbial infection. Thus, controlling free residual chlorine properly is definitely important to ensure meeting regulatory requirements and satisfying customer needs.This paper presents the main aspects regarding chlorine decay in drinking-water distribution networks and, also a free chlorine decay simulation with EPANET2 on Ramnicu Valcea water distribution system.

  7. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-profiling for biomarker discovery applied to human polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Fernanda B; Ferreira, Christina R; Sobreira, Tiago Jose P; Yannell, Karen E; Jarmusch, Alan K; Cedenho, Agnaldo P; Lo Turco, Edson G; Cooks, R Graham

    2017-09-15

    We describe multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-profiling, which provides accelerated discovery of discriminating molecular features, and its application to human polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis. The discovery phase of the MRM-profiling seeks molecular features based on some prior knowledge of the chemical functional groups likely to be present in the sample. It does this through use of a limited number of pre-chosen and chemically specific neutral loss and/or precursor ion MS/MS scans. The output of the discovery phase is a set of precursor/product transitions. In the screening phase these MRM transitions are used to interrogate multiple samples (hence the name MRM-profiling). MRM-profiling was applied to follicular fluid samples of 22 controls and 29 clinically diagnosed PCOS patients. Representative samples were delivered by flow injection to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer set to perform a number of pre-chosen and chemically specific neutral loss and/or precursor ion MS/MS scans. The output of this discovery phase was a set of 1012 precursor/product transitions. In the screening phase each individual sample was interrogated for these MRM transitions. Principal component analysis (PCA) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used for statistical analysis. To evaluate the method's performance, half the samples were used to build a classification model (testing set) and half were blinded (validation set). Twenty transitions were used for the classification of the blind samples, most of them (N = 19) showed lower abundances in the PCOS group and corresponded to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids. Agreement of 73% with clinical diagnosis was found when classifying the 26 blind samples. MRM-profiling is a supervised method characterized by its simplicity, speed and the absence of chromatographic separation. It can be used to rapidly isolate discriminating molecules in healthy/disease conditions by

  8. Mantra, music and reaction times: a study of its applied aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Malhotra, Rinku Garg, Usha Dhar, Neera Goel, Yogesh Tripathy, Iram Jaan, Sachit Goyal, Sumit Arora

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims &Objectives: The mechanism of the effects of music is still under scientific study and needs to be understood in a better way. We designed this study to see how music affects reaction time and concentration. The aim of our study was to study the effect of Gayatri mantra on reaction time. Material and Methods: 30 healthy subjects were selected for the study. Baseline record of Visual online Reaction time test was taken. Online visual reaction time was measured during listening to Gayatri Mantra was taken. Results:The reaction times decreased significantly p<0.001. Conclusion: Listening to music at work area reduces distractions, helps increase concentration and delays fatigue. It can be used to heal tinnitus, as an educational tool to develop children with special needs, Alzheimers disease, to improve motor skills in Parkinsonism and help alleviate pain after surgery.

  9. Radiation-Initiated Chlorination of 1, 2-Dichloroethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danno, A.; Abe, T.; Washino, M.; Souda, T.; Shimada, K. [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Watanuki-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma-ken (Japan)

    1969-12-15

    Radiation-initiated chlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane was carried out with a batch system to study the chlorination reaction in the laboratory and also with a flow system to obtain information on its scale-up. It was found that the direct chlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane in the presence of gamma radiation takes place by a free-radical chain reaction with a high G-value of the order of 10{sup 5}. Successive chlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane gives 1,1, 2-trichloroethane, 1,1,1, 2- and 1,1, 2, 2-tetrachloroethane, pentachloroethane and hexachloroethane. No products other than these polychloro ethanes were detected. The composition of the reaction products depends on the degree of chlorination; it is independent of the dose rate and the chlorine feed rate. A promising application of this process is to produce trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene by thermal dehydrochlorination of a mixture of tetrachloroethane and pentachloroethane. The optimum conditions of producing these compounds with high yields depend on the feed rate of 1, 2-dichloroethane and chlorine gas, the dose rate and the reaction temperature. A pilot experimental facility with a 2-litre reaction vessel has been completed and is now in operation. (author)

  10. Radiolytic removal of trihalomethane in chlorinated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajamohan, R.; Rajesh, Puspalata; Venugopalan, V.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Natesan, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Biofouling is one of the major operational problems in seawater cooling systems. It is controlled by application of chlorine based biocides in the range of 0.5-2.0 mg L -1 . The bromide in seawater reacts with the added chlorine and forms hypobromous acid. The brominated residual biocides react with natural organic matter present in the seawater, resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) such as bromoform (CHBr 3 ), dibromochloromethane (CHBr 2 Cl) bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl 2 ). Though THMs represent a small fraction of the added chlorine, they are relatively more persistent than residual chlorine, and hence pose a potential hazard to marine life because of their reported mutagenicity. There have been few reports on removal of THMs from chlorinated seawater. In this work, the efficacy of gamma irradiation technique for the removal of THMs from chlorine-dosed seawater was investigated. Experiments were carried out using seawater collected from Kalpakkam. Irradiation study was conducted in chlorinated (1, 3, and 5 mg L -1 of Cl 2 ) seawater by applying various dosages (0.4-5.0 kGy) of gamma radiation using a 60 Co Gamma Chamber 5000. Bromoform showed a faster rate of degradation as compared to other halocarbons like bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane. This shows the change in total THM concentration with variation in the radiation dose and initial Cl 2 dosing. When the percentage degradation of all the three trihalomethane species was compared with applied doses, it was found that the maximum reduction occurred at a dose of 2.5 kGy. The reduction was almost similar for all the three doses (1, 3, 5 ppm of Cl 2 ) used for chlorination. With a further increase in radiation dose to 5.0 kGy, a slight increase in reduction was observed

  11. Chlorine solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, J.K.; Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The chlorine solar neutrino experiment in the Homestake Gold Mine is described and the results obtained with the chlorine detector over the last fourteen years are summarized and discussed. Background processes producing 37 Ar and the question of the constancy of the production rate of 37 Ar are given special emphasis

  12. Water Chlorination for human consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocenti, A.; Giacosa, D.; Segatori, M.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning from this issue, an initiative of Federgasacqua (Federal association dealing with the gas and the water) takes place through the activities of the Task Forces Water Quality Control and Materials and Processes, which aim is to offer to the water industry operators and updated information concerning some main subjects, emphasizing in particular the technical and management applied topics. The paper deals with the chlorination processes in drinking water treatment. An overview of the italian situation is presented, concerning disinfection as well as other oxidation processes, together with an historical background on chlorination. Concerning the applications, the chemical technologies and the main processes, the disinfectant effectiveness and the byproducts formation have been described. Further, the regulations in force have been reported and discussed on national and international bases [it

  13. Sonolysis of chlorinated compounds in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Myung Hee; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Young Uk; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2007-02-01

    To examine the reaction rates of sonochemical degradation of aqueous phase carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene and 1,2,3-trichloropropane at various temperatures, power intensities, and saturating gases, the batch tests were carried out. The degradations of chlorinated hydrocarbons were analyzed as pseudo first order reactions and their reaction rate constants were in the range of 10(-1)-10(-3)/min. The reaction was fast at the low temperature with higher power intensity. Also, the reaction went fast with the saturating gas with high specific heat ratio, high solubility and low thermal conductivity. The main mechanism of destruction of chemicals was believed the thermal combustion in the bubble.

  14. The chlorination kinetics of zirconium dioxide mixed with carbon black

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movahedian, A.; Raygan, Sh.; Pourabdoli, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this research, the effects of chlorine gas at different chlorine partial pressures and carbon concentrations on the carbochlorination of zirconia were studied. It was found that in briquettes containing 18.7 %wt carbon, in a chlorine partial pressure range of 0.25-0.75 atm and for a reacted fraction of less than 0.7, the chemical reaction model was dominant for the carbochlorination process of zirconia. The order of reaction into chlorine gas (n) in this situation was 0.57. Moreover, the best weight ratio of carbon to zirconia was 40/60. In this case, the activation energy of the reaction was 209.9 kJ mol -1 in a temperature range of 1023-1223 K, and the dominant model was the chemical reaction model.

  15. A field ion microscope study of the surface reaction of tungsten with n-octanol under an applied positive voltage: reaction conditions for the 'splitting' of (110) plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, T.; Iwatsu, F.; Morikawa, H.

    1993-01-01

    Field ion microscopy is a powerful tool for the study of surface phenomena on an atomic scale, especially when they are crystal plane dependent, because the microscope shows many crystal planes of the sample tip simultaneously. Although a large number of FIM studies on vapor deposition, surface diffusion and surface reactions at a metal-gas interface have been reported, those on reactions at a metal-liquid interface are few. The authors have studied the corrosion or tungsten with aqueous solutions and found that water corroded the tungsten tips very severely to reduce the radius of curvature of the tip cap drastically. The reaction was so severe that it was not possible to trace it back to the very initial stages. They adopted, as a weaker reagent, one of the higher alcohols, n-octanol(C 8 H 17 OH), and found that it reacted with tungsten tips when an electrical pulse with a positive voltage between 5 and 10V was applied to the tip, giving very interesting field ion images in which the central (110) plane was divided into two parts located side by side across the [001] zone line. This means that some anisotropic surface reaction occurred which made a groove along the [001] zone line going through the (110) plane, usually the most stable plane chemically for bcc metals. They named this phenomenon 'splitting'. This reaction was less severe than that with water and some results on the morphology of the groove and on the reaction sequence have been reported. In the present paper more detailed reaction conditions which give rise to the splitting are described

  16. Degradation of Nicotine in Chlorinated Water: Pathways and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report The objective of the study is to illustrate how drinking water would affect alkaloid pesticides, and to address the issue by (a) investigating the fate of nicotine in chlorinated drinking water and deionized water, (b) determining the reaction rate and pathway of the reaction between nicotine and aqueous chlorine, (c) identifying nicotine’s degradation products, and (d) providing data that can be used to assess the potential threat from nicotine in drinking water.

  17. Chlorination of niobium oxide in the presence of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, L.R. de

    1984-01-01

    The chlorination kinetics of niobium pentoxide in the presence of carbon monoxide between 500-800 0 C of temperature is studied. The following variable that influences on the reaction rate are analysed: gas flow, geometry and volume of the Nb 2 O 5 samples, reaction temperature and composition of the chlorinated mixture. At the same time, two other materials were studied: the CaO.Nb 2 O 5 (synthetized in laboratory) and pyrochlorine concentrates. The three materials are compared for the chlorination method used. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Statistical Significance of the Maximum Hardness Principle Applied to Some Selected Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ranajit; Pan, Sudip; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2016-11-05

    The validity of the maximum hardness principle (MHP) is tested in the cases of 50 chemical reactions, most of which are organic in nature and exhibit anomeric effect. To explore the effect of the level of theory on the validity of MHP in an exothermic reaction, B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,3pd) and LC-BLYP/6-311++G(2df,3pd) (def2-QZVP for iodine and mercury) levels are employed. Different approximations like the geometric mean of hardness and combined hardness are considered in case there are multiple reactants and/or products. It is observed that, based on the geometric mean of hardness, while 82% of the studied reactions obey the MHP at the B3LYP level, 84% of the reactions follow this rule at the LC-BLYP level. Most of the reactions possess the hardest species on the product side. A 50% null hypothesis is rejected at a 1% level of significance.

  19. A new kind of Molotov? Gasoline-pool chlorinator mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutches, Katherine; Lord, James

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the reaction between pool chlorinators and gasoline. In particular, the propensity for self-ignition and the resulting chemical products were studied. An organic pool chlorinator was combined with gasoline in varying proportions in an attempt to form a hypergolic mixture. None of the combinations resulted in self-ignition, but larger quantities of chlorinator produced vigorous light-colored smoke and a solid mass containing isocyanuric acid and copper chloride. Additionally, the chlorinating abilities of different commercially available pool chlorinators were explored. When Ca(ClO)(2) and sodium dichloro-s-triazinetrione-based chlorinators were used, the presence of gasoline was still visible after 10 days, despite limited chlorination. The trichloro-s-triazinetrione-based chlorinator, however, caused efficient chlorination of the C(2)- and C(3)-alkylbenzenes, making gasoline no longer identifiable. 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  20. UASB reactor effluent disinfection by ozone and chlorine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro da Silvia, G.H.; Bruning, H.; Gerrity, D.; Daniel, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    This research studied the sequential ozone and chlorine process with respect to, the inactivation of indicator bacteria and the formation of ozone disinfection byproducts in sanitary wastewater effluent. The applied ozone doses were 5, 8 and 10 mg.O3.L-1, followed by chlorine doses of 10, 20 and 30

  1. The Induced Dimension Reduction method applied to convection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astudillo, R.; Van Gijzen, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Discretization of (linearized) convection-diffusion-reaction problems yields a large and sparse non symmetric linear system of equations, Ax = b. (1) In this work, we compare the computational behavior of the Induced Dimension Reduction method (IDR(s)) [10], with other short-recurrences Krylov

  2. The induced dimension reduction method applied to convection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astudillo Rengifo, R.A.; van Gijzen, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Discretization of (linearized) convection-diusion-reaction problems yields
    a large and sparse non symmetric linear system of equations,
    Ax = b: (1)
    In this work, we compare the computational behavior of the Induced Dimension
    Reduction method (IDR(s)) [10], with other

  3. Study of the surrogate-reaction method applied to neutron-induced capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutoux, G.; Jurado, B.; Méot, V.; Roig, O.; Mathieu, L.; Aïche, M.; Barreau, G.; Capellan, N.; Companis, I.; Czajkowski, S.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Burke, J.T.; Bail, A.; Daugas, J.M.; Faul, T.; Morel, P.; Pillet, N.; Théroine, C.; Derkx, X.; Sérot, O.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-decay probabilities of 173 Yb and 176 Lu have been measured using the surrogate reactions 174 Yb( 3 He,αγ) 173 Yb* and 174 Yb( 3 He,pγ) 176 Lu*, respectively. For the first time, the gamma-decay probabilities have been obtained with two independent experimental methods based on the use of C 6 D 6 scintillators and Germanium detectors. Our results for the radiative-capture cross sections are several times higher than the corresponding neutron-induced data. To explain these differences, we have used our gamma-decay probabilities to extract rather direct information on the spin distributions populated in the transfer reactions used. They are about two times wider and the mean values are 3 to 4 ℏ higher than the ones populated in the neutron-induced reactions. As a consequence, in the transfer reactions neutron emission to the ground and first excited states of the residual nucleus is strongly suppressed and gamma-decay is considerably enhanced.

  4. State of the art on cyanotoxins in water and their behaviour towards chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merel, Sylvain; Clément, Michel; Thomas, Olivier

    2010-04-01

    The occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms is drastically increasing in temperate countries and drinking water resources are threatened. As a result, cyanotoxins should be considered in water treatment to protect human health. This study presents a state of the art on cyanotoxins in water and their behaviour towards chlorination, a common drinking water disinfection process. Chlorination efficiency on cyanotoxins alteration depends on pH, chlorine dose and oxidant nature. Microcystins and cylindrospermopsin are efficiently transformed by chlorine, with respectively 6 and 2 by-products identified. In addition, chlorination of microcystins and cylindrospermopsin is associated with a loss of acute toxicity. Even though they have been less investigated, saxitoxins and nodularins are also altered by chlorine. For these toxins, no by-products have been identified, but the chlorinated mixture does not show acute toxicity. On the contrary, the fact that anatoxin-a has a very slow reaction kinetics suggests that this toxin resists chlorination. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heat-Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Chlorinated Solvents in Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialu Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat-activated persulfate oxidative treatment of chlorinated organic solvents containing chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in soil was investigated with different persulfate dosages (20 g/L, 40 g/L, and 60 g/L and different temperatures (30°C, 40°C, and 50°C. Chlorinated organic solvents removal was increased as persulfate concentration increase. The persulfate dosage of 20 g/L with the highest OE (oxidant efficiency value was economically suitable for chlorinated organic solvents removal. The increasing temperature contributed to the increasing depletion of chlorinated organic solvents. Chlorinated ethenes were more easily removed than chlorinated ethanes. Moreover, the persulfate depletion followed the pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics (kps=0.0292 [PS]0+0.0008, R2=0.9771. Heat-activated persulfate appeared to be an effective oxidant for treatment of chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  6. Biological reduction of chlorinated solvents: Batch-scale geochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsova, Irina; Mao, Xiaomin; Robinson, Clare; Barry, D. A.; Gerhard, Jason I.; McCarty, Perry L.

    2010-09-01

    Simulation of biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones requires a model that accounts for the complexity of processes involved and that is consistent with available laboratory studies. This paper describes such a comprehensive modeling framework that includes microbially mediated degradation processes, microbial population growth and decay, geochemical reactions, as well as interphase mass transfer processes such as DNAPL dissolution, gas formation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. All these processes can be in equilibrium or kinetically controlled. A batch modeling example was presented where the degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and its byproducts and concomitant reactions (e.g., electron donor fermentation, sulfate reduction, pH buffering by calcite dissolution) were simulated. Local and global sensitivity analysis techniques were applied to delineate the dominant model parameters and processes. Sensitivity analysis indicated that accurate values for parameters related to dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) degradation (i.e., DCE and VC maximum utilization rates, yield due to DCE utilization, decay rate for DCE/VC dechlorinators) are important for prediction of the overall dechlorination time. These parameters influence the maximum growth rate of the DCE and VC dechlorinating microorganisms and, thus, the time required for a small initial population to reach a sufficient concentration to significantly affect the overall rate of dechlorination. Self-inhibition of chlorinated ethenes at high concentrations and natural buffering provided by the sediment were also shown to significantly influence the dechlorination time. Furthermore, the analysis indicated that the rates of the competing, nonchlorinated electron-accepting processes relative to the dechlorination kinetics also affect the overall dechlorination time. Results demonstrated that the model developed is a flexible research tool that is

  7. Zirconia concentrate chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, N.G.; Albuquerque Brocchi, E. de

    1990-01-01

    Chlorination experiments were conducted in order to study the kinetics of gasification of the zirconium oxide present in the zirconia concentrate. The variables studied are temperature (1173 to 1373 K), percentage of reducing agent (12 to 36%) and porosity (22 to 30%). The results indicated a greater influence of temperature and percentage of reducing agent as well as allowed the conclusion that a balance between the levels of these variables is an important factor in the appropriate chlorination conditions. (author)

  8. Chlorine trifluoride (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, L.M.; Gillardeau, J.

    1963-01-01

    This monograph on chlorine trifluoride may be considered as a working tool useful in gaseous diffusion research. It consists of data gathered from the literature and includes furthermore a certain amount of original data. This monograph groups together the physical, chemical and physiological properties of chlorine trifluoride, as well as the preparation and analytical methods. It has been thought wise to add some technological information, and the safety regulations governing its use. (authors) [fr

  9. Kinetic study on the chlorination of β-spodumene for lithium extraction with Cl2 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, L.I.; Valente, N.G.; González, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► β-Spodumene was chlorinated to extract lithium with pure chlorine. ► The kinetics of the chlorination was studied in the range of 1000–1100 °C. ► Cl 2 flow rate, sample mass, and Cl 2 partial pressure were the operating variables. ► Experimental data were best fitted by the sequential nucleation and growth model. - Abstract: In this paper, the kinetics chlorination of β-spodumene for the extraction of lithium has been studied using gaseous chlorine as chlorinating agent. The effect of chlorine flow rate, temperature, mass of the sample, and partial pressure of Cl 2 was investigated. The study of the effect of chlorine flow rate indicated that the chlorination of β-spodumene may be carried out in the presence of active chlorinating species The chlorine partial pressure was found to have an appreciable effect on the system reactivity. The temperature was found to be the most important variable affecting the reaction rate. The β-spodumene chlorination process by Cl 2 was characterized by an apparent activation energy of about 359 kJ/mol in the range from 1000 to 1100 °C. Reaction was of non-catalytic gas–solid nature and experimental data fitted the sequential nucleation and growth model

  10. Exhaustive Conversion of Inorganic Nitrogen to Nitrogen Gas Based on a Photoelectro-Chlorine Cycle Reaction and a Highly Selective Nitrogen Gas Generation Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Jinhua; Bai, Jing; Shen, Zhaoxi; Li, Linsen; Xia, Ligang; Chen, Shuai; Zhou, Baoxue

    2018-02-06

    A novel method for the exhaustive conversion of inorganic nitrogen to nitrogen gas is proposed in this paper. The key properties of the system design included an exhaustive photoelectrochemical cycle reaction in the presence of Cl - , in which Cl· generated from oxidation of Cl - by photoholes selectively converted NH 4 + to nitrogen gas and some NO 3 - or NO 2 - . The NO 3 - or NO 2 - was finally reduced to nitrogen gas on a highly selective Pd-Cu-modified Ni foam (Pd-Cu/NF) cathode to achieve exhaustive conversion of inorganic nitrogen to nitrogen gas. The results indicated total nitrogen removal efficiencies of 30 mg L -1 inorganic nitrogen (NO 3 - , NH 4 + , NO 3 - /NH 4 + = 1:1 and NO 2 - /NO 3 - /NH 4 + = 1:1:1) in 90 min were 98.2%, 97.4%, 93.1%, and 98.4%, respectively, and the remaining nitrogen was completely removed by prolonging the reaction time. The rapid reduction of nitrate was ascribed to the capacitor characteristics of Pd-Cu/NF that promoted nitrate adsorption in the presence of an electric double layer, eliminating repulsion between the cathode and the anion. Nitrate was effectively removed with a rate constant of 0.050 min -1 , which was 33 times larger than that of Pt cathode. This system shows great potential for inorganic nitrogen treatment due to the high rate, low cost, and clean energy source.

  11. Transformation of avobenzone in conditions of aquatic chlorination and UV-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebše, Polonca; Polyakova, Olga V; Baranova, Maria; Kralj, Mojca Bavcon; Dolenc, Darko; Sarakha, Mohamed; Kutin, Alexander; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-09-15

    Emerging contaminants represent a wide group of the most different compounds. They appear in the environment at trace levels due to human activity. Most of these compounds are not yet regulated. Sunscreen UV-filters play an important role among these emerging contaminants. In the present research the reactions of 4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzoylmethane (avobenzone), the most common UV filter in the formulation of sunscreens, were studied under the combined influence of active chlorine and UV-irradiation. Twenty five compounds were identified by GC/MS as transformation products of avobenzone in reactions of aquatic UV-irradiation and chlorination with sodium hypochlorite. A complete scheme of transformation of avobenzone covering all the semivolatile products is proposed. The identification of the two primary chlorination products (2-chloro-1-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanedione and 2,2-dichloro-1-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanedione) was confirmed by their synthesis and GC/MS and NMR analysis. Although the toxicities of the majority of these products remain unknown substituted chlorinated phenols and acetophenones are known to be rather toxic. Combined action of active chlorine and UV-irradiation results in the formation of some products (chloroanhydrides, chlorophenols) not forming in conditions of separate application of these disinfection methods. Therefore caring for people «well-being» it is of great importance to apply the most appropriate disinfection method. Since the primary transformation products partially resist powerful UV-C irradiation they may be treated as stable and persistent pollutants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Release of chlorine from biomass at gasification conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerkman, E.; Stroemberg, B. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-05-01

    The objective of the project was to investigate the influence of different gasifying atmospheres on the release of chlorine from biomass during gasification conditions. Furthermore, the purpose was also to try and identify the formed chloro compounds. The results showed that O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} had negligible effect on the chlorine release at temperatures under 700 deg C. At temperatures above 800 deg C the reactivity towards CO{sub 2} increased and could be seen as higher chlorine release and less solid residue. No chloro organic compounds (aliphatic one to six carbons or aromatic one to two rings) could be detected in the tar or the fuel gas produced during pyrolysis/gasifying. On the other hand, comparable amounts of chlorinated benzenes were found in the cooling section during combustion of lucerne and of synthetic waste, indicating that oxygen is essential for chlorination reactions. 11 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  13. Release of chlorine from biomass at gasification conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerkman, E.; Stroemberg, B.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of the project was to investigate the influence of different gasifying atmospheres on the release of chlorine from biomass during gasification conditions. Furthermore, the purpose was also to try and identify the formed chloro compounds. The results showed that O 2 , H 2 O and CO 2 had negligible effect on the chlorine release at temperatures under 700 deg C. At temperatures above 800 deg C the reactivity towards CO 2 increased and could be seen as higher chlorine release and less solid residue. No chloro organic compounds (aliphatic one to six carbons or aromatic one to two rings) could be detected in the tar or the fuel gas produced during pyrolysis/gasifying. On the other hand, comparable amounts of chlorinated benzenes were found in the cooling section during combustion of lucerne and of synthetic waste, indicating that oxygen is essential for chlorination reactions. 11 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  14. Quantum and Statistical Mechanics Applied to Singlet Carbenes, Pericyclic Reactions, and Condensed Phase Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanseck, Jeffrey Donald

    The completed research covers a broad range of theoretical applications in organic chemistry. It is divided into three chapters which covers the chemistry of singlet carbenes (Chapter 1), substituent effects in pericyclic rearrangements (Chapter 2), and the effects of solvent on the reactivity of organic reactions (Chapter 3). The selectivity between 1,2- and 1,4-intramolecular additions to restricted diene systems has been investigated. A decrease in activation energy for the intramolecular cycloaddition is noted for systems which approach the idealized geometry found with intermolecular addition of carbenes to olefins. Direct substitution at the carbene site dramatically effects the predicted activation barriers for 1,2-hydrogen shifts. An excellent correlation between the activation energy and a substituents sigma_sp {rm R}{rm o} parameters has been demonstrated. The long standing problem of orbital alignment influences on the selectivity of 1,2-hydrogen arrangements shows significant geometric distortions, yet has little influence on the rates of singlet alkylcarbene rearrangements. The exo-selectivities observed for 1,2-shifts in rigid systems are explained by torsional and steric interactions which develop in the transition structures. Substituent effects on pericyclic reactions have been computed for several conrotatory and disrotatory electrocyclizations. The six-electron disrotatory electrocyclization of 1-substituted hexatrienes displays a strong electronic component in determining stereoselectivity, despite incredible steric interference. The eight-electron conrotatory electrocyclization transition structure of 1-substituted octatetraene has an unusual helical transition structure which does not differentiate between substituent position. The effects of solvents on the acidity differences between E and Z esters has supplemented earlier ab initio quantum mechanical results on the enhanced acidity of Meldrum's acid. Monte Carlo simulations predict a

  15. Designing driver assistance systems with crossmodal signals: multisensory integration rules for saccadic reaction times apply.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rike Steenken

    Full Text Available Modern driver assistance systems make increasing use of auditory and tactile signals in order to reduce the driver's visual information load. This entails potential crossmodal interaction effects that need to be taken into account in designing an optimal system. Here we show that saccadic reaction times to visual targets (cockpit or outside mirror, presented in a driving simulator environment and accompanied by auditory or tactile accessories, follow some well-known spatiotemporal rules of multisensory integration, usually found under confined laboratory conditions. Auditory nontargets speed up reaction time by about 80 ms. The effect tends to be maximal when the nontarget is presented 50 ms before the target and when target and nontarget are spatially coincident. The effect of a tactile nontarget (vibrating steering wheel was less pronounced and not spatially specific. It is shown that the average reaction times are well-described by the stochastic "time window of integration" model for multisensory integration developed by the authors. This two-stage model postulates that crossmodal interaction occurs only if the peripheral processes from the different sensory modalities terminate within a fixed temporal interval, and that the amount of crossmodal interaction manifests itself in an increase or decrease of second stage processing time. A qualitative test is consistent with the model prediction that the probability of interaction, but not the amount of crossmodal interaction, depends on target-nontarget onset asynchrony. A quantitative model fit yields estimates of individual participants' parameters, including the size of the time window. Some consequences for the design of driver assistance systems are discussed.

  16. Aqueous microwaves assisted cross-coupling reactions applied to unprotected nucleosides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOPHE eLEN

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention due to their potential biological activities. Amongst all synthetic nucleosides, C5-modified pyrimidines and C7- or C8-modified purines have mostly been prepared using palladium cross-coupling reactions and then studied as antitumoral and antiviral agents. Our objective is to focus this review on the Suzuki-Miyaura and on the Heck cross-couplings of nucleosides using microwave irradiations which are an alternative technology compatible with green chemistry and sustainable development.

  17. Selective recovery of uranium from Ca-Mg uranates by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomiro, Federico J.; Gaviría, Juan P.; Quinteros, Raúl D.

    2017-01-01

    A chlorination process is proposed for the uranium extraction and separation using Calcium−Magnesium uranates such as starting reactants which were obtained by precipitation from uranyl nitrate solutions with calcium hydroxide. The study is based on thermodynamic and reaction analysis using chlorine gas as chlorination agent. The results showed that the chlorination reaction of Ca uranate is more feasible to occur than the Mg uranate. The products obtained after chlorination reactions were washed with deionized water to remove the chlorides produced and analyzed. The XRD patterns of the washed products indicated that the chlorination between 400 and 500 °C result in a single phase of calcium uranate (CaUO 4 ) as reaction product. The formation of U 3 O 8 and MgU 3 O 10 was observed at temperatures between 600 °C and 700 °C for 8 hs. The optimal conditions to recover uranium were 3 l h −1 of chlorine and 10 hs of reaction at 700 °C being U 3 O 8 the single uranium product obtained. - Highlights: •The chlorination is an effective method for the recovery uranium from Ca-Mg uranates. •The optimal conditions were: 10 hs of reaction time at 700 °C using 3 l/h of Cl 2 (g). •U 3 O 8 is recovery by washing out the chlorination by-products.

  18. Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) applied to mice in the 5-choice serial reaction time task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzpatrick, C. M.; Caballero-Puntiverio, M.; Gether, U.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale The 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) is widely used to measure rodent attentional functions. In humans, many attention studies in healthy and clinical populations have used testing based on Bundesen’s Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) to estimate visual processing speeds...... on an individual level. Scopolamine HBr dose-dependently reduced 5-CSRTT attentional performance while also increasing reward collection latency at the highest dose. Upon TVA modelling, scopolamine HBr significantly reduced visual processing speed at both doses, while having less pronounced effects on visual...... modelled using a new three-parameter version of TVA to obtain estimates of visual processing speeds, visual thresholds and motor response baselines in each mouse. Results The parameter estimates for each animal were reliable across sessions, showing that the data were stable enough to support analysis...

  19. Understanding customer reactions to brokered ultimatums: applying negotiation and justice theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Stephen E; Ellis, Aleksander P J; Conlon, Donald E; Tinsley, Catherine H

    2004-06-01

    There has been little research examining customer reactions to brokered ultimatum game (BUG) contexts (i.e. exchanges in which 1 party offers an ultimatum price for a resource through an intermediary, and the ultimatum offer is accepted or rejected by the other party). In this study, the authors incorporated rational decision-making theory and justice theory to examine how customers' bids, recommendations, and repatronage behavior are affected by characteristics of BUG contexts (changing from an ultimatum to negotiation transaction, response timeliness, and offer acceptance or rejection). Results indicated that customers attempt to be economically efficient with their bidding behavior. However, negotiation structures, long waits for a response, and rejected bids create injustice perceptions (particularly informational and distributive injustice), negatively influencing customers' recommendations to others and their repatronage. The authors then discuss the practical and theoretical implications of their results. (c) 2004 APA

  20. Observation on the adverse reactions of different concentrations of povidone-iodine applied before cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Jun Wu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the efficiency and safety of 50g/L povidone-iodine solution in preventing postoperative endophthalmitis through comparing the incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis and adverse reactions after conjunctival sac washing with povidone-iodine of different concentrations.METHODS: Totally 500 cataract patients were divided into 50g/L povidone-iodine group and 25g/L povidone-iodine group. All the operated eyes were observed during and after surgery.The patients' subjective discomfort was inquired and their signs of eyes were recorded. RESULTS: The eye irritation of 50g/L povidone-iodine group was more significant than 25g/L povidone-iodine group. No significant difference in the corneal epithelial loss and endophthalmitis was observed between two groups.CONCLUSION:Conjunctival sac washing with 50g/L povidone-iodine is an effective and safe measure to prevent endophthalmitis after cataract surgery.

  1. An overview of relativistic hydrodynamics as applied to heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strottman, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The application of relativistic hydrodynamics as applied to heavy ions is reviewed. Constraints on the nuclear equation of state, as well as the form of the hydrodynamic equations imposed by causality are discussed. Successes (flow, side-splash, scaling) and shortcomings of one-fluid hydrodynamics are reviewed. Models for pion production within hydrodynamics and reasons for disagreement with experiment are assessed. Finally, the motivations for and the implementations of multi-fluid models are presented. 74 refs., 11 figs

  2. Chlorine inactivation of Tubifex tubifex in drinking water and the synergistic effect of sequential inactivation with UV irradiation and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiao-Bao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Long, Yuan-Nan; He, Pan-Pan; Xu, Chao

    2017-06-01

    The inactivation of Tubifex tubifex is important to prevent contamination of drinking water. Chlorine is a widely-used disinfectant and the key factor in the inactivation of T. tubifex. This study investigated the inactivation kinetics of chlorine on T. tubifex and the synergistic effect of the sequential use of chlorine and UV irradiation. The experimental results indicated that the Ct (concentration × time reaction ) concept could be used to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex with chlorine, thus allowing for the use of a simpler Ct approach for the assessment of T. tubifex chlorine inactivation requirements. The inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be well-fitted to a delayed pseudo first-order Chick-Watson expression. Sequential experiments revealed that UV irradiation and chlorine worked synergistically to effectively inactivate T. tubifex as a result of the decreased activation energy, E a , induced by primary UV irradiation. Furthermore, the inactivation effectiveness of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be affected by several drinking water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand with potassium permanganate (COD Mn ) concentration. High pH exhibited pronounced inactivation effectiveness and the decrease in turbidity and COD Mn concentrations contributed to the inactivation of T. tubifex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nonaqueous chlorination of uranium metal in tributyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchikhin, E.P.; Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Shatalov, V.V.; Vidanov, V.L.; Chekmarev, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Low-temperature (30-50 deg C) chlorination of uranium metal in the TBP-TCE-Cl 2 system (TCE = tetrachloroethylene) was studied. Dissolution of uranium in the dipolar aprotic solvent proceeds with formation of U(IV) compounds. The activation energy of this process is 31.24 kJ mol -1 , and relative reaction order with respect to Cl 2 is 2. The effect of TBP concentration on chlorination was examined. The chlorination rate sharply increases at a water content in the TBP-TCE system of 0.2- 0.6 vol % [ru

  4. Coupled channel theory of pion--deuteron reaction applied to threshold scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, T.; Koltun, D.S.

    1977-01-01

    Scattering and absorption of pions by a nuclear target are treated together in a coupled channel theory. The theory is developed explicitly for the problem of pion scattering and absorption by a deuteron. The equations are presented in terms of the integral equations of three-body scattering theory. The method is then applied in an approximate from to calculate the contribution of pion absorption to the scattering length for pion--deuteron scattering. The sensitivity of the calculated results to the model assumptions and approximations is investigated

  5. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  6. Production of hydrogen through the carbonation-calcination reaction applied to CH4/CO2 mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, L.; Bidini, G.; Corradetti, A.; Desideri, U.

    2007-01-01

    The production of hydrogen combined with carbon capture represents a possible option for reducing CO 2 emissions in atmosphere and anthropogenic greenhouse effect. Nowadays the worldwide hydrogen production is based mainly on natural gas reforming, but the attention of the scientific community is focused also on other gas mixtures with significant methane content. In particular mixtures constituted mainly by methane and carbon dioxide are extensively used in energy conversion applications, as they include land-fill gas, digester gas and natural gas. The present paper addresses the development of an innovative system for hydrogen production and CO 2 capture starting from these mixtures. The plant is based on steam methane reforming, coupled with the carbonation and calcination reactions for CO 2 absorption and desorption, respectively. A thermodynamic approach is proposed to investigate the plant performance in relation to the CH 4 content in the feeding gas. The results suggest that, in order to optimize the hydrogen purity and the efficiency, two different methodologies can be adopted involving both the system layout and operating parameters. In particular such methodologies are suitable for a methane content, respectively, higher and lower than 65%

  7. Chlorine transportation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautkaski, Risto; Mankamo, Tuomas.

    1977-02-01

    An assessment has been made on the toxication risk of the population due to the bulk rail transportation of liquid chlorine in Finland. Fourteen typical rail accidents were selected and their probability was estimated using the accident file of the Finnish State Railways. The probability of a chlorine leak was assessed for each type of accident separately using four leak size categories. The assessed leakage probability was dominated by station accidents, especially by collisions of a chlorine tanker and a locomotive. Toxication hazard areas were estimated for the leak categories. A simple model was constructed to describe the centring of the densely populated areas along the railway line. A comparison was made between the obtained risk and some other risks including those due to nuclear reactor accidents. (author)

  8. Bio-remediation of aquifers polluted by chlorinated solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, F.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous cases of contamination of aquifers by chlorinated aliphatic solvents, largely utilized during the last decades, constitute a public health problem, because of the toxic effect of such compounds. Different types of aerobic or anaerobic bacteria are able to degrade these molecules. Processes of bio remediation are now experimented in order to restore polluted aquifers. We present here the microorganisms and the enzymatic reactions involved in the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents, and different examples of in situ bio remediation operations are described. (author)

  9. Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) applied to mice in the 5-choice serial reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, C M; Caballero-Puntiverio, M; Gether, U; Habekost, T; Bundesen, C; Vangkilde, S; Woldbye, D P D; Andreasen, J T; Petersen, A

    2017-03-01

    The 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) is widely used to measure rodent attentional functions. In humans, many attention studies in healthy and clinical populations have used testing based on Bundesen's Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) to estimate visual processing speeds and other parameters of attentional capacity. We aimed to bridge these research fields by modifying the 5-CSRTT's design and by mathematically modelling data to derive attentional parameters analogous to human TVA-based measures. C57BL/6 mice were tested in two 1-h sessions on consecutive days with a version of the 5-CSRTT where stimulus duration (SD) probe length was varied based on information from previous TVA studies. Thereafter, a scopolamine hydrobromide (HBr; 0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg) pharmacological challenge was undertaken, using a Latin square design. Mean score values were modelled using a new three-parameter version of TVA to obtain estimates of visual processing speeds, visual thresholds and motor response baselines in each mouse. The parameter estimates for each animal were reliable across sessions, showing that the data were stable enough to support analysis on an individual level. Scopolamine HBr dose-dependently reduced 5-CSRTT attentional performance while also increasing reward collection latency at the highest dose. Upon TVA modelling, scopolamine HBr significantly reduced visual processing speed at both doses, while having less pronounced effects on visual thresholds and motor response baselines. This study shows for the first time how 5-CSRTT performance in mice can be mathematically modelled to yield estimates of attentional capacity that are directly comparable to estimates from human studies.

  10. Effects of short-chain chlorinated paraffins on soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezchlebová, Jitka; Cernohlávková, Jitka; Kobeticová, Klára; Lána, Jan; Sochová, Ivana; Hofman, Jakub

    2007-06-01

    Despite the fact that chlorinated paraffins have been produced in relatively large amounts, and high concentrations have been found in sewage sludge applied to soils, there is little information on their concentrations in soils and the effect on soil organisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of chlorinated paraffins in soils. The effects of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (64% chlorine content) on invertebrates (Eisenia fetida, Folsomia candida, Enchytraeus albidus, Enchytraeus crypticus, Caenorhabditis elegans) and substrate-induced respiration of indigenous microorganisms were studied. Differences were found in the sensitivity of the tested organisms to short-chain chlorinated paraffins. F. candida was identified as the most sensitive organism with LC(50) and EC(50) values of 5733 and 1230 mg/kg, respectively. Toxicity results were compared with available studies and the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) of 5.28 mg/kg was estimated for the soil environment, based on our data.

  11. Tailoring the Synergistic Bronsted-Lewis acidic effects in Heteropolyacid catalysts: Applied in Esterification and Transesterification Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Meilin; Xue, Lifang; Sun, Zhong; Wang, Shengtian; Wang, Xiaohong; Shi, Junyou

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the influences of Lewis metals on acidic properties and catalytic activities, a series of Keggin heteropolyacid (HPA) catalysts, HnPW11MO39 (M = TiIV, CuII, AlIII, SnIV, FeIII, CrIII, ZrIV and ZnII; for Ti and Zr, the number of oxygen is 40), were prepared and applied in the esterification and transesterification reactions. Only those cations with moderate Lewis acidity had a higher impact. Ti Substituted HPA, H5PW11TiO40, posse lower acid content compared with TixH3−4...

  12. Transformation mechanism of benzophenone-4 in free chlorine promoted chlorination disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Wei, Dongbin; Yin, Junxia; Wei, Guohua; Du, Yuguo

    2013-10-15

    The UV-filter BP-4 (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid) has been frequently observed in the environment, showing high potentials to invade drinking water, swimming water, or wastewater reclamation treatment systems. With the help of high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 10 new products from free chlorine-promoted BP-4 disinfection have been disclosed and their possible transformation routes have been investigated. The first route is chlorine substitution of BP-4 and its transformation products, forming mono-, di-, and tri-chlorinated BP-4 analogs. The second is Baeyer-Villiger-Type oxidation, converting diphenyl ketone to phenyl ester derivatives. The third is ester hydrolysis, generating corresponding phenolic and benzoic products. The fourth is decarboxylation, replacing the carboxyl group by chloride in the benzoic-type intermediate. The fifth is desulfonation, degrading the sulfonic group through an alternative chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. Orthogonal experiments have been established to investigate the species transformed from BP-4 at different pH values and free available chlorine (FAC) dosages. The reaction pathways are strongly dependent on pH conditions, while an excessive amount of FAC eliminates BP-4 to the smaller molecules. The initial transformation of BP-4 in chlorination system follows pseudo-first-order kinetics, and its half-lives ranged from 7.48 s to 1.26 × 10(2) s. More importantly, we have observed that the FAC-treated BP-4 aqueous solution might increase the genotoxic potentials due to the generation of chlorinated disinfection by-products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a Site-Specific Kinetic Model for Chlorine Decay and the Formation of Chlorination By-Products in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhur Saeed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine is used commonly to prevent biofouling in cooling water systems. The addition of chlorine poses environmental risks in natural systems due to its tendency to form chlorination by-products (CBPs when exposed to naturally-occurring organic matter (NOM. Some of these CBPs can pose toxic risks to aquatic and benthic species in the receiving waters. It is, therefore, important to study the fate of residual chlorine and CBPs to fully understand the potential impacts of chlorination to the environment. The goal of this study was to develop improved predictions of how chlorine and CBP concentrations in seawater vary with time, chlorine dose and temperature. In the present study, chlorination of once-through cooling water at Ras Laffan Industrial City (RLIC, Qatar, was studied by collecting unchlorinated seawater from the RLIC cooling water system intake, treating it with chlorine and measuring time series of chlorine and CBP concentrations. Multiple-rate exponential curves were used to represent fast and slow chlorine decay and CBP formation, and site-specific chlorine kinetic relationships were developed. Through extensive analysis of laboratory measurements, it was found that only some of the control parameters identified in the literature were important for predicting residual chlorine and CBP concentrations for this specific location. The new kinetic relationships were able to significantly improve the predictability and validity of Generalized Environmental Modeling System for Surfacewaters (GEMSS-chlorine kinetics module (CKM, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and chlorine kinetics and transport model when applied for RLIC outfall studies using actual field measurements.

  14. Preliminary GRS Measurement of Chlorine Distribution on Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J. M.; Boynton, W. V.; Taylor, G. J.; Hamara, D.; Janes, D. M.; Kerry, K.

    2003-12-01

    suggested fine material formation mechanisms, this preliminary result is intriguing. Tentative models involving venting of chlorine from hydrothermal systems (Newsom 1999), enrichment of chlorine through volcanic aerosols (Settle 1979) or acid fog reactions (Banin et al 1997), and preferential deposition of a proposed salt component in Mars fines (Clark 1993), if more easily mobilized from the Martian duricrust, are viable. Finally, this preliminary measurement will be improved through further data collection by Mars Odyssey and comparisons with MER and future missions.

  15. Oxidative elimination of cyanotoxins: comparison of ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Eva; Onstad, Gretchen D; Kull, Tomas P J; Metcalf, James S; Acero, Juan L; von Gunten, Urs

    2007-08-01

    As the World Health Organization (WHO) progresses with provisional Drinking Water Guidelines of 1 microg/L for microcystin-LR and a proposed Guideline of 1 microg/L for cylindrospermopsin, efficient treatment strategies are needed to prevent cyanotoxins such as these from reaching consumers. A kinetic database has been compiled for the oxidative treatment of three cyanotoxins: microcystin-LR (MC-LR), cylindrospermopsin (CYN), and anatoxin-a (ANTX) with ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate. This kinetic database contains rate constants not previously reported and determined in the present work (e.g. for permanganate oxidation of ANTX and chlorine dioxide oxidation of CYN and ANTX), together with previously published rate constants for the remaining oxidation processes. Second-order rate constants measured in pure aqueous solutions of these toxins could be used in a kinetic model to predict the toxin oxidation efficiency of ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate when applied to natural waters. Oxidants were applied to water from a eutrophic Swiss lake (Lake Greifensee) in static-dose testing and dynamic time-resolved experiments to confirm predictions from the kinetic database, and to investigate the effects of a natural matrix on toxin oxidation and by-product formation. Overall, permanganate can effectively oxidize ANTX and MC-LR, while chlorine will oxidize CYN and MC-LR and ozone is capable of oxidizing all three toxins with the highest rate. The formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the treated water may be a restriction to the application of sufficiently high-chlorine doses.

  16. Chlorination and Carbochlorination of Cerium Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, Marcelo; Bohe, Ana; Pasquevich, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    The chlorination and carbochlorination of cerium oxide were studied by thermogravimetry under controlled atmosphere (TG) in the 700 0 C 950 0 C temperature range.Both reactants and products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (RX), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Thermodynamic calculations were performed by computer assisted software.The chlorination starts at a temperature close to 800 0 C.This reaction involves the simultaneous formation and evaporation of CeCl3.Both processes control the reaction rate and their kinetic may not be easily separated.The apparent chlorination activation energy in the 850 0 C-950 0 C temperature range is 172 to 5 kJ/ mole.Carbon transforms the CeO2-Cl2 into a more reactive system: CeO2-C-Cl2, where the effects of the carbon content, total flow rate and temperature were analyzed.The carbochlorination starting temperature is 700 0 C.This reaction is completed in one step controlled by mass transfer with an apparent activation energy of 56 to 5 kJ/mole in the 850 0 C-950 0 C temperature range

  17. Thermodynamic consideration on chlorination of uraniferous phosphorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, Kimio; Tozawa, Kazuteru; Taki, Tomihiro; Hirono, Shuichiro.

    1989-01-01

    The uranium ore of low grade which has apatite as a main mineral, but is different from the phosphorite used as the raw material for phosphoric acid production, exists in large amount in South America and Africa continents, and the importance of its effective utilization as future uranium resources is recognized. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. took up the establishment of the treatment techniques to make this ore into resources as the subject of a project, and proposed the process of volatilizing the uranium in the ore as the chloride and recovering it, and at present, it attempts the experiment on the chlorination treatment. In this paper, the thermodynamic examination on the feasibility of this process, the optimum condition for leaving calcium existing in a large amount in the ore as the phosphate without chlorination and recovering only uranium by chlorination and volatilization, the phase reaction equilibrium chart and the calculation method according to thermodynamics concerning the behavior of chlorination of accompanying elements such as iron, silicon and aluminum and the effect of moisture in the ore are reported. (K.I.)

  18. Reaction of β-blockers and β-agonist pharmaceuticals with aqueous chlorine. Investigation of kinetics and by-products by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, José Benito; Rodil, Rosario; Cela, Rafael

    2012-06-01

    The degradation of two β-blockers (atenolol and propranolol) and one β-receptor agonist (salbutamol) during water chlorination was investigated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). An accurate-mass quadrupole time-of-flight system (QTOF) was used to follow the time course of the pharmaceuticals and also used in the identification of the by-products. The degradation kinetics of these drugs was investigated at different concentrations of chlorine, bromide and sample pH by means of a Box-Behnken experimental design. Depending on these factors, dissipation half-lives varied in the ranges 68-145 h for atenolol, 1.3-33 min for salbutamol and 42-8362 min for propranolol. Normally, an increase in chlorine dosage and pH resulted in faster degradation of these pharmaceuticals. Moreover, the presence of bromide in water samples also resulted in a faster transformation of atenolol at low chlorine doses. The use of an accurate-mass high-resolution LC-QTOF-MS system permitted the identification of a total of 14 by-products. The transformation pathway of β-blockers/agonists consisted mainly of halogenations, hydroxylations and dealkylations. Also, many of these by-products are stable, depending on the chlorination operational parameters employed.

  19. The difference between the metal ion extracted from the R.F. ion source by applying plasma chemistry reaction and by non-plasma range chemistry reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Gui Bin

    1987-01-01

    The paper introduced the difference between using plasma chemistry reaction draw metal ion and non-plasma range chemistry reaction in the R.F. ion source. By using of the plasma chemistry reaction draw metal ion higher percentage than non-plasma range chemistry reaction in the R.F. ion source. The authors plasma chemistry reaction to R.F. ion source and implanter successfully. The effect is very well, it has its own characteristic

  20. Where does Chlorine-36 go?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Chlorine-36 and Iodine-129 are the unique long-life radionuclides in the halogen family and halogens are known to be very mobile in the environment. Chlorine-36 is present in slight quantities in radioactive wastes containing carbon or issued from spent fuel reprocessing. The migration of Chlorine-36 in the environment has been very little studied, so a collaboration between the French institute of protection and nuclear safety (IPSN) and the Ukrainian institute for agricultural radioecology (UIAR) has been launched. IPSN will study the migration of Chlorine-36 in soils and UIAR will be in charge of studying the transfer of Chlorine-36 from soil to plants. (A.C.)

  1. Radiochemical analysis of chlorine-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Pina, G.; Lara, E.

    2006-01-01

    The radioactive chlorine isotope, 36 Cl, decays with a half-life of 3x10 5 years by emitting a beta particle (98 %) and by electron capture. The aim of this paper is to propose a radiochemical separation method of 36 Cl from the other beta-gamma emitters present in low and medium radioactive wastes such as spent ion exchange resins and evaporator concentrates, that arise from Nuclear Power Plants and particularly in the wastes that come from decommissioning activities of graphite reactors, in order to provide data for 36 Cl inventory calculations. The separation method proposed is based on an oxidation technique where chlorine is trapped by NaOH. 36 Cl beta emissions are measured by liquid scintillation counting by the dual label technique in order to avoid the contamination produced by 14 C which is also trapped by NaOH and which is the main contaminant present in graphite samples. The sensitivity of this method is sufficient to achieve the needed thresholds for the radiological characterization of the radioactive materials to which this method can be applied. (author)

  2. Temperature sensitivity indicates that chlorination of organic matter in forest soil is primarily biotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastviken, David; Svensson, Teresia; Karlsson, Susanne; Sandén, Per; Oberg, Gunilla

    2009-05-15

    Old assumptions that chloride is inert and that most chlorinated organic matter in soils is anthropogenic have been challenged by findings of naturally formed organochlorines. Such natural chlorination has been recognized for several decades, but there are still very few measurements of chlorination rates or estimates of the quantitative importance of terrestrial chlorine transformations. While much is known about the formation of specific compounds, bulk chlorination remains poorly understood in terms of mechanisms and effects of environmental factors. We quantified bulk chlorination rates in coniferous forest soil using 36Cl-chloride in tracer experiments at different temperatures and with and without molecular oxygen (O2). Chlorination was enhanced by the presence of O2 and had a temperature optimum at 20 degrees C. Minimum rates were found at high temperatures (50 degrees C) or under anoxic conditions. The results indicate (1) that most of the chlorination between 4 and 40 degrees C was biotic and driven by O2 dependent enzymes, and (2) that there is also slower background chlorination occurring under anoxic conditions at 20 degrees C and under oxic conditions at 50 degrees C. Hence, while oxic and biotic chlorination clearly dominated, chlorination by other processes including possible abiotic reactions was also detected.

  3. Effect of the temperature and the chlorine pressure, over the aluminium chlorides obtained by direct chlorination of the 6061 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Fabiola J.; Bohe, Ana E.; Pasquevich, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    The aluminium chloride is synthesized by direct chlorination of aluminium, in agreement with the following reaction: Al(s) + 3/2 Cl 2 AlCl 3 (s,g).The present work focuses on the preparation of aluminium chlorides by two methods: (a) Chlorination of 6061 aluminium alloy with gaseous chlorine in sealed containers, filled with different pressures of gas, from 0.8 to 74 Kpa and in the range of temperature between 200 0 and 500 0 C.(b) Chlorination of the same alloy in chlorine flow between 150 0 and 400 0 C.In the sealed systems, the hexahydrated aluminium trichloride predominated over the anhydrous form. For pressures lower than 14 Kpa and temperatures under 250 0 C, the chloride didn't appear.The residues were rich in aluminium, chlorine and magnesium.In the other systems, the anhydrous chloride was found in the areas of the reactor of temperatures above 100 0 C, for all the thermal treatments. The waste was composed by CrCl 3 and AlCl 3 .6H 2 O.The influence of the chlorine pressures and the heating temperature over the characteristics of the product, was studied.The characterization techniques were x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy, and the evolution of the structure was followed by scanning electron microscopy

  4. Chlorine and bromine solar neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R. Jr.; Cleveland, B.T.; Rowley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The solar neutrino experiment based upon the neutrino capture reaction 37 Cl (ν, e - ) 37 Ar has been in operation in the Homestake Gold Mine at Lead, South Dakota since 1967. The results of this experiment are well known, and have been reported most recently to the solar neutrino conference at Lead in 1984. We report here the latest results from this experiment. A radiochemical neutrino detector based upon the neutrino capture reaction 81 Br (ν, e - ) 81 Kr* → 81 Kr has recently been shown to be feasible. Our plans for performing a full scale test of the method using the Homestake chlorine detector are discussed briefly. 8 refs

  5. Synthetic strategies in the preparation of regiospecifically chlorine-37 labeled polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahiou, Belaid; Deinzer, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    A series of thirteen regiospecifically chlorine-37 labeled polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins were synthesized via the Sandmeyer reaction. Nitrochlorodibenzodioxins which were obtained by a base promoted condensation of catechols and dinitropolyhalobenzenes were reduced and converted to the diazonium salts. Chlorine-37 was introduced using cuprous chloride-37. The isotopic enrichment was in the range 75-96%. (Author)

  6. Simultaneous multielement analysis of zirconium alloys by chlorination separation of matrix/ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kaneharu

    1990-01-01

    An analytical method combined chlorination separation of matrix with ICP-AES has been developed for reactor grade Zr alloys (Zircaloy-2). A sample (1 g) is taken into a Pt boat and chlorinated with HCl gas of 100 ml/min in a glass reaction tube at ca. 330degC. Matrix Zr of the sample is volatilized and separated as ZrCl 4 . The analytic elements remaining quantitatively as chlorination residue are dissolved in a mixture of mineral acids (6 M HCl 3 ml+conc. HNO 3 0.5 ml+conc. H 2 SO 4 0.2 ml) and diluted to 20 ml with distilled water after filtration. ICP-AES was used for simultaneous multielement determination using a calibration curve method. The present method has the following advantages: simple sample preparation procedure; applicability to any form of samples to determine multielements; simple ICP-AES calibration procedure. This method was successfully applied to the determination of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, Mn and Pb in the Zr alloys of JAERI CRM's and NBS SRM's. (author)

  7. Cooling-water chlorination: the kinetics of chlorine, bromine, and ammonia in sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.D.; Inman, G.W. Jr.; Trofe, T.W.

    1982-11-01

    The major inorganic reaction pathways for the chlorination of saline waters were measured by a variety of techniques including: (1) amperometric titration, (2) amperometric membrane covered electrode, (3) uv spectrophotometry, (4) conventional kinetics methods for slow reactions, and (5) stopped-flow kinetics measurements with a microcomputer data acquisition system. The major reactions studied were: (1) the competitive reactions of ammonia and bromide ion with hypochlorous acid, (2) bromide oxidation by hypochlorous acid, (3) monochloramine formation in sea water, (4) monobromamine formation and subsequent disproportionation to form dibromamine, and (5) monochloramine oxidation of bromide to form bromochloramine. Reaction rates were determined in sodium chloride and sea water as a function of reactant concentration, pH, salinity, and ammonia concentration. Rate constants and corresponding rate laws and mechanisms were developed for each reaction

  8. [Formation mechanism and chemical safety of nonintentional chemical substances present in chlorinated drinking water and wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Sukeo

    2010-09-01

    This paper reviews the formation mechanism and chemical safety of nonintentional chemical substances (NICS) present in chlorine-treated water containing organic contaminants. Undesirable compounds, i.e., NICS, may be formed under certain conditions when chlorine reacts with organic matter. The rate and extent of chlorine consumption with organics are strongly dependent on their chemical structures, particularly whether double bonds or sulfur and nitrogen atoms occur in the molecules. Organothiophosphorus pesticides (P=S type) are easily oxidized to their phosphorus compounds (P=O type) in chlorinated water containing HOCl as little as 0.5 mg/l, resulting in an increase in cholinesterase-inhibitory activity. Chlorination of phenols in water also produces a series of highly chlorinated compounds, including chlorophenols, chloroquinones, chlorinated carboxylic acids, and polychlorinated phenoxyphenols (PCPPs). In some of these chloroquinones, 2,6-dichloroalkylsemiquinones exhibit a strong mutagenic response as do positive controls used in the Ames test. 2-phenoxyphenols in these PCPPs are particularly interesting, as they are present in the chlorine-treated phenol solution and they are also precursors (predioxins) of the highly toxic chlorinated dioxins. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were found to undergo chemical changes due to hypochlorite reactions to give chloro-substituted PAHs, oxygenated (quinones) and hydroxylated (phenols) compounds, but they exhibit a lower mutagenic response. In addition, field work was performed in river water and drinking water to obtain information on chemical distribution and their safety, and the results are compared with those obtained in the model chlorination experiments.

  9. Synthesis and spectral properties of novel chlorinated pH fluorescent probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xianglong; Jin Xilang; Wang Yunxia; Mei Qibing; Li Jianli; Shi Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Eight chlorinated fluoresceins have been synthesized by the reaction of chlorinated resorcinols with 4, 5, 6, 7-tetrachlorophthalic anhydride or 3, 6-dichloro-4-carboxyphthalic anhydride in the presence of methanesulfonic acid. The spectral properties of the chlorinated fluoresceins were studied. It was found that they have absorption and emission maxima at long wavelengths and high fluorescence quantum yields. Emission spectra of chlorinated fluoresceins shifted towards long wavelength with increase in chlorine. pH-dependent properties of chlorinated fluoresceins were studied in detail. These compounds showed a strongly pH-sensitive range of 3.0-7.0. These chlorinated fluoresceins will be used as pH probes for pH measurement of the cell because of the high quantum yield and strong pH-sensitivity. - Research highlights: → Eight chlorinated fluoresceins have been synthesized in the presence of methanesulfonic acid. → Emission spectra of these compounds shifted towards long wavelength with increase in chlorine. → Eight chlorinated fluoresceins showed a strongly pH-sensitive range of 3.0-7.0. → They have emission maxima at long wavelengths and high fluorescence quantum yields.

  10. Sintering with a chemical reaction as applied to uranium monocarbide; Frittage-reaction dans le cas du monocarbure d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accary, A; Caillat, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The present paper provides a survey of different investigations whose aim was the preparation and fabrication of uranium monocarbide for nuclear use. If a chemical reaction takes place in the sample during the sintering operation, it may be expected that the atom rearrangements involved in this reaction should favour the sintering process and thereby lower the temperature needed to yield a body of a given density. With this hypothesis in mind, the following methods have been studied: - Sintering of U-C mixtures; - Sintering of UO{sub 2}-C mixtures; - Hot pressing of U-C mixtures; - Extrusion of U-C mixtures. To generalize our result, it could be said that a chemical reaction does not lead to high densification, if one depends on a simple contact between discrete particles. On the contrary, a chemical reaction can help sintering if, as our hot pressing experiments shows, the densification can be achieved prior to the reaction. (author) [French] Le present article resume les etudes faites pour le compte du Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique dans le but de preparer du monocarbure d'uranium pour usage nucleaire. Si, en meme temps que l'on fritte une poudre, celle-ci est le siege d'une reaction chimique, on peut s'attendre a ce que le rearrangement atomique d'une reaction chimique favorise le frittage et, ainsi abaisse la temperature de travail necessaire pour obtenir une densite donnee. Nous avons etudie les methodes suivantes: - frittage des melanges U-C; - frittage des melanges UO{sub 2}-C; - frittage sous charge des melanges U-C; - filage des melanges U-C. Nos resultats montrent qu'une reaction chimique en cours de frittage ne conduit pas a un produit de haute densite si on opere sur un melange de poudres. Par contre, elle permet d'atteindre de hautes densites si la densification peut etre obtenue avant la reaction chimique. (auteur)

  11. Tailoring the Synergistic Bronsted-Lewis acidic effects in Heteropolyacid catalysts: Applied in Esterification and Transesterification Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meilin; Xue, Lifang; Sun, Zhong; Wang, Shengtian; Wang, Xiaohong; Shi, Junyou

    2015-09-16

    In order to investigate the influences of Lewis metals on acidic properties and catalytic activities, a series of Keggin heteropolyacid (HPA) catalysts, HnPW11MO39 (M = Ti(IV), Cu(II), Al(III), Sn(IV), Fe(III), Cr(III), Zr(IV) and Zn(II); for Ti and Zr, the number of oxygen is 40), were prepared and applied in the esterification and transesterification reactions. Only those cations with moderate Lewis acidity had a higher impact. Ti Substituted HPA, H5PW11TiO40, posse lower acid content compared with Ti(x)H(3-4x)PW12O40 (Ti partial exchanged protons in saturated H3PW12O40), which demonstrated that the Lewis metal as an addenda atom (H5PW11TiO40) was less efficient than those as counter cations (Ti(x)H(3-4x)PW12O40). On the other hand, the highest conversion reached 92.2% in transesterification and 97.4% in esterification. Meanwhile, a good result was achieved by H5PW11TiO40 in which the total selectivity of DAG and TGA was 96.7%. In addition, calcination treatment to H5PW11TiO40 make it insoluble in water which resulted in a heterogeneous catalyst feasible for reuse.

  12. Chlorination of uranium oxides with CCl4 using a mechanochemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitawaki, Shinichi; Nagai, Takayuki; Sato, Nobuaki

    2013-08-01

    A chlorination method for uranium oxides at low temperature was investigated by using a mechanochemical method. In particular, the possibility of the chlorination of uranium oxides, such as UO2 and U3O8, via mechanochemical reaction with CCl4 was studied using a planetary ball mill. Mechanochemical experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of milling time, CCl4/uranium oxide molar ratio, and revolution speed on the reaction. The synthesized products were then subjected to X-ray diffraction analysis, and it was found that the chlorination of U3O8 with CCl4 to UOCl2, UCl4, and U2O2Cl5 proceeded. However, the chlorination reaction could not be observed when using UO2 powder as the raw material. The chlorination reaction could not be observed when using UO2 powder as the raw material. The chlorination of U3O8 with CCl4 to form UOCl2, UCl4, and U2O2Cl5 via mechanochemical reaction occurs at room temperature. The ratio of chlorination increases with milling time when the appropriate amount of CCl4 is employed. However, the use of excess liquid CCl4 decreases the mechanochemical effect.

  13. Selective recovery of uranium from Ca-Mg uranates by chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomiro, Federico J.; Gaviría, Juan P.; Quinteros, Raúl D.; Bohé, Ana E.

    2017-07-01

    A chlorination process is proposed for the uranium extraction and separation using Calciumsbnd Magnesium uranates such as starting reactants which were obtained by precipitation from uranyl nitrate solutions with calcium hydroxide. The study is based on thermodynamic and reaction analysis using chlorine gas as chlorination agent. The results showed that the chlorination reaction of Ca uranate is more feasible to occur than the Mg uranate. The products obtained after chlorination reactions were washed with deionized water to remove the chlorides produced and analyzed. The XRD patterns of the washed products indicated that the chlorination between 400 and 500 °C result in a single phase of calcium uranate (CaUO4) as reaction product. The formation of U3O8 and MgU3O10 was observed at temperatures between 600 °C and 700 °C for 8 hs. The optimal conditions to recover uranium were 3 l h-1 of chlorine and 10 hs of reaction at 700 °C being U3O8 the single uranium product obtained.

  14. Effects of operating conditions on THMs and HAAs formation during wastewater chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yingxue; Wu Qianyuan [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hu Hongying, E-mail: hyhu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tian Jie [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-09-15

    Disinfection is the last barrier of wastewater reclamation process to protect ecosystem safety and human health. However, the chlorination process results in the formation of mutagenic/carcinogenic disinfection by-products (DBPs) deriving from the reaction of the chlorine with organic compounds in wastewater. The effects of operating conditions (chlorine dose, contact time, reaction temperature and pH value) of chlorination on the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) in biologically treated wastewater samples were investigated in this study. The results indicated that the total THMs (TTHM) and total HAAs (THAA) increased exponentially with increasing chlorine dose, but there are discrepancies between the formation rates of TTHM and THAA. The THAA reached a peak at contact time of 2 h and thereafter decreased with extended time. The formation time of THMs depends on the wastewater content of quick or slow formers. The yields of bromated HAAs (as MBAA, BCAA, and BDCAA) would decrease markedly after the contact time over 2 h during wastewater chlorination, and were favored in low pH values of 4 and high pH values of 9 under certain contact time. In addition, the formation of MBAA, BCAA, BDCAA decreased gradually as reaction temperature increased from 4 to 30 deg. C in the chlorination of wastewater containing a certain concentration of bromide. The effects of operating conditions on THMs and HAAs formation during wastewater chlorination were completely different from those of surface water disinfection.

  15. Effects of operating conditions on THMs and HAAs formation during wastewater chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yingxue; Wu Qianyuan; Hu Hongying; Tian Jie

    2009-01-01

    Disinfection is the last barrier of wastewater reclamation process to protect ecosystem safety and human health. However, the chlorination process results in the formation of mutagenic/carcinogenic disinfection by-products (DBPs) deriving from the reaction of the chlorine with organic compounds in wastewater. The effects of operating conditions (chlorine dose, contact time, reaction temperature and pH value) of chlorination on the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) in biologically treated wastewater samples were investigated in this study. The results indicated that the total THMs (TTHM) and total HAAs (THAA) increased exponentially with increasing chlorine dose, but there are discrepancies between the formation rates of TTHM and THAA. The THAA reached a peak at contact time of 2 h and thereafter decreased with extended time. The formation time of THMs depends on the wastewater content of quick or slow formers. The yields of bromated HAAs (as MBAA, BCAA, and BDCAA) would decrease markedly after the contact time over 2 h during wastewater chlorination, and were favored in low pH values of 4 and high pH values of 9 under certain contact time. In addition, the formation of MBAA, BCAA, BDCAA decreased gradually as reaction temperature increased from 4 to 30 deg. C in the chlorination of wastewater containing a certain concentration of bromide. The effects of operating conditions on THMs and HAAs formation during wastewater chlorination were completely different from those of surface water disinfection.

  16. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orosco, Pablo; Barbosa, Lucía; Ruiz, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl 2 –N 2 flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al 2 O 3 (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl 2 atmosphere of the MgO–Al 2 O 3 mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C

  17. Sulfonate activation of the electrophilic reactivity of chlorine and alkyl hypochlorides by the insertion of sulfur trioxide at the C1-C1 and O-C1 bonds. Addition of chlorine chloro- and ethoxysulfate to olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zefirov, N.S.; Koz'min, A.S.; Sorokin, V.D.; Zhdankin, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    At low temperatures (-40 to -80 0 C) sulfur trioxide enters the chlorine molecule (with the formation of chlorine chlorosulfate) and the ethyl hypochlorite molecule (giving chlorine ethoxysulfate). Both new compounds are highly reactive electrophilic chlorinating reagents and add to ethylene, activated alkenes (1-hexene and cyclohexene), and deactivated olefins (methyl methacrylate, tri- and tetrachloroethylene) in methylene chloride solution at low temperatures. The addition of chlorine chlorosulfate leads to the formation of β-chloroalkyl chlorosulfates with yields of 24-85%, and the addition of chlorine ethoxysulfate leads to β-chloroalkyl ethylsulfates with yields of 65-85%. The reactions with unsymmetrical olefins lead to mixtures of the regioisomers with a preference for the products from addition according to the Markovnikov rule; the addition to cyclohexene is trans-stereospecific. The investigated processes represent a new simple approach to the production of sulfate-activated chlorinating reagents and extend the possibilities for functional substitution of olefins

  18. Room-temperature Pd-catalyzed C-H chlorination by weak coordination: one-pot synthesis of 2-chlorophenols with excellent regioselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuyun; Sun, Yonghui; Zhang, Chao; Rao, Yu

    2014-02-07

    A room-temperature Pd(II)-catalyzed regioselective chlorination reaction has been developed for a facile one-pot synthesis of a broad range of 2-chlorophenols. The reaction demonstrates an excellent regioselectivity and reactivity for C-H chlorination. This reaction represents one of the rare examples of mild C-H functionalization at ambient temperature.

  19. Chlorine: Is it really so bad and what are the alternatives?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    bromine can be lost in side reactions with any organic matter present in the .... Nature 354, 255. ANDREWS ... CHRISTMAN K (2004) Report to the Chlorine Chemistry Council. ... (1992) Full-litter Resorptions Caused by Low-molecular wieght.

  20. Delignification of softwood kraft pulp by chlorine dioxide in a laboratory bleaching liquor displacement reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamzeh, Y.; Izadyar, S.

    2008-01-01

    The chlorine dioxide delignification efficiency of softwood kraft pulp in the laboratory liquor displacement reactor (fixed bed reactor) was investigated and compared with conventional batch reactor. The comparison of two reactors was made based on the effective efficiency and overall efficiency of chlorine dioxide. Effective efficiency corresponds to the oxidizing capacity of chlorine dioxide which consumed by organic materials. Comparison of two reactors based on the effective efficiency showed that the selectivity of delignification significantly enhanced in the displacement reactor in which the primary reaction products are eliminated from reaction zone by displacing flow. On the other hand, the formation of high amounts of chlorate in the reaction zone of displacement reactor reduces the overall efficiency of chlorine dioxide delignification stage. Thus, in spite of significant decrease in useless secondary reactions, this type of reactor would not be cost effective in the industrial scale

  1. Selective recovery of uranium from Ca-Mg uranates by chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomiro, Federico J., E-mail: pomiro@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Fisicoquímica y Control de Calidad, Complejo Tecnológico Pilcaniyeu, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Gaviría, Juan P. [Departamento de Fisicoquímica y Control de Calidad, Complejo Tecnológico Pilcaniyeu, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Quinteros, Raúl D. [Departamento de Fisicoquímica y Control de Calidad, Complejo Tecnológico Pilcaniyeu, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); and others

    2017-07-15

    A chlorination process is proposed for the uranium extraction and separation using Calcium−Magnesium uranates such as starting reactants which were obtained by precipitation from uranyl nitrate solutions with calcium hydroxide. The study is based on thermodynamic and reaction analysis using chlorine gas as chlorination agent. The results showed that the chlorination reaction of Ca uranate is more feasible to occur than the Mg uranate. The products obtained after chlorination reactions were washed with deionized water to remove the chlorides produced and analyzed. The XRD patterns of the washed products indicated that the chlorination between 400 and 500 °C result in a single phase of calcium uranate (CaUO{sub 4}) as reaction product. The formation of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and MgU{sub 3}O{sub 10} was observed at temperatures between 600 °C and 700 °C for 8 hs. The optimal conditions to recover uranium were 3 l h{sup −1} of chlorine and 10 hs of reaction at 700 °C being U{sub 3}O{sub 8} the single uranium product obtained. - Highlights: •The chlorination is an effective method for the recovery uranium from Ca-Mg uranates. •The optimal conditions were: 10 hs of reaction time at 700 °C using 3 l/h of Cl{sub 2}(g). •U{sub 3}O{sub 8} is recovery by washing out the chlorination by-products.

  2. Antiradiation effectiveness of the chlorine C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubnova, O.M.; Grechka, I.I.; Znamensky, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    At present ever more attention of the experimenters in the field of search of high-effective antiray means - is directed to development of preparations from bio-active substances of a natural origin. In this connection all greater interest is caused by researches of antiray activity of these compounds, distinguished, as a rule, from known preparations of synthetic manufacture of low toxicity, absence of expressed collateral effects and possibility of course application. It has biological (antiray) activity in dozes 5-10 mg/kg and chlorine C which is derivative of chlorophil A. At present it passes tests in oncology. Porphyrines (synthetic and natural) are recently subjected to wide study as potential medicinal means, due to their ability to be accumulated in bodies of the reticulo-endothelial system and proliferous tissues, as well as their physical-chemical characteristics (fluorescence, photosensitizing action, colouring). All this testifies for the benefit of perspective use of porphyrin for treatment and diagnostics of tumors. According to the above described properties of porphyrines there is that fact, that for some of them radioprotective properties are revealed during the injections as well as before and after radiation treatment. The above said has formed the basis for study of antiray properties of the chlorine C during the experiments on small-sized laboratory animals. Antiradiation effectivity of chlorine C was studied on the mice (CBA x C57 B1) F1. Chlorine C was applied in a wide range of dozes with its' use in 3 variants: before radiation treatment, after radiation treatment, combined (before and after radiation treatment). Radioprotective activity of chlorine C reduces at an increase of a time of the injection before radiation treatment and at other ways of injection (intramuscularly, subcutaneously, per os). Studies of medical activity of chlorine C in experiments on mice have shown, that the compound does not possess medical activity. The death of

  3. Application of compound specific 13C isotope investigations of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osenbrueck, K.; Heidinger, M.; Voropaev, A.; Ertl, S.; Eichinger, L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Chlorinated hydrocarbons are one of the most common pollutants found in groundwater. Due to complex contamination situations with overlapping contamination plumes the assessment of the organic contaminants requires the installation of expensive observation wells and high analytical effort. Here the determination of the stable isotope ratio 13 C/ 12 C of the organic compounds offers a promising and efficient tool to investigate the origin and the biodegradation characteristics of the chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater. The application of the method is based on characteristic isotope fingerprints, differing in chlorinated solvents. This isotope fingerprint is derived from different production pathways and is not influenced by transport or by retardation processes in the underground. Due to the fact, that two different contaminations can easily be distinguished by isotope ratios, an improved distinction of spatially and temporally different contamination plumes might be possible. In course of biologically mediated degradation processes a shift of the isotope ratios between the precursor and the product can frequently be observed, such as with denitrification or sulfate reduction processes. The isotope fractionation is due to a preferential reaction of the bonds formed by the lighter isotopes and leads to a progressive enrichment of the heavy isotopes in the precursor while the product becomes depleted in the heavy isotopes. Biological degradation of the highly chlorinated hydrocarbons is due to a co-metabolic dechlorinisation. Tetrachloroethene (PCE) for example degrades under anoxic conditions via trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Subsequent degradation to vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene may appear under aerobic as well as reducing environments depending on the site specific conditions. In several laboratory studies it has been shown, that biodegradation of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is accompanied by an isotope fractionation of

  4. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF ACTIVE CHLORINE PRIOR TO DETERMINING AMES MUTAGENICITY OF CHLORINATED NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER (NOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many potable water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that result from the reaction of natural organic matter (NOM) with oxidizing chlorine are known or suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. The Ames assay is routinely used to assess an overall level of mutagenicity for all com...

  5. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O Omarova

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane, applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters.

  6. Studies with solid chlorine chemical for chlorination of sea water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, N.; Kumaraswamy, P.; Santhanam, V.S.; Jeena, P.; Hari Krishna, K.; Rajendran, D.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorination is one of the conventional methods to control biofouling of condenser cooling water systems using either river water, reservoir water or sea water. However, there are many safety concerns associated with handling, storage and application of gaseous chlorine. Studies were carried out with suitable alternative chlorine chemical compounds which do not involve majority of these concerns but meet the functional requirement of gas chlorine. Trichloroisocyanuric Acid (TCCA) is one of the suitable alternatives to Gas chlorine. TCCA is a chlorine stabilized compound, stabilized with Cyanuric acid, thus similar to Gas Chlorine in its functions except that it is available in solid form. Release of chlorine is a gradual process in TCCA unlike Gaseous chlorine. Field studies with TCCA indicated gradual and near uniform release rate of chlorine, for longer duration with the requisite free residual chlorine levels (FRC). Thus, use of TCCA could be considered as a suitable alternative for gas chlorine for regular chlorination requirements. (author)

  7. Electrochemical chlorine evolution at rutile oxide (110) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heine Anton; Man, Isabela Costinela; Studt, Felix

    2010-01-01

    -sites are established for MO2 (M being Ir, Ru, Pt, Ti). The linear relations form the basis for constructing a generalized surface phase diagram where two parameters, the potential and the binding energy of oxygen, are needed to determine the surface composition. We calculate the catalytic activity as function...... the lowest overpotential at which all elementary reaction steps in the chlorine evolution reaction are downhill in free energy. This condition is then used as a measure for catalytic activity. Linear scaling relations between the binding energies of the intermediates and the oxygen binding energies at cus...... of the oxygen binding energy, giving rise to a Sabatier volcano. By combining the surface phase diagram and the volcano describing the catalytic activity, we find that the reaction mechanism differs depending on catalyst material. The flexibility in reaction path means that the chlorine evolution activity...

  8. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Eigl, Rosmarie; Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter; Sterba, Johannes H.; Golser, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t 1/2 = 37.24 min) – accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36 Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t 1/2 = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the 36 Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for 36 Cl/Cl analysis.

  9. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Stephan R., E-mail: srw@tlabs.ac.za [Universität Wien, Fakultät für Physik, Institut für Isotopenforschung und Kernphysik (Austria); Eigl, Rosmarie [Universität Wien, Fakultät für Chemie, Institut für Anorganische Chemie (Austria); Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter [Universität Wien, Fakultät für Physik, Institut für Isotopenforschung und Kernphysik (Austria); Sterba, Johannes H. [Technische Universität Wien, Atominstitut (Austria); Golser, Robin [Universität Wien, Fakultät für Physik, Institut für Isotopenforschung und Kernphysik (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t{sub 1/2} = 37.24 min) – accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of {sup 36}Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t{sub 1/2} = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the {sup 36}Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for {sup 36}Cl/Cl analysis.

  10. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Eigl, Rosmarie; Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter; Sterba, Johannes H.; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t1/2 = 37.24 min) - accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the 36Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for 36Cl/Cl analysis.

  11. The Nernst equation applied to oxidation-reduction reactions in myoglobin and hemoglobin. Evaluation of the parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroff, Harry A

    Analyses of the binding of oxygen to monomers such as myoglobin employ the Mass Action equation. The Mass Action equation, as such, is not directly applicable for the analysis of the binding of oxygen to oligomers such as hemoglobin. When the binding of oxygen to hemoglobin is analyzed, models incorporating extensions of mass action are employed. Oxidation-reduction reactions of the heme group in myoglobin and hemoglobin involve the binding and dissociation of electrons. This reaction is described with the Nernst equation. The Nernst equation is applicable only to a monomeric species even if the number of electrons involved is greater than unity. To analyze the oxidation-reduction reaction in a molecule such as hemoglobin a model is required which incorporates extensions of the Nernst equation. This communication develops models employing the Nernst equation for oxidation-reduction reactions analogous to those employed for hemoglobin in the analysis of the oxygenation (binding of oxygen) reaction.

  12. Role of soot in the transport of chlorine in hydrocarbon-air diffusion flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, S.; Saito, K.; Stencel, J.M.; Majidi, V.; Owens, M.

    1991-01-01

    Soot is an inevitable product of incomplete combustion in many practical combustion systems such as automobiles, incinerators and furnaces. Recent studies on chlorinated hydrocarbon combustion have shown that soot and other praticulates (eg. fly ash) play an important role in secondary reactions leading to the formation of chlorine substituted polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In order to attain very high destruction efficiencies the fundamental chemical and physical processes that are associated with combustion, and post-combustion cleanup must be well understood. In order to understand the effect of chlorine on the soot formed in a combustion system, fundamental studies using a coflow laminar hydrocarbon-air diffusion flame have been carried out. Phenomenological studies have revealed the effect of chlorine on the visible structure of the flame. Soot inception activation energies were estimated for methane, ethane and ethylene diffusion flames for the case of with and without chlorine addition. No significant difference in the activation energy was estimated for either case. The effect of chlorine on the soot escape rate of an acetylene diffusion flame was estimated. The soot formed in these diffusion flames was analyzed for chlorine using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and by laser induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS). REsults from these techniques indicate the presence of chlorine in the soot formed. In this paper a chemical scheme to explain the chlorine found in the soot is proposed based on known theories of soot formation

  13. Radiolytic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xing-Zheng; Yamamoto, Takeshi [Fukui Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Fukui (Japan); Hatashita, Masanori [The Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center, Research Dept., Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Radiolytic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloroform, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene) in water was carried out. Water solutions of the chlorinated hydrocarbons with different concentrations were irradiated with {gamma} rays. Concentrations of methane, ethane, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} after the irradiation were determined by gas chromatography. Concentration of chloride ion in the irradiated sample was determined by ion chromatography. Experimental results show that radiolytic degradation of the chlorinated hydrocarbon increased with the radiation dose. Methane, ethane, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and Cl{sup -} concentrations increased with the radiation dose and the sample concentration. On the other hand, O{sub 2} concentration decreased with the radiation dose and the sample concentration. When sample concentration was high, dissolved oxygen might be not enough for converting most of the C atoms in the sample into CO{sub 2}. This resulted in a low decomposition ratio. Addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as an oxygen resource could increase the decomposition ratio greatly. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was applied to identify some intermediates of the radiolytic dehalogenation. Radiolytic degradation mechanisms are also discussed. (author)

  14. Study of the production of zirconium tetrachloride by chlorination of its oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, E.S.M.

    1983-01-01

    The studies carried out on the production of zirconium tetrachloride by chlorination of pure zirconium oxide with carbon tetrachloride and chlorine in the presence of carbon. In the process of chlorination with carbon tetrachloride, the chlorination efficiency increases with the rise in temperature at intervals between 450 and 750 0 C. The flow of the carbon tetrachloride vapour was 1.50l/min. Higher temperatures of 700 to 850 0 C were used for the zirconium oxide chlorination in the presence of carbon, and the flowrate of the chlorine gas used in the process was 0.50 l/min. Pure zirconium oxide chlorination as well as zirconium oxide - carbon misture chlorination have been studied in connection with the time of reaction at different temperatures and the apparent rate constant, the activation energies, the order of reaction in relation to the concentration of the gases (CCl 4 and Cl 2 ) and the content of carbon in the pellet have all been determined. (Author) [pt

  15. Photodynamic tissue adhesion with chlorin(e6) protein conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, J; Veloso, A A; Tolentino, F; Hasan, T; Hamblin, M R

    1999-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that a photodynamic laser-activated tissue solder would perform better in sealing scleral incisions when the photosensitizer was covalently linked to the protein than when it was noncovalently mixed. Conjugates and mixtures were prepared between the photosensitizer chlorin(e6) and various proteins (albumin, fibrinogen, and gelatin) in different ratios and used to weld penetrating scleral incisions made in human cadaveric eyes. A blue-green (488-514 nm) argon laser activated the adhesive, and the strength of the closure was measured by increasing the intraocular pressure until the wound showed leakage. Both covalent conjugates and noncovalent mixtures showed a light dose-dependent increase in leaking pressure. A preparation of albumin chlorin(e6) conjugate with additional albumin added (2.5 protein to chlorin(e6) molar ratio) showed significantly higher weld strength than other protein conjugates and mixtures. This is the first report of dye-protein conjugates as tissue solders. These conjugates may have applications in ophthalmology.

  16. Chlorin photosensitizers sterically designed to prevent self-aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchoa, Adjaci F; de Oliveira, Kleber T; Baptista, Mauricio S; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Iamamoto, Yassuko; Serra, Osvaldo A

    2011-11-04

    The synthesis and photophysical evaluation of new chlorin derivatives are described. The Diels-Alder reaction between protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester and substituted maleimides furnishes endo-adducts that completely prevent the self-aggregation of the chlorins. Fluorescence, resonant light scattering (RLS) and (1)H NMR experiments, as well as X-ray crystallographic have demonstrated that the configurational arrangement of the synthesized chlorins prevent π-stacking interactions between macrocycles, thus indicating that it is a nonaggregating photosensitizer with high singlet oxygen (Φ(Δ)) and fluorescence (Φ(f)) quantum yields. Our results show that this type of synthetic strategy may provide the lead to a new generation of PDT photosensitizers.

  17. Recalled Peritraumatic Reactions, Self-Reported PTSD, and the Impact of Malingering and Fantasy Proneness in Victims of Interpersonal Violence Who Have Applied for State Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Maarten; Winkel, Frans Willem; Bogaerts, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores the associations between three types of peritraumatic reactions (dissociation, distress, and tonic immobility) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a sample of 125 victims of interpersonal violence who had applied for compensation with the Dutch Victim Compensation Fund (DCVF). In addition, the…

  18. The reactivity of anion-exchange resins by applying OT-for-OH exchange reaction in the equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Naoki; Nihei, Makoto; Imaizumi, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    In order to reveal the behavior of hydroxyl group in isotope exchange reaction, OT-for-OH exchange reaction between each anion-exchange resin (OH - form) and tritiated water (abbreviated as HTO water below) was observed at 80degC under the equilibrium. Anion-exchange resins used were Amberlite IRA-400, IRA-410 (both strongly basic), and IRA-94S (weakly basic). It can be thought that an HTO molecule dissociates into H + +OT - (or T + +OH - ). The activity of each resin based on OT-for-OH exchange reaction was measured with a liquid scintillation counter. From the above-mentioned, the following five were found. Isotope exchange reaction as 'atomic group' occurred between the OH group in each anion-exchange resin and the OT group in HTO water. The reactivity of strongly basic anion-exchange resin is larger than that of weakly basic one. The ratio of the reactivity of these resins can roughly be expressed as follows: (IRA-410): (IRA-400): (IRA-94S)=42: 7: 1. The degree of OT-for-OH exchange reaction may be smaller than that of T-for-H exchange reaction. The method used and results obtained in this work may be helpful to obtain the data for the prevention of T-contamination, especially to obtain the data from certain atomic groups including T. (author)

  19. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  20. Recovery of Actinides from Actinide-Aluminium Alloys: Chlorination Route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Soucek, P.; Jardin, R.; Glatz, J.P.; Cassayre, L.

    2008-01-01

    A method for recovery of actinides (An) from An-Al alloys formed by electrochemical separation of metallic spent nuclear fuel on solid aluminium electrodes in molten chloride salts is described. The proposed route consists of three main steps: -) vacuum distillation of salt adhered on the electrodes, -) chlorination of An-Al alloy by pure chlorine gas and -) sublimation of formed AlCl 3 . A thermochemical study of the route was performed to determine important chemical reactions and to find optimum experimental conditions for all process steps. Vacuum distillation of the electrode is efficient for complete removal of remaining salt and most fission products, full chlorination of the An-Al alloys is possible at any working temperature and evaporation of AlCl 3 is achieved by heating under argon. Experiments have been carried out using U-Al alloy in order to define parameters providing full alloy chlorination without formation of volatile UCl 5 and UCl 6 . It was shown that full chlorination of An-Al alloys without An losses should be possible at a temperature approx. 150 deg. C. (authors)

  1. Recovery of Actinides from Actinide-Aluminium Alloys: Chlorination Route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Soucek, P.; Jardin, R.; Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cassayre, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique (LGC), Universite Paul Sabatier, UMR CNRS 5503, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2008-07-01

    A method for recovery of actinides (An) from An-Al alloys formed by electrochemical separation of metallic spent nuclear fuel on solid aluminium electrodes in molten chloride salts is described. The proposed route consists of three main steps: -) vacuum distillation of salt adhered on the electrodes, -) chlorination of An-Al alloy by pure chlorine gas and -) sublimation of formed AlCl{sub 3}. A thermochemical study of the route was performed to determine important chemical reactions and to find optimum experimental conditions for all process steps. Vacuum distillation of the electrode is efficient for complete removal of remaining salt and most fission products, full chlorination of the An-Al alloys is possible at any working temperature and evaporation of AlCl{sub 3} is achieved by heating under argon. Experiments have been carried out using U-Al alloy in order to define parameters providing full alloy chlorination without formation of volatile UCl{sub 5} and UCl{sub 6}. It was shown that full chlorination of An-Al alloys without An losses should be possible at a temperature approx. 150 deg. C. (authors)

  2. Degradation of Organic UV filters in Chlorinated Seawater Swimming Pools: Transformation Pathways and Bromoform Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasfi, Tarek; Coulomb, Bruno; Ravier, Sylvain; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-12-05

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are used in sunscreens and other personal-care products to protect against harmful effects of exposure to UV solar radiation. Little is known about the fate of UV filters in seawater swimming pools disinfected with chlorine. The present study investigated the occurrence and fate of five commonly used organic UV filters, namely dioxybenzone, oxybenzone, avobenzone, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate, and octocrylene, in chlorinated seawater swimming pools. Pool samples were collected to monitor the variation of UV filter concentrations during pool opening hours. Furthermore, laboratory-controlled chlorination experiments were conducted in seawater spiked with UV filters to investigate the reactivity of UV filters. Extracts of chlorination reaction samples were analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry and electron-capture detection to identify the potentially formed byproducts. In the collected pool samples, all the UV filters except dioxybenzone were detected. Chlorination reactions showed that only octocrylene was stable in chlorinated seawater. The four reactive UV filters generated brominated transformation products and disinfection byproducts. This formation of brominated products resulted from reactions between the reactive UV filters and bromine, which is formed rapidly when chlorine is added to seawater. Based on the identified byproducts, the transformation pathways of the reactive UV filters were proposed for the first time. Bromoform was generated by all the reactive UV filters at different yields. Bromal hydrate was also detected as one of the byproducts generated by oxybenzone and dioxybenzone.

  3. Assessing chlorinated ethene degradation in a large scale contaminant plume by dual carbon–chlorine isotope analysis and quantitative PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunkeler, D.; Abe, Y.; Broholm, Mette Martina

    2011-01-01

    The fate of chlorinated ethenes in a large contaminant plume originating from a tetrachloroethene (PCE) source in a sandy aquifer in Denmark was investigated using novel methods including compound-specific carbon and chlorine isotope analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q...... reduction by pyrite as indicated by the formation of cDCE and stable carbon isotope data. TCE and cDCE showed carbon isotope trends typical for reductive dechlorination with an initial depletion of 13C in the daughter products followed by an enrichment of 13C as degradation proceeded. At 1000 m downgradient......DCE. The significant enrichment of 13C in VC indicates that VC was transformed further, although the mechanismcould not be determined. The transformation of cDCEwas the rate limiting step as no accumulation of VC occurred. In summary, the study demonstrates that carbon–chlorine isotope analysis and qPCR combinedwith...

  4. Evaluation of the AGCU Expressmarker 16 and 22 PCR Amplification Kits Using Biological Samples Applied to FTA Micro Cards in Reduced Volume Direct PCR Amplification Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Ogden

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the performance of the  Wuxi AGCU ScienTech Incorporation (HuiShan, Wuxi, China AGCU Expressmarker 16 (EX 16 and 22 (EX22 short tandem repeat (STR amplification kits in reduced reaction volumes using direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification workflows. The commercially available PowerPlex® 21 (PP21 System (Promega, Wisconsin, USA, which follows similar direct workflows, was used as a reference. Anticoagulate blood applied to chemically impregnated  FTA TM Micro Cards (GE Healthcare UK Limited, Amersham Place, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9NA, UK was used to represent a complex biological sample. Allelic concordance, first-pass success rate, average peak heights, heterozygous peak height ratios (HPHRs, and intracolor and intercolor peak height balance were determined. In reduced volume PCR reactions, the performances of both the EX16 and EX22 STR amplification kits were comparable to that of the PP21 System. The level of performance was maintained at PCR reaction volumes, which are 40% of that recommended. The EX22 and PP21 System kits possess comparable overlapping genome coverage. This study evaluated the performance of the AGCU EX16 and EX22 STR amplification kits in reduced PCR reaction volumes using direct workflows in combination with whole blood applied to FTA TM Micro Cards. Allelic concordance, first-pass success rate, average peak heights, HPHRs, and intracolor and intercolor peak height balance were determined. A concordance analysis was completed that compared the performance of the EX16 and EX22 kits using human blood applied to FTA Micro Cards in combination with full, half, and reduced PCR reaction volumes. The PP21 System (Promega was used as a reference kit. Where appropriate, the distributions of data were assessed using the Shapiro-Wilk test. For normally-distributed data, statistics were calculated using analysis of variance (ANOVA and for nonparametric data the Wilcoxon

  5. Application of activated carbons from coal and coconut shell for removing free residual chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Tominaga, Hisato; Ueda, Ayaka; Tanaka, Yuko; Iwata, Yuka; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the removal of free residual chlorine by activated carbon (AC). ACs were prepared from coal (AC1) and coconut shell (AC2). The specific surface area of AC1 was larger than that of AC2. The removal of free residual chlorine increased with elapsed time and amount of adsorbent. The removal mechanism of free residual chlorine was the dechlorination reaction between hypochlorous acid or hypochlorite ion and AC. Moreover, AC1 was useful in the removal of free residual chlorine in tap water. The optimum condition for the removal of free residual chlorine using a column is space velocity 306 1/h; liner velocity 6.1 m/h.

  6. Frontier Molecular Orbital Contributions to Chlorination versus Hydroxylation Selectivity in the Non-Heme Iron Halogenase SyrB2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srnec, Martin; Solomon, E. I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 6 (2017), s. 2396-2407 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Chlorination * Chlorine compounds * Free radical reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  7. Frontier Molecular Orbital Contributions to Chlorination versus Hydroxylation Selectivity in the Non-Heme Iron Halogenase SyrB2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srnec, Martin; Solomon, E. I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 6 (2017), s. 2396-2407 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Chlorination * Chlorine compounds * Free radical reaction s Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  8. Estimation of optimum experimental parameters in chlorination of UO2 with Cl2 gas and carbon for UCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.S.; Kang, Y.H.; Lee, H.K.

    1997-01-01

    For the preparation of uranium tetrachloride, the chlorination of UO 2 was carried out and an appropriate reaction system was confirmed. The effects of reaction temperature, time, injection ratio of N 2 gas and appropriate amount of carbon using a reductant on the conversion ratio and volatilization were evaluated. The optimum reaction time and temperature in chlorination of UO 2 for the preparation of UCl 4 were 2 h and 500-700 C, respectively. Also 50% of N 2 gas in chlorine gas proved to be the appropriate injection ratio. (orig.)

  9. Linear response theory applied to the computation of multi-differential cross sections in deep inelastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, C.

    1978-01-01

    Correlations between observable quantities in deep inelastic reactions, which are observed through multidifferential cross sections measurements, provide a severe test for the models by making strong constraints. Nevertheless these multicorrelated measurements provide hints for the physical features which they have to take into account. (orig.) [de

  10. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  11. Transformation of benzophenone-type UV filters by chlorine: Kinetics, products identification and toxicity assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jian; Ma, Li-yun; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Chlorination kinetics of three benzophenone-type UV filters (BPs) was studied. • Chlorination of BPs followed second-order reaction. • The transformation products (TPs) of six BPs were identified. • Several transformation pathways were proposed. • Mostly enhanced toxicity of TPs after chlorination was observed. - Abstract: The present study focused on the kinetics, transformation pathways and toxicity of several benzophenone-type ultraviolet filters (BPs) during the water chlorination disinfection process. The transformation kinetics of the studied three BPs was found to be second-order reaction, which was dependent on the concentration of BPs and chlorine. The second-order rate constants increased from 86.7 to 975 M"−"1 s"−"1 for oxybenzone, 49.6–261.7 M"−"1 s"−"1 for 4-hydroxybenzophenone and 51.7–540 M"−"1 s"−"1 for 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid with the increasing pH value from 6 to 8 of the chlorination disinfection condition. Then the transformation products (TPs) of these BPs were identified by HPLC-QTof analysis. Several transformation pathways, including electrophilic substitution, methoxyl substitution, ketone groups oxidation, hydrolysis, decarboxylation and ring cleavage reaction, were speculated to participate in the chlorination transformation process. Finally, according to the toxicity experiment on luminescent bacteria, Photobacterium phosphoreum, enhanced toxicity was observed for almost all the TPs of the studied BPs except for 2,2′-dihydroxy-4,4′-dimethoxybenzophenone; it suggested the formation of TPs with more toxic than the parent compounds during the chlorination process. The present study provided a foundation to understand the transformation of BPs during chlorination disinfection process, and was of great significance to the drinking water safety.

  12. Transformation of benzophenone-type UV filters by chlorine: Kinetics, products identification and toxicity assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian; Ma, Li-yun; Xu, Li, E-mail: xulpharm@mails.tjmu.edu.cn

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • Chlorination kinetics of three benzophenone-type UV filters (BPs) was studied. • Chlorination of BPs followed second-order reaction. • The transformation products (TPs) of six BPs were identified. • Several transformation pathways were proposed. • Mostly enhanced toxicity of TPs after chlorination was observed. - Abstract: The present study focused on the kinetics, transformation pathways and toxicity of several benzophenone-type ultraviolet filters (BPs) during the water chlorination disinfection process. The transformation kinetics of the studied three BPs was found to be second-order reaction, which was dependent on the concentration of BPs and chlorine. The second-order rate constants increased from 86.7 to 975 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} for oxybenzone, 49.6–261.7 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} for 4-hydroxybenzophenone and 51.7–540 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} for 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid with the increasing pH value from 6 to 8 of the chlorination disinfection condition. Then the transformation products (TPs) of these BPs were identified by HPLC-QTof analysis. Several transformation pathways, including electrophilic substitution, methoxyl substitution, ketone groups oxidation, hydrolysis, decarboxylation and ring cleavage reaction, were speculated to participate in the chlorination transformation process. Finally, according to the toxicity experiment on luminescent bacteria, Photobacterium phosphoreum, enhanced toxicity was observed for almost all the TPs of the studied BPs except for 2,2′-dihydroxy-4,4′-dimethoxybenzophenone; it suggested the formation of TPs with more toxic than the parent compounds during the chlorination process. The present study provided a foundation to understand the transformation of BPs during chlorination disinfection process, and was of great significance to the drinking water safety.

  13. Process for producing chlorinated polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Shinji; Takayama, Shin-ichi; Kodama, Takashi.

    1970-01-01

    A process for chlorinated polyethylene by the chlorination of an aqueous suspension of polyethylene without the use catalysts is given, using 5-55% by gel content of cross-linked polyethylene powders. The products have favorable material workability, transparency, impact strength and tensile properties. In the case of peroxide cross-linking, a mixture of peroxides with polyethylene must be ground after heat treatment. The polyethylene may preferably have a gel content of 5-55%. The chlorination temperature may be 40 0 C or more, preferably 60 0 to 160 0 C. In one example, high pressure polymerized fine polyethylene powders of 15μ having a density of 0.935 g/cc, a softening point of 114 0 C, an average molecular weight of 35,000 were irradiated in air with 40 Mrad electron beams from a 2 MV Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator at room temperature. The thus irradiated polyethylene had a gel content of 55% and a softening point of 119 0 C. It was chlorinated upto a chlorine content of 33% at 100 0 C. Products were white crystals having a melting point of 122 0 C and a melting heat value of 32 mcal/mg. A sheet formed from this product showed a tensile strength of 280 kg/cm 2 , an elongation of 370% and a hardness of 90. (Iwakiri, K.)

  14. Removal of trihalomethane from chlorinated seawater using gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamohan, R; Natesan, Usha; Venugopalan, V P; Rajesh, Puspalata; Rangarajan, S

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine addition as a biocide in seawater results in the formation of chlorination by-products such as trihalomethanes (THMs). Removal of THMs is of importance as they are potential mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. In this context, a study was conducted that used ionizing radiation to remove THMs from chlorinated (1, 3, and 5 mg/L) seawater by applying various dosages (0.4-5.0 kGy) of gamma radiation. Bromoform (BF) showed a faster rate of degradation as compared to other halocarbons such as bromodichloromethane (BDCM) and dibromochloromethane (DBCM). In chlorine-dosed seawater, total irradiation dose of 0.4 to 5 kGy caused percentage reduction in the range of 6.9 to 76.7%, 2.3 to 99.6%, and 45.7 to 98.3% for BDCM, DBCM, and BF, respectively. During the irradiation process, pH of the chlorinated seawater decreased with increase in the absorbed dose; however, no change in total organic carbon (TOC) was observed. The results show that gamma dose of 2.5 kGy was adequate for maximum degradation of THM; but for complete mineralization, higher dose would be required.

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of styrene epoxidation by chlorite: role of chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Jessica K; Rajput, Jonathan; Richardson, David E

    2014-07-07

    An investigation of the kinetics and mechanism for epoxidation of styrene and para-substituted styrenes by chlorite at 25 °C in the pH range of 5-6 is described. The proposed mechanism in water and water/acetonitrile includes seven oxidation states of chlorine (-I, 0, I, II, III, IV, and V) to account for the observed kinetics and product distributions. The model provides an unusually detailed quantitative mechanism for the complex reactions that occur in mixtures of chlorine species and organic substrates, particularly when the strong oxidant chlorite is employed. Kinetic control of the reaction is achieved by the addition of chlorine dioxide to the reaction mixture, thereby eliminating a substantial induction period observed when chlorite is used alone. The epoxidation agent is identified as chlorine dioxide, which is continually formed by the reaction of chlorite with hypochlorous acid that results from ClO produced by the epoxidation reaction. The overall stoichiometry is the result of two competing chain reactions in which the reactive intermediate ClO reacts with either chlorine dioxide or chlorite ion to produce hypochlorous acid and chlorate or chloride, respectively. At high chlorite ion concentrations, HOCl is rapidly eliminated by reaction with chlorite, minimizing side reactions between HOCl and Cl2 with the starting material. Epoxide selectivity (>90% under optimal conditions) is accurately predicted by the kinetic model. The model rate constant for direct reaction of styrene with ClO2(aq) to produce epoxide is (1.16 ± 0.07) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) for 60:40 water/acetonitrile with 0.20 M acetate buffer. Rate constants for para substituted styrenes (R = -SO3(-), -OMe, -Me, -Cl, -H, and -NO2) with ClO2 were determined. The results support the radical addition/elimination mechanism originally proposed by Kolar and Lindgren to account for the formation of styrene oxide in the reaction of styrene with chlorine dioxide.

  16. Fluorine and chlorine determination in mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel and plutonium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elinson, S.V.; Zemlyanukhina, N.A.; Pavlova, I.V.; Filatkina, V.P.; Tsvetkova, V.T.

    1981-01-01

    A technique of fluorine and chlorine determination in the mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel and plutonium dioxide, based on their simultaneous separation by means of pyrohydrolysis, is developed. Subsequently, fluorine is determined by photometry with alizarincomplexonate of lanthanum or according to the weakening of zirconium colouring with zylenol orange. Chlorine is determined using the photonephelometric method according to the reaction of chloride-ion interaction with silver nitrate or by spectrophotometric method according to the reaction with mercury rhodanide. The lower limit of fluorine determination is -6x10 -5 %, of chlorine- 1x10 -4 % in the sample of 1g. The relative mean quadratic deviation of the determination result (Ssub(r)), depends on the character of the material analyzed and at the content of nx10 -4 - nx10 -3 mass % is equal to from 0.05 to 0.32 for fluorine and from 0.11 to 0.35 for chlorine [ru

  17. Comparative investigation of X-ray contrast medium degradation by UV/chlorine and UV/H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiujuan; Jiang, Jin; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yi; Pang, Suyan

    2018-02-01

    The degradation of iopamidol and diatrizoate sodium (DTZ) by UV/chlorine was carried out according to efficiency, mechanism, and oxidation products, and compared to that by UV/H 2 O 2 . The pseudo-first order rate (k') of iopamidol and DTZ was accelerated by UV/chlorine compared to that by UV and chlorine alone. k' of iopamidol and DTZ by UV/chlorine increased with increasing chlorine dosage. Both of iopamidol and DTZ could not be effectively removed by UV/H 2 O 2 compared to that by UV/chlorine. Secondary radicals (Cl 2 - and ClO) rather than primary radicals (HO and Cl) were demonstrated to be mainly responsible for the enhanced removal of iopamidol and DTZ by UV/chlorine. The oxidation products of iopamidol and DTZ resulting from UV/chlorine and UV/H 2 O 2 process were identified, and differences existed in the two systems. IO 3 - (the desired sink of I - ) was the major inorganic product in the UV/chlorine process whereas I - was the predominant inorganic product in the UV/H 2 O 2 process. The formation of chlorine-containing products during the degradation of iopamidol and DTZ by UV/chlorine was also observed. H-abstraction, additions, de-iodination were shared during the degradation of iopamidol by UV/chlorine and UV/H 2 O 2 . Neutral pH condition was preferred for the removal of iopamidol and DTZ by UV/chlorine. UV/chlorine could also be applied in real waters for the removal of iopamidol and DTZ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  19. Kinetics of membrane damage to high (HNA) and low (LNA) nucleic acid bacterial clusters in drinking water by ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, ferrate(VI), and permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, Maaike K; von Gunten, Urs; Freihofer, Pietro; Hammes, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Drinking water was treated with ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, ferrate(VI), and permanganate to investigate the kinetics of membrane damage of native drinking water bacterial cells. Membrane damage was measured by flow cytometry using a combination of SYBR Green I and propidium iodide (SGI+PI) staining as indicator for cells with permeabilized membranes and SGI alone to measure total cell concentration. SGI+PI staining revealed that the cells were permeabilized upon relatively low oxidant exposures of all tested oxidants without a detectable lag phase. However, only ozonation resulted in a decrease of the total cell concentrations for the investigated reaction times. Rate constants for the membrane damage reaction varied over seven orders of magnitude in the following order: ozone > chlorine > chlorine dioxide ≈ ferrate > permanganate > chloramine. The rate constants were compared to literature data and were in general smaller than previously measured rate constants. This confirmed that membrane integrity is a conservative and therefore safe parameter for disinfection control. Interestingly, the cell membranes of high nucleic acid (HNA) content bacteria were damaged much faster than those of low nucleic acid (LNA) content bacteria during treatment with chlorine dioxide and permanganate. However, only small differences were observed during treatment with chlorine and chloramine, and no difference was observed for ferrate treatment. Based on the different reactivity of these oxidants it was suggested that HNA and LNA bacterial cell membranes have a different chemical constitution. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Chlorine on Enterovirus RNA Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary mechanism of disinfection of waterborne pathogens by chlorine has always been believed to be due to the alteration of proteins by free chlorine and subsequent disruption of their biological structure.

  1. Formation of aryl-chlorinated aromatic acids and precursors for chloroform in chlorination of humic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Leer, E.W.B. de; Galan, L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of chloroform when humic substances are chlorinated is well known. Other chlorinated products that may be formed are chloral, di- and trichloroacetic acid, chlorinated C-4 diacids, and α-chlorinated aliphatic acids. Several of these compounds are formed in molar yields comparable

  2. Dynamic separation of Szilard-Chalmers reaction products applied to the trioxalatochromium ion adsorbed on anionic exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.B.S.

    1979-01-01

    A method of dynamic elution of recoiled 51 Cr +3 , formed by the Szilard-Chalmers reaction during the irradiation of trioxalatochromium ion adsorbed on anionic exchange resin is presented. The influence of some factors on the separation yield of chromium-51, such as: composition, concentration and flow rate of eluent, mesh size of the resin and irradiation time are studied. The results are compardd with those obtained by the static method, in which the recoiled atom is separated from the target after irradiation. Because of the high separation yield of chromium-51, the method of dynamic separation is proposed for routine production of this elemnt, with high specific activities. (author) [pt

  3. Direct Chlorination of Zircon Sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwiretnani Sudjoko; Budi Sulistyo; Pristi Hartati; Sunardjo

    2002-01-01

    It was investigated the direct chlorination of zircon sand in a unit chlorination equipment. The process was in semi batch. The product gas was scrubbed in aqueous NaOH. It was search the influence of time, ratio of reactant and size of particle sand to the concentration of Zr and Si in the product. From these research it was found that as the times, ratio of reactant increased, the concentration of Zr increased, but the concentration of Si decreased, while as grain size of zircon sand decreased the concentration of Zr decreased, but the concentration of Si increased. (author)

  4. Optimization of Chlorination Process for Mature Leachate Disinfection Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzeh Ali Jamali1

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: leachate from landfill contains high level of microbial pathogens which is considered as one of the most important threats for the environment. One of the common and simple methods for water and wastewater disinfection is chlorination, but it rarely has been used for leachate disinfection. The objective of this study was evaluating the efficiency of chlorine for leachate disinfection and optimization of the effect of concentration and contact time on the death of total and fecal coliforms, as a microbial contamination index. Methods: In this descriptive-analysis study, microbial indices monitoring in leachates initiated from landfill of Qazvin city were conducted for one year. After pre-tests, the range of chlorine concentration and contact time on the inactivation of microbial indices were determined. Central composite design (CCD and response surface methodology (RSM were applied to optimize chlorine concentration and contact time parameters effect on microbial inactivation. 13 runs of tests were performed on samples. Tests were included BOD, COD, total and fecal coliforms. All analytical experiments were according to the standard methods for the examination of water and wastewater. Results: Results of the study showed that microbial indices had relatively high sensitivity to inactivation by chlorination, which in the chlorine concentration of 2 mg/L and contact time of 9 min, and chlorine concentration of 0.5 mg/L and contact time of 12 min, 100% of total and fecal coliforms inactivated, respectively. The RSM method was used for analysis of bacterial inactivation. Analyses showed that in contact time of 9.4 min and chlorine concentration of 2.99 mg/L, the inactivation efficiency of total and fecal coliforms were 89.16% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: Chlorine could be used for leachate disinfection. However, in high concentrations of organic matter in leachates, due to production potential of chlorination by-products, health

  5. Kinetics of the gas-phase reactions of chlorine atoms with CH2F2, CH3CCl3 and CF3CFH2 over the temperature range 253 – 551 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Johnson, Matthew Stanley; Nielsen, Ole John

    2009-01-01

    Relative rate techniques were used to study the title reactions in 930–1200 mbar of N2 diluent. The reaction rate coefficients measured in the present work are summarized by the expressions k(Cl+CH2F2) = 1.19×10-17 T 2 exp(-1023/T ) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 (253– 553 K), k(Cl+CH3CCl3) = 2.41×10-12 exp(...

  6. Chlorination of uranium oxides with CCl4 using a mechanochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitawaki, Shinichi; Nagai, Takayuki; Sato, Nobuaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • UCl 4 or UOCl 2 could be synthesized from U 3 O 8 with CCl 4 by using a planetary ball mill. • The chlorination could not be observed when using UO 2 powder as the starting material. • Extension of milling time was effective for chlorinating U 3 O 8 with the appropriate amount of CCl 4 . -- Abstract: A chlorination method for uranium oxides at low temperature was investigated by using a mechanochemical method. In particular, the possibility of the chlorination of uranium oxides, such as UO 2 and U 3 O 8 , via mechanochemical reaction with CCl 4 was studied using a planetary ball mill. Mechanochemical experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of milling time, CCl 4 /uranium oxide molar ratio, and revolution speed on the reaction. The synthesized products were then subjected to X-ray diffraction analysis, and it was found that the chlorination of U 3 O 8 with CCl 4 to UOCl 2 , UCl 4 , and U 2 O 2 Cl 5 proceeded. However, the chlorination reaction could not be observed when using UO 2 powder as the raw material

  7. Chlorination of uranium oxides with CCl{sub 4} using a mechanochemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitawaki, Shinichi, E-mail: kitawaki.shinichi@jaea.go.jp [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Nagai, Takayuki [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Sato, Nobuaki [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • UCl{sub 4} or UOCl{sub 2} could be synthesized from U{sub 3}O{sub 8} with CCl{sub 4} by using a planetary ball mill. • The chlorination could not be observed when using UO{sub 2} powder as the starting material. • Extension of milling time was effective for chlorinating U{sub 3}O{sub 8} with the appropriate amount of CCl{sub 4}. -- Abstract: A chlorination method for uranium oxides at low temperature was investigated by using a mechanochemical method. In particular, the possibility of the chlorination of uranium oxides, such as UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, via mechanochemical reaction with CCl{sub 4} was studied using a planetary ball mill. Mechanochemical experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of milling time, CCl{sub 4}/uranium oxide molar ratio, and revolution speed on the reaction. The synthesized products were then subjected to X-ray diffraction analysis, and it was found that the chlorination of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} with CCl{sub 4} to UOCl{sub 2}, UCl{sub 4}, and U{sub 2}O{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} proceeded. However, the chlorination reaction could not be observed when using UO{sub 2} powder as the raw material.

  8. The influence of chlorine on the gasification of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, C von; Struis, R; Stucki, S [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Chlorides of the heavy metals copper, lead and zinc inhibit the CO{sub 2}-gasification reaction of charcoal. This is observed either by impregnation the wood with the salts before pyrolysis or by mechanically mixing the salts with the charcoal before gasification. Charcoal impregnated or mixed with ammonium chloride reacts more slowly than untreated charcoal. Treating the charcoal with HCl also influences negatively the gasification reactivity, indicating that chlorine plays an important role in the gasification. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs.

  9. Formation of emerging DBPs from the chlorination and chloramination of seawater algal organic matter and related model compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Nihemaiti, Maolida

    2014-01-01

    Limited studies focused on reactions occurring during disinfection and oxidation processes of seawater. The aim of this work was to investigate disinfection by-products (DBPs) formation from the chlorination and chloramination of seawater algal

  10. Mass Spectrometry Identification of N-Chlorinated Dipeptides in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guang; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xing-Fang

    2017-04-04

    We report the identification of N-chlorinated dipeptides as chlorination products in drinking water using complementary high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) and quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry techniques. First, three model dipeptides, tyrosylglycine (Tyr-Gly), tyrosylalanine (Tyr-Ala), and phenylalanylglycine (Phe-Gly), reacted with sodium hypochlorite, and these reaction solutions were analyzed by QTOF. N-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N-Cl-Phe-Gly, N,N-di-Cl-Phe-Gly, N-Cl-Tyr-Ala, and N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Ala were identified as the major products based on accurate masses, 35 Cl/ 37 Cl isotopic patterns, and MS/MS spectra. These identified N-chlorinated dipeptides were synthesized and found to be stable in water over 10 days except N,N-di-Cl-Phe-Gly. To enable sensitive detection of N-chlorinated dipeptides in authentic water, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. N-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Gly, N-Cl-Phe-Gly, N-Cl-Tyr-Ala, and N,N-di-Cl-Tyr-Ala along with their corresponding dipeptides were detected in authentic tap water samples. The dipeptides were clearly detected in the raw water, but the N-chlorinated dipeptides were at background levels. These results suggest that the N-chlorinated dipeptides are produced by chlorination. This study has identified N-chlorinated dipeptides as new disinfection byproducts in drinking water. The strategy developed in this study can be used to identify chlorination products of other peptides in drinking water.

  11. The maintenance of elevated active chlorine levels in the Antarctic lower stratosphere through HCl null cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Rolf; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Mannan Zafar, Abdul; Robrecht, Sabine; Lehmann, Ralph

    2018-03-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole arises from ozone destruction driven by elevated levels of ozone destroying (active) chlorine in Antarctic spring. These elevated levels of active chlorine have to be formed first and then maintained throughout the period of ozone destruction. It is a matter of debate how this maintenance of active chlorine is brought about in Antarctic spring, when the rate of formation of HCl (considered to be the main chlorine deactivation mechanism in Antarctica) is extremely high. Here we show that in the heart of the ozone hole (16-18 km or 85-55 hPa, in the core of the vortex), high levels of active chlorine are maintained by effective chemical cycles (referred to as HCl null cycles hereafter). In these cycles, the formation of HCl is balanced by immediate reactivation, i.e. by immediate reformation of active chlorine. Under these conditions, polar stratospheric clouds sequester HNO3 and thereby cause NO2 concentrations to be low. These HCl null cycles allow active chlorine levels to be maintained in the Antarctic lower stratosphere and thus rapid ozone destruction to occur. For the observed almost complete activation of stratospheric chlorine in the lower stratosphere, the heterogeneous reaction HCl + HOCl is essential; the production of HOCl occurs via HO2 + ClO, with the HO2 resulting from CH2O photolysis. These results are important for assessing the impact of changes of the future stratospheric composition on the recovery of the ozone hole. Our simulations indicate that, in the lower stratosphere, future increased methane concentrations will not lead to enhanced chlorine deactivation (through the reaction CH4 + Cl → HCl + CH3) and that extreme ozone destruction to levels below ≈ 0.1 ppm will occur until mid-century.

  12. Réaction du polyisobutène chloré sur l'anhydride maléique : mécanisme. Catalyse par l'anhydride dichloromaléique Reaction of Chlorinated Polyisobutene on Maleic Anhydride. Mechanism. Catalysis by Dichloromaleic Anhydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sillion B.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article le mécanisme de la réaction de condensation du polyisobutène chloré sur l'anhydride maléique, qui sert dans la synthèse d'additif pour lubrifiant, est étudié par une cinétique globale et par un travail sur composés modèles. Il est montré que, dans cette réaction, l'anhydride maléique joue un double rôle : de catalyseur de déshydrochloration par une réactivité de type acide de Lewis organique, de réactif comme diénophile. Grâce à ces résultats, il est proposé une catalyse par l'anhydride dichloromaléique, qui permet une amélioration sensible du procédé. This article examines the mechanism of the chlorinated-polyisobutene condensation reaction on maleic anhydride. The overall kinetics and model compounds are investigated for this reaction which is used in the synthesis of lubricant additives. Maleic anhydride is shown to play the dual role of a dehydrochlorination catalyst by having a reactivity of the organic Lewis acid type and of a reactant like dienophile. These results are used to propose a catalysis by dichloromaleic anhydride which appreciably improves the process.

  13. Feasibility study of the separation of chlorinated films from plastic packaging wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Mallampati Srinivasa; Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Okuda, Tetsuji; Tsai, Tsung-Yueh; Nakai, Satoshi; Nishijima, Wataru; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2010-04-01

    This study describes the possible separation of chlorinated plastic films (PVC and PVDC) from other heavy plastic packaging waste (PPW) by selective twist formation and gravity separation. Twists formation was mechanically induced in chlorinated plastic films, whereas twist formation did not occur in PS and PET films. After twist formation, all the films had the apparent density of less than 1.0g/cm(3) and floated in water even though the true density was more than 1.0g/cm(3). However, the apparent density of the PS and the PET films increased with agitation to more than 1.0g/cm(3), whereas that of chlorinated plastic films was kept less than 1.0g/cm(3). The main reason would be the air being held inside the chlorinated plastic films which was difficult to be removed by agitation. Simple gravity separation after twist formation was applied for artificial film with 10wt.% of the chlorinated films and real PPW films with 9wt.% of the chlorinated films. About 76wt.% of the artificial PPW films and 75wt.% of real PPW films after the removal of PP and PE were recovered as settling fraction with 4.7wt.% and 3.0wt.% of chlorinated plastic films, respectively. These results indicate that simple gravity separation process after twist formation can be used to reduce the chlorinated plastic concentration from mixed heavy PPW films. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Feasibility study of the separation of chlorinated films from plastic packaging wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Mallampati Srinivasa; Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Okuda, Tetsuji; Tsai, Tsung-Yueh; Nakai, Satoshi; Nishijima, Wataru; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the possible separation of chlorinated plastic films (PVC and PVDC) from other heavy plastic packaging waste (PPW) by selective twist formation and gravity separation. Twists formation was mechanically induced in chlorinated plastic films, whereas twist formation did not occur in PS and PET films. After twist formation, all the films had the apparent density of less than 1.0 g/cm 3 and floated in water even though the true density was more than 1.0 g/cm 3 . However, the apparent density of the PS and the PET films increased with agitation to more than 1.0 g/cm 3 , whereas that of chlorinated plastic films was kept less than 1.0 g/cm 3 . The main reason would be the air being held inside the chlorinated plastic films which was difficult to be removed by agitation. Simple gravity separation after twist formation was applied for artificial film with 10 wt.% of the chlorinated films and real PPW films with 9 wt.% of the chlorinated films. About 76 wt.% of the artificial PPW films and 75 wt.% of real PPW films after the removal of PP and PE were recovered as settling fraction with 4.7 wt.% and 3.0 wt.% of chlorinated plastic films, respectively. These results indicate that simple gravity separation process after twist formation can be used to reduce the chlorinated plastic concentration from mixed heavy PPW films.

  15. Corrosion of copper by chlorine trifluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, L.

    1966-01-01

    The research described called for a considerable amount of preliminary development of the test methods and equipment in order that the various measurements and observations could be carried out without contaminating either the samples or this highly reactive gas. The chlorine trifluoride was highly purified before use, its purity being checked by gas-phase chromatography, micro-sublimation and infrared spectrography. The tests were carried out on copper samples of various purities, in particular a 99.999 per cent copper in the form of mono-crystals. They involved kinetic measurements and the characterization of corrosion products under different temperature and pressure conditions. The kinetics showed reactions of the same order of magnitude as those obtained with elementary fluorine. At atmospheric pressure there occurs formation of cupric fluoride and cuprous chloride. The presence of this latter product shows that it is not possible to consider ClF 3 simply as a fluorinating agent. At low pressures an unknown product has been characterized. There are strong grounds for believing that it is the unstable cuprous fluoride which it has not yet been possible to isolate. A germination phenomenon has been shown to exist indicating an analogy between the initial phases of fluorination and those of oxidation. Important effects resulting from the dissociation of the copper fluorides and the solubility of chlorine in this metal have been demonstrated. Finally, tests have shown the considerable influence of the purity of the gas phase and of the nature of the reaction vessel walls on the rates of corrosion which can in certain cases be increased by a factor of several powers of ten. (author) [fr

  16. Dissociative electron attachment negative ion mass spectrometry: a chlorine-specific detector for gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jonathan M.; Boyd, Robert K.

    1997-11-01

    This work describes the application of negative ion chemical ionization, optimized for dissociative electron attachment (DEA), to location of unknown trace chlorinated compounds in complex gas chromatograms by selected ion recording (SIR) of m / z 35 and 37. The DEA-SIR technique is compared with other GC detectors, including the electron capture detector, electrolytic conductivity detector, the atomic emission detector and the chemical reaction interface mass spectrometry method, with respect to selectivity for chlorine, sensitivity, linear dynamic range, and general robustness and ease of use. When applied to quantitative analysis of target analytes such as polychlorobiphenyls, the DEA-SIR method has potential problems arising from the possibility of suppression effects due to abundant co-eluting components, and possible alleviating measures are discussed. In addition to these practical investigations, literature information on the fundamental physical and chemical phenomena underlying the DEA process is summarized in order to guide future work on extension to other compound types and on general improvements to the technique.

  17. Detection of chlorine in water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašík, Ivan; Mrázek, Jan; Podrazký, Ondřej; Seidl, Miroslav; Aubrecht, Jan; Tobiška, Petr; Pospíšilová, Marie; Matějec, Vlastimil; Kovács, B.; Markovics, A.; Szili, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 1 (2009), s. 139-142 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0948 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : optical fiber sensor * chlorine Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.083, year: 2009

  18. DFT application for chlorin derivatives photosensitizer drugs modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Neila; Carvalho, B. G.; Téllez Soto, C. A.; Martin, A. A.; Favero, P. P.

    2018-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an alternative form of cancer treatment that meets the desire for a less aggressive approach to the body. It is based on the interaction between a photosensitizer, activating light, and molecular oxygen. This interaction results in a cascade of reactions that leads to localized cell death. Many studies have been conducted to discover an ideal photosensitizer, which aggregates all the desirable characteristics of a potent cell killer and generates minimal side effects. Using Density Functional Theory (DFT) implemented in the program Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package, new chlorin derivatives with different functional groups were simulated to evaluate the different absorption wavelengths to permit resonant absorption with the incident laser. Gaussian 09 program was used to determine vibrational wave numbers and Natural Bond Orbitals. The chosen drug with the best characteristics for the photosensitizer was a modified model of the original chlorin, which was called as Thiol chlorin. According to our calculations it is stable and is 19.6% more efficient at optical absorption in 708 nm in comparison to the conventional chlorin e6. Vibrational modes, optical and electronic properties were predicted. In conclusion, this study is an attempt to improve the development of new photosensitizer drugs through computational methods that save time and contribute to decrease the numbers of animals for model application.

  19. Relation Between Acid and Catalytic Properties of Chlorinated Gamma-Alumina. a 31p Mas Nmr and Ftir Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume D.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the effect of chlorine on the surface properties of gamma-alumina, especially on their acid properties. The use of FTIR spectroscopy and 31P MAS NMR of adsorbed trimethylphosphine allows to propose a chlorination mechanism. To correlate the surface properties of these chlorinated gamma-alumina with their catalytic properties, we have used a model reaction, the cracking of n-heptane under reforming conditions. The analysis of the correlation between acid properties determined by 31P MAS NMR and the catalytic results (in terms of activities and selectivities allows to identify which sites are involved in the cracking reaction.

  20. Chloride pyrometallurgy of uranium ore. 1. Chlorination of phosphate ore using solid or gas chlorinating agent and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Komoto, Shigetoshi; Otomura, Keiichiro; Takenaka, Toshihide; Sato, Nobuaki; Fujino, Takeo.

    1995-01-01

    A thermodynamical and pyrometallurgical study to recover uranium from the phosphate ores was undertaken using the chloride volatilization method. Iron was chlorinated with solid chlorinating agents such as NaCl and CaCl 2 in combination with activated carbon, which will be used for removing this element from the ore, but uranium was not. On the other hand, the chlorination using Cl 2 gas and activated carbon gave a good result at 1,223 K. Not only uranium but also iron, phosphorus, aluminum and silicon were found to form volatile chlorides which vaporized out of the ore, while calcium remained in the ore as non-volatile CaCl 2 . The chlorination condition was studied as functions of temperature, reaction time and carbon content. The volatilization ratio of uranium around 95% was obtained by heating the mixture of the ore and activated carbon (35 wt%) in a mixed gas flow of Cl 2 (200 ml/min) and N 2 (200 ml/min) at 1,223 K for 120 min. (author)

  1. Combined toxicity of free chlorine, chloramine, and temperature to stage 1 larvae of the American lobster Homarus americanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capuzzo, J M; Lawrence, S A; Davidson, J A

    1976-01-01

    The differential effects of free chlorine and chloramine on stage I larvae of the American lobster Homarus americanus have been investigated in continuous flow bioassay units. Applied chloramine was more toxic than corresponding concentrations of applied free chlorine to lobster larvae with estimated LC/sub 50/ values at 25/sup 0/ of 16.30 mg/l applied free chlorine and 2.02 mg/l applied chloramine. The synergistic effect of temperature on the toxicity of both free chlorine and chloramine has also been demonstrated. Exposure to applied free chlorine at 20/sup 0/ resulted in no significant mortality of test organisms, whereas exposure at 30/sup 0/ resulted in an estimated LC/sub 50/ value of 2.50 mg/l. Applied chloramine was considerably more toxic with an estimated LC/sub 50/ value at 20/sup 0/ of 4.08 mg/l and at 30/sup 0/ of 0.56 mg/l. The action of each toxicant appeared to be an alteration of standard metabolic activity as revealed by changes in respiration rates during and after exposure to applied free chlorine and chloramine. Initial respiratory stress was detected during exposure to 0.05 mg/l applied chloramine and 5.00 mg/l applied free chlorine. Reductions in respiration rates 48 h after exposure were observed with exposure to all concentrations tested, similar results being obtained following exposure to 0.05 mg/l applied chloramine and 0.10 mg/l applied free chlorine. These results are indicative of the need for information in addition to that obtained in standard bioassays for an adequate assessment of chlorine toxicity.

  2. Health effects from swimming training in chlorinated pools and the corresponding metabolic stress pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Hua Li

    Full Text Available Chlorination is the most popular method for disinfecting swimming pool water; however, although pathogens are being killed, many toxic compounds, called disinfection by-products (DBPs, are formed. Numerous epidemiological publications have associated the chlorination of pools with dysfunctions of the respiratory system and with some other diseases. However, the findings concerning these associations are not always consistent and have not been confirmed by toxicological studies. Therefore, the health effects from swimming in chlorinated pools and the corresponding stress reactions in organisms are unclear. In this study, we show that although the growth and behaviors of experimental rats were not affected, their health, training effects and metabolic profiles were significantly affected by a 12-week swimming training program in chlorinated water identical to that of public pools. Interestingly, the eyes and skin are the organs that are more directly affected than the lungs by the irritants in chlorinated water; instead of chlorination, training intensity, training frequency and choking on water may be the primary factors for lung damage induced by swimming. Among the five major organs (the heart, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys, the liver is the most likely target of DBPs. Through metabolomics analysis, the corresponding metabolic stress pathways and a defensive system focusing on taurine were presented, based on which the corresponding countermeasures can be developed for swimming athletes and for others who spend a lot of time in chlorinated swimming pools.

  3. Kinetics of the oxidation of cylindrospermopsin and anatoxin-a with chlorine, monochloramine and permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Eva; Sordo, Ana; Metcalf, James S; Acero, Juan L

    2007-05-01

    Cyanobacteria produce toxins that may contaminate drinking water sources. Among others, the presence of the alkaloid toxins cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and anatoxin-a (ANTX) constitutes a considerable threat to human health due to the acute and chronic toxicity of these compounds. In the present study, not previously reported second-order rate constants for the reactions of CYN and ANTX with chlorine and monochloramine and of CYN with potassium permanganate were determined and the influence of pH and temperature was established for the most reactive cases. It was found that the reactivity of CYN with chlorine presents a maximum at pH 7 (rate constant of 1265 M(-1)s(-1)). However, the oxidation of CYN with chloramine and permanganate are rather slow processes, with rate constants chlorination product of CYN was found to be 5-chloro-CYN (5-Cl-CYN), which reacts with chlorine 10-20 times slower than the parent compound. The reactivity of ANTX with chlorine and chloramines is also very low (kchlorine dose of 1.5 mg l(-1) was enough to oxidize CYN almost completely. However, 3 mg l(-1) of chlorine was able to remove only 8% of ANTX, leading to a total formation of trihalomethanes (TTHM) at a concentration of 150 microg l(-1). Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for CYN degradation during oxidation and disinfection processes but not for ANTX removal. The permanganate dose required for CYN oxidation is very high and not applicable in waterworks.

  4. Development of a General Aza-Cope Reaction Trigger Applied to Fluorescence Imaging of Formaldehyde in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, Kevin J; Walvoord, Ryan R; Brewer, Thomas F; Burgos-Barragan, Guillermo; Wit, Niek; Pontel, Lucas B; Patel, Ketan J; Chang, Christopher J

    2017-04-19

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a reactive signaling molecule that is continuously produced through a number of central biological pathways spanning epigenetics to one-carbon metabolism. On the other hand, aberrant, elevated levels of FA are implicated in disease states ranging from asthma to neurodegenerative disorders. In this context, fluorescence-based probes for FA imaging are emerging as potentially powerful chemical tools to help disentangle the complexities of FA homeostasis and its physiological and pathological contributions. Currently available FA indicators require direct modification of the fluorophore backbone through complex synthetic considerations to enable FA detection, often limiting the generalization of designs to other fluorophore classes. To address this challenge, we now present the rational, iterative development of a general reaction-based trigger utilizing 2-aza-Cope reactivity for selective and sensitive detection of FA in living systems. Specifically, we developed a homoallylamine functionality that can undergo a subsequent self-immolative β-elimination, creating a FA-responsive trigger that is capable of masking a phenol on a fluorophore or any other potential chemical scaffold for related imaging and/or therapeutic applications. We demonstrate the utility of this trigger by creating a series of fluorescent probes for FA with excitation and emission wavelengths that span the UV to visible spectral regions through caging of a variety of dye units. In particular, Formaldehyde Probe 573 (FAP573), based on a resorufin scaffold, is the most red-shifted and FA sensitive in this series in terms of signal-to-noise responses and enables identification of alcohol dehydrogenase 5 (ADH5) as an enzyme that regulates FA metabolism in living cells. The results provide a starting point for the broader use of 2-aza-Cope reactivity for probing and manipulating FA biology.

  5. Flash photolysis of chlorine dioxide in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    1972-01-01

    The primary process when aqueous solutions of chlorine dioxide are flash photo-lysed by light with a wave length greater than 270 nm is: OClO → hν ClO ( 2 Π) + O ( 3 P). The photochemical decomposition is characterized by the formation of small quantities of O ( 3 P) atoms and of equal amounts of chlorine atoms and molecular oxygen, the latter originating in the reaction: ClOO → Cl + O 2 . The isomer ClOO is formed by the germinate recombination of ClO and O, a process which is twice as important as diffusion of the fragments into the mass of the solution and one which represents 30 per cent of the decomposition of the chlorine dioxide. Under our experimental conditions, the lifetime of the ClOO is less than one microsecond. Chlorine atoms are precursors of Cl 2 O 2 , whose UV absorption spectrum has been determined, and which is formed by the reactions: Cl + OClO → Cl 2 O 2 ; Cl + Cl - → Cl 2- ; Cl 2- + OClO → Cl 2 O 2 + Cl - k = (1,0 ±0,1) 10 9 M -1 s -1 . Cl 2 O 2 disappears by a first-order process which leads to the formation of the ions Cl - and ClO 3 - . Competition between the reactions: O ( 3 P) + O 2 → O 3 ; O ( 3 P) + OClO → ClO 3 . ( k OClO + O)/( k O 2 + O) = 1.85±0.25 has been studied and the molar extinction coefficient of ClO 3 determined at its absorption maximum (255 nm): ε 255 nm = (920 ± 90) M -1 cm -1 . (author) [fr

  6. Strategies to reduce gaseous KCl and chlorine in deposits during combustion of biomass in fluidised bed boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassman, Haakan

    2012-11-01

    Combustion of a biomass with an enhanced content of alkali and chlorine (Cl) can result in operational problems including deposit formation and superheater corrosion. The strategies applied to reduce such problems include co-combustion and the use of additives. In this work, measures were investigated in order to decrease the risk of superheater corrosion by reducing gaseous KCl and the content of chlorine in deposits. The strategies applied were sulphation of KCl by sulphur/sulphate containing additives (i.e. elemental sulphur (S) and ammonium sulphate (AS)) and co-combustion with peat. Both sulphation of KCl and capture of potassium (K) in ash components can be of importance when peat is used. The experiments were mainly performed in a 12 MW circulation fluidised bed (CFB) boiler equipped for research purposes but also in a full-scale CFB boiler. The results were evaluated by means of IACM (on-line measurements of gaseous KCl), conventional gas analysis, deposit and corrosion probe measurements and ash analysis. Ammonium sulphate performed significantly better than elemental sulphur. Thus the presence of SO{sub 3} (i.e. AS) is of greater importance than that of SO{sub 2} (i.e. S) for sulphation of gaseous KCl and reduction of chlorine in deposits. Only a minor reduction of gaseous KCl was obtained during co-combustion with peat although chlorine in the deposits was greatly reduced. This reduction was supposedly due to capture of K by reactive components from the peat ash in parallel to sulphation of KCl. These compounds remained unidentified. The effect of volatile combustibles on the sulphation of gaseous KCl was investigated. The poorest sulphation was attained during injection of ammonium sulphate in the upper part of the combustion chamber during the lowest air excess ratio. The explanation for this is that SO{sub 3} was partly consumed by side reactions due to the presence of combustibles. These experimental results were supported by modelling, although the

  7. Effect of degree of polymerization and of temperature on the reactivity of poly(vinyl alcohol) by applying T-for-H exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Imai, Kazunari

    1999-01-01

    In order to reveal the effect of the degree of polymerization and of temperature on the reactivity of functional polymers, the hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction between poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) having each degree of polymerization and tritiated water vapor (HTO vapor) was dynamically observed at 35-80 deg C in a gas-solid system. The reason of the observation at 35 deg C is to clarify the possibility of the T-for-H exchange reaction at a temperature near the environment. The degree of polymerization of PVA used in this work was 500, 1000, 2000, 2800, or 3500. Applying the A''-McKay plot method to the data obtained in each observation, the rate constant (k) for each PVA in the reaction was calculated. Moreover, the Arrhenius plot for each PVA was made by using the k values. Comparing the k values and the results obtained previously, the following six matters have been clarified. In the temperature range of 35-80 deg C, the T-for-H exchange reaction between HTO vapor and each PVA occurred, and in this case, the atoms participating in the reaction are the H atoms in the OH groups in PVA and T atoms in HTO vapor. The reactivity of each PVA increases with rising temperature, and decreases with increasing the degree of polymerization. The rate of the decreasing of k with increasing the degree of polymerization changes at near the degree of polymerization of 1000, and the rate is fairly large under the degree of 1000. Under the degree of polymerization of 1000, the reactivity of PVA is more affected by the effect of the degree of polymerization than by the effect of temperature, and the reactivity is large when the degree of polymerization is small. Over the degree of polymerization of 1000, the reactivity of PVA is affected by both the degree of polymerization and temperature, and the reactivity is large when temperature is high. For the T-for-H exchange reaction in a gas-solid system, the reaction form is unchanged in the range of 35-80 deg C, and the reactivity at 35

  8. Kinetic model for predicting the composition of chlorinated water discharged from power plant cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietzke, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    A kinetic model for predicting the composition of chlorinated water discharged from power plant cooling systems has been developed. The model incorporates the most important chemical reactions that are known to occur when chlorine is added to natural fresh waters. The simultaneous differential equations, which describe the rates of these chemical reactions, are solved numerically to give the composition of the water as a function of time. A listing of the computer program is included, along with a description of the input variables. A worked-out example illustrates the application of the program to an actual cooling system. An appendix contains a compilation of the known equilibrium and kinetic data for many of the chemical reactions that might be encountered in chlorinating natural fresh waters

  9. Comprehensive Model for Enhanced Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsova, I.; Gerhard, J. I.; Mao, X.; Robinson, C.; Barry, A. D.; Harkness, M.; Mack, E. E.; Dworatzek, S.

    2007-12-01

    SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) is a public/private consortium whose charter is to de-termine if enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can result in effective treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The focus of this 4-year, $5.7 million research and development project is a field site in the United Kingdom containing TCE DNAPL. A comprehensive numerical model for simulating dehalogenation of chlorinated ethenes has been developed. The model considers the kinetic dissolution of DNAPL and nonaqueous organic amendments, bacterial growth and decay, and the interaction of biological and geochemical reactions that might influence biological activity. The model accounts for inhibitory effects of high chlorin-ated solvent concentrations as well as the link between fermentation and dehalogenation due to dynamic hydrogen concentration (the direct electron donor). In addition to the standard biodegradation pathways, sulphate reduction, mineral dissolution and precipitation kinetics are incorporated. These latter processes influence the soil buffering capacity and thus the net acidity generated. One-dimensional simulations were carried out to reproduce the data from columns packed with site soil and groundwater exhibiting both intermediate (250 mg/L) and near solubility (1100 mg/L) TCE concentrations. The modelling aims were to evaluate the key processes underpinning bioremediation success and provide a tool for investigating field sys-tem sensitivity to site data and design variables. This paper will present the model basis and validation and examine sensitivity to key processes including chlorinated ethene partitioning into soybean oil, sulphate reduction, and geochemical influences such as pH and the role of buffering in highly dechlorinating systems.

  10. Organochlorine compounds and the biogeochemical cycle of chlorine in soils: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Makarov, M. I.

    2017-09-01

    Chloride ions in soil may interact with soil organic matter and form organochlorine compounds in situ. The biotic chlorination of soil organic substances takes places under aerobic conditions with participation of H2O2 forming from peroxidases released by soil microorganisms (in particular, by microscopic fungi). The abiotic chlorination results also from the redox reactions with the participation of Fe3+/Fe2+ system, but it develops several times slower. Chlorination of soil organic substances is favored by Cl- coming to soil both from natural (salinized soil-forming rocks and groundwater, sea salt) and anthropogenic sources of chlorides, i.e., spills of saline water at oil production, road deicing chemicals, mineral fertilizers, etc. The study of the biogeochemical chlorine cycle should take into account the presence of organochlorine compounds in soils, in addition to transformation and migration of chloride ions.

  11. Cl app: android-based application program for monitoring the residue chlorine in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intaravanne, Yuttana; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Porntheeraphat, Supanit; Chaitavon, Kosom; Vuttivong, Sirajit

    2015-07-01

    A farmer usually uses a cheap chemical material called chlorine to destroy the cell structure of unwanted organisms and remove some plant effluents in a baby shrimp farm. A color changing of the reaction between chlorine and chemical indicator is used to monitor the residue chlorine in water before releasing a baby shrimp into a pond. To get rid of the error in color reading, our previous works showed how a smartphone can be functioned as a color reader for estimating the chlorine concentration in water. In this paper, we show the improvement of interior configuration of our prototype and the distribution to several baby shrimp farms. In the future, we plan to make it available worldwide through the online market as well as to develop more application programs for monitoring other chemical substances.

  12. Alkaline earth metal, silicon, chlorine, hydrogen. A reaction system for the heterogeneous hydrodehalogenation of silicon tetrachloride to nanocrystalline silicon; Erdalkalimetall-Silicium-Chlor-Wasserstoff. Das Reaktionssystem fuer die heterogene Hydrodehalogenierung von Siliciumtetrachlorid bis zum nanokristallinen Silicium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Katja

    2012-02-17

    Reactions of an alkaline earth metal with a SiCl{sub 4}-H{sub 2} result in a quaternary system with a metastable quaternary phase which separates into the metal chloride and nanocrystalline silicon upon cooling. The present study was dedicated to a making a detailed characterisation of the quaternary phase. For this purpose the properties of the quaternary system were derived from those of the six binary and four ternary systems. The first ever characterisation of the surface by means of photoelectron spectroscopy was undertaken. It also proved possible for the first time to follow the formation reaction by measuring the potential difference across the reaction system. Using the results of the characterisation the author presents first steps towards identifying the formation mechanism involved. [German] Im quaternaeren System Erdalkalimetall-Silicium-Chlor-Wasserstoff bildet sich bei der Umsetzung des Metalls mit einer SiCl{sub 4}-H{sub 2}-Atmosphaere eine quaternaere Phase. Diese metastabile Phase zerfaellt beim Abkuehlen in das Metallchlorid und Silicium in nanokristalliner Form. Die vorliegende Arbeit hat sich mit der tiefergehenden Charakterisierung der quaternaeren Phase beschaeftigt. Dazu wurden die Eigenschaften des quaternaeren Systems aus den Eigenschaften der sechs binaeren und vier ternaeren Systemen abgeleitet. Die Oberflaeche wurde erstmals mit Photoelektronenspektroskopie charakterisiert. Zusaetzlich gelang erstmalig die Verfolgung der Bildungsreaktion durch Messung des Spannungsabfalls ueber das Reaktionssystem. Erste Ansaetze zur Aufklaerung des Bildungsmechanismus ausgehend von den Ergebnissen der Charakterisierung wurden zusaetzlich aufgezeigt.

  13. Ultrafast measurements of chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludowise, P.D.

    1997-08-01

    Time-resolved mass spectrometry and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy are used to study the ultrafast photodissociation dynamics of chlorine dioxide, an important constituent in stratospheric ozone depletion. Chapter 1 introduces these pump/probe techniques, in which a femtosecond pump pulse excites a molecule to a dissociative state. At a later time, a second femtosecond probe pulse ionizes the molecule. The resulting mass and photoelectron spectra are acquired as a function of the delay between the pump and probe pulses, which follows the evolution of the molecule on the excited state. A comparison to other techniques used to study reaction dynamics is discussed. Chapter 2 includes a detailed description of the design and construction of the experimental apparatus, which consists of a femtosecond laser system, a molecular beam time-of-flight spectrometer, and a data acquisition system. The time-of-flight spectrometer is specifically designed to have a short flight distance to maximize the photoelectron collection efficiency without degrading the resolution, which is limited by the bandwidth of the femtosecond laser system. Typical performance of the apparatus is demonstrated in a study of the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitric oxide. The results of the time-resolved mass spectrometry experiments of chlorine dioxide are presented in Chapter 3. Upon excitation to the A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state near 3.2 eV, the molecule dissociates through an indirect two-step mechanism. The direct dissociation channel has been predicted to be open, but is not observed. A quantum beat is observed in the OClO{sup +} species, which is described as a vibrational coherence of the optically prepared A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state. Chapter 4 presents the results of the time-resolved photoelectron experiments of chlorine dioxide. At short delay time, the quantum beat of the OClO{sup +} species is observed in the X {sup 1}A{sub 1} state of the ion. At infinite delay, the signal

  14. The effect of chlorine and combined chlorine/UV treatment on coliphages in drinking water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyara, Alyaa M; Torvinen, Eila; Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine disinfection is a globally used method to ensure the safety of drinking water. However, it has not always been successful against viruses and, therefore, it is important to find new methods to disinfect water. Seventeen different coliphages were isolated from the treated municipal wastewater. These coliphages and MS2 were treated with different dosages of chlorine in drinking water, and a combined chlorine/ultraviolet irradiation treatment for the chlorine-resistant coliphages. Chlorine disinfection with 0.3-0.5 mg/L total chlorine (free Cl-dosage 0.12-0.21 mg/L) for 10 min achieved 2.5-5.7 Log10-reductions for 11 sensitive coliphages. The six most resistant coliphages showed no reduction with these chlorine concentrations. MS2 was intermediate in chlorine resistance, and thus it is not a good indicator for viruses in chlorine disinfection. In the combined treatment total chlorine of 0.05-0.25 mg/L (free Cl-dosage 0.02-0.08 mg/L) and ultraviolet irradiation (14-22 mWs/cm(2)) were more effective than chlorine alone, and 3-5 Log10-reductions were achieved for the chlorine-resistant strains. The chlorination efficiency could be increased by higher dosages and longer contact times, but this could increase the formation of disinfection by-products. Therefore, the combination treatment is a recommended disinfection method.

  15. Temperature thresholds for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drdla, K. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Mueller, R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (DE). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-7)

    2012-07-01

    Low stratospheric temperatures are known to be responsible for heterogeneous chlorine activation that leads to polar ozone depletion. Here, we discuss the temperature threshold below which substantial chlorine activation occurs. We suggest that the onset of chlorine activation is dominated by reactions on cold binary aerosol particles, without the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), i.e. without any significant uptake of HNO{sub 3} from the gas phase. Using reaction rates on cold binary aerosol in a model of stratospheric chemistry, a chlorine activation threshold temperature, T{sub ACL}, is derived. At typical stratospheric conditions, T{sub ACL} is similar in value to T{sub NAT} (within 1-2 K), the highest temperature at which nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) can exist. T{sub NAT} is still in use to parameterise the threshold temperature for the onset of chlorine activation. However, perturbations can cause T{sub ACL} to differ from T{sub NAT}: T{sub ACL} is dependent upon H{sub 2} O and potential temperature, but unlike T{sub NAT} is not dependent upon HNO3. Furthermore, in contrast to T{sub NAT}, T{sub ACL} is dependent upon the stratospheric sulfate aerosol loading and thus provides a means to estimate the impact on polar ozone of strong volcanic eruptions and some geo-engineering options, which are discussed. A parameterisation of T{sub ACL} is provided here, allowing it to be calculated for low solar elevation (or high solar zenith angle) over a comprehensive range of stratospheric conditions. Considering T{sub ACL} as a proxy for chlorine activation cannot replace a detailed model calculation, and polar ozone loss is influenced by other factors apart from the initial chlorine activation. However, T{sub ACL} provides a more accurate description of the temperature conditions necessary for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere than T{sub NAT}. (orig.)

  16. Metabolic fate of chlorinated paraffins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darnerud, P.O.; Biessmann, A.; Brandt, I.

    1982-01-01

    The disposition of three [1- 14 C]-chlorododecanes (MCDD, PCDD I and PCDD II; 17.4%, 55.9%, and 68.5% chlorination) was studied in C57Bl mice. [1- 14 C]-lauric acid (LA) was studied as reference compound. Fifty-two percent (MCDD), 32% (PCDD I), and 8% (PCDD II) of the radioactive doses were exhaled as 14 CO 2 during 12 h after i.v. injection. Similar results were obtained after p.o. administration. In addition to a marked labelling of the liver and fat, the distribution patterns observed at 24 h after administration revealed an uptake of radioactivity in tissues with high cell turnover/high metabolic activity, e.g., intestinal mucosa, bone marrow, salivary glands and thymus. The concentration of radioactivity in these sites and the exhalation of 14 CO 2 , which were inverse to the degree of chlorination, indicate that the chloroalkanes are degraded to metabolites which can be utilized in the intermediary metabolism. A similar, although more pronounced, distribution pattern and 14 CO 2 -exhalation (70% of i.v. dose) was observed after LA administration. The long time retention of heptane-soluble radioactivity in liver and fat (indicating unmetabolized substance) increased with degree of chlorination. On the contrary, the administration of LA and the chlorododecanes MCDD and PCDD I, but not of PCDD II, resulted in a selective labelling of the central nervous system 30-60 days after injection. (orig.)

  17. Study on removing chlorin by conversion-aborption of chlorin resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yunbai; Zhao Jinfang; Tang Zhijuan; Huang Qijin; Deng Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Theon version of chlorin resin and the reclamation of acid and uranium in converting solution were investigated. The results indicated the residual chlorin can meet the requirement after converting, acid and uranium in converting solution can be reclaimed. (authors)

  18. Formation of nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during chlorine disinfection of wastewater effluents prior to use in irrigation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivanoglu-Mantas, Elif; Hawley, Elisabeth L; Deeb, Rula A; Sedlak, David L

    2006-01-01

    The probable human carcinogen nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is produced when wastewater effluent is disinfected with chlorine. In systems where wastewater effluent is used for landscape or crop irrigation, relatively high chlorine doses (i.e., up to 2,000,mg-min/L) are often used to ensure adequate disinfection and to minimize biofouling in the irrigation system. To assess the formation of NDMA in such systems, samples were collected from several locations in full-scale wastewater treatment systems and their associated irrigation systems. Up to 460 ng/L of NDMA was produced in full-scale systems in which chloramines were formed when wastewater effluent was disinfected with chlorine in the presence of ammonia. Less than 20 ng/L of NDMA was produced in systems that used free chlorine (i.e., HOCl/OCl(-)) for disinfection in the absence of ammonia. The production of NDMA in ammonia-containing systems was correlated with the concentration of NDMA precursors in the wastewater effluent and the overall dose of chlorine applied. Much of the NDMA formation occurred in chlorine contact basins or in storage basins where water that contained chloramines was held after disinfection. When landscape or crop irrigation is practiced with ammonia-containing wastewater effluent, NDMA production can be controlled by use of lower chlorine doses or by application of alternative disinfectants.

  19. Native sulfur/chlorine SAD phasing for serial femtosecond crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, Takanori; Song, Changyong; Suzuki, Mamoru; Nango, Eriko; Kobayashi, Jun; Masuda, Tetsuya; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nakatsu, Toru; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Iwata, So; Sugahara, Michihiro

    2015-12-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) allows structures to be determined with minimal radiation damage. However, phasing native crystals in SFX is not very common. Here, the structure determination of native lysozyme from single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) by utilizing the anomalous signal of sulfur and chlorine at a wavelength of 1.77 Å is successfully demonstrated. This sulfur SAD method can be applied to a wide range of proteins, which will improve the determination of native crystal structures.

  20. Aqueous chlorination of mefenamic acid: kinetics, transformation by-products and ecotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adira Wan Khalit, Wan Nor; Tay, Kheng Soo

    2016-05-18

    Mefenamic acid (Mfe) is one of the most frequently detected nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the environment. This study investigated the kinetics and the transformation by-products of Mfe during aqueous chlorination. The potential ecotoxicity of the transformation by-products was also evaluated. In the kinetic study, the second-order rate constant (kapp) for the reaction between Mfe and free available chlorine (FAC) was determined at 25 ± 0.1 °C. The result indicated that the degradation of Mfe by FAC is highly pH-dependent. When the pH was increased from 6 to 8, it was found that the kapp for the reaction between Mfe and FAC was decreased from 16.44 to 4.4 M(-1) s(-1). Characterization of the transformation by-products formed during the chlorination of Mfe was carried out using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry. Four major transformation by-products were identified. These transformation by-products were mainly formed through hydroxylation, chlorination and oxidation reactions. Ecotoxicity assessment revealed that transformation by-products, particularly monohydroxylated Mfe which is more toxic than Mfe, can be formed during aqueous chlorination.

  1. Factors affecting THMs, HAAs and HNMs formation of Jin Lan Reservoir water exposed to chlorine and monochloramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huachang; Xiong, Yujing; Ruan, Mengyong; Liao, Fanglei; Lin, Hongjun; Liang, Yan

    2013-02-01

    The formations of THMs, HAAs, and HNMs from chlorination and chloramination of water from Jinlan Reservoir were investigated in this study. Results showed that monochloramine rather than chlorine generally resulted in lower concentration of DBPs, and the DBPs formation varied greatly as the treatment conditions changed. Specifically, the yields of THMs, HAAs and HNMs all increased with the high bromide level and high disinfectant dose both during chlorination and chloramination. The longer reaction time had a positive effect on the formation of THMs, HAAs and HNMs during chlorination and HNMs during chloramination. However, no time effect was observed on the formation of THMs and HAAs during chloramination. An increase in pH enhanced the levels of THMs and HNMs upon chlorination but reduced levels of HNMs upon chloramination. As for the THMs in chloramination and HAAs in chlorination and chloramination, no obvious pH effect was observed. The elevated temperature significantly increased the yields of THMs during chlorination and HNMs during chloramination, but has no effect on THMs and HAAs yields during chloramination. In the same temperature range, the formation of HAAs and HNMs in chlorination showed a first increasing and then a decreasing trend. In chloramination study, addition of nitrite markedly increased the formation of HNMs but had little impact on the formation of THMs and HAAs. While in chlorination study, the presence of high nitrite levels significantly reduced the yields of THMs, HAAs and HNMs. Range analysis revealed that the bromide and disinfectant levels were the major factors affecting THMs, HAAs and HNMs formation, in both chlorination and chloramination. Finally, comparisons of the speciation of mono-halogenated, di-halogenated, tri-halogenated HAAs and HNMs between chlorination and monochloramination were also conducted, and factors influencing the speciation pattern were identified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chlorine-36 investigations of salt lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivas, A.R.; Kiss, E.

    1987-01-01

    The first chlorine-36 measurements are reported for surficial halite in lakes from a west-to-east traverse in Western Australia and from Lake Amadeus NT. Measurements of chlorine-36 were made using a 14 MV tandem accelerator. Isotopic chlorine ratios ranged from 8 to 53 x 10 exp-15, with no clear evidence for bomb-spike chlorine-36. The Western Australian samples have values close to secular equilibrium values for typical granite and groundwaters in this rock type. Studies are aimed at calculating the residence time of chloride in the surficial environment. 1 tab

  3. Chain chemical reactions during matrix devitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkalov, I.M.

    1980-01-01

    Investigation results of chain reaction mechanisms, proceeding at devitrification of glass-like matrices under the effect of γ-irradiation are summarized. Peculiarities of kinetics and mechanism of chain reactions proceeding at devitrification are considered: hydrocarbon chlorination, polymerization of vinyl monomers, copolymerization and graft polymerization. Possible application aspects of the chain reaction conducting during matrix devitrification are also considered

  4. Bank security dye packs: synthesis, isolation, and characterization of chlorinated products of bleached 1-(methylamino)anthraquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, James M; Rickenbach, Michael; Mooney, Kim E; Palenik, Chris S; Golombeck, Rebecca; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-11-01

    Banknote evidence is often submitted after a suspect has attempted to disguise or remove red dye stain that has been released because of an anti-theft device that activates after banknotes have been unlawfully removed from bank premises. Three chlorinated compounds have been synthesized as forensic chemical standards to indicate bank security dye bleaching as a suspect's intentional method for masking a robbery involving dye pack release on banknotes. A novel, facile synthetic method to provide three chlorinated derivatives of 1-(methylamino)anthraquinone (MAAQ) is presented. The synthetic route involved Ultra Clorox bleach as the chlorine source, iron chloride as the catalyst, and MAAQ as the starting material and resulted in a three-component product mixture. Two mono-chlorinated isomers (2-chloro-1-(methylamino)anthraquinone and 4-chloro-1-(methylamino)anthraquinone) and one di-chlorinated compound (2,4-dichloro-1-(methylamino)anthraquinone) of the MAAQ parent molecule were detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and subsequently isolated by liquid chromatography (LC) with postcolumn fraction collection. Although GC-MS is sensitive enough to detect all of the chlorinated products, it is not definitive enough to identify the structural isomers. Liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was utilized to elucidate structurally the ortho- and para-mono-chlorinated isomers once enough material was properly isolated. A reaction mechanism involving iron is proposed to explain the presence of chlorinated MAAQ species on stolen banknotes after attempted bleaching.

  5. Derivatization method of free cyanide including cyanogen chloride for the sensitive analysis of cyanide in chlorinated drinking water by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye-In; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2015-01-20

    A novel derivatization method of free cyanide (HCN + CN(-)) including cyanogen chloride in chlorinated drinking water was developed with d-cysteine and hypochlorite. The optimum conditions (0.5 mM D-cysteine, 0.5 mM hypochlorite, pH 4.5, and a reaction time of 10 min at room temperature) were established by the variation of parameters. Cyanide (C(13)N(15)) was chosen as an internal standard. The formed β-thiocyanoalanine was directly injected into a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer without any additional extraction or purification procedures. Under the established conditions, the limits of detection and the limits of quantification were 0.07 and 0.2 μg/L, respectively, and the interday relative standard deviation was less than 4% at concentrations of 4.0, 20.0, and 100.0 μg/L. The method was successfully applied to determine CN(-) in chlorinated water samples. The detected concentration range and detection frequency of CN(-) were 0.20-8.42 μg/L (14/24) in source drinking water and 0.21-1.03 μg/L (18/24) in chlorinated drinking water.

  6. Molecular recognition and self-assembly special feature: A general protocol for creating high-throughput screening assays for reaction yield and enantiomeric excess applied to hydrobenzoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Shagufta H; Regan, Clinton J; Anslyn, Eric V

    2009-06-30

    A general approach to high-throughput screening of enantiomeric excess (ee) and concentration was developed by using indicator displacement assays (IDAs), and the protocol was then applied to the vicinal diol hydrobenzoin. The method involves the sequential utilization of what we define herein as screening, training, and analysis plates. Several enantioselective boronic acid-based receptors were screened by using 96-well plates, both for their ability to discriminate the enantiomers of hydrobenzoin and to find their optimal pairing with indicators resulting in the largest optical responses. The best receptor/indicator combination was then used to train an artificial neural network to determine concentration and ee. To prove the practicality of the developed protocol, analysis plates were created containing true unknown samples of hydrobenzoin generated by established Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation reactions, and the best ligand was correctly identified.

  7. Behavior of chlorine in lake water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriraman, A.K.

    2006-01-01

    Water from monsoon fed Sagre lake is being used as a source of raw water for Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS--1 and 2). The raw water from the lake is initially pumped to Sagre water treatment plant (SWTP) operated by Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation (MIDC) from where, the processed water is sent to cater the needs of both the units of TAPS-1 and 2, townships of TAPS and MIDC, and the nearby villages. At the SWTP the raw water is treated with alum to remove the turbidity, filtered and chlorinated using bleaching powder. All these years the raw water is chlorinated in such a way whereby a residual chlorine level of 0.5-1.0 mg/l, is maintained at the outlet of water treatment plant. The adequacy of the current chlorination practice was investigated, at the request of the NPC-500 MWe group during 1990, so that the future requirements of raw water for TAPP-3 and 4, can be met from the expanded SWTP. In this connection experiments on chlorine dose -- residual chlorine relationship and the decay pattern of chlorine with time was carried out in the lake water (with low value of total dissolved solids and total hardness 3 sample at the site. The total bacterial count in the raw water observed to be 10 7 counts/ml originally came down to 10 3 counts/ml at the end of one-hour exposure time to chlorine. It was found that the chlorine demand of the water was around 6 mg/l. In addition Jar test to evaluate the aluminum dose was also carried out. Based on these experiments a chlorine dose of 6 mg/l for one hour contact time was arrived at. The experimental findings were in agreement with the current chlorination practices. (author)

  8. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogen species in chlorinated saline cooling waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietzke, M.H.; Haag, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    A kinetic model for predicting the composition of chlorinated water discharged from power plants using fresh water for cooling was previously reported. The model has now been extended to be applicable to power plants located on estuaries or on the seacoast where saline water is used for cooling purposes. When chloride is added to seawater to prevent biofouling in cooling systems, bromine is liberated. Since this reaction proceeds at a finite rate there is a competition between the bromine (i.e., hypobromous acid) and the added chlorine (i.e., hypochlorous acid) for halogenation of any amine species present in the water. Hence not only chloramines but also bromamines and bromochloramines will be formed, with the relative concentrations a function of the pH, temperature, and salinity of the water. The kinetic model takes into account the chemical reactions leading to the formation and disappearance of the more important halamines and hypohalous acids likely to be encountered in chlorinated saline water

  9. Separation of non-hazardous, non-radioactive components from ICPP calcine via chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.O.

    1995-05-01

    A pyrochemical treatment method for separating non-radioactive from radioactive components in solid granular waste accumulated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was investigated. The goal of this study was to obtain kinetic and chemical separation data on the reaction products of the chlorination of the solid waste, known as calcine. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were completed to verify that a separation of radioactive and non-radioactive calcine components was possible. Bench-scale chlorination experiments were completed subsequently in a variety of reactor configurations including: a fixed-bed reactor (reactive gases flowed around and not through the particle bed), a packed/fluidized-bed reactor, and a packed-bed reactor (reactive gases flowed through the particle bed). Chemical analysis of the reaction products generated during the chlorination experiments verified the predictions made by the equilibrium calculations. An empirical first-order kinetic rate expression was developed for each of the reactor configurations. 20 refs., 16 figs., 21 tabs

  10. Anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of wastewaters from chlorine and total chlorine-free bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidal, G.; Soto, M.; Field, J.; Mendez-Pampin, R.; Lema, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Chlorine bleaching effluents are problematic for anaerobic wastewater treatment due to their high methanogenic toxicity and low biodegradability. Presently, alternative bleaching processes are being introduced, such as elemental chlorine-free (ECF) and total chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching. The

  11. Direct chlorination of alcohols with chlorodimethylsilane catalyzed by a gallium trichloride/tartrate system under neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Makoto; Shimizu, Kenji; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Baba, Akio

    2008-08-07

    The reaction of secondary alcohols 1 with chlorodimethylsilane (HSiMe(2)Cl) proceeded in the presence of a catalytic amount of GaCl(3)/diethyl tartrate to give the corresponding organic chlorides 3. In the catalytic cycle, the reaction of diethyl tartrate 4a with HSiMe(2)Cl 2 gives the chlorosilyl ether 5 with generation of H(2). Alcohol-exchange between the formed chlorosilyl ether 5 and the substrate alcohol 1 affords alkoxychlorosilane 6, which reacts with catalytic GaCl(3) to give the chlorinated product 3. The moderate Lewis acidity of GaCl(3) facilitates chlorination. Strong Lewis acids did not give product due to excessive affinity for the oxy-functionalities. Although tertiary alcohols were chlorinated by this system even in the absence of diethyl tartrate, certain alcohols that are less likely to give carbocationic species were effectively chlorinated using the GaCl(3)/diethyl tartrate system.

  12. Degradation kinetics of organic chloramines and formation of disinfection by-products during chlorination of creatinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyang; Xu, Bin; Wang, Anqi; Cui, Changzheng

    2018-03-01

    Organic chloramines can interfere with the measurement of effective combined chlorine in chlorinated water and are potential intermediate products of highly toxic disinfection by-products (DBPs). In order to know more about the degradation and transformation of organic chloramines, a typical organic chloramine precursor creatinine was selected for investigation and a corresponding individual organic chloramine chlorocreatinine was prepared in this study. The preparation condition of chlorocreatinine by chlorination was established as chlorine/creatinine = 1 M/M, reaction time = 2 h and pH = 7.0. Then the degradation kinetics of chlorocreatinine during further chlorination was studied, and a second-order rate constant of 1.16 (±0.14) M -1 s -1 was obtained at pH 7.0. Solution pH significantly influenced the degradation rate, and the elementary rate constants of chlorocreatinine with HOCl+H + , HOCl, OCl - and chlorocreatinine - with OCl - were calculated as 2.43 (±1.55) × 10 4  M -2  s -1 , 1.05 (±0.09) M -1 s -1 , 2.86 (±0.30) M -1 s -1 and 3.09 (±0.24) M -1 s -1 , respectively. Besides, it was found that chlorocreatinine could be further converted into several C-DBPs (chloroform and trichloroacetone) and N-DBPs (dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and trichloronitromethane (TCNM)) during chlorination. The total yield of DBPs increased obviously with increasing pH, especially for TCNM. In addition, the presence of humic acid in creatinine solution could increase the formation of DCAN obviously during chlorination. Based on the UPLC-Q-TOF-MS analysis, the conversion pathways of chlorocreatinine were proposed. Several kinds of intermediate products were also identified as organic chloramines and some of them could even exist stably during the further chlorination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effectiveness of Chlorinated Water, Sodium Hypochlorite, Sodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the efficacy of chlorinated water, sodium hypochlorite solution, sodium chloride solution and sterile distilled water in eliminating pathogenic bacteria on the surfaces of raw vegetables. Lettuce vegetables were dipped in different concentrations of chlorinated water, sodium hypochlorite solution, sodium ...

  14. Monitoring chlorination practices during operation at TAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriraman, A.K.; Wani, B.N.; Gokhale, A.S.; Yuvaraju, B.

    1995-01-01

    Chlorination of cooling waters is aimed at the condenser surfaces to minimize the biogrowth, while the residual oxidants in the effluents are negligible. This paper describes the fulfillment of the above criteria, as observed during the monitoring of chlorination practices at Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) during 1990. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs

  15. The Synthesis of Carbon Nanomaterials using Chlorinated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of chlorine on the morphology of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) prepared from a Fe-Co/CaCO3 catalyst was investigated using chlorobenzene (CB), dichlorobenzene (DCB), trichlorobenzene (TCB), dichloroethane (DCE), trichloroethane (TCE) and tetrachloroethane (TTCE) as chlorine sources using a catalytic ...

  16. Internal chlorination of Ni-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berztiss, D.; Hennesen, K.; Grabke, H.J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In contrast to internal oxidation, sulfidation and carburization, very little information is available regarding internal chlorination, especially diffusion of chlorine in metallic alloys. This paper describes results of experiments on Ni-Cr alloys (<10 wt% Cr) exposed in an atmosphere containing radioactive HCl. The diffusion of chlorine in the alloy can be determined by measurement of residual {beta}-activity from the sample surface. Successively thin layers (0.5-10 {mu}m) of the alloy were removed by lapping and the surface activity was measured to obtain a depth profile. Both single and polycrystalline materials were tested. Through this work it should be determined if there is in fact solubility and diffusion of chlorine in Ni-based alloys as some authors have proposed or if the ingress of chlorine is mainly a grain boundary phenomenon. (orig.)

  17. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; Ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Minimization of zirconium chlorinator residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.K.; Harbuck, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    Zirconium chlorinator residues contain an array of rare earths, scandium, unreacted coke, and radioactive thorium and radium. Because of the radioactivity, the residues must be disposed in special waste containment facilities. As these sites become more congested, and with stricter environmental regulations, disposal of large volumes of wastes may become more difficult. To reduce the mass of disposed material, the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) developed technology to recover rare earths, thorium and radium, and unreacted coke from these residues. This technology employs an HCl leach to solubilize over 99% of the scandium and thorium, and over 90% of the rare earths. The leach liquor is processed through several solvent extraction stages to selectively recover scandium, thorium, and rare earths. The leach residue is further leached with an organic acid to solubilize radium, thus allowing unreacted coke to be recycled to the chlorinator. The thorium and radium waste products, which comprise only 2.1% of the original residue mass, can then be sent to the radioactive waste facility

  19. Study of the production of Zirconium tetracheoride by chlorination of its oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, E.S.M.; Abrao, A.

    1987-08-01

    This work describes the studies carried out on the production of zirconium tetrachloride by chlorianation of pure zirconium oxide with (a) carbon tetrachloride and (b) chlorine in the presence of carbon. In the process of chlorination with carbon tetrachloride it has been determined that efficiency increases with the rising of temperature between 450 and 750 0 C. The flow rate of the carbon tetrachloride vapour used was 1.50L/min. For the zirconium oxide chlorination in the presence of carbon, the study has been carried out at temperatures between 700 and 850 0 C and the flow rate of the chlorine gas used in the process was 0,50/Lmin. Pure zirconium oxide chlorination as well as zirconium oxide-carbon mixture chlrorination have been studied in connection with the time of reaction at different temperatures and the apparent rate constants, the activation energies, the order of reaction in relation to the concentration of the gases (CCl 4 and Cl 2 ) and the content of carbon in the pellet have all been determined. (Author) [pt

  20. Extraction of lithium from β-spodumene using chlorination roasting with calcium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Lucía I., E-mail: lbarbosa@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI-CONICET), Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco 17, CP 5700 San Luis (Argentina); González, Jorge A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI-CONICET), Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco 17, CP 5700 San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Padre Jorge Contreras 1300, Parque General San Martín, CP M5502JMA Mendoza (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI-CONICET), Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco 17, CP 5700 San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-04-10

    Highlights: • β-Spodumene was roasted with calcium chloride to extract lithium. • The optimal conditions of the chlorination process are 900 °C and 120 min. • The products of the reaction are lithium chloride, anorthite, and silica. - Abstract: Chlorination roasting was used to extract lithium as lithium chloride from β-spodumene. The roasting was carried out in a fixed bed reactor using calcium chloride as chlorinating agent. The mineral was mixed with CaCl{sub 2} on a molar ratio of 1:2. Reaction temperature and time were investigated. The reactants and roasted materials were characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The mineral starts to react with CaCl{sub 2} at around 700 °C. The optimal conditions of lithium extraction were found to be 900 °C and 120 min of chlorination roasting, under which it is attained a conversion degree of 90.2%. The characterization results indicate that the major phases present in the chlorinating roasting residue are CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}, SiO{sub 2}, and CaSiO{sub 3}.

  1. Chlorination and chloramination of bisphenol A, bisphenol F, and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Rachael F; Adams, Craig D; Randtke, Stephen J; Carter, Ray E

    2015-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF), and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) are common components of epoxy coatings used in food packaging and in drinking water distribution systems. Thus, leachates from the epoxy may be exposed to the disinfectants free chlorine (Cl2/HOCl/OCl(-)) and monochloramine (MCA, NH2Cl). Bisphenols are known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) with estrogenic activity. Chlorination by-products have the potential to have reduced or enhanced estrogenic qualities, and are, therefore, of interest. In this work, chlorination reactions for bisphenols and BADGE were explored (via LC/MS/MS) and kinetic modeling (using a pseudo-first order approach) was conducted to predict the fate of these compounds in drinking water. The half-lives of BPA and BPF with 1 mg/L of free chlorine ranged from 3 to 35 min over the pH range from 6 to 11 and the temperature range of 10-25 °C. Half-lives for reactions of BPA and BPF with a nominal MCA concentration of 3.5 mg/L as Cl2 were from 1 to 10 days and were greater at higher pH and lower temperature. Formation of chlorinated bisphenol A by-products was observed during the kinetic studies. BADGE was found unreactive with either oxidant. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Chlorinated Phospholipids and Fatty Acids: (Pathophysiological Relevance, Potential Toxicity, and Analysis of Lipid Chlorohydrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Schröter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated phospholipids are formed by the reaction of hypochlorous acid (HOCl, generated by the enzyme myeloperoxidase under inflammatory conditions, and the unsaturated fatty acyl residues or the head group. In the first case the generated chlorohydrins are both proinflammatory and cytotoxic, thus having a significant impact on the structures of biomembranes. The latter case leads to chloramines, the properties of which are by far less well understood. Since HOCl is also widely used as a disinfecting and antibacterial agent in medicinal, industrial, and domestic applications, it may represent an additional source of danger in the case of abuse or mishandling. This review discusses the reaction behavior of in vivo generated HOCl and biomolecules like DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates but will focus on phospholipids. Not only the beneficial and pathological (toxic effects of chlorinated lipids but also the importance of these chlorinated species is discussed. Some selected cleavage products of (chlorinated phospholipids and plasmalogens such as lysophospholipids, (chlorinated free fatty acids and α-chloro fatty aldehydes, which are all well known to massively contribute to inflammatory diseases associated with oxidative stress, will be also discussed. Finally, common analytical methods to study these compounds will be reviewed with focus on mass spectrometric techniques.

  3. Extraction of lithium from β-spodumene using chlorination roasting with calcium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Lucía I.; González, Jorge A.; Ruiz, María del Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • β-Spodumene was roasted with calcium chloride to extract lithium. • The optimal conditions of the chlorination process are 900 °C and 120 min. • The products of the reaction are lithium chloride, anorthite, and silica. - Abstract: Chlorination roasting was used to extract lithium as lithium chloride from β-spodumene. The roasting was carried out in a fixed bed reactor using calcium chloride as chlorinating agent. The mineral was mixed with CaCl 2 on a molar ratio of 1:2. Reaction temperature and time were investigated. The reactants and roasted materials were characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The mineral starts to react with CaCl 2 at around 700 °C. The optimal conditions of lithium extraction were found to be 900 °C and 120 min of chlorination roasting, under which it is attained a conversion degree of 90.2%. The characterization results indicate that the major phases present in the chlorinating roasting residue are CaAl 2 Si 2 O 8 , SiO 2 , and CaSiO 3

  4. Kinetics of AOX Formation in Chlorine Dioxide Bleaching of Bagasse Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangxi Nie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a kinetic model of the first chlorine dioxide bleaching stage (D0 in an elemental chlorine-free (ECF bleaching sequence is presented for bagasse pulps. The model is based on the rate of adsorbable organic halogen (AOX formation. The effects of the chlorine dioxide dosage, the sulfuric acid dosage, and the reaction temperature on the AOX content of wastewater are examined. The reaction of AOX formation could be divided into two periods. A large amount of AOX was formed rapidly within the first 10 min. Ten minutes later, the AOX formation rate significantly decreased. The kinetics could be expressed as: dW⁄dt=660.8•e^(-997.98/T 〖•[ClO〗_2 ]^0.877•[H2SO4 ]^0.355•W^(-1.065, where W is the AOX content, t is the bleaching time (min, T is the temperature (K, [ClO2] is the dosage of chlorine dioxide (kg/odt, and [H2SO4] is the dosage of sulfuric acid (kg/odt. The fit of the experiment results obtained for different temperatures, initial chlorine dioxide dosages, initial sulfuric acid dosages, and AOX content were very good, revealing the ability of the model to predict typical mill operating conditions.

  5. Evaluating the effects of granular and membrane filtrations on chlorine demand in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheesan, Veeriah; Kim, Seung Hyun; Joo, C K; Gao, Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    In this study, chlorine decay experiments were conducted for the raw water from Nakdong River that is treated by Chilseo Water Treatment Plant (CWTP) situated in Haman, Korea as well as the effluents from sand and granular activated carbon (GAC) filters of CWTP and fitted using a chlorine decay model. The model estimated the fast and slow reacting nitrogenous as well as organic/inorganic compounds that were present in the water. It was found that the chlorine demand due to fast and slow reacting (FRA and SRA) organic/inorganic substances was not reduced significantly by sand as well as GAC filters. However, the treated effluents from those filters contained FRA and SRA that are less reactive and had small reaction rate constants. For the effluents from microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and nanofiltration the chlorine demand because FRA and SRA were further reduced but the reaction rate constants were larger compared to those of sand and GAC filter effluents. This has implications in the formation of disinfection by products (DBPs). If DBPs are assumed to form due to the interactions between chlorine and SRA, then it is possible that the DBP formation potential in the effluents from membrane filtrations could be higher than that in the effluents from granular media filters.

  6. A thermogravimetric analyzer for corrosive atmospheres, and its application to the chlorination of ZrO2-C mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquevich, Daniel; Caneiro, Alberto

    1990-01-01

    A thermogravimetric analyzer built on the basis of a Cahn 2000 electrobalance, suitable for using with corrosive atmospheres, is reported. The corrections for buoyancy and gas-flow effects, which strongly modify the thermogravimetric curves are discussed. As an application, the kinetics of a reaction between chlorine and a mixture of zirconia and carbon has been studied. It has been able to measure the uptake of chlorine by carbon and the reaction rate within the first 50 seconds. Evidence of a transition to quite a different reaction rate at longer times is presented. (Author)

  7. Hydrogen-promoted chlorination of RuO2(110)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, J.P.; Zweidinger, S.; Knapp, M.; Seitsonen, A.P.; Schulte, K.; Andersen, J.N.; Lundgren, E.; Over, H.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution core-level photoemission spectroscopy and temperature-programmed reaction experiments together with density functional theory calculations were used to elucidate on the atomic scale the chlorination mechanism of ruthenium dioxide RuO2(110) by hydrogen chloride exposure. The

  8. Kinetic model for predicting the composition of chlorinated water discharged from power plant cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietzke, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of applying a kinetic model to the chlorination data supplied by Commonwealth Edison on the once-through cooling system at the Quad Cities Nuclear Station provide a validation of the model. The two examples given demonstrate that the model may be applied to either once-through cooling systems or to cooling systems involving cooling towers

  9. Durability of Selected Membrane Materials when Exposed to Chlorine Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikeland, Marianne Soerflaten

    2001-03-01

    This thesis is focusing on the durability of selected membrane materials when exposed to chlorine gas in the temperature range 30-100{sup o}C. Studies of the changes of membrane separation properties and the mechanisms promoting these changes have been studied. The selected membrane materials were poly(dimethylsioxane) (PDMS), Fluorel, fluorosilicone, and blends of PDMS and Fluorel. The thesis is organised in seven chapters. The first chapter gives an introduction to the background of the work. The second chapter presents the theory for gas separation using dense rubbery membranes. The properties of the selected membrane materials are presented in chapter three. The fourth chapter describes degradation mechanisms for polymeric materials in general and for the selected membrane materials in particular. Presentation of the experimental work is given in chapter five, while the results with discussions are presented in chapter six. The conclusions and recommendations for further studies are given in chapter seven. Five appendixes are attached: Appendix A describes the calculations of permeability and solubility coefficients and the accuracy of the experimental measurements. Appendix B summarises the measured values in tables and Appendix C describes the analytical methods. Appendix D gives the properties of the gases used in the experiments. Appendix E is the article ''Durability of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) when Exposed to Chlorine Gas'', submitted to the Journal of Applied Polymer Science. Highly crosslinked PDMS was found to have an initial high permeability for chlorine gas and a high Cl{sub 2}/O{sub 2} selectivity. However when exposed to chlorine gas the permeability decreased significantly. Crosslinking of the PDMS polymer chain and chlorination of the polymer gave a denser polymer structure and thus lower permeability. Fluorel showed very low permeabilities and selectivities for the gases in question and was thus not interesting for this

  10. UV/chlorine treatment of carbamazepine: Transformation products and their formation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yanheng; Cheng, ShuangShuang; Yang, Xin; Ren, Jingyue; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii; Song, Weihua; Lian, Lushi; Zhang, Xinran

    2017-06-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is one of the pharmaceuticals most frequently detected in the aqueous environment. This study investigated the transformation products when CBZ is degraded by chlorine under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (the UV/chlorine process). Detailed pathways for the degradation of CBZ were elucidated using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS). CBZ is readily degraded by hydroxyl radicals (HO) and chlorine radicals (Cl) in the UV/chlorine process, and 24 transformation products were identified. The products indicate that the 10,11-double bond and aromatic ring in CBZ are the sites most susceptible to attack by HO and Cl. Subsequent reaction produces hydroxylated and chlorinated aromatic ring products. Four specific products were quantified and their evolution was related with the chlorine dose, pH, and natural organic matter concentration. Their yields showed an increase followed by a decreasing trend with prolonged reaction time. CBZ-10,11-epoxide (I), the main quantified transformation product from HO oxidation, was observed with a peak transformation yield of 3-32% depending on the conditions. The more toxic acridine (IV) was formed involving both HO and Cl with peak transformation yields of 0.4-1%. All four quantified products together amounted to a peak transformation yield of 34.5%. The potential toxicity of the transformation products was assayed by evaluating their inhibition of the bioluminescence of the bacterium Vibrio Fischeri. The inhibition increased at first and the decreased at longer reaction times, which was in parallel with the evolution of transformation products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bacterial Community Shift Drives Antibiotic Resistance Promotion during Drinking Water Chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shuyu; Shi, Peng; Hu, Qing; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2015-10-20

    For comprehensive insights into the effects of chlorination, a widely used disinfection technology, on bacterial community and antibiotic resistome in drinking water, this study applied high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic approaches to investigate the changing patterns of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and bacterial community in a drinking water treatment and distribution system. At genus level, chlorination could effectively remove Methylophilus, Methylotenera, Limnobacter, and Polynucleobacter, while increase the relative abundance of Pseudomonas, Acidovorax, Sphingomonas, Pleomonas, and Undibacterium in the drinking water. A total of 151 ARGs within 15 types were detectable in the drinking water, and chlorination evidently increased their total relative abundance while reduced their diversity in the opportunistic bacteria (p < 0.05). Residual chlorine was identified as the key contributing factor driving the bacterial community shift and resistome alteration. As the dominant persistent ARGs in the treatment and distribution system, multidrug resistance genes (mainly encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division transportation system) and bacitracin resistance gene bacA were mainly carried by chlorine-resistant bacteria Pseudomonas and Acidovorax, which mainly contributed to the ARGs abundance increase. The strong correlation between bacterial community shift and antibiotic resistome alteration observed in this study may shed new light on the mechanism behind the chlorination effects on antibiotic resistance.

  12. Atmospheric chemistry of HFE-7000 (CF(3)CF (2)CF (2)OCH (3)) and 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-1-butanol (CF (3)CF (2)CF (2)CH (2)OH): kinetic rate coefficients and temperature dependence of reactions with chlorine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Mera, Yolanda; Aranda, Alfonso; Bravo, Iván; Rodríguez, Diana; Rodríguez, Ana; Moreno, Elena

    2008-10-01

    The adverse environmental impacts of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the Earth's ozone layer have focused attention on the effort to replace these compounds by nonchlorinated substitutes with environmental acceptability. Hydrofluoroethers (HFEs) and fluorinated alcohols are currently being introduced in many applications for this purpose. Nevertheless, the presence of a great number of C-F bonds drives to atmospheric long-lived compounds with infrared absorption features. Thus, it is necessary to improve our knowledge about lifetimes and global warming potentials (GWP) for these compounds in order to get a complete evaluation of their environmental impact. Tropospheric degradation is expected to be initiated mainly by OH reactions in the gas phase. Nevertheless, Cl atoms reaction may also be important since rate constants are generally larger than those of OH. In the present work, we report the results obtained in the study of the reactions of Cl radicals with HFE-7000 (CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3)) (1) and its isomer CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH (2). Kinetic rate coefficients with Cl atoms have been measured using the discharge flow tube-mass spectrometric technique at 1 Torr of total pressure. The reactions of these chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) substitutes have been studied under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions in excess of the fluorinated compounds over Cl atoms. The temperature ranges were 266-333 and 298-353 K for reactions of HFE-7000 and CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH, respectively. The measured room temperature rate constants were k(Cl+CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3)) = (1.24 +/- 0.28) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)and k(Cl+CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH) = (8.35 +/- 1.63) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (errors are 2sigma + 10% to cover systematic errors). The Arrhenius expression for reaction 1 was k (1)(266-333 K) = (6.1 +/- 3.8) x 10(-13)exp[-(445 +/- 186)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k (2)(298-353 K) = (1.9 +/- 0.7) x 10(-12)exp[-(244 +/- 125)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (errors

  13. Degradation of lipid regulators by the UV/chlorine process: Radical mechanisms, chlorine oxide radical (ClO•)-mediated transformation pathways and toxicity changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiujuan; Wu, Zihao; Ren, Ziran; Guo, Kaiheng; Hou, Shaodong; Hua, Zhechao; Li, Xuchun; Fang, Jingyun

    2018-06-15

    Degradation of three lipid regulators, i.e., gemfibrozil, bezafibrate and clofibric acid, by a UV/chlorine treatment was systematically investigated. The chlorine oxide radical (ClO • ) played an important role in the degradation of gemfibrozil and bezafibrate with second-order rate constants of 4.2 (±0.3) × 10 8  M -1  s -1 and 3.6 (±0.1) × 10 7  M -1  s -1 , respectively, whereas UV photolysis and the hydroxyl radical (HO • ) mainly contributed to the degradation of clofibric acid. The first-order rate constants (k') for the degradation of gemfibrozil and bezafibrate increased linearly with increasing chlorine dosage, primarily due to the linear increase in the ClO • concentration. The k' values for gemfibrozil, bezafibrate, and clofibric acid degradation decreased with increasing pH from 5.0 to 8.4; however, the contribution of the reactive chlorine species (RCS) increased. Degradation of gemfibrozil and bezafibrate was enhanced in the presence of Br - , whereas it was inhibited in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). The presence of ammonia at a chlorine: ammonia molar ratio of 1:1 resulted in decreases in the k' values for gemfibrozil and bezafibrate of 69.7% and 7%, respectively, but led to an increase in that for clofibric acid of 61.8%. Degradation of gemfibrozil by ClO • was initiated by hydroxylation and chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. Then, subsequent hydroxylation, bond cleavage and chlorination reactions led to the formation of more stable products. Three chlorinated intermediates were identified during ClO • oxidation process. Formation of the chlorinated disinfection by-products chloral hydrate and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone was enhanced relative to that of other by-products. The acute toxicity of gemfibrozil to Vibrio fischeri increased significantly when subjected to direct UV photolysis, whereas it decreased when oxidized by ClO • . This study is the first to report the transformation pathway of a

  14. Quantifying Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffin Congener Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Bo; Bogdal, Christian; Berger, Urs; MacLeod, Matthew; Gebbink, Wouter A.; Alsberg, Tomas; Wit, de Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate quantification of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) poses an exceptional challenge to analytical chemists. SCCPs are complex mixtures of chlorinated alkanes with variable chain length and chlorination level; congeners with a fixed chain length (n) and number of chlorines (m) are

  15. Clean Chlorination of Silica Surfaces by a Single-site Substitution Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Maity, Niladri

    2018-02-12

    A chlorination method for the selective substitution of well-defined isolated silanol groups of the silica surface has been developed using the catalytic Appel reaction. Spectroscopic analysis, complemented by elemental microanalysis studies, reveals that a quantitative chlorination could be achieved with highly dehydroxylated silica materials that exclusively possess non-hydrogen bonded silanol groups. The employed method did not leave any carbon or phosphorous residue on the silica surface and can be regarded as a promising tool for the future functionalization of metal oxide surfaces.

  16. Simple Identification of the Neutral Chlorinated Auxin in Pea by Thin Layer Chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1980-01-01

    to small volumes and chromatographed in CHCl3 or CCl4 solvent systems separating the chlorinated auxin from indoleacetonitrile and the methyl or ethyl esters of indoleacetic acid. Colour reaction was carried out with some of the Salkowski FeCl3 sprays of which Ehmann's FeCl3/dimethylaminobenzaldehyde......One of the neutral chlorinated auxins of immature pea seeds was readily identified by thin layer procedures simple enough to serve in student's laboratory courses. 4-Chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester was extracted from 50 g of commercial, frozen peas by either water or acetone, concentrated...

  17. Clean Chlorination of Silica Surfaces by a Single-site Substitution Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Maity, Niladri; Barman, Samir; Abou-Hamad, Edy; D'Elia, Valerio; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2018-01-01

    A chlorination method for the selective substitution of well-defined isolated silanol groups of the silica surface has been developed using the catalytic Appel reaction. Spectroscopic analysis, complemented by elemental microanalysis studies, reveals that a quantitative chlorination could be achieved with highly dehydroxylated silica materials that exclusively possess non-hydrogen bonded silanol groups. The employed method did not leave any carbon or phosphorous residue on the silica surface and can be regarded as a promising tool for the future functionalization of metal oxide surfaces.

  18. Sem-edx and ftir studies of chlorinated rubber coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, H.; Khan, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Anticorrosive performance of chlorinated rubber coating has been investigated by visual examination, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. After surface preparation, commercially available coating system based on chlorinated rubber (primer)/chlorinated rubber (topcoat) formulation was applied on mild steel test panels (10cm x 15cm sizes). Prepared coated panels were exposed at marine, industrial and urban test sites located in Karachi, Pakistan according to ISO 8565 norm. Accelerated testing was performed by using a salt spray chamber (ASTM B117 norm). Accelerated weathering methods are the methods in which the factors responsible for the degradation of coatings are artificially intensified in order to achieve the rapid degradation of coatings. Visual examination of blistering and rusting as well as SEM micrographs indicated a more severe degradation of the coating surface characteristics at natural exposure testing sites (particularly at marine test site) than for accelerated (salt spray) testing. EDX determination of the Oxygen/Carbon (O/C) ratios also indicated increased degradation at natural test sites compared to the accelerated (salt spray) testing. Photooxidation of the binder results in the formation of carbonyl compounds as revealed by FTIR spectroscopy which also indicated dehydrochlorination. (author)

  19. InCl3/NaClO: a reagent for allylic chlorination of terminal olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisoni, Diego S.; Gamba, Douglas; Fonseca, Carlos V.; Costa, Jesse S. da; Petzhold, Cesar L.; Oliveira, Eduardo R. de; Ceschi, Marco A.

    2006-01-01

    Indium trichloride promotes the chlorination of terminal olefins in the presence of sodium hypochlorite with good results. Carvone was chosen as a model compound to examine some of the general features of this reaction, such as stoichiometry, temperature, reaction time and product conversion. Treatment of β-pinene with sodium hypochlorite in the presence of indium trichloride resulted in a facile rearrangement to selectively yield perillyl chloride, which is an important precursor for C-7 oxygenated limonenes. (author)

  20. Vanadium Chloroperoxidases: The Missing Link in the Formation of Chlorinated Compounds and Chloroform in the Terrestrial Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Ron; Barnett, Phil

    2017-08-17

    It is well established that the majority of chlorinated organic substances found in the terrestrial environment are produced naturally. The presence of these compounds in soils is not limited to a single ecosystem. Natural chlorination is also a widespread phenomenon in grasslands and agricultural soils typical for unforested areas. These chlorinated compounds are formed from chlorination of natural organic matter consisting of very complex chemical structures, such as lignin. Chlorination of several lignin model compounds results in the intermediate formation of trichloroacetyl-containing compounds, which are also found in soils. These decay, in general, through a haloform-type reaction mechanism to CHCl 3 . Upon release into the atmosphere, CHCl 3 will produce chlorine radicals through photolysis, which will, in turn, lead to natural depletion of ozone. There is evidence that fungal chloroperoxidases able to produce HOCl are involved in the chlorination of natural organic matter. The objective of this review is to clarify the role and source of the various chloroperoxidases involved in the natural formation of CHCl 3 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Studies on chlorinated bromide salt for microfouling control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpathy, K.K.; Rajmohan, R.; Rao, T.S.; Nair, K.V.K.; Mathur, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Fast Breeder Test reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam has been facing various problems in cooling water systems in spite of intermittent chlorination.Effects of chlorinated-bromide mixture was evaluated against heterotrophic bacteria (TVC) and iron oxidising bacteria (IOB) vis-a-vis chlorine. Results indicated that chlorinated-bromide mixture was far superior (2 orders of magnitude for TVC and 2 times for IOB) to chlorine in microfouling control. Results also showed that at bromide to chlorine ratio of one effectiveness of chlorinated-bromide was at its maximum. (author). 9 refs., 1 tab

  2. Chlorine isn't Just for Swimming Pools Anymore... Chlorination of Organic Compounds in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, A.; Raab, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    The cycling of chlorine between its organic and inorganic forms is known to occur in forest soils, but little is known about the generality of this mechanism, which soil components chlorine attaches to, and at what rate chlorination occurs. The study uses peat-rich tundra soils from Barrow, Alaska varying in age since formation of 50 yrs - 5500 yrs BP, and seeks to measure the rate at which organic molecules are chlorinated and to understand what changes those molecules undergo once chlorinated. Soil abundance of chlorine and bromine was estimated in soils of varying age using X-ray fluorescence, and org-Cl levels were measured using pyro-hydrolysis [Table 1]. We considered activity of the enzyme Chloroperoxidase, and data was gathered using absorbance scans of the organic molecule monochlorodimedone to determine whether it had been chlorinated and if so, at what rate. Additional information was gathered from the chlorination of small organic components of the macromolecule lignin, whose constituent molecules make up a large portion of humic materials critical to soil health, through emission scans and fluorescence scans. The results showed that the enzyme chloroperoxidase, which is found in nature and is associated with fungi or bacteria, attaches a chlorine atom to monochlorodimedone and that similar enzymes found in Arctic soils act on it, as well as the lignin model subunits cinnamaldehyde ((2E)-3-phenylprop-2-enal) and naringenin-7-rhamnoglucoside. The results may provide more information on chlorination rates in the Arctic and may contribute to an understanding of how and at what rate chlorine changes form in nature, and answer questions about ozone deterioration or anthropogenic chlorine impact(s) on the environment.Average Halogen Abundance in Arctic Soils xrf=Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescencepyro= TOX Pyro-Hydrolysis

  3. Decontamination of Pangasius fish (Pangasius hypophthalmus) with chlorine or peracetic acid in the laboratory and in a Vietnamese processing company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong Thi, Anh Ngoc; Sampers, Imca; Van Haute, Sam; Samapundo, Simbarashe; Ly Nguyen, Binh; Heyndrickx, Marc; Devlieghere, Frank

    2015-09-02

    This study evaluated the decontamination of Pangasius fillets in chlorine or peracetic acid treated wash water. First, the decontamination efficacy of the washing step with chlorinated water applied by a Vietnamese processing company during trimming of Pangasius fillets was evaluated and used as the basis for the experiments performed on a laboratory scale. As chlorine was only added at the beginning of the batch and used continuously without renewal for 239min; a rapid increase of the bacterial counts and a fast decrease of chlorine in the wash water were found. This could be explained by the rapid accumulation of organic matter (ca. 400mg O2/L of COD after only 24min). Secondly, for the experiments performed on a laboratory scale, a single batch approach (one batch of wash water for treating a fillet) was used. Chlorine and PAA were evaluated at 10, 20, 50 and 150ppm at contact times of 10, 20 and 240s. Washing with chlorine and PAA wash water resulted in a reduction of Escherichia coli on Pangasius fish which ranged from 0-1.0 and 0.4-1.4logCFU/g, respectively while less to no reduction of total psychrotrophic counts, lactic acid bacteria and coliforms on Pangasius fish was observed. However, in comparison to PAA, chlorine was lost rapidly. As an example, 53-83% of chlorine and 15-17% of PAA were lost after washing for 40s (COD=238.2±66.3mg O2/L). Peracetic acid can therefore be an alternative sanitizer. However, its higher cost will have to be taken into consideration. Where (cheaper) chlorine is used, the processors have to pay close attention to the residual chlorine level, pH and COD level during treatment for optimal efficacy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Determination of chlorine in nuclear-grade uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chunqing; Liu Fuyun; Huang Dianfan

    1988-01-01

    The determination of chlorine in nuclear-grade uranium compounds is discribed. Chlorine is separated from uranium oxide pyrohydrolytically with stream of wet oxygen in a furnace at 800 ∼ 900 deg C. Chlorine is volatilized as hydrochloric acid, absorbed in a dilute alkaline solution and measured with chlorine-selective electrode. This method covers the concentration range of 10 ∼ 500 pm chlorine in uranium oxide. Precision of at least ± 10% and recovery of 85 ∼ 108% have been reported

  5. Microbial community response to chlorine conversion in a chloraminated drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Proctor, Caitlin R; Edwards, Marc A; Pryor, Marsha; Santo Domingo, Jorge W; Ryu, Hodon; Camper, Anne K; Olson, Andrew; Pruden, Amy

    2014-09-16

    Temporary conversion to chlorine (i.e., "chlorine burn") is a common approach to controlling nitrification in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems, yet its effectiveness and mode(s) of action are not fully understood. This study characterized occurrence of nitrifying populations before, during and after a chlorine burn at 46 sites in a chloraminated distribution system with varying pipe materials and levels of observed nitrification. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene markers present in nitrifying populations indicated higher frequency of detection of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) (72% of samples) relative to ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) (28% of samples). Nitrospira nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were detected at 45% of samples, while presence of Nitrobacter NOB could not be confirmed at any of the samples. During the chlorine burn, the numbers of AOA, AOB, and Nitrospira greatly reduced (i.e., 0.8-2.4 log). However, rapid and continued regrowth of AOB and Nitrospira were observed along with nitrite production in the bulk water within four months after the chlorine burn, and nitrification outbreaks appeared to worsen 6-12 months later, even after adopting a twice annual burn program. Although high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed a distinct community shift and higher diversity index during the chlorine burn, it steadily returned towards a condition more similar to pre-burn than burn stage. Significant factors associated with nitrifier and microbial community composition included water age and sampling location type, but not pipe material. Overall, these results indicate that there is limited long-term effect of chlorine burns on nitrifying populations and the broader microbial community.

  6. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking

  7. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  8. Determination of chlorine in high purity materials by charged particle activation analysis using deuteron beam from VEC accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, S.; Datta, J.; Chowdhury, D.P.; Verma, R.

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative determination of chlorine by conventional methods viz., AAS, ICP-OES is difficult and erroneous at times due to gaseous nature of elemental chlorine. It is possible to determine chlorine by NAA and charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) producing activation product 38 Cl (t 1/2 = 37.2 min, 1642 (32.8 %), 2168 keV (44 %)). Fast INAA method has been applied to determine Cl in concentration ranges 10 mgkg -1 in some suitable matrices in PCF of DHRUVA reactor with a neutron flux of 10 13 cm -2 s -1 with a detection limit of Cl of ∼1 mgkg -1

  9. Assessment of benzophenone-4 reactivity with free chlorine by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreira, N; Rodríguez, I; Rodil, R; Cela, R

    2012-09-19

    The stability of the UV filter benzophenone-4 (BP-4) in free chlorine-containing water was investigated, for the first time, by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QqTOF-MS). High mass accuracy and resolution capabilities of this hybrid mass spectrometer were used for the reliable assignation of empirical formulae and chemical structures of BP-4 derivatives. Time-course profiles of the parent compound and its by-products were simultaneously recorded by direct injection of sample aliquots, after quenching the excess of chlorine, in the LC-QqTOF-MS system. At neutral pHs, in excess of chlorine, BP-4 showed a limited stability fitting a pseudo-first-order degradation kinetics. A noticeable reduction in the half-lives of BP-4 was observed when increasing the sample pH between 6 and 8 units and also in presence of bromide traces. The reaction pathway of this UV filter involved a first electrophilic substitution of hydrogen per chlorine (or bromide) in the phenolic ring, followed by oxidation of the carbonyl moiety to an ester group, which induced a further electrophilic substitution in the same aromatic ring. Above reactions were also noticed when mixing a BP-4 containing personal care product with chlorinated tap water and in chlorinated swimming pool and sewage water, previously spiked with a BP-4 standard. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Generation and selected reactions of chlorinated thiocarbonyl S-imides*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mloston, Grzegorz; Pipiak, Paulina; Voss, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    N-Aryl-1,1,1-trichloromethanesulfenamides ArNH-SCCl3 easily undergo dehydrochlorination upon treatment with potassium hydroxide in ethanolic solution. The intermediate thiocarbonyl S-imides formed thereby behave differently depending on the type of the N-aryl group. The sterically crowded N-(2,6-...

  11. Development and evaluation of analytical techniques for total chlorine in used oils and oil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskill, A. Jr.; Estes, E.D.; Hardison, D.L.; Friedman, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    A current EPA regulation prohibits the sale for burning in nonindustrial boilers of used oils and oil fuels. This paper discusses how analytical techniques for determining total chlorine were evaluated to provide regulatory agencies and the regulated community with appropriate chlorine test methods. The techniques evaluated included oxygen bomb combustion followed by chemical titration or ion chromatography, instrumental microcoulometry, field test kits, and instrumental furnace/specific ion electrode determinator, a device based on the Beilstein reaction, and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. These techniques were subjected to interlaboratory testing to estimate their precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. Virgin and used crankcase oils, hydraulic and metalworking oils, oil fuels and oil fuel blends with used oils were tested. The bomb techniques, one of the test kits, microcoulometry and all but one x-ray analyzer were found to be suitable for this application. The chlorine furnace and the Beilstein device were found to be inapplicable at the levels of interest

  12. Dechlorination of short chain chlorinated paraffins by nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Lu, Mang; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Xiao, Meng; Zhang, Min

    2012-12-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles were synthesized and used for the reductive dehalogenation of short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in the laboratory. The results show that the dechlorination rate of chlorinated n-decane (CP(10)) by NZVI increased with decreased solution pH. Increasing the loading of NZVI enhanced the dechlorination rate of CP(10). With an increase in temperature, the degradation rate increased. The reduction of CP(10) by NZVI was accelerated with increasing the concentration of humic acid up to 15 mg/L but then was inhibited. The dechlorination of CP(10) within the initial 18 h followed pseudo-first order rate model. The formation of intermediate products indicates a stepwise dechlorination pathway of SCCPs by NZVI. The carbon chain length and chlorination degree of SCCPs have a polynominal impact on dechlorination reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microbial transformation of chlorinated aromatics in sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, J.E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous contaminants like heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated benzenes (CBs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo- p -dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated furans (PCDFs) are detected in the major rivers in the

  14. Synthesis of 3-Alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via Diels-Alder and Electron Transfer Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Vanelle

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A convenient route to 3-alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via a hetero Diels-Alder reaction between an azadiene and naphthoquinone, a free radical chlorination and an electron transfer reaction is reported.

  15. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Dehalogenation of Chlorinated Hydroxybiphenyls by Fungal Laccase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Asgard; Jonas, Ulrike; Hammer, Elke; Schauer, Frieder

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the transformation of chlorinated hydroxybiphenyls by laccase produced by Pycnoporus cinnabarinus. The compounds used were transformed to sparingly water-soluble colored precipitates which were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as oligomerization products of the chlorinated hydroxybiphenyls. During oligomerization of 2-hydroxy-5-chlorobiphenyl and 3-chloro-4-hydroxybiphenyl, dechlorinated C—C-linked dimers were formed, demonstrating the dehalogenation ability of laccase. In addition to these nonhalogenated dimers, both monohalogenated and dihalogenated dimers were identified. PMID:11526052

  17. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Stratospheric chlorine: Blaming it on nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, G.

    1993-01-01

    Much of the bitter public debate over ozone depletion has centered on the claim that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) pale into insignificance alongside natural sources of chlorine in the stratosphere. If so, goes the argument, chlorine could not be depleting ozone as atmospheric scientists claim, because the natural sources have been around since time immemorial, and the ozone layer is still there. The claim, put forward in a book by Rogelio Maduro and Ralf Schauerhammer, has since been touted by former Atomic Energy Commissioner Dixy Lee Ray and talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, and it forms the basis of much of the backlash now being felt by atmospheric scientists. The argument is simple: Maduro and Schauerhammer calculate that 600 million tons of chlorine enters the atmosphere annually from seawater, 36 million tons from volcanoes, 8.4 million tons from biomass burning, and 5 million tons from ocean biota. In contrast, CFCs account for a mere 750,000 tons of atmospheric chlorine a year. Besides disputing the numbers, scientists have both theoretical and observational bases for doubting that much of this chlorine is getting into the stratosphere, where it could affect the ozone layer. Linwood Callis of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center points out one crucial problem with the argument: Chlorine from natural sources is soluble, and so it gets rained out of the lower atmosphere. CFCs, in contrast, are insoluble and inert and thus make it to the stratosphere to release their chlorine. What's more, observations of stratospheric chemistry don't support the idea that natural sources are contributing much to the chlorine there

  19. Chlorine isotope investigation of natural attenuation of trichloroethene in an aerobic aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Heraty, L.J.; Huang, L.; Holt, B.D.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Clausen, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Natural attenuation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) can be an important mechanism for groundwater remediation. It is difficult to determine the effectiveness of natural CAH attenuation from chemical analyses of groundwater samples because mixing, dispersion, and secondary reactions can mask the chemical evidence of attenuation. In this paper, the authors explore the application of stable chlorine isotope ratio measurements as a new tool for evaluating natural attenuation of CAHs. They report stable isotope ratios of chlorine in both trichloroethene (TCE) and inorganic chloride in groundwater from an aerobic aquifer beneath an extensively contaminated industrial site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. Variations in the concentrations and chlorine isotope ratios of TCE and chloride in the groundwater are consistent with those expected from natural attenuation. These data support a model in which partial TCE degradation occurred in relatively impermeable, clay-rich sediments above the aquifer, and little or no further degradation of TCE occurred within the aquifer. A record of changing conditions within the TCE source area can be inferred from the spatial variation of chlorine isotope ratios for TCE and chloride within the plume

  20. Oxidation of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) by chlorine, ozone and permanganate--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shanshan; Zhao, Zhiwei; Xu, Yongpeng; Tian, Jiayu; Qi, Hong; Lin, Wei; Cui, Fuyi

    2014-06-15

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX), a typical sulfonamide antibiotic, has been widely detected in secondary wastewater effluents and surface waters. In this work we investigated the oxidative degradation of SMX by commonly used oxidants of chlorine, ozone and permanganate. Chlorine and ozone were shown to be more effective for the removal of SMX (0.05-5.0mg/L), as compared with permanganate. Higher pH enhanced the oxidation of SMX by ozone and permanganate, but decreased the removal by chlorine. Moreover, the ozonation of SMX was significantly influenced by the presence of humic acid (HA), which exhibited negligible influence on the oxidation by chlorine and permanganate. Fairly lower mineralization of SMX occurred during the oxidation reactions, with the highest dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal of 13% (for ozone). By using LC-MS/MS, 7, 5 and 5 oxidation products were identified for chlorine, ozone and permanganate and possible transformation pathways were proposed. It was shown that different oxidants shared some common pathways, such as the cleavage of SN bond, the hydroxylation of the benzene ring, etc. On the other hand, each of the oxidants also exhibited exclusive degradation mechanisms, leading to the formation of different transformation products (TPs). This work may provide useful information for the selection of oxidants in water treatment processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of Chlorine-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chenyu; Altemir, David A.; Margrave, John L.; Hauge, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    Low temperature deposition of diamond has been achieved by a chlorine-assisted diamond chemical vapor deposition (CA-CVD) process. This method begins with the thermal dissociation of molecular chlorine into atomic chlorine in a resistively heated graphite furnace at temperatures between 1300 and 1500 deg. C. The atomic chlorine, upon mixing, subsequently reacts with molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons. The rapid exchange reactions between the atomic chlorine, molecular hydrogen, and hydrocarbons give rise to the atomic hydrogen and carbon precursors required for diamond deposition. Homoepitaxial diamond growth on diamond substrates has been studied over the substrate temperature range of 100-950 C. It was found that the diamond growth rates are approximately 0.2 microns/hr in the temperature range between 102 and 300 C and that the growth rates do not decrease significantly with a decrease in substrate temperature. This is unique because the traditional diamond deposition using H2/CH4 systems usually disappears at substrate temperatures below approx. 500 deg. C. This opens up a possible route to the deposition of diamond on low-melting point materials such as aluminum and its alloys.

  2. A comparative study on the radiation induced degradation of chlorinated organics and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekboelet, M.; Balcioglu, A.I.; Getoff, N.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiation induced degradation of chlorinated benzaldehydes has been studied by the application of UV-photolysis, UV-assisted catalytic oxidation and gamma radiolysis processes. The degradation was followed in terms of the substrate removal and formation of the decomposition products such as chloride and formaldehyde. Formation of the acidic compounds were also determined by the pH decrease during irradiation periods. The below given table summarizes the obtained results in terms of photochemical G (G PH )values. The main idea of this paper was to evaluate the applied processes in relation to the end products rather and to compare the efficiency of the methods. Besides, chloride and formaldehyde formation, the substrate degradation and formation of the stable end products, were followed by HPLC analyses. Hydroxylated parent compounds chlorophenols, benzaldehyde were also detected. Formation of muconic acid through ring opening as well as the formation of lower molecular weight organic acids by decomposition such as oxalic, citric, tartaric and formic acids were observed with respect the applied oxidation process. Depending on the formed stable end products and the related probable reaction mechanisms, isomeric positions were found to be selective toward oxidative degradation

  3. Transformation of Flame Retardant Tetrabromobisphenol A by Aqueous Chlorine and the Effect of Humic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Pang, Su-Yan; Jiang, Jin; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Yang; Li, Juan; Wang, Li-Hong; Lu, Xue-Ting; Yuan, Li-Peng

    2016-09-06

    In this work, it was found that the most widely used brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBrBPA) could be transformed by free chlorine over a wide pH range from 5 to 10 with apparent second-order rate constants from 138 to 3210 M(-1)·s(-1). A total of eight products, including one quinone-like compound (i.e., 2,6-dibromoquinone), two dimers, and several simple halogenated phenols (e.g., 4-(2-hydroxyisopropyl)-2,6-dibromophenol, 2,6-dibromohydroquinone, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol), were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) using a novel precursor ion scan (PIS) approach. A tentative reaction pathway was proposed: chlorine initially oxidized TBrBPA leading to the formation of a phenoxy radical, and then this primary radical and its secondary intermediates (e.g., 2,6-dibromo-4-isopropylphenol carbocation) formed via beta-scission subsequently underwent substitution, dimerization, and oxidation reactions. Humic acid (HA) considerably inhibited the degradation rates of TBrBPA by chlorine even accounting for oxidant consumption. A similar inhibitory effect of HA was also observed in permanganate and ferrate oxidation. This inhibitory effect was possibly attributed to the fact that HA competitively reacted with the phenoxy radical of TBrBPA and reversed it back to parent TBrBPA. This study confirms that chlorine can transform phenolic compounds (e.g., TBrBPA) via electron transfer rather than the well-documented electrophilic substitution, which also have implications on the formation pathway of halo-benzoquinones during chlorine disinfection. These findings can improve the understanding of chlorine chemistry in water and wastewater treatment.

  4. Chlorinated drinking water for lightweight laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Schneider

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The study aimed to evaluate the effect of different levels of chlorine in drinking water of laying hens on zootechnical performance, eggs shell quality, hemogasometry levels and calcium content in tibia. 144 Hy-Line laying hens, 61 weeks old, were used distributed in 24 metabolism cages. They were subjected to water diets, for a period of 28 days, using sodium hypochlorite as a chlorine source in order to obtain the following concentrations: 5ppm (control, 20ppm, 50ppm, and 100ppm. Their performance was evaluated through water consumption, feed intake, egg production and weight, egg mass, feed conversion. Shell quality was measured by specific gravity. At the end of the experiment, arterial blood was collected for blood gas level assessment and a poultry of each replicate was sacrificed to obtain tibia and calcium content measurement. There was a water consumption reduction from 20ppm of chlorine and feed intake reduction in poultry receiving water with 100ppm of chlorine. The regression analysis showed that the higher the level of chlorine in water, the higher the reduction in consumption. There were no differences in egg production and weight, egg mass, feed conversion, specific gravity, tibia calcium content, and hemogasometry levels (hydrogenionic potential, carbon dioxide partial pressure, oxygen partial pressure, sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, carbon dioxide total concentration, anion gap and oxygen saturation. The use of levels above 5ppm of chlorine is not recommended in the water of lightweight laying hens.

  5. Chlorine decay under steady and unsteady-state hydraulic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoianov, Ivan; Aisopou, Angeliki

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a simulation framework for the scale-adaptive hydraulic and chlorine decay modelling under steady and unsteady-state flows. Bulk flow and pipe wall reaction coefficients are replaced with steady and unsteady-state reaction coefficients. An unsteady decay coefficient is defined...... which depends upon the absolute value of shear stress and the rate of change of shear stress for quasi-unsteady and unsteady-state flows. A preliminary experimental and analytical investigation was carried out in a water transmission main. The results were used to model monochloramine decay...... and these demonstrate that the dynamic hydraulic conditions have a significant impact on water quality deterioration and the rapid loss of disinfectant residual. © 2013 The Authors....

  6. Examining the interrelationship between DOC, bromide and chlorine dose on DBP formation in drinking water--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tom; Huang, Jin; Graham, Nigel J D; Templeton, Michael R

    2014-02-01

    During drinking water treatment aqueous chlorine and bromine compete to react with natural organic matter (NOM). Among the products of these reactions are potentially harmful halogenated disinfection by-products, notably four trihalomethanes (THM4) and nine haloacetic acids (HAAs). Previous research has concentrated on the role of bromide in chlorination reactions under conditions of a given NOM type and/or concentration. In this study different concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from U.K. lowland water were reacted with varying amounts of bromide and chlorine in order to examine the interrelationship between the three reactants in the formation of THM4, dihaloacetic acids (DHAAs) and trihaloacetic acids (THAAs). Results showed that, in general, molar yields of THM4 increased with DOC, bromide and chlorine concentrations, although yields did fluctuate versus chlorine dose. In contrast both DHAA and THAA yields were mainly independent of changes in bromide and chlorine dose at low DOC (1 mg·L(-1)), but increased with chlorine dose at higher DOC concentrations (4 mg·L(-1)). Bromine substitution factors reached maxima of 0.80, 0.67 and 0.65 for the THM4, DHAAs and THAAs, respectively, at the highest bromide/chlorine ratio studied. These results suggest that THM4 formation kinetics depend on both oxidation and halogenation steps, whereas for DHAAs and THAAs oxidation steps are more important. Furthermore, they indicate that high bromide waters may prove more problematic for water utilities with respect to THM4 formation than for THAAs or DHAAs. While mass concentrations of all three groups increased in response to increased bromide incorporation, only the THMs also showed an increase in molar yield. Overall, the formation behaviour of DHAA and THAA was more similar than that of THM4 and THAA. © 2013.

  7. Two-phase ozonation of chlorinated organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Freshour, A.; West, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the last few years the amount of research being conducted in the field of single-phase ozonation has grown extensively. However, traditional aqueous-phase ozonation systems are limited by a lack of selective oxidation potential, low ozone solubility in water, and slow intermediate decomposition rates. Furthermore, ozone may decompose before it can be utilized for pollutant destruction since ozone can be highly unstable in aqueous solutions. Naturally occurring compounds such as NaHCO 3 also affect ozone reactions by inhibiting the formation of OH-free radicals. To compensate for these factors, excess ozone is typically supplied to a reactor. Since ozone generation requires considerable electric power consumption (16 - 24 kWh/kg of O 3 ), attempts to enhance the ozone utilization rate and stability should lead to more efficient application of this process to hazardous waste treatment. To improve the process, ozonation may be more efficiently carried out in a two-phase system consisting of an inert solvent (saturated with O 3 ) contacted with an aqueous phase containing pollutants. The non-aqueous phase must meet the following criteria: (1) non-toxic, (2) very low vapor pressure, (3) high density (for ease of separation), (4) complete insolubility in water, (5) reusability, (6) selective pollutant extractability, (7) high oxidant solubility, and (8) extended O 3 stability. Previously published studies (1) have indicated that a number of fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds fit these criteria. For this project, FC40 (a product of 3M Co.) was chosen due to its low vapor pressure (3 mm Hg) and high specific gravity (1.9). The primary advantages of the FC40 solvent are that it is non-toxic, reusable, has an ozone solubility 10 times that of water, and that 85 % of the ozone remains in the solvent even after 2 hours. This novel two-phase process has been utilized to study the rapid destruction of organic chlorine compounds and organic mixtures

  8. Native sulfur/chlorine SAD phasing for serial femtosecond crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakane, Takanori; Song, Changyong; Suzuki, Mamoru; Nango, Eriko; Kobayashi, Jun; Masuda, Tetsuya; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nakatsu, Toru; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Iwata, So; Sugahara, Michihiro

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur SAD phasing facilitates the structure determination of diverse native proteins using femtosecond X-rays from free-electron lasers via serial femtosecond crystallography. Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) allows structures to be determined with minimal radiation damage. However, phasing native crystals in SFX is not very common. Here, the structure determination of native lysozyme from single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) by utilizing the anomalous signal of sulfur and chlorine at a wavelength of 1.77 Å is successfully demonstrated. This sulfur SAD method can be applied to a wide range of proteins, which will improve the determination of native crystal structures

  9. Kinetics of Adsorbable Organic Halides (AOX Reduction in Laccase-Aided Chlorine Dioxide Bleaching of Bagasse Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Song

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a kinetic model of the laccase-aided chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp. The kinetic model was based on the rate of reduction of adsorbed organic halogen (AOX. The effects of the laccase enzyme dosage, the mediator 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT dosage, and the reaction temperature on the AOX content of the bleaching effluent are discussed. Good fits were obtained for the experimental data obtained from the different laccase enzyme dosages, HBT dosages, and reaction temperatures, indicating the feasibility of the kinetic model as a means of predicting the optimal operation conditions for the laccase-aided chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp in the future.

  10. Combined toxicity effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton. Progress report, November 1976--31 January 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, J. C.

    1978-02-01

    Studies on the effects of chlorine, chloramines, and temperature on marine plankton have been carried out for three years. Species studied include marine phytoplankton, lobster larvae (Homarus americanus), oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica), copepods (Acartia tonsa), rotifers (Brachionas plicatilis), grass shrimp (Palamonetes pugio) summer flounder larvae (Paralichthys dentatus), larval and juvenile killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus), juvenile scup (Stenotomus versicolor), and juvenile winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). In addition extensive studies on chlorine chemistry in seawater have been carried out. The major conclusions are that entrainment effects on permanent plankton such as phytoplankton, copepods, and rotifers are temporary, that is those organisms surviving chlorination and temperature shocks are capable of renewed and unrestricted growth once returned to the receiving water. Because chlorine is only applied for short periods daily in most power plants, the total population of the above organisms actually exposed to chlorine is small and the effects may be hardly measurable in receiving waters. However, chlorination effects on larval species that spawn intermittently could be catastrophic. In addition, there are many unanswered questions regarding the fate of chlorine that is dissipated in marine waters. Are the losses real and, if so, do they pose a toxicity threat to marine biota.

  11. Combined toxicity effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton. Progress report, September 16, 1975--September 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, J. C.; Ryther, J. H.

    1976-10-01

    Research on the combined effects of chlorine, ammmonia and temperature on marine plankton have been carried out for 20 months. To date continuous-flow bioassays have been conducted on lobster larvae (Homarus americanus), oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica), copepods (Acartia tonsa), rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis), three juvenile and larval fish, killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus), scup (Stenotomus versicolor), and winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus), and phytoplankton (the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum). In addition, studies on zooplankton metabolism, filtration rates, and growth were carried out on exposed organisms. In general, the responses of invertebrates were distinctly different than those of fish: increasing mortality with increasing chlorine dose and greater sensitivity to chloramines than free chlorine in the former, and a threshold level of chlorine and greater sensitivity to free chlorine in the latter. Phytoplankton responses indicate that chlorine effects on primary producers are minimal compared to the serious effects on zooplankton, particularly larval forms that spawn intermittently. The overall conclusion of our studies is that chlorine application at power plants must be carried out with extreme caution and that serious consideration should be given to applying dechlorination at all coastal cooling systems.

  12. Determination of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water by solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianli; Kang, Haiyan; Wu, Junfeng

    2016-05-01

    Given the potential risks of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the analysis of their presence in water is very urgent. We have developed a novel procedure for determining chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water based on solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The extraction parameters of solid-phase extraction were optimized in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method showed wide linear ranges (1.0-1000 ng/L) with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9952 to 0.9998. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were in the range of 0.015-0.591 and 0.045-1.502 ng/L, respectively. Recoveries ranged from 82.5 to 102.6% with relative standard deviations below 9.2%. The obtained method was applied successfully to the determination of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in real water samples. Most of the chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected and 1-monochloropyrene was predominant in the studied water samples. This is the first report of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples in China. The toxic equivalency quotients of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the studied tap water were 9.95 ng the toxic equivalency quotient m(-3) . 9,10-Dichloroanthracene and 1-monochloropyrene accounted for the majority of the total toxic equivalency quotients of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tap water. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A self-consistent, multivariate method for the determination of gas-phase rate coefficients, applied to reactions of atmospheric VOCs and the hydroxyl radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jacob T.; Lidster, Richard T.; Cryer, Danny R.; Ramirez, Noelia; Whiting, Fiona C.; Boustead, Graham A.; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Rickard, Andrew R.; Dunmore, Rachel E.; Heard, Dwayne E.; Lewis, Ally C.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Hamilton, Jacqui F.; Dillon, Terry J.

    2018-03-01

    Gas-phase rate coefficients are fundamental to understanding atmospheric chemistry, yet experimental data are not available for the oxidation reactions of many of the thousands of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) observed in the troposphere. Here, a new experimental method is reported for the simultaneous study of reactions between multiple different VOCs and OH, the most important daytime atmospheric radical oxidant. This technique is based upon established relative rate concepts but has the advantage of a much higher throughput of target VOCs. By evaluating multiple VOCs in each experiment, and through measurement of the depletion in each VOC after reaction with OH, the OH + VOC reaction rate coefficients can be derived. Results from experiments conducted under controlled laboratory conditions were in good agreement with the available literature for the reaction of 19 VOCs, prepared in synthetic gas mixtures, with OH. This approach was used to determine a rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 2,3-dimethylpent-1-ene for the first time; k = 5.7 (±0.3) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. In addition, a further seven VOCs had only two, or fewer, individual OH rate coefficient measurements available in the literature. The results from this work were in good agreement with those measurements. A similar dataset, at an elevated temperature of 323 (±10) K, was used to determine new OH rate coefficients for 12 aromatic, 5 alkane, 5 alkene and 3 monoterpene VOC + OH reactions. In OH relative reactivity experiments that used ambient air at the University of York, a large number of different VOCs were observed, of which 23 were positively identified. Due to difficulties with detection limits and fully resolving peaks, only 19 OH rate coefficients were derived from these ambient air samples, including 10 reactions for which data were previously unavailable at the elevated reaction temperature of T = 323 (±10) K.

  14. Modeling the impact of chlorine emissions from coal combustion and prescribed waste incineration on tropospheric ozone formation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiming; Fan, Qi; Chen, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Jun; Ling, Zhenhao; Hong, Yingying; Li, Weibiao; Chen, Xunlai; Wang, Mingjie; Wei, Xiaolin

    2018-02-01

    Chlorine radicals can enhance atmospheric oxidation, which potentially increases tropospheric ozone concentration. However, few studies have been done to quantify the impact of chlorine emissions on ozone formation in China due to the lack of a chlorine emission inventory used in air quality models with sufficient resolution. In this study, the Anthropogenic Chlorine Emissions Inventory for China (ACEIC) was developed for the first time, including emissions of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and molecular chlorine (Cl2) from coal combustion and prescribed waste incineration (waste incineration plant). The HCl and Cl2 emissions from coal combustion in China in 2012 were estimated to be 232.9 and 9.4 Gg, respectively, while HCl emission from prescribed waste incineration was estimated to be 2.9 Gg. Spatially the highest emissions of HCl and Cl2 were found in the North China Plain, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Sichuan Basin. Air quality model simulations with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system were performed for November 2011, and the modeling results derived with and without chlorine emissions were compared. The magnitude of the simulated HCl, Cl2 and ClNO2 agreed reasonably with the observation when anthropogenic chlorine emissions were included in the model. The inclusion of the ACEIC increased the concentration of fine particulate Cl-, leading to enhanced heterogeneous reactions between Cl- and N2O5, which resulted in the higher production of ClNO2. Photolysis of ClNO2 and Cl2 in the morning and the reaction of HCl with OH in the afternoon produced chlorine radicals which accelerated tropospheric oxidation. When anthropogenic chlorine emissions were included in the model, the monthly mean concentrations of fine particulate Cl-, daily maximum 1 h ClNO2, and Cl radicals were estimated to increase by up to about 2.0 µg m-3, 773 pptv, and 1.5 × 103 molecule cm-3 in China, respectively. Meanwhile, the monthly mean daily maximum 8 h O3

  15. Modeling the impact of chlorine emissions from coal combustion and prescribed waste incineration on tropospheric ozone formation in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine radicals can enhance atmospheric oxidation, which potentially increases tropospheric ozone concentration. However, few studies have been done to quantify the impact of chlorine emissions on ozone formation in China due to the lack of a chlorine emission inventory used in air quality models with sufficient resolution. In this study, the Anthropogenic Chlorine Emissions Inventory for China (ACEIC was developed for the first time, including emissions of hydrogen chloride (HCl and molecular chlorine (Cl2 from coal combustion and prescribed waste incineration (waste incineration plant. The HCl and Cl2 emissions from coal combustion in China in 2012 were estimated to be 232.9 and 9.4 Gg, respectively, while HCl emission from prescribed waste incineration was estimated to be 2.9 Gg. Spatially the highest emissions of HCl and Cl2 were found in the North China Plain, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Sichuan Basin. Air quality model simulations with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ modeling system were performed for November 2011, and the modeling results derived with and without chlorine emissions were compared. The magnitude of the simulated HCl, Cl2 and ClNO2 agreed reasonably with the observation when anthropogenic chlorine emissions were included in the model. The inclusion of the ACEIC increased the concentration of fine particulate Cl−, leading to enhanced heterogeneous reactions between Cl− and N2O5, which resulted in the higher production of ClNO2. Photolysis of ClNO2 and Cl2 in the morning and the reaction of HCl with OH in the afternoon produced chlorine radicals which accelerated tropospheric oxidation. When anthropogenic chlorine emissions were included in the model, the monthly mean concentrations of fine particulate Cl−, daily maximum 1 h ClNO2, and Cl radicals were estimated to increase by up to about 2.0 µg m−3, 773 pptv, and 1.5  ×  103 molecule cm−3 in China, respectively. Meanwhile

  16. Quantification of bisphenol A, 353-nonylphenol and their chlorinated derivatives in drinking water treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Antoine; Migeot, Virginie; Cariot, Axelle; Albouy-Llaty, Marion; Legube, Bernard; Rabouan, Sylvie

    2012-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenols (NP) are of major concern to public health due to their high potential for human exposure and to their demonstrated toxicity (endocrine disruptor effect). A limited number of studies have shown that BPA and NP are present in drinking water. The chlorinated derivatives that may be formed during the chlorination step in drinking water treatment plants (DWTP) exhibit a higher level of estrogenic activity than their parent compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate BPA, 353NP, and their chlorinated derivative concentrations using an accurate and reproducible method of quantification. This method was applied to both surface and treated water samples from eight French DWTPs producing from surface water. Solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed in order to quantify target compounds from water samples. The limits of detection ranged from 0.3 to 2.3 ng/L for BPA and chlorinated BPA and from 1.4 to 63.0 ng/L for 353NP and chlorinated 353NP. BPA and 353NP were found in most analyzed water samples, at a level ranging from 2.0 to 29.7 ng/L and from 0 to 124.9 ng/L, respectively. In most of DWTPs a decrease of BPA and 353NP was observed between surface water and treated water (36.6 to 78.9 % and 2.2 to 100.0 % for BPA and 353NP, respectively). Neither chlorinated BPA nor chlorinated 353NP was detected. Even though BPA and 353NP have been largely removed in the DWTPs studied, they have not been completely eliminated, and drinking water may consequently remain a source of human exposure.

  17. Halogenating reaction activity of aromatic organic compounds during disinfection of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Gaimei; Chen Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    The halogenating reactions of five aromatic organic compounds (AOCs) with aqueous chlorine (HOCl/OCl - ) and aqueous bromine (HOBr/OBr - ) were studied with an aim to compare the formation properties of haloacetic acids (HAAs) for the corresponding chlorination or bromination reactions of AOCs, respectively. The experiment results indicated that the HAAs substitution efficiency for the bromination reactions of AOCs was greater than that for the chlorination reactions, and the formation of HAAs had a strong dependence on the chemical structure of AOCs. The chlorination or bromination reaction activities for the AOCs with electron donating functional groups were higher than that for them with electron withdrawing functional groups. The kinetic experiments indicated that the reactions of aqueous bromine with phenol were faster than those of aqueous chlorine with phenol and the halogen consumption exhibited rapid initial and slower consumption stages for the reactions of phenol with aqueous chlorine and bromine, respectively. In addition, the HAAs production for the chlorination reaction of phenol decreased with the increase of pH. These conclusions could provide the valuable information for the effective control of the disinfection by-products during drinking water treatment operation

  18. CHLORINE ABUNDANCES IN COOL STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A. [Indiana University Bloomington, Astronomy Department, Swain West 319, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Hinkle, K., E-mail: zmaas@indiana.edu, E-mail: cpilacho@indiana.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H{sup 35}Cl at 3.69851 μ m. The high-resolution L -band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with −0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] = (−0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [{sup 35}Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ∼0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H{sup 35}Cl and H{sup 37}Cl could be measured, a {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.

  19. Effect of chlorination on the development of marine biofilms dominated by diatoms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Jagadeesan, V.

    , and Thalassionema did not increase in density after chlorine treatment. It was also demonstrated that diatoms can colonize, grow and photosynthesize on chlorine-treated surfaces. Under pulse chlorination (treatment every 6 h), irrespective of chlorine concentration...

  20. Automatic analyzing device for chlorine ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugibayashi, Shinji; Morikawa, Yoshitake; Fukase, Kazuo; Kashima, Hiromasa.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device of automatically analyzing a trance amount of chlorine ions contained in feedwater, condensate and reactor water of a BWR type power plant. Namely, zero-adjustment or span calibration in this device is conducted as follows. (1) A standard chlorine ion liquid is supplied from a tank to a mixer by a constant volume pump, and the liquid is diluted and mixed with purified water to form a standard liquid. (2) The pH of the standard liquid is adjusted by a pH adjuster. (3) The standard liquid is supplied to an electrode cell to conduct zero adjustment or span calibration. Chlorine ions in a specimen are measured by the device of the present invention as follows. (1) The specimen is supplied to a head tank through a line filter. (2) The pH of the specimen is adjusted by a pH adjuster. (3) The specimen is supplied to an electrode cell to electrically measure the concentration of the chlorine ions in the specimen. The device of the present invention can automatically analyze trance amount of chlorine ions at a high accuracy, thereby capable of improving the sensitivity, reducing an operator's burden and radiation exposure. (I.S.)

  1. The study of chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine and calcium chloride in the presence of active additives

    OpenAIRE

    Ilic, Ilija; Krstev, Boris; Stopic, Srecko; Cerovic, K

    1997-01-01

    Chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine and calcium chloride in the presence of C, BaS and S were studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine was carried out in the temperature range 573-873 K and by calcium chloride in the temperature range 1023-1223 K. The results obtained of the chlorination of nickel oxide by chlorine showed that C has the strongest and S the weakest effect on the process. Addition of BaS has a favorable effect on the chlorina...

  2. A micromachined electrochemical sensor for free chlorine monitoring in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, A; Shekhar, H; Hyun, S H; Hong, S; Cho, H J

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we designed, fabricated and tested a disposable, flow-through amperometric sensor for free chlorine determination in water. The sensor is based on the principle of an electrochemical cell. The substrate, as well as the top microfluidic layer, is made up of a polymer material. The advantages include; (a) disposability from low cost; (b) stable operation range from three-electrode design; (c) fluidic interconnections that provide on line testing capabilities; and (d) transparent substrate which provides for future integration of on-chip optics. The sensor showed a good response and linearity in the chlorine concentration ranging from 0.3 to 1.6 ppm, which applies to common chlorination process for drinking water purification.

  3. Negative chlorine ion chemistry in the upper stratosphere and its application to an artificially created dense electron cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Prasad

    Full Text Available This paper discusses new potential reactions of chlorine-bearing anions (negative ions in the upper stratosphere. These reactions are then applied to the negative-ion chemistry following the injection of an electron cloud of very high density, of the order of 106-107 e- cm-3, in the 40-45-km region. The idea is to evaluate the recently proposed scheme to mitigate ozone depletion by converting the reactive chlorine atoms at these altitudes into Cl- ions which are unreactive towards ozone, i.e., electron scavenging of Cl. We find that the previously neglected photodetachment from Cl- is fast. For an overhead sun, this process may have a rate coefficient of 0.08 s-1 when multiple scattering is included. The rate could be even higher, depending on the ground albedo. Switching reaction between Cl-·H2O and HCl might lead to the formation of Cl-·HCl anion. Possible reactions of Cl-·H2O and Cl-·HCl with O atoms could produce ClO- and Cl-2. The production of ClO- in this manner is significant because Cl- having a high photodetachment rate constant would be regenerated in the very likely reactions of ClO- with O. When these possibilities are considered, then it is found that the chlorine anions may not be the major ions inside the electron cloud due to the rapid photodetachment from Cl-. Furthermore, in such a cloud, there may be the hazard that the Cl--Cl-·H2O-ClO--Cl- cycle amounts to catalytic destruction of two O atoms. Thus, the scheme could be risky if practised in the altitude region where atomic oxygen is an important constituent. Similar conclusions apply even if the ClO- species forms ClO-3 by three-body association with O2

  4. Negative chlorine ion chemistry in the upper stratosphere and its application to an artificially created dense electron cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Prasad

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses new potential reactions of chlorine-bearing anions (negative ions in the upper stratosphere. These reactions are then applied to the negative-ion chemistry following the injection of an electron cloud of very high density, of the order of 106-107 e- cm-3, in the 40-45-km region. The idea is to evaluate the recently proposed scheme to mitigate ozone depletion by converting the reactive chlorine atoms at these altitudes into Cl- ions which are unreactive towards ozone, i.e., electron scavenging of Cl. We find that the previously neglected photodetachment from Cl- is fast. For an overhead sun, this process may have a rate coefficient of 0.08 s-1 when multiple scattering is included. The rate could be even higher, depending on the ground albedo. Switching reaction between Cl-·H2O and HCl might lead to the formation of Cl-·HCl anion. Possible reactions of Cl-·H2O and Cl-·HCl with O atoms could produce ClO- and Cl-2. The production of ClO- in this manner is significant because Cl- having a high photodetachment rate constant would be regenerated in the very likely reactions of ClO- with O. When these possibilities are considered, then it is found that the chlorine anions may not be the major ions inside the electron cloud due to the rapid photodetachment from Cl-. Furthermore, in such a cloud, there may be the hazard that the Cl--Cl-·H2O-ClO--Cl- cycle amounts to catalytic destruction of two O atoms. Thus, the scheme could be risky if practised in the altitude region where atomic oxygen is an important constituent. Similar conclusions apply even if the ClO- species forms ClO-3 by three-body association with O2, instead of reacting with O. It must be emphasized that the present study is speculative at this time, because none of the relevant reactions have been investigated in the laboratory as yet. Nevertheless, it is very safe to say that the scheme of ozone preservation by electron scavenging of the upper stratospheric Cl is

  5. Laser cutting of silicon with the liquid jet guided laser using a chlorine-containing jet media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopman, Sybille; Mayer, Kuno; Fell, Andreas; Mesec, Matthias; Granek, Filip [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    In this paper results for liquid media are presented, which are used the first time as liquid jet for cutting of silicon with laser chemical processing (LCP). The liquids contain a perfluoro-carbon compound as solvent and elemental chlorine as etching agent for silicon. Experiments were performed to investigate its influence on groove form and maximum achieved groove depth. It is shown that with the addition of low-concentration chlorine, the groove depth can already be significantly increased. The groove shape could be changed from a V-profile to a U-profile. Furthermore, an about four times greater groove depth was achieved by applying a saturated chlorine solution compared to groove depths without using chlorine. Finally, a theory is given and discussed to describe the phenomena observed. (orig.)

  6. A self-consistent, multivariate method for the determination of gas-phase rate coefficients, applied to reactions of atmospheric VOCs and the hydroxyl radical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Shaw

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase rate coefficients are fundamental to understanding atmospheric chemistry, yet experimental data are not available for the oxidation reactions of many of the thousands of volatile organic compounds (VOCs observed in the troposphere. Here, a new experimental method is reported for the simultaneous study of reactions between multiple different VOCs and OH, the most important daytime atmospheric radical oxidant. This technique is based upon established relative rate concepts but has the advantage of a much higher throughput of target VOCs. By evaluating multiple VOCs in each experiment, and through measurement of the depletion in each VOC after reaction with OH, the OH + VOC reaction rate coefficients can be derived. Results from experiments conducted under controlled laboratory conditions were in good agreement with the available literature for the reaction of 19 VOCs, prepared in synthetic gas mixtures, with OH. This approach was used to determine a rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 2,3-dimethylpent-1-ene for the first time; k =  5.7 (±0.3  ×  10−11 cm3 molecule−1 s−1. In addition, a further seven VOCs had only two, or fewer, individual OH rate coefficient measurements available in the literature. The results from this work were in good agreement with those measurements. A similar dataset, at an elevated temperature of 323 (±10 K, was used to determine new OH rate coefficients for 12 aromatic, 5 alkane, 5 alkene and 3 monoterpene VOC + OH reactions. In OH relative reactivity experiments that used ambient air at the University of York, a large number of different VOCs were observed, of which 23 were positively identified. Due to difficulties with detection limits and fully resolving peaks, only 19 OH rate coefficients were derived from these ambient air samples, including 10 reactions for which data were previously unavailable at the elevated reaction temperature of T =  323 (±10 K.

  7. Chlorination of tyrosyl residues in peptides and proteins by hypochlorous acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettle, A.J.; Chapman, A.L.P.; Senthilmohan, R.; Vile, G.F.; Chai, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Hypochlorous acid (HOCI) is the major strong oxidant produced by neutrophils. These granulocytic cells use HOCI to kill bacteria and it is also proposed to promote inflammation. Previously, it was shown that HOCI converts tyrosyl residues in proteins to 3-chlorotyrosine. This chlorinated molecule is an ideal biomarker for determining the precise roles HOCI plays in bacterial killing and inflammatory tissue damage. We have investigated the reaction of HOCI with tyrosyl residues in peptides and proteins to establish whether or not chlorinated products in addition to 3-chlorotyrosine are formed. When 200μM HOCI was added to 500μg/ml of bovine serum albumin both 3-chlorotyrosine and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine were formed. The monochlorinated amino acid was the predominant product and its formation was complete by 20 minutes whereas levels of 3,5-dichlorotyrosine continued to increase for up to an hour. Amounts of both chlorinated products increased with increasing concentrations of HOCI until a plateau was reached at about 800μM. At all concentrations of HOCI a substantial amount of the tyrosine that had reacted was unaccounted for as either 3-chlorotyrosine or 3,5-dichlorotyrosine. Similar results were obtained with small peptides containing tyrosine. Sub-stoichiometric concentrations of HOCI converted tyrosyl residues in GGYR to 3-chlorotyrosine. At higher concentrations of HOCI, chlorination was rapid and both 3-chlorotyrosine and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine were produced but they accounted for less than 50% of the products. To identify the additional products of the reaction, we reacted HOCI with tyrosine analogues including N-acetyltyrosine, phydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 4-propylphenol. Separation of the reaction mixture by HPLC revealed that numerous products were formed besides mono and dichlorinated derivatives of the parent compounds. Analysis of the products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry strongly indicated that mono and dichlorinated

  8. Characterization of unknown iodinated disinfection byproducts during chlorination/chloramination using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Yahe; Shi, Quan; Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated disinfection byproducts (I-DBPs), formed from the reaction of disinfectant(s) with organic matter in the presence of iodide in raw water, have recently been focused because of their more cytotoxic and genotoxic properties than their chlorinated or brominated analogues. To date, only a few I-DBPs in drinking water have been identified. In this study, C18 solid phase extraction coupled with electrospray ionization ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize unknown I-DBPs in chloraminated/chlorinated water spiked with iodide and humic substances. In total, 178 formulas for one-iodine-containing products, 13 formulas for two-iodine-containing products, and 15 formulas for one-chlorine and one-iodine-containing products were detected in the chloraminated water sample, while only 9 formulas for one-iodine-containing products and 6 formulas for one-chlorine and one-iodine-containing products were found in the chlorinated water sample. Most I-DBPs have corresponding chlorine-containing analogues with identical CHO compositions. As indicated by the modified aromaticity index (AI mod ), in the C18 extracts, more than 68% of the I-DBPs have aromatic structures or polycyclic aromatic structures. This result demonstrates that the use of chloramination as an alternative disinfection method may lead to the formation of abundant species of I-DBPs in the presence of iodide. Thus, the suitability of adopting chloramination as an alternative disinfection method should be reevaluated, particularly when iodide is present in raw water. - Highlights: • The formulas of 206 iodinated DBPs in chloraminated drinking water were proposed. • More than 68% of the I-DBPs might have aromatic or polycyclic aromatic structures. • Precursors with high aromaticity is preferential to form iodinated DBPs.

  9. Characterization of unknown iodinated disinfection byproducts during chlorination/chloramination using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Juan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang, Yahe; Shi, Quan [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Yang, Min, E-mail: yangmin@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2016-06-01

    Iodinated disinfection byproducts (I-DBPs), formed from the reaction of disinfectant(s) with organic matter in the presence of iodide in raw water, have recently been focused because of their more cytotoxic and genotoxic properties than their chlorinated or brominated analogues. To date, only a few I-DBPs in drinking water have been identified. In this study, C18 solid phase extraction coupled with electrospray ionization ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize unknown I-DBPs in chloraminated/chlorinated water spiked with iodide and humic substances. In total, 178 formulas for one-iodine-containing products, 13 formulas for two-iodine-containing products, and 15 formulas for one-chlorine and one-iodine-containing products were detected in the chloraminated water sample, while only 9 formulas for one-iodine-containing products and 6 formulas for one-chlorine and one-iodine-containing products were found in the chlorinated water sample. Most I-DBPs have corresponding chlorine-containing analogues with identical CHO compositions. As indicated by the modified aromaticity index (AI{sub mod}), in the C18 extracts, more than 68% of the I-DBPs have aromatic structures or polycyclic aromatic structures. This result demonstrates that the use of chloramination as an alternative disinfection method may lead to the formation of abundant species of I-DBPs in the presence of iodide. Thus, the suitability of adopting chloramination as an alternative disinfection method should be reevaluated, particularly when iodide is present in raw water. - Highlights: • The formulas of 206 iodinated DBPs in chloraminated drinking water were proposed. • More than 68% of the I-DBPs might have aromatic or polycyclic aromatic structures. • Precursors with high aromaticity is preferential to form iodinated DBPs.

  10. Separation of chlorinated diastereomers of decarboxy-betacyanins in myeloperoxidase catalyzed chlorinated Beta vulgaris L. extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybraniec, Sławomir; Starzak, Karolina; Szneler, Edward; Pietrzkowski, Zbigniew

    2016-11-15

    A comparative chromatographic evaluation of chlorinated decarboxylated betanins and betanidins generated under activity of hypochlorous acid exerted upon these highly antioxidative potent decarboxylated pigments derived from natural sources was performed by LC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. Comparison of the chromatographic profiles of the chlorinated pigments revealed two different directions of retention changes in relation to the corresponding substrates. Chlorination of all betacyanins that are decarboxylated at carbon C-17 results in an increase of their retention times. In contrast, all other pigments (the non-decarboxylated betacyanins as well as 2-decarboxy- and 15-decarboxy-derivatives) exhibit lower retention after chlorination. During further chromatographic experiments based upon chemical transformation of the related pigments (decarboxylation and deglucosylation), the compounds' structures were confirmed. The elaborated method for determination of chlorinated pigments enabled analysis of a chlorinated red beet root extract that was submitted to the MPO/H 2 O 2 /Cl - system acting under inflammation-like conditions (pH 5). This indicates a promising possibility for measurement of these chlorinated pigments as indicators of specific inflammatory states wherein betacyanins and decarboxylated betacyanins act as hypochlorite scavengers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of aging on chlorinated plasma polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turri, Rafael Gustavo; Amorim, Milena Kowalczuk Manosso; Hadich, Tayan Vieira; Fernandes, Isabela Cristina; Fernandes, Gabriel Ferreira; Rossi, Diego; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Durrant, Steven Frederick, E-mail: steve@sorocaba.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Plasmas Tecnologicos

    2017-07-15

    Thin films deposited from propanol-chloroform-argon mixtures by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at different partial pressures of chloroform in the feed, C{sub Cl}, were characterized after two years of aging and their characteristics compared with their as-deposited properties. Film thickness decreased and surface roughness increased with aging. Surface contact angles also increased with aging for the chlorinated films. For the film deposited with 40% chloroform in the feed the contact angle increased about 14°. Transmission infrared and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the films gain carbonyl and hydroxyl groups and lose chlorine and hydrogen on aging. Chlorination appears to make the films more durable. Delamination was observed for the unchlorinated films. (author)

  12. Investigation of molybdenum pentachloride interaction with chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Vovkotrub, Eh.G.; Strekalovskij, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    In Raman spectra of molybdenum pentachloride solutions in liquid chlorine lines were recorded in case of 397, 312, 410, 217 and 180 cm - 1 vibrations of ν 1 (A 1 '), ν 2 (A 1 '), ν 5 (E'), ν 6 (E') and ν 8 (E'') monomer (symmetry D 3h ) molecules of MoCl 5 . Interaction of molten molybdenum pentachloride with chlorine at increased (up to 6 MPa) pressures of Cl 2 was studied. In Raman spectra of its vapour distillation in liquid chlorine alongside with MoCl 5 lines appearance of new lines at 363 and 272 cm -1 , similar in their frequency to the ones calculated for the vibrations ν 1 (A 1g ) and ν 2 (E g ) of MoCl 6 molecules (symmetry O h ), was observed

  13. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, W.E. Jr.; Laylor, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water

  14. Occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, Maria M; Olsen, Jørn; Villeneuve, Sara

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF).......To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF)....

  15. Blends of caprolactam/caprolactone copolymers and chlorinated polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberda van Ekenstein, G.O.R.; Deuring, H.; ten Brinke, G.; Ellis, T.S.

    The phase behaviour of blends of chlorinated polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and chlorinated PVC with random copolymers of caprolactone and caprolactam has been investigated and the results correlated with a binary interaction model. The known miscibility of polycaprolactone in the

  16. Chlorine isotopes potential as geo-chemical tracers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Pradhan, U.K.; Banerjee, R.

    The potential of chlorine isotopes as tracers of geo-chemical processes of earth and the oceans is highlighted based on systematic studies carried out in understanding the chlorine isotope fractionation mechanism, its constancy in seawater and its...

  17. Effects of the temperature and the irradiation on the behaviour of chlorine 37 in nuclear graphite: consequences on the mobility of chlorine 36 in irradiated graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the studies of the management of irradiated graphite wastes issued from the dismantling of the UNGG French reactors. This work focuses on the behavior of 36 Cl. This radionuclide is mainly issued through the neutron activation of 35 Cl by the reaction 35 Cl(n, γ) 36 Cl, pristine chlorine being an impurity of nuclear graphite, present at the level of some at.ppm. 36 Cl is a long lived radionuclide (about 300,000 years) and is highly soluble in water and mobile in concrete and clay. The solubilization of 36 Cl is controlled by the water accessibility into irradiated graphite pores as well as by factors related to 36 Cl itself such as its chemical speciation and its location within the irradiated graphite. Both speciation and chlorine location should strongly influence its behaviour and need to be taken into account for the choice of liable management options. However, data on radioactive chlorine features are difficult to assess in irradiated graphite and are mainly related to detection sensitivity problems. In this context, we simulated and evaluated the impact of the temperature, the irradiation and the radiolytic oxidation on the chlorine 36 behaviour. In order to simulate the presence of 36 Cl, we implanted 37 Cl into virgin nuclear graphite. Ion implantation has been widely used to study the lattice location, the diffusion and the release of fission and activation products in nuclear materials. Our results on the comparative effects of the temperature and the irradiation show that chlorine occurs in irradiated graphite on temperature and electronic and nuclear irradiation improve this effect. (author)

  18. Complementing approaches to demonstrate chlorinated solvent biodegradation in a complex pollution plume: mass balance, PCR and compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Courbet Christelle; Rivière Agnès; Jeannottat Simon; Rinaldi Sandro; Hunkeler Daniel; Bendjoudi Hocine; De Marsily Ghislain

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the use of different complementing methods (mass balance polymerase chain reaction assays and compound specific stable isotope analysis) to demonstrate the existence and effectiveness of biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in an alluvial aquifer. The solvent contaminated site is an old chemical factory located in an alluvial plain in France. As most of the chlorinated contaminants currently found in the groundwater at this site were produced by local industries at vario...

  19. Chlorin derivatives for potential use in BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, J.; Neumann, M.; Ruf, S.; Gabel, D.

    2000-01-01

    A series of BSH containing alkyl ether homologues of pytropheophorbide a has been prepared. Cellular uptake studies show that is possible to accumulate 2.2 mg of the heptyl ether after 2 h of incubation with a 0.04 mM solution. That means a boron amount of 330 μg per gram cell mass. Cytotoxicity studies allow radiobiological experiments. The patterns of subcellular localisation visualised by fluorescence microscopy and CLSM show that much of the chlorins is located close to the nucleus and in the nucleus membrane. However, no chlorin was found in the nucleus. (author)

  20. Chlorinated tyrosine derivatives in insect cuticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    2004-01-01

    A method for quantitative measurement of 3-monochlorotyrosine and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine in insect cuticles is described, and it is used for determination of their distribution in various cuticular regions in nymphs and adults of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. The two chlorinated tyrosine......, not-yet sclerotized cuticle of adult femur and tibia, the amounts increased rapidly during the first 24 h after ecdysis and more slowly during the next two weeks. Control analyses using stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry have confirmed that the chlorinated tyrosines are not artifacts formed...

  1. Determination of carbon chlorine and fluorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijko, N.I.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques of chlorine and fluorine determination and simultaneous determination of carbon and chlorine in electrolytic uranium dioxide are described. The method of chlorine and fluorine determination is based on their separation during oxide pyrohydrolysis with subsequent spectrophotometric analysis of condensate. Lower determination limits constitute 1 μg for chlorine, 0.5 μg for fluorine. Relative standard deviation when the content of impurities analyzed is 10 -3 % constitutes 0.05-0.07

  2. Investigation of hydrogen and chlorine at the SiO2/Si interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsong, I.S.T.; Monkowski, M.D.; Monkowski, J.R.; Miller, P.D.; Moak, C.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Wintenberg, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon oxides thermally grown in H 2 O, O 2 , HCl/O 2 and Cl 2 /O 2 ambients were analyzed, via 1 H( 19 F,αγ) 16 O nuclear reaction and SIMS, for the presence of hydrogen. In addition, those oxides grown in HCl/O 2 and Cl 2 /O 2 ambients were analyzed with SIMS for the presence of chlorine. The SIMS data show that the hydrogen levels in these oxides were below the limit of detection for nuclear reaction experiments. The 35 Cl + depth-profiles show that chlorine is enriched at the SiO 2 interface for the HCl/O 2 grown oxides while it is more evenly distributed in oxide bulk in the Cl 2 /O 2 grown samples

  3. A Straightforward Route to Tetrachloroauric Acid from Gold Metal and Molecular Chlorine for Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin R. King

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous solutions of tetrachloroauric acid of high purity and stability were synthesised using the known reaction of gold metal with chlorine gas. The straightforward procedure developed here allows the resulting solution to be used directly for gold nanoparticle synthesis. The procedure involves bubbling chlorine gas through pure water containing a pellet of gold. The reaction is quantitative and progressed at a satisfactory rate at 50 °C. The gold(III chloride solutions produced by this method show no evidence of returning to metallic gold over at least twelve months. This procedure also provides a straightforward method to determine the concentration of the resulting solution using the initial mass of gold and volume of water.

  4. Development and performance of charged particle detectors applied to the study of heavy ion reactions; Developpement et performances de detecteurs de particules chargees appliques a l`etude des reactions avec ions lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourde, M; Beaulieu, L; Dore, D; Laforest, R; Pouliot, J; Roy, R; St-Pierre, C [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Physique

    1994-12-31

    The new type of charged particle detector described comprises a thin layer of plastic scintillator over a much thicker CsI(Tl) crystal, an optical guide, and a photomultiplier. Results obtained at Chalk River Laboratories for the identification of particles with Z = 1-6 from the {sup 12}C + {sup 197}Au reaction are shown. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  5. A new formulation of equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Newman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC is a convenient parameter to quantify the effects of halogens (chlorine and bromine on ozone depletion in the stratosphere. We show, discuss, and analyze a new formulation of EESC that now includes the effects of age-of-air dependent fractional release values and an age-of-air spectrum. This EESC can be more appropriately applied to various parts of the stratosphere because of this dependence on mean age-of-air. This new formulation provides quantitative estimates of EESC that can be directly related to inorganic chlorine and bromine throughout the stratosphere. In this paper, we first provide a detailed description of the EESC calculation. We then use this EESC formulation to estimate that human-produced ozone depleting substances will recover to 1980 levels in 2041 in the midlatitudes, and 2067 over Antarctica. These recovery dates are based upon the assumption that the international agreements for regulating ozone-depleting substances are adhered to. In addition to recovery dates, we also estimate the uncertainties and possible problems in the estimated times of recovery. The midlatitude recovery of 2041 has a 95% confidence uncertainty from 2028 to 2049, while the 2067 Antarctic recovery has a 95% confidence uncertainty from 2056 to 2078. The principal uncertainties are from the estimated mean age-of-air and fractional release values, and the assumption that these quantities are time independent. Using other model estimates of age decrease due to climate change, we estimate that midlatitude recovery may be significantly accelerated.

  6. Production and distribution of chlorination by-products in the cooling water system of a coastal power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinnitha, E.; Rajamohan, R.; Venugopalan, V.P.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    Employing chlorination as antifouling agent in cooling water circuits of coastal power plants can lead to the production of chlorination by-products (CBP), mainly due to chlorine's reactions with the organic compounds present in natural seawater. Important among the by products are trihalomethane, haloacetonitriles, halo acetic acids, halo phenols etc., with trihalomethanes (THM) generally being the predominant compounds. The THM species that are commonly observed are chloroform, mono bromodichloromethane, dibromochloro-methane and bromoform. The present work was carried out to understand the production and distribution of chlorination by products (mainly trihalomethanes) in the cooling water systems of Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). Field studies were carried out in which samples collected from the intake, forebay pump house, out fall point and mixing point were analysed for THM using gas chromatograph with electron capture detector. The results showed that bromoform was the dominant THM formed as a result of chlorination, followed by dibromochloromethane. Mono bromodichloromethane and chloroform were not observed in seawater throughout the study period. Moreover, no THM could be detected at the intake point. The total THM values at other stations ranged between 25-250 μgL -1 , the highest values were observed at the process seawater pump outlet and the lowest at the mixing point. The concentrations of CBP's formed were found to be related to the chlorine residuals measured. In addition, laboratory experiments were carried out to understand CBP formation as a function of chlorine dose and contact time. Chlorine doses ranging from 1 to 10 mgL -1 were added to unfiltered seawater and the various THMs formed were analysed after different time intervals. The results confirmed that bromoform was the dominant THM species, followed by dibromochloromethane, as observed in the field studies. As the chlorine doses increased, the other THMs, namely, mono

  7. 21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlorinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyether resins, chlorinated. 177.2430 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2430 Polyether resins, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyether resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use in...

  8. Impacts of the January 2005 solar particle events on middle atmospheric chlorine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Holger; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Notholt, Justus; Maik Wissing, Jan; Kallenrode, May-Britt; Santee, Michelle

    It is well established that solar particle events (SPEs) are sources of significant chemical dis-turbances in the Earth's polar atmosphere. The observed SPE effects on nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen compounds have been investigated in some detail in recent years, and they can be reproduced by atmospheric models using basic parametrizations for NOx and HOx produc-tion as a funtion of the particle impact ionisation. However, there are considerable differences between model predictions and measurements concerning several other trace gases including chlorine species. Two major SPEs occurred on January 17, and January 20, 2005. The latter had an exceptionally hard energy spectrum which caused maximum particle impact ionization at stratospheric altitudes. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on-board the Aura satellite has measured a short-term decrease of HCl in the northern polar region corresponding to January 2005 SPEs. The peak HCl depletion is ˜300 ppt at 35-40 km. This is comparable to the depletion of messopheric HCl observed by the HALOE instrument during the July 2000 SPE. We will present simulation results of the University of Bremen Ion Chemistry (UBIC) model for the SPEs in January 2005 focusing on chlorine species. The simulations indicate that the observed short-term decrease of middle atmospheric HCl is due to a conversion into active chlorine species such as Cl, ClO and HOCl. The magnitude of the observed HCl loss can only be reproduced if reactions of negative chlorine species and the production of O(1 D) from the reaction N(2 D) + O2 are taken into account. The model results will be compared to MLS/Aura data of HCl, HOCl and ClO. Additionally, the impacts of the observed chlorine activation, e.g. on ozone, will be assessed.

  9. Modeling bromide effects on yields and speciation of dihaloacetonitriles formed in chlorinated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccaro, Paolo; Chang, Hyun-shik; Vagliasindi, Federico G A; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-10-15

    This study examined effects of bromide on yields and speciation of dihaloacetonitrile (DHAN) species that included dichloro-, bromochloro- and dibromoacetonitriles generated in chlorinated water. Experimental data obtained using two water sources, varying concentrations and characters of Natural Organic Matter (NOM), bromide concentrations, reaction times, chlorine doses, temperatures and pHs were interpreted using a semi-phenomenological model that assumed the presence of three kinetically distinct sites in NOM (denoted as sites S1, S2 and S3) and the occurrence of sequential incorporation of bromine and chlorine into them. One site was found to react very fast with the chlorine and bromine but its contribution in the DHAN generation was very low. The site with the highest contribution to the yield of DHAN (>70%) has the lowest reaction rates. The model introduced dimensionless coefficients (denoted as φ1(DHAN), φ2(DHAN) and φ3(DHAN)) applicable to the initial DHAN generation sites and their monochlorinated and monobrominated products, respectively. These parameters were used to quantify the kinetic preference to bromine incorporation over that of chlorine. Values of these coefficients optimized for DHAN formation were indicative of the strongly preferential incorporation of bromine into the engaged NOM sites. The same set of φ(i)(DHAN) coefficients could be used to model the speciation of DHAN released from their kinetically different precursors. The dimensionless speciation coefficients φ(i)(DHAN) were determined to be site specific and dependent on the NOM content and character as well as pH. The presented model of DHAN formation and speciation can help quantify in more detail the generation of DHAN and provide more insight necessary for further assessment of their potential health effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Method of identification of unbranched chain reaction with cross termination of chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poluehktov, V.A.; Begishev, I.R.

    1977-01-01

    Gas-phase chlorination of unsymmetrical difluoroethane initiated by gamma quanta of Co 60 has been studied. At decreased temperatures the only hydrogen is replaced by a chlorine atom. Over a wide range of ratios of the initial reagents, the reaction occurs with a chain rupture. An analysis of the kinetics of such a reaction provides a method for identification of an unbranched chain reaction with a cross-rupture of the chain

  11. Feasibility study of self-lubrication by chlorine implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhajdenung, T.; Aizawa, T.; Yoshitake, M.; Mitsuo, A.

    2003-01-01

    Implantation of chlorine into titanium nitride (TiN) coating on the high-speed steel substrate has succeeded in significant reduction of wear rate and friction coefficient for original TiN under dry wear condition. Through precise investigation on the surface reaction in the wear track, in situ formation of oxygen-deficient titanium oxides was found to play a role as a lubricious oxide. In the present paper, this self-lubrication mechanism is further investigated for various wearing conditions. For wide range of sliding speed and normal load in the wear map, the wear volume of a counter material is actually reduced with comparison to the un-implanted TiN. Effect of the ion implantation dose on this self-lubrication mechanism is also studied for practical use. Some comments are made on further application of this self-lubrication to manufacturing

  12. Some considerations in the handling of fluorine and the chlorine fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, R.L. Jr.; Barber, E.J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews many considerations in the safe handling of fluorine and the chlorine fluorides. The physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of the materials are reviewed. Proper choice of materials of construction and materials in contact with the active gases are considered. The survey includes safe practices in design and operation of experiments and processes. Soda lime traps and caustic scrubbing are reviewed for fluorine disposal methods. Finally some explosive reactions and explosive situations are discussed

  13. Shelf-Life of Chlorine Solutions Recommended in Ebola Virus Disease Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qais Iqbal

    Full Text Available In Ebola Virus Disease (EVD outbreaks, it is widely recommended to wash living things (handwashing with 0.05% (500 mg/L chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies with 0.5% (5,000 mg/L chlorine solution. Chlorine solutions used in EVD response are primarily made from powdered calcium hypochlorite (HTH, granular sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC, and liquid sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, and have a pH range of 5-11. Chlorine solutions degrade following a reaction highly dependent on, and unusually sensitive to, pH, temperature, and concentration. We determined the shelf-life of 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions used in EVD response, including HTH, NaDCC, stabilized NaOCl, generated NaOCl, and neutralized NaOCl solutions. Solutions were stored for 30 days at 25, 30, and 35°C, and tested daily for chlorine concentration and pH. Maximum shelf-life was defined as days until initial concentration fell to 30 days. Models were developed for solutions with maximum shelf-lives between 1-30 days. Extrapolating to 40°C, the maximum predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% NaDCC solutions were 0.38 and 0.82 hours, respectively; predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% generated NaOCl solutions were >30 and 5.4 days, respectively. Each chlorine solution type offers advantages and disadvantages to responders, as: NaDCC is an easy-to-import high-concentration effervescent powder; HTH is similar, but forms a precipitate that may clog pipes; and, NaOCl solutions can be made locally, but are difficult to transport. We recommend responders chose the most appropriate source chlorine compound for their use, and ensure solutions are stored at appropriate temperatures and used or replaced before expiring.

  14. Shelf-Life of Chlorine Solutions Recommended in Ebola Virus Disease Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Qais; Lubeck-Schricker, Maya; Wells, Emma; Wolfe, Marlene K; Lantagne, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    In Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreaks, it is widely recommended to wash living things (handwashing) with 0.05% (500 mg/L) chlorine solution and non-living things (surfaces, personal protective equipment, dead bodies) with 0.5% (5,000 mg/L) chlorine solution. Chlorine solutions used in EVD response are primarily made from powdered calcium hypochlorite (HTH), granular sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC), and liquid sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and have a pH range of 5-11. Chlorine solutions degrade following a reaction highly dependent on, and unusually sensitive to, pH, temperature, and concentration. We determined the shelf-life of 0.05% and 0.5% chlorine solutions used in EVD response, including HTH, NaDCC, stabilized NaOCl, generated NaOCl, and neutralized NaOCl solutions. Solutions were stored for 30 days at 25, 30, and 35°C, and tested daily for chlorine concentration and pH. Maximum shelf-life was defined as days until initial concentration fell to pH = 7) had a maximum shelf-life of a few hours, NaDCC solutions (pH = 6) 2 days, generated NaOCl solutions (pH = 9) 6 days, and HTH and stabilized NaOCl solutions (pH 9-11) >30 days. Models were developed for solutions with maximum shelf-lives between 1-30 days. Extrapolating to 40°C, the maximum predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% NaDCC solutions were 0.38 and 0.82 hours, respectively; predicted shelf-life for 0.05% and 0.5% generated NaOCl solutions were >30 and 5.4 days, respectively. Each chlorine solution type offers advantages and disadvantages to responders, as: NaDCC is an easy-to-import high-concentration effervescent powder; HTH is similar, but forms a precipitate that may clog pipes; and, NaOCl solutions can be made locally, but are difficult to transport. We recommend responders chose the most appropriate source chlorine compound for their use, and ensure solutions are stored at appropriate temperatures and used or replaced before expiring.

  15. 21 CFR 177.1610 - Polyethylene, chlorinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Chlorine in Vinyl Chloride Polymers and Copolymers,” which is incorporated by reference (Copies may be..., Philadelphia, PA 19428-2959, or may be examined at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For... percent in plastic articles prepared from polyvinyl chloride and/or from vinyl chloride copolymers...

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... inside diameter manhole, fitted with a cover located above the maximum liquid level and as close as... accessary equipment shall be of a type suitable for use with chlorine and shall be made of metal, corrosion... shutoff valves and with safety relief valves. All valves shall be bolted to the cover or covers specified...

  17. Simultaneous Recovery of Hydrogen and Chlorine from Industrial Waste Dilute Hydrochloric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Paidimarri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of chlorine from byproduct HCl has inevitable commercial importance in industries lately because of insufficient purity or too low concentration to recycle it. Instead it is being neutralized in industries before disposing to meet stringent environmental conditions. Although recovery through catalytic oxidation processes is studied since the 19th century, their high operating conditions combined with sluggish reaction kinetics and low single pass conversions make electrolysis a better alternative. The present motive of this work is to develop a novel electrolysis process which in contrast to traditional processes effectively recovers both hydrogen and chlorine from dilute HCl. For this, an electrolytic cell with an Anionic Exchange Membrane has been designed which only allows the passage of chlorine anions from catholyte to anolyte separating the gasses in a single step. The catholyte can be as low as 3.59 wt% because of fixed anolyte concentration of 1.99 wt% which minimizes oxygen formation. Preliminary results show that the simultaneous recovery of hydrogen and chlorine is possible with high conversion up to 98%. The maximum current density value for 4.96 cm2 membrane surface area (70% active surface area is 2.54 kAm−2, which is comparable with reported commercial processes. This study is expected to be useful for process intensification of the same in a continuous process environment.

  18. A theoretical prediction of thermodynamic properties of chlorine fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Hongchen; Liu, Yan; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Jianying; Liu, Hui; Gong, Xuedong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Correlation between the HOFs obtained from the formation reactions (HOF(FR)) and modified formation reactions (HOF(MFR)). Highlights: → We calculate the heats of formation of nine chlorine fluorides - ClF, ClF 3 , ClF 5 , ClFO, ClFO 2 , ClFO 3 , ClF 3 O 2 , ClF 3 O, and ClF 5 O. → The formation reaction in conjunction with the G3 theory can give accurate results. → ClF, ClF 3 , ClF 5 and ClF 3 O are stable at the room temperature. → ClFO 2 , ClF 3 O 2 and ClF 5 O may be stable at lower temperature. - Abstract: The heats of formation of ClF, ClF 3 , ClF 5 , ClFO, ClFO 2 , ClFO 3 , ClF 3 O 2 , ClF 3 O, and ClF 5 O have been calculated with the help of atomization reaction (AR), formation reaction (FR), and modified formation reaction (MFR) at the G3 and G3X (X = B3, MP2, and MP2B3) levels. FR or MFR in conjunction with the G3 theory can give accurate results close to experimental values. The standard thermodynamic functions of the title compounds have also been evaluated and the results agree well with the available experimental data. Results show that ClF, ClF 3 , ClF 5 and ClF 3 O are stable at the room temperature, and ClFO 2 , ClF 3 O 2 , and ClF 5 O may be stable at lower temperature.

  19. Turbidity and chlorine demand reduction using alum and moringa flocculation before household chlorination in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Kelsey; Lantagne, Daniele; Kotlarz, Nadine; Jellison, Kristen

    2010-03-01

    Over 1.1 billion people in the world lack access to improved drinking water. Diarrhoeal and other waterborne diseases cause an estimated 1.87 million deaths per year. The Safe Water System (SWS) is a household water treatment intervention that reduces diarrhoeal disease incidence among users in developing countries. Turbid waters pose a particular challenge to implementation of SWS programmes; although research shows that a 3.75 mg l(-1) sodium hypochlorite dose effectively treats turbid waters, users sometimes object to the strong chlorine taste and prefer to drink water that is more aesthetically pleasing. This study investigated the efficacy of two locally available chemical water treatments-alum and Moringa oleifera flocculation-to reduce turbidity and chlorine demand at turbidities of 10, 30, 70, 100 and 300 NTU. Both treatments effectively reduced turbidity (alum flocculation 23.0-91.4%; moringa flocculation 14.2-96.2%). Alum flocculation effectively reduced chlorine demand compared with controls at 30, 70, 100 and 300 NTU (p=0.01-0.06). Moringa flocculation increased chlorine demand to the point where adequate free chlorine residual was not maintained for 24 hours after treatment. Alum pretreatment is recommended in waters>or=30 NTU for optimum water disinfection. Moringa flocculation is not recommended before chlorination.

  20. Recovery of uranium by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoto, Shigetoshi; Taki, Tomihiro

    1988-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from uraniferous phosphate by conventional process is generally uneconomic, except that uranium is recovered as a by-product. If an economical process by which uranium is recovered efficiently as a chief product is discovered, uraniferous phosphate will be used effectively as uranium ore. By using chiorination which will be expected to be favorable in comparison with conventional process, the recovery of uranium from uraniferous phosphate has been carried out. The paper describes the reaction machanism and general characteristics of the uranium chiorination, and the research done so for. (author)

  1. Development of a Chlorine Dosing Strategy for Fresh Produce Washing Process to Maintain Microbial Food Safety and Minimize Residual Chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Hung, Yen-Con

    2018-05-22

    The residual free chlorine level in fresh produce wash solution is closely correlated to the chemical and microbial safety of produce. Excess amount of free chlorine can quickly react with organic matters to form hazardous disinfection by-products (DBPs) above EPA-permitted levels, whereas deficiency of residual chlorine in produce wash solution may result in incompletely removing pathogens on produce. The purpose of this study was to develop a chlorine dosing strategy to optimize the chlorine dosage during produce washing process without impacting the microbial safety of fresh produce. Prediction equations were developed to estimate free chlorine needed to reach targeted residual chlorine at various sanitizer pH and organic loads, and then validated using fresh-cut iceberg lettuce and whole strawberries in an automated produce washer. Validation results showed that equations successfully predicted the initial chlorine concentration needed to achieve residual chlorine at 10, 30, 60, and 90 mg/L for both lettuce and strawberry washing processes, with the root mean squared error at 4.45 mg/L. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 reductions only slightly increased on iceberg lettuce and strawberries with residual chlorine increasing from 10 to 90 mg/L, indicating that lowering residual chlorine to 10 mg/L would not compromise the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine-based sanitizer. Based on the prediction equations and E. coli O157:H7 reduction results, a chlorine dosing strategy was developed to help the produce industry to maintain microbial inactivation efficacy without adding excess amount of free chlorine. The chlorine dosing strategy can be used for fresh produce washing process to enhance the microbial food safety and minimize the DBPs formation potential. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Estimation of rate constants of PCB dechlorination reactions using an anaerobic dehalogenation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Filiz; Imamoglu, Ipek

    2017-02-15

    This study aims to estimate anaerobic dechlorination rate constants (k m ) of reactions of individual PCB congeners using data from four laboratory microcosms set up using sediment from Baltimore Harbor. Pathway k m values are estimated by modifying a previously developed model as Anaerobic Dehalogenation Model (ADM) which can be applied to any halogenated hydrophobic organic (HOC). Improvements such as handling multiple dechlorination activities (DAs) and co-elution of congeners, incorporating constraints, using new goodness of fit evaluation led to an increase in accuracy, speed and flexibility of ADM. DAs published in the literature in terms of chlorine substitutions as well as specific microorganisms and their combinations are used for identification of pathways. The best fit explaining the congener pattern changes was found for pathways of Phylotype DEH10, which has the ability to remove doubly flanked chlorines in meta and para positions, para flanked chlorines in meta position. The range of estimated k m values is between 0.0001-0.133d -1 , the median of which is found to be comparable to the few available published biologically confirmed rate constants. Compound specific modelling studies such as that performed by ADM can enable monitoring and prediction of concentration changes as well as toxicity during bioremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Toxic effects of chlorinated cake flour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, H M; Lawrence, G A; Tryphonas, L

    1977-05-01

    Four experiments were conducted using weanling Wistar rats to determine whether chlorinated cake flour or its constituents were toxic. Levels of 0.2 and 1.0% chlorine added to unbleached cake flour significantly (p less than 0.01) reduced growth rate by 20.7 and 85.2% and increased liver weight relative to body weight by 16.7 and 25.3%, respectively. Lipids extracted from flour chlorinated at the same levels had similar effects. Rat chow diets containing 0.2 and 0.6% chlorine in the form of chlorinated wheat gluten reduced growth rate and increased liver weight as a percentage of body weight. A rat chow diet containing 0.2% chlorine as chlorinated flour lipids increased absolute liver weight by 40%, kidney by 20%, and heart by 10% compared to pair-fed controls.

  4. Reaction of carbohydrates with Vilsmeier reagent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thota, Niranjan; Mukherjee, Debaraj; Reddy, Mallepally Venkat

    2009-01-01

    A convenient and efficient method for selective replacement of the primary hydroxyl groups of sugars by chlorine with concomitant O-formylation, compatible with the presence of a variety of functional groups, has been developed using the Vilsmeier-Haack reaction. Sugars having free primary hydrox...

  5. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  6. Mutagenic activities of a chlorination by-product of butamifos, its structural isomer, and their related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoshita, Masahiro; Kosaka, Koji; Endo, Osamu; Asami, Mari; Aizawa, Takako

    2010-01-01

    The mutagenic activities of 5-methyl-2-nitrophenol (5M2NP), a chlorination by-product of butamifos, its structural isomer 2-methyl-5-nitrophenol (2M5NP), and related compounds were evaluated by the Ames assay. The mutagenic activities of 5M2NP and 2M5NP were negative or not particularly high. However, those of their chlorinated derivatives were increased in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 and the overproducer strains YG1026, and YG1029 in the absence and/or presence of a rat liver metabolic activation system (S9 mix), particularly for YG1029. The mutagenic activities of 6-chloro-2-methyl-5-nitrophenol (6C2M5NP) in YG1029 in the absence and presence of S9 mix were 70000 and 110000 revertants mg(-1), respectively. When nitro functions of 6C2M5NP and 4-chloro-5-methyl-2-nitrophenol (4C5M2NP) were reduced to amino functions, their mutagenic activities were markedly decreased. The mutagenic activities of 5M2NP and 4C5M2NP were lower than those of 2M5NP and 6C2M5NP, respectively. Thus, it was shown that substituent position is a key factor for the mutagenic activities of methylnitrophenols (MNPs) and related compounds. The mutagenic activities of the extracts of 2M5NP in chlorination increased early during the reaction time and then decreased. The main chlorination by-product contributing to the mutagenic activities of the extracts of 2M5NP in chlorination was 6C2M5NP. The results of chlorination of 2M5NP suggested that MNPs were present as their dichlorinated derivatives or further chlorination by-products in drinking water. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The influence of chlorine on the fate and activity of alkali metals during the gasification of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struis, R; Scala, C von; Schuler, A; Stucki, S [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Chlorine clearly inhibits the CO{sub 2}-gasification reaction of charcoal at 800{sup o}C. From this and other observations the picture emerges that the reduction in the gasification reactivity of the charcoal is intimately related to the deactivation of the catalytically active alkali metals residing in the wood due to the formation of the chloride salt. It is argued that the heavy metal chlorides will likely transfer the chlorine to the indigenous alkali metals during the pyrolysis stage of the wood. The fate of the thus formed alkali metal chlorides can then be either their removal from the sample (evaporation), or, when present at the gasification stage, re-activation (i.e., de-chlorination) under our gasification conditions. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  8. Shape coexistence in the "island of inversion": Search for the $0^{+}_{2}$ state in $^{32}$Mg applying a two-neutron transfer reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Blazhev, A A; Nardelli, S; Kruecken, R; Voulot, D; Hadinia, B; Kalkuehler, M; Clement, E; Habs, D; Diriken, J V J; Wady, P T; Angus, L J

    2008-01-01

    We aim to study the structure of neutron-rich nuclei in the "island of inversion" where intruder $\\textit{fp}$-orbitals favouring deformed states compete with the normal spherical $\\textit{sd}$-orbitals. In particular, we search for the spherical 0$^{+}_{2}$ state in $^{32}$Mg which should coexist with the deformed ground state but has not been observed so far. We propose to populate this state by a (t,p) two-neutron transfer reaction with a $^{30}$Mg beam at around 2 MeV/u from REX-ISOLDE impinging on a tritium-loaded Ti target. The $\\gamma$-rays are detected by MINIBALL and the particles by our new set-up of segmented Si detectors. The results will shed new light on the breaking of the shell closure at $\\textit{N}$ = 20 in this region.

  9. Comparison of the reactivity of the materials having two different kinds of functional groups by applying hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, H.; Yumoto, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction between m- (or p-) aminobenzoic acid and HTO vapor has been observed in order to estimate the scale of the reactivity of the material. Each rate constant has been obtained by the A''-McKay plot method. Comparing the rate constants, the following three items have been confirmed: (1) the reactivity of both COOH and NH 2 groups increases with temperature; (2) the degree of the effect of the COOH (or NH 2 ) group on the reactivity in m-aminobenzoic acid is larger than that in p-aminobenzoic acid; (3) the A''-McKay plot method is useful in studying the reactivity of the materials not only with one (or the same kinds of) functional group(s), but also with two different kinds of functional groups. (orig.)

  10. Investigation of the 34S(p,γ)35Cl reaction and resonant absorption applied to the excitation of bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The yield curve of the reaction 34 S(p,γ) 35 Cl has been measured over the energy range Esub(p) = 1.95 - 2.91 MeV. Proton energies and strengths of 84 resonances are given. The decay schemes of 38 selected resonances have been studied, and for these branching ratios and spin limits are presented. Angular distributions have been measured at four 34 S(p,γ) 35 Cl resonances, at Esub(x) = 8.63, 8.64, 8.95 and 9.08 MeV, giving spin-parity assignments Jsup(π) = 7/2 - , (3/2,5/2), 3/2 + and 5/2, respectively. Spins and parities have been determined for bound states at Esub(x) = 3.92, 4.11, 4.85 and 5.16 MeV, as Jsup(π) = 3/2 + , 7/2 + , (1/2,3/2), 7/2 - , respectively. Branching and mixing ratios have been obtained for the decay of the states at Esub(x) = 3.92, 4.11, 4.35 and 5.16 MeV. Transition strengths are presented for the first three of these. A resonant absorption experiment at the Esub(p) = 2.79 MeV resonance gives for the resonance width GAMMA = 65 +- 20 eV, and also determines the partial widths GAMMAsub(γ), GAMMAsub(p) and GAMMAsub(p1). The level at 7064.3 +- 0.5 keV in 208 Pb has been excited in a resonant absorption experiment by Doppler shifted γ-radiation from the 34 S(p,γ) 35 Cl reaction at Esub(p) = 1974 keV. (Auth.)

  11. Dispersion of chlorine at seven southern California coastal generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grove, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) determine chlorine concentrations and exposure time gradients of chlorine through seven coastal generating stations and (2) assess the dispersion characteristics of chlorine in the receiving waters. Remarkable variability in chlorine injection concentrations, condenser outlet concentrations, outfall concentrations, and dissipation rates between generating stations and, to a lesser extent, between surveys at the same generating station was found in this chlorine monitoring study. Other than quite consistent low injection and correspondingly low outfall concentrations at San Onofre (a generating station that had one of the more rigorous chlorine control and minimization programs in effect at the time), no recognizable patterns of chlorination could be discerned in the data. Over half of the outfall chlorine surveys had chlorine concentrations below 0.08 mg/L, which is the accepted level of detection for the titrator being used in the surveys. The post-outfall dilution calculations further showed that the chlorine that does enter the receiving water is initially diluted with entrained ambient water at a ratio of 5.2:19.0

  12. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; hide

    2013-01-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (less than 150 micrometers), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of approximately 50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of approximately 0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the

  13. Spectrographic determination of chlorine and fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamin, G.

    1965-04-01

    Experimental conditions have been investigated in order to obtain the highest sensitivity in spectrographic determination of chlorine and fluorine using the Fassel method of excitation in an inert atmosphere. The influence of the nature of the atmosphere, of the discharge conditions and of the matrix material has been investigated. The following results have been established: 1. chlorine determination is definitely possible: a working curve has been drawn between 10 μg and 100 μg, the detection limit being around 5 μg; 2. fluorine determination is not satisfactory: the detection limit is still of the order of 80 μg. The best operating conditions have been defined for both elements. (author) [fr

  14. Optimal intervention strategies for cholera outbreak by education and chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Toni

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the control of infectious diseases in the framework of optimal control approach. A case study on cholera control was studied by considering two control strategies, namely education and chlorination. We distinct the former control into one regarding person-to-person behaviour and another one concerning person-to-environment conduct. Model are divided into two interacted populations: human population which follows an SIR model and pathogen population. Pontryagin maximum principle was applied in deriving a set of differential equations which consists of dynamical and adjoin systems as optimality conditions. Then, the fourth order Runge-Kutta method was exploited to numerically solve the equation system. An illustrative example was provided to assess the effectiveness of the control strategies toward a set of control scenarios.

  15. Phytoscreening of BTEX and chlorinated solvents by tree coring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Trapp, Stefan; Kalisz, Mariusz

    Background/Objectives. Site characterization is often time consuming and a financial burden for the site owners, which raises a demand for rapid and inexpensive screening methods. Tree coring is a phytoscreening method useful for detection of contamination with organic compounds. The method takes...... level in the subsurface and plumes may be mapped. Various plants can be used for phytoscreening, however trees are preferable to smaller plants as their large root system can absorb chemicals from a broader and deeper area. Approach/Activities. In this study tree coring is tested for fuel components...... and chlorinated solvents. The method was applied at various European sites contaminated with PCE/TCE or BTEXs due to former site activities (industrial production, gas stations, air base or gas plant). Tree core samples were collected in fall 2013 and analyzed by HS-GC/MS. Results were used to map the plume...

  16. Chlorine-36 dating of continental evaporites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qi

    1990-01-01

    Teh chloring-36 production, principle and experimental method of 36 Cl dating are briefly described. The ages calculated from the 36 Cl/Cl ratios are generally concordant with those obtained by using 14 C, 230 Th and magnetostratigraphic techniques. It confirms the constancy of the chlorine input ratio over the last million years and implys that 36 Cl can provide accurate dates on continental saline sediments

  17. Microbial transformation of chlorinated aromatics in sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Beurskens, J.E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous contaminants like heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated benzenes (CBs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo- p -dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated furans (PCDFs) are detected in the major rivers in the Netherlands. These contaminants have relatively low aqueous solubilities and bind substantially to the suspended solids in river water. Due to decreasing stream velocities in the downstream stretches of a...

  18. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Gavarini, S.; Martin, P.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, isotopes such as 35 Cl present as impurities in the nuclear fuel are activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of nuclear fuel, the activation products such as 36 Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute to the ''instant release fraction'' as they are likely to migrate in defects and grain boundaries. In order to differentiate diffusion mechanisms due to ''athermal'' processes during irradiation from thermally activated diffusion, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This work concerns the measurement of the thermal diffusion coefficient of chlorine in UO 2 . 37 Cl was implanted at a 10 13 at/cm 2 fluence in depleted UO 2 samples which were then annealed in the 900-1200 C temperature range and finally analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to obtain 37 Cl depth profiles. The migration process appears to be rather complex, involving mechanisms such as atomic, grain boundary, directed diffusion along preferential patterns as well as trapping into sinks before successive effusion. However, using a diffusion model based on general equation of transport, apparent diffusion coefficients could be calculated for 1000 and 1100 C and a mean activation energy of 4.3 eV is proposed. This value is one of the lowest values compared to those found in literature for other radionuclides pointing out a great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO 2 at relatively low temperatures. In order to unequivocally determine the diffusion behaviour of both implanted and pristine chlorine before and after thermal annealing, the structural environment of chlorine in UO 2 was examined using micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (micro-XAS). (orig.)

  19. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. This paper describes a long-term (26 week) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 1) the length of exposure, and it describes three 8-week experiments relating concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 2) their concentration in soil 3) the soil organic matter content and, 4) the degree of chlorination. In the 26-week experiment, the concentration of 1,2,4 - trichlorobenzene in earthworms fluctuated only slightly about a mean of 0.63 ppm (Fig. 1). Although a statistically significant decrease can be demonstrated over the test (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = -0.62 p earthworms showed a cyclical trend that coincided with replacement of the media, and a slight but statistically significant tendency to increase from about 2 to 3 ppm over the 26 weeks (r = 0.55, p earthworms increased as the concentrations in the soil increased (Fig. 2), but leveled off at the highest soil concentrations. The most surprising result of this study was the relatively low concentrations in earthworms compared to those in soils. The average concentration of each of the six isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene in earthworms was only about 1 ppm (Table 2); the isomeric structure did not affect accumulation. The concentration of organic matter in soil had a prominent effect on hexachlorobenzene concentrations in earthworms (Fig. 3). Hexachlorobenzene concentrations decreased steadily from 9.3 ppm in earthworms kept in soil without any peat moss added to about 1 ppm in soil containing 16 or 32% organic matter.

  20. Radioimmunoassay for chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albro, P.W.; Chae, K.; Luster, M.I.; Mckinney, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The invention provides a double-antibody radioimmunoassay method for the determination of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, particularly, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, in environmental samples including animal tissues such as monkey liver and adipose tissues. The limit of detection is approximately 25 picograms for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin. Assuming an appropriate cleanup procedure is used, chlorinated dibenzofurans are the only likely interferences, and these can be distinguished through the use of two antisers of different dibenzo-furan/dibenzodioxin selectivities. The invention includes the preparation of a reproducible antigen, an appropriate radiolabeled hapten, and effective sample extracts. A feature of the assay method is the use of a nonionic detergent (e.g., ''cutscum'' or ''triton x-305'') to solubilize the extremely hydrophobic dibenzo-p-dioxins in a manner permitting their binding by antibodies. The immunoassay is applicable to screening samples in order to minimize the demand for mass spectrometric screening, and to routine monitoring for exposure to known chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins in potentially contaminated environments

  1. Ion exchange and trace element surface complexation reactions associated with applied recharge of low-TDS water in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNab, Walt W.; Singleton, Michael J.; Moran, Jean E.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope data, a dissolved gas tracer study, groundwater age dating, and geochemical modeling were used to identify and characterize the effects of introducing low-TDS recharge water in a shallow aerobic aquifer affected by a managed aquifer recharge project in California's San Joaquin Valley. The data all consistently point to a substantial degree of mixing of recharge water from surface ponds with ambient groundwater in a number of nearby wells screened at depths above 60 m below ground surface. Groundwater age data indicate that the wells near the recharge ponds sample recently recharged water, as delineated by stable O and C isotope data as well as total dissolved solids, in addition to much older groundwater in various mixing proportions. Where the recharge water signature is present, the specific geochemical interactions between the recharge water and the aquifer material appear to include ion exchange reactions (comparative enrichment of affected groundwater with Na and K at the expense of Ca and Mg) and the desorption of oxyanion-forming trace elements (As, V, and Mo), possibly in response to the elevated pH of the recharge water

  2. Atmospheric pressure ionization of chlorinated ethanes in ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Benson, Michael T.

    2015-05-16

    This study investigates the APCI mechanisms associated with chlorinated ethanes in an attempt to define conditions under which unique pseudo-molecular adducts, in addition to chloride ion, can be produced for analytical measurements using IMS and MS. The ionization chemistry of chlorinated compounds typically leads to the detection of only the halide ions. Using molecular modeling, which provides insights into the ion formation and relative binding energies, predictions for the formation of pseudo-molecular adducts are postulated. Predicted structures of the chloride ion with multiple hydrogens on the ethane backbone was supported by the observation of specific pseudo-molecular adducts in IMS and MS spectra. With the proper instrumental conditions, such as short reaction times and low temp.

  3. Chlorination of antimony and its volatilization treatment of waste antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, K.; Enokida, Y.

    2011-01-01

    For the waste antimony-uranium composite oxide catalyst, the chlorination of antimony and its volatilization treatment were proposed, and evaluated using hydrogen chloride gas at 873-1173 K. During the treatment, the weight loss of the composite oxide sample, which resulted from the volatilization of antimony, was confirmed. An X-ray diffraction analysis showed that uranium oxide, U 3 O 8 , was formed during the reaction. After the treatment at 1173 K for 1 h, almost all the uranium contained in the waste catalyst was dissolved by a 3 M nitric acid solution at 353 K within 10 min, although that of the non-treated catalyst was less than 0.1%. It was found that the chlorination and volatilization treatment was effective to separate antimony from the composite oxide catalyst and change uranium into its removable form. (orig.)

  4. Identification of intermediates leading to chloroform and C-4 diacids in the chlorination of humic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Leer, E.W.B. de; Erkelens, Corrie; Galan, L.

    1985-01-01

    The chlorination of terrestrial humic acid was studied at pH 7. 2 with varying chlorine to carbon ratios. The principal products are chloroform, di- and trichloroacetic acid, and chlorinated C-4 diacids. At a high chlorine dose many new chlorination products were detected, among them

  5. Dissection of the mechanism of manganese porphyrin-catalyzed chlorine dioxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umile, Thomas P; Wang, Dong; Groves, John T

    2011-10-17

    Chlorine dioxide, an industrially important biocide and bleach, is produced rapidly and efficiently from chlorite ion in the presence of water-soluble, manganese porphyrins and porphyrazines at neutral pH under mild conditions. The electron-deficient manganese(III) tetra-(N,N-dimethyl)imidazolium porphyrin (MnTDMImP), tetra-(N,N-dimethyl)benzimidazolium (MnTDMBImP) porphyrin, and manganese(III) tetra-N-methyl-2,3-pyridinoporphyrazine (MnTM23PyPz) were found to be the most efficient catalysts for this process. The more typical manganese tetra-4-N-methylpyridiumporphyrin (Mn-4-TMPyP) was much less effective. Rates for the best catalysts were in the range of 0.24-32 TO/s with MnTM23PyPz being the fastest. The kinetics of reactions of the various ClO(x) species (e.g., chlorite ion, hypochlorous acid, and chlorine dioxide) with authentic oxomanganese(IV) and dioxomanganese(V)MnTDMImP intermediates were studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. Rate-limiting oxidation of the manganese(III) catalyst by chlorite ion via oxygen atom transfer is proposed to afford a trans-dioxomanganese(V) intermediate. Both trans-dioxomanganese(V)TDMImP and oxoaqua-manganese(IV)TDMImP oxidize chlorite ion by 1-electron, generating the product chlorine dioxide with bimolecular rate constants of 6.30 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.13 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, at pH 6.8. Chlorine dioxide was able to oxidize manganese(III)TDMImP to oxomanganese(IV) at a similar rate, establishing a redox steady-state equilibrium under turnover conditions. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced during turnover was found to rapidly and reversibly react with manganese(III)TDMImP to give dioxoMn(V)TDMImP and chloride ion. The measured equilibrium constant for this reaction (K(eq) = 2.2 at pH 5.1) afforded a value for the oxoMn(V)/Mn(III) redox couple under catalytic conditions (E' = 1.35 V vs NHE). In subsequent processes, chlorine dioxide reacts with both oxomanganese(V) and oxomanganese(IV)TDMImP to afford chlorate

  6. Features of copper etching in chlorine-argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremov, A.M.; Svettsov, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Chlorine mixtures with inert gases including argon exhibit promise as plasma feed gases for etching metals and semiconductors in the microelectronics industry. It was shown that even strong dilution of reactive gas with an inert gas (up to 80-90% of the latter) has virtually no effect in decreasing the rate of plasma etching of materials such as silicon and gallium arsenide, compared to etching in pure chlorine. The principal reactive species responsible for etching these substrates are chlorine atoms therefore, a possible explanation of the effect is an increase in the rate of bulk generation of chlorine atoms in the presence of argon. In this work the authors studied the influence of argon on the rate of copper etching in chlorine, because copper, unlike the above substrates, reacts effectively not only with the atoms but with the ground-state molecules of chlorine

  7. Kinetic modelling of chlorination of nitrided ilmenite using MATLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar, E-mail: srsivakumar@usm.my; Kwok, Teong Chen, E-mail: ctck@live.com; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul, E-mail: rezanshk@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300, Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    In the present study, chlorination of nitride ilmenite using 2{sup k} factorial design was investigated. The reduction experiments were carried out in a temperature range of 400°C to 500°C, chlorination duration from 1 hour to 3 hours and using different type of carbon reactant. Phases of raw materials and reduced samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ilmenite was reduced to TiO{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub z} through carbothermal and nitridation for further chlorination into titanium tetrachloride. The Design of Experiment analysis suggested that the types of carbon reactant contribute most influence to the extent of chlorination of nitride ilmenite. The extent of chlorination was highest at 500°C with 3 hours chlorination time and carbon nanotube as carbon reactant.

  8. The elimination of chlorinated ethylenes from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehringer, P.; Proksch, E.; Eschweiler, H.; Szinovatz, W.

    1990-01-01

    Sub-ppm quantities of chlorinated ethylenes dissolved in drinking water can be decomposed by high energy radiation very effectively. The decomposition reaction is initiated mainly by OH·radicals originating from water radiolysis. For perchloroethylene the main decomposition products are CO 2 and Cl - , for trichloroethylene beside these formic acid is formed. However, as an undesirable side reaction, a small fraction of the nitrate present in the water is converted to nitrite. The presence of ozone during the irradiation prevents the nitrite formation. Additionally, the radiation catalyzes the conversion of ozone into OH·radicals. Therefore, the effect of the combined treatment is always higher than the sum of the individual effects of ozone and radiation. Compared to ozonation alone the combined treatment results in decomposition rates for per- and trichloroethylene higher by about two powers of ten. Compared to γ-irradiation alone, the doses necessary for a 90 % pollutant reduction could be lowered by factors of about 6 (for perchloroethylene) and 10 (for trichloroethylene) when an initial ozone concentration of 5 ppm is provided. Electron beams are less effective than γ-rays and require higher ozone concentrations if the results of the combined ozone/γ-irradiation treatment should be realized. (author)

  9. The removal of phenols from oily wastewater by chlorine dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Chung-Jung

    1988-01-01

    Treatability studies were performed on oily wastewaters produced by petroleum and canning industries. Chlorine dioxide was used for the removal of phenolic compounds from these oily wastewaters. Most of phenolic compounds can be destroyed by chlorine dioxide within 15 minutes if CI02-to-phenol ratios of higher than 5.0 are provided. Factors such as pH, temperature, and COD have little effect on phenol removal. The effectiveness of chlorine dioxide treatment depends critic...

  10. Simulation of chlorinated water discharges from power plants on estuaries and rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eraslan, A.H.; Lietzke, M.H.; Fischer, S.K.; Kalmaz, E.V.

    1977-01-01

    The fast-transient (tidal-transient) one-dimensional discrete-element chemical transport model and its associated computer code CHMONE were applied to study the effects of chlorinated water discharges from power plants on tidal estuaries and controlled rivers. The mathematical model has the capability to predict simultaneously the hydrodynamic, thermal, and chemical composition of water as one-dimensional time-dependent distributions

  11. Inactivation of viruses in municipal effluent by chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Hajenian, H. G.; Butler, M.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of pH and temperature on the efficiency of chlorine inactivation of two unrelated picornaviruses in a typical urban wastewater effluent was examined. Temperature, unlike pH, had relatively little effect on the rate of inactivation. The pH effect was complex and the two viruses differed. The f2 coliphage was more sensitive to chlorine at low pH, but at all values there was a threshold above which additional chlorine resulted in very rapid inactivation. The amount of chlorine requ...

  12. Chlorine isotope effects from isotope ratio mass spectrometry suggest intramolecular C-Cl bond competition in trichloroethene (TCE) reductive dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretnik, Stefan; Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Löffler, Frank; Elsner, Martin

    2014-05-20

    Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (bio)chemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE) dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i) of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii) of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were -19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE) and -12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE) (95% confidence intervals). Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (-5.0‰ ± 0.1‰) and TCE (-3.6‰ ± 0.2‰). In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by -16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error)) than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of -2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of -6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals). A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect). These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition). This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I) or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  13. Chlorine Isotope Effects from Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Suggest Intramolecular C-Cl Bond Competition in Trichloroethene (TCE Reductive Dehalogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Cretnik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated ethenes are prevalent groundwater contaminants. To better constrain (biochemical reaction mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, the position-specificity of reductive trichloroethene (TCE dehalogenation was investigated. Selective biotransformation reactions (i of tetrachloroethene (PCE to TCE in cultures of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1; and (ii of TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE in cultures of Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ were investigated. Compound-average carbon isotope effects were −19.0‰ ± 0.9‰ (PCE and −12.2‰ ± 1.0‰ (TCE (95% confidence intervals. Using instrumental advances in chlorine isotope analysis by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry, compound-average chorine isotope effects were measured for PCE (−5.0‰ ± 0.1‰ and TCE (−3.6‰ ± 0.2‰. In addition, position-specific kinetic chlorine isotope effects were determined from fits of reactant and product isotope ratios. In PCE biodegradation, primary chlorine isotope effects were substantially larger (by −16.3‰ ± 1.4‰ (standard error than secondary. In TCE biodegradation, in contrast, the product cis-DCE reflected an average isotope effect of −2.4‰ ± 0.3‰ and the product chloride an isotope effect of −6.5‰ ± 2.5‰, in the original positions of TCE from which the products were formed (95% confidence intervals. A greater difference would be expected for a position-specific reaction (chloride would exclusively reflect a primary isotope effect. These results therefore suggest that both vicinal chlorine substituents of TCE were reactive (intramolecular competition. This finding puts new constraints on mechanistic scenarios and favours either nucleophilic addition by Co(I or single electron transfer as reductive dehalogenation mechanisms.

  14. Effects of UV irradiation and UV/chlorine co-exposure on natural organic matter in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zaili; Yang, Xin; Xu, Yiyue; Liang, Yongmei

    2012-01-01

    The effects of co-exposure to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (with either low- or medium-pressure UV lamps) and free chlorine (chloramine) at practical relevant conditions on changes in natural organic matter (NOM) properties were investigated using four waters. The changes were characterized using the specific disinfection by-product formation potential (SDBPFP), specific total organic halogen formation potential (STOXFP), differential UV absorbance (∆UVA), and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The results for exposure to UV irradiation alone and for samples with no exposure were also obtained. The SDBPFPs in all UV-irradiated NOM waters observed were higher than those of non-irradiated samples. UV irradiation led to increases in STOXFPs as a result of chlorination, but no changes, or only small decreases, from chloramination. UV irradiation alone led to positive ∆UVA spectra of the four NOM waters; co-exposure to UV and chlorine gave larger negative ∆UVA spectra than those obtained by chlorine exposure alone. No obvious changes in SEC results were observed for samples only irradiated with UV light; co-exposure gave no detectable changes in the abundances of small fractions for exposure to chlorine only. Both UV photooxidation and photocatalytic oxidation appear to affect the reactivity of the NOM toward subsequent chlorination, and the magnitude of the changes is generally greater for medium-pressure lamps than for low-pressure lamps. These results suggest that applying UV disinfection technology to a particular source may not always be disinfection by-product-problem-free, and the interactions between UV light, chlorine, and NOM may need to be considered. - Highlights: ► We discussed the effects of co-exposure to UV light and chlorine on properties of natural organic matters in waters. ► UV irradiation led to increases in SDBPFP and STOXFP of NOM waters from chlorination. ► We suggest that applying an UV disinfection technology to a particular

  15. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  16. Comparison of Phytoscreening and Direct-Push- Based Site Investigation at a Rural Megasite Contaminated with Chlorinated Ethenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Arno; Holm, Olaf; Trapp, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    areas in particular. Here we compare two site screening techniques that can be applied quickly at relatively low cost, namely Direct Push (DP)-based groundwater sampling and tree core sampling. The effectiveness of both methods is compared for a rural megasite contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons...

  17. Identification of molecules in graphite furnace by laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: sulfur and chlorine containing compounds

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Raseleka, RM

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An electro thermal vaporizer (ETV) coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) with laser ionization (LI) was applied to the identification of molecules from sulphur and chlorine matrices in the furnace. An interface was developed...

  18. DBP formation from degradation of DEET and ibuprofen by UV/chlorine process and subsequent post-chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdam, Ehsan; Xiang, Yingying; Sun, Jianliang; Shang, Chii; Yang, Xin; Fang, Jingyun

    2017-08-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) from the degradation of N,N-diethyl-3-methyl benzoyl amide (DEET) and ibuprofen (IBP) by the ultraviolet irradiation (UV)/chlorine process and subsequent post-chlorination was investigated and compared with the UV/H 2 O 2 process. The pseudo first-order rate constants of the degradation of DEET and IBP by the UV/chlorine process were 2 and 3.1 times higher than those by the UV/H 2 O 2 process, respectively, under the tested conditions. This was due to the significant contributions of both reactive chlorine species (RCS) and hydroxyl radicals (HO) in the UV/chlorine process. Trichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloro-2-propanone and dichloroacetic acid were the major known DBPs formed after 90% of both DEET and IBP that were degraded by the UV/chlorine process. Their yields increased by over 50% after subsequent 1-day post-chlorination. The detected DBPs after the degradation of DEET and IBP comprised 13.5% and 19.8% of total organic chlorine (TOCl), respectively, and the proportions increased to 19.8% and 33.9% after subsequent chlorination, respectively. In comparison to the UV/H 2 O 2 process accompanied with post-chlorination, the formation of DBPs and TOCl in the UV/chlorine process together with post-chlorination was 5%-63% higher, likely due to the generation of more DBP precursors from the attack of RCS, in addition to HO. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Pulse radiolysis investigations on the oxidation of bilirubin by chlorinated peroxyl radicals (Preprint No. RC.18)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Hari; Gopinathan, C.

    1989-01-01

    Chlorinated peroxyl radicals were observed to oxidize bilirubin. The rate constants, estimated from the formation kinetics of bilirubin cation, were observed to decrease with decrease in the chlorine substitution of various chlorinated peroxyl radicals. (author)

  20. Analysis of a novel chlorine recycling process based on anhydrous HCl oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Isai Gonzalez; Vidaković-Koch, Tanja; Kuwertz, Rafael; Kunz, Ulrich; Turek, Thomas; Sundmacher, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Gas phase HCl electrolysis combined with oxygen reduction reaction (oxygen depolarized cathode) for chlorine production. • Determination of potential losses in half-cell measurements under technically relevant conditions. • Optimization of gas diffusion electrodes with respect to Nafion and catalyst loadings. • The optimal Nafion content in the catalyst layer for HCl oxidation is much higher than for other gas phase reactions, such as the oxygen reduction in the cathode. • Nafion improves catalyst dispersion, but catalyst utilization depends on the diffusion and absorption properties of the educts in the ionomer phase. - Abstract: A novel process for the recycling of chlorine based on the gaseous HCl oxidation on gas diffusion electrodes has been investigated. The cathodic and anodic reactions have been analyzed separately as half-cell reactions in a cyclone flow cell and optimized regarding catalyst as well as ionomer loadings. For the anodic hydrogen chloride oxidation, an optimal value of ca. 60 wt% Nafion has been found, whereas for the cathodic oxygen reduction a value below 37 wt% has been obtained. This discrepancy was mainly attributed to the different absorption and transport properties of HCl in Nafion compared to oxygen. The main potential losses in the reactor were identified at the cathode

  1. Recoil Reactions in Neutron-Activation Analysis. The Szilard-Chalmers Effect Applied in the Analysis of Biological Samples; II. Transfer of Activities from Container Material to Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D

    1965-01-15

    The present investigation consists of two parts. The one part concerns the application of the Szilard-Chalmers effect in the separation of activities from neutron-irradiated biological material. The nuclides As-76, Au-198, Br-82, Ca-47, Cd-115, Cl-38, Co-60, Cr-51, Cs-134, Cu-64, Fe-59, Mg-27, Mo-99, Na-24, P-32, Rb-86, Se-75 and Zn-65 were extracted from either liver tissue, whole blood or muscle tissue. The extractions were made in water, 0.1 N HCl, 1 N HCl or conc. HCl respectively. The nuclides belonging to the alkali metals together with Br and Cl, were found present in the water and hydrochloric extracts to 96 per cent or more. In the conc. HCl extracts, the greater part of the nuclides were recovered to 90 per cent or more. The enrichment of the different nuclides obtained in the Szilard-Chalmers process was investigated as follows. After extraction of the nuclides from the irradiated material the solution obtained was divided into two parts, one of which was reactivated. The specific activities of the nuclides in the two solutions were then compared, thus giving the enrichment factor In one case, the residue of organic material after extraction was reactivated and the activity compared to the initial one. The effect of dilution together with the application of short irradiation periods favouring higher yield was investigated in the separation of Fe-59 from whole blood samples irradiated in frozen conditions. The other part of the investigation concerns an estimation of the amounts of the activities originating from polyethylene and quartz containers transferred to container surface due to the recoil effect in the thermal neutron-capture process, thus causing contamination of the sample. The universal range-energy relationship given by Lindhard and Scharff has been applied in these calculations. As regards containers with impurities in the ppm region, the amounts of activities transferred owing to this effect were found to be quite negligible. However, when

  2. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  3. Quantification of chlorine in zirconium oxide and biological samples by instrumental NAA utilizing PCF of Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, Amol D.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Acharya, R.; Balaji Rao, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Recently studies on chlorine contents in various samples are being pursued due to its corrosive nature. Chlorine present at trace level in various finished products as well as powder is used as a raw material for production of different types of zircaloys used as structural materials in nuclear technology. As a part of quality assurance program, it is necessary to quantify chlorine accurately with suitable and simple technique. In the present work we have applied instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) utilizing its short-lived activation product ( 38 Cl, 37 min, 1642 and 2168 keV) for its estimation. Pneumatic Carrier Facility (PCF) of Dhruva reactor, BARC was used sample irradiation of zirconium oxide dry powder, synthetic wax and IAEA RMs 1515 (Apple leaves) and Lichen 336. (author)

  4. Skeletal and chlorine effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts of chlorinated polycyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa V.E.U.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish a comparative analysis of chemical shifts caused by ring compression effects or by the presence of a chlorine atom on strained chlorinated carbons, a series of the chlorinated and dechlorinated polycyclic structures derived from "aldrin" (5 and "isodrin" (14 was studied. Compounds were classified in four different groups, according to their conformation and number of ring such as: endo-exo and endo-endo tetracyclics, pentacyclics and hexacyclics. The 13C chemical shift comparison between the chlorinated and dechlorinated compounds showed that when C-9 and C-10 are olefinic carbons, it occurs a shielding of 0.5-2.4 ppm for endo-endo tetracyclics and of 4.7-7.6 ppm for endo-exo tetracyclic. The chemical shift variation for C-11 reaches 49-53 ppm for endo-exo and endo-endo tetracyclics, 54 ppm for pentacyclic and 56-59 ppm for hexacyclic compounds. From these data, it was possible to observe the influence of ring compression on the chemical shifts.

  5. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  6. A current driven capacitively coupled chlorine discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shuo; Gudmundsson, J T

    2014-01-01

    The effect of driving current, driving frequency and secondary electrons on capacitively coupled chlorine discharge is systematically investigated using a hybrid approach consisting of a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation and a volume-averaged global model. The driving current is varied from 20 to 80 A m −2 , the driving frequency is varied from 13.56 to 60 MHz and the secondary electron emission coefficient is varied from 0.0 to 0.4. Key plasma parameters including electron energy probability function, electron heating rate, ion energy and angular distributions are explored and their variations with control parameters are analyzed and compared with other discharges. Furthermore, we extend our study to dual-frequency (DF) capacitively coupled chlorine discharge by adding a low-frequency current source and explore the effect of the low-frequency source on the discharge. The low-frequency current density is increased from 0 to 4 A m −2 . The flux of Cl 2 + ions to the surface increases only slightly while the average energy of Cl 2 + ions to the surface increases almost linearly with increasing low-frequency current, which shows possible independent control of the flux and energy of Cl 2 + ions by varying the low-frequency current in a DF capacitively coupled chlorine discharge. However, the increase in the flux of Cl + ions with increasing low-frequency current, which is mainly due to the increased dissociation fraction of the background gas caused by extra power supplied by the low-frequency source, is undesirable. (paper)

  7. Bromate formation from the oxidation of bromide in the UV/chlorine process with low pressure and medium pressure UV lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jingyun; Zhao, Quan; Fan, Chihhao; Shang, Chii; Fu, Yun; Zhang, Xiangru

    2017-09-01

    When a bromide-containing water is treated by the ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine process, hydroxyl radicals (HO) and halogen radicals such as Cl or Br are formed due to the UV photolysis of free halogens. These reactive species may induce the formation of bromate, which is a probable human carcinogen. Bromate formation in the UV/chlorine process using low pressure (LP) and medium pressure (MP) lamps in the presence of bromide was investigated in the present study. The UV/chlorine process significantly enhanced bromate formation as compared to dark chlorination. The bromate formation was elevated with increasing UV fluence, bromide concentration, and pH values under both LP and MP UV irradiations. It was significantly enhanced at pH 9 compared to those at pH 6 and 7 with MP UV irradiation, while it was slightly enhanced at pH 9 with LP UV. The formation by UV/chlorine process started with the formation of free bromine (HOBr/OBr - ) through the reaction of chlorine and bromide, followed by a subsequent oxidation of free bromine and formation of BrO and bromate by reacting with radicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of direct injection nebulizer and desolvating microconcentric nebulizer for analysis of chlorine-, bromine- and iodine-containing compounds by reversed phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B.P.; Gammelgaard, Bente; Hansen, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    the direct injection nebulizer at flow rates of 25 and 50 mul min(-1), the influence of 0-50% methanol and 0-25% acetonitrile on the sensitivity was studied. For chlorine and bromine, the relative sensitivity decreased with increasing amounts of organic solvent. For iodine, the relative sensitivity reached...... structure. Many chlorine-, bromine-, and iodine-containing compounds were partially lost in the desolvating unit. For those chlorine- and iodine-containing compounds that were not lost, the sensitivity was independent of methanol concentration in the solvent when a 0-100% methanol gradient was applied......With the purpose of finding ways to combine micro-bore reversed phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection for analysis of drug substances containing chlorine, bromine and iodine, the suitability of a direct injection nebulizer and an Aridus desolvating microconcentric nebulizer was compared. Using...

  9. The photochemistry and kinetics of chlorine compounds important to stratospheric mid-latitude ozone destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Leah

    1997-09-01

    The catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone via chlorinated species was first proposed in the 1970's. Since that time a decline in column ozone abundance in the polar regions as well as at mid-latitudes has been observed. Much of this reduction has been attributed to the increases in anthropogenic chlorine compounds such as CFCs. This study summarizes experimental results obtained using pulsed-photolysis resonance fluorescence and pulsed- photolysis long-path absorption methods to study processes important to chlorine-catalyzed ozone destruction: the quantum yields of the products in the dissociation of ClONO2 and the reactions of free radicals with ClONO2 and ClO. The quantum yields for the production of O, Cl and ClO from ClONO2 were studied at specific laser wavelengths (193, 222, 248, and 308 nm). Cl and ClO yields were comparable at nearly all the wavelengths, expect for 193 nm, where the O atom yield was appreciable. The yields at 308 nm (a wavelength available in the stratosphere) were 0.64 ± 0.17 for Cl, 0.37 ± 0.18 for ClO and product yield for the former reaction, previously unreported, was determined to be ~1. The kinetics of the reaction of O atoms with ClO were measured using a new experimental system built specifically to investigate such radical-radical reactions. A slight negative temperature dependence (E/B = -90 ± 30) was observed over the temperature range (227-363 K). From the measured Arrhenius equation the rate constant at 240 K is 4.1 × 10-11 cm3molecule-1s-1 which is in excellent agreement (l.4% greater) with the currently recommended value. This observation is significant, since this reaction is the rate limiting the dominate chlorine catalytic cycle that destroys O3 near 40 km. To analyze the implications of the kinetic and photochemical information from this work, a box model was constructed. The vertical profile of ozone concentrations and loss rates calculated by this simple model compare well with atmospheric measurements and

  10. Biological Chlorine Cycling in Arctic Peat Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlamal, J. E.; Raab, T. K.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Soils of the Arctic tundra near Barrow, Alaska are waterlogged and anoxic throughout most of the profile due to underlying permafrost. Microbial communities in these soils are adapted for the dominant anaerobic conditions and are capable of a surprising diversity of metabolic pathways. Anaerobic respiration in this environment warrants further study, particularly in the realm of electron cycling involving chlorine, which preliminary data suggest may play an important role in arctic anaerobic soil respiration. For decades, Cl was rarely studied outside of the context of solvent-contaminated sites due to the widely held belief that it is an inert element. However, Cl has increasingly become recognized as a metabolic player in microbial communities and soil cycling processes. Organic chlorinated compounds (Clorg) can be made by various organisms and used metabolically by others, such as serving as electron acceptors for microbes performing organohalide respiration. Sequencing our arctic soil samples has uncovered multiple genera of microorganisms capable of participating in many Cl-cycling processes including organohalide respiration, chlorinated hydrocarbon degradation, and perchlorate reduction. Metagenomic analysis of these soils has revealed genes for key enzymes of Cl-related metabolic processes such as dehalogenases and haloperoxidases, and close matches to genomes of known organohalide respiring microorganisms from the Dehalococcoides, Dechloromonas, Carboxydothermus, and Anaeromyxobacter genera. A TOX-100 Chlorine Analyzer was used to quantify total Cl in arctic soils, and these data were examined further to separate levels of inorganic Cl compounds and Clorg. Levels of Clorg increased with soil organic matter content, although total Cl levels lack this trend. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was used to provide information on the structure of Clorg in arctic soils, showing great diversity with Cl bound to both aromatic and alkyl groups

  11. Diversity and Variability of Geoporphyrins and Chlorins During Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junium, C. K.; Mawson, D. H.; Arthur, M. A.; Keely, B. J.

    2005-12-01

    Geoporphyrins and chlorins are biomarkers that result from the transformation of tetrapyrroles including chlorophylls, bacteriochlorophylls and haems. The transformation reactions are initiated in the water column and sediments during early diagenesis and are dependent on a range of variables including, but not limited to water column redox state, burial conditions, and time. Geoporphyrins and chlorins can retain structural characteristics that allow unambiguous assignment of precursor structures and source organisms making their utility in paleoenvironmental studies extraordinary where such information is preserved. Black shales from Oceanic Anoxic Event II (OAE II, Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary) of ODP Leg 207 present a unique opportunity for investigating the variations in the tetrapyrrole record in very well preserved sediments across a globally significant biogeochemcal event. Identification and structural assignment of tetrapyrroles in this study were achieved by a combination of high-performance-liquid-chromatography (HPLC)/diode-array-detection (DAD) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSn) on acetone extracts. Stratigraphic variations in geoporphyrin compounds occur through OAE II. The relative proportions of metallated vs. free-base (metal free) porphyrins vary throughout the sequence, favoring free-base porphyrins during the height of the anoxic event. The greater proportion of free-base porphyrins associated with more extensive reducing conditions is consistent with metal ion limitation during euxinia. For example, vanadyl porphyrins become much less abundant during the peak of the event suggesting that the oceanic inventory of V was sequestered in black shales and unavailable. Preliminary characterization of the tetrapyrroles through OAE II of ODP Leg 207, Demerara Rise, reveals a wide range of geoporphyrins and chlorins. Notably, positive identification of chlorins, the geologically unstable intermediates between highly reactive

  12. Removal of chlorite by reaction with ferrous iron

    OpenAIRE

    Iatrou, Angela

    1991-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as an oxidant and/or disinfectant for drinking water treatment has been an alternative considered when utilities seek to control trihalomethane concentrations. However, concern regarding residual concentrations of chlorite and chlorate have resulted in limitations on applied chlorine dioxide dosages. This study describes the use of ferrous iron as a possible reducing agent for the elimination of residual chlorite from drinking water.

  13. Chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic VOC decomposition in air mixture by using electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Sun Yongxia; Bulka, S.; Zimek, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, which are emitted from coal power station and waste incinerators, are very harmful to the environment and human health. Recent studies show that chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons are suspected to be the precursors of dioxin's formation. Dioxin's emission into atmosphere will cause severe environmental problems by ecology contamination. l,4-dichlorobenzene(l,4-DCB) and cis-dichloroethylene(cis-DCE) were chosen as representative chlorinated aromatic and aliphatic compounds, respectively. Their decomposition was investigated by electron beam irradiation. The experiments were carried out 'in batch' system. It is found that over 97% cis-DCE is decomposed having an initial concentration of 661 ppm. G-values of cis-DCE decomposition vary from 10 to 28 (molecules/100 eV) for initial concentration of 270-1530 ppm cis-DCE. The decomposition is mainly caused by secondary electron attachment and Cl addition reactions. Comparing with cis-DCE, 1,4-DCB decomposition needs higher absorbed dose. G-value of 1,4-DCB is below 4 molecules/100 eV

  14. Crossed molecular beam studies of unimolecular reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buss, R.J.

    1979-04-01

    The study of seven radical-molecule reactions using the crossed molecular beam technique with supersonic nozzle beams is reported. Product angular and velocity distributions were obtained and compared with statistical calculations in order to identify dynamical features of the reactions. In the reaction of chlorine and fluorine atoms with vinyl bromide, the product energy distributions are found to deviate from predictions of the statistical model. A similar effect is observed in the reaction of chlorine atoms with 1, 2 and 3-bromopropene. The reaction of oxygen atoms with ICl and CF 3 I has been used to obtain an improved value of the IO bond energy, 55.0 +- 2.0 kcal mol -1 . In all reactions studied, the product energy and angular distributions are found to be coupled, and this is attributed to a kinematic effect of the conservation of angular momentum

  15. Bacterial oxidation of low-chlorinated compounds under anoxic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons belong to the most frequently encountered contaminants in soil and groundwater. Many of them were found to be toxic and recalcitrant, which causes a potential threat to the environment. Therefore, it is of great importance that sites contaminated with chlorinated

  16. 78 FR 66767 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ...)] Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... reason of imports from China and Japan of chlorinated isocyanurates, provided for in subheadings 2933.69... (LTFV) from Japan and subsidized by the Government of China.\\2\\ \\1\\ The record is defined in sec. 207.2...

  17. Chlorine-containing natural compounds in higher plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    More than 130 chlorine-containing compounds have been isolated from higher plants and ferns; about half are polyacetylenes, thiophenes and sesquiterpene lactones from the Asteraceae. A chlorinated chlorophyll may be an important part of photosystem 1. High biological activity is found in 4...

  18. Dense chlorinated solvents and other DNAPLs in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, K.

    1996-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Pankow,J.F. & Cherry,J.A.: Dense chlorinated solvents and other DNAPLs in groundwater. Waterloo Press, Portland, Oregon, USA, 1996......Anmeldelse af Pankow,J.F. & Cherry,J.A.: Dense chlorinated solvents and other DNAPLs in groundwater. Waterloo Press, Portland, Oregon, USA, 1996...

  19. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Qiao, Juan, E-mail: qjuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu, Yun, E-mail: luyun@tsinghua.edu.cn [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-02-13

    Highlights: • Chlorination is effective to reduce the inflammation inducing capacity of LPS in lung. • LAL-detected endotoxin activity is not correlated to the potency of inflammation induction. • Alkyl chain of LPS was chlorinated in chlorination process. • LPS aggregate size decreases after chlorination. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies.

  20. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Chlorination is effective to reduce the inflammation inducing capacity of LPS in lung. • LAL-detected endotoxin activity is not correlated to the potency of inflammation induction. • Alkyl chain of LPS was chlorinated in chlorination process. • LPS aggregate size decreases after chlorination. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies.

  1. Detecting chlorinated hydrocarbon residues: Rachel Carson's villains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Anthony S

    2012-07-01

    In 1962, Rachel Carson's Silent Spring drew the public's attention to the deleterious effects of chlorinated hydrocarbons employed as economic poisons in agriculture. However, she did not discuss how their residues could be routinely identified and quantified. In part, this was because the introduction of instruments for use in environmental analysis had only just begun, and she was probably unaware of their existence. The development of the instrumental methods began in industry, particularly at Dow and Shell, in the mid-1950s. Dow scientists, by combining mass spectrometry with gas chromatography, developed the most powerful technique, then and now, for the separation, quantitation and identification of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Shell scientists were no less innovative, particularly with the application of highly sensitive gas chromatography detectors to trace analysis. The first of these detectors, the electron capture detector, was invented by James Lovelock at the National Institute of Medical Research, North London, at the end of the 1950s. Around the same time, Dale Coulson in the USA developed his microcoulometric detector.

  2. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in a pelagic community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, D.; Fowler, S.W.

    1976-01-01

    For several years data have been accruing on the distribution of chlorinated hydrocarbon pollutants in marine ecosystems. An overall picture of ambient levels in biota, water and sediments is now emerging however, despite the vast amount of data collected to date, questions still arise as to whether certain pollutants such as chlorinated hydrocarbons are indeed magnified through the marine food web. Evidence both for and against trophic concentration of PCB and DDT compounds has been cited. The answer to this question remains unclear due to lack of adequate knowledge on the relative importance of food and water in the uptake of these compounds as well as the fact that conclusions are often confounded by comparing pollutant concentrations in successive links in the food chain sampled at different geographical locations and/or at different points in time. The situation is further complicated by complex prey-predator relationships that exist in many marine communities. In the present study we have tried to eliminate some of these problems by examining PCB and DOT concentrations in species belonging to a relatively well-defined pelagic food chain sampled at one point in space and time

  3. Bioremediation of chlorinated solvents and diesel soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huismann, S.S.; Peterson, M.A.; Jardine, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Army, in a cooperative effort with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and its cooperator, ENSR, performed an innovative enhanced bioremediation project at Fort Gillem in Atlanta, Georgia. The objective of the project was to remediate six hundred cubic yards of soil affected by a mixture of chlorinated compounds and petroleum hydrocarbons which posed a threat to uppermost groundwater and private drinking water wells. ENSR completed a demonstration project to measure the effects of bioremediation on both chlorinated compounds (primarily TCE) and petroleum hydrocarbons (number-sign 2 diesel). Contaminated soil was placed on top of a bermed polyethylene liner to construct an ex-situ biovault. Nutrients were added to the soil as it was loaded onto the liner. Contaminated soil was also used to construct a control vault. A methane barrier cover was placed over both piles. The cover was designed to prevent short circuiting of induced airflow in and around the enhanced pile, and to prevent the release of fugitive emissions from either pile

  4. Effect of temperature and pH on dehalogenation of total organic chlorine, bromine and iodine in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusallout, Ibrahim; Rahman, Shamimur; Hua, Guanghui

    2017-11-01

    Disinfection byproduct (DBP) concentrations in drinking water distribution systems and indoor water uses depend on competitive formation and degradation reactions. This study investigated the dehalogenation kinetics of total organic chlorine (TOCl), bromine (TOBr) and iodine (TOI) produced by fulvic acid under different pH and temperature conditions, and total organic halogen (TOX) variations in a treated drinking water under simulated distribution system and heating scenarios. TOX dehalogenation rates were generally in the order of TOI ≅ TOCl(NH 2 Cl) > TOBr > TOCl(Cl 2 ). The half-lives of different groups of TOX compounds formed by fulvic acid varied between 27 and 139 days during incubation at 20 °C and 0.98-2.17 days during heating at 55 °C. Base-catalyzed reactions played a major role in TOX degradation as evidenced by enhanced dehalogenation under high pH conditions. The results of heating of a treated water in the presence of residuals showed that TOX concentrations of chlorinated samples increased rapidly when chlorine residuals were present and then gradually decreased after chlorine residuals were exhausted. The final TOX concentrations of chlorinated samples after heating showed moderate decreases with increasing ambient water ages. Chloraminated samples with different ambient water ages exhibited similar final TOX concentrations during simulated distribution system and heating experiments. This study reinforces the importance of understanding DBP variations in indoor water uses as wells as in distribution systems to provide more accurate DBP information for exposure assessment and regulatory determination. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Device for the chlorinating volatization of thorium and/or uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser, M.; Bohnenstingl, J.; Fischer, E.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a device for the chlorinating volatization of nuclear fuel or breeding elements, preferably of thorium or uranium carbide and/or thorium or uranium oxide. A cupola furnace serves as reaction vessel, being connected to the condenser via a reactiongas pipe. In the interior of the cupola furnace, a tube is arranged consisting of porous graphite and heatable by direct current transfer, the tube being surrounded by a casing of ceramic material (sillimanite or rotosile). The chlorine gas is introduced into the cupola furnace via an additional socket. The gaseous reaction products penetrate the porous wall of the inner tube and enter the condenser first via the space between casing and inner tube and then via the reaction-gas pipe. The condenser consists of a gas-permeable tube and a surrounding tube, the space between being passed by the coolant gas. The maximum grain size of the ground pellets should be smaller than 300 μm. (HPH) [de

  6. Hydrogen and chlorine detection at the SiO2/Si interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsong, I.S.T.; Monkowski, M.D.; Monkowski, J.R.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Miller, P.D.; Moak, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen and chlorine depth profiles were obtained on a series of silicon oxides thermally grown in HCl/O 2 and Cl 2 /O 2 ambients at 1100 0 C for 15 minutes using the 19 F nuclear reaction and SIMS techniques. The data show close correlation between the H and Cl profiles in both the HCl/O 2 and Cl 2 /O 2 oxides. While the H and Cl appear to be enriched at the SiO 2 /Si interface of the HCl/O 2 oxides, they are higher in concentration and more evenly distributed in the oxide bulk of the Cl 2 /O 2 oxides

  7. Energy and exergy analyses of a copper-chlorine thermochemical water decomposition pilot plant for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, M.F.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear-based hydrogen production via thermochemical water decomposition using a copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle consists of a series of chemical reactions in which water is split into hydrogen and oxygen as the net result. This is accomplished through reactions involving intermediate copper and chlorine compounds, which are recycled. Energy and exergy analyses are reported here of a Cu-Cl pilot plant, including the relevant chemical reactions. The reference environment is taken to be at a temperature of 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure (1 atm). The chemical exergy of a substance, which is the maximum work that can be obtained from it by taking it to chemical equilibrium with the reference environment at constant temperature and pressure, is calculated with property data for the substance and the reference environment, with enthalpy and entropy values calculated using Shomate equations. The reaction heat, exergy destruction and efficiencies in each chemical reaction vary with the reaction temperature and reference-environment temperature. A parametric study with variable reaction and reference-environment temperatures is also presented. (author)

  8. Formation of chlorinated breakdown products during degradation of sunscreen agent, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate in the presence of sodium hypochlorite

    OpenAIRE

    Gackowska, Alicja; Przybyłek, Maciej; Studziński, Waldemar; Gaca, Jerzy

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a new degradation path of sunscreen active ingredient, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC) and 4-methoxycinnamic acid (MCA) in the presence of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), was discussed. The reaction products were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Since HOCl treatment leads to more polar products than EHMC, application of polar extracting agents, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate/n-hexane mixture, gave better results in terms of chlorinated breakdo...

  9. Formation of chlorinated breakdown products during degradation of sunscreen agent, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate in the presence of sodium hypochlorite

    OpenAIRE

    Gackowska, Alicja; Przyby?ek, Maciej; Studzi?ski, Waldemar; Gaca, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new degradation path of sunscreen active ingredient, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC) and 4-methoxycinnamic acid (MCA) in the presence of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), was discussed. The reaction products were detected using gas chromatography?mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Since HOCl treatment leads to more polar products than EHMC, application of polar extracting agents, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate/n-hexane mixture, gave better results in terms of chlorinated breakdo...

  10. Mixed Redox Catalytic Destruction of Chlorinated Solvents in Soils and Groundwater: From the Laboratory to the Field

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Song; Rupp, Erik; Bell, Suzanne; Willinger, Martin; Foley, Theresa; Barbaris, Brian; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Arnold, Robert G.; Betterton, Eric

    2008-01-01

    A new thermocatalytic method to destroy chlorinated solvents has been developed in the laboratory and tested in a pilot field study. The method employs a conventional Pt/Rh catalyst on a ceramic honeycomb. Reactions proceed at moderate temperatures in the simultaneous presence of oxygen and a reductant (mixed redox conditions) to minimize catalyst deactivation. In the laboratory, stable operation with high conversions (above 90% at residence times shorter than 1 s) for perchloroethylene (PCE)...

  11. The behavior of SiC and Si3N4 ceramics in mixed oxidation/chlorination environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John E.; Kreidler, Eric R.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of silicon-based ceramics in mixed oxidation/chlorination environments was studied. High pressure mass spectrometry was used to quantitatively identify the reaction products. The quantitative identification of the corrosion products was coupled with thermogravimetric analysis and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations run under similar conditions in order to deduce the mechanism of corrosion. Variations in the behavior of the different silicon-based materials are discussed. Direct evidence of the existence of silicon oxychloride compounds is presented.

  12. Formation of assimilable organic carbon during oxidation of natural waters with ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, permanganate, and ferrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, Maaike K; Peter, Andreas; Traber, Jacqueline; von Gunten, Urs

    2011-02-01

    Five oxidants, ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, permanganate, and ferrate were studied with regard to the formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and oxalate in absence and presence of cyanobacteria in lake water matrices. Ozone and ferrate formed significant amounts of AOC, i.e. more than 100 μg/L AOC were formed with 4.6 mg/L ozone and ferrate in water with 3.8 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. In the same water samples chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and permanganate produced no or only limited AOC. When cyanobacterial cells (Aphanizomenon gracile) were added to the water, an AOC increase was detected with ozone, permanganate, and ferrate, probably due to cell lysis. This was confirmed by the increase of extracellular geosmin, a substance found in the selected cyanobacterial cells. AOC formation by chlorine and chlorine dioxide was not affected by the presence of the cells. The formation of oxalate upon oxidation was found to be a linear function of the oxidant consumption for all five oxidants. The following molar yields were measured in three different water matrices based on oxidant consumed: 2.4-4.4% for ozone, 1.0-2.8% for chlorine dioxide and chlorine, 1.1-1.2% for ferrate, and 11-16% for permanganate. Furthermore, oxalate was formed in similar concentrations as trihalomethanes during chlorination (yield ∼ 1% based on chlorine consumed). Oxalate formation kinetics and stoichiometry did not correspond to the AOC formation. Therefore, oxalate cannot be used as a surrogate for AOC formation during oxidative water treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Formation of Emerging Disinfection By-products by Chlorination/Chloramination of Seawater Impacted by Algal Organic Matter

    KAUST Repository

    Nihemaiti, Maolida

    2015-08-31

    The aim of this work was to study the formation of haloacetamides (HAcAms) and other DBPs during chlorination and chloramination of algal organic matter (AlOM). The HAcAms formation potentials of different precursors (amino acids, simulated algal blooms grown in the Red Sea) were evaluated. Experiments with simulated algal blooms were conducted in the presence of bromide ion (synthetic seawater containing 800 μg/L Br−) to assess the formation of brominated analogues of HAcAms in conditions close to the disinfection of real seawater. Chlorination produced more HAcAms than chloramination from real algae (Synecococcus sp.), thus indicating that the nitrogen of HAcAms comes predominantly from DON through the decarboxylation of amino acids rather than from NH2Cl. Dibrominated species of DBPs (i.e., DBAcAm, DBAA and DBAN) were the dominant species formed by both chlorination and chloramination of algal bloom samples. Chloramination of the amino acid asparagine produced an important amount of DCAcAm as compared to chlorination, indicating the existence of a specific reaction pathway.

  14. Formation of Emerging Disinfection By-products by Chlorination/Chloramination of Seawater Impacted by Algal Organic Matter

    KAUST Repository

    Nihemaiti, Maolida; Le Roux, Julien; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the formation of haloacetamides (HAcAms) and other DBPs during chlorination and chloramination of algal organic matter (AlOM). The HAcAms formation potentials of different precursors (amino acids, simulated algal blooms grown in the Red Sea) were evaluated. Experiments with simulated algal blooms were conducted in the presence of bromide ion (synthetic seawater containing 800 μg/L Br−) to assess the formation of brominated analogues of HAcAms in conditions close to the disinfection of real seawater. Chlorination produced more HAcAms than chloramination from real algae (Synecococcus sp.), thus indicating that the nitrogen of HAcAms comes predominantly from DON through the decarboxylation of amino acids rather than from NH2Cl. Dibrominated species of DBPs (i.e., DBAcAm, DBAA and DBAN) were the dominant species formed by both chlorination and chloramination of algal bloom samples. Chloramination of the amino acid asparagine produced an important amount of DCAcAm as compared to chlorination, indicating the existence of a specific reaction pathway.

  15. Molecular mechanisms in the pyrolysis of unsaturated chlorinated hydrocarbons: formation of benzene rings. 1. Quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Grant J; Russell, Douglas K

    2013-05-23

    Analogues of important aromatic growth mechanisms in hydrocarbon pyrolysis and combustion systems are extended to chlorinated systems. We consider the addition of C2Cl2 to both C4Cl3 and C4Cl5 radicals at the M06-2X/6-311+G(3df,3p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory, and we demonstrate that these reaction systems have much in common with those of nonchlorinated species. In particular, we find that these radicals appear to lead preferentially to fulvenes, and not to the observed aromatic products, as is found in nonchlorinated systems. We have therefore also considered nonradical C4/C2 channels by way of Diels-Alder cyclization of C4Cl4/C2Cl2 and C4H2Cl2/C2HCl pairs to describe aromatic formation. While the latter pair readily leads to the formation of partially chlorinated benzenes, the fully chlorinated congeners are sterically prohibited from ring closing directly; this leads to a series of novel rearrangement processes which predict the formation of hexachloro-1,5-diene-3-yne, in addition to hexachlorobenzene, in good agreement with experiment. This suggests, for the first time, that facile nonradical routes to aromatic formation are operative in partially and fully chlorinated pyrolysis and combustion systems.

  16. The effect of chlorination and hydrodynamic shear stress on the persistence of bacteriophages associated with drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelleieux, S; Mathieu, L; Block, J-C; Gantzer, C; Bertrand, I

    2016-10-01

    This work aimed to assess at pilot scale the effect of chlorination and water flushing on 2-month-old drinking water biofilms and, above all, on biofilm-associated F-specific RNA bacteriophages MS2, GA and Qβ. Chlorination (4 mg l(-1) ) was applied first with a hydrodynamic shear stress of 1 Pa and second with an increase in hydrodynamic shear stress to 10 Pa. Despite a rapid decrease in the number of biofilm bacteria and associated phages, infectious phages were still detected on surfaces after completion of the 150 min cleaning procedure. The resulting sequence of phage removal was: GA > Qβ ≫ MS2. The effect of chlorine on biofilm bacteria and biofilm-associated phages was limited to the upper layers of the biofilm and was not enhanced by an increase in hydrodynamic shear stress. A smaller decrease was observed for MS2 than for GA or Qβ after completion of the cleaning procedure. The differences observed between the three phages suggest that the location of the viral particles in the biofilm, which is related to their surface properties, affects the efficiency of chlorine disinfection. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Hong, Pei-Ying; Nada, Nabil; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  18. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  19. [Toxicity and influencing factors of liquid chlorine on chironomid larvae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xing-Bin; Cui, Fu-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song; Guo, Zhao-Hai; Xu, Feng; Liu, Li-Jun

    2005-09-01

    The excessive propagation of Chironomid larvae (red worm) in the sedimentation tanks is a difficult problem for the normal function of waterworks. The toxic effect of liquid chlorine on the different instar larvae of Chironomid was studied using distilled water as test sample. Furthermore, the effect of pH value, organic matter content, ammonia nitrogen, and algae content on toxicity of liquid chlorine was observed. The results show that the tolerance of Chironomid larvae to liquid chlorine is strengthened with the increase in instar. The 24h semi-lethal concentration (LC50) of liquid chlorine to the 4th instar larvae of Chironomid is 3.39 mg/L. Low pH value and high algae content are helpful to improve the toxic effect of liquid chlorine to Chironomid larvae. In neutral water body, the increase in organic matter content results in the decrease in the death rate of Chironomid larvae. The toxicity of liquid chlorine differs greatly in different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen. The death rate of the 4th instar larvae of Chironomid in raw water is higher by contrast with that in sedimentation tanks water for 24h disposal with various amount of liquid chlorine.

  20. Chlorine diffusion in uranium dioxide under heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Y.; Bererd, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Peaucelle, C.; Toulhoat, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Raimbault, L.; Sainsot, P.; Carlot, G.

    2007-01-01

    The radiation enhanced diffusion of chlorine in UO 2 during heavy ion irradiation is studied. In order to simulate the behaviour of 36 Cl, present as an impurity in UO 2 , 37 Cl has been implanted into the samples (projected range 200 nm). The samples were then irradiated with 63.5 MeV 127 I at two fluxes and two temperatures and the chlorine distribution was analyzed by SIMS. The results show that, during irradiation, the diffusion of the implanted chlorine is enhanced and slightly athermal with respect to pure thermal diffusion. A chlorine gain of 10% accumulating near the surface has been observed at 510 K. This corresponds to the displacement of pristine chlorine from a region of maximum defect concentration. This behaviour and the mean value of the apparent diffusion coefficient found for the implanted chlorine, around 2.5 x 10 -14 cm 2 s -1 , reflect the high mobility of chlorine in UO 2 during irradiation with fission products

  1. Chlorine diffusion in uranium dioxide under heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Peaucelle, C.; Toulhoat, N.; Jaffrézic, H.; Raimbault, L.; Sainsot, P.; Carlot, G.

    2007-04-01

    The radiation enhanced diffusion of chlorine in UO2 during heavy ion irradiation is studied. In order to simulate the behaviour of 36Cl, present as an impurity in UO2, 37Cl has been implanted into the samples (projected range 200 nm). The samples were then irradiated with 63.5 MeV 127I at two fluxes and two temperatures and the chlorine distribution was analyzed by SIMS. The results show that, during irradiation, the diffusion of the implanted chlorine is enhanced and slightly athermal with respect to pure thermal diffusion. A chlorine gain of 10% accumulating near the surface has been observed at 510 K. This corresponds to the displacement of pristine chlorine from a region of maximum defect concentration. This behaviour and the mean value of the apparent diffusion coefficient found for the implanted chlorine, around 2.5 × 10-14 cm2 s-1, reflect the high mobility of chlorine in UO2 during irradiation with fission products.

  2. Detection and occurrence of chlorinated byproducts of bisphenol a, nonylphenol, and estrogens in drinking water of china: comparison to the parent compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhanlan; Hu, Jianying; An, Wei; Yang, Min

    2013-10-01

    This study applied a sensitive dansylation LC-MS/MS method to the investigation on the occurrence of bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), estrogens (E1 and E2), and their 11 chlorinated byproducts in 62 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) of 31 major cities across China. BPA (4.7-512 ng/L), NP (8.2-918 ng/L), and E1 (ND-9.9 ng/L) were widely detected in source waters, E2 was detected in less than half of the samples (ND-3.2 ng/L), while chlorinated byproducts were only detected in source waters of two DWTPs. In drinking water, chlorinated BPAs and monochloro-NP (MCNP) were detected in more than half of the samples with concentrations of 0.2-26.7 ng/L for monochloro-BPA (MCBPA), ND-6.3 ng/L for dichloro-BPA (DCBPA), ND-7.7 ng/L for trichloro-BPA (TCBPA), ND-4.8 ng/L for tetrachloro-BPA (TBBPA), and ND-13.3 ng/L for MCNP, while dichloro-E1 (DCE1, ND-0.2 ng/L) and dichloro-NP (DCNP, ND-1.6 ng/L) were less frequently detected (10/62 and 4/62). The production of chlorinated NPs in DWTPs was mainly influenced by the amount of NP in source water and chlorine added, while the concentrations of chlorinated BPAs in drinking waters were only found to be significantly correlated with those of BPA in source waters. Advanced treatment processes could be effective techniques for reducing target chlorinated byproducts in drinking water. This is the first report on the occurrence of chlorinated byproducts of BPA, NP, and estrogens in drinking water, and these chemicals should be considered when assessing the human risk of their parent compounds.

  3. Experimental lifetimes for Mg-like chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstroem, L.; Bengtsson, P.; Jupen, C.; Livingston, A.E.; Martinson, I.

    1995-01-01

    The results of beam-foil measurements of lifetimes for low-lying singlet levels in Mg-like chlorine, Cl VI, are presented. The decay curves were analyzed by means of the arbitrarily normalized decay curve method, combined with the recently developed CANYL code, which facilitates studies of decay chains. Cascade corrected data are presented for the levels 3s3p 1 P, 3p 2 1 S, 3p 2 1 D, and 3s3d 1 D, whereas less rigorous lifetime values, based on curve fits, were obtained for the 3p3d 1 D, 3p3d 1 F, and 3s4f 1 F levels. The data are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical values, and previous discrepancies between experiment and theory for short-lived states have been removed

  4. Preparation of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and trichloroethylene labelled with radioactive chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, G.E.; Shalygin, V.A.; Zel'venskij, Ya.D.; Prosyanov, N.N.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane is carried out. 1,2,2,2-tetrachloroethane is labelled with radioactive chlorine by chlorinating the mixture of cis-, transisomeres of dichlorethylene with elementary chlorine. Trichloroethylene labelled with radioactive chlorine is prepared by the effect of alkali alcohol solution on radioactive 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane

  5. Reactive Minerals and Dechlorinating Communities: Mechanisms Governing the Degradation of Chlorinated Ethenes during Back Diffusion from Low Permeability Zones in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, E. C.; Zeng, R.; Singh, H.; Valocchi, A. J.; Sanford, R. A.; Strathmann, T. J.; Schaefer, C. E.; Werth, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Low permeability zones (LPZs) comprised of silts and clays, and contaminated with chlorinated ethenes, can act as a long term source of contaminated groundwater by diffusion into adjacent high permeability zones (HPZs). Following initial remediation efforts, chlorinated ethenes that have diffused into LPZs will back diffuse and recontaminate HPZs. Because chlorinated ethenes are known to cause cancer and damage the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system, it is important to understand how they degrade in natural systems and how to model their fate and transport. Previous work has shown that anaerobic hydrogenolysis reactions are facilitated by both dechlorinating microorganisms and reactive minerals. Abiotic dichloro-elimination reactions with reactive minerals can also degrade chlorinated ethenes to acetylene, albeit at slower rates than biotic processes. More recently, studies have explored aerobic abiotic degradation of chlorinated ethenes to formate, glycolate, and carbon dioxide. This study focuses on these biotic and abiotic reactions and their contributions to chlorinated ethene degradation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions at the LPZ/HPZ interface. A two-dimensional flow cell was constructed to model this interface using clay and sand from Pease Air Force Base. The clay was inoculated with a dechlorinating enrichment culture. Tenax adsorbent beads equilibrated with trichloroethylene (TCE) were used as a chlorinated ethene source zone at the base of the clay. TCE and its degradation products diffused from the clay into the sand, where they were removed from the flow cell by groundwater at a rate of 50 mL/day. Volatile compounds were trapped in a sample loop and removed every 48 hours for analysis by GC-FID. Organic and inorganic ions in the effluent were analyzed on the HPLC and IC. The experiment was terminated by freezing the flow cell, and chemical profiles through the flow cell material were created to show the spatial distribution of degradation

  6. Release of Chlorine and Sulfur during Biomass Torrefaction and Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, Suriyati Binti; Flensborg, Julie Pauline; Shoulaifar, Tooran Khazraie

    2014-01-01

    The release of chlorine (Cl) and sulfur (S) during biomass torrefaction and pyrolysis has been investigated via experiments in two laboratory-scale reactors: a rotating reactor and a fixed bed reactor. Six biomasses with different chemical compositions covering a wide range of ash content and ash...... reporting that biomasses with a lower chlorine content release a higher fraction of chlorine during the pyrolysis process. A significant sulfur release (about 60%) was observed from the six biomasses investigated at 350 degrees C. The initial sulfur content in the biomass did not influence the fraction...

  7. Chlorine and bromine contents in tobacco and tobacco smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haesaenen, E.; Manninen, P.K.G.; Himberg, K.; Vaeaetaeinen, V.

    1990-01-01

    The chlorine and bromine contents in tobacco and tobacco smoke in both the particulate and gaseous phases were studied by neutron activation analysis. Eleven popular brands of western filter cigarettes were tested. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide concentrations were measured in the gaseous phase in two leading brands in Finland. The results suggest that the mainstream smoke from one cigarette conveys into the lungs about 150 μg chlorine and about 5 μg bromine. Probably most of the chlorine and bromine is in the form of organic compounds and the main components are methyl chloride and methyl bromide. (author) 14 refs.; 1 tab

  8. Effect of Chlorine on Giardia lamblia Cyst Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Jarroll, Edward L.; Bingham, Alan K.; Meyer, Ernest A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of chlorine concentration on Giardia lamblia cyst viability was tested under a variety of conditions. The ability of Giardia cysts to undergo excystation was used as the criterion of viability. The experimental variables employed included temperature (25, 15, and 5°C), pH (6, 7, and 8), chlorine-cyst contact time (10, 30, and 60 min), and chlorine concentration (1 to 8 mg/liter). In the pH range studied, cyst survival generally was observed to increase as buffer pH increased. Water...

  9. A green Hunsdiecker reaction of cinnamic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodre, Leonardo R.; Esteves, Pierre M.; Mattos, Marcio C. S. de, E-mail: pesteves@iq.ufrj.br, E-mail: mmattos@iq.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica. Departamento de Quimica

    2013-02-15

    Tribromo- and trichloroisocyanuric acids react with cinnamic acids in NaOH/H{sub 2}O/Et{sub 2}O at room temperature to produce (E)-2-halostyrenes regioselectively in 25-95% yield. Mechanism studies using Hammett correlations and DFT (density functional theory) calculations have shown that this reaction has as rate determining step the electrophilic addition of chlorine atom to the double bond. (author)

  10. Relative rate study of the kinetics, mechanism, and thermodynamics of the reaction of chlorine atoms with CF3CF═CH2 (HFO-1234yf) in 650-950 Torr of N2 or N2/O2 diluent at 296-462 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, E W; Wallington, T J

    2012-06-21

    The rate constant of the reaction Cl + CF(3)CF═CH(2) (k(1)) has been measured relative to several reference species using the relative rate technique with either gas chromatographic analysis with flame-ionization detection (GC/FID) or Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. Cl atoms were generated by UV irradiation of Cl(2)/CF(3)CF═CH(2)/reference/N(2)/O(2) mixtures. At 300-400 K in the presence of >20 Torr O(2), k(1) = 1.2 × 10(-11) e((+1100/RT)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). In N(2) diluent, k(1) has a sharp negative temperature coefficient resulting from the relatively small exothermicity of the following reactions: (1a) Cl + CF(3)CF═CH(2) ↔ CF(3)CFClCH(2)(•); (1b) Cl + CF(3)CF═CH(2) ↔ CF(3)CF(•)CH(2)Cl (reaction 1), which were determined in these experiments to be ∼16.5 (±2.0) kcal mol(-1). This low exothermicity causes reaction 1 to become significantly reversible even at ambient temperature. The rate constant ratio for the reaction of the chloroalkyl radicals formed in reaction 1 with Cl(2) (k(2)) or O(2) (k(3)) was measured to be k(2)/k(3) = 0.4 e(-(3000/RT)) for 300-400 K. At 300 K, k(2)/k(3) = 0.0026. The reversibility of reaction 1 combined with the small value of k(2)/k(3) leads to a sensitive dependence of k(1) on the O(2) concentration. Products measured by GC/FID as a function of temperature are CF(3)CFClCH(2)Cl, CF(3)COF, and CH(2)Cl(2). The mechanism leading to these products is discussed. The rate constant for the reaction Cl + CF(3)CFClCH(2)Cl (k(11)) was measured as a function of temperature (300-462 K) at 760 Torr to be k(11) = 8.2 × 10(-12) e(-(4065/RT)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Rate constants relative to CH(4) for the reactions of Cl with the reference compounds CH(3)Cl, CH(2)Cl(2), and CHCl(3) were measured at 470 K to resolve a literature discrepancy. (R = 1.986 cal K(-1) mol(-1)).

  11. Potential for formation of disinfection by-products from storage of chlorinated surface water in the Basalt aquifer near Fallon, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Lico, Michael S.

    2005-01-01

    Increased pumpage from a basalt aquifer near Fallon, Nevada, has caused its water levels to decline and has induced changes in the quality of water pumped from the basalt. The aquifer is the sole source of water for municipal supply to the city of Fallon, the Naval Air Station Fallon, and the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe. These changes may be mitigated by storage of surface water in the basalt for subsequent use. Because chlorination of the surface water may be required for storage, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe, made laboratory tests using laboratory carbon-organic-free water, surface-water, ground-water, and basaltic-rock samples to determine the potential for formation of disinfection by-products. Experiments with water samples only (no rock and no chlorine) indicated no change in dissolved-organic-carbon (DOC) concentrations over a 20-day reaction period; whereas, all experiments using rock, water, and no chlorine indicated an increase in DOC concentrations. The greatest increase in DOC concentrations for all three water samples occurred in experiments with the rock samples from outcrops on Rattlesnake Hill. Experiments with water only and chlorine yielded a total trihalomethane (THM) concentration of 97.4 ?g/L for the ground-water sample and 347 ?g/L for the surface-water sample. Experiments with mixtures of water, rocks, and chlorine indicated that reactions with the rock consumed chlorine and released significant amounts of organic carbon from the rock, increasing the DOC concentration in the water. The organic carbon in the rocks likely is associated with the secondary clay minerals that line vesicles and fractures in the rocks. THM concentrations were greatest, from 335 to 909 ?g/L, for surface water equilibrated with rock samples from Rattlesnake Hill. However, the concentration of chlorine required to produce these high THM concentrations ranged from 18 to 84 mg/L. The results of the experiments suggest

  12. Assessing the Impact of Chlorinated-Solvent Sites on Metropolitan Groundwater Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Narter, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated-solvent compounds are among the most common groundwater contaminants in the U.S.A. The majority of the many sites contaminated by chlorinated-solvent compounds are located in metropolitan areas, and most such areas have one or more chlorinated-solvent contaminated sites. Thus, contamination of groundwater by chlorinated-solvent compounds may pose a potential risk to the sustainability of potable water supplies for many metropolitan areas. The impact of chlorinated-solvent sites on...

  13. Mechanochemistry-assisted synthesis of hierarchical porous carbons applied as supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistenschneider, Desirée; Jäckel, Nicolas; Hippauf, Felix; Presser, Volker

    2017-01-01

    A solvent-free synthesis of hierarchical porous carbons is conducted by a facile and fast mechanochemical reaction in a ball mill. By means of a mechanochemical ball-milling approach, we obtained titanium(IV) citrate-based polymers, which have been processed via high temperature chlorine treatment to hierarchical porous carbons with a high specific surface area of up to 1814 m2 g−1 and well-defined pore structures. The carbons are applied as electrode materials in electric double-layer capacitors showing high specific capacitances with 98 F g−1 in organic and 138 F g−1 in an ionic liquid electrolyte as well as good rate capabilities, maintaining 87% of the initial capacitance with 1 M TEA-BF4 in acetonitrile (ACN) and 81% at 10 A g−1 in EMIM-BF4. PMID:28781699

  14. Mechanochemistry-assisted synthesis of hierarchical porous carbons applied as supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée Leistenschneider

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A solvent-free synthesis of hierarchical porous carbons is conducted by a facile and fast mechanochemical reaction in a ball mill. By means of a mechanochemical ball-milling approach, we obtained titanium(IV citrate-based polymers, which have been processed via high temperature chlorine treatment to hierarchical porous carbons with a high specific surface area of up to 1814 m2 g−1 and well-defined pore structures. The carbons are applied as electrode materials in electric double-layer capacitors showing high specific capacitances with 98 F g−1 in organic and 138 F g−1 in an ionic liquid electrolyte as well as good rate capabilities, maintaining 87% of the initial capacitance with 1 M TEA-BF4 in acetonitrile (ACN and 81% at 10 A g−1 in EMIM-BF4.

  15. Feedback control of chlorine inductively coupled plasma etch processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chaung; Leou, K.-C.; Shiao, K.-M.

    2005-01-01

    Feedback control has been applied to poly-Si etch processing using a chlorine inductively coupled plasma. Since the positive ion flux and ion energy incident upon the wafer surface are the key factors that influence the etch rate, the ion current and the root mean square (rms) rf voltage on the wafer stage, which are measured using an impedance meter connected to the wafer stage, are adopted as the controlled variables to enhance etch rate. The actuators are two 13.56 MHz rf power generators, which adjust ion density and ion energy, respectively. The results of closed-loop control show that the advantages of feedback control can be achieved. For example, with feedback control, etch rate variation under the transient chamber wall condition is reduced roughly by a factor of 2 as compared to the open-loop case. In addition, the capability of the disturbance rejection was also investigated. For a gas pressure variation of 20%, the largest etch rate variation is about 2.4% with closed-loop control as compared with as large as about 6% variation using open-loop control. Also the effect of ion current and rms rf voltage on etch rate was studied using 2 2 factorial design whose results were used to derive a model equation. The obtained formula was used to adjust the set point of ion current and rf voltage so that the desired etch rate was obtained

  16. Bromine incorporation into five DBP classes upon chlorination of water with extremely low SUVA values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huachang; Yan, Xiaoqing; Song, Xuhui; Qin, Yanyan; Sun, Hongjie; Lin, Hongjun; Chen, Jianrong; Liang, Yan

    2017-07-15

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effects of disinfection conditions on bromine incorporation into disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination of water with low specific UV absorbance (SUVA). Five classes of DBPs were included: trihalomethanes (THMs), dihaloacetic acids (di-HAAs), trihaloacetic acids (tri-HAAs), dihaloacetonitriles (DHANs) and trihalonitromethanes (THNMs). Results showed that the bromine utilization in DBPs formation was positive related with reaction time, pH and temperature. On the other hand, the bromine substitution factors (BSFs) of DBPs were generally increased with pH (except tri-HAAs) and bromide concentration, but decreased with the reaction time, temperature and chlorine dose. Moreover, the BSFs values varied with DBP classes with the ranking being as following: THNMs≫DHANs≫tri-HAAs>THM≈di-HAAs. These results were mostly similar with the references, yet the pH effect on BSFs as well as the rank of BSFs for different DBP classes may differ with the specific UV absorbance of organic matter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of chlorine and its cresylate byproducts on brain and lung performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Kaye H

    2003-12-01

    Chlorine and potassium cresylate spilled from a train wreck forced evacuation of nearly 1000 people in and near the town of Alberton, Montana, in 1996. Because respiratory and other symptoms persisted in this population, neurobehavioral and pulmonary functions were evaluated in a cohort of exposed vs. unexposed individuals. Ninety-seven subjects were tested 7 wk after exposure. Three years later, 36 of the original subjects were retested, along with 21 new patients exposed in the same incident. These 57 were compared with 22 unexposed individuals. Twenty-six neurobehavioral functions were tested, and spirometry was performed on each subject. At 7 wk postexposure, patients showed significant differences in 5 neurobehavioral functions (i.e., balance, simple reaction time, abnormal visual quadrants, vocabulary, and information), compared with the unexposed individuals recruited in 1999. Patients' Profile of Mood States scores and frequencies of 35 symptoms were also elevated, compared with the unexposed group. At 3 yr postexposure, patients exhibited differences in 7 additional neurobehavioral functions (i.e., choice reaction time, balance with eyes open, color errors, visual fields, Culture Fair, and verbal recall). Respiratory symptoms were increased, but pulmonary functions did not change. Exposure to chlorine and potassium cresylate produced neurobehavioral impairments that have been observed to increase across 3 yr. Spills in heavily populated areas could injure thousands, overwhelming medical facilities.

  18. Disinfection byproduct formation from chlorination of pure bacterial cells and pipeline biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Jian; Liu, Xin; Ng, Tsz Wai; Xiao, Jie-Wen; Chow, Alex T; Wong, Po Keung

    2013-05-15

    Disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation is commonly attributed to the reaction between natural organic matters and disinfectants, yet few have considered the contribution from disinfecting bacterial materials - the essential process of water disinfection. Here, we explored the DBP formation from chlorination and chloramination of Escherichia coli and found that most selected DBPs were detectable, including trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles, chloral hydrate, chloropicrin, and 1,1,1-trichloro-2-propanone. A positive correlation (P = 0.08-0.09) between DBP formation and the log reduction of E. coli implied that breaking down of bacterial cells released precursors for DBP formation. As Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a dominant bacterial species in pipeline biofilms, the DBP formation potentials (DBPFPs) from its planktonic cells and biofilms were characterized. Planktonic cells formed 7-11 times greater trihalomethanes per carbon of those from biofilms but significantly lower (P biofilms on polyvinyl chloride compared to that on galvanized zinc. This study revealed both the in situ disinfection of bacterial planktonic cells in source water and ex situ reaction between biofilms and residual chlorine in pipeline networks as hitherto unknown DBP sources in drinking water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Drinking water biofilm cohesiveness changes under chlorination or hydrodynamic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, L; Bertrand, I; Abe, Y; Angel, E; Block, J C; Skali-Lami, S; Francius, G

    2014-05-15

    Attempts at removal of drinking water biofilms rely on various preventive and curative strategies such as nutrient reduction in drinking water, disinfection or water flushing, which have demonstrated limited efficiency. The main reason for these failures is the cohesiveness of the biofilm driven by the physico-chemical properties of its exopolymeric matrix (EPS). Effective cleaning procedures should break up the matrix and/or change the elastic properties of bacterial biofilms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in the cohesive strength of two-month-old drinking water biofilms under increasing hydrodynamic shear stress τw (from ∼0.2 to ∼10 Pa) and shock chlorination (applied concentration at T0: 10 mg Cl2/L; 60 min contact time). Biofilm erosion (cell loss per unit surface area) and cohesiveness (changes in the detachment shear stress and cluster volumes measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM)) were studied. When rapidly increasing the hydrodynamic constraint, biofilm removal was found to be dependent on a dual process of erosion and coalescence of the biofilm clusters. Indeed, 56% of the biofilm cells were removed with, concomitantly, a decrease in the number of the 50-300 μm(3) clusters and an increase in the number of the smaller (i.e., 600 μm(3)) ones. Moreover, AFM evidenced the strengthening of the biofilm structure along with the doubling of the number of contact points, NC, per cluster volume unit following the hydrodynamic disturbance. This suggests that the compactness of the biofilm exopolymers increases with hydrodynamic stress. Shock chlorination removed cells (-75%) from the biofilm while reducing the volume of biofilm clusters. Oxidation stress resulted in a decrease in the cohesive strength profile of the remaining drinking water biofilms linked to a reduction in the number of contact points within the biofilm network structure in particular for the largest biofilm cluster volumes (>200 μm(3)). Changes in the cohesive

  20. MICROEMULSION OF MIXED CHLORINATED SOLVENTS USING FOOD GRADE (EDIBLE) SURFACTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground water contamination frequently consists of mixed chlorinated solvents [e.g., tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and trans-1,2- dichloroethylene (DCE)]. In this research, mixtures of the food grade (edible) surfactants bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinat...