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Sample records for chlorinated hydrocarbon levels

  1. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Radiolytic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolytic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloroform, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene) in water was carried out. Water solutions of the chlorinated hydrocarbons with different concentrations were irradiated with γ rays. Concentrations of methane, ethane, CO, CO2, H2, and O2 after the irradiation were determined by gas chromatography. Concentration of chloride ion in the irradiated sample was determined by ion chromatography. Experimental results show that radiolytic degradation of the chlorinated hydrocarbon increased with the radiation dose. Methane, ethane, CO2, H2, and Cl- concentrations increased with the radiation dose and the sample concentration. On the other hand, O2 concentration decreased with the radiation dose and the sample concentration. When sample concentration was high, dissolved oxygen might be not enough for converting most of the C atoms in the sample into CO2. This resulted in a low decomposition ratio. Addition of H2O2 as an oxygen resource could increase the decomposition ratio greatly. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was applied to identify some intermediates of the radiolytic dehalogenation. Radiolytic degradation mechanisms are also discussed. (author)

  3. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M.E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent

  4. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in arctic marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norstrom, R J; Muir, D C

    1994-09-16

    By 1976, the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) had been demonstrated in fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), ringed seal (Phoca hispida), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), walrus (Obdobenus rosmarus divergens), beluga (Delphinapterus leucas), porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in various parts of the Arctic. In spite of this early interest, very little subsequent research on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals was undertaken until the mid-1980s. Since that time, there has been an explosion of interest, resulting in a much expanded data base on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals. Except in the Russian Arctic, data have now been obtained on the temporospatial distribution of PCBs and other contaminants in ringed seal, beluga and polar bear. Contaminants in narwhal (Monodon monoceros) have also now been measured. On a fat weight basis, the sum of DDT-related compounds (S-DDT) and PCB levels are lowest in walrus (< 0.1 microgram/g), followed by ringed seal, (0.1-1 microgram/g range). Levels are an order of magnitude higher in beluga and narwhal (1-10 micrograms/g range). It appears that metabolism and excretion of S-DDT and PCBs may be less efficient in cetaceans, leading to greater biomagnification. Polar bears have similar levels of PCBs as cetaceans (1-10 micrograms/g), but with a much simpler congener pattern. DDE levels are lowest in polar bear, indicating rapid metabolism. Effects of age and sex on residue levels are found for all species where this was measured. Among cetaceans and ringed seal, sexually mature females have lower levels than males due to lactation. Although PCB levels in adult male polar bears are about twice as high as females, there is only a trivial age effect in either sex apart from an initial decrease from birth to sexual maturity (age 0-5). Comparison of levels of S-DDT and PCBs in Arctic beluga and ringed seal with those in beluga in the Gulf of St

  5. Chlorinated hydrocarbons- (CHC) and PCDD/F-levels in sediments and breams (Abramis brama) from the river Elbe (contribution to the German Environmental Specimen Banking)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxynos, K. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Schramm, K.W. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Marth, P. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Schmitzer, J. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Kettrup, A. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons have been determined in sediments and breams (Abramis brama) from different locations along the river Elbe, starting from the border to the Czech Republic down-stream up to Cumlosen (river km 470), near the frontier of the former German Democratic Republic. High levels of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) have been found in sediments. HCB, DDT-metabolites and octachlorostyrene (OCS) have been the most dominant compounds in bream, especially fish from eastern sampling sites have been heavily contaminated. Furthermore, sediments from 1991-1993 have been analysed to determine polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F). The CHC-burden of the river Elbe declines downstream, whereas the PCDD/F-content increases in that direction. (orig.)

  6. Anaerobic Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Groundwater Aquifers or "Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation"

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, R. Brent; Jay D Keasling

    1997-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE), is a major concern throughout the United States. A developing strategy for the remediation of PCE and TCE contaminated aquifers is anaerobic biodegradation. From a TCE contaminated groundwater site, microorganisms were enriched with the ability to anaerobically convert PCE and TCE completely to ethene. Kinetic studies performed with this culture showed that degradation of PCE, TCE...

  7. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    OpenAIRE

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M. E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent formation of less desirable side-products. For example, mixtures of chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons are still formed as by-products in industrial processes such as the production of vinyl chlor...

  8. Characteristic levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons and trace metals in fish from coastal waters of North and Baltic sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckas, B; Harms, U

    1987-01-01

    During investigations on the occurrence and distribution of contaminants in coastal waters of the North Sea and the Baltic organochlorine compounds such as hexachlorobenzene (HCB), octachlorostyrene (OCS), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCH), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT) and its metabolites and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metals such as mercury, cadmium and lead were determined in a selected flatfish species (flounder, Platichthys flesus L.). The sampling network covered the outer estuaries of the rivers Weser and Elbe, the German Bight, the Danish North Sea coast and coastal regions of the south-western Baltic. Organochlorine compounds were determined by high-resolution glass capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detector after sample pretreatment and clean up. For the determination of heavy metals a multi-stage analytical procedure was used, in which graphite furnace (for Cd and Pb) resp. cold vapour (for Hg) atomic absorption spectrometry was combined with pre-instrumental separation and enrichment techniques. Evaluation of the data from the programme made obvious significant geographical differences in the levels and the pattern with regard to the substances involved. For HCB, OCS and Hg a crucial point of contamination within the German Bright was recognized that was apparently influenced to a large extent by the inflow of waters from the Elbe. PMID:2439467

  9. Emission of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons from combustion of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission of simple chlorinated compounds has been analyzed at five different cases at the district heating plant in Tranaas. The aim of this project has been to investigate the possibilities of finding a method for continuous monitoring of the emissions of chlorinated organic compounds from combustion. Samples were taken only after flue gas condensation. Three easily detectable chlorinated compounds could be quantified in spite of extremely low chlorine content in the fuel: * trichloroethylene, * tetrachloroethylene, * mono chlorinated benzene. Total amount of these compounds were > 0.2 mg/nm3. It is hard to find correlations between the emissions of chlorinated hydrocarbons and combustion conditions. One reason can be the sampling method which did not come up to our expectations. The high volatility of the solvent caused ice in the sampling train and most probably there has been great losses of the most volatile compounds. In spite of the fact that the combustion parameters in several samples were very good with low values of CO (0.2 mg/nm3 of monochlorinated benzene could be detected in the flue gas. Due to the unsatisfactory sampling method the real concentrations of the detected compounds are probably higher than the reported values. The amounts of chlorinated compounds detected are, in this plant, too low for continuous measurements. ( 6 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.)

  10. Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons at cold temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study of the viability of intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons at cold temperatures, at a former landfill site, some 300 km northeast of Edmonton. The landfill was also used for disposing of various hydrocarbon-based products of environmental concern.The project was conducted in four phases, i. e. site investigation, analysis of contaminant concentration, microbial study in the laboratory, and computer fate and transport modeling, with the primary focus being on the effect of cold temperatures on the rate of reductive dechlorination. Preliminary analysis of the results shows considerable evidence for the biodegradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and confirms intrinsic bioremediation as a viable option for cold temperature sites. 20 refs., 7 figs

  11. Environmental Behavior, Sources, and Effects of Chlorinated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohura

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental sources and behaviors of chlorinated 2- to 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs. ClPAHs are ubiquitous contaminants found in urban air, vehicle exhaust gas, snow, tap water, and sediments. The concentrations of ClPAHs in each of these environments are generally higher than those of dioxins but markedly lower than the concentrations of the parent compounds, PAHs. Environmental data and emission sources analysis for ClPAHs reveal that the dominant process of generation is by reaction of PAHs with chlorine in pyrosynthesis. This secondary reaction process also occurs in aquatic environments. Certain ClPAHs show greater toxicity, such as mutagenicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity, than their corresponding parent PAHs. Investigation of the sources and environmental behavior of ClPAHs is of great importance in the assessment of human health risks.

  12. Session 6: The catalytic oxidation of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oszczudlowski, J. [Institute of Chemistry, Swietokrzyska Academy, Kielce (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The catalytic oxidation of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons was investigated in the presence of natural zeolites modified with 3M HCl and chromium and lanthanum from aqueous solutions. Natural zeolites of the structure of clinoptilolite or mordenite possess unique physical and chemical properties such as high sorptive capacity and ion-exchange selectivity, relatively high heat and mechanical resistance. The activation of samples of natural zeolites was carried out in a 3M aqueous solution of HCl using a Soxhlet apparatus, whereas the ion exchange from aqueous solutions of chromium (III) and lanthanum (III) nitrates. Samples of activated zeolites were calcinated at 500 C with a programmable temperature increase within 4 hours The amounts of Cr and La on zeolite were 3,0 % wt and 4,5 % wt, respectively. Catalytic tests were conducted in a micro-reactor coupled with a gas chromatograph. The conditions of reaction were as follows: temperature range: 473-723 K, substrate composition: chlorinated hydrocarbon (1000-10000 ppm), steam (0-10000 ppm) and air. Under standard conditions volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons were introduced into a gas flux as vapours, whereas low-volatile ones in a mixture with n-hexane or cyclohexane. The quantity of the deposits on the surface of a catalyst was analysed by the thermogravimetric and GC-MS methods. The composition of oxidation products of chlorinated hydrocarbons was chromatographically analysed indirectly with the techniques SPME-GC-ECD and SPME-GCFID. The total quantity of the products was stored in gas containers-Tedlars and the quantitative and qualitative composition was analysed by the method SPME-HS-GC-ECD (solid phase micro-extraction-headspace-gas chromatography-electron capture detector). The total oxidation of CCl{sub 4} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6} in the presence of the Cr/zeolite catalyst occurs at 400 C. The conversion of the catalytic oxidation of chloro-olefins in the presence of the La/zeolite catalyst increases within

  13. Supported metal nanoparticles for the remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrick, Bettina

    Zero valent iron filings are currently being used in pilot scale field studies to dehalogenate toxic chlorinated hydrocarbons from contaminated surface- and groundwater. Iron filings reduce trichloroethylene (TCE), a model contaminant, via two interconnected degradation pathways: (a) reductive beta-elimination and (b) sequential hydrogenolysis, in which each chlorine atom is sequentially replaced by hydrogen. For the latter pathway, problems arise because the dehalogenation rate decreases as the number of chlorine atoms in the molecule decreases. Therefore, some of the products formed, such as vinyl chloride (VC), are more toxic than the parent compound (TCE), and are only slowly reduced by iron. To improve the rate, cost and technique of remediation for chlorinated hydrocarbons, zero valent nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) nanoparticles have been developed. To elucidate the dehalogenation reaction and particularly the product distributions from a mechanistic standpoint, the roles that nickel and iron play in the dehalogenation of TCE were studied. On the bimetallic particles, the reaction occurs by nickel-catalyzed hydrodechlorination. As the iron actively corrodes, the cathodically protected nickel surface chemisorbs hydrogen ions, and TCE adsorbed to the Ni surface is thus hydrogenated. This reaction competes kinetically with the evolution of molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenolysis of the C-Cl bond results in the formation of linear, as well as branched saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Dispersing the nanometals onto high surface area supports, such as hydrophilic carbon or polyacrylic acid (PAA), provides a delivery vehicle for the reactive nanoparticles. The support acts as a nanometal carrier, and may also help preconcentrate the toxins, and provide a conductive pathway for electron transfer. In general, supports are expected to stabilize the nanoparticles and give an increased surface to volume ratio. The carbon- and PAA-supported nanometals form a permanent suspension

  14. Bioremediation of soils containing petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench-scale treatability investigations, pilot-scale and full-scale bioremediation projects were conducted to evaluate Daramend trademark bioremediation of soils containing petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy oils, paraffins, chlorinated phenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Bench-scale investigations were conducted using glass microcosms. Pilot-scale and full-scale demonstrations were conducted at industrial sites and included treatment of excavated soils and sediments in on-site cells constructed using synthetic liners and covered by steel/polyethylene structures as well as in-situ treatment. A total of approximately 5,000 tons of soil was treated. The soil treatment included organic soil amendments, specialized tillage/aeration apparatus, and strict control of soil moisture. The amendments are composed of naturally-occurring organic materials prepared to soil-specific particle size distributions, nutrient profiles, and nutrient-release kinetics. Bench-scale work indicated that in refinery soil containing high concentrations of heavy oils, extractable hydrocarbon concentrations could be rapidly reduced to industrial clean-up criteria, and that the hydrocarbons were fully mineralized with release of CO2

  15. Solidification of sediment contaminated with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, E.J. [Anchor QEA LLC, Portland, OR (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A series of bench-scale treatability tests were used to evaluate the effectiveness of various solidification reagents in treating sediments contaminated with high concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The effectiveness of Portland cement, cement kiln dust, lime kiln dust, fly ash, and a combination of silica and lime were was assessed relative to their ability to reduce the leaching of contaminants, increase the strength of the contaminated sediment, and reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the sediments. The aim of the study was to develop a design for treating sediments in a stagnant water body located on the grounds of an industrial facility. The sediments were predominantly fine-grained and high in organic content. Preliminary tests identified Portland cement and the silica and lime mixture as achieving the desired strength and resistance to leaching. The solidification reagents were used to solidify more than 11,000 cubic yards of sediment with a mixture of 2 fly ashes. The full-scale solidification project surpassed the required standards for strength and permeability. 10 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  16. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (less than 150 micrometers), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of approximately 50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of approximately 0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the

  17. Comment on 'inflow, levels and the fate of some persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons in the Rijeka Bay area of the Adriatic Sea by N. Picer and M. Picer'

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    the PCB standard used for their identification and quantification of PCBs. It is unjustified to report the concentration levels of PCBs, as such, in the environment unless each and every congener of the PCBs is properly identified. It is a well known... individual congener of PCB, such as IUPAC No. 88 or IUPAC No. 209, is indispensable without which the data reproduced would become meaningless (Duinker and Hillebrand, 1983). Chemical Oceanography Division National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula...

  18. Chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in biota, sediments and water collected from the Ligurian Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of samples were collected for measurement of DDT and its derivatives DDE and DDD, lindane and polychlorinated biphenyls and for assessment of their presence in biota, sediments and water of the Ligurian sea. Retention times of chlorinated hydrocarbons relative to that of aldrin in the samples are reported. Comparisions are made of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations in fresh and freeze dried samples and also in zooplankton and seaplant. The hydrocarbon concentrations are measured in mussels, Mytillus galloprovincialis, sediments and water. The Σ DDT/PCB ratios are determined for mussels and sediment samples

  19. Heavy metal and chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in California sea loins (Zalophus californianus californianus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhler, D.R.; Claeys, R.R.; Mate, B.R.

    1975-12-01

    Samples of various tissues and organs from healthy California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) and sick animals (apparently with leptospirosis) collected along the central Oregon coast in 1970, 1971, and 1973 were analyzed for total mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Maximum mercury concentrations of 74 to 170 ppM occurred in sea lion liver, but only 1.6 to 3.7 percent of this was present as methylmercury. Cadmium was concentrated primarily in the kidney which contained 7.2 to 12.0 ppM of the metal. Chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in sea lion fat ranged between 253 to 475 ppM DDE, and 21.2 and 34.1 ppM PCB. Although mercury, cadmium, and chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in some of the sick sea lions were significantly higher than those present in healthy animals, it is not possible to relate these differences to the onset of leptospirosis.

  20. Petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons in water from Lake Manzala and associated canals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badawy, M.I.; Wahaab, R.A.; Abou Waly, H.F. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    1995-08-01

    Lake Manzala is located at the north eastern edge of Nile Delta in Egypt. It is separated from the Mediterranean sea by a sandy beach ridge. However, the lake is in connection with the sea through three opening nearby Port Said. The area of the lake is about 769 Km{sup 2} and relatively shallow with an average depth of 1.3 m. The lake is of high economic value as a natural resource, for fishery, reacreation and for migratory birds. The lake is highly polluted as it receives wastewaters discharged by several canal. The present investigation aimed to assess the residue levels of petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in the lake water as well as in Hadous canal, Fariskur canal and Bahr-El-Baqar canal. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. Rush-hour aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons in selected subway stations of Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Li, Chunlei; Wang, Xinming; Guo, Hai; Feng, Yanli; Chen, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Air samples were collected simultaneously at platform, mezzanine and outdoor in five typical stations of subway system in Shanghai, China using stainless steel canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD) after cryogenic preconcentration. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) at the platforms and mezzanines inside the stations averaged (10.3 +/- 2.1), (38.7 +/- 9.0), (19.4 +/- 10.1) and (30.0 +/- 11.1) microg/m3, respectively; while trichloroethylene (TrCE), tetrachloroethylene (TeCE) and para-dichlorobenzene (pDCB), vinyl chloride and carbon tetrachloride were the most abundant chlorinated hydrocarbons inside the stations with average levels of (3.6 +/- 1.3), (1.3 +/- 0.5), (4.1 +/- 1.1), (2.2 +/- 1.1) and (1.2 +/- 0.3) microg/m3, respectively. Mean levels of major aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons were higher indoor (platforms and mezzanines) than outdoor with average indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios of 1.1-9.5, whereas no significant indoor/outdoor differences were found except for benzene and TrCE. The highly significant mutual correlations (p tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a marker of traffic-related emission without other indoor and outdoor sources, indicated that BTEX were introduced into the subway stations from indoor/outdoor air exchange and traffic emission should be their dominant source. TrCE and pDCB were mainly from indoor emission and TeCE might have both indoor emission sources and contribution from outdoor air, especially in the mezzanines. PMID:22783624

  2. Rush-hour aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons in selected subway stations of Shanghai, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanli Zhang; Chunlei Li; Xinming Wang; Hai Guo; Yanli Feng; Jianmin Chen

    2012-01-01

    Air samples were collected simultaneously at platform,mezzanine and outdoor in five typical stations of subway system in Shanghai,China using stainless steel canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD) after cryogenic preconcentration.Benzene,toluene,ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) at the platforms and mezzanines inside the stations averaged (10.3± 2.1),(38.7 ± 9.0),(19.4 ± 10.1) and (30.0 ± 11.1) μg/m3,respectively; while trichloroethylene (TrCE),tetrachloroethylene (TeCE)and para-dichlorobenzene (pDCB),vinyl chloride and carbon tetrachloride were the most abundant chlorinated hydrocarbons inside the stations with average levels of (3.6 ± 1.3),(1.3 ± 0.5),(4.1 ± 1.1),(2.2 ± 1.1) and (1.2 ± 0.3) μg/m3,respectively.Mean levels of major aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons were higher indoor (platforms and mezzanines) than outdoor with average indoor/outdoor (I/O)ratios of 1.1-9.5,whereas no significant indoor/outdoor differences were found except for benzene and TrCE.The highly significant mutual correlations (p < 0.01) for BTEX between indoor and outdoor and their significant correlation (p < 0.05) with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE),a marker of traffic-related emission without other indoor and outdoor sources,indicated that BTEX were introduced into the subway stations from indoor/outdoor air exchange and traffic emission should be their dominant source.TrCE and pDCB were mainly from indoor emission and TeCE might have both indoor emission sources and contribution from outdoor air,especially in the mezzanines.

  3. Kinetics of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Toxicity of Trichloroethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhuis, Roelof; Oedzes, Johannes Y.; Waarde, Jacob J. van der; Janssen, Dick B.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and seven other chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were studied. All experiments were performed with cells grown under copper stress and thus expressing soluble methane monooxygenase. Compounds that were re

  4. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Múčka, V.; Buňata, M.; Čuba, V.; Silber, R.; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, Jul (2015), s. 108-116. ISSN 0969-806X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28721S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chlorinated hydrocarbons * TCE * PCE * PCBs * dechlorination * gamma irradiation * modifiers * cell membrane permeability Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 1.380, year: 2014

  5. Volatile Short-chain Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in the Groundwater of the City of Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijanović-Rajčić, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the quality of the groundwater sampled from private wells and the public water-supply system in terms of estimating the contamination caused by short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons, as well as to estimate the exposure of the citizens dwelling in different suburbs to these pollutants of their drinking water (Fig. 1. The aim of the study was also to determine which suburb is supplied through the public water-supply system with water originating from the Sašnak spring that is contaminated with volatile chlorinated short-chain hydrocarbons.Drinking water samples were taken from 3 private wells and 1 public water-supply system situated in 3 Zagreb suburbs - Pešćenica, Trnje, and Trešnjevka. The sampling was carried out during 2003 and was undertaken on a seasonal basis. Short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons - 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethene and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene - were determined by gas chromatography, following "liquid-liquid extraction" in pentane. For that purpose, we applied the gas chromatograph equipped with an electron-capture detector, thermo-programmable operations, and a suitable capillary column. The technique applied was that of split-injection.The groundwater of the City of Zagreb was found to be contaminated with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons. The concentration level of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, determined in most of the samples, was found to be low (Fig. 2. On the other hand, 1,1,2-trichloroethene was present in all samples in concentrations of about 1 µg l-1- (Fig. 3. Only the drinking water samples taken from private wells in the suburb of Trnje contained somewhat higher mass concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, with the peak value of 19.03 µg l-1, measured in the winter season. In the samples taken from private wells in Trnje, the mass concentrations of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene rangedfrom 15.30 µg l-1 to 18.65 µg l-1, as measured in autumn

  6. Kinetics of aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of chlorinated and brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, João; Frascari, Dario; Pozdniakova, Tatiana; Danko, Anthony S

    2016-05-15

    This review analyses kinetic studies of aerobic cometabolism (AC) of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) from 2001-2015 in order to (i) compare the different kinetic models proposed, (ii) analyse the estimated model parameters with a focus on novel HAHs and the identification of general trends, and (iii) identify further research needs. The results of this analysis show that aerobic cometabolism can degrade a wide range of HAHs, including HAHs that were not previously tested such as chlorinated propanes, highly chlorinated ethanes and brominated methanes and ethanes. The degree of chlorine mineralization was very high for the chlorinated HAHs. Bromine mineralization was not determined for studies with brominated aliphatics. The examined research period led to the identification of novel growth substrates of potentially high interest. Decreasing performance of aerobic cometabolism were found with increasing chlorination, indicating the high potential of aerobic cometabolism in the presence of medium- and low-halogenated HAHs. Further research is needed for the AC of brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons, the potential for biofilm aerobic cometabolism processes, HAH-HAH mutual inhibition and the identification of the enzymes responsible for each aerobic cometabolism process. Lastly, some indications for a possible standardization of future kinetic studies of HAH aerobic cometabolism are provided. PMID:26874310

  7. Metabolism of volatile chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbergh, P A; Kunka, B S

    1988-01-01

    A Pseudomonas fluorescens strain designated PFL12 was isolated from soil and water that were contaminated with various chloroaliphatic hydrocarbons. The isolate was able to metabolize 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 2,2-dichloropropane, and trichloroethylene.

  8. Application of compound specific 13C isotope investigations of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Chlorinated hydrocarbons are one of the most common pollutants found in groundwater. Due to complex contamination situations with overlapping contamination plumes the assessment of the organic contaminants requires the installation of expensive observation wells and high analytical effort. Here the determination of the stable isotope ratio 13C/12C of the organic compounds offers a promising and efficient tool to investigate the origin and the biodegradation characteristics of the chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater. The application of the method is based on characteristic isotope fingerprints, differing in chlorinated solvents. This isotope fingerprint is derived from different production pathways and is not influenced by transport or by retardation processes in the underground. Due to the fact, that two different contaminations can easily be distinguished by isotope ratios, an improved distinction of spatially and temporally different contamination plumes might be possible. In course of biologically mediated degradation processes a shift of the isotope ratios between the precursor and the product can frequently be observed, such as with denitrification or sulfate reduction processes. The isotope fractionation is due to a preferential reaction of the bonds formed by the lighter isotopes and leads to a progressive enrichment of the heavy isotopes in the precursor while the product becomes depleted in the heavy isotopes. Biological degradation of the highly chlorinated hydrocarbons is due to a co-metabolic dechlorinisation. Tetrachloroethene (PCE) for example degrades under anoxic conditions via trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Subsequent degradation to vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene may appear under aerobic as well as reducing environments depending on the site specific conditions. In several laboratory studies it has been shown, that biodegradation of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is accompanied by an isotope fractionation of

  9. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions containing the active carbon (AC) or cupric oxide (CuO) as the modifiers was studied. The obtained results were compared to the previously studied dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both modifiers were found to decrease the efficiency of dechlorination. The AC modifier acts mainly via adsorption of the aliphatic (unlike the aromatic) hydrocarbons and the CuO oxide mainly inhibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. The results presented in this paper will be also helpful for the studies of the impact of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the membrane permeability of living cells. - Highlights: • The active carbon affects negatively the dechlorination of aliphatic hydrocarbons. • The inhibition effect is connected with the adsorption of hydrocarbons. • The CuO oxide ihibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. • None of the two modifiers changes the reaction order of radiation induced dechlorination

  10. Kinetics of chlorinated hydrocarbon degradation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and toxicity of trichloroethylene.

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenhuis, Roelof; Oedzes, Johannes Y.; Waarde, Jacob J. van der; Janssen, Dick B.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and seven other chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were studied. All experiments were performed with cells grown under copper stress and thus expressing soluble methane monooxygenase. Compounds that were readily degraded included chloroform, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, and TCE, with V(max) values of 550, 330, and 290 nmol min-1 mg of cells-1, respectively. 1,1-Dichloroethylene was a very poor substra...

  11. Application of Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1 for the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Hage, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    The large-scale application of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) has resulted in many cases of groundwater contamination. Contaminated groundwater can be remediated by pump-and-treat: the groundwater is pumped to the surface and treated. The groundwater can be treated in bioreactors, in which the contaminants are biodegraded. Since extracted groundwater is often anaerobic, it has to be oxygenated in order to allow aerobic biodegradation of the contaminants. However, direct oxygenation...

  12. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water

  13. Natural attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in a freshwater wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Michelle M.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Smith, Barrett L.

    1997-01-01

    Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) occurs as ground water discharges from a sand aquifer to a freshwater wetland at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Field and laboratory results indicate that biotransformation in the anaerobic wetland sediments is an important attenuation process. Relatively high concentrations of the parent compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (PCA) and low or undetectable concentrations of daughter products were measured in the aquifer. In contrast, relatively high concentrations of the daughter products cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (12DCE); vinyl chloride (VC); 1,1,2-trichloroethane (112TCA); and 1,2-dichloroethane (12DCA) were measured in ground water in the wetland sediments, although total VOC concentrations decreased upward from about 1 mu mol/L (micromoles per liter) at the base of the wetland sediments to less than 0.2 near the surface. Microcosm experiments showed that 12DCE and VC are produced from anaerobic degradation of both TCE and PCA; PCA degradation also produced 112TCA and 12DCA.

  14. Numerical simulation of the thermal destruction of some chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, E M; Koshland, C P

    1990-10-01

    We have numerically modeled the breakdown of small quantities of several chlorinated hydrocarbons (CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, C2H3Cl, and C2H5Cl) in a lean mixture of combustion products between 800 and 1480 K. This simulates the fate of poorly atomized waste in a liquid-injection incinerator. Kinetics calculations were performed using the CHEMKIN and SENKIN programs, with a reaction mechanism that was developed at Louisiana State University to model flat-flame burner experiments. A 99.99-percent destruction efficiency was attained in one second at temperatures ranging from 1280 to 960 K, with CCl4 requiring the highest temperature for destruction and C2H5Cl the lowest. For all compounds except C2H5Cl, there was a range of temperatures at which byproducts accounted for several percent of the elemental chlorine at the outlet. The more heavily chlorinated compounds formed more byproducts even though the amount of elemental chlorine was the same in all cases. The sensitivity of results to residence time, equivalence ratio, temperature profile, and the presence of additional chlorine, was examined for the case of CHCl3. PMID:2257126

  15. Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons at cold temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of intrinsic bioremediation in cold climates was evaluated based on studies on a former landfill site at Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake. This site has been used in the past as a disposal site for various hydrocarbon products, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX), dichloroethanes, and dichlorobenzenes. Computer models based on the results of the investigation suggest that reductive dechlorination and BTEX mineralization has occurred and is occurring at this site despite the colder in-situ temperatures. Further studies of the complex redox environment required to facilitate reductive dechlorination is recommended before intrinsic bioremediation can be considered with certainty as a viable remedial option in cold temperature environments. 17 refs., 7 figs

  16. Assessing breeding potential of peregrine falcons based on chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations in prey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J.E. [Canadian Wildlife Service, Pacific Wildlife Research Centre, 5421 Robertson Rd., RR no. 1, Delta, British Columbia, V4K 3N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: john.elliott@ec.gc.ca; Miller, M.J. [Iolaire Ecological Consulting, 7899 Thrasher St., Mission, British Columbia, V2V 5H3 (Canada); Wilson, L.K. [Canadian Wildlife Service, Pacific Wildlife Research Centre, 5421 Robertson Rd., RR no. 1, Delta, British Columbia, V4K 3N2 (Canada)

    2005-03-01

    Peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) now breed successfully in most areas of North America from which they were previously extirpated. The loss during the mid-part of the last century of many of the world's peregrine populations was largely a consequence of impaired reproduction caused by the effects of DDE on eggshell quality and embryo hatchability. Population recovery has been attributed to re-introduction efforts, coupled with regulatory restrictions on the use of organochlorine pesticides. Peregrines have not returned to breed in some areas, such as the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia. That region has been extensively planted in fruit orchards which were treated annually with DDT during the early 1950s to the 1970s. Ongoing contamination of avian species, including potential peregrine prey, inhabiting orchards has been documented. In response to an initiative to release peregrines around the city of Kelowna in the Okanagan Valley, we collected potential peregrine prey species and analyzed whole bodies for chlorinated hydrocarbon residues. We used a simple bioaccumulation model to predict concentrations of DDE in peregrine eggs using concentrations in prey and estimates of dietary makeup as input. Peregrines would be expected to breed successfully only if they fed on a diet primarily of doves. Feeding on as little as 10% of other species such as starlings, robins, gulls and magpies would produce DDE concentrations in peregrine eggs greater than the threshold of 15 mg/kg. We also estimated the critical concentration of DDE in total prey to be about 0.5 mg/kg, one half of the previous most conservative criterion for peregrine prey. Concentrations of dieldrin and PCBs in peregrine prey are less than suggested critical levels. - Based on the level of DDE contamination of prey items, it seems unlikely that peregrine falcons could breed successfully throughout most of the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia.

  17. Effect of reduced iron on the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated soil and ground water: A review of publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

    2014-02-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons are among the most hazardous organic pollutants. The traditional remediation technologies, i.e., pumping of contaminated soil- and groundwater and its purification appear to be costly and not very efficient as applied to these pollutants. In the last years, a cheaper method of destroying chlorine-replaced hydrocarbons has been used based on the construction of an artificial permeable barrier, where the process develops with the participation of in situ bacteria activated by zerovalent iron. The forced significant decrease in the redox potential (Eh) down to -750 mV provides the concentration of electrons necessary for the reduction of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A rise in the pH drastically accelerates the dechlorination process. In addition to chlorine-organic compounds, ground water is often contaminated with heavy metals. The influence of the latter on the effect of zerovalent iron may be different: both accelerating its degradation (Cu) and inhibiting it (Cr). Most of the products of zerovalent iron corrosion, i.e., green rust, magnetite, ferrihydrite, hematite, and goethite, weaken the efficiency of the Fe0 barrier by mitigating the dechlorination and complicating the water filtration. However, pyrrhotite FeS, on the contrary, accelerates the dechlorination of chlorine hydrocarbons.

  18. Biotransformation of monoaromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons at an aviation-gasoline spill site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of petroleum products from underground storage tanks, pipelines, and accidental spills are major sources of contamination of unsaturated soils, aquifer solids, and a shallow water table aquifer under the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station at Traverse City, MI, has acclimated to the aerobic and anaerobic transformation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons (BTX) released from an aviation gasoline spill. The aquifer also exhibits reductive dechlorination of a chlorinated solvent spill adjacent to the aviation gasoline spill. The groundwater is buffered near neutrality. The aviation gasoline plume is methanogenic and the aquifer contains enough iron minerals to support significant iron solubilization. Field evidence of both aerobic and anaerobic biotransformation of monoaromatics was confirmed by laboratory studies of aquifer material obtained from the site. In the laboratory studies, the removal of the monoaromatics in the anaerobic material was rapid and compared favorable with removal in the aerobic material. The kinetics of anaerobic removal of monoaromatics in the laboratory were similar to the kinetics at field scale in the aquifer. Biotransformation of the chlorinated solvents was not observed until late in the study, when daughter products from reductive dechlorination of the chlorinated solvents were identified by GC/MS

  19. Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chlorine gas are inhaled. Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) that may be delayed for a few hours ... health problems such as fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) following the initial exposure. How people can protect ...

  20. Hydrocarbon level detection with nanosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosecond laser induced breakdown in liquid is used as a technique to detect hydrocarbon levels in water. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was focused to generate optical breakdown associated with shock wave generation. The shock wave was propagated at the speed of sound in the medium after travelling 1 μs outward from the center of optical breakdown. Different amplitudes of sound were traced with the aid of an ultrasonic probe. The optical properties of the hydrocarbon solution were quantified via fundamental refractive index measurement (the Snell law). A continuous mode diode pumped solid state laser with second harmonic generation was used as the illumination light source. A CCD video camera with Matrox version 4.2 software was utilized to analyze the recording image. Option line analysis was performed to analyze the intensity of optical breakdown at different input energies. Gray level analysis was also conducted on the scattering light after passing through the hydrocarbon solution at different concentrations. The hydrocarbon solution comprised impurities or particles that varied according to the concentration. The average of the gray level is assumed to present the size of the particle. Inherently, as the acoustic wave propagates outward, it transports the mass (particles or impurities) and impacts on the ultrasonic probe. As a result a higher concentration of hydrocarbons reveals a larger amplitude of sound waves. This phenomenon is identified as a finger print for hydrocarbon levels between 100 and 1000 ppm. The transient detection, without complicated sampling preparation and no hazardous chemical involvement, makes laser ablation a promising technique to detect in situ hydrocarbon levels in water. (paper)

  1. In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons: Three case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ biodegradation of organic contaminants is one of the most cost-effective means of site remediation. This method has proven successful in soils, ground water, and slurries. Bacteria capable of degrading organic contaminants within an aquifer include many species from a wide spectrum of genera, e.g. Pseudomonas, Corynebacterium, Bacillus, etc. In most cases, a mixture of bacterial strains is required to completely oxidize a complex organic contaminant. Each strain of an organism may target a specific compound, working together with other organisms to ultimately degrade each intermediate until complete degradation, also known as mineralization, occurs. One or more of the following mechanisms are utilized by bacteria for organic chemical degradation: (1) aerobic, (2) anaerobic, and (3) co-metabolic. During aerobic oxidation of organic chemicals, bacteria utilize the pollutant as an electron and hydrogen source and oxygen acts as the electron and hydrogen acceptor, resulting in water. As the bacterial enzymes cleave the compound, oxidized products are produced along with energy for the reaction to proceed. This is the most rapid and widely utilized mechanism. Dehalogenation occurs under aerobic, or perhaps more often, under anoxic conditions. This process occurs in the presence of alternate electron acceptors and replaces chlorine with hydrogen. The mechanism of co-metabolism can be aerobic or anaerobic, but is more often aerobic. This process requires a separate energy source for the bacterial cell because the pollutant is not utilized as an energy source. The role of bioremediation in site remediation is demonstrated below by three case studies: (1) a refinery, (2) a municipal landfill and (3) a pesticide formulation plant

  2. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in fish-eating birds wintering in the Gdansk Bay, Baltic Sea, 1980-81

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falandysz, J. (Veterinary Hygiene Research Station, Gdansk, Poland); Szefer, P.

    1982-04-01

    Further samples of the chlorinated hydrocarbon content in adipose tissue of fish-eating birds wintering in the South Baltic show high concentrations of PCB compared with ..sigma..DDT, HCB, alpha- and gamma-BHC. The great crested grebe presently examined had approximately four times higher PCB/..sigma..DDT ratios than specimens taken during 1975-76.

  3. Chromatographic study of gamma-ray irradiated degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbon in gamma ray irradiation was examined in order to get information on treatment of groundwater. Water chloroform was sealed into a vial irradiated with gamma ray. Both gas chromatography and ion chromatography were applied for determination of degradation products. Carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane and chloride ion were detected in the irradiated system. Effect of radiation dose on the gamma ray induced chloroform degradation was investigated. The elimination of chloride ion and the degradation of chloroform were promoted by gamma irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. The G(CHCl3), which was defined as the number of degraded chloroform molecules when absorbed 100eV, was inferred to be 3.1. The degradation mechanism of chloroform irradiated with gamma ray seemed to involve that chloroform reacted with electron from radiolysis of water and the elimination of chloride ion occurred. (author)

  4. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, Stuart E.

    2002-06-01

    Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

  5. Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons: Ugly duckling to beautiful swan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, G.F.

    1999-10-01

    For many years anaerobic biological processes were reputed to be more sensitive than aerobic processes to toxic substances such as chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) and thus a poor choice for treating water containing these compounds. This was especially true for water containing perchloroethylene (PCE) or trichloroethylene (TCE) because vinyl chloride, a human carcinogen, is produced when these two compounds are degraded anaerobically. Aerobic treatment with organisms containing oxygenase enzyme systems, which could fortuitously degrade a wide variety of chlorinated aliphatics (but not PCE), was favored. Recently, however, several enrichments and organisms have been isolated that will convert PCE and TCE into ethene and ethane, as shown by field data. Because of this evidence, anaerobic processes are now considered a significant alternative treatment for CAH contamination. Recent work at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, has focused on the effect of mixtures of CAHs on biotransformation of individual organic compounds and the potential for a combined methanogen-iron (Fe(0)) system to improve CAH bioremediation. At the concentration ranges tested, the presence of a mixture of CAHs seems to decrease rate of transformation of individual organics. However, there are important exceptions; in some cases a mixture of CAHs seems to facilitate transformation of an individual organic compound. Combination of an active methanogenic population with Fe(0) increases the rate and extent of transformation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. Results with PCE and 1,1,1-trichloroethane are less clear.

  6. California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) have lower chlorinated hydrocarbon contents in northern Baja California, Mexico, than in California, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Toro, Ligeia [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California (UABC), Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Investigacion y Conservacion de Mamiferos Marinos de Ensenada, A.C., Placido Mata 2309 Depto. D-5, Condominio Las Fincas, Ensenada, Baja California 22810 (Mexico); Heckel, Gisela [Investigacion y Conservacion de Mamiferos Marinos de Ensenada, A.C., Placido Mata 2309 Depto. D-5, Condominio Las Fincas, Ensenada, Baja California 22810 (Mexico) and Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, B.C. Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico)]. E-mail: gheckel@cicese.mx; Camacho-Ibar, Victor F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanologicas, UABC, Apdo. Postal 453, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico); Schramm, Yolanda [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California (UABC), Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Investigacion y Conservacion de Mamiferos Marinos de Ensenada, A.C., Placido Mata 2309 Depto. D-5, Condominio Las Fincas, Ensenada, Baja California 22810 (Mexico)

    2006-07-15

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) were determined in blubber samples of 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) that stranded dead along Todos Santos Bay, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, January 2000-November 2001. {sigma}DDTs were the dominant group (geometric mean 3.8 {mu}g/g lipid weight), followed by polychlorinated biphenyls ({sigma}PCBs, 2.96 {mu}g/g), chlordanes (0.12 {mu}g/g) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (0.06 {mu}g/g). The {sigma}DDTs/{sigma}PCBs ratio was 1.3. We found CH levels more than one order of magnitude lower than those reported for California sea lion samples collected along the California coast, USA, during the same period as our study. This sharp north-south gradient suggests that Z. californianus stranded in Ensenada (most of them males) would probably have foraged during the summer near rookeries 500-1000 km south of Ensenada and the rest of the year migrate northwards, foraging along the Baja California peninsula, including Ensenada, and probably farther north. - Results suggest that sea lion prey must also have lower hydrocarbons in Baja California than in California in the USA.

  7. California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) have lower chlorinated hydrocarbon contents in northern Baja California, Mexico, than in California, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) were determined in blubber samples of 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) that stranded dead along Todos Santos Bay, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, January 2000-November 2001. ΣDDTs were the dominant group (geometric mean 3.8 μg/g lipid weight), followed by polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCBs, 2.96 μg/g), chlordanes (0.12 μg/g) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (0.06 μg/g). The ΣDDTs/ΣPCBs ratio was 1.3. We found CH levels more than one order of magnitude lower than those reported for California sea lion samples collected along the California coast, USA, during the same period as our study. This sharp north-south gradient suggests that Z. californianus stranded in Ensenada (most of them males) would probably have foraged during the summer near rookeries 500-1000 km south of Ensenada and the rest of the year migrate northwards, foraging along the Baja California peninsula, including Ensenada, and probably farther north. - Results suggest that sea lion prey must also have lower hydrocarbons in Baja California than in California in the USA

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe – investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G; A. Holubová Šmejkalová; J. Klánová; P. Přibylová; Váňa, M.

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. Σ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m−3 and below analytical method detection limit (< MDL) to 2.1 × 103 ng L−1. The concentrations of PCBs and CPs in rainwater were < MDL. Σ PCB and Σ CP concentrations in air ranged fr...

  9. The synergistic effect of Escherichia coli inactivation by sequential disinfection with low level chlorine dioxide followed by free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Dong; Zhu, Sui-Yi; Chen, Bo-Yan; Huo, Ming-Xin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there was little information available on pathogen removal using low level disinfectant followed by free chlorine in sequential disinfection (SD). This study investigated Escherichia coli inactivation by four types of disinfection: single step disinfection (SSD), SD, traditional sequential disinfection (TSD) and mixed disinfectant disinfection (MDD). Results indicated that SD had higher ability to inactivate E. coli than the others, indicating there was a positive synergistic effect on chlorine disinfection by prior dosing with a low level of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). The ONPG assay suggested that the permeability of cell wall rather than the viability of E. coli were changed under 0.02 mg/l ClO(2) treatment. The coexistence of residual ClO(2) and free chlorine also plays an active synergistic effect. Additionally, temperature had a positive effect on E. coli inactivation in SD, while inactivation was reduced in alkaline compared to neutral and acidic conditions. PMID:23165713

  10. Reproductive and morphological condition of wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lutra canadensis) in relation to chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, L E; Harris, M L; Stephen, C. R.; Elliott, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    We assessed chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of mink and river otters on the Columbia and Fraser River systems of northwestern North America, in relation to morphological measures of condition. We obtained carcasses of mink and river otters from commercial trappers during the winters 1994-1995 and 1995-1996. Necropsies included evaluation of the following biological parameters: sex, body mass and length, age, thymus, heart, liver, lung, spleen, pancreas, kidney, gonad, omentum, adrenal g...

  11. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Strand

    2004-09-27

    The research objectives for this report are: (1) Transform poplar and other tree species to extend and optimize chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) oxidative activities. (2) Determine the mechanisms of CHC oxidation in plants. (3) Isolate the genes responsible for CHC oxidation in plants. We have made significant progress toward an understanding of the biochemical mechanism of CHC transformation native to wild-type poplar. We have identified chloral, trichloroethanol, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid as products of TCE metabolism in poplar plants and in tissue cultures of poplar cells.(Newman et al. 1997; Newman et al. 1999) Use of radioactively labeled TCE showed that once taken up and transformed, most of the TCE was incorporated into plant tissue as a non-volatile, unextractable residue.(Shang et al. 2001; Shang and Gordon 2002) An assay for this transformation was developed and validated using TCE transformation by poplar suspension cells. Using this assay, it was shown that two different activities contribute to the fixation of TCE by poplar cells: one associated with cell walls and insoluble residues, the other associated with a high molecular weight, heat labile fraction of the cell extract, a fixation that was apparently catalyzed by plant enzymes.

  12. Isotopic control of methods for the determination of residues of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of residues of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides is of importance mainly in case of foods of animal origin. However, this determination is made slower or even inhibited by a number of difficulties. Extraction and clean-up procedures are of primary importance even in case of the most polished methods of pesticide analysis problems. The isotopic method was used for testing the mentioned steps. Experiments were carried out with radioactive C-14 isotope. According to the results of control tests, data varying within relatively wide limits have been obtained, depending on the applied method. In each case where the boiling point of the solvent permits, the use of the Kuderna--Danish instrument is advisable. In case of a solvent of higher boiling point a combined method is more expedient. For this purpose a method has been suggested which enables the evaporation of the sample to be carried out without any practical loss of agent, thus the obtained analytical results can be considered as perfectly reliable ones. (P.J.)

  13. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in tuna homogenate IAEA-351: Results of a world-wide exercise. ILMR intercalibration exercise report no. 44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present intercalibration exercise provides, once again, strong evidence for insufficient data quality for chlorinated hydrocarbons in marine samples. This comment must be considered in perspective. The principle aim of these exercises is not just to obtain narrower confidence intervals for a given parameter moreover it is to guarantee that the data generated by monitoring exercises is of sufficient quality to evaluate contaminant levels, gradients and trends in the environment. All data should be accurate but precision (expressed as confidence limits) may vary according to its application. It is clearly not the same problem to measure DDT for human health protection (legal concentration limits in seafood range from about 1000-5000 ng/g) as it is to monitor environmental trends where values in biota are commonly one to three orders of magnitude lower. Even the 8 laboratories achieving 'good' data for pp'DDT would not be able to statistically distinguish a 35% increase of the concentration of this parameter from 30-41 ng/g on the basis of the precision observed in the present exercise. Fortunately spatial gradients for DDTs tend to be much larger than this and significant changes could be easily detected by the 'good' labs provided that they use adequate quality control procedures

  14. Quantification of Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Saturated Low Permeability Sediments Using Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Philipp; Parker, Beth L; Chapman, Steven W; Aravena, Ramon; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    This field and modeling study aims to reveal if degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in low permeability sediments can be quantified using compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). For that purpose, the well-characterized Borden research site was selected, where an aquifer-aquitard system was artificially contaminated by a three component chlorinated solvent mixture (tetrachloroethene (PCE) 45 vol %, trichloroethene (TCE) 45 vol %, and chloroform (TCM) 10 vol %). Nearly 15 years after the contaminant release, several high-resolution concentration and CSIA profiles were determined for the chlorinated hydrocarbons that had diffused into the clayey aquitard. The CSIA profiles showed large shifts of carbon isotope ratios with depth (up to 24‰) suggesting that degradation occurs in the aquitard despite the small pore sizes. Simulated scenarios without or with uniform degradation failed to reproduce the isotope data, while a scenario with decreasing degradation with depth fit the data well. This suggests that nutrients had diffused into the aquitard favoring stronger degradation close to the aquifer-aquitard interface than with increasing depth. Moreover, the different simulation scenarios showed that CSIA profiles are more sensitive to different degradation conditions compared to concentration profiles highlighting the power of CSIA to constrain degradation activities in aquitards. PMID:27153381

  15. Distributions and fate of chlorinated pesticides, biomarkers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments along a contamination gradient from a point-source in San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, W.E.; Hostettler, F.D.; Rapp, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution and fate of chlorinated pesticides, biomarkers, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surficial sediments along a contamination gradient in the Lauritzen Canal and Richmond Harbor in San Francisco Bay was investigated. Compounds were identified and quantified using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry. Biomarkers and PAHs were derived primarily from weathered petroleum. DDT was reductively dechlorinated under anoxic conditions to DDD and several minor degradation products, DDMU, DDMS, and DDNU. Under aerobic conditions, DDT was dehydrochlorinated to DDE and DBP. Aerobic degradation of DDT was diminished or inhibited in zones of high concentration, and increased significantly in zones of lower concentration: Other chlorinated pesticides identified in sediment included dieldrin and chlordane isomers. Multivariate analysis of the distributions of the DDTs suggested that there are probably two sources of DDD. In addition, DDE and DDMU are probably formed by similar mechanisms, i.e. dehydrochlorination. A steep concentration gradient existed from the Canal to the Outer Richmond Harbor, but higher levels of DDD than those found in the remainder of the Bay indicated that these contaminants are transported on particulates and colloidal organic matter from this source into San Francisco Bay. Chlorinated pesticides and PAHs may pose a potential problem to biota in San Francisco Bay.

  16. Synergistic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons with microorganisms and zero valent iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöftner, Philipp; Summer, Dorothea; Leitner, Simon; Watzinger, Andrea; Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC) are located mainly within build-up regions. Therefore in most cases only in-situ technologies without excavation of soil material can be used for remediation. This project examines a novel in-situ remediation method, in which the biotic degradation via bacteria is combined with abiotic degradation via zero-valent iron particles (ZVI). ZVI particles are injected into the aquifer where CHC-molecules are reductively dechlorinated. However Fe0 is also oxidized by reaction with water leading to generation of H2 without any CHC degradation. To achieve biotic degradation often strictly anaerobic strains of the bacteria Dehalococcoides are used. These bacteria can dechlorinate CHC by utilizing H2. By combining these processes the H2, produced during the anaerobic corrosion of Fe0, could be used by bacteria for further CHC degradation. Therefore the amount of used Fe0 and as a consequence also remediation costs could be reduced. Additionally the continuous supply of H2 could make the bacterial degradation more controllable. Different Fe0 particles (nano- and micro-scale) were tested for their perchloroethene (PCE) degradation rate and H2 production rate in microcosms. PCE-degradation rate by different bacterial cultures was investigated in the same microcosm system. In course of these experiments the 13C enrichment factors of the PCE degradation of the different particles and cultures were determined to enable the differentiation of biotic and abiotic degradation. Preliminary results showed, that the nano-scale particles reacted faster with PCE and water than their micro-scaled counterparts. The PCE degradation via micro-scaled particles lead to 13C enrichment factors in the range of -3,6 ‰ ± 0,6 to -9,5 ‰ ± 0,2. With one of the examined bacterial cultures a fast reduction of PCE to ethene was observed. Although PCE and TCE were completely degraded by this culture the metabolites DCE and VC could still be detected

  17. Assessment of semi-empirical mass transfer correlations for pervaporation treatment of wastewater contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Sean X.; PENG Ming

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of mass transfer characteristics of pervaporation (PV) treatment of wastewater contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons is of great importance for water treatment plant operators conducting initial evaluation, process optimization,and process economics. While a membrane plays a central role in pervaporation processes and separation efficiency, the mass transfer in the liquid layer next to the membrane surface is of equal, if not greater importance. It is one of the few process parameters that can be adjusted in situ to manipulate the outcome ora pervaporation process. In this study, a bench scale pervaporation experiment of removing a common chlorinated hydrocarbon from water was carried out and the results of it were compared to the ones based on well-known semi-empirical correlations. The mass transfer coefficients from the experiments, ranging from 0.8×10-5~2.5×10-5 m/s under the operating conditions, are higher than those predicted by the correlation. The corresponding separation factors under varying flow velocities are determined to be between 310~950.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubová Šmejkalová, A.; Klánová, J.; Přibylová, P.; Váňa, M.

    2014-10-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. Σ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m-3 and below analytical method detection limit (particulate matter and rainwater properties were investigated. The concentrations of ionic species in particulate matter and rainwater were significantly correlated, highlighting the importance of particle scavenging process. Overall, higher scavenging efficiencies were found for relatively less volatile PAHs, underlining the effect of analyte gas-particle partitioning on scavenging process. The PAH wet scavenging was more effective when the concentrations of ionic species were high. In addition, the elemental and organic carbon contents of the particulate matter were found to influence the PAH scavenging.

  19. The effect of remedial measures upon groundwater quality in connection with soil contamination by chlorinated hydrocarbons and the related costs - by example of the City of Hanover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of remedial actions on the groundwater quality was investigated in the aquifer of the City of Hannover. The improvement of groundwater quality was related to the costs for the remedial actions. The attention was focussed on groundwater pollution by chlorinated hydrocarbons as the most important contaminants of groundwater in urban areas. (orig.)

  20. SIMULATION OF PERFORMANCE OF CHLORINE-FREE FLURORINATED ETHERS AND FLUORINATED HYDROCARBONS TO REPLACE CFC-11 AND CFC-114 IN CHILLERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses simulation of the performance of chlorine-free fluorinated ethers and fluorinated hydrocarbons as potential long-term replacements for CFC-11 and -114. Modeling has been done with in-house refrigeration models based on the Carnahan-Starling-DeSantis Equation o...

  1. Investigation of chlorine radical chemistry in the Eyjafjallajkull volcanic plume using observed depletions in non-methane hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Baker; Rauthe-Schch, A.; T. J. Schuck; C. A. M. Brenninkmeijer; van Velthoven, P.F.J.; A. Wisher; D. E. Oram

    2011-01-01

    As part of the effort to understand volcanic plume composition and chemistry during the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajkull, the CARIBIC atmospheric observatory was deployed for three special science flights aboard a Lufthansa passenger aircraft. Measurements made during these flights included the collection of whole air samples, which were analyzed for non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). Hydrocarbon concentrations in plume samples were found to be reduced to levels below backgrou...

  2. A biogeochemical transport model to simulate the attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant fluxes across the groundwater-surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Binning, Philip John; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons originating from point sources are amongst the most prevalent contaminants of ground water and surface water resources. Riparian zones may play an important role in the attenuation of contaminant concentrations when contaminant plumes flow from groundwater to surface water...... because of the occurrence of redox gradients, strongly reductive conditions and high biological activity. In order to meet the expectations of the EU Water Framework Directive, an evaluation of the impact of such plumes on surface water is needed. The aim of this work is to develop a groundwater transport...... and biogeochemical transformation model of the discharge of a TCE plume into a stream, and to determine which parameters most strongly affect pollutant discharge concentrations. Here biological kinetics and the interaction with the soil matrix are implemented in PHREEQC. The ability of PHREEQC to deal...

  3. Use of tree rings to investigate the onset of contamination of a shallow aquifer by chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanosky, T.M.; Hansen, B.P.; Schening, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Oaks (Quercus velutina Lam.) growing over a shallow aquifer contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons were studied to determine if it was possible to estimate the approximate year that contamination began. The annual rings of some trees downgradient from the contaminant release site contained elevated concentrations of chloride possibly derived from dechlorination of contaminants. Additionally, a radial-growth decline began in these trees at approximately the same time that chloride became elevated. Growth did not decline in trees that contained smaller concentrations of chloride. The source of elevated chloride and the corresponding reductions in tree growth could not be explained by factors other than contamination. On the basis of tree-ring evidence alone, the release occurred in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Contaminant release at a second location apparently occurred in the mid- to late 1970s, suggesting that the area was used for disposal for at least 5 years and possibly longer. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Polynuclear aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons in mussels from the coastal zone of Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Oscar A; Comoglio, Laura I; Sericano, José L

    2011-03-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis chilensis) were collected from 12 coastal locations in Ushuaia Bay, Argentina, and the surrounding area in October 1999 and again in October 2003. Concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and selected chlorinated pesticides were determined to assess the impact of a fast-growing population in the area. Total PAH concentrations ranged from 2.24 to an extremely high concentration of 2,420 µg/g lipid measured in mussels collected near an oil jetty used to discharge to shore storage tanks. The composition of PAHs in these samples indicates that the source of these compounds inside Ushuaia Bay is predominantly petrogenic, with some pyrogenic background, whereas mostly pyrogenic-related PAHs were evident in areas outside the bay. Total concentrations of PCBs ranged between 12.8 and 8,210 ng/g lipid, with the highest concentration, detected inside Ushuaia harbor, representing a 10-fold increase when compared with historical data. Chlorinated pesticides were detected at comparatively lower concentrations, with 4-4'- 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene being the most common. The aggressive increase in population and related activities observed in the city of Ushuaia over the last two decades might have affected the environmental quality of the local bay. Moreover, the oceanographic and atmospheric conditions existing in Ushuaia Bay and surrounding areas may favor the accumulation and long-term presence of these organic pollutants in all compartments of this fragile environment. PMID:21128271

  5. Fenton process for degradation of selected chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons exemplified by trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene and chloroform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimin QIANG; Weiwei BEN; ChinPao HUANG

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of selected chlorinated ali-phatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) exemplified by trichloroethy-lene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (DCE), and chloroform (CF) was investigated with Fenton oxidation process. The results indicate that the degradation rate was primarily affected by the chemical structures of organic contami-nants. Hydroxyl radicals (·OH) preferred to attack the organic contaminants with an electron-rich structure such as chlorinated alkenes (i.e., TCE and DCE). The dosing mode of Fenton's reagent, particularly of Fe2+, significantly affected the degradation efficiency of studied organic compound. A new "time-squared" kinetic model, C = Coexp(-kobst2), was developed to express the degrada-tion kinetics of selected CAHs. This model was applicable to TCE and DCE, but inapplicable to CF due to their varied reaction rate constants towards ·OH. Chloride release was monitored to examine the degree of dechlorina- tion during the oxidation of selected CAHs. TCE was more easily dechlorinated than DCE and CF. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) was identified as the major reaction intermediate in the oxidation of TCE, which could be completely removed as the reaction proceeded. No reaction intermedi- ates or byproducts were identified in the oxidation of DCE and CF. Based on the identified intermediate, the reaction mechanism of TCE with Fenton's reagent was proposed.

  6. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Eigl, Rosmarie; Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter; Sterba, Johannes H.; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t1/2 = 37.24 min) - accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the 36Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for 36Cl/Cl analysis.

  7. Natural attenuation of chlorinated-hydrocarbon contamination at Fort Wainwright, Alaska; a hydrogeochemical and microbiological investigation workplan

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Lilly, Michael R.; Braddock, Joan F.; Hinzman, Larry D.

    1998-01-01

    Natural attenuation processes include biological degradation, by which microorganisms break down contaminants into simpler product compounds; adsorption of contaminants to soil particles, which decreases the mass of contaminants dissolved in ground water; and dispersion, which decreases dissolved contaminant concentrations through dilution. The primary objectives of this study are to (1) assess the degree to which such natural processes are attenuating chlorinated-hydrocarbon contamination in ground water, and (2) evaluate the effects of ground-water/surface-water interactions on natural-attenuation processes in the area of the former East and West Quartermasters Fueling Systems for Fort Wainwright, Alaska. The study will include investigations of the hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological processes occurring at this site that influence the transport and fate of chlorinated hydrocarbons in ground water. To accomplish these objectives, a data-collection program has been initiated that includes measurements of water-table elevations and the stage of the Chena River; measurements of vertical temperature profiles within the subsurface; characterization of moisture distribution and movement in the unsaturated zone; collection of ground-water samples for determination of both organic and inorganic chemical constituents; and collection of ground-water samples for enumeration of microorganisms and determination of their potential to mineralize contaminants. We will use results from the data-collection program described above to refine our conceptual model of hydrology and contaminant attenuation at this site. Measurements of water-table elevations and river stage will help us to understand the magnitude and direction of ground-water flow and how changes in the stage of the Chena River affect ground-water flow. Because ambient ground water and surface water typically have different temperature characteristics, temperature monitoring will likely provide further insight

  8. HIgh volume collection of chlorinated hydrocarbons in urban air using three solid adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, W. Neil; Bidleman, Terry F.

    Airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and chlorinated pesticides were measured in Columbia, SC; Denver, CO and over a landfill at New Bedford, MA. At each location comparative sampling was carried out using porous polyurethane foam (PPF), Tenax-GC resin and XAD-2 resin. Concentrations of light and heavy PCB (Aroclors 1016 and 1254), p, p'-DDE, chlordane and toxaphene measured using the different adsorbents agreed well, with average relative standard deviations of 11-15%. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was poorly collected by PPF, but well retained by the resins. HCB concentrations measured using Tenax and XAD-2 agreed within 6 % average relative standard deviation, and were several times higher than those found using PPF. The breakthrough of Aroclor 1016 on PPF was studied in detail for over 30 field sampling experiments. Penetration of 1016 through a PPF bed depends on total air volume and ambient temperature. Breakthrough from the front to backup traps was best correlated with the temperature-weighted air volume, where the temperature factor was derived from PCB vapor pressures at the ambient sampling temperature and at 20 °C.

  9. Thermal decomposition of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons during gas combustion in fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olek Malgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of thermal decomposition of dichloromethane (DCM and chlorobenzene (MCB during the combustion in an inert, bubbling fluidized bed, supported by LPG as auxiliary fuel, have been studied. The concentration profiles of C6H5CI, CH2Cl2, CO2, CO, NOx, COCl2, CHCl3, CH3Cl, C2H2, C6H6, CH4 in the flue gases were specified versus mean bed temperature. Results The role of preheating of gaseous mixture in fluidized bed prior to its ignition inside bubbles was identified as important factor for increase the degree of conversion of DCM and MCB in low bed temperature, in comparison to similar process in the tubular reactor. Conclusions Taking into account possible combustion mechanisms, it was identified that autoignition in bubbles rather than flame propagation between bubbles is needed to achieve complete destruction of DCM and MCB. These condition occurs above 900°C causing the degree of conversion of chlorine compounds of 92-100%.

  10. Optimisation of an integrated optical evanescent wave absorbance sensor for the determination of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, J; Bürck, J; Ache, H J

    1996-03-01

    The suitability of an integrated optical chemical sensor for the determination of highly volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous solutions has been proven. The analytes are detected by NIR absorption spectrometry in the evanescent field of an integrated optical strip waveguide generated in a BGG31 (Schott, Germany) glass substrate, which is coated with a hydrophobic polymer superstrate as sensing layer. It has been shown that the sensitivity increases when the refractive index of the superstrate is increased from 1.333 up to 1.46. Different UV-cured polysiloxanes with low cross sensitivity to water have been prepared. Due to the good light transmission properties of the IO-sensors prepared by this method, quantitative measurements have been performed with the model system trichloroethene (TCE) in water. A detection limit of 22 ppm has been found and the sensor response times (t(90)-value) are between five and fourteen minutes for a coating thickness of around 30 microm. The sensor response is totally reversible. The analyte desorbes in air within 2 min. The enrichment of trichloroethene in the polysiloxane coating can be described by film diffusion through the aqueous boundary layer as rate determining step. PMID:15048399

  11. Comparison of purge and trap GC/MS and purgeable organic chloride analysis for monitoring volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Thurman, E. Michael; Takahashi, Yoshi; Noriega, Mary C.

    1992-01-01

    A combined field and laboratory study was conducted to compare purge and trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (PT-GC/MS) and purgeable organic chloride (POCl) analysis for measuring volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCH) in ground water. Distilled-water spike and recovery experiments using 10 VCH indicate that at concentrations greater than 1 ??g/l recovery is more than 80 percent for both methods with relative standard deviations of about 10 percent. Ground-water samples were collected from a site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where a shallow unconfined aquifer has been contaminated by VCH, and were analyzed by both methods. Results for PT-GC/MS and POCl analysis of the ground-water samples were not significantly different (alpha = 0.05, paired t-test analysis) and indicated little bias between the two methods. Similar conclusions about concentrations and distributions of VCH in the ground-water contamination plume were drawn from the two data sets. However, only PT-GC/MS analysis identified the individual compounds present and determined their concentrations, which was necessary for toxicological and biogeochemical evaluation of the contaminated ground water. POCl analysis was a complimentary method for use with PT-GC/MS analysis for identifying samples with VCH concentrations below the detection limit or with high VCH concentrations that require dilution. Use of POCl as a complimentary monitoring method for PT-GC/MS can result in more efficient use of analytical resources.

  12. Local and seasonal variations in concentrations of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with particles in a Japanese megacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohura, Takeshi; Kamiya, Yuta; Ikemori, Fumikazu

    2016-07-15

    Concentrations of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and chlorinated PAHs (ClPAHs) were measured in different seasons at five sampling stations in Nagoya, a Japanese megacity. The annual mean total ClPAH and total PAH concentrations were 43.3-92.6pg/m(3) and 5200-8570pg/m(3), respectively. The concentrations of total ClPAHs were significantly variable than those of total PAHs, and both total concentrations through the seasons did not significantly correlate at any of the stations. Principal component analysis was used to characterize the ClPAH sources, resulted that ClPAHs were found to be associated with the sources of high-molecular-weight PAHs in the warmer seasons and of low-molecular-weight PAHs in the colder seasons. These findings suggest that principal sources of particle-bound ClPAHs are present in the local area, and change in the seasons. Toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations were estimated to assess the risks associated with exposure to ClPAHs in air. The TEQ concentrations in the samples were 0.05-0.32pg-TEQ/m(3). The TEQ concentrations in summer were approximately half the TEQ concentrations in the other seasons at all of the stations. PMID:27037480

  13. Reproductive success and chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of resident great blue herons (Ardea herodias) from coastal British Columbia, Canada, 1977 to 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human disturbance and loss of nesting habitat were more important factors than chlorinated hydrocarbons in changing heron reproductive success. - Over the period 1977-2000, eggs of Pacific great blue heron (Ardea herodias fannini) were collected from 23 colonies along the southern coast of British Columbia, Canada, and analyzed for persistent organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Concentrations of OC pesticides in eggs declined sharply in the late 1970s, after which there were minimal changes. The sums of PCB congeners were not reduced appreciably during the 1980s and 1990s, but Aroclor 1260 concentrations suggested a sharp decline in PCB contamination of eggs in the late 1970s, similar to that shown for OC pesticides. Eggs collected along or near the Fraser River delta showed higher levels of most pesticides compared to other monitored colonies. Although the delta lands support a long-standing agricultural economy, the primary factors influencing OC levels in the delta colonies were thought to be driven by estuarine processes. We suggest two possible influencing factors were: 1) a greater rate of bioaccumulation in the estuary due to the deposition of particulates collected over a vast area encompassed by the Fraser River watershed; or 2) a higher rate of biomagnification in the estuary due to species differences at lower trophic levels of the heron food chain. Eggs from urban colonies contained higher levels of PCBs. The congener pattern was not clearly different from that observed in less contaminated eggs from rural and pulp mill-influenced colonies, except that colonies in Vancouver had greater proportions of PCB-66, suggesting a local source of Aroclor 1242. Productivity in the coastal heron colonies was highly variable over the period of study, with 71% of recorded colony-wide reproductive failures occurring in colonies near pulp mills. However, the predominant factors influencing reproductive success were probably disturbance

  14. Baseline hydrocarbon levels in New Zealand coastal and marine avifauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, H M; Gartrell, B D; Chilvers, B L; Finlayson, S T; Bridgen, P C E; Morgan, K J

    2015-05-15

    The external effects of oil on wildlife can be obvious and acute. Internal effects are more difficult to detect and can occur without any external signs. To quantify internal effects from oil ingestion by wildlife during an oil spill, baseline levels of ubiquitous hydrocarbon fractions, like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), need to be established. With these baseline values the extent of impact from exposure during a spill can be determined. This research represents the first investigation of baseline levels for 22 PAHs in New Zealand coastal and marine avian wildlife. Eighty-five liver samples were tested from 18 species. PAHs were identified in 98% of livers sampled with concentrations ranging from 0 to 1341.6 ng/g lipid wt or on wet wt basis, 0 to 29.5 ng/g. Overall, concentrations were low relative to other globally reported avian values. PAH concentration variability was linked with species foraging habitat and migratory patterns. PMID:25707316

  15. Stratospheric ozone depletion and future levels of atmospheric chlorine and bromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Michael J.; Watson, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    The rise in atmospheric chlorine levels caused by the emission of chlorofluorocarbons and other halocarbons is thought to be the main cause of the appearance of the Antarctic ozone 'hole' in the late 1970s, and the more modest ozone depletion observed over parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Atmospheric bromine, also associated with halocarbon emissions, is believed to contribute to ozone depletion. Over the next decade, further increases in these compounds are inevitable. Model calculations show that by the end of the next century, atmospheric chlorine and bromine levels may return to those prevalent before the onset of the ozone hole, but only if more stringent regulations are applied to halocarbon production than those currently proposed.

  16. Contamination of Omnivorous Freshwater Fish Species and Sediments by Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niewiadowska Alicja

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs were determined in 158 muscle samples of bream (Abramis brama and roach (Rutilus rutilus, and 84 samples of sediments collected from 10 river and lake sampling sites in 2011 and 2012. The concentrations of DDTs (p,p’-DDT, o,p’-DDT, p,p’-DDE, and p,p’-DDD, HCH isomers (a-, ß-, and y-HCH, HCB, and PCBs (six indicator PCB congeners 28, 52, 101, 138, 153 and 180 were determined using the capillary gas chromatography. The mean concentrations of DDTs in bream and roach were in the range of 11.2-654 and 4.5-121 ug/kg wet weight respectively, and PCBs were in the range of 1.3-75.9 and 1.1-112 ug/kg wet weight, respectively. Mean concentrations of DDTs and PCBs in sediments were 0.5-270 ug/kg dry weight and ⋋0.1-2.2 ug/kg dry weight respectively. The study showed clear spatial differences in the levels of organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in fish and sediments from different aquatic ecosystems. The highest levels of contaminants were detected in fish and sediments from the Vistula River in vicinity of Cracow. The possible risk to the fish meat consumers and ecological risk were evaluated.

  17. Demonstration of denitration and chlorination process using real high level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pyropartitioning process separates the actinide elements including the minor actinide elements from the high-level liquid waste generated at the Purex reprocessing of spent LWR fuel and introduces them to metallic fuel cycle. Since the separation of the actinide elements from the fission product elements is performed in molten chloride salt/liquid metal system, the actinide and fission product elements in the high-level liquid waste must be converted to the chlorides as the first step of the pyropartitioning process. In order to demonstrate the conversion of the actinide and fission product elements to the chlorides, a series of denitration and chlorination test using 520g of real high-level liquid waste, which contains 8400 micro-g/g of uranium, 600 micro-g/g of transuranium elements, and 2000 micro-g/g of fission products including 870 micro-g/g of rare-earth elements, was performed. The results of the tests are as following; 1) The entire denitration product of the high-level liquid waste was successfully recovered from the containing crucible, which is made of stainless steel. No damage was found on the inside surface of the crucible. During the denitration, small amount of ruthenium was evaporated. 2) After the chlorination of the denitrated material, only 1 to 5% of each actinide element remained as the water insoluble material in the salt phase, which is assumed to be oxide. And almost all of the actinide elements were converted to water soluble material in the salt phase, which are assumed to be chloride. Additionally, almost all of the rare-earth fission product, alkaline-earth fission product, and alkaline-metal fission product elements were also converted to water soluble material in the salt. Some of the fission products such as molybdenum and zirconium were evaporated during the chlorination. 3) Since nearly 100% of each actinide element was recovered as the chloride, the denitration and chlorination were successfully demonstrated. (author)

  18. Intercalibration of analytical methods on marine environmental samples. Results of MEDPOL-II exercise for the intercalibration of chlorinated hydrocarbon measurements on mussel homogenate (MA-M-2/OC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussels have been considered as good indicators of chlorinated hydrocarbon pollution of the marine environment and this led to the development of mussel watch programmes in many countries in the late seventies. These intercalibration exercises were arranged in order to increase the quality of analytical capabilities of environmental laboratories. The samples MA-M-2/0C of Mediterranean mussels with chlorinated hydrocarbon content were checked by 27 laboratories. It was judged highly suitable for these laboratories to have at their disposal a reference material made of mussel tissue with robust estimations of the true values with respect to several chlorinated hydrocarbons. Such a material would allow chemists to check the validity of new analytical procedures

  19. Geological and hydrogeological features affecting migration, multi-phase partitioning and degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons through unconsolidated porous media.

    OpenAIRE

    Filippini, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents are the most ubiquitous organic contaminants found in groundwater since the last five decades. They generally reach groundwater as Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL). This phase can migrate through aquifers, and also through aquitards, in ways that aqueous contaminants cannot. The complex phase partitioning to which chlorinated solvent DNAPLs can undergo (i.e. to the dissolved, vapor or sorbed phase), as well as their transformations (e.g. degradation), depend on the...

  20. The Reaction Specificity of Nanoparticles in Solution: Application to the Reaction of Nanoparticulate Iron and Iron-Bimetallic Compounds with Chlorinated Hydrocarbons and Oxyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prospect for better remediation technologies using nanoparticles of iron, iron oxides, and iron with catalytic metals (i.e., bimetallics) has potentially transformative implications for environmental management of DOE sites across the country. Of particular interest is the potential to avoid undesirable products from the degradation of chlorinated solvents by taking advantage of the potential selectivity of nanoparticles to produce environmentally benign products from CCl4. Chlorinated solvents are the most frequently reported subsurface contaminants across the whole DOE complex, and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is the chlorinated solvent that is of greatest concern at Hanford (U. S. Department Energy 2001). In evaluating technologies that might be used at the site, a critical concern will be that CCl4 reduction usually occurs predominantly by hydrogenolysis to chloroform (CHCl3) and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2), both of which are nearly as problematic as CCl4 (National Research Council, 1978). Competing reaction pathways produce the more desirable products carbon monoxide (CO) and/or formate (HCOO-), and possibly CO2, but the proportion of reaction that occurs by these pathways is highly variable. Iron-based metallic and oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have enhanced reactivity towards a variety of chemical species, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible oxyanions. Possibly of greater importance is the ability of nanoparticles to select for specific reaction products, potentially facilitating the formation of more environmentally acceptable products. The purpose of this study is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanism responsible for the overall particle reactivity and reaction selectivity of reactive metal and oxide nanoparticles. To achieve this objective the project involves the synthesis (using solution and vacuum synthesis methods) and characterization of well-defined nanoparticles, measurements of particle reactivity in

  1. Evaluation of solid polymeric organic materials for use in bioreactive sediment capping to stimulate the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashgahi, Siavash; Maphosa, Farai; De Vrieze, Jo; Haest, Pieter Jan; Boon, Nico; Smidt, Hauke; Springael, Dirk; Dejonghe, Winnie

    2014-03-01

    In situ bioreactive capping is a promising technology for mitigation of surface water contamination by discharging polluted groundwater. Organohalide respiration (OHR) of chlorinated ethenes in bioreactive caps can be stimulated through incorporation of solid polymeric organic materials (SPOMs) that provide a sustainable electron source for organohalide respiring bacteria. In this study, wood chips, hay, straw, tree bark and shrimp waste, were assessed for their long term applicability as an electron donor for OHR of cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) in sediment microcosms. The initial release of fermentation products, such as acetate, propionate and butyrate led to the onset of extensive methane production especially in microcosms amended with shrimp waste, straw and hay, while no considerable stimulation of VC dechlorination was obtained in any of the SPOM amended microcosms. However, in the longer term, short chain fatty acids accumulation decreased as well as methanogenesis, whereas high dechlorination rates of VC and cDCE were established with concomitant increase of Dehalococcoides mccartyi and vcrA and bvcA gene numbers both in the sediment and on the SPOMs. A numeric simulation indicated that a capping layer of 40 cm with hay, straw, tree bark or shrimp waste is suffice to reduce the groundwater VC concentration below the threshold level of 5 μg/l before discharging into the Zenne River, Belgium. Of all SPOMs, the persistent colonization of tree bark by D. mccartyi combined with the lowest stimulation of methanogenesis singled out tree bark as a long-term electron donor for OHR of cDCE/VC in bioreactive caps. PMID:23955471

  2. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  3. EVALUATION OF FUSED-SILICA CAPILLARY COLUMNS FOR GC/ECD (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ELECTRON CAPTURE DETECTION) ANALYSIS OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS LISTED IN EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) METHOD 8120 (JOURNAL VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four mega-bore, one wide-bore, and one narrow-bore fused-silica capillary columns were evaluated for their applicability to the GC/ECD analysis of 22 chlorinated hydrocarbons, some of which are currently targeted by EPA Method 8120. No one column can resolve all 22 compounds. Fou...

  4. Chlorination by-product concentration levels in seawater and fish of an industrialised bay (Gulf of Fos, France) exposed to multiple chlorinated effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjellaba, D; Dron, J; Revenko, G; Démelas, C; Boudenne, J-L

    2016-01-15

    Chlorination is one of the most widely used techniques for biofouling control in large industrial units, leading to the formation of halogenated chlorination by-products (CBPs). This study was carried out to evaluate the distribution and the dispersion of these compounds within an industrialised bay hosting multiple chlorination discharges issued from various industrial processes. The water column was sampled at the surface and at 7 m depth (or bottom) in 24 stations for the analysis of CBPs, and muscle samples from 15 conger eel (Conger conger) were also investigated. Temperature and salinity profiles supported the identification of the chlorination releases, with potentially complex patterns. Chemical analyses showed that bromoform was the most abundant CBP, ranging from 0.5 to 2.2 μg L(-1) away from outlets (up to 10 km distance), and up to 18.6 μg L(-1) in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) regasification plume. However, CBP distributions were not homogeneous, halophenols being prominent in a power station outlet and dibromoacetonitrile in more remote stations. A seasonal effect was identified as fewer stations revealed CBPs in summer, probably due to the air and water temperatures increases favouring volatilisation and reactivity. A simple risk assessment of the 11 identified CBPs showed that 7 compounds concentrations were above the potential risk levels to the local marine environment. Finally, conger eel muscles presented relatively high levels of 2,4,6-tribromophenol, traducing a generalised impregnation of the Gulf of Fos to CBPs and a global bioconcentration factor of 25 was determined for this compound. PMID:26410714

  5. Levels of persistent fluorinated, chlorinated and brominated compounds in human blood collected in Sweden in 1997-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, G.; Kaerrman, A.; Bavel, B. van [MTM Research Centre, Oerebro Univ. (Sweden); Hardell, L. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden); Hedlund, B. [Environmental Monitoring Section, Swedish EPA, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Levels of persistent fluorinated, chlorinated and brominated compounds in blood collected from the Swedish population have been determined in connection with several exposure and monitoring studies at the MTM Research Centre. A data base with 631 individual congener specific measurements on halogenated POPs such as dioxins, PCBs, HCB, DDE, chlordanes, PBDEs and PFAs including information on residency, age, BMI, diet, occupation, number of children, smoking habits, immunological status etc. has been compiled from samples collected between 1994 and 2004. A brief overview focusing on levels of some persistent chlorinated, brominated and fluorinated, compounds in blood collected in a background population group (n=83) in 1997-2000 is given here.

  6. Different behavioral effect dose–response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: Influence of structural and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umezu, Toyoshi, E-mail: umechan2@nies.go.jp; Shibata, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yshibata@nies.go.jp

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose–response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose–response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose–response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose–response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose–response profiles. - Highlights: • We examine effects of 4 chlorinated hydrocarbons on 6 behavioral endpoints in mice. • The behavioral effect dose–response profiles for the 4 compounds are different. • We utilize regression analysis to clarify probable causes of the different profiles. • The compound's physicochemical properties probably produce the different profiles.

  7. Different behavioral effect dose–response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: Influence of structural and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose–response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose–response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose–response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose–response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose–response profiles. - Highlights: • We examine effects of 4 chlorinated hydrocarbons on 6 behavioral endpoints in mice. • The behavioral effect dose–response profiles for the 4 compounds are different. • We utilize regression analysis to clarify probable causes of the different profiles. • The compound's physicochemical properties probably produce the different profiles

  8. Technology assessment: Chlorine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine is not just one of many chemical feedstocks which is used in a few definitely harmful products like PVC or CFC but is irrelevant in all other respects. Just the opposite is true: There is hardly any product line of the chemical industry that can do without chlorine, from herbicides and pesticides to dyes, plastics, pharmaceuticals, photographic atricles, and cosmetics. Chlorine is not only a key element of chemical production but also an ubiquitous element of everyday life in civilisation. There are even many who would agree that the volume of chlorine production is an indicator of the competitive strength and national wealth of a modern society. By now, however, it has become evident that the unreflected use of chlorine is no longer ecologically acceptable. The consequences of a chlorine phase-out as compared to the continued chlorine production at the present level were investigated scientifically by a PROGNOS team. They are presented in this book. (orig.)

  9. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in fish-eating birds wintering in the Gdansk Bay, 1981-82 and 1982-83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falandysz, J.; Szefer, P.

    1984-08-01

    Seventy-four samples of adipose fat of 10 species of fish-eating birds commonly wintering in Gdansk Bay and one of little auk, a rare species in this area, have been analysed for residues of HCB, ..sigma..BHC, ..sigma..DDT and PCBs. Auks (guillemot, black guillemot and razorbill), which probably stay a whole year in the Baltic area, contained in their fat twice the level of PCBs as mergansers, and 5-6 times as much as in divers and grebes - birds which stay in the sea mainly after the breeding season. ..sigma..DDT levels were somewhat higher but comparable in auks and grebes, and lower in mergansers and divers. ..sigma..BHC and HCB levels were 3-4 times and 5-10 times higher, respectively, in auks than in birds from other families studied. When comparing residue levels found in adipose fat of birds taken during the wintering seasons of 1981-82 and 1982-83 with those taken in 1975-76 or 1980-81, an initially rapid, but in recent years a rather slow decline in ..sigma..DDT level is detectable for grebes, mergansers and divers, and in the case of PCBs the residue levels fell slightly. In auks, the ..sigma..DDT residue level fell by half, but remains rather stable in recent years, while there are only minor fluctuations in the residue level of PCBs. 18 references, 2 tables.

  10. Site profiles of low-volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons - cause-oriented monitoring in aquatic media. Vol.2. Low-volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in surface water, sediments, suspended matter and fish of the Elbe river and its tributaries; Standortprofile schwerfluechtiger chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe (SCKW) - ursachenorientiertes Monitoring in aquatischen Medien. Bd. 2. SCKW in Oberflaechenwasser, Sediment, Schwebstoffen und Fischen aus der Elbe und Nebenfluessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, E.; Kettrup, A.; Gebefuegi, I.; Martens, D.; Bergheim, W.; Wenzel, S.

    2001-07-01

    Evaluating the primary data from ARGE ELBE, LAU Halle/Saale and the Environmental Specimen Banking (Umweltprobenbank) as well from publications from the Czech Republic (CHMU) the concentrations of the following low volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons were established for surface water, sediment, breams and eels from the rivers Elbe, Schwarze Elster, Mulde and Saale partly from 1989 till 1999: DDT and its metabolites DDE and DDD, partly as 2,4'- and 4,4' isomers; HCH ({alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}- and {delta} isomers); chlorinated benzenes with 1-6 Cl atoms and octachlorostyrene. The data evaluated were drawn up into tables - comprehensive in a separate supplement, in short versions within the text - and consolidated into graphs. Aim of the paper was a cause-oriented monitoring. The by far most important emission sources, found from the distance and time profiles as well as from special assessments of the substance patterns, were chemical plants. (orig.) [German] Durch Auswertung von Primaerdaten der ARGE ELBE, des LAU Halle/Saale und der Umweltprobenbank sowie von Publikationen aus Tschechien (CHMU) wurden fuer Oberflaechenwasser, Sediment, Brassen/Bleien und Aale aus der Elbe, Schwarzen Elster, Mulde und Saale fuer die Jahre von z.T. 1989 bis 1999 die Konzentrationen der folgenden schwerfluechtigen Kohlenwasserstoffe (SCKW) ermittelt: DDT und seine Metabolite DDE und DDD, z.T. als 2,4'- und 4,4'-Isomere; HCH ({alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}- und {delta}-Isomere); chlorierte Benzole mit 1-6 Cl-Atomen und Octachlorstyrol. Die ausgewerteten Daten wurden zu Tabellen - ausfuehrlich in einem gesonderten Tabellenanhang und verkuerzt im Textteil - zusammengestellt sowie zu Grafiken verdichtet. Ziel der Arbeit war ein ursachenorientiertes Monitoring. Als mit Abstand wesentlichste Emissionsquellen konnten anhand von Streckenprofilen und Zeitrastern sowie durch spezielle Auswertungen der Stoffmusterverteilungen Chemibetriebe ermittelt werden. (orig.)

  11. Sodium and chlorine levels in hair and nails of healthy and cystic fibrosis children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium and chlorine values are reported in μ/g, as determined by neutron activation analysis in washed hair and nails from healthy and cystic fibrosis children. The values thus determined in cystic fibrosis tended to be higher than those in controls, however statistical differences were not significant (p>0.01). Additional experiments were carried out for comparison between washed and unwashed samples of the cystic fibrosis and control group and only the differences between washed and unwashed cystic fibrosis nails were significant (p<0.01) in both sodium and chlorine values. Analysis of a standard reference milk sample, A-11 from IAEA, for the elements mentioned above gave a good agreement with the certified values. (author) 24 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. Control by isotopes of the methods for the determination of residues of pesticides of chlorinated hydrocarbon Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The restriction of the use of pesticides of organochlorine type did not give the desired results because the decrease of the level of contamination was much smaller than expected. In contrast to that, the degree of the acceptable contamination is lowered more and more internationally. This makes reasonable the adoption methods which are reliable and can be applied in routine tests. On the basis of recovery values of 98 +-2% the control of the Book of Methods of AOAC issued in 1975 carried out with the use of 14C-DDT and 14C-DDE, respectively, proved unequivocally the suitability of this book in Hungary. (author)

  13. Levels and distribution patterns of short chain chlorinated paraffins in sewage sludge of wastewater treatment plants in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are listed as persistent organic pollutant candidates in the Stockholm Convention and are receiving more and more attentions worldwide. In general, concentrations of contaminants in sewage sludge can give an important indication on their pollution levels at a local/regional basis. In this study, SCCPs were investigated in sewage sludge samples collected from 52 wastewater treatment plants in China. Concentrations of total SCCPs (ΣSCCPs) in sludge were in the range of 0.80–52.7 μg/g dry weight (dw), with a mean value of 10.7 μg/g dw. Most of SCCPs in the sludge samples showed a similar congener distribution patterns, and C11 and Cl7,8 were identified as the dominant carbon and chlorine congener groups. Significant linear relationships were found among different SCCP congener groups (r2 ≥ 0.9). High concentrations of SCCPs in sewage sludge imply that SCCPs are widely present in China. - Highlights: ► Levels and distribution patterns of SCCPs were studied in sewage sludge in China. ► Concentrations of total SCCPs in sludge ranged from 0.8 to 52.7 μg/g dry weight. ► C11 and Cl7,8 were identified as the dominant congener groups within SCCPs. ► Significant linear relationships were found among SCCP congener groups (r2 ≥ 0.9). ► SCCPs are present in household products and can be exposing to human. - High levels of short chain chlorinated paraffins in sewage sludge of wastewater treatment plants in China have been found.

  14. Influence of long-range atmospheric transportation (LRAT) on mono-to octa-chlorinated PCDD/Fs levels and distributions in soil around Qinghai Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Liu, Wenbin; Hansen, Hans Chr Bruun; Chen, Xuebin; Liao, Xiao; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Mengjing; Yan, Nan

    2016-08-01

    Long-range atmospheric transportation (LRAT) of persistent organic pollutants followed by their deposition in cold, arid regions is of wide concern. This problem occurs at Qinghai Lake in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, a sparsely populated area with extreme weather conditions and little current or historical anthropogenic pollution. The concentrations and distribution patterns of the mono-to octa-chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) congeners in surface soil samples collected from around Qinghai Lake were quantified. Concentration differences between low-(mono-to tri-) chlorinated PCDD/Fs and high-(tetra-to octa-) chlorinated PCDD/Fs were measured. High PCDD/F levels were detected, with total concentrations of 15,108 ± 6323 pg/g for the 27 PCDD/F congeners and 15,104 ± 6324 pg/g for the low-chlorinated PCDD/Fs. The concentrations of 17 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs were only 3.1 ± 4.4 pg/g and the corresponding international toxicity equivalency (I-TEQ) was 0.11 ± 0.22 pg I-TEQ/g. Given their higher vapor pressures and lower boiling points, low-chlorinated PCDD/Fs, were predominantly gaseous, whereas high-chlorinated PCDD/Fs were predominantly solid, indicating that there is a higher potential for long-range transport of low-chlorinated PCDD/Fs. Overall, because of their high LRAT potential, low-chlorinated PCDD/Fs may pose a greater risk to local ecosystems in cold, remote areas than high-chlorinated PCDD/Fs. PMID:27174827

  15. Determination of hydrocarbon levels in water via laser-induced acoustics wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidin, Noriah; Hossenian, Raheleh; Duralim, Maisarah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Marsin, Faridah Mohd; Nughro, Waskito; Zainal, Jasman

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination in water is a major environmental concern in terms of foreseen collapse of the natural ecosystem. Hydrocarbon level in water was determined by generating acoustic wave via an innovative laser-induced breakdown in conjunction with high-speed photographic coupling with piezoelectric transducer to trace acoustic wave propagation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG (40 mJ) was focused in cuvette-filled hydrocarbon solution at various concentrations (0-2000 ppm) to induce optical breakdown, shock wave generation and later acoustic wave propagation. A nitro-dye (ND) laser (10 mJ) was used as a flash to illuminate and frozen the acoustic wave propagation. Lasers were synchronised using a digital delay generator. The image of acoustic waves was grabbed and recorded via charged couple device (CCD) video camera at the speed of 30 frames/second with the aid of Matrox software version 9. The optical delay (0.8-10.0 μs) between the acoustic wave formation and its frozen time is recorded through photodetectors. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) was used to trace the acoustic wave (sound signal), which cascades to a digital oscilloscope. The acoustic speed is calculated from the ratio of acoustic wave radius (1-8 mm) and optical time delay. Acoustic wave speed is found to linearly increase with hydrocarbon concentrations. The acoustic signal generation at higher hydrocarbon levels in water is attributed to supplementary mass transfer and impact on the probe. Integrated high-speed photography with transducer detection system authenticated that the signals indeed emerged from the laser-induced acoustic wave instead of photothermal processes. It is established that the acoustic wave speed in water is used as a fingerprint to detect the hydrocarbon levels.

  16. The Levels and Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) Contamination in Bottom Sediments in Manila Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Evangeline Santiago

    1997-01-01

    The concentration levels of 18 PAH compounds extracted from 19 bottom sediments from the Limay Coast and 16 bottom sediments from the coast along Metro Manila and Cavitc Province of Manila Bay were determined by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.The PAH contamination, the levels of other non-PAH petroleum hydrocarbon compounds. and total organic content in the sediments were assessed in relation to the location and depth of the sampling sites. The PAH concentrations and the levels of other...

  17. Monochloramine and chlorine dioxide for controlling Legionella pneumophila contamination: biocide levels and disinfection by-product formation in hospital water networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Isabella; Ferranti, Greta; Bargellini, Annalisa; Marchegiano, Patrizia; Predieri, Guerrino; Stout, Janet E; Borella, Paola

    2013-12-01

    Legionella colonization in hospital hot water distribution networks was evaluated following 36 months of continuous treatment with monochloramine and compared with chlorine dioxide. Nitrite, nitrate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids as well as the biocide concentration at sampled points were measured. Only 8/84 samples treated with monochloramine were found contaminated and after the first 8 months of treatment no Legionella was isolated. Chlorine dioxide was associated with a strong reduction in Legionella contamination compared to pre-treatment, but differences according to the device were observed. Monochloramine between 2 and 3 mg l(-1) and chlorine dioxide between 0.50 and 0.70 mg l(-1) were needed to control Legionella colonization. Comparing no- and post-flush samples, a higher frequency of no-flush positive samples was noted using chlorine dioxide, suggesting an increased risk for patients when they open the tap. No increase in chlorite levels and no water nitrification occurred by using monochloramine. Chlorite at levels exceeding the limit requested for drinking water was measured when chlorine dioxide was applied. In conclusion, we highlight that continuous injection of monochloramine should be considered as an effective alternative to chlorine dioxide in controlling legionellae contamination inside hospital water distribution systems. PMID:24334848

  18. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION LEVELS IN COLLECTED SAMPLES FROM VICINITY OF A HIGHWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Samimi ، R. Akbari Rad ، F. Ghanizadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tehran as the biggest city of Iran with a population of more than 10 millions has potentially high pollutant exposures of gas oil and gasoline combustion from vehicles that are commuting in the highways every day. The vehicle exhausts contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are produced by incomplete combustion and can be directly deposited in the environment. In the present study, the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination in the collected samples of a western highway in Tehran was investigated. The studied location was a busy highway in Tehran. High performance liquid chromatography equipped with florescence detector was used for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons concentrations in the studied samples. Total concentration of the ten studied polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons compounds ranged from 11107 to 24342 ng/g dry weight in the dust samples and increased from 164 to 2886 ng/g dry weight in the soil samples taken from 300 m and middle of the highway, respectively. Also the average of Σ PAHs was 1759 ng/L in the water samples of pools in parks near the highway. The obtained results indicated that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination levels were very high in the vicinity of the highway.

  19. Studies with solid chlorine chemical for chlorination of sea water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination is one of the conventional methods to control biofouling of condenser cooling water systems using either river water, reservoir water or sea water. However, there are many safety concerns associated with handling, storage and application of gaseous chlorine. Studies were carried out with suitable alternative chlorine chemical compounds which do not involve majority of these concerns but meet the functional requirement of gas chlorine. Trichloroisocyanuric Acid (TCCA) is one of the suitable alternatives to Gas chlorine. TCCA is a chlorine stabilized compound, stabilized with Cyanuric acid, thus similar to Gas Chlorine in its functions except that it is available in solid form. Release of chlorine is a gradual process in TCCA unlike Gaseous chlorine. Field studies with TCCA indicated gradual and near uniform release rate of chlorine, for longer duration with the requisite free residual chlorine levels (FRC). Thus, use of TCCA could be considered as a suitable alternative for gas chlorine for regular chlorination requirements. (author)

  20. Estimation of free-hydrocarbon volume from fluid levels in monitoring wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the assumption of local vertical equilibrium, fluid pressure distributions specified from well fluid levels in monitoring wells may be used to predict water and hydrocarbon saturation profiles given expressions for air-water-hydrocarbon saturation-pressure relations. Vertical integration of the oil-saturation profile yields the actual oil volume in porous media per unit area adjacent to the well. Three-phase fluid distributions are predicted using a scaling procedure which requires knowledge of two-phase air-water saturation-pressure relations, hydrocarbon density, and hydrocarbon surface tension. Results reveal that whereas the distance above an oil-water table at which oil saturations become zero may be independent of soil type, estimated light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) volumes per unit area may differ substantially. Hence, estimates of LNAPL volume cannot be inferred directly from soil LNAPL thickness or well LNAPL thickness data without consideration of effects of soil properties. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that no simple linear conversion scheme can be employed to relate the height of LNAPL in a monitoring well to the LNAPL volume in porous media. Effects of grain-size distribution and well LNAPL thickness on the ration of actual LNAPL thickness in the aquifer to well LNAPL thickness are shown

  1. The levels and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contamination in bottom sediments in Manila Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration levels of 18 PAH compounds extracted from 19 bottom sediments from the Limay coast and 16 bottom sediments from the coast along Metro Manila and Cavite province of Manila Bay were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The PAH contamination, the levels of other non-PAH petroleum hydrocarbon compounds, and total organic content in the sediments were assessed in relation to the location and depth of the sampling sites. The PAH concentrations and the levels of other petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediments showed that the spatial distribution of PAH and other hydrocarbon contamination in Manila Bay is largely dependent on the proximity of the sediment deposition site to known point sources of pollution. On the western side, the highest levels of PAH contamination normalized to % TOC (1.29 x 104 at L12, 1.28 x 104 at L16, 0.55 at L13, and 0.54 at L15) were obtained from sediments collected at deposition sites near the outfall of the Petron Oil Refinery. On the eastern side, sediments located at the effluent zones of the Paranaque and Malabon rivers showed excessively higher levels of PAH normalized to %TOC (3.32 x 104 and 2.87 x 104; respectively) compared to those obtained from other sites in the area. The PAH contamination in the sediments from Manila Bay is dominated by alkylated naphthalenes and phenanthrenes which are associated with petrogenic sources. This indicates that the surface sediments in Manila Bay are exposed to chronic contamination of petroleum hydrocarbons introduced mainly by direct spillage on the western side and by urban run-off on the eastern side. (Author)

  2. The Levels and Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH Contamination in Bottom Sediments in Manila Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangeline Santiago

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The concentration levels of 18 PAH compounds extracted from 19 bottom sediments from the Limay Coast and 16 bottom sediments from the coast along Metro Manila and Cavitc Province of Manila Bay were determined by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.The PAH contamination, the levels of other non-PAH petroleum hydrocarbon compounds. and total organic content in the sediments were assessed in relation to the location and depth of the sampling sites. The PAH concentrations and the levels of other petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediments showed that the spatial distribution of PAH and other hydrocarbon contamination in Manila Bay is largely dependent on the proximity of the sediment deposition site to known point sources of pollution. On the western side, the highest levels of PAH contamination normalized to % TOC (1.29 X 104 at Ll2, 1.28 x 104 at Ll6, 0.55 at Ll3, and 0.54 at Ll5 were obtained from sediments collected at deposition sites near the outfall of the Petron Oil Refinery. On the eastern side. sediments located at the effiuent zones of the Paranaque and Malabon Rivers showed excessively higher levels of PAH normalized to % TOC (3.32 x 104 and 2.87 x 104: respectively compared to those obtained from other sites in the area.The PAH contamination in the sediments from Manila Bay is dominated by alkylated naphthalenes and phenanthrenes which are associated with petrogenic sources. This indicates that the surface sediments in Manila Bay are ex-posed to chronic contamination of petroleum hydrocarbons introduced mainly by direct spillage on the western side and by urban run-off on the eastern side.

  3. Development of a solid-phase microextraction-based method for sampling of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons in an urbanized coastal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Eddy Y; Tsukada, David; Diehl, Dario W

    2004-11-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has been used as an in situ sampling technique for a wide range of volatile organic chemicals, but SPME field sampling of nonvolatile organic pollutants has not been reported. This paper describes the development of an SPME-based sampling method employing a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated (100-microm thickness) fiber as the sorbent phase. The laboratory-calibrated PDMS-coated fibers were used to construct SPME samplers, and field tests were conducted at three coastal locations off southern California to determine the equilibrium sampling time and compare the efficacy of the SPME samplers with that of an Infiltrex 100 water pumping system (Axys Environmental Systems Ltd., Sidney, British Columbia, Canada). p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE were the components consistently detected in the SPME samples among 42 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and 17 chlorinated pesticidestargeted. SPME samplers deployed attwo locations with moderate and high levels of contamination for 18 and 30 d, respectively, attained statistically identical concentrations of p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE. In addition, SPME samplers deployed for 23 and 43 d, respectively, at a location of low contamination also contained statistically identical concentrations of p,p'-DDE. These results indicate that equilibrium could be reached within 18 to 23 d. The concentrations of p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDE, or p,p'-DDD obtained with the SPME samplers and the Infiltrex 100 system were virtually identical. In particular, two water column concentration profiles of p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE acquired by the SPME samplers at a highly contaminated site on the Palos Verdes Shelf overlapped with the profiles obtained by the Infiltrex 100 system in 1997. The field tests not only reveal the advantages of the SPME samplers compared to the Infiltrex 100 system and other integrative passive devices but also indicate the need to improve the sensitivity of the SPME-based sampling technique. PMID:15575294

  4. Ready-to-eat vegetables production with low-level water chlorination: an evaluation of water quality and of its impact on end products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca D'Acunzo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the microbiological impact of low-level chlorination (1 ppm free chlorine on the production of ready-to-eat (RTE vegetables by monitoring the microbiological quality of irrigation and processing water in two production plants over a 4-season period, as well as the microbiological quality of unprocessed vegetables and RTE product. Water samples were also characterized in terms of some chemical and physico-chemical parameters of relevance in chlorination management. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Both producers use water with maximum 1 ppm free chlorine for vegetables rinsing, while the two processes differ by the number of washing cycles. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Salmonella spp and Campylobacter spp were detected once in two different irrigation water samples out of nine from one producer. No pathogens were found in the vegetable samples. As expected, the procedure encompassing more washing cycles performed slightly better in terms of total mesophilic count (TCM when comparing unprocessed and RTE vegetables of the same batch. However, data suggest that low-level chlorination may be insufficient in preventing microbial build-up in the washing equipment and/or batch-to batch cross-contamination.

  5. Emission of hydrocarbons and NOx at low levels of excess air in CFB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low NOx operation at low excess air levels heighten the risk of increasing the level of hazardous and polluting emissions from the boiler. These emissions are mainly of two types, greenhouse gases and the mutageneous compounds. The aim of this project has been to show which types of emissions and their correlation you can expect when firing a CFB at low excess air levels. Results: The NOx emission decreases asymptotically with increased CO-level. High load gives higher NOx -emissions. There is no significant difference in average NOx value between wood fuel and RDF-mix. The total hydrocarbon (THC) emission level increases exponentially with increased COlevel. There was no significant difference between wood and RDF-mix. Measurements of NOx, O2, CO (dry gas) and THC were made each second. The measurements of light hydrocarbons (VOC) showed only methane and ethene, both with a good correlation to CO. Below 1000 ppm of CO there is practically no ethene. Above 1000-2000 ppm of CO there is a rapidly increasing emission of ethene. The emission levels at given CO-level are influenced by the furnace temperature. The POM, PNA and Ames test analysis showed good correlation with CO and THC. The results indicate an emission increase at about 200-500 ppm of CO and 10-20 ppm of THC. Dioxin was measured on three occasions with RDF-mix as fuel. The measurements showed an increase of dioxin emission at increased THC-emission. The supply of ammonia, into the flue gas before the cyclones, gave no significant change in hydrocarbon or CO-emission levels. CO, THC and Ames Test are probably good indicators of environmental hazardous compounds. The amount of mutageneous compounds are in general only increased when a certain level of CO is reached. 6 refs, 45 figs, 5 tabs, 7 appendices

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons levels evaluation in urban area after October 23rd 1998 promulgation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the result concerning the air quality evaluation in an urban centre in the hinterland of Milan., with an high population density and an intense road traffic, relatively to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) concentration levels. The data, referred to the annual season, indicate that, near high traffic road, the above compounds are always present in the concentration level analytically detectable and that the concentration of benzo(a)pyrene is 2.7 ng/m3. The reported study is an useful instruments both for a road town planning, in order to people disease prevention, and for monitoring the evolution of PAH concentration levels in the future

  7. Persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons (PHC) - end products and intermediate products of technical synthesis processes in surface water of the Rhine region. Vol. 5: Site profiles of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons - source-oriented monitoring in aquatic media; Persistente chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe (PCKW) - End- und Zwischenprodukte technischer Synthesen in Gewaessern der Rheinregion. Band 5 der Reihe: Standortprofile persistenter chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe - ursachenorientiertes Monitoring in aquatischen Medien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, E.; Kettrup, A.; Bergheim, W.; Wenzel, S.

    2003-07-01

    By evaluating the primary data from 20 regional institutions in the period 1984-2002 about persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons (PCHC) in fishes (eels, Anguilla anguilla; breams, Abramis brama; barbs, Barbus barbus and reaches, Rutilus rutilus), sediment and suspended matter it was tried to mark the burdens and substance profiles for sampling sites on the river Rhine and rivers in BW, Hess, RP and NRW. The compounds investigated were the isomere di-, tri- and tetrachlorobenzenes, penta- and hexachlorobenzene, octachlorostyrene (OCS), hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) as well as the 6 DIN (IUPAC, Ballschmiter) congeners of the PCB, substances which were - as to the REACH - described as PBT, partly as vPvB substances and regarded as ''priority harmful substances'' (PCBz; HCB, HCBD), respectively. The statistically elaborated single data were summarized in distance profiles and time series, aiming at marking local and regional immissions as well as hints to their origin and current importance. The background of these efforts is the lack of specialized publications about technical synthesis or compulsory yield of the compounds concerning kind, amount and period. Especially tetrachlorobenzene (mainly 1,2,4,5-TeCBz) and HCBD could be defined as indicator substances for past and recent technical synthesis of chloroorganic compounds. The higher chlorinated PCB congeners no. 138, 153 and 180 (HPCB) proved very persistent. The sites of chemical industry in the vicinity of the sampling points Rheinfelden, Grenzach, Lampertheimer Altrhein, Biebesheimer Rhein, Muendung Schwarzbach, Bischofsheim and Griesheim (Main), Hitdorf, Duisburg-Homberg und Huels (Lippe) could be made transparent by maxima and special substance patterns. (orig.) [German] Durch Auswertung von Primaerdaten ueber persistente chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe (PCKW) in Fischen (Aale, Anguilla anguilla; Brachsen, Abramis brama; Barben, Barbus barbus und Rotaugen, Rutilus rutilus), Sediment und

  8. Chlorinated paraffins in the environment: A review on their production, fate, levels and trends between 2010 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Louise M; Gaus, Caroline; Leonards, Pim E G; de Boer, Jacob

    2016-07-01

    This review provides an update on information regarding the production volumes, regulations, as well as the environmental levels, trends, fate and human exposure to chlorinated paraffin mixtures (CPs). CPs encompas thousands congeners with varying properties and environmental fate. Based on their carbon chain lengths, CPs are divided into short- (SCCPs; C10-13), medium- (MCCPs; C14-17) and long- (LCCPs; C ≥ 18) chained groups. They are high production volume and persistent chemicals, and their cumulative global production already surpasses that of other persistent anthropogenic chemicals (e.g. PCBs). However, international regulations are still curbed by insufficient information on their levels and fate, including bioaccumulation and toxicity potential. An increasing number of studies since 2010 demonstrate that CPs are detected in almost every compartment in the environment, including remote areas. Consensus on the long range transport and high bioaccumulation potential (BCF > 5000 & TMF > 1) has recently been reached for SCCPs, fulfilling criteria under the Stockholm Convention for designation as a persistent organic pollutant; information on their levels is, however, still sparse for many countries. M/LCCPs have received comparatively little attention in the past, but as replacement chemicals for SCCPs, MCCPs are now considered in an increasing number of studies. The limited data to date suggests MCCPs are widely used. Although data on their bioaccumulation and toxicity are still inconclusive, MCCPs and LCCPs with Cenvironment, a better understanding on the levels and fate of all CPs is needed. PMID:27135701

  9. Zirconia concentrate chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination experiments were conducted in order to study the kinetics of gasification of the zirconium oxide present in the zirconia concentrate. The variables studied are temperature (1173 to 1373 K), percentage of reducing agent (12 to 36%) and porosity (22 to 30%). The results indicated a greater influence of temperature and percentage of reducing agent as well as allowed the conclusion that a balance between the levels of these variables is an important factor in the appropriate chlorination conditions. (author)

  10. Assessing biodegradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in a river sediment by conservative and reactive isotope tracers (2H, 18O, 13C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study is part of the joint project SEDBARCAH, which investigates the intrinsic capacity of microbial communities in eutrophic river sediments as natural biobarriers against the release of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) from polluted ground water into surface water. The study site is located in an industrial area in Vilvoorde (Belgium) and characterized by heavily CAH-contaminated groundwater, which infiltrates the sediments of the eutrophic river Zenne. The stable isotopic compositions (δ2H, δ18O) of ground water, interstitial water, and Zenne surface water were used as conservative tracers to distinguish between river sediment zones, which are characterized by (i) ground water influx and exfiltration and (ii) river water infiltration and mixing between ground and surface water. Interstitial water was sampled in 3 longitudinal river sediment profiles in up to 3 depths in a 45 m long section of the Zenne. The δ2H- and δ18O-data show that ground water and Zenne surface water are isotopically clearly distinct. Interstitial water mostly exhibits δ2H- and δ18O-values identical or close to ground water, indicating influx of ground water into the sediments and exfiltration into the surface water at these positions. However, at several sampling positions and depths δ2H- and δ18O-values of interstitial water approaches or attains those of Zenne surface water. This testifies to surface water infiltration into the river sediments and mixing with ascending groundwater. These findings thus reflect the existence of small- to mid-scale hydraulic heterogeneities in the sediment and/or differences in the basal river flow velocities, which led to the establishment of zones of rapid as well as slow or even suppressed discharge of CAH-contaminated ground water into the Zenne surface water. At present, the CAH-pollution in the ground and interstitial water consists of vinyl chloride (VC), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and 1,1-dichloroethane (1

  11. Fine-structure energy levels, oscillator strengths and lifetimes of chlorine-like chromium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Man Mohan; Avnindra K Singh; Alok K S Jha; Narendra Singh

    2005-07-01

    We have done relativistic calculations for the evaluation of energy levels, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities and lifetimes for Cr VIII ion. Use has been made of configuration interaction technique by including Briet–Pauli approximation. The energies of various levels from the ground state to excited levels of 3s3p6, 3s23p43d, 3s23p44s, 3s23p44d of Cr VIII are given in LSJ coupling scheme after fine-tuning and are compared with the experimental results compiled in the NIST Data Base. Many new lines have been predicted which have not appeared so far in the NIST Data.

  12. Residual Levels and New Inputs of Chlorinated POPs in Agricultural Soils from Taihu Lake Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong-Jian; JIANG Xin; WANG Fang; BIAN Yong-Rong; WANG Dai-Zhang; DEND Jian-Cai; YAN Dong-Yun

    2005-01-01

    Selected persistent organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT)and its principal metabolites 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and its isomers (α-, β-, γ-, and δ-HCH), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), endosulfan, dieldrin, and endrin were quantified to determine current levels of organochlorine pesticides, to assess the ecotoxicological potential, and to distinguish previous and current inputs in agricultural soils from the Taihu Lake region.Gas chromatography equipped with a 63Ni electron-capture detector (GC-ECD) system was employed. Thirteen OCPs were detectable in all soil samples, with DDTs being the main residues, and HCHs had the second highest level of OCP residues. Although OCP residual levels were lower than those in 1990s, the residual levels for most of the DDTs and some of HCHs were still higher than the national environmental standards for agricultural soils. The ratios of DDT/DDE and γ-/α-HCH in twelve soils indicated that new inputs could be present in the soils. Thus, efforts should be made to completely ban the production of OCPs and their use in agriculture so as to reduce the threat of OCPs to food quality and human health.

  13. Characterization of Preferential Ground-Water Seepage From a Chlorinated Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer to West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcher, Emily H.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Lorah, Michelle M.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands act as natural transition zones between ground water and surface water, characterized by the complex interdependency of hydrology, chemical and physical properties, and biotic effects. Although field and laboratory demonstrations have shown efficient natural attenuation processes in the non-seep wetland areas and stream bottom sediments of West Branch Canal Creek, chlorinated volatile organic compounds are present in a freshwater tidal creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volatile organic compound concentrations in surface water indicate that in some areas of the wetland, preferential flow paths or seeps allow transport of organic compounds from the contaminated sand aquifer to the overlying surface water without undergoing natural attenuation. From 2002 through 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division of the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, characterized preferential ground-water seepage as part of an ongoing investigation of contaminant distribution and natural attenuation processes in wetlands at this site. Seep areas were discrete and spatially consistent during thermal infrared surveys in 2002, 2003, and 2004 throughout West Branch Canal Creek wetlands. In these seep areas, temperature measurements in shallow pore water and sediment more closely resembled those in ground water than those in nearby surface water. Generally, pore water in seep areas contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds had lower methane and greater volatile organic compound concentrations than pore water in non-seep wetland sediments. The volatile organic compounds detected in shallow pore water in seeps were spatially similar to the dominant volatile organic compounds in the underlying Canal Creek aquifer, with both parent and anaerobic daughter compounds detected. Seep locations characterized as focused seeps contained the highest concentrations of chlorinated parent compounds

  14. The chlorination of cooling water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After reviewing the means of fighting biological pollution of cooling water circuits in nuclear power stations, the authors describe the chlorination treatment methods used by EDF. This deals with the massive shock chlorination of the cooling towers and the continuous low-level chlorination of coastal nuclear power stations. In both areas, the Research and Development Board of EDF has carried out and encouraged research with the aim of improving circuit protection, while still protecting the aquatic eco-system against damage that might be caused by waste chlorinated water

  15. 挥发性氯代烃在土壤中的吸附行为研究进展%A REVIEW OF STUDIES ON SORPTION BEHAVIORS OF VOLATILE CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS IN NATURAL SOIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锐; 孟凡勇; 文晓刚; 陈吕军; 张永明

    2012-01-01

    挥发性氯代烃(Volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons,VCHs)是工业污染场地的常见污染物,在非饱和带存在于土壤气相、水相、固相或以高密度非水相液体(Dense non-aqueous phase liquids,DNAPL)的形式存在,形成一个动态平衡系统.土壤对VCHs的吸附不仅影响土壤中的污染物浓度,而且极大地影响VCHs的迁移转化行为.根据VCHs在土壤中的吸附机制,可以对土壤中的VCHs浓度进行预测,优化各种模型参数,指导污染修复及管理工作.本文总结了VCHs在非饱和带土壤中的相间分配特征,吸附机制及其影响因素,特别探讨了土壤有机碳、矿物及水分对吸附的影响,提出了当前研究中存在的问题,并对将来研究进行了展望.%Volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs) are common pollutants in industrial polluted sites, existing in aqueous phase, gaseous phase, solid phase or the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids ( DNAPL) , in unsaturated zones of the soil, forming a dynamic equilibrium system. The sorption of VCHs by the soil not only influences concentration of the pollutants in the soil, but also affects substantially migration and fate of VCHs. Understanding the mechanisms of VCHs sorption by the soil may help predict their concentrations in the soil, optimize the parameters of pertinent models, and guide remediation and management of the contaminated soil. A review is presented to summarize characteristics of the distribution of VCHs between these phases in soils of unsaturated zones, their sorption mechanisms as well as their affecting factors, and to elaborate in particular influences of soil organic carbon, minerals, and soil water on their sorption. Meanwhile, existent problems are pointed out in the current researches and an outlook is described of the future researches.

  16. Evaluating emission levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from organic materials by analytical pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, Daniele; Vassura, Ivano [Laboratory of Chemistry, C.I.R.S.A., University of Bologna, via S. Alberto 163, I-48100 Ravenna (Italy)

    2006-03-01

    A procedure in off-line analytical pyrolysis was investigated for the rapid determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) evolved from thermal degradation of organic materials. Samples spiked with perdeuterated PAHs were pyrolysed at 1000{sup o}C for 60s by means of a resistively heated filament pyrolyser inserted into a glass chamber connected to a cartridge with a sorbent (XAD-2 resin). PAHs trapped onto the resin were extracted with dichloromethane and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The analytical performance of the overall procedure (precision, recovery, effect of experimental parameters) was evaluated by pyrolysing a bituminous coal certified reference material (CRM). Emission levels of naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, acenaphtylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene were determined for bituminous and anthracite coals, tyre, and cellulose. Despite some limitations, the method was adequate to the purpose of quantitatively measuring the tendency of various materials to release volatile PAHs upon heating. (author)

  17. Inverse association of highly chlorinated dioxin congeners in maternal breast milk with dehydroepiandrosterone levels in three-year-old Vietnamese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Teruhiko; Honma, Seijiro; Nhu, Dang Duc; Manh, Ho Dung; Van Tung, Dao; Liang, Sun Xian; Anh, Le Thai; Okamoto, Rie; Maruzeni, Shoko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Hung, Nguyen Ngoc; Son, Le Ke

    2016-04-15

    This study aims to evaluate the endocrine-disrupting effect of dioxin congeners on adrenal steroid hormones in mother-child pairs. In our previous study, we found that cortisol and cortisone levels were higher in the blood and the saliva of mothers living in a dioxin hotspot area than in mothers from a non-exposed region in Vietnam. In this follow-up study, we determined the salivary steroid hormone levels in 49 and 55 three-year-old children of these mothers in the hotspot and non-exposed region, respectively. Steroid hormones were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and dioxin in the maternal breast milk was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Dioxin levels in the breast milk of mothers from the hotspot (median total toxic equivalents polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans; (TEQ PCDD/Fs) of 11pg/g lipid) were three to four times higher than those of mothers in the non-exposed region (median TEQ PCDD/Fs of 3.07pg/g lipid). Salivary dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels in children were found to be significantly lower in the hotspot than in the non-exposed region, while cortisol and cortisone levels were not different between the two regions. Highly chlorinated dioxin congeners, such as octacholorodibenzodioxin (OCDD), 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptacholorodibenzodioxin (HpCDD) and 1,2,3,4 (or 6), 7,8-hexachlorodibenzodioxin Hx(CDD), showed stronger inverse associations with the children's salivary DHEA than other lowly chlorinated dioxin congeners. Glucocorticoid levels in the mothers exhibited a significantly positive correlation with OCDD and HpCDD/F (polychlorinated dibenzofurans). In conclusion, highly chlorinated dioxin congeners are more strongly correlated with endocrine-disrupting effects on adrenal hormones, resulting in high cortisol levels in the mothers and low DHEA levels in their three-year-old children. PMID:26820928

  18. 水中氯代烃单体碳同位素分析中预富集方法进展%Review on Pre-enrichment Methods in Compound Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌媛; 黄毅; 尚文郁; 谢曼曼; 刘舒波; 孙青

    2011-01-01

    Highly accurate determination of Compound Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis ( CSIA ) of chlorinated hydrocarbons is of great significance in tracing the source and revealing the biodegradating progress of pollutants. The isotopic composition of organic contaminations may be stable or varied in the process of environmental transformation. We can trace the source of contaminations if the composition is stable and can evaluate the probability and degree of degradation of contaminations. This paper summarizes solid-phase microextraction, static headspace analysis, purge and trap method and compound specific isotope analyses of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water, using combinations of these pretreatment methods, Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry ( GC-C-IRMS ), and comparesthe three methods. Compared with liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase micro extraction, static headspace analysis, purge and trap method are all solvent-free enrichment techniques, producing no secondary pollution, less interference, and the resolution and accuracy of the analysis of GC-C-IRMS is improved. No, or little, isotopic mass fractionation occurred during the isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water by combining these solvent-free enrichment techniques with GC-C-IRMS, of which the precision of the analysis is less than l%e. The detection limit decreased along with the methods of static headspace analysis, solid-phase micro extraction, purge and trap method. Purge and trap is the most popular method because of its good reproducibility and low detection limit for the compound specific isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbon in Water. The combinations of in-needle microextraction, in-tube microextraction, stir bar sorptive extraction or headspace sorptive extraction with GC-C-IRMS have a bright future.%高精度准确测定氯代烃单体碳同位素对示踪污染物来源,了解污染物的生物降解过程具有重要意义.在环境转化过程中,

  19. Six-month low level chlorine dioxide gas inhalation toxicity study with two-week recovery period in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akamatsu Akinori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorine dioxide (CD gas has a potent antimicrobial activity at extremely low concentration and may serve as a new tool for infection control occupationally as well as publicly. However, it remains unknown whether the chronic exposure of CD gas concentration effective against microbes is safe. Therefore, long-term, low concentration CD gas inhalation toxicity was studied in rats as a six-month continuous whole-body exposure followed by a two-week recovery period, so as to prove that the CD gas exposed up to 0.1 ppm (volume ratio is judged as safe on the basis of a battery of toxicological examinations. Methods CD gas at 0.05 ppm or 0.1 ppm for 24 hours/day and 7 days/week was exposed to rats for 6 months under an unrestrained condition with free access to chow and water in a chamber so as to simulate the ordinary lifestyle in human. The control animals were exposed to air only. During the study period, the body weight as well as the food and water consumptions were recorded. After the 6-month exposure and the 2-week recovery period, animals were sacrificed and a battery of toxicological examinations, including biochemistry, hematology, necropsy, organ weights and histopathology, were performed. Results Well regulated levels of CD gas were exposed throughout the chamber over the entire study period. No CD gas-related toxicity sign was observed during the whole study period. No significant difference was observed in body weight gain, food and water consumptions, and relative organ weight. In biochemistry and hematology examinations, changes did not appear to be related to CD gas toxicity. In necropsy and histopathology, no CD gas-related toxicity was observed even in expected target respiratory organs. Conclusions CD gas up to 0.1 ppm, exceeding the level effective against microbes, exposed to whole body in rats continuously for six months was not toxic, under a condition simulating the conventional lifestyle in human.

  20. Breakdown of low-level total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in contaminated soil using grasses and willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Patrick; Kuzovkina, Yulia A; Schulthess, Cristian P; Guillard, Karl

    2016-01-01

    A phytoremediation study targeting low-level total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was conducted using cool- and warm-season grasses and willows (Salix species) grown in pots filled with contaminated sandy soil from the New Haven Rail Yard, CT. Efficiencies of the TPH degradation were assessed in a 90-day experiment using 20-8.7-16.6 N-P-K water-soluble fertilizer and fertilizer with molasses amendments to enhance phytoremediation. Plant biomass, TPH concentrations, and indigenous microbes quantified with colony-forming units (CFU), were assessed at the end of the study. Switchgrass grown with soil amendments produced the highest aboveground biomass. Bacterial CFU's were in orders of magnitude significantly higher in willows with soil amendments compared to vegetated treatments with no amendments. The greatest reduction in TPH occurred in all vegetated treatments with fertilizer (66-75%) and fertilizer/molasses (65-74%), followed sequentially by vegetated treatments without amendments, unvegetated treatments with amendments, and unvegetated treatments with no amendment. Phytoremediation of low-level TPH contamination was most efficient where fertilization was in combination with plant species. The same level of remediation was achievable through the addition of grasses and/or willow combinations without amendment, or by fertilization of sandy soil. PMID:26553847

  1. Six-month low level chlorine dioxide gas inhalation toxicity study with two-week recovery period in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Akamatsu Akinori; Lee Cheolsung; Morino Hirofumi; Miura Takanori; Ogata Norio; Shibata Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chlorine dioxide (CD) gas has a potent antimicrobial activity at extremely low concentration and may serve as a new tool for infection control occupationally as well as publicly. However, it remains unknown whether the chronic exposure of CD gas concentration effective against microbes is safe. Therefore, long-term, low concentration CD gas inhalation toxicity was studied in rats as a six-month continuous whole-body exposure followed by a two-week recovery period, so as to...

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban air : concentration levels and patterns and source analysis in Nairobi, Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthini, M.; Yoshimichi, H.; Yutaka, K.; Shigeki, M. [Yokohama National Univ., Yokohama (Japan). Graduate School of Environment and Information Sciences

    2005-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the environment are often the result of incomplete combustion processes. This paper reported concentration levels and patterns of high molecular weight PAHs in Nairobi, Kenya. Daily air samples for 30 different PAHs were collected at residential, industrial and business sites within the city. Samples were then extracted using deuterated PAH with an automated Soxhlet device. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a capillary column was used to analyze the extracts using a selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Statistical analyses were then performed. PAH concentration levels were reported for average, median, standard deviation, range, and Pearson's correlation coefficients. Data were then analyzed for sources using a principal component analysis (PCA) technique and isomer ratio analysis. Nonparametric testing was then conducted to detect inherent differences in PAH concentration data obtained from the different sites. Results showed that pyrene was the most abundant PAH. Carcinogenic PAHs were higher in high-traffic areas. The correlation coefficient between coronene and benzo(ghi)pyrene was high. The PAH isomer ratio analysis demonstrated that PAHs in Nairobi are the product of traffic emissions and oil combustion. Results also showed that PAH profiles were not well separated. It was concluded that source distinction methods must be improved in order to better evaluate PAH emissions in the city. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  3. Microbial and molecular techniques to evaluate and to implement in-situ biodegradation potential and activity at sites contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karg, F. [HPC Envirotec / France and HPC AG (Germany); Henkler, Ch. [Planreal (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    (Biochemical Laboratory of the Medical Faculty) the first PBG-SP : 'Pole Biotechnologique et Genetique - Sites Pollues' in France. The modern tools and approaches have been applied successfully at several field sites for the evaluation, implementation and on-going monitoring of the bio-restoration/ attenuation of various aromatic and chlorinated compounds. (authors)

  4. Microbial and molecular techniques to evaluate and to implement in-situ biodegradation potential and activity at sites contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (Biochemical Laboratory of the Medical Faculty) the first PBG-SP : 'Pole Biotechnologique et Genetique - Sites Pollues' in France. The modern tools and approaches have been applied successfully at several field sites for the evaluation, implementation and on-going monitoring of the bio-restoration/ attenuation of various aromatic and chlorinated compounds. (authors)

  5. Room Temperature ppb Level Chlorine Gas Sensor Based on Copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, R. K.; Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman

    2010-12-01

    Spin coating technique has been used to fabricate room temperature chlorine gas sensor based on copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu)8) films. Gas sensor shows a response of 185% to few parts per billion level of Cl2 gas with response time of 9.5 minutes at room temperature. The interactions between sensor and analytes followed first order kinetics with rate constant 0.01≤k≤0.02. The chemiresistive sensor showed very good stability at room temperature over a long period of time.

  6. Room Temperature ppb Level Chlorine Gas Sensor Based on Copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin coating technique has been used to fabricate room temperature chlorine gas sensor based on copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu)8) films. Gas sensor shows a response of 185% to few parts per billion level of Cl2 gas with response time of 9.5 minutes at room temperature. The interactions between sensor and analytes followed first order kinetics with rate constant 0.01≤k≤0.02. The chemiresistive sensor showed very good stability at room temperature over a long period of time.

  7. Níveis de cloro para codornas japonesas na fase de postura Chlorine levels for Japanese quails during the egg-laying period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseane Madeira Bezerra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos de quatro níveis de cloro sobre o desempenho e a qualidade de ovos de codornas japonesas na fase de produção, 288 codornas com 17 semanas de idade foram distribuídas em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com seis tratamentos, oito repetições e seis aves por unidade experimental. Os níveis de cloro avaliados foram 0,07; 0,12; 0,17; 0,22; 0,27 e 0,32% e os parâmetros de desempenho e qualidade dos ovos foram: consumos de ração e água, porcentagem de postura, peso e massa de ovos, conversão alimentar, umidade das excretas, coeficientes de digestibilidade da matéria seca (CDMS, nitrogênio (CDN e energia bruta (CDEB, energia metabolizável aparente (EMA e aparente corrigida (EMAn, unidade Haugh, porcentagens de albúmen, gema e casca. Os níveis de cloro não influenciaram significativamente nenhuma dessas variáveis, entretanto, a gravidade específica aumentou linearmente com o acréscimo de cloro na ração. Pode-se recomendar que rações para codornas japonesas na fase de produção sejam formuladas com níveis de cloro de até 0,32%.In order to evaluate the effects of chlorine levels on performance and egg quality of Japanese quails during the production phase, 288 quails with seventeen weeks of age were distributed in a completely randomized design with six treatments, eight replicates and six birds experimental unit. Chlorine levels were: 0.07, 0.12, 0.17, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.32%. Performance and egg quality parameters evaluated were: feed intake (g/bird/day, water consumption (mL/bird/day, production (%, egg weight (g, egg mass (g/bird/day, feed conversion (g/g, moisture of excreta, digestibility of dry matter, coefficient of nitrogen, coefficient of gross energy, apparent metabolizable energy, corrected apparent metabolizable energy, Haugh unit, percentages of albumen, yolk and shell. Chlorine levels did not significantly influence any of those variables; however, the specific gravity

  8. Level, potential sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particulate matter (PM10) in Naples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vaio, Paola; Cocozziello, Beatrice; Corvino, Angela; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Frecentese, Francesco; Magli, Elisa; Onorati, Giuseppe; Saccone, Irene; Santagada, Vincenzo; Settimo, Gaetano; Severino, Beatrice; Perissutti, Elisa

    2016-03-01

    In Naples, particulate matter PM10 associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air were determined in urban background (NA01) and urban traffic (NA02) sites. The principal objective of the study was to determine the concentration and distribution of PAHs in PM10 for identification of their possible sources (through diagnostic ratio - DR and principal component analysis - PCA) and an estimation of the human health risk (from exposure to airborne TEQ). Airborne PM10 samples were collected on quartz filters using a Low Volume Sampler (LVS) for 24 h with seasonal samples (autumn, winter, spring and summer) of about 15 days each between October 2012 and July 2013. The PM10 mass was gravimetrically determined. The PM10 levels, in all seasons, were significantly higher (P Perylene), had a large contribution (∼50-55%) of total PAHs concentration in PM10 in two sites and in each of the campaigns. Diagnostic ratio analysis and PCA suggested a substantial contributions from traffic emission with minimal influence from coal combustion and natural gas emissions. In particular diesel vehicular emissions were the major source of PAHs at the studied sites. The use of Toxicity Equivalence Quantity (TEQ) concentration provide a better estimation of carcinogenicity activities; health risk to adults and children associated with PAHs inhalation was assessed by taking into account the lifetime average daily dose and corresponding incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR). The ILCR was within the acceptable range (10-6-10-4), indicating a low health risk to residents in these areas.

  9. Influence of oil contamination levels on hydrocarbon biodegradation in sandy sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del' Arco, J.P.; Franca, F.P. de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Bioquimica

    2001-07-01

    The influence of oil concentration on hydrocarbon biodegradation in a sandy sediment was studied in polyvinyl chloride reactors (0.45x0.28x0.31 m) containing 76.8 kg of beach sand in natura, where the upper layer was artificially contaminated with petroleum. The oil-degrading microorganisms used consisted of a mixed culture named N{sub D}, obtained from landfarming and associated with indigenous microorganisms. On the 28th day of the process, the degradation in reactors containing sandy sediment contaminated with light Arabian oil and presenting an initial oil content of 14, 21 or 28 g kg{sup -1} reached the following levels (%): 33.7, 32.9 and 28.9 for oil and grease; up to 88.3, 35.3 and 13.0 for C{sub 14}-C{sub 26} n-alkanes; and 100, 61.3 and 59.4 for pristane, respectively. Phytane removal (37.1%) was only detected in the reactor contaminated with the lowest oil concentration studied. These results, together with the expressive bacterial growth observed (from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 11} cfu g{sup -1}) give strong support to the argument that biodegradation was the dominant component of the remediation process. Susceptibility to biodegradation was inversely proportional to increasing oil contamination. The degradation of branched alkane: pristane was not repressed by the presence of n-alkanes. (Author)

  10. Effects of grilling procedures on levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in grilled meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon-Goo; Kim, Su-Yeon; Moon, Jung-Sik; Kim, Sheen-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Yoon, Hae-Jung

    2016-05-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are chemicals formed when muscle meat is cooked using high-temperature methods, such as grilling directly over an open flame. PAHs have been found to be mutagenic-that is, they cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer. We investigated the effects of grilling procedures on the level of 4 PAHs; benzo[a]anthracene (B[a]A), chrysene (Chr), benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F), and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). PAHs were extracted and determined by gas chromatography with mass detection (GC-MS). With regard to barbecuing successive meat samples with the same batch of burning charcoal, it was observed that stable combustion contribute to reduction of PAHs. Significant reductions in the sum of the four PAHs were observed through treatments which removed meat drippings and smoke with alternative grilling apparatus. The sums of 4 PAHs were reduced 48-89% with dripping removed and 41-74% with the smoke removal treatment in grilled pork and beef meats than conventional grilling. We investigated the components of meats drippings. The major constituent of meat dripping was fat. The most important factor contributing to the production of PAHs in grilling was smoke resulting from incomplete combustion of fat dripped onto the fire. PMID:26776018

  11. Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of sub-parts per billion level waterborne petroleum hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Huang, Y.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis (CSCIA and CSHIA) has been increasingly used to study the source, transport, and bioremediation of organic contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. In natural aquatic systems, dissolved contaminants represent the bioavailable fraction that generally is of the greatest toxicological significance. However, determining the isotopic ratios of waterborne hydrophobic contaminants in natural waters is very challenging because of their extremely low concentrations (often at sub-parts ber billion, or even lower). To acquire sufficient quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with 10 ng/L concentration for CSHIA, more than 1000 L of water must be extracted. Conventional liquid/liquid or solid-phase extraction is not suitable for such large volume extractions. We have developed a new approach that is capable of efficiently sampling sub-parts per billion level waterborne petroleum hydrocarbons for CSIA. We use semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to accumulate hydrophobic contaminants from polluted waters and then recover the compounds in the laboratory for CSIA. In this study, we demonstrate, under a variety of experimental conditions (different concentrations, temperatures, and turbulence levels), that SPMD-associated processes do not induce C and H isotopic fractionations. The applicability of SPMD-CSIA technology to natural systems is further demonstrated by determining the ??13C and ??D values of petroleum hydrocarbons present in the Pawtuxet River, RI. Our results show that the combined SPMD-CSIA is an effective tool to investigate the source and fate of hydrophobic contaminants in the aquatic environments.

  12. Level, potential sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particulate matter (PM10) in Naples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vaio, Paola; Cocozziello, Beatrice; Corvino, Angela; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Frecentese, Francesco; Magli, Elisa; Onorati, Giuseppe; Saccone, Irene; Santagada, Vincenzo; Settimo, Gaetano; Severino, Beatrice; Perissutti, Elisa

    2016-03-01

    In Naples, particulate matter PM10 associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air were determined in urban background (NA01) and urban traffic (NA02) sites. The principal objective of the study was to determine the concentration and distribution of PAHs in PM10 for identification of their possible sources (through diagnostic ratio - DR and principal component analysis - PCA) and an estimation of the human health risk (from exposure to airborne TEQ). Airborne PM10 samples were collected on quartz filters using a Low Volume Sampler (LVS) for 24 h with seasonal samples (autumn, winter, spring and summer) of about 15 days each between October 2012 and July 2013. The PM10 mass was gravimetrically determined. The PM10 levels, in all seasons, were significantly higher (P agents, (i.e Benzo[a]Pyrene, Indeno[1,2,3-cd]Pyrene, Benzo[b]Fluoranthene, Benzo[k]Fluoranthene and Benzo[g,h,i]Perylene), had a large contribution (∼50-55%) of total PAHs concentration in PM10 in two sites and in each of the campaigns. Diagnostic ratio analysis and PCA suggested a substantial contributions from traffic emission with minimal influence from coal combustion and natural gas emissions. In particular diesel vehicular emissions were the major source of PAHs at the studied sites. The use of Toxicity Equivalence Quantity (TEQ) concentration provide a better estimation of carcinogenicity activities; health risk to adults and children associated with PAHs inhalation was assessed by taking into account the lifetime average daily dose and corresponding incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR). The ILCR was within the acceptable range (10-6-10-4), indicating a low health risk to residents in these areas.

  13. Measurement of monoterpene hydrocarbon levels in vapor phase surrounding single-leaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla Torr. & Frem.: Pinaceae) understory litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, F M; Miller, G C; Everett, R L

    1993-07-01

    A headspace air-sampling experiment was performed in the laboratory to determine the identity and concentrations of monoterpene hydrocarbons that could be attained in the vapor phase surrounding single-leaf pinyon pine (Pinus monophylla Torr. & Frem.) understory litter using controlled air collection conditions at a simulated field temperature of 37.8°C. The total monoterpene hydrocarbon content in 21 sequential samples of air collected from a sealed glass carboy packed with 1.44 kg of single-leaf pinyon litter equivalent to a bulk density of 0.15 g/cm(3) averaged 3.56 ± 1.04 mg/liter. The monoterpenesα-pinene and camphene were present in the vapor phase at the highest concentrations, averaging 2.40±0.64 and 0.68±0.22 mg/ liter, respectively. Myrcene,β-pinene, 3-carene,β-phellandrene, andγ-terpinene were all present at average concentrations below 0.30 mg/liter. The first two traps of the sequential air samples yielded the highest concentrations for the monoterpene hydrocarbons; however, the average total levels were relatively stable throughout the remaining 19 traps. Therefore, the data indicate that these hydrocarbons volatilize from the source pinyon litter and maintain an equilibrium in the vapor phase. Although this analysis was conducted using an artificial system, combined with results from our previous studies, mounting evidence indicates that monoterpene hydrocarbons present in the vapor phase of the single-leaf pinyon understory may be toxic to a variety of native plant species and thus further implicates allelopathy as a significant contributor to the observed patterning of associated vegetation in these forests. PMID:24249172

  14. [Assessment of occupational exposure to aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons determining urinary levels of 1-pyrenol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavanello, S; Genova, A; Foà, V; Clonfero, E

    2000-01-01

    In conformity with Italian law 626/94, occupational exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in several types of work environments was assessed by analysing urinary levels of 1-pyrenol. A total of 231 non-smokers exposed to PAH (82 workers, employed in two different thermoelectric power plants using combustible oil (30 subjects from plant A and 52 from plant B), 18 subjects working for a company recovering exhausted oils, 12 working on rubber production, 10 on road surface asphalting operations, 22 working in the anodizing section of an aluminium plant, 27 chimney-sweeps, and 60 coke-oven workers (30 topside workers, and 30 doing other jobs)) were enrolled. There were also 53 non-smoker control subjects, not occupationally exposed to PAH. Current smokers were excluded, since smoking is an important confounding factor when occupational exposure to low PAH concentrations are monitored. Confounding factors, i.e., diet and passive smoking, were checked by means of a questionnaire which, in addition to personal data and habits, also requested specific details about the type of diet followed and possible exposure to passive smoking during the 24-hour period preceding urine collection. In controls, exposure to PAH in the diet significantly increased 1-pyrenol levels in urine: in subjects introducing > or = 1 microgram of pyrene with the diet, the mean urinary level of 1-pyrenol was significantly higher than that introduced with coke-oven workers, both those working at the top side of the oven and those doing other jobs (t = 2.19, p = 0.02; t = 2.56, p = 0.01; t = 5.25, p = 0.001; t = 3.34, p = 0.001; t = 7.82, p = 0.001, respectively; F = 9.7, p oils, workers recovering exhausted oils, or rubber production workers. Diet and passive smoking did not influence urinary 1-pyrenol levels in the entire sample population. This biomarker also allowed an assessment of exposure levels among certainly exposed subjects. The percentage of subjects with urinary 1-pyrenol

  15. Differentiation of naturally-occurring vs. artificial hydrocarbons in a landfill groundwater investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interpretation of groundwater sampling data at a large municipal/industrial landfill indicates contamination by both artificial and naturally-occurring hydrocarbons. Site hydrogeology consists of three different water bearing zones. The uppermost (shallow) aquifer is an unconfined unit consisting of silt, clay, and sand deposits. An intermediate depth semiconfined aquifer underlies the unconfined unit, and consists of a chert rubble zone and the upper portion of a fractured and solution-enhanced limestone formation. A regionally-extensive organic-rich shale underlies the semiconfined aquifer and separates it from the deep confined aquifer, which also consists of limestone. Groundwater investigations at the landfill have detected chlorinated and non-chlorinated hydrocarbons in the different aquifer intervals. Chlorinated hydrocarbons detected include tetrachloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride and occur almost exclusively in the shallow aquifer. Aromatic hydrocarbons detected include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) and-occur in the intermediate and deep aquifers. The landfill was originally interpreted as the source of the contaminants. The observation of free-phase liquid hydrocarbons in the intermediate aquifer at the site, and high dissolved BTEX levels in the deep and intermediate aquifers upgradient of the landfill suggest that the aromatics were derived from a source other than the landfill. A potential source of BTEX contamination may be abandoned (pre-1930) natural gas wells located near the landfill. An additional BTEX source may be the organic-rich shale formation (a documented petroleum source rock)

  16. The hydrogen concentration as parameter to identify natural attenuation processes of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in ground water; Die Wasserstoffkonzentration als Parameter zur Identifizierung des natuerlichen Abbaus von leichtfluechtigen Chlorkohlenwasserstoffen (LCKW) im Grundwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alter, M.D.

    2006-06-15

    In this study, the hydrogen concentration as parameter to identify natural attenuation processes of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons was investigated. The currently accepted and recommended bubble strip method for hydrogen sampling was optimized, and a storage method for hydrogen samples was developed. Furthermore batch experiments with a dechlorinating mixed culture and pure cultures were carried out to study H{sub 2}-concentrations of competing redox processes. The extraction of hydrogen from ground water was optimized by a reduced inlet diameter of the usually applied gas sampling bulbs, allowing a maximal turbulent ow and gas transfer. With a gas volume of 10 ml and flow rates of 50 to 140 ml/min, the course of extraction almost followed the theoretical course of equilibration. At flow rates > 100 ml/min a equilibrium of 98% was achieved within 20 min. Until recently it was generally accepted that hydrogen samples can be stored only for 2 hours and therefore have to be analyzed immediately in the eld. Here, it was shown that eld samples can be stored for 1-3 days until analysis. For the dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE), a hydrogen threshold concentration of 1-2 nM was found with the dechlorinating mixed culture as well as with a pure culture of Sulfurospirillum multivorans in combination with another pure culture Methanosarcina mazei. No dechlorination was detectable below this concentration. With the dechlorinating mixed culture, this finding is valid for all successive dechlorination steps until ethene. The hydrogen threshold concentration for denitrification were below the detection limit of 0,2 nM with the dechlorinating mixed culture. A threshold concentration of 3,1-3,5 nM was found for sulphate reduction and a threshold of 7-9 nM H{sub 2} for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. This implies that the natural dechlorination at contaminated sites is preferred to competing processes like sulphate reduction and methanogenesis. The threshold

  17. Study on Equilibrium Adsorption of Volatile Chlorinated Hydrocarbons on Humid Soils%挥发性氯代烃在湿润土壤中的平衡吸附研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟凡勇; 刘锐; 小林刚; 万梅; 余素林; 陈吕军

    2012-01-01

    吸附是挥发性氯代烃(volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons,VCHs)赋存于土壤的主要机制之一.开展动态吸附实验,研究了4种常见VCHs污染物在我国8种典型土壤中的吸附平衡关系.结果表明,土壤在干燥条件下对VCHs气体的吸附能力要远大于湿润条件,且随含水率的升高吸附能力急剧下降,在含水率达到10%以后土壤吸附量趋于稳定.湿润土壤对三氯乙烯(TCE)、四氯乙烯(PCE)、1,1,1-三氯乙烷(MC)气体的吸附等温线符合Henry型吸附等温式,而1,1,2-三氯乙烷(1,1,2-TCA)符合Freundlich模型.VCHs在湿润土壤中的吸附量总体上与土壤有机碳(soil organic carbon,SOC)含量呈正相关,且受SOC类型和化合物极性影响较大.弱极性的TCE、PCE在土壤中的吸附能力与SOC含量呈严格正相关,而极性的MC、1,1,2-TCA在黑土等高碳土壤中不仅与SOC含量有关,还受到SOC物质组成的影响.建立了TCE和PCE在湿润土壤中的平衡吸附量预测模型,预测值与实测值相关性良好(n=80,R2=0.98).%Adsorption is one of the principal mechanisms for soil contamination by volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons(VCHs).Dynamic adsorption experiments were carried out to study the equilibrium adsorption of four common VCHs pollutants onto eight typical soils in China.Results showed that dry soils had far greater adsorption capacity than humid soils.The soil adsorption capacity sharply decreased with the increase in the soil water content,and then reached a plateau as the water content rose to 10% or above.The adsorption isotherms of trichloroethylene(TCE),tetrachloroethylene(PCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane(MC) could be fitted with Henry's equation,while the adsorption isotherms of 1,1,2-trichloroethane(1,1,2-TCA) could be fitted with Freundlich model.The adsorption capacities of VCHs on humid soils were principally influenced by the content of soil organic carbon(SOC),but sometimes also

  18. Distribution of chlorinated hydrocarbons in overlying water, sediment, polychaete, and hornyhead turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis) in the coastal ocean, Southern California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Eddy Y; Tran, Kim

    2002-08-01

    1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) and its primary metabolites (DDTs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a major source of concern in the Southern California Bight (SCB), USA. The fate of DDTs and PCBs is a key element in assessing the effects imposed by these potential carcinogens on the marine ecosystem. We found that DDTs and PCBs remained widely distributed in the overlying water, sediment, polychaetes, and liver and muscle tissues of the hornyhead turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis) collected from three nearshore locations of the SCB with different levels of contamination. Student's t tests indicated that the measured partition coefficients between the nonaqueous phases (sediment, polychaete, and fish) and overlying water at a heavily contaminated location were significantly greater than those predicted by the equilibrium partitioning theory (EPT). Measured partition coefficients between the nonaqueous phases and overlying water for a few DDT components at two other stations (moderate and low contamination) were also generally greater than the EPT predictions. On the other hand, DDTs and PCBs in polychaetes and fish tissues may be taken up from sediments via equilibrium partitioning or from food sources. These findings are suggestive of the possibility that contaminated sediments may have become an important source of contamination. PMID:12152759

  19. On chlorinated hydrocarbons in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; SenGupta, R.

    The data available on the distribution of organochlorine compounds such as DDT and its metabolites, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, isomers of HCH and the PCBs in the sediments, water, zooplankton, fish and seals from the Indian Ocean is reviewed. High...

  20. Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, W.J.; Penrose, W.R.; Stetter, J.R. [Transducer Research, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Transducer Research, Inc. (TRI) has been working with the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center to develop a new chemical monitor based on a unique sensor which responds selectively to vapors of chlorinated solvents. We are also developing field applications for the monitor in actual DOE cleanup operations. During the initial phase, prototype instruments were built and field tested. Because of the high degree of selectivity that is obtained, no response was observed with common hydrocarbon organic compounds such as BTX (benzene, toluene, xylene) or POLs (petroleum, oil, lubricants), and in fact, no non-halogen-containing chemical has been identified which induces a measurable response. By the end of the Phase I effort, a finished instrument system was developed and test marketed. This instrument, called the RCL MONITOR, was designed to analyze individual samples or monitor an area with automated repetitive analyses. Vapor levels between 0 and 500 ppm can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ppm using the handportable instrument. In addition to the development of the RCL MONITOR, advanced sampler systems are being developed to: (1) extend the dynamic range of the instrument through autodilution of the vapor and (2) allow chemical analyses to be performed on aqueous samples. When interfaced to the samplers, the RCL MONITOR is capable of measuring chlorinated solvent contamination in the vapor phase up to 5000 ppm and in water and other condensed media from 10 to over 10,000 ppb(wt)--without hydrocarbon and other organic interferences.

  1. Sediment baseline study of levels and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals in Lake Nicaragua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye, Katrine; Weisser, Johan; Borggaard, Ole K.;

    2014-01-01

    Selected metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed in sediment samples from 24 sites in Lake Nicaragua sampled May 2010 to provide a baseline of pollution levels. Cu exceeded the Consensus-Based Sediment Quality Guideline (CBSQG) Threshold Effect Concentrations (TECs) at 21.......g., creosote). The main sources of PAHs in Lake Nicaragua were determined as of diffuse petrogenic and pyrogenic origin as well as diagenetic produced perylene. The relative importance of these PAH sources was determined by interpretation of loading and score plots from a principal component analysis. This...... study concluded that areas of Lake Nicaragua represent an important pollution baseline for future studies in this lake and other tropical lakes....

  2. Detection of petroleum hydrocarbons at low ppb levels using quartz resonator sensors and instrumentation of a smart environmental monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, I; Seyama, M; Nakamura, M

    1999-04-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon vapors at low ppb levels can be detected using a thickness shear mode resonator (TSMR) coated with a chemical-sensing overlayer, prepared by radiofrequency sputtering of porous sintered-polyethylene (PS-PE). The sensing capabilities of PS-PE sensors were profoundly affected by the sputtering methods; they were enhanced by the photo-excitation effect, and were reduced by carbonization and water treatment. The photo-assisted PS-PE sensor was extremely sensitive and could detect linear hydrocarbon (> C12) vapors below the ppb level. The time constant of the sorption curve, however, was large, indicating a slow sensing speed. Toward creating instrumentation for a smart environmental monitoring system, the TSMR sensors were arrayed on a circuit board equipped with a serial interface and signal processing chips of the oscillation drive and frequency counter. Co-sorption with water vapor at a relative humidity of about 10% has almost no effect on the sensing ability of PS-PE sensors for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Conversely, it enhances the sensitivity of the TSMR sensor coated with a D-phenylalanine film. Upward shifts in the baseline are evident with elapsed time. However, a rigorous ten-cycle iteration test for 100 ppm toluene vapor demonstrated good reproducibility of the sensor's signals. PMID:11529091

  3. Development of an analysis method for determining chlorinated hydrocarbons in marine sediments and suspended matter giving particular consideration to supercritical fluid extraction; Entwicklung eines Analysenverfahrens zur Bestimmung von chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffen in marinen Sedimenten und Schwebstoffen unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung der ueberkritischen Fluidextraktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterzenbach, D.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop an analysis method for chlorinate hydrocarbons in marine environments using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) instead of conventional approaches. In order to apply this extraction method the available SFE device had to be extended and all the individual steps of the analysis method had to be optimised and adapted. As chlorinated hydrocarbons only occur at very low concentrations in marine environments (ppm to ppt range) the analysis method had to be extremely sensitive. High sensitivity, in town, is generally associated with a high susceptibility of an analysis method to faults through contamination or losses. This meant that the entire method and all its individual steps had to scrutinised for such weak points and improved where necessary. A method for sampling suspended matter in marine environments had to be developed which permits efficient separation of the smallest possible particles from seawater. The designated purpose of the developed analysis method is to deal with topical aspects of marine chemistry relating to sources, transport, distribution, and the fate of chlorinated hydrocarbons in marine environments. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit ist, ein Analysenverfahren fuer chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe in der marinen Umwelt zu entwickeln. Dabei soll die ueberkritische Fluidextraktion (SFE) anstelle herkoemmlicher Verfahren eingesetzt werden. Fuer die Anwendung dieser Extraktionsmethode ist es erforderlich, das zur Verfuegung stehende SFE-Geraet zu erweitern und saemtliche Teilschritte des Analysenverfahrens zu optimieren und auf diese Methode abzustimmen. Der Umstand, dass die chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffe nur in sehr geringen Konzentrationen in der marinen Umwelt vorkommen (ppm- bis ppt-Bereich), erfordert eine sehr hohe Empfindlichkeit des Analysenverfahrens. Eine hohe Empfindlichkeit bedingt eine grosse Stoeranfaelligkeit des Analysenverfahrens durch Kontaminationen oder Verluste. Aus

  4. Behavior of chlorine in lake water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water from monsoon fed Sagre lake is being used as a source of raw water for Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS--1 and 2). The raw water from the lake is initially pumped to Sagre water treatment plant (SWTP) operated by Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation (MIDC) from where, the processed water is sent to cater the needs of both the units of TAPS-1 and 2, townships of TAPS and MIDC, and the nearby villages. At the SWTP the raw water is treated with alum to remove the turbidity, filtered and chlorinated using bleaching powder. All these years the raw water is chlorinated in such a way whereby a residual chlorine level of 0.5-1.0 mg/l, is maintained at the outlet of water treatment plant. The adequacy of the current chlorination practice was investigated, at the request of the NPC-500 MWe group during 1990, so that the future requirements of raw water for TAPP-3 and 4, can be met from the expanded SWTP. In this connection experiments on chlorine dose -- residual chlorine relationship and the decay pattern of chlorine with time was carried out in the lake water (with low value of total dissolved solids and total hardness 3 sample at the site. The total bacterial count in the raw water observed to be 107 counts/ml originally came down to 103 counts/ml at the end of one-hour exposure time to chlorine. It was found that the chlorine demand of the water was around 6 mg/l. In addition Jar test to evaluate the aluminum dose was also carried out. Based on these experiments a chlorine dose of 6 mg/l for one hour contact time was arrived at. The experimental findings were in agreement with the current chlorination practices. (author)

  5. Effects of petroleum hydrocarbon levels on morphological and physiological characteristics of two bermudagrass species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Saraeian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum hydrocarbons (PHs are one of the most important soil contaminants. Presence of these compounds in soil may cause some stresses to plants and make the growth conditions unfavorable. Thus, for landscaping in the contaminated areas, tolerant plants to these stresses are needed. The aim of this research was to determine morphophysiological characteristics of two native and non-native bermudagrass species in a soil with 0, 2.1, 3.87 and 12.25 percent by weight PHs:soil. A factorial experiment, based on randomized complete blocks design with three replications, was performed in research greenhouse of College of Agriculture, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran. Results showed that application of 2.1% PHs to soil significantly reduced color and density of bermudagrasses (3.3% and 5%, respectively, and the growth of native and non-native species was reduced by 31.1% and 7.3%, respectively. Relative water content and chlorophyll content were significantly decreased and proline content was increased, when soil pollutant content by PHs was increased. Also, the increase in contaminants content up to 2.1% increased catalase activity. But, higher rates of contamination reduced its activity, as compared to control. Conclusively, both bermudagrass species had acceptable turf quality and therefore could be recommended to be used in PHs-polluted soils; although quality and growth of non-native bermudagrass was better than the native one.

  6. Influence of ozone and meteorological parameters on levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehnec, Gordana; Jakovljević, Ivana; Šišović, Anica; Bešlić, Ivan; Vađić, Vladimira

    2016-04-01

    Concentrations of ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the PM10 particle fraction were measured together with ozone and meteorological parameters at an urban site (Zagreb, Croatia) over a one-year period. Data were subjected to regression analysis in order to determine the relationship between the measured pollutants and selected meteorological variables. All of the PAHs showed seasonal variations with high concentrations in winter and autumn and very low concentrations during summer and spring. All of the ten PAHs concentrations also correlated well with each other. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between the concentrations of PAHs and ozone concentrations and concentrations of PAHs and temperature, as well as a positive correlation between concentrations of PAHs and PM10 mass concentration and relative humidity. Multiple regression analysis showed that concentrations of PM10 and ozone, temperature, relative humidity and pressure accounted for 43-70% of PAHs variability. Concentrations of PM10 and temperature were significant variables for all of the measured PAH's concentrations in all seasons. Ozone concentrations were significant for only some of the PAHs, particularly 6-ring PAHs.

  7. Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Polychlorinated Biphenyls, and Organochlorine Pesticides in Various Tissues of White-Backed Vulture in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dhananjayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study provides information on the current status of contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs in the tissues of endangered White-backed Vulture Gyps bengalensis in India. Chemical analyses revealed detectable amounts of PAHs, PCBs, and OCPs. Concentration ranges of ∑PAHs, ∑PCBs, and ∑OCPs in tissues were 60–2037 ng/g, 30–5790 ng/g, and 3.2–5836 ng/g wet weight, respectively. 1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenylethylene (p,p′-DDE concentrations ranged from below detectable level to 599 ng/g wet weight, representing more than 90% of the total dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT. Among the various OCPs analyzed, p,p′-DDE was detected most frequently. All the contaminants recorded show higher accumulation in liver than other tissues. Levels of contaminants measured in the tissues of vulture are comparable with the levels documented in a number of avian species and are lower than those reported to have caused deleterious effects. Although no threat is expected from the current level of contamination, the presence of varying levels of contaminants and their additive or synergistic toxicity is a cause of concern to vultures. Values reported in this study can serve as guideline for future research.

  8. The energy levels and transition probabilities for silicon, phosphorous, sulfur, and chlorine ions of the boron iso-electronic sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slater type radial wave functions of the 1S, 2S, and 2P orbitals have been employed in order to construct the hartree-fock (HF) wave functions of the ground states 1S2 2S2 2P for Si X, ph XI, S XII and C1 XIII of the boron iso-electronic sequence. The radial functions of the excited orbitals ns, np, and nf (n=3-5) have been optimized using the CIV3 code which uses the multi-configuration hartree-fock (MCHF) method in evaluating these functions. The wave functions thus obtained have been used in calculating energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities. The calculated energies (in au) relative to the ground state were in a good agreement with the available published experimental and theoretical values within the experimental error for all levels of the ions of the sequence except for the 3 p, 4 p, and 5 p levels of Si X, Ph XI, S XII and CI XIII. The deviation may be attributed to relativistic effects in case of highly ionized members of the sequence. The oscillator strengths for the allowed electric dipole transitions have been computed in dipole-length from by using the same code. The transition probabilities for spontaneous emission Aji (sec1) are calculated using the equation Aji=6.6 x 1015 gi fij / Lambda2 gj (sec1) where lambda is the wavelength of the transition (in A0) from state (i) to state (j) and gi. gj are the statistical weights for these states, fg is the oscillator strength of the transition. More over results of oscillator strengths and transition probabilities are found to be in a fairly good agreement with the available published experimental and theoretical values

  9. Levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in some agricultural, industrial and urban areas along Xiamen coastal waters, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An intensive investigation was conducted to study the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), to show firstly the level of pollution in the agricultural areas and analyses specifically the status of soil polluted by these persistent pollutants in some locations of Xiamen region. Soil samples collected from Jiulong agricultural catchment have been analysed for 16 PAH compounds, using gas chromatography flame ionization detection in order to determine the level of selected PAH components and to identify the factors that may control their distribution and persistence in the area. The main PAHs found in soil samples were the low molecular weight. The total PAHs detected in soil samples ranged from 0.50 to 0.95 μg/g soil. The highest values of PAHs were significantly detected in the orange tree leaves, which range from 236.1 to 249.3 μg/g soil showing recent atmospheric inputs of these volatile pollutants. The distribution of PAHs in vegetable were monitored and indicating that the concentration were high and ranged from 8.24 to 58.87 μg/g. Other sediment samples were also collected and analysed from urban sewage (5.26 μg/g dw), aquacultural(0.52 μg/g dw) and industrial areas (from 0.62 to 2.09 μg/g dw), during this investigation. The contamination of Jiulong river estuary and Xiamen Western Sea by PAHs has been then widely justified by wastewater discharges and soil runoffs from these areas. The results, therefore, provide important information on the current contamination status caused by the atmospheric transport and point to the need for urgent actions to stop the release of these hydrocarbons to the environment. The necessity of implementing systematic monitoring of PAHs is also emphasized.

  10. Regional contamination versus regional dietary differences: Understanding geographic variation in brominated and chlorinated contaminant levels in polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, M.A.; Letcher, R.J.; Aars, J.; Born, E.W.; Branigan, M.; Dietz, R.; Evans, T.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Muir, D.C.G.; Peacock, E.; Sonne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The relative contribution of regional contamination versus dietary differences to geographic variation in polar bear (Ursus maritimus) contaminant levels is unknown. Dietary variation between Alaska Canada, East Greenland, and Svalbard subpopulations was assessed by muscle nitrogen and carbon stable isotope (?? 15N, ?? 13C) and adipose fatty acid (FA) signatures relative to their main prey (ringed seals). Western and southern Hudson Bay signatures were characterized by depleted ?? 15N and ??13C, lower proportions of C20 and C22 monounsaturated FAs and higher proportions of C18 and longer chain polyunsaturated FAs. East Greenland and Svalbard signatures were reversed relative to Hudson Bay. Alaskan ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Factors affecting the level and pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at Gosan, Korea during a dust period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sung-Deuk [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100, Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Ghim, Young Sung, E-mail: ysghim@hufs.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Science, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Wangsan-ri, Mohyeon-myeon, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Yi [Department of Environmental Engineering, BK21 Team for Biohydrogen Production, Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Young [Center for Environmental Technology Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Pyo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ewha Womans University, 11-1 Daehyun-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We collected air samples at a remote site during an Asian dust period. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyzed levels, patterns, and gas/particle partitioning of PAHs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particulate PAHs were highly correlated with PM{sub 2.5}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fraction of particulate PAHs increased during the dust period. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fine particles might be an important carrier of PAHs emitted from China. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in both gas and total suspended particles were measured at Gosan, Jeju Island in Korea, a remote background site, for 15 days (March 29-April 12, 2002). During the sampling period, a severe three-day Asian dust (AD) event originating from Mongolia and northern China was observed throughout the Korean Peninsula and Jeju Island. In addition, pollution (PO) and normal (NO) periods were also identified based on the levels of anthropogenic pollutants. Despite a large difference of PM{sub 10} concentrations between the AD and PO periods, the levels of particulate PAHs in both periods were comparable (2.7 {+-} 1.0 and 2.4 {+-} 0.5 ng m{sup -3}, respectively) since they were determined by the concentration of anthropogenic PM{sub 2.5} transported from industrial areas of China. In the AD period, the level of gaseous PAHs, which were mostly from local sources, was the lowest due to strong winds; the gas/particle partitioning was close to equilibrium as the effect of long-range transport was manifested. The results of backward air trajectories, correlation analysis, and diagnostic ratios show that long-range transport of particulate PAHs produced by coal/biomass burning in China could strongly affect the levels and patterns of PAHs at Gosan, Korea.

  12. Factors affecting the level and pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at Gosan, Korea during a dust period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We collected air samples at a remote site during an Asian dust period. ► We analyzed levels, patterns, and gas/particle partitioning of PAHs. ► Particulate PAHs were highly correlated with PM2.5. ► The fraction of particulate PAHs increased during the dust period. ► Fine particles might be an important carrier of PAHs emitted from China. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in both gas and total suspended particles were measured at Gosan, Jeju Island in Korea, a remote background site, for 15 days (March 29–April 12, 2002). During the sampling period, a severe three-day Asian dust (AD) event originating from Mongolia and northern China was observed throughout the Korean Peninsula and Jeju Island. In addition, pollution (PO) and normal (NO) periods were also identified based on the levels of anthropogenic pollutants. Despite a large difference of PM10 concentrations between the AD and PO periods, the levels of particulate PAHs in both periods were comparable (2.7 ± 1.0 and 2.4 ± 0.5 ng m−3, respectively) since they were determined by the concentration of anthropogenic PM2.5 transported from industrial areas of China. In the AD period, the level of gaseous PAHs, which were mostly from local sources, was the lowest due to strong winds; the gas/particle partitioning was close to equilibrium as the effect of long-range transport was manifested. The results of backward air trajectories, correlation analysis, and diagnostic ratios show that long-range transport of particulate PAHs produced by coal/biomass burning in China could strongly affect the levels and patterns of PAHs at Gosan, Korea.

  13. Comparison of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons level between suspended solid and sediment samples of Pengkalan Chepa River, Kelantan state, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslim, Noor Zuhartini Md; Babaheidari, Seyedreza Hashemi; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi

    2015-09-01

    Sixteen type of common Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) which consist of naphthalene, acenaphthene, acenaphthylene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[ghi]-perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]-pyrene and dibenz[a,h]-anthracene in suspended solid and sediment samples of Pengkalan Chepa River, Kelantan state, Malaysia were investigated. The analysis samples were taken from six different sites of Pengkalan Chepa River during sunny day. The samples were subjected to a series of pre-treatment before the level of PAHs can be determined. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) was the prime method for the analysis of PAHs level. A total of 16 PAHs concentration in suspended solid of the whole Pengkalan Chepa River was found to be 2144.6 ng/g dry weights. This concentration was about eight times more than 16 PAHs concentration in sediment which found to be 266.5 ng/g dry weights.

  14. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere - Analysis at the parts-per-trillion level by GC-MS. [Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    The propellant gases (Freons) used in aerosol spray cans can diffuse into the earth's upper atmosphere where they can react with the unfiltered ultraviolet radiation from the sun to reduce the earth's protective ozone layer. These Freons have been identified commonly by gas chromatography. Mass spectrometer data confirm other reports on the widespread concentrations of the Freons in the troposphere and demonstrate the presence of Freon 113 which has not been previously identified.

  15. Water Treatment Technology - Chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on chlorination provides instructional materials for nine competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purpose and process of chlorination, chlorine…

  16. Chlorine solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorine solar neutrino experiment in the Homestake Gold Mine is described and the results obtained with the chlorine detector over the last fourteen years are summarized and discussed. Background processes producing 37Ar and the question of the constancy of the production rate of 37Ar are given special emphasis

  17. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, V P; Snead, M C; Krusé, C W; Kawata, K

    1986-11-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants--free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide--when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic pipe were added for circulation. The levels of residual disinfectants tested were 0.2 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as available chlorine. In the absence of a disinfectant residual, microorganisms in the sewage contaminant were consistently recovered at high levels. The presence of any disinfectant residual reduced the microorganism level and frequency of occurrence at the consumer's tap. Free chlorine was the most effective residual disinfectant and may serve as a marker or flag in the distribution network. Free chlorine and chlorine dioxide were the least stable in the pipe network. The loss of disinfectant in the pipe network followed first-order kinetics. The half-life determined in static tests for free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and combined chlorine was 140, 93, and 1680 min. PMID:3028767

  18. Surface tension prediction for hydrocarbons and its application to level swell modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumber, Peter

    2002-01-28

    In this article, methods for estimating surface tension are considered where the specific gravity and normal boiling point are known such as when the composition is expressed using petroleum fractions. This is of interest as surface tension is an important parameter in the calculation of outflow conditions from a two-phase vessel undergoing level swell. A new improved correlation for the parachor is presented and the improved accuracy of the surface tension and bubble rise velocity compared to when the original parachor correlation is used is assessed. Finally the sensitivity of outflow predictions to changes in the surface tension is presented for a depressurising vessel containing pentane. For the vessel depressurisation simulation where the original parachor correlation is used, two-phase venting is maintained for two-three times as long compared to when the actual parachor or improved parachor correlation is used to estimate the surface tension. This has an impact on the error in predicting the mass flow rate as a source condition for other consequence models and also in vent sizing calculations. PMID:11744200

  19. Distribution coefficients of chlorinated hydrocarbons between muscle tissue and liver in fish. A contribution to the Federal database of environmental samples (UPB); Verteilungskoeffizienten chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe zwischen Muskulatur und Leber bei Fischen. Ein Beitrag zur Umweltprobenbank des Bundes (UPB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, K.W.; Oxynos, K.; Schmitzer, J. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie; Marth, P.; Kettrup, A. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie; Technische Univ. Muenchen, Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Oekologische Chemie und Umweltanalytik; Wolf, A. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Klinische Kooperationsgruppe Umweltdermatologie und Allergologie; Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie am Biederstein; Hahn, K. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (DE). Inst. fuer Medizinische Informatik und Systemforschung (MEDIS)

    1999-09-01

    Measured distribution coefficients (KL{sub M/L}) related to lipid concentrations between the muscle (C{sub ML}) and liver (C{sub LL}) tissue of two fish species (Abramis brama, Zoarces viviparus) exhibit nominal values of unity according to the relationship KL{sub M/L}=C{sub ML}/C{sub LL}=1 for persistent compounds such as highly chlorinated PCB and values above one for degradable compounds for example chlorinated cyclohexanes or DDT. The corresponding theory is presented. The relationship holds for samples for single fish as well as for pooled samples. (orig.) [German] Lipidbezogene Verteilungskoeffizienten (KL{sub M/L}) zwischen Muskelkonzentrationen- (C{sub ML}) und Leberkonzentrationen (C{sub LL}) zweier Friedfischarten Brassen (Abramis brama) und Aalmutter (Zoarces viviparus) ergeben theoriekonform (KL{sub M/L}=C{sub ML}/C{sub LL}=1) nominale Werte um 1 fuer persistente (hochchlorierte PCB) und Werte ueber 1 fuer metabolisierbare lipophile Umweltchemikalien wie chlorierte Cyclohexane oder DDT. (orig.)

  20. Distribution, Levels, and Risk Assessment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs in Some Water Bodies along the Coastal Belt of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kofi Essumang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels and distribution of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were determined in six water bodies along the coastal belt of Ghana using gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection (GC/FID. The average total PAHs recorded are from the Pra estuary, 6.3 μg/L; Benya lagoon, 7.5 μg/L; Sakumono lagoon, 10.1 μg/L; lower Volta estuary, 26.3 μg/L; Keta lagoon, 10.6 μg/L; and Narkwa lagoon, 16.1 μg/L.The 12 PAHs that were well distributed in all the coastal waters analyzed include naphthalene, pyrene, fluorene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene, acephnaphthalene, acephnaphthene, 1-methylphenanthrene, 2,3,5-trimethylnaphthalene, chrysene, biphenyl, and phenanthrene. The presence of benzo(bfluoranthene, benzo(aanthracene, and benzo(j,kfluoranthene in some of the water bodies is a source of concern as they have been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA as probable human carcinogens. These water bodies are used for fishing and for some domestic purposes by the people living around them, thereby exposing them to some dangers and the risk of getting cancer. The human health cancer risk assessment carried out also indicates that there is the possibility of some users of the water bodies getting cancer in their lifetime.

  1. Relation between chlorine with the quality of crude water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine as disinfection agent in drinking water was used widely since it was successfully been practiced in drinking water in Jersey City, 1908. Mostly, water treatment plants in Malaysia were using chlorine as disinfection agent to kill pathogen and contaminated materials that can be dangerous to consumer. Because of chlorine was a strongly disinfection agent, it also can react with another chemical components such as manganese, hydrogen, sulfides, ammonia and phenol in water. These reactions happen very fast, and chlorine will not react as disinfection agent unless all the organic and inorganic substitution presented in water reacts with chlorine. These reactions between components will increase demand of chlorine in water. The demand of chlorine in water must be filled before the free radical chlorine occurred. These free radical chlorine will decay into hypochlorous acid and hypochlorite ion that so important in disinfection process to kill pathogens and pollutants in water. Most of water treatment plant to maintain free chlorine up to 0.2 mg/ L in distribution system to consumer. These researches involved determination of parameters that can be trusted to react with the chlorine in nine sampling station along Semenyih River and four stations in water treatment plants. These parameters were determined from ammonia, cyanides, sulfides, phenol, phosphorus, nitrite, manganese, iron and sum of organic carbons. Overall, these researches concluded that ammonia and sum of organic carbons were the most compounds that react with the chlorine to produce tryhalometane and chloramines. Besides that, the concentration of cyanides compounds, sulfide, phenol, phosphorus, nitrite, manganese and iron also decrease after the chlorination process. Results can used to evaluate demanding levels of chlorine in Semenyih River. (author)

  2. A hand-portable instrument system for the real-time analysis of chlorinated organic compound contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Working with the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Transducer Research, Inc. (TRI) recently developed a new chemical monitor which responds selectively to vapors of chlorinated solvents. No response is observed with common hydrocarbon organic compounds such as BTXs (benzene, toluene, xylene) or POLs (petroleum, oil, lubricants), and in fact, no nonhalogen containing chemical has been identified which induces a measurable response. This instrument, the RCL MONITOR, was designed to analyze individual samples or monitor an area with automated repetitive analyses. Vapor levels between 0 and 500 ppm can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ppm using the hand-portable instrument. In addition to the development of the RCL MONITOR, advanced sampler systems are being developed to: (1) extend the dynamic range of the instrument through autodilution of the vapor and (2) allow chemical analyses to be performed on groundwater with a unique closed-loop sampler. When interfaced to the samplers, the RCL MONITOR is capable of measuring chlorinated solvent contamination in the vapor phase up to 5,000 ppm and in water and other condensed media from 10 to over 10,000 ppbwt. The performance of RCL MONITOR was demonstrated at several DOE facilities and applications have been identified in which the selective and sensitive measurement and monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons is essential. Case studies are currently underway at DOE Hanford and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  3. RESEARCH ON MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF RESIDUAL CHLORINE DECAY AND OPTIMIZATION OF CHLORINATION ALLOCATION OF URBAN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yi-mei; CHI Hai-yan; LI Hong; SHAN Jin-lin; ZHAI Chun-nian

    2005-01-01

    The concentration of Residual Chlorine (RC) frequently violates the standard in situations of urban water distribution system with large water supply area and long time of distribution.If chlorine dosage increases within water treatment plant, although RC in distribution system could meet water quality standard, Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) such as hydrocarbon halide rises.In the paper, a mathematical model of chlorine allocation optimization was presented based on reaction kinetics mechanism and optimization theory to solve the problem.The model includes the objective function of minimizing annual operation cost and constraints of RC standard and rational chlorination station distribution, and solving by 0-1 Integer Programming (IP).The model had been applied to a real water distribution system.The simulation results of the model showed that adding chlorine in water distribution system remarkably improved water quality and reduced the operation cost by 49.3% per year less than chlorine dosed only in water treatment plant to meet RC standard.The results prove adding chlorine in water distribution system based on the model can bring both technological and economic advancement.

  4. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxi...

  5. The expression level of the transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) determines cellular survival after radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour hypoxia promotes radioresistance and is associated with poor prognosis. The transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), also designated as Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1β, is part of the HIF pathway which mediates cellular adaptations to oxygen deprivation and facilitates tumour progression. The subunits HIF-1α and ARNT are key players within this pathway. HIF-1α is regulated in an oxygen-dependent manner whereas ARNT is considered to be constitutively expressed. However, there is mounting evidence that certain tumour cells are capable to elevate ARNT in hypoxia which suggests a survival benefit. Therefore the objective of this study was to elucidate effects of an altered ARNT expression level on the cellular response to radiation. Different human cell lines (Hep3B, MCF-7, 786-Owt, 786-Ovhl, RCC4wt and RCC4vhl) originating from various tumour entities (Hepatocellular carcinoma, breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma respectively) were X-irradiated using a conventional linear accelerator. Knockdown of ARNT expression was achieved by transient siRNA transfection. Complementary experiments were performed by forced ARNT overexpression using appropriate plasmids. Presence/absence of ARNT protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Clonogenic survival assays were performed in order to determine cellular survival post irradiation. Statistical comparison of two groups was achieved by the unpaired t-test. The results of this study indicate that ARNT depletion renders tumour cells susceptible to radiation whereas overexpression of this transcription factor confers radioresistance. These findings provide evidence to consider ARNT as a drug target and as a predictive marker in clinical applications concerning the response to radiation. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0539-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  6. Pollution level, inhalation exposure and lung cancer risk of ambient atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Taiyuan, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive air samplers were deployed to collect both gas and particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Taiyuan between 2009 and 2010. Annual average concentrations of BaP equivalent concentration (B[a]Peq) in background, rural and urban areas were 2.90 ± 0.29, 23.2 ± 30.8 and 27.4 ± 28.1 ng/m3, respectively, with higher concentration in the winter than in other seasons. The median B[a]Peq concentrations of annual inhalation exposure were estimated to be in the range of 103–347 ng/d for all population groups in rural as well as in urban areas. The median values of incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) induced by whole year inhalation exposure for all groups were basically larger than 10−6, with higher values in winter than in other seasons and in urban than in rural area. In the same season and area, the ILCR of adults was larger than other age groups and that of females was a little higher than males. - Highlights: ► The median values of ILCR were higher in winter than in other seasons. ► The median values of ILCR were higher in urban than in rural area. ► In the same season and area, the ILCR of adults was larger than other age groups. ► In the same season and area, the ILCR of females was a little higher than males. ► Exposure level and the cancer slope factor influenced the ILCR greatly. - The inhalation exposure and lung cancer risk of ambient atmospheric PAHs changed for different seasons, areas and population groups in Taiyuan, China.

  7. Chlorine trifluoride (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monograph on chlorine trifluoride may be considered as a working tool useful in gaseous diffusion research. It consists of data gathered from the literature and includes furthermore a certain amount of original data. This monograph groups together the physical, chemical and physiological properties of chlorine trifluoride, as well as the preparation and analytical methods. It has been thought wise to add some technological information, and the safety regulations governing its use. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of HEPA vacuum cleaning and dry steam cleaning in reducing levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and house dust mite allergens in carpets

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chang Ho; Yiin, Lih-Ming; Fan, Zhi-hua (Tina); Rhoads, George G.

    2008-01-01

    Dry steam cleaning, which has gained recent attention as an effective method to reduce house dust mite (HDM) allergen concentration and loading in carpets, was evaluated in this study for its efficacy in lowering levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as HDM allergens. Fifty urban homes with wail-to-wall carpets, mostly low-income and with known lead contamination, were studied in 2003 and 2004. Two carpet-cleaning interventions were compared: Repeated HEPA (High Efficiency...

  9. Levels and distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in topsoils from SE Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Antoaneta; Bogdevich, Oleg; Sion, Alina

    2012-11-15

    The aim of this work was to determine the concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in topsoils (n=17) at two sampling depths in Southeastern Romania, including industrial (Galati iron and steel plant) and agricultural sites in Galati and Braila counties, as well as nature reserves such as Lower Prut Meadow (Galati County) and Bugeac Lake (Constanta County), and to compare them with national guidelines and values reported for other regions. The total detectable OCP concentrations vary in the ranges 58-1662ngg(-1) dry weight (dw) for 0-5cm depth and 6-12,644ngg(-1) dw for 5-20cm depth. Of these, the concentrations of HCHs, DDTs, and heptachlor varied in the ranges 6-6818ngg(-1), 27-5826ngg(-1), and 108-873ngg(-1) dw, respectively, the highest values being registered near a cultivated area, located in the proximity of Siret River and Galati town, probably due to extensive use of pesticides in the past. Chlordane was detected only at one industrial site in Galati (53ngg(-1) dw), while the levels of aldrin, dieldrin, endrin and mirex were below the detection limits in all the locations and for both depths. The total PAH concentrations for 5-20cm depth range from 9ngg(-1) (Lower Prut Meadow) to 25,352ngg(-1) dw (cattle farm), being lower than those reported for the upper 5cm layer. The PAH distribution pattern in this study is in agreement with that previously obtained for surface soils from Lower Prut Meadow (prevalence of 3-ring PAHs), industrial area and farmland (prevalence of 4- and 5-ring PAHs), their sources being industrial activity, traffic and agricultural waste burning. Carcinogenic PAHs contribute 44.8-56.4% for 5-20cm and 43.7-55.8% for 0-5cm depth to total PAHs. In some locations the HCH, DDT and PAH amounts exceed the legal values. PMID:23063641

  10. Spatial and temporal variability of inorganic chlorine in Northwestern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommariva, R.; Hollis, L. D. J.; Baker, A. R.; Ball, S. M.; Bell, T. G.; Cordell, R. L.; Fleming, Z.; Gaget, M.; Yang, M. X.; Monks, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine is well known to be a strong oxidant in the atmosphere;chlorine reactivity impacts the formation of tropospheric ozone, theoxidation of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons, and the cycling ofnitrogen, sulphur and mercury. An accurate assessment of the roleplayed by chlorine in tropospheric chemical processes is complicatedby the scarce knowledge of its sources, sinks and distribution.We report observations of inorganic chlorine species (Cl2, ClNO2,particulate chloride) taken over the period 2014-2015 at threedifferent locations in Britain: an urban site a hundred kilometersfrom the ocean (Leicester), a coastal site mostly affected by shiptraffic (Penlee Point, Cornwall) and a coastal site experiencingeither clean air from the North Sea or polluted air from inland(Weybourne, Norfolk).This dataset provides a first look into the geographical distributionand seasonal variability of chlorine in Northwestern Europe: theresults suggest that, during the night, ClNO2 is ubiquitous withconcentrations in the range of hundreds to thousands of pptV at alllocations, whereas Cl2 can be observed only at coastal sites, withconcentrations of a few tens of pptV. The implications of thewidespread presence of these forms of inorganic chlorine for ozoneproduction and, in general, for the oxidative processes in the loweratmosphere are discussed with the help of a wide range of supportingmeasurements.

  11. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Robert H.; Joseph O. Falkinham; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains wer...

  12. Chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger - formation of halogenated phenols and subsequent environmental risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melbye, Alf G.; Faksness, Liv-Guri; Knudsen, Boerre Leif

    2006-03-15

    Formation of halogenated phenols as side products from treatment of produced water with aqueous chlorine dioxide has been investigated. The literature describes formation of halogenated hydrocarbons in effluent treatment using chlorine, hypochlorite and chlorine dioxide. A new chlorine dioxide product, originally intended as a H2S scavenger in the oil and gas industry, has been tested both as a phenol scavenger and H2S-scavenger for produced water applications. The concern about the possible formation of halogenated by-products initiated laboratory testing of chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger for produced water applications. The tests also included synthetic matrixes containing phenols, and the tests show that halogenated phenols, mainly brominated species, are found in produced water after treatment with chlorine dioxide. Due to potential environmental risk from halogenated organic contaminants, the use of chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger is not recommended. (Author)

  13. Supplying sodium and chlorine is effective on patients with congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Changcong Cui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the relationship of severity of heart failure and the concentration of serum sodium(Na + ) and chlorine(Cl- ) and to explore the effect of supplying sodium and chlorine on patients with Congestive heart failure. Methods: 80 patients with congestive heart failure were divided into two groups, namely supplying and control group. Serum sodium and chlorine were measured in all these patients. All treatments but supplying sodium and chlorine were same between the supplying and control groups. Results:According to NYHA, patients who were in class Ⅳ had lower level of serum sodium and chlorine than those in class Ⅱ ( P < 0.05). The heart function was improved after the level of serum sodium and chlorine were raised. Conclusions: The concentration of serum sodium and chlorine relates to the severity of heart failure. The therapy of supplying sodium and chlorine is an effective way to decrease death rate.

  14. Immunoassay for petroleum hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and ground water has become a serious environmental problem. Since the 1940s, it has been a common practice to bury fuel tanks underground to guard against fire and explosions. The leakage of petroleum fuel from these aging tanks creates a long term threat to human health. In order to location and identify these sources of contamination, an on-site screening test is very desirable. A simple, inexpensive petroleum hydrocarbon immunoassay has been developed for this purpose. The EnviroGard Petroleum Hydrocarbon test kit is designed for qualitative or semiquantitative analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon fuel in soil and ground water. The assay can be easily used on-site and takes 15 minutes to perform. Following a 2 minute methanol extraction, the test is performed in polystyrene tubes and can detect gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, home heating oil and other major fuels at ppm levels in soil and sub-ppm levels in water samples

  15. Correlation between maternal milk and infant serum levels of chlorinated pesticides (CP) and the impact of elevated CP on bleeding tendency and immune status in some infants in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaalan, Mona F; Abdelraouf, Sahar M; Mohamed, Waleed A; Hassanein, Fetouh S

    2012-01-01

    Chlorinated pesticides (CP) are environmentally persistent pollutants that (prenatally through the placenta and post-natally via breastfeeding) are transferred from mother to child. Considering the significant bleeding tendency noted in infants of CP-intoxicated mothers in Egypt, this study aimed to investigate any correlation between levels of these xenobiotics in mothers' milk and bleeding tendencies of their infants, as well as a possible role of any related immunosuppression in this phenomenon. This study examined 180 newborns presenting with altered bleeding tendencies and their mothers, and 180 normal newborns and their mothers (serving as a controls), selected from the Breastfeeding Unit, Center for Social and Preventive Medicine at the Cairo University Pediatric Hospital. Chlorinated pesticides (e.g., hexachlorocyclohexane, DDT, hepta-chloroepoxide, α- and β-endosulfan, aldrin, endrin, dieldrin) levels and their derivatives were measured in mothers' milk as well as in serum of neonates using gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry. To link bleeding tendency with lactational intoxication of neonates by CP, newborns' blood was assessed for: platelet count, bleeding and prothrombin time, liver enzymes, Vitamin K, TNFα, and IL-10. Breast milk CP levels were associated with a higher incidence of bleeding in infants. Interference with the coagulation cascade was supported by changes in prothrombin time (prolonged), platelet counts (decreased), liver enzymes (increased), and serum vitamin K concentrations (decreased). Moreover, the significant decrease in WBC count and lymphocytes added to depressed cytokine secretion, i.e., TNFα and IL-10, suggested an organochlorine-induced immunotoxicity in infants developmentally exposed to the agents. We conclude that maternal transfer of CP, via breastfeeding or across the placenta, was sufficient to achieve similar CP levels in the serum of their infants; this correlated with a manifesting of altered

  16. Bench scale studies: Ozonation as a potential treatment for waters contaminated with hydrocarbons or dioxins and furans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the bench scale studies was to examine the destruction efficiency and efficacy of ozone on chemicals of concern (COC's) commonly found in contaminated ground water and rhenoformer wash water. The ground water used in these tests contained aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and mineral spirits. The rhenoformer wash water used in these tests contained a variety of dioxins (including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) and furans. Summaries are presented of the bench scale studies by describing the COCs, methodologies, test reactors, observations, and results. The summaries also detail which applications hold promise with respect to ozonation and which ones do not. Bench test results for the experiments in which aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and mineral spirits where the COCs were relatively successful. Concentrations for the COCs ranging from 300 to 3,400 micrograms per liter (microg/L) were brought below levels specified for storm sewer discharge per the National Priority Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) permit requirements. Bench test results for the experiments in which dioxins and furans were the COCs were less promising and revealed that additional processes would have to be used in conjunction with ozonation to bring the concentration of COCs within the targeted ranges. It was realized, however, that the effectiveness and efficacy of ozonation were diminished by the presence of particulates, to which some of the dioxin and furan compounds adhered

  17. Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Polychlorinated Biphenyls, and Organochlorine Pesticides in Various Tissues of White-Backed Vulture in India

    OpenAIRE

    Dhananjayan, V.; Muralidharan, S

    2013-01-01

    This study provides information on the current status of contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the tissues of endangered White-backed Vulture Gyps bengalensis in India. Chemical analyses revealed detectable amounts of PAHs, PCBs, and OCPs. Concentration ranges of ∑ PAHs, ∑ PCBs, and ∑ OCPs in tissues were 60–2037 ng/g, 30–5790 ng/g, and 3.2–5836 ng/g wet weight, respectively. 1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(p-c...

  18. THE COMPATIBILITY OF BLENDS OF POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE) OR CHLORINATED POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE) WITH POLY(METHYL METHACRYLATE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingguo; CHENG Rongshi

    1988-01-01

    IR spectral shifts of carbonyl vibrational absorption for ethyl acetate, which acts analogically as the structural unit of poly(methyl methacrylate), in cyclohexane, chloroform, chlorinated paraffins, poly(vinyl chloride) and chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride) were measured. The results suggest that there are specific interactions between the carbonyl groups and the chlorinated hydrocarbons which could be responsible for the apparent compatibility of poly(vinyl chloride) -poly(methyl methacrylate) and chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride) -poly(methyl methacrylate) blends. Additionally, the effects of the preparation mode of blend films on phase separation and observed compatibility are discussed.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediment and oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) from mangrove of Guadeloupe: levels, bioavailability, and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdine, Gaëlle; Fichet, Denis; Louis, Max; Lemoine, Soazig

    2012-05-01

    Surface sediment and oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) from the coastlines of Guadeloupe were analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using GC/MS. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were used to assess the response of these oysters to hydrocarbons exposure. The total concentration of PAHs in the sediment ranged from 49 to 1065 ng/g dw, while concentrations in oyster ranged from 66 to 961 ng/g dw. Molecular indices based on isomeric PAHs ratios characterize the pollution sources and show that most of the contaminations in sediment originate from pyrolytic inputs. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) have been related to isomeric ratio calculated for oysters in order to refine PAHs sources. The variations of BAFs observed in the different compounds resulted from different uptake pathways in the mangrove oysters according to the type of inputs. Response of biomarkers showed inhibition of catalase and an increase of lipid peroxidation at the station where PAHs concentrations were the highest. Taken together, data obtained point to the relevance of considering environmental conditions as factors influencing biomarker responses in environmental monitoring programs. These data also indicate the need for regular environmental follow-up studies in Guadeloupe. PMID:22209019

  20. Plasma Levels of Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, and Causation

    OpenAIRE

    Kohles, Sean S.; Freeman, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are synthetic chlorinated hydrocarbons that have extensively polluted the environment and bioaccumulated in the food chain. PCBs have been deemed to be probable carcinogens by the Environmental Protection Agency, and exposure to high levels of PCBs has been consistently linked to increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In the present article we present a forensic epidemiologic evaluation of the causal relationship between NHL and elevated PCB levels via ...

  1. Simultaneous chlorination and sulphation of calcined limestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukata, M.; Takeda, K.; Miyatain, T.; Ueyama, K. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-06-01

    In order to analyze HCl and SO{sub 2} retention in fluidized bed combustors of coal and wastes, chlorination and sulphation of calcined limestone were investigated at 1023 K and atmospheric pressure using thermogravimetry. The rate of chlorination of calcined limestone slightly depended on its particle size and was kept almost constant against the progress of chlorination. In contrast, the rate of sulphation increased with decreasing particle size and steeply decreased with the progress of sulphation as commonly reported. It was found that the sulphation was markedly accelerated in the presence of HCl. Such acceleration of sulphation was remarkable for larger limestone. The level of conversion of CaO to (CaSO{sub 4} + CaCl{sub 2}) always approached 100% in the simultaneous absorption of HCl and SO{sub 2}. It was observed by SEM that in the chlorination a number of spherical aggregates and large voids were formed on the surface of limestone and that large aggregates with very flat surface and large voids have been formed in the course of the simultaneous chlorination and sulphation. The chlorination behavior and the acceleration of SO{sub 2} absorption in the presence of HCl can be due both to the formation of a mobile Cl{sup -} ion-containing phase and to the formation of voids playing a role of the diffusion paths for HCl and SO{sub 2} toward the interior of a limestone particle. Melting of a eutectic mixture of CaCl{sub 2} and CaSO{sub 4} might largely contribute to the promotion of SO{sub 2} absorption in the case of simultaneous absorption of HCl and SO{sub 2}. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Atmospheric reactivity of alcohols, thiols and fluoroalcohols with chlorine atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon Ruiz, Andres

    Alcohols, thiols and fluoroalcohols are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are emitted to the atmosphere from both natural (vegetation, oceans, volcanoes, etc.) and anthropogenic sources (fuels, solvents, wastewater, incinerators, refrigerants, etc.). These pollutants can be eliminated from the troposphere by deposition on the terrestrial surface, direct photolysis or reaction with different tropospheric oxidants. Reactions of VOCs with tropospheric oxidants are involved in the well-known atmospheric phenomenon of photochemical smog or the production of tropospheric ozone. The oxidation of these VOCs in the troposphere is mainly initiated by reaction with OH radicals during the daytime and with NO radicals at night. However, in recent years, the oxidation by chlorine atoms (Cl) has gained great importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments. In general, Cl atoms are much more reactive species than OH and NO; radicals and therefore low concentrations of Cl may compete with OH and NO3 in hydrocarbon oxidation processes. The main source of tropospheric Cl atoms is believed to be the photolysis of chlorine-containing molecules generated by heterogeneous reactions of sea salt aerosols. It has also been proposed that Cl atoms, produced in the photolysis of Cl2 emitted from industrial processes, may enhance hydrocarbon oxidation rates and ozone production in urban environments. In this work, a kinetic, theoretical and mechanistic study of the reaction of several alcohols, thiols, and fluoroalcohols with Cl atoms has been carried out. Pulsed laser photolysis-fluorescence resonance (PLP-RF) technique was used for the kinetic study as a function of temperature and pressure. An environmental chamber-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) system was also employed in the kinetic studies. Tropospheric lifetimes of these pollutants were estimated using obtained kinetic

  3. Chlorination of zirconyte concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination experiments with zirconyte concentrate were carried out in order to study the effects of temperature, percentage of reducing agent and porosity on the gasification of ZrO2 for 10 and 20 minutes of reaction. Factorial analysis was applied and the results indicated that temperature and percentage of reducing agent were the two only variables effecting the ZrO2 gasification. (author)

  4. Association Between Ambient Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Small for Gestational Age Hispanic Infants Born Along the United States-Mexico Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maypole-Keenan, Coty M; Symanski, Elaine; Stock, Thomas H; Waller, D Kim

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have examined associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and birth outcomes, and no studies have been conducted in El Paso County Texas, along the United States-Mexico border. Infants born from 2005-2007 to Hispanic mothers with a birth weight less than the 10th percentile for gestational age and sex were classified as small for gestational age (SGA). PAH exposures were estimated for the entire period of gestation and for each trimester of pregnancy using ambient air monitoring data from 2004-2007. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for the association between PAH levels and SGA infants. There was marked seasonal variation in the carcinogenic PAHs. Established risk factors for SGA were observed to be associated with SGA births in this population. No associations were detected between PAH levels and SGA births. These findings provide no evidence of an association between PAHs and SGA infants. PMID:24585213

  5. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the ...

  6. Multi-year levels and trends of non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations observed in ambient air in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waked, Antoine; Sauvage, Stéphane; Borbon, Agnès; Gauduin, Julie; Pallares, Cyril; Vagnot, Marie-Pierre; Léonardis, Thierry; Locoge, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of 31 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were carried out at three urban (Paris, 2003-2014, Strasbourg, 2002-2014 and Lyon, 2007-2014) sites in France over the period of a decade. A trend analysis was applied by means of the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test to annual and seasonal mean concentrations in order to point out changes in specific emission sources and to assess the impact of emission controls and reduction strategies. The trends were compared to those from three rural sites (Peyrusse-Vieille, 2002-2013, Tardière, 2003-2013 and Donon, 1997-2007). The results obtained showed a significant yearly decrease in pollutant concentrations over the study period and for the majority of species in the range of -1 to -7% in accordance with the decrease of NMHC emissions in France (-5 to -9%). Concentrations of long-lived species such as ethane and propane which are recognized as tracers of distant sources and natural gas remained constant. Compounds associated with combustion processes such as acetylene, propene, ethylene and benzene showed a significant decline in the range of -2% to -5% yr-1. These trends are consistent with those recently described at urban and background sites in the northern mid-latitudes and with emission inventories. C7-C9 aromatics such as toluene and xylenes as well as C4-C5 alkanes such as isopentane and isobutane also showed a significant decrease in the range of -3% to -7% yr-1. The decreasing trends in terms of % yr-1 observed at these French urban sites were typically higher for acetylene, ethylene and benzene than those reported for French rural sites of the national observatory of Measurement and Evaluation in Rural areas of trans-boundary Air pollution (MERA). The study also highlighted the difficult choice of a long term sampling site representative of the general trends of pollutant concentrations.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentration levels, pattern, source identification and soil toxicity assessment in urban traffic soil of Dhanbad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Swapnil; Sinha, Alok; Tarafdar, Abhrajyoti

    2016-03-01

    Present study was carried out to assess and understand potential health risk and to examine the impact of vehicular traffic on the contamination status of urban traffic soils in Dhanbad City with respect to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Eight urban traffic sites and two control/rural site surface soils were analyzed and the contents of 13 priority PAHs was determined. Total PAH concentration at traffic sites ranged from 1.019μgg(-1) to 10.856μgg(-1) with an average value of 3.488μgg(-1). At control/rural site, average concentration of total PAHs was found to be 0.640μgg(-1). PAH pattern was dominated by four- and five-ring PAHs (contributing >50% to the total PAHs) at all the eight traffic sites. On the other hand, rural soil showed a predominance of low molecular weight three-ring PAHs (contributing >30% to the total PAHs). Indeno[123-cd]pyrene/benz[ghi]perylene (IP/BgP) ratio indicated that PAH load at the traffic sites is predominated by the gasoline-driven vehicles. The ratio of Ant/(Ant+Phe) varied from 0.03 to 0.44, averaging 0.10; Fla/(Fla+Pyr) from 0.39 to 0.954, averaging 0.52; BaA/(BaA+Chry) from 0.156 to 0.60, averaging 0.44; and IP/(IP+BgP) from 0.176 to 0.811, averaging 0.286. The results indicated that vehicular emission was the major source for PAHs contamination with moderate effect of coal combustion and biomass combustion. Carcinogenic potency of PAH load in traffic soil was nearly 6.15 times higher as compared to the control/rural soil. PMID:26747999

  8. Photophysical properties and localization of chlorins substituted with methoxy groups, hydroxyl groups and alkyl chains in liposome-like cellular membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Omari, S [Department of Physics, Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan)

    2007-06-01

    Some of the photophysical properties (stationary absorbance and fluorescence, fluorescence decay times and singlet oxygen quantum yields) of chlorins substituted with methoxy groups, hydroxyl groups and hydrocarbonic chains were studied in ethanol and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. The photophysical behaviors of the chlorins in liposomes like cellular membrane were compared with those obtained from chlorin-liposome systems delivered to Jurkat cells in order to select potent photosensitizers for the photodynamic treatment of cancer. The localization of the studied chlorins inside liposomes was found to depend strongly on the substituents of chlorins. Absorption spectra of chlorins embedded in DPPC-liposomes have been recorded in the temperature range of 20-70 deg. C. It is demonstrated that the location of the chlorin molecules depends on the phase state of the phospholipids. These observations are confirmed by the fluorescence lifetimes, singlet oxygen lifetimes and singlet oxygen quantum yields results.

  9. Photophysical properties and localization of chlorins substituted with methoxy groups, hydroxyl groups and alkyl chains in liposome-like cellular membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the photophysical properties (stationary absorbance and fluorescence, fluorescence decay times and singlet oxygen quantum yields) of chlorins substituted with methoxy groups, hydroxyl groups and hydrocarbonic chains were studied in ethanol and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. The photophysical behaviors of the chlorins in liposomes like cellular membrane were compared with those obtained from chlorin-liposome systems delivered to Jurkat cells in order to select potent photosensitizers for the photodynamic treatment of cancer. The localization of the studied chlorins inside liposomes was found to depend strongly on the substituents of chlorins. Absorption spectra of chlorins embedded in DPPC-liposomes have been recorded in the temperature range of 20-70 deg. C. It is demonstrated that the location of the chlorin molecules depends on the phase state of the phospholipids. These observations are confirmed by the fluorescence lifetimes, singlet oxygen lifetimes and singlet oxygen quantum yields results

  10. Total petroleum content and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon levels in soil and groundwater at the site of a fuel service station in Accra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of Total Petroleum Content (TPC) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) in soil and groundwater at the site of a fuel service station indicated leakage of petroleum products from the underground storage tanks buried 3.6km below the surface. The leakage resulted in contamination of areas within a 60 m radius. In the TPC profiles, distinct peak corresponding to diesel oil occurred between 5 and 17 mins; while a hump characteristic of mineral oil occurred between 17 and 25 mins. In the PAH profiles, 18 compounds were identified and quantified by means of gas chromatography. The TPC levels ranged between 0.918 - 21.9 μg/L for ground water and 44.1 - 894 mg/kg for soil. The levels of PAHs were low and HM-PAHs were not detected. The total PAH levels varied between 20.93 - 51.85 μg/L for groundwater and 2.07 - 6.5 ng/kg ww for soil. The levels of LM-PAHs were above the International standard of 200 ng/L, while BaP levels were 710 ng/L (indicative of carcinogenic effects). Naphthalene was found to be abundant in the groundwater. (au)

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon levels and measures of oxidative stress in the Mediterranean endemic bivalve Pinna nobilis exposed to the Don Pedro oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Antoni; Tejada, Silvia; Box, Antonio; Deudero, Salud

    2013-06-15

    The fan mussel (Pinna nobilis Linné, 1758) is the largest endemic Mediterranean bivalve subject to strict protection as an endangered species. Antioxidant biomarkers in P. nobilis gills for biomonitoring marine pollution were researched after the Don Pedro oil spill. Two sampling locations on the east and southeast of the island of Ibiza (Western Mediterranean, Spain) were selected, one extensively affected by the oil spill and the other unaffected (control area). Mussels were sampled 1 month, 6 months and 1 year after the accident. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon levels and antioxidant enzymes significantly increased as result of the oil spill in all sampling periods (p<0.05). Oxidative damage in lipids significantly increased in the mussels collected in the affected area (p<0.05), though such damage was back to normal after 1 year. In conclusion, the Don Pedro oil spill induced a situation of oxidative stress on P. nobilis that continued a year later. PMID:23623655

  12. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment alters eicosanoid levels in several organs of the mouse in an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent fashion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, Peter; Solaimani, Parrisa [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Wu, Xiaomeng [Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hankinson, Oliver, E-mail: ohank@mednet.ucla.edu [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) adversely affects many mammalian organs and tissues. These effects are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 are upregulated by the liganded AHR. These (and other) cytochromes P450 can metabolize arachidonic acid into a variety of bioactive eicosanoids. Towards investigating a potential role of eicosanoids in TCDD toxicity, arachidonic acid, two other unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, and up to twenty-five eicosanoids were measured in five organs/tissues of male and female wild-type and Ahr null mice treated or untreated with TCDD. TCDD generally increased the levels of the four dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and (where measured) 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and 18-, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (HETEs) in the serum, liver, spleen and lungs, but not the heart, of both sexes, and increased the levels in the serum, liver and spleen of several metabolites that are usually considered products of lipoxygenase activity, but which may also be generated by cytochromes P450. TCDD also increased the levels of the esterified forms of these eicosanoids in the liver in parallel with the corresponding free forms. The levels of prostanoids were generally not affected by TCDD. The above changes did not occur in Ahr null mice, and are therefore mediated by the AHR. TCDD increased the mRNA levels of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1 and the Pla2g12a form of phospholipase A{sub 2} to varying degrees in the different organs, and these increases correlated with some but not all the changes in eicosanoids levels in the organs, suggesting that other enzymes may also be involved. -- Highlights: ► TCDD treatment increases the levels of many eicosanoids in several mouse organs. ► Products of both the cytochrome P450 and classical lipoxygenase pathways are increased. ► These increases are dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. ► Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 appear to be responsible for much but

  13. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment alters eicosanoid levels in several organs of the mouse in an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent fashion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) adversely affects many mammalian organs and tissues. These effects are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 are upregulated by the liganded AHR. These (and other) cytochromes P450 can metabolize arachidonic acid into a variety of bioactive eicosanoids. Towards investigating a potential role of eicosanoids in TCDD toxicity, arachidonic acid, two other unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, and up to twenty-five eicosanoids were measured in five organs/tissues of male and female wild-type and Ahr null mice treated or untreated with TCDD. TCDD generally increased the levels of the four dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and (where measured) 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and 18-, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (HETEs) in the serum, liver, spleen and lungs, but not the heart, of both sexes, and increased the levels in the serum, liver and spleen of several metabolites that are usually considered products of lipoxygenase activity, but which may also be generated by cytochromes P450. TCDD also increased the levels of the esterified forms of these eicosanoids in the liver in parallel with the corresponding free forms. The levels of prostanoids were generally not affected by TCDD. The above changes did not occur in Ahr null mice, and are therefore mediated by the AHR. TCDD increased the mRNA levels of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1 and the Pla2g12a form of phospholipase A2 to varying degrees in the different organs, and these increases correlated with some but not all the changes in eicosanoids levels in the organs, suggesting that other enzymes may also be involved. -- Highlights: ► TCDD treatment increases the levels of many eicosanoids in several mouse organs. ► Products of both the cytochrome P450 and classical lipoxygenase pathways are increased. ► These increases are dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. ► Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 appear to be responsible for much but not

  14. Natural Attenuation Mechanism and Capability of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Shallow Groundwater in a Study Area in Shanghai%上海某污染场地浅层地下水中氯代烃自然降解机制及能力研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭琳

    2013-01-01

    自然衰减修复技术(Natural Attenuation remedy)是目前控制浅层地下水氯代烃污染比较可行的技术之一,其能否成功应用的关键在于证实在天然条件下是否存在氯代烃生物降解可能性及生物降解程度是否能满足场地的修复目标.针对上海某污染场地的浅层地下水氯代烃污染在自然条件下生物降解的机制进行了探讨,并对该场地氯代烃污染自然衰减能力进行了定性评价,以及利用归一化方法计算了场地内1,1,1-三氯乙烷的生物降解速率常数为0.032a-1,说明浅层地下水中的1,1,1-三氯乙烷存在天然生物降解,但降解速率比较缓慢,可采用人工加强自然衰减的方式对该场地进行修复.%Natural Attenuation Remedy is an effective and feasible technology for controlling the shallow groundwater chlorinated hydrocarbons contamination,the key of this technology is to verify the existence of biological degradation under the natural conditions,and determine whether the degradation can meet the remediation target levet.The mechanism of natural attenuation in groundwater of a study area in Shanghai was discussed,and the capacity of natural attenuation was also evaluated qualitatively.The calculated biological degradation rate of l,l,l-trichloroethane of this site is 0.032 a-1,which indicated the sufficient evidence of natural attenuation,but the degradation velocity is relatively slow.The natural attenuation process can be enhanced by some artificial measures.

  15. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  16. Biodegradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in a vapor phase reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bench scale gas lift loop reactor was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradative microorganisms being used to treat TCE contaminated air. Two different microorganisms were used as biocatalysts in this reactor. After proper operating conditions were established for use of this reactor/biocatalyst combination, both microorganisms could degrade 95% of inlet TCE at air flow rates of up to 3% of the total reactor volume per minute. TCE concentrations of between 300 μg/L (60ppmv) and 3000 μg/L (600 ppmv) were degraded with 95% or better efficiency. Preliminary economic evaluations suggest that bioremediation may be the low cost alternative for treating certain TCE contaminated air streams and field trials of a scaled-up reactor system based on this technology are currently underway

  17. Riverine input of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the coastal pollution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; Everaarts, J.M.

    This chapter presents an overview of the contamination of the coastal ecosystem of the North Sea, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, East China Sea, Atlantic Sea, Aegean Sea, East Java Sea, Australian coast and the Mediterranean Sea due to riverine input...

  18. Determination of chlorine in graphite by combustion-ion chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Lianzhong [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy; Watanabe, Kazuo; Itoh, Mitsuo

    1995-09-01

    A combustion/ion chromatographic method has been studied for the sensitive determination of chlorine in graphite. A graphite sample was burnt at 900degC in a silica reaction tube at an oxygen flow rate of 200 ml/min. Chlorine evolved was absorbed in 20 ml of a 0.1 mM sodium carbonate solution. The solution was evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved with a small volume of water. Chlorine in the solution was determined using ion chromatography. The method was applied to JAERI graphite certified reference materials and practical graphite materials. The detection limit was about 0.8 {mu}gCl/g for a 2.0 g sample. The precision was about 2.5% (relative standard deviation) for samples with chlorine content of 70 {mu}g/g level. The method is also usable for coal samples. (author).

  19. Determination of chlorine in graphite by combustion-ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combustion/ion chromatographic method has been studied for the sensitive determination of chlorine in graphite. A graphite sample was burnt at 900degC in a silica reaction tube at an oxygen flow rate of 200 ml/min. Chlorine evolved was absorbed in 20 ml of a 0.1 mM sodium carbonate solution. The solution was evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved with a small volume of water. Chlorine in the solution was determined using ion chromatography. The method was applied to JAERI graphite certified reference materials and practical graphite materials. The detection limit was about 0.8 μgCl/g for a 2.0 g sample. The precision was about 2.5% (relative standard deviation) for samples with chlorine content of 70 μg/g level. The method is also usable for coal samples. (author)

  20. Dioxins, PCBs, chlorinated pesticides and brominated flame retardants in free-range chicken eggs from peri-urban areas in Arusha, Tanzania: Levels and implications for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polder, A; Müller, M B; Brynildsrud, O B; de Boer, J; Hamers, T; Kamstra, J H; Lie, E; Mdegela, R H; Moberg, H; Nonga, H E; Sandvik, M; Skaare, J U; Lyche, J L

    2016-05-01

    The environment in the northern part of Tanzania is influenced by rapid population growth, and increased urbanization. Urban agriculture is common and of economic value for low income families. In Arusha, many households sell eggs from free-ranging backyard chicken. In 2011, 159 eggs from different households in five different locations in Arusha were collected, homogenized, pooled into 28 composite samples and analyzed for a wide selection of POPs. Levels of POPs varied widely within and between the locations. The levels of dieldrin and ΣDDT ranged between 2 and 98,791 and 2 and 324ng/g lipid weight (lw), respectively. EU MRLs of 0.02mg/kg dieldrin for eggs were exceeded in 4/28 samples. PCBs, HCHs, chlordanes, toxaphenes and endosulfanes were found at lower frequency and levels. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), e.g polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromphenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were present in 100%, 60% and 46% of the composite samples, respectively. Octa-and deca-BDEs were the dominating PBDEs and BDE 209 levels ranged between toxicity reference values (TRVs) such as the provisional tolerable intake (PTDI) or Reference Doses (RfDs). In one sample dieldrin exceeded the PTDI (100ng/kgbw/day). Correlation was found between bio-TEQs and lipid adjusted levels of ΣPBDEs, suggesting similar sources. Open fires in backyards may be one of the sources for contamination of eggs with BFRs and dioxins. PMID:26897409

  1. Radiochemical analysis of chlorine-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to propose a radiochemical separation method of chlorine-36 from other beta-gamma emitters based on an oxidation technique where chlorine is trapped by NaOH. Chlorine-36 beta emissions are measured by liquid scintillation counting by the dual label technique in order to avoid the contamination produced by carbon-14 which is also trapped by NaOH and it is the main contaminant present in graphite samples. The sensitivity of this radiochemical method is high enough to achieve the needed thresholds for the radiological characterization of the radioactive materials in which this method can be applied

  2. Estimating individual-level exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons throughout the gestational period based on personal, indoor, and outdoor monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H.; Perera, F.; Pac, A.; Wang, L.; Flak, E.; Mroz, E.; Jacek, R.; Chai-Onn, T.; Jedrychowski, W.; Masters, E.; Camann, D.; Spengler, J. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Current understanding on health effects of long-term polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure is limited by lack of data on time-varying nature of the pollutants at an individual level. In a cohort of pregnant women in Krakow, Poland, we examined the contribution of temporal, spatial, and behavioral factors to prenatal exposure to airborne PAHs within each trimester and developed a predictive model of PAH exposure over the entire gestational period. The observed personal, indoor, and outdoor B(a)P levels we observed in Krakow far exceed the recommended Swedish guideline value for B(a)P of 0.1 ng/m{sup 3}. Based on simultaneously monitored levels, the outdoor PAH level alone accounts for 93% of total variability in personal exposure during the heating season. Living near the Krakow bus depot, a crossroad, and the city, center and time spent outdoors or commuting were not associated with higher personal exposure. During the nonheating season only, a 1-hr increase in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure was associated with a 10-16% increase in personal exposure to the nine measured PAHs. A 1{degree}C decrease in ambient temperature was associated with a 3-5% increase in exposure to benz(a)anthracene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and dibenz(a,h)anthracene, after accounting for the outdoor concentration. A random effects model demonstrated that mean personal exposure at a given gestational period depends on the season, residence location, and ETS. Considering that most women reported spending < 3 hr/day outdoors, most women in the study were exposed to outdoor-originating PAHs within the indoor setting. Cross-sectional, longitudinal monitoring supplemented with questionnaire data allowed development of a gestation-length model of individual-level exposure with high precision and validity.

  3. Variation in indoor levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from burning various biomass types in the traditional grass-roofed households in Western Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass burning as fuel in the traditional grass-roofed rural households of Western Province of Kenya in open fire places, in poorly ventilated conditions, lead to accumulation of soot under the roofs. This study characterized and quantified the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in accumulated soot in these households and determined the variation in PAHs concentrations with fuel biomass type. Soot samples collected from the households were extracted, cleaned and analysed by gas chromatography. The PAHs were identified using retention times, verified by gas chromatographic mass spectral analysis and quantified from peak area responses using the internal standard method. The PAHs levels significantly varied (P ≤ 0.05) with biomass type in the order: dung ≥ indigenous trees ≥ exotic trees ≥ shrubs and crop residues. Use of dung and wood from indigenous trees as fuel should be discouraged since they are higher emitters (P ≤ 0.05) of carcinogenic PAHs. - Highlights: → Biomass burning in the traditional households emits PAHs which adsorb onto soot. → The emitted PAHs levels significantly varied (P ≤ 0.05) with biomass fuel type used. → PAHs from burning wood from indigenous trees were characterized for the first time. → This study provides baseline data on PAHs resulting from biomass burning in Kenya. - Indoor burning of biomass fuel in open fires places emit PAHs, which adsorb onto soot particles.

  4. Screening-level ecological and human health risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater detention pond sediments of Coastal South Carolina, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Screening-level ecological and human health assessments were performed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the sediments of 19 stormwater detention ponds located in coastal South Carolina. For ecological screening benchmarks, we used threshold and probable effect concentrations (TEC and PEC) derived from consensus-based sediment quality guidelines for individual PAH analytes and equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmarks-toxic units (ΣESB-TU) derived for PAH mixtures. For human health benchmarks, we used preliminary remediation goals (PRGs). Sediments of five stormwater ponds (four commercial ponds and one residential pond with a large drainage area) exceeded PEC values for several PAH analytes and the ΣESB-TU safe value of 1 for PAH mixtures. These same five stormwater ponds also exceeded the PRG values for five carcinogenic PAH analytes. These results suggest that the PAH levels in sediments from certain commercial and residential ponds have the potential to pose moderate to high risks for adverse, chronic effects to benthic organisms in situ and an increased risk of cancer to humans ex situ following excavation and on-site disposal. We recommend that sediment from these stormwater ponds be tested prior to excavation to determine the appropriate method of disposal. We also recommend that regulatory agencies enforce guidelines for periodic sediment removal as this should reduce both in situ and ex situ risks resulting from sediment PAH exposure.

  5. Evaluation of HEPA vacuum cleaning and dry steam cleaning in reducing levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and house dust mite allergens in carpets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang Ho; Yiin, Lih-Ming; Tina Fan, Zhi-Hua; Rhoads, George G

    2009-01-01

    Dry steam cleaning, which has gained recent attention as an effective method to reduce house dust mite (HDM) allergen concentration and loading in carpets, was evaluated in this study for its efficacy in lowering levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as HDM allergens. Fifty urban homes with wall-to-wall carpets, mostly low-income and with known lead contamination, were studied in 2003 and 2004. Two carpet-cleaning interventions were compared: Repeated HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air filtered) vacuuming alone and repeated HEPA vacuuming supplemented with dry steam cleaning. Vacuum samples were collected to measure carpet loading of dust and contaminants immediately before and after cleaning. Paired comparisons were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the cleaning protocols in reducing the levels of PAHs and HDM allergens in carpets. The results indicated that both cleaning methods substantially reduced the loading of PAHs and HDM allergens as well as dust in carpets (p < 0.0001). The reductions in loading of dust (64.4%), PAHs (69.1%), and HDM allergens (85.5%), by dry steam cleaning plus repetitive HEPA vacuuming were larger than the reductions by regular HEPA vacuuming alone: dust (55.5%), PAHs (58.6%), and HDM allergens (80.8%), although the difference was statistically significant only for dust and PAHs. We conclude that intensive HEPA vacuum cleaning substantially reduced the loading of PAHs and HDM allergens in carpets in these urban homes and that dry steam cleaning added modestly to cleaning effectiveness. PMID:19137159

  6. Variation in indoor levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from burning various biomass types in the traditional grass-roofed households in Western Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisouza, Fred Ayodi, E-mail: lisouzafred@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Maseno University, P.O. Box 333, Maseno 40105 (Kenya); Owuor, Okinda P. [Department of Chemistry, Maseno University, P.O. Box 333, Maseno 40105 (Kenya); Lalah, Joseph O. [Department of Chemical Science and Technology, Kenya Polytechnic University College, P.O. Box 52428, Nairobi 00200 (Kenya)

    2011-07-15

    Biomass burning as fuel in the traditional grass-roofed rural households of Western Province of Kenya in open fire places, in poorly ventilated conditions, lead to accumulation of soot under the roofs. This study characterized and quantified the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in accumulated soot in these households and determined the variation in PAHs concentrations with fuel biomass type. Soot samples collected from the households were extracted, cleaned and analysed by gas chromatography. The PAHs were identified using retention times, verified by gas chromatographic mass spectral analysis and quantified from peak area responses using the internal standard method. The PAHs levels significantly varied (P {<=} 0.05) with biomass type in the order: dung {>=} indigenous trees {>=} exotic trees {>=} shrubs and crop residues. Use of dung and wood from indigenous trees as fuel should be discouraged since they are higher emitters (P {<=} 0.05) of carcinogenic PAHs. - Highlights: > Biomass burning in the traditional households emits PAHs which adsorb onto soot. > The emitted PAHs levels significantly varied (P {<=} 0.05) with biomass fuel type used. > PAHs from burning wood from indigenous trees were characterized for the first time. > This study provides baseline data on PAHs resulting from biomass burning in Kenya. - Indoor burning of biomass fuel in open fires places emit PAHs, which adsorb onto soot particles.

  7. Influence of parasitism in dogs on their serum levels of persistent organochlorine compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Carretón, Elena; Camacho, María; Montoya-Alonso, José Alberto; Boada, Luis D; Valerón, Pilar F; Cordón, Yaiza Falcón; Almeida-González, Maira; Zumbado, Manuel; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2016-08-15

    Persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) are toxic chemicals, which accumulate in humans and animals, as only few species have the capability of eliminating them. However, some authors have pointed to the possibility that certain species of invertebrates (i.e. nematodes) could metabolize this type of compounds. As certain species of nematodes act as parasites of vertebrates, this research was designed to explore the influence of some of the most common parasites of the dogs in their serum levels of 56 common POPs. The study included three groups of dogs (n=64), which were prospectively recruited in the island of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain): a) control animals, non-parasitized (serologically tested negative, n=24); b) dogs tested positive for intestinal parasites and negative for other parasites (n=24); and c) dogs tested positive for heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) and negative for other parasites (n=16). The presence of Dirofilaria immitis was strongly associated with lower serum levels of a wide range of pollutant in their hosts (PCB congeners 28, 52, 118, 138, 153, and 180; hexachlorobenzene, lindane, aldrin, dieldrin, anthracene and pyrene). We also found an inverse association between the hosts' serum levels of PCBs and intestinal parasites. We did not find any association with DDT or its metabolites, but this might be explained by the recently suggested ability of dogs for the efficient metabolization of these compounds. According to the results of this study certain forms of parasitism would reduce the bioavailability of the major classes of POPs in dogs. However, further studies are needed to elucidate whether this phenomenon is due to a competence between parasites and hosts or could respond to a possible capability of parasitic nematodes for the metabolization of these POPs. PMID:27096633

  8. [Halogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments of Maozhou River, Shenzhen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Lin; Ni, Hong-Gang; Ding, Chao; Zeng, Hui

    2012-09-01

    Surface sediments collected from the Maozhou River watershed in Shenzhen were analyzed for the concentration levels and spatial distribution characteristics of halogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HPAHs) using GC-MS. Total concentrations of three chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs) and six brominated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (BrPAHs) of concern ranged from 3.00 to 301 ng x g(-1) and 7.52 to 285 ng x g(-1), respectively. Source appointments indicated that the HPAHs in these surface sediments were mainly derived from waste incineration, fossil fuel combustion, vehicle emission, and burning of crop straw, accounting for 40%, 20.5% 11.9%, and 11.7% of the total loading, respectively. Additionally, the toxic equivalency quotients (TEQ) of total ClPAHs and BrPAHs ranged from 7.95 to 38.1 pg x g(-1) and 38.1 to 105 pg x g(-1) respectively. Finally, the relationships between the HPAHs levels and different land use types were examined. Results indicated that the levels of HPAHs in surface sediments showed a decreasing trend after the first increase to the peak with the density of industrial land, but inversely proportional to the density of agricultural land. PMID:23243864

  9. Oxidation of manganese(II) during chlorination: role of bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, S; Fouche, L; Dick, J; Heitz, A; von Gunten, U

    2013-08-01

    The oxidation of dissolved manganese(II) (Mn(II)) during chlorination is a relatively slow process which may lead to residual Mn(II) in treated drinking waters. Chemical Mn(II) oxidation is autocatalytic and consists of a homogeneous and a heterogeneous process; the oxidation of Mn(II) is mainly driven by the latter process. This study demonstrates that Mn(II) oxidation during chlorination is enhanced in bromide-containing waters by the formation of reactive bromine species (e.g., HOBr, BrCl, Br2O) from the oxidation of bromide by chlorine. During oxidation of Mn(II) by chlorine in bromide-containing waters, bromide is recycled and acts as a catalyst. For a chlorine dose of 1 mg/L and a bromide level as low as 10 μg/L, the oxidation of Mn(II) by reactive bromine species becomes the main pathway. It was demonstrated that the kinetics of the reaction are dominated by the adsorbed Mn(OH)2 species for both chlorine and bromine at circumneutral pH. Reactive bromine species such as Br2O and BrCl significantly influence the rate of manganese oxidation and may even outweigh the reactivity of HOBr. Reaction orders in [HOBr]tot were found to be 1.33 (±0.15) at pH 7.8 and increased to 1.97 (±0.17) at pH 8.2 consistent with an important contribution of Br2O which is second order in [HOBr]tot. These findings highlight the need to take bromide, and the subsequent reactive bromine species formed upon chlorination, into account to assess Mn(II) removal during water treatment with chlorine. PMID:23859083

  10. Assessment of the risk of transporting liquid chlorine by rail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, W.B.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the risk of shipping liquid chlorine by rail. While chlorine is not an energy material, there are several benefits to studying chlorine transportation risks. First, chlorine, like energy materials, is widely used as a feedstock to industry. Second, it is the major purification agent in municipal water treatment systems and therefore, provides direct benefits to the public. Finally, other risk assessments have been completed for liquid chlorine shipments in the US and Europe, which provide a basis for comparison with this study. None of the previous PNL energy material risk assessments have had other studies for comparison. For these reasons, it was felt that a risk assessment of chlorine transportation by rail could provide information on chlorine risk levels, identify ways to reduce these risks and use previous studies on chlorine risks to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the PNL risk assessment methodology. The risk assessment methodology used in this study is summarized. The methodology is presented in the form of a risk assessment model which is constructed for ease of periodic updating of the data base so that the risk may be reevaluated as additional data become available. The report is sectioned to correspond to specific analysis steps identified in the model. The transport system and accident environment are described. The response of the transport system to accident environments is described. Release sequences are postulated and evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a direct comparison with other reports in this series.

  11. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  12. Determination of low levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil by high performance liquid chromatography with tandem fluorescence and diode-array detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujuan; Wei, Jing; Song, Jing; Chen, Mengfang; Luo, Yongming

    2013-08-01

    Risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminated soil and source apportionment require accurate analysis of the concentration of each PAH congener in the soil. However, determination of low level PAH congeners in soil is difficult because of similarity in the chemical properties of 16 PAHs and severe matrix interferences due to complex composition of soils. It is therefore imperative to develop a sensitive and accurate method for determination of low level PAHs in soil. In this work, high performance liquid chromatography equipped with fluorescence and diode-array detectors (HPLC-FLD-DAD) was used to determine the concentration of 16 PAHs in soil. The separation of the 16 PAHs was achieved by optimization of the mobile phase gradient elution program and FLD wavelength switching program. Qualitative analysis of the 16 PAHs was based on the retention time (RT) and each PAH specific spectrum obtained from DAD. In contrast, the quantitative analysis of individual PAH congeners was based on the peak areas at the specific wavelength with DAD and FLD. Under optimal conditions the detection limit was in the range 1.0-9.5 μg L(-1) for 16 PAHs with DAD and 0.01-0.1 μg L(-1) for 15 PAHs with FLD, and the RSD of PAHs was less than 5% with DAD and 3% with FLD. The spiked recoveries were in the range 61-96%, with the exception of NaP (<40%). The results show that HPLC-FLD-DAD can provide more accurate and reliable analysis of low level PAH congeners in soil samples. PMID:23659963

  13. The effects of cooking on wire and stone barbecue at different cooking levels on the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in beef steak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Fatih; Yuzer, M Onur

    2016-07-15

    The effects of type of barbecue (wire and stone) and cooking levels (rare, medium, well-done and very well-done) on the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in beef steak were investigated. Varying levels of IQx (up to 0.29ng/g), IQ (up to 0.93ng/g), MeIQx (up to 0.08ng/g), MeIQ (up to 0.75ng/g), 7,8-DiMeIQx (up to 0.08ng/g), 4,8-DiMeIQx (up to 4.95ng/g), PhIP (up to 6.24ng/g) and AαC (up to 0.20ng/g) were determined, while MeAαC was not detected. The total HCA amounts in wire barbecued samples were higher than stone barbecued samples. Total HCA contents of the samples ranged between nd and 13.52ng/g. In terms of PAHs, varying levels of BaA (up to 0.34ng/g), Chry (up to 0.28ng/g), BbF (up to 0.39ng/g), BkF (up to 0.90ng/g), BaP (up to 0.29ng/g) and Bghip (up to 0.43ng/g) were determined, while DahA and IncdP were not detected. The total PAH amounts in stone barbecued samples were higher than those of wire barbecued samples. Total PAH amounts of the samples ranged between nd and 2.63ng/g. PMID:26948589

  14. Kinetic study of neodymium oxide chlorination with gaseous chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, Marta V., E-mail: marta.bosco@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Fouga, Gaston G. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida Bustillo 9500, CP 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Bohe, Ana E. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida Bustillo 9500, CP 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Centro Regional Universitario Bariloche, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, CP 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze the kinetics of the neodymium oxide chlorination reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For temperatures below 425 Degree-Sign C the system is under chemical control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reaction order of 0.40 with respect to chlorine partial pressure was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An activation energy of 161 {+-} 4 kJ mol{sup -1} was determined. - Abstract: The kinetics of the chlorination of neodymium oxide has been investigated by thermogravimetry between 312 Degree-Sign C and 475 Degree-Sign C, and for partial pressures of chlorine ranging from 10 kPa to 50 kPa. The starting temperature for the reaction of neodymium oxide with chlorine was determined to be about 250 Degree-Sign C, leading to neodymium oxychloride as product. The results showed that, for temperatures below 425 Degree-Sign C, the system is under chemical control and the formation of the oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The influence of chlorine mass transport through the bulk gas phase and through the boundary layer on the overall reaction rate was analyzed. In the absence of these two mass-transfer steps, a reaction order of 0.39 with respect to chlorine partial pressure, and an activation energy of 161 {+-} 4 kJ mol{sup -1} were determined. A complete rate equation has been successfully developed.

  15. Metal loaded zeolitic media for the storage and oxidative destruction of chlorinated VOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintawar, Prashant Shiodas

    Industrial solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), etc. are suspected carcinogens and are linked to atmospheric and groundwater pollution. Therefore, the destruction and/or safe disposal of these chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) is an immediate national need. The objective of this dissertation was to study transition metal (TM) loaded zeolites for adsorption (storage) and subsequent catalytic destruction of CVOCs present in humid air streams. In this study, zeolite Y, ZSM-5 and ETS-10 were modified by introduction of a TM cation to make them suitable as dual function sorbent/catalyst (S/C) media. In order to develop these S/C media, five investigations were carried out. In the first investigation, the activity and selectivity of three catalysts viz., Cr-Y, Co-Y, Co/Alsb2Osb3, was compared for the destruction of CVOCs. Cr-Y was the most promising catalyst with its activity decreasing with an increase in the chlorine content of the CVOC molecule. In the second investigation, in order to elucidate the pathways involved in the destruction of CVOCs, in situ FT-IR studies were carried out on active Cr-Y surfaces at 25, 100 (or 130) and 300sp°C which showed that CVOC destruction proceeded through the formation of oxygenated intermediates (carbonyl, carboxylate, etc.). These investigations showed the necessity of chromium for destruction of CVOCs. However, chromium residues in the spent catalysts are an environmental concern. Therefore, in the third investigation, attempts were made to stabilize low levels of chromium on ZSM-5 zeolites. Thus, Cr-ZSM-5 media of varying SiOsb2/Alsb2Osb3 ratio were evaluated for sorption and destruction of TCE. This investigation led to the development of a Cr-ZSM-5 (SiOsb2/Alsb2Osb3=80,\\ {˜}0.5 wt% chromium) as an efficient S/C medium for TCE destruction. In the fourth investigation, deactivation experiments were carried out on four Cr-ZSM-5 catalysts. Under the conditions used, all the catalysts

  16. Replacing fish meal by food waste to produce lower trophic level fish containing acceptable levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Health risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhang; Mo, Wing-Yin; Lam, Cheung-Lung; Choi, Wai-Ming; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed at using different types of food wastes (mainly containing cereal [food waste A] and meat meal [food waste B]) as major sources of protein to replace the fish meal used in fish feeds to produce quality fish. The traditional fish farming model used to culture low trophic level fish included: bighead, (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), grass carp, (Ctenopharyngodon idellus), and mud carp, (Cirrhinus molitorella) of omnivorous chain. The results indicated that grass carp and bighead carp fed with food waste feeds were relatively free of PAHs. The results of health risk assessment showed that the fish fed with food waste feeds were safe for consumption from the PAHs perspective. PMID:25880597

  17. Sodium and chlorine concentrations in mixed saliva of healthy and cystic fibrosis children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium and chlorine concentrations in mixed saliva were simultaneously measured by neutron activation analysis in nine normal children and in nine patients with cystic fibrosis. Sodium levels showed a significant difference (P < 0.01) between patients and controls. The concentration of chlorine was similar in both the control and the cystic fibrosis groups. (author)

  18. Chlorinated organic pesticides in marketed food: Barcelona, 2001-06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontcuberta, M. [Agencia de Salut Publica de Barcelona, ASPB, Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Av Drassanes 13, 08001 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: mfontcub@aspb.es; Arques, J.F.; Villalbi, J.R.; Martinez, M.; Centrich, F.; Serrahima, E.; Pineda, L.; Duran, J.; Casas, C. [Agencia de Salut Publica de Barcelona, ASPB, Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Av Drassanes 13, 08001 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    This paper reports concentration levels of 22 chlorinated organic compounds (both primary compounds and metabolites) in food marketed in the city of Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) in 2001-06. Samples included meat products, fish and seafood, eggs, milk and dairy, vegetal oils, cereal products and derivates, vegetables, fresh fruits, dry fruits, spices, formula and baby food, tea and wine. Levels of chlorinated organic compounds were determined by gas chromatography with selective detectors: electron capture (ECD), flame photometric (FPD) and confirmation with mass-spectrometry. Chlorinated organic pesticides were detected in 7 of the 1,484 samples analyzed in the 2001-06 period (0.5%): 1 dairy product, 1 fruit, 1 olive oil and 4 vegetables. Specific pesticides detected are lindane and endosulfan {alpha}, {beta} or sulphate. A decrease in both the proportion of samples with detectable residues and in the variety of chlorinated pesticides found is visible when comparing these results with those of the previous 1989-2000 period. These results suggest the gradual disappearance of regulated chlorinated organic pesticides as a consequence of the growing worldwide implementation of current regulatory agreements.

  19. Chlorinated organic pesticides in marketed food: Barcelona, 2001-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports concentration levels of 22 chlorinated organic compounds (both primary compounds and metabolites) in food marketed in the city of Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) in 2001-06. Samples included meat products, fish and seafood, eggs, milk and dairy, vegetal oils, cereal products and derivates, vegetables, fresh fruits, dry fruits, spices, formula and baby food, tea and wine. Levels of chlorinated organic compounds were determined by gas chromatography with selective detectors: electron capture (ECD), flame photometric (FPD) and confirmation with mass-spectrometry. Chlorinated organic pesticides were detected in 7 of the 1,484 samples analyzed in the 2001-06 period (0.5%): 1 dairy product, 1 fruit, 1 olive oil and 4 vegetables. Specific pesticides detected are lindane and endosulfan α, β or sulphate. A decrease in both the proportion of samples with detectable residues and in the variety of chlorinated pesticides found is visible when comparing these results with those of the previous 1989-2000 period. These results suggest the gradual disappearance of regulated chlorinated organic pesticides as a consequence of the growing worldwide implementation of current regulatory agreements

  20. Levels and distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in agricultural soils in an emerging e-waste recycling town in Taizhou area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xianjin; Shen, Chaofeng; Cheema, Sardar Alam; Chen, Lei; Xiao, Xi; Zhang, Congkai; Liu, Wenli; Li, Feng; Chen, Yingxu

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the levels, distributions, profiles and possible sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in agricultural soils around Zeguo, an emerging e-waste recycling town in Taizhou area, China. Concentrations of sixteen USEPA priority PAHs and soil organic matter were analyzed in 59 agricultural soil samples. The total PAH concentrations ranged from 262.6 to 3,420.2 microg/kg, with the average values in a gradually descending order: agricultural soil near e-waste recycling plants and workshops (1,336.0 microg/kg) > agricultural soil in villages with open burning and e-waste recycling activities (945.8 microg/kg) > agricultural soil in other villages (466.5 microg/kg). Analysis of the distribution patterns of the PAHs showed that phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene were the dominant species. The significant correlations among individual, low-molecular-weight (LMW), high-molecular-weight (HMW) and total PAHs and the very similar PAH profiles in the three sampling areas indicated that the PAHs might have come from similar sources. The ratios of Anthracene to sum of Anthracene and Phenanthrene concentrations (Ant/(Ant+Phe)) and fluoranthene to sum of fluoranthene and pyrene concentrations (Flt/(Flt+Pyr)) were calculated and principal component analysis (PCA) was performed and the results suggested that an anthropogenic source such as the combustion of a petroleum product or coal during the e-waste recycling process seemed to be the main source of PAHs in the Zeguo agricultural soil. In conclusion, soils taken from Zeguo agricultural areas were considered to be heavily polluted, and the emerging e-waste recycling activities had definite effects on PAH soil concentrations. PMID:20535879

  1. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  2. Emission of hydrocarbons and NO{sub x} at low levels of excess air in CFB; Emissioner av kolvaeten och NO{sub x} vid laaga luftoeverskott i CFB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, R. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-06-01

    Low NO{sub x} operation at low excess air levels heighten the risk of increasing the level of hazardous and polluting emissions from the boiler. These emissions are mainly of two types, greenhouse gases and the mutageneous compounds. The aim of this project has been to show which types of emissions and their correlation you can expect when firing a CFB at low excess air levels. Results: The NO{sub x} emission decreases asymptotically with increased CO-level. High load gives higher NO{sub x} -emissions. There is no significant difference in average NO{sub x} value between wood fuel and RDF-mix. The total hydrocarbon (THC) emission level increases exponentially with increased CO{sub l}evel. There was no significant difference between wood and RDF-mix. Measurements of NO{sub x}, O2, CO (dry gas) and THC were made each second. The measurements of light hydrocarbons (VOC) showed only methane and ethene, both with a good correlation to CO. Below 1000 ppm of CO there is practically no ethene. Above 1000-2000 ppm of CO there is a rapidly increasing emission of ethene. The emission levels at given CO-level are influenced by the furnace temperature. The POM, PNA and Ames test analysis showed good correlation with CO and THC. The results indicate an emission increase at about 200-500 ppm of CO and 10-20 ppm of THC. Dioxin was measured on three occasions with RDF-mix as fuel. The measurements showed an increase of dioxin emission at increased THC-emission. The supply of ammonia, into the flue gas before the cyclones, gave no significant change in hydrocarbon or CO-emission levels. CO, THC and Ames Test are probably good indicators of environmental hazardous compounds. The amount of mutageneous compounds are in general only increased when a certain level of CO is reached. 6 refs, 45 figs, 5 tabs, 7 appendices

  3. Effects of Chlorine on Enterovirus RNA Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary mechanism of disinfection of waterborne pathogens by chlorine has always been believed to be due to the alteration of proteins by free chlorine and subsequent disruption of their biological structure.

  4. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of landfills as an in situ biological treatment system represents an alternative for source area remediation with a significant cost saving. The specific objective of this research is to investigate the intrinsic bioattenuation capacity of the landfill ecosystem for chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The research was conducted in two complementary systems: simulated landfill bioreactors and batch degradation experiment in serum bottles. Refuse samples excavated from a landfill were tested in laboratory bioreactors designed and operated to facilitate refuse decomposition under landfilling conditions. Each bioreactor was operated with leachate recirculation and gas collection. Target CAHs, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), were added to selected reactors and maintained at 20 μM each in leachate to simulate the effect of long-term exposure of refuse microorganisms to CAHs on the degradation potential of these chemicals in landfills. At two different stages of refuse decomposition, active refuse decomposition representing young landfills and maturation phase representing aged landfills, anaerobic microbial cultures were derived from selected bioreactors and tested in serum bottles for their abilities to biodegrade target CAHs. Results of this study suggest that landfills have an intrinsic reductive dechlorination capacity for PCE and TCE. The decomposition of refuse, a source of complex organics, enhances reductive dechlorination by the refuse cultures tested in this study. In addition, the test results suggest that it may be possible to develop engineering strategies to promote both CAHs degradation and refuse decomposition in landfills. (author)

  5. Modeling potential migration of petroleum hydrocarbons from a mixed-waste disposal site in the vadose zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental monitoring of a mixed-waste disposal site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has confirmed release and migration into the vadose zone of: (1) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vapor phase and (2) trace levels of certain transuranic elements. The finding has prompted an evaluation of the potential role of waste petroleum hydrocarbons in mediating or influencing contaminant migration from the disposal site. Disposal records indicate that a large volume of machine oil contaminated with transuranic isotopes was disposed at the site along with the chlorinated solvents and other radioactive wastes. A multiphase flow model was used to assess the possible extent of oil and vapor movement through the 177 m thick vadose zone. One dimensional simulations were performed to estimate the vertical distribution of the vapor phase, the aqueous phase, and immiscible free liquid as a function of time. The simulations indicate that the oil may migrate slowly through the vadose zone, to potentially significant depths. Calculated transport rates support the following ranking with regard to relative mobility: vapor phase > aqueous phase > free liquid. 21 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Petroleum Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated Hydrocarbons, and Metal in Soils and Sediments of Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Numerous oil production facilities were in place when Quivira NWR was purchased, and oil production has continued and some new production facilities have been...

  7. Bacterial repopulation of drinking water pipe walls after chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Laurence; Francius, Grégory; El Zein, Racha; Angel, Edith; Block, Jean-Claude

    2016-09-01

    The short-term kinetics of bacterial repopulation were evaluated after chlorination of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) colonized with drinking water biofilms and compared with bare HDPE surfaces. The effect of chlorination was partial as a residual biofilm persisted and was time-limited as repopulation occurred immediately after water resupply. The total number of bacteria reached the same levels on both the bare and chlorinated biofilm-fouled HDPE after a seven-day exposure to drinking water. Due to the presence of a residual biofilm, the hydrophobicity of chlorinated biofilm-fouled surface exhibited much lower adhesion forces (2.1 nN) compared to bare surfaces (8.9 nN). This could explain the rapid repopulation after chlorination, with a twofold faster bacterial accumulation rate on the bare HDPE surface. γ-Proteobacteria dominated the early stages of repopulation of both surfaces and a shift in the dominance occurred over the colonization time. Such observations define a timescale for cleaning frequency in industrial environments and guidelines for a rinsing procedure using drinking water. PMID:27483985

  8. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    OpenAIRE

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N. A.; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactiv...

  9. Sonochemical Treatment of Water Polluted by Chlorinated Organocompounds. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Louisnard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As one of several types of pollutants in water, chlorinated compounds have been routinely subjected to sonochemical analysis to check the environmental applications of this technology. In this review, an extensive study of the influence of the initial concentration, ultrasonic intensity and frequency on the kinetics, degradation efficiency and mechanism has been analyzed. The sonochemical degradation follows a radical mechanism which yields a very wide range of chlorinated compounds in very low concentrations. Special attention has been paid to the mass balance comparing the results from several analytical techniques. As a conclusion, sonochemical degradation alone is not an efficient treatment to reduce the organic pollutant level in waste water.

  10. Reducing chlorination of niobium pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of cylindric briquettes of Nb2O5 and carbon are presented. The effects of chlorine flow, dimension of the briquettes, porosity, percentage of the reducing agent in the mixture and temperature are analysed. The volatilization aspect of Nb2O5 by the briquettes and the structural transformations of the samples are described. (M.A.C.)

  11. Novel chlorinated derivatives of BODIPY

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Moreno, I.; Costela González, Ángel; Chiara, José Luis; Duran-Sampedro, G.; Ortiz, M. J.; Rodríguez Agarrabeitia, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to the use of novel dyes with a BODIPY structure, characterised in that they contain at least one chlorine atom bound to the carbons of the boradiazaindacene system, to the use thereof as laser dyes and fluorescent markers, and to a method for obtaining some of these compounds.

  12. Predicting hydrocarbon release from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' The remediation of hazardous chemicals from soils can be a lengthy and costly process. As a result, recent regulatory initiatives have focused on risk-based corrective action (RBCA) approaches. Such approaches attempt to identify the amount of chemical that can be left at a site with contaminated soil and still be protective of human health and the environment. For hydrocarbons in soils to pose risk to human heath and the environment, the hydrocarbons must be released from the soil and accessible to microorganisms, earthworms, or other higher level organisms. The sorption of hydrocarbons to soil can reduce the availability of the hydrocarbon to receptors. Typically in soils and sediments, there is an initial fast release of a hydrocarbon from the soil to the aqueous phase followed by a slower release of the remaining hydrocarbon to the aqueous phase. The rate and extent of slow release can influence aqueous hydrocarbon concentrations and the fate and transport of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. Once the fast fraction of the chemical has been removed from the soil, the remaining fraction of a chemical may desorb at a rate that natural mechanisms can attenuate the released hydrocarbon. Hence, active remediation may be needed only until the fast fraction has been removed. However, the fast fraction is a soil and chemical specific parameter. This presentation will present a tier I type protocol that has been developed to quickly estimate the fraction of hydrocarbons that are readily released from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Previous research in our laboratory and elsewhere has used long-term desorption (four months) studies to determine the readily released fraction. This research shows that a single short-term (less than two weeks) batch extraction procedure provides a good estimate of the fast released fraction derived from long-term experiments. This procedure can be used as a tool to rapidly evaluate the release and bioavailability of

  13. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nai; TIAN ZuoJi; LENG YingYing; WANG HuiTong; SONG FuQing; MENG JianHua

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2)branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4)phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hydrocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclusions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram.And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion,saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  14. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2) branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4) phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hy-drocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclu-sions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydro-carbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram. And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  15. Effects of assimilable organic carbon and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Liu

    Full Text Available Assimilable organic carbon (AOC is one of the most important factors affecting the re-growth of microorganisms in drinking water. High AOC concentrations result in biological instability, but disinfection kills microbes to ensure the safety of drinking water. Free chlorine is an important oxidizing agent used during the disinfection process. Therefore, we explored the combined effects of AOC and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water using flow cytometry (FCM. The initial AOC concentration was 168 μg.L(-1 in all water samples. Without free chlorine, the concentrations of intact bacteria increased but the level of AOC decreased. The addition of sodium hypochlorite caused an increase and fluctuation in AOC due to the oxidation of organic carbon. The concentrations of intact bacteria decreased from 1.1 × 10(5 cells.mL(-1 to 2.6 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.6 mg.L(-1 to 4.8 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.3 mg.L(-1 due to free chlorine originating from sodium hypochlorite. Additionally, free chlorine might be more obviously affected AOC concentrations than microbial growth did. These results suggested that AOC and free chlorine might have combined effects on microbial growth. In this study, our results showed concentrations determined by FCM were higher than those by HPC, which indicated that some E. coli detected by FCM might not be detected using HPC in drinking water. The level of free chlorine might restrain the consumption of AOC by inhibiting the growth of E. coli; on the other hand, chlorination might increase the level of AOC, thereby increase the potential for microbial growth in the drinking water network.

  16. Variation in assimilable organic carbon formation during chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingbin; Yuan, Ting; Ni, Huishan; Li, Yanpeng; Hu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter (EOM) solutions under different conditions, to determine how the metabolites produced by these organisms affect water safety and the formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC). The effects of chlorine dosages, coagulant dosage, reaction time and temperature on the formation of AOC were investigated during the disinfection of M.aeruginosa metabolite solutions. The concentration of AOC followed a decreasing and then increasing pattern with increasing temperature and reaction time. The concentration of AOC decreased and then increased with increasing chlorination dosage, followed by a slight decrease at the highest level of chlorination. However, the concentration of AOC decreased continuously with increasing coagulant dosage. The formation of AOC can be suppressed under appropriate conditions. In this study, chlorination at 4mg/L, combined with a coagulant dose of 40mg/L at 20°C over a reaction time of 12hr, produced the minimum AOC. PMID:27372113

  17. Effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols have many significant effects on the reactivity of oxido-reduction. The effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate were evaluated through different kinetics studies. Since chlorine was an electron withdrawing atom, the substitution of chlorine on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by σ-electron withdrawing conductive effect; at the same time, the substitution of chlorine at ortho or para position on the aromatic ring increased the oxidation rate constant by π-electron donating conjugative effect, and the conjugative effect could counteract the negative impact of the conductive effect to some extent. On the other hand, the substitution of chlorine at ortho position on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by steric hindrance effect. The oxidation rate constants of phenol and chlorinated phenols studied decreased as follow order: 4-chlorophenol>2,4-dichlorophenol>phenol>2,6-dichlorophenol.

  18. Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil - A combined modelling and experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelius, Malin; Svensson, Teresia; Lourino-Cabana, Beatriz; Thiry, Yves; Bastviken, David

    2016-06-01

    Much of the total pool of chlorine (Cl) in soil consists of naturally produced organic chlorine (Clorg). The chlorination of bulk organic matter at substantial rates has been experimentally confirmed in various soil types. The subsequent fates of Clorg are important for ecosystem Cl cycling and residence times. As most previous research into dechlorination in soils has examined either single substances or specific groups of compounds, we lack information about overall bulk dechlorination rates. Here we assessed bulk organic matter chlorination and dechlorination rates in coniferous forest soil based on a radiotracer experiment conducted under various environmental conditions (additional water, labile organic matter, and ammonium nitrate). Experiment results were used to develop a model to estimate specific chlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl(-) transformed to Clorg per time unit) and specific dechlorination (i.e., fraction of Clorg transformed to Cl(-) per time unit) rates. The results indicate that chlorination and dechlorination occurred simultaneously under all tested environmental conditions. Specific chlorination rates ranged from 0.0005 to 0.01 d(-1) and were hampered by nitrogen fertilization but were otherwise similar among the treatments. Specific dechlorination rates were 0.01-0.03d(-1) and were similar among all treatments. This study finds that soil Clorg levels result from a dynamic equilibrium between the chlorination and rapid dechlorination of some Clorg compounds, while another Clorg pool is dechlorinated more slowly. Altogether, this study demonstrates a highly active Cl cycling in soils. PMID:26950634

  19. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W., E-mail: Gary.Hoyle@louisville.edu

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. - Highlights: • Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. • Corticosteroids may inhibit lung injury through their anti-inflammatory actions. • Corticosteroids inhibited chlorine-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary edema. • Mometasone and budesonide are potential rescue treatments for chlorine lung injury.

  20. Chlorine isotope investigation of natural attenuation of trichloroethene in an aerobic aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural attenuation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) can be an important mechanism for groundwater remediation. It is difficult to determine the effectiveness of natural CAH attenuation from chemical analyses of groundwater samples because mixing, dispersion, and secondary reactions can mask the chemical evidence of attenuation. In this paper, the authors explore the application of stable chlorine isotope ratio measurements as a new tool for evaluating natural attenuation of CAHs. They report stable isotope ratios of chlorine in both trichloroethene (TCE) and inorganic chloride in groundwater from an aerobic aquifer beneath an extensively contaminated industrial site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. Variations in the concentrations and chlorine isotope ratios of TCE and chloride in the groundwater are consistent with those expected from natural attenuation. These data support a model in which partial TCE degradation occurred in relatively impermeable, clay-rich sediments above the aquifer, and little or no further degradation of TCE occurred within the aquifer. A record of changing conditions within the TCE source area can be inferred from the spatial variation of chlorine isotope ratios for TCE and chloride within the plume

  1. Water Chlorination for human consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beginning from this issue, an initiative of Federgasacqua (Federal association dealing with the gas and the water) takes place through the activities of the Task Forces Water Quality Control and Materials and Processes, which aim is to offer to the water industry operators and updated information concerning some main subjects, emphasizing in particular the technical and management applied topics. The paper deals with the chlorination processes in drinking water treatment. An overview of the italian situation is presented, concerning disinfection as well as other oxidation processes, together with an historical background on chlorination. Concerning the applications, the chemical technologies and the main processes, the disinfectant effectiveness and the byproducts formation have been described. Further, the regulations in force have been reported and discussed on national and international bases

  2. Metabolic fate of chlorinated paraffins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposition of three [1-14C]-chlorododecanes (MCDD, PCDD I and PCDD II; 17.4%, 55.9%, and 68.5% chlorination) was studied in C57Bl mice. [1-14C]-lauric acid (LA) was studied as reference compound. Fifty-two percent (MCDD), 32% (PCDD I), and 8% (PCDD II) of the radioactive doses were exhaled as 14CO2 during 12 h after i.v. injection. Similar results were obtained after p.o. administration. In addition to a marked labelling of the liver and fat, the distribution patterns observed at 24 h after administration revealed an uptake of radioactivity in tissues with high cell turnover/high metabolic activity, e.g., intestinal mucosa, bone marrow, salivary glands and thymus. The concentration of radioactivity in these sites and the exhalation of 14CO2, which were inverse to the degree of chlorination, indicate that the chloroalkanes are degraded to metabolites which can be utilized in the intermediary metabolism. A similar, although more pronounced, distribution pattern and 14CO2-exhalation (70% of i.v. dose) was observed after LA administration. The long time retention of heptane-soluble radioactivity in liver and fat (indicating unmetabolized substance) increased with degree of chlorination. On the contrary, the administration of LA and the chlorododecanes MCDD and PCDD I, but not of PCDD II, resulted in a selective labelling of the central nervous system 30-60 days after injection. (orig.)

  3. Inhibition of chlorine-induced lung injury by the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Weiyuan; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Rando, Roy J. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA (United States); Pathak, Yashwant V. [College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Hoyle, Gary W., E-mail: Gary.Hoyle@louisville.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Chlorine is a highly toxic respiratory irritant that when inhaled causes epithelial cell injury, alveolar-capillary barrier disruption, airway hyperreactivity, inflammation, and pulmonary edema. Chlorine is considered a chemical threat agent, and its release through accidental or intentional means has the potential to result in mass casualties from acute lung injury. The type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram was investigated as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury. Rolipram inhibits degradation of the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic AMP. Potential beneficial effects of increased cyclic AMP levels include inhibition of pulmonary edema, inflammation, and airway hyperreactivity. Mice were exposed to chlorine (whole body exposure, 228–270 ppm for 1 h) and were treated with rolipram by intraperitoneal, intranasal, or intramuscular (either aqueous or nanoemulsion formulation) delivery starting 1 h after exposure. Rolipram administered intraperitoneally or intranasally inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema. Minor or no effects were observed on lavage fluid IgM (indicative of plasma protein leakage), KC (Cxcl1, neutrophil chemoattractant), and neutrophils. All routes of administration inhibited chlorine-induced airway hyperreactivity assessed 1 day after exposure. The results of the study suggest that rolipram may be an effective rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury and that both systemic and targeted administration to the respiratory tract were effective routes of delivery. -- Highlights: ► Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. ► Rolipram inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema and airway hyperreactivity. ► Post-exposure rolipram treatments by both systemic and local delivery were effective. ► Rolipram shows promise as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury.

  4. Inhibition of chlorine-induced lung injury by the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine is a highly toxic respiratory irritant that when inhaled causes epithelial cell injury, alveolar-capillary barrier disruption, airway hyperreactivity, inflammation, and pulmonary edema. Chlorine is considered a chemical threat agent, and its release through accidental or intentional means has the potential to result in mass casualties from acute lung injury. The type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram was investigated as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury. Rolipram inhibits degradation of the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic AMP. Potential beneficial effects of increased cyclic AMP levels include inhibition of pulmonary edema, inflammation, and airway hyperreactivity. Mice were exposed to chlorine (whole body exposure, 228–270 ppm for 1 h) and were treated with rolipram by intraperitoneal, intranasal, or intramuscular (either aqueous or nanoemulsion formulation) delivery starting 1 h after exposure. Rolipram administered intraperitoneally or intranasally inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema. Minor or no effects were observed on lavage fluid IgM (indicative of plasma protein leakage), KC (Cxcl1, neutrophil chemoattractant), and neutrophils. All routes of administration inhibited chlorine-induced airway hyperreactivity assessed 1 day after exposure. The results of the study suggest that rolipram may be an effective rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury and that both systemic and targeted administration to the respiratory tract were effective routes of delivery. -- Highlights: ► Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. ► Rolipram inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema and airway hyperreactivity. ► Post-exposure rolipram treatments by both systemic and local delivery were effective. ► Rolipram shows promise as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury.

  5. Transformation pathways and acute toxicity variation of 4-hydroxyl benzophenone in chlorination disinfection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wei, Dongbin; Liu, Qi; Du, Yuguo

    2016-07-01

    Benzophenones compounds (BPs) are widely used as UV filters, and have been frequently found in multiple environmental matrices. The residual of BPs in water would cause potential threats on ecological safety and human health. Chlorination disinfection is necessary in water treatment process, in which many chemicals remained in water would react with disinfectant chlorine and form toxic by-products. By using ultra performance liquid phase chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer (UPLC-QTOF-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the transformation of 4-hydroxyl benezophenone (4HB) with free available chlorine (FAC) was characterized. Eight major products were detected and seven of them were identified. Transformation pathways of 4HB under acid, neutral, and alkaline conditions were proposed respectively. The transformation mechanisms involved electrophilic chlorine substitution of 4HB, Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of ketones, hydrolysis of esters and oxidative breakage of benzene ring. The orthogonal experiments of pH and dosages of disinfectant chlorine were conducted. The results suggested that pH conditions determined the occurrence of reaction types, and the dosages of disinfectant chlorine affected the extent of reactions. Photobacterium assay demonstrated that acute toxicity had significant increase after chlorination disinfection of 4HB. It was proved that 3,5-dichloro-4HB, one of the major transformation products, was responsible for the increasing acute toxicity after chlorination. It is notable that, 4HB at low level in real ambient water matrices could be transformed during simulated chlorination disinfection practice. Especially, two major products 3-chloro-4HB and 3,5-dichloro-4HB were detected out, implying the potential ecological risk after chlorination disinfection of 4HB. PMID:27085063

  6. Two-phase ozonation of chlorinated organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years the amount of research being conducted in the field of single-phase ozonation has grown extensively. However, traditional aqueous-phase ozonation systems are limited by a lack of selective oxidation potential, low ozone solubility in water, and slow intermediate decomposition rates. Furthermore, ozone may decompose before it can be utilized for pollutant destruction since ozone can be highly unstable in aqueous solutions. Naturally occurring compounds such as NaHCO3 also affect ozone reactions by inhibiting the formation of OH-free radicals. To compensate for these factors, excess ozone is typically supplied to a reactor. Since ozone generation requires considerable electric power consumption (16 - 24 kWh/kg of O3), attempts to enhance the ozone utilization rate and stability should lead to more efficient application of this process to hazardous waste treatment. To improve the process, ozonation may be more efficiently carried out in a two-phase system consisting of an inert solvent (saturated with O3) contacted with an aqueous phase containing pollutants. The non-aqueous phase must meet the following criteria: (1) non-toxic, (2) very low vapor pressure, (3) high density (for ease of separation), (4) complete insolubility in water, (5) reusability, (6) selective pollutant extractability, (7) high oxidant solubility, and (8) extended O3 stability. Previously published studies (1) have indicated that a number of fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds fit these criteria. For this project, FC40 (a product of 3M Co.) was chosen due to its low vapor pressure (3 mm Hg) and high specific gravity (1.9). The primary advantages of the FC40 solvent are that it is non-toxic, reusable, has an ozone solubility 10 times that of water, and that 85 % of the ozone remains in the solvent even after 2 hours. This novel two-phase process has been utilized to study the rapid destruction of organic chlorine compounds and organic mixtures

  7. Precise determination of stable chlorine isotopic ratios in low-concentration natural samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenheim, A. J.; Spivack, A. J.; Volpe, C.; Ransom, B.

    1994-07-01

    Investigation of stable chlorine isotopes in geological materials has been hindered by large sample requirements and/or lack of analytical precision. Here we describe precise methods for the extraction, isolation, and isotopic analysis of low levels of chlorine in both silicate and aerosol samples. Our standard procedure uses 2 μg of Cl for each isotopic analysis. External reproducibility (1 σ) is 0.25%. for the 37Cl /35Cl measurements. Chlorine is extracted from silicate samples (typically containing at least 20 μg of Cl) via pyrohydrolysis using induction heating and water vapor as the carrier, and the volatilized chlorine is condensed in aqueous solution. Atmospheric aerosols collected on filters are simply dissolved in water. Prior to isotopic measurement, removal of high levels of SO 42-, F -, and organic compounds is necessary for the production of stable ion beams. Sulfate is removed by BaSCO 4 precipitation, F - by CaF 2 precipitation, and organic compounds are extracted with activated carbon. Chlorine is converted to stoichiometric CsCl by cation exchange, and isotopic ratios are determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of Cs 2Cl +. We demonstrate that the sensitivity and precision of this method allow resolution of natural variations in chlorine isotopic composition, and thereby provide insight to some fundamental aspects of chlorine geochemistry.

  8. Fracturing graphene by chlorination: a theoretical viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Ijäs, M.; Havu, P.; Harju, A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent photochlorination experiment [B. Li et al., ACS Nano 5, 5957 (2011)], we study theoretically the interaction of chlorine with graphene. In previous theoretical studies, covalent binding between chlorine and carbon atoms has been elusive upon adsorption to the graphene basal plane. Interestingly, in their recent experiment, Li et al. interpreted their data in terms of chemical bonding of chlorine on top of the graphene plane, associated with a change from sp2 to sp3 in ...

  9. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: groundwater biogeochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Michael E; Klecka, Gary M; Lutz, Edward J; Ei, Tom A; Grosso, Nancy R; Chapelle, Francis H

    2002-07-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/ aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally atteuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. PMID:12143993

  10. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: Groundwater biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, M.E.; Klecka, G.M.; Lutz, E.J.; Ei, T.A.; Grosso, N.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally attenuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Appraisal of chlorine contact tank modelling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauen, William B; Angeloudis, Athanasios; Falconer, Roger A

    2012-11-15

    With new water directives imposing strict regulations to reduce the footprint of treatment operations and contaminant levels, a performance review of water treatment facilities, including Chlorine Contact Tanks (CCTs) is required. This paper includes a critical appraisal of the international literature on CCT modelling practices to date, aiming to assist the identification of areas requiring further development, in particular, relating to the computational modelling capability and availability of tools to assist hydraulic design and optimisation studies of CCTs. It notes that the hydraulic optimisation practice of poorly designed tanks commenced with experimental studies undertaken in the 1960s and 1970s, which involved mainly two types of studies, namely in situ tracer tests and laboratory physical modelling. The former has traditionally been conducted to diagnose the hydraulic performance of existing CCTs, typically based on results such as Residence Time Distribution (RTD) curves and values of the Hydraulic Efficiency Indicators (HEIs). The latter has been useful in trial and error testing of the impact of certain design modifications on those results, with suggestions for later improvements of the field scale unit. In the 1980s mathematical and numerical modelling studies started to be used to assist CCT investigations, offering a greater level of detail in a more cost-effective manner than equivalent experimentally based investigations. With the growth of computing power and the popularisation of computational models, the 1990s saw the development and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools to simulate the hydraulic performance of CCTs, sometimes independently of experimentation, other than by using available data to calibrate and validate modelling predictions. This has led to the current scenario of CFD models being invaluable assistive tools in optimisation studies of CCTs, with the experimentation practice continuing to allow for specific

  12. The continuous chlorination of plutonium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, M.J.

    1959-08-14

    Previous reports on the chlorination of plutonium dioxide describe numerous small-scale experiments and a few fair-sized batch preparations. The chemistry of chlorination by numerous reagents is covered, but no process had received sufficient study for large-scale preparation of anhydrous plutonium trichloride. The literature search revealed no extensive studies on chlorination rates, exhaust gas filtering, atmospheric requirements, reactor materials, etc. A program was undertaken to select a chlorination process, to develop the necessary information for defining operating conditions and equipment specifications, and then to demonstrate the operation of the process.

  13. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl2–N2 mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated

  14. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated.

  15. A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Thornton, Kathleen R.; Northrup, Paul A.; Dunigan, Marisa R.; Ness, Katherine J.; Gellis, Austin B.

    2015-08-01

    Chloride--the most abundant ion in sea water--affects ocean salinity, and thereby seawater density and ocean circulation. Its lack of reactivity gives it an extremely long residence time. Other halogens are known to be incorporated into marine organic matter. However, evidence of similar transformations of seawater chloride is lacking, aside from emissions of volatile organochlorine by marine algae. Here we report high organochlorine concentrations from 180 to 700 mg kg-1 in natural particulate organic matter that settled into sediment traps at depths between 800 and 3,200 m in the Arabian Sea, taken between 1994 and 1995. X-ray spectromicroscopic imaging of chlorine bonding reveals that this organochlorine exists primarily in concentrated aliphatic forms consistent with lipid chlorination, along with a more diffuse aromatic fraction. High aliphatic organochlorine in particulate material from cultured phytoplankton suggests that primary production is a source of chlorinated organic matter. We also found that particulate algal detritus can act as an organic substrate for abiotic reactions involving Fe2+, H2O2 or light that incorporate chlorine into organic matter at levels up to several grams per kilogram. We conclude that transformations of marine chloride to non-volatile organochlorine through biological and abiotic pathways represent an oceanic sink for this relatively unreactive element.

  16. Release of chlorine from biomass at pyrolysis and gasification conditions, part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from pyrolysis experiment with some biomass materials and pure cellulose shows that the chlorine evaporates from different fuels in two steps. The second of these steps can be explained as evaporation of KCl or other volatile chlorides. The first step starts at temperature levels 300-400 deg C which is too low for salt volatilization. Anyhow, the materials releases up to 50% of the total fuel chlorine in this first step. To explain this first step a mechanism has been suggested in which the chlorine during pyrolysis can be transferred to hydrogen chloride 4 refs, 9 figs

  17. Process for producing hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, K.; Komatsu, A.; Moroe, M.; Moroe, T.

    1980-07-22

    A process is described for producing a hydrocarbon product consisting essentially of hydrocarbons having about 10 to 50 carbon atoms with 60% or more of said product consisting of hydrocarbons containing 25 to 32 carbon atoms which comprises subjecting a synthetic polyisoprene rubber having 92 to 97% cis-type double bods to a thermally destructive distillation at about 300 to 400/sup 0/ C for about 30 minutes under a reduced pressure of about 0.1 to 5 mm. Hg to obtain said hydrocarbon product consisting essentially of hydrocarbons having about 10 to 50 carbon atoms with 60% or more of said product consisting of hydrocarbons containing 25 to 35 carbon atoms, said hydrocarbon product not having a bad odor and containing scarcely any resinous material.

  18. Contaminant risks from biosolids land application Contemporary organic contaminant levels in digested sewage sludge from five treatment plants in Greater Vancouver, British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risks of organic contaminants in sewage sludges are evaluated. - This study examines the potential for environmental risks due to organic contaminants at sewage sludge application sites, and documents metals and various potential organic contaminants (volatile organics, chlorinated pesticides, PCBs, dioxins/furans, extractable petroleum hydrocarbons, PAHs, phenols, and others) in current production biosolids from five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) within the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD). There has been greater focus in Europe, North America and elsewhere on metals accumulation in biosolids-amended soil than on organic substances, with the exception of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans. Another objective, therefore, was to evaluate the extent to which management of biosolids re-use based on metal/metalloid levels coincidentally minimizes environmental risks from organic contaminants. Historical-use contaminants such as chlorophenols, PCBs, and chlorinated pesticides were not detected at environmentally relevant concentrations in any of the 36 fresh biosolids samples, and appear to have virtually eliminated from sanitary collection system inputs. The few organic contaminants found in freshly produced biosolids samples that exhibited high concentrations relative to British Columbia and Canadian soil quality benchmarks included p-cresol, phenol, phenanthrene, pyrene, naphthalene, and heavy extractable petroleum hydrocarbons (HEPHs-nCl9-C34 effective carbon chain length). It was concluded that, with the exception of these petroleum hydrocarbon constituents or their microbial metabolites, the mixing of biosolids with uncontaminated soils during land application and based on the known metal concentrations in biosolids from the Greater Vancouver WWTPs investigated provides adequate protection against the environmental risks associated with organic substances such as dioxins and furans, phthalate esters, or volatile

  19. Chlorine dioxide and by-products in water distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Francisco Cardoso

    1991-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is used as both a pre-oxidant and/or a post-disinfectant in several water treatment plants in the United States. Chlorine dioxide is associated with its byproducts chlorite and chlorate. Chlorine dioxide, chlorine, chlori te and chlorate were sampled in four distribution systems where chlorine dioxide is used for disinfection purposes: Charleston, WV, Columbus, GA, New Castle, PA, and Skagit, WA. The fate of chlorine dioxide and its by-products in dist...

  20. Site-selective photofragmentation of chlorinated polymeric films observed around the chlorine K-edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arantes, C., E-mail: csilva@inmetro.gov.br [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Xerém 25250-020, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Mendes, L.A.V. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Ondina, 40210-340 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pinho, R.R. [Departamento de Física-ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Campus Universitário, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Ferreira, M. [PEMM/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, G.G.B. de; Rocha, A.B.; Rocco, M.L.M. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► PVC and PVDC were studied by PSID and NEXAFS techniques at the Chlorine 1s-edge. ► PVC film presented isotope ratio of 3:1 in the PSID spectrum. ► Cl{sup +} ion yield curves reproduce the photoabsorption spectrum for both polymers. ► Site-selectivity of C–Cl bond breaking due to an efficient spectator Auger decay. - Abstract: Photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID) and Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) studies have been performed on poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and poly(vinyl dichloride) (PVDC) around the chlorine 1s-edge. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron source operating in the single-bunch mode and a time-of-flight mass spectrometry for ion analysis. Cl{sup +} ion yields, as a function of the photon energy, reproduce the photoabsorption spectrum, showing significant increase at the 1s-resonance. Edge-jump ratios, defined as the ratio between edge-jumps (intensity ratio of the yields between above and below the absorption edge) of two different transitions, for Cl{sup +} ion yields were much higher than the equivalent electron yields, indicating site-selectivity in C–Cl bond breaking for both polymers, as a result of efficient spectator Auger decay. The expected isotope ratio of 3:1 for chlorine was measured for PVC. The interpretation of the NEXAFS spectrum was assisted by quantum mechanical calculations at a multireference perturbation theory level.

  1. Analysis of Organohalogen Products From Chlorination of Natural Waters Under Simulated Biofouling Control Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, R. M.; Mann, D. C.; Riley, R. G.

    1980-06-01

    The products of low-level chlorination of natural waters from ten locations across the continental United States have been studied, with emphasis on volatile and lipophilic organohalogen components. A specially designed apparatus permitted continuous sampling and chlorination of water in a manner analogous to some types of cooling water treatments. Volatile components were analyzed using headspace, purge-and-trap, and resin adsorption methods. The less-volatile components were collected by passing large volumes of the chlorinated water over XAD-2 columns. Total organic halogen collected on XAD resins was compared with the halogen contribution of haloform compounds. The XAD samples were further separated into fractions according to molecular weight and polarity using liquid chrOmatography. These studies indicate that haloforms are the most abundant lipophilic halogenated products formed from low-level chlorination of natural waters, but that other halogenated lipophilic material is also formed.

  2. Reaction products from the chlorination of seawater. Final report 15 Jul 75-14 Jul 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, J.H.; Smith, C.A.; Zika, R.G.

    1981-03-01

    Chemical treatment of natural waters, in particular the use of chlorine as a biocide, modifies the chemistry of these waters in ways that are not fully understood. The research described in this report examined both inorganic and organic reaction products from the chlorination of seawater using a variety of analytical approaches. Some analytical methods in widespread current use underestimate the residual oxidants in chlorinated seawater by as much as 70% depending upon the detail of the procedures. The chlorination of seawater in the presence of light produces substantial quantities of bromate ions which can influence standard analytical procedures and represents an unknown factor in estuarine and coastal waters. The copper complexing capacity of Biscayne Bay, Florida water was found to be substantially reduced with the addition of chlorine. Analysis was made by anodic stripping voltammetry on water samples after successive additions of copper sulfate solution. Laboratory chlorination of water from the intake of the Port Everglades, Florida power plant produces bromoform levels comparable to that found in the plant discharge. These results are in contrast to results reported in the literature for a power plant on the Patuxent estuary in Maryland, so that bromoform production appears to be site-specific. Chloroform extracts of chlorinated Biscayne Bay water are found to contain halogenated compounds which are new and different, and which pose unusual analytical problems. Studies using GC/ECD, GC/MS, HPLC, H NMR, differential pulsed polarography and other techniques on natural extracts and synthesized compounds are reported.

  3. Inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine.

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, D.; Hoff, J C

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine were studied at 5 degrees C with a purified preparation of single virions and a preparation of cell-associated virions. Inactivation of the virus preparations with chlorine and chlorine dioxide was studied at pH 6 and 10. The monochloramine studies were done at pH 8. With 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter at pH 6, more than 4 logs (99.99%) of the single virions were inactivated in less than 15 s...

  4. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.300 Chlorine...

  5. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  6. Chlorine demand and residual chlorine decay kinetics of Kali river water at Kaiga project area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power plant at Kaiga would use Kali river water for condenser cooling. This necessitated studies on the chemistry of chlorination such as chlorine demand, kinetics of chlorination and other water characteristics aimed at obtaining base line data. The study revealed significant seasonal variation of chlorine demand ranging from 0.5 ppm to 1.7 ppm (3.0 ppm dose, 30 min contact time) and total consumption of 5.0 ppm (10.0 ppm dose, 48 hours contact time). The reaction follows first order kinetics in chlorine. High correlation of chlorine demand with chlorophyll a, suspended matter, turbidity, silica, nitrite, phosphate and sulphate indicated that chlorine demand is greatly influenced by water quality. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  7. In Situ and Laboratory Studies on the Fate of Specific Organic Compounds in an Anerobic Landfill Leachate Plume, 2. Fate of Aromatic and Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Bjarnadóttir, Helga; Winter, Pia L.; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    landfill in Fe(IIl)-reducing conditions but not in NO3-reducing conditions at 350 m from the landfill. Abiotic processes apparently contributed to the transformation of tetrachloromethane. A local variation in the transformation of the chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons was observed at 2 m from the...

  8. Internal chlorination of Ni-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berztiss, D.; Hennesen, K.; Grabke, H.J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In contrast to internal oxidation, sulfidation and carburization, very little information is available regarding internal chlorination, especially diffusion of chlorine in metallic alloys. This paper describes results of experiments on Ni-Cr alloys (<10 wt% Cr) exposed in an atmosphere containing radioactive HCl. The diffusion of chlorine in the alloy can be determined by measurement of residual {beta}-activity from the sample surface. Successively thin layers (0.5-10 {mu}m) of the alloy were removed by lapping and the surface activity was measured to obtain a depth profile. Both single and polycrystalline materials were tested. Through this work it should be determined if there is in fact solubility and diffusion of chlorine in Ni-based alloys as some authors have proposed or if the ingress of chlorine is mainly a grain boundary phenomenon. (orig.)

  9. Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Updates Subscribe Listen Page last reviewed April ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Download page Subscribe to RSS Get email ...

  10. [Action modes of chlorine dioxide--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingken; Lai, Jieling; Zhan, Ping

    2012-04-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a highly effective disinfectant for food and potable water treatment. Till now, the action mode of ClO2 is still unclear. ClO2, can denature proteins by oxidizing tyrosine, tryptophan, and cysteine. We reviewed the pathways by which ClO02 reacts with important bio-molecules, as well as the primary target sites at individual cellular level of ClO2-induced biocidal effects. PMID:22799207

  11. Comparative Analytical Methods for the Measurment of Chlorine Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Unmesh Jeetendra

    2002-01-01

    Four commercially available methods used for the analysis of low-level Chlorine Dioxide (ClO2) concentrations in drinking water were evaluated for accuracy and precision and ranked according to cost, efficiency and ease of the methods under several conditions that might be encountered at water treatment plants. The different analytical methods included: 1.The DPD (N, N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine) method 2.Lissamine Green B (LGB) wet-chemical method 3.Palintest® kit LGB 4.A...

  12. Chlorinated and Non chlorinated-Volatile Organic Compounds (Vocs) in Drinking Water of Peninsular Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey undertaken in Peninsular Malaysia has shown that volatile organic compounds (VOCs), both chlorinated and non-chlorinated, are present in selected drinking water samples. In this study, analyses of VOCs were performed by means of solid phase micro extraction (SPME) with a 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fibre followed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry detector (GC-MSD). Samples from different points of the distribution system networks were taken and analysed for 54 VOCs of different chemical families. The results of the study indicated that chloroform constituted the major portion of the VOCs in all samples analysed. In addition to trihalo methanes (THMs), other abundant compounds detected were cis and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,2-dibromoethane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. However, the measured concentrations did not exceed the National Guideline for Drinking Water Quality 2000 in any case. No clear relationship between the status of development of a state in Malaysia to the levels and types of VOCs detected in its drinking water was noted. Nevertheless, the finding of anthropogenic chemicals, even at low concentrations, gave credibility to the viewpoint that improper development and disposal practices threatened the purity of the drinking water. (author)

  13. Effects of Chlorination on Soil Chemical Properties and Nitrogen Uptake for Tomato Drip Irrigated with Secondary Sewage Eflfuent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-feng; LI Jiu-sheng; ZHANG Hang

    2014-01-01

    Chlorination is usually an economical method for treating clogging in drip emitters during sewage application. Appropriate assessment of the responses of soil and crop is essential for determining an optimal chlorination scheme. During 2008 to 2009, ifeld experiments were conducted in a solar-heated greenhouse for tomato drip irrigated with secondary sewage eflfuent, to investigate the inlfuences of chlorine injection intervals and levels on soil chemical properties and nitrogen uptake. Injection intervals ranging from two to eight weeks and injection concentrations ranging from 2 to 50 mg L-1 were used. A salinity factor and a nutrient factor were extracted from the pool of the nine soil chemical constituents using factor analysis method. The results demonstrated that chlorination practices increased the residual Cl in the soil, resulting in an increased salinity factor, especially for the frequent chlorination at a high injection concentration. Chlorination weakened the accumulation of nutrients factor in the upper soil layer. Nitrogen uptake of the tomato plants also was inhibited by the increased salinity in the upper soil layer caused by high chlorination levels. In order to reduce the unfavorable effect on soil chemical properties and nitrogen uptake, chlorination scheme with concentrations of lower than 20 mg L-1 was recommended.

  14. Chlorinated contaminants in chorio-allantoic membranes from great blue heron eggs at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, G P; Norman, D M; Miller, M W; Brewer, L W; Johnston, R K

    1995-01-01

    Chorio-allantoic membranes (CAMs) were collected and analyzed for chlorinated hydrocarbons as part of a wildlife toxicology demonstration project at Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island, Washington, USA. Concentrations of DDT, DDE, DDD, Aroclor 1254, and Aroclor 1260 were found at concentrations below 0.4 ppm for 13 of 14 samples. The low correlations among DDT and its metabolites in CAMs suggest herons are not being exposed to a consistent source of these compounds. Comparison of chlorinated hydrocarbon data for CAMs from three Puget Sound heron colonies, NAS Whidbey, Samish Island and Dumas Bay, indicates contaminant burdens in herons from NAS Whidbey and Samish Island are significantly lower than burdens in herons from Dumas Bay. PMID:7874465

  15. Effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on an aquatic ecosystem: acute toxicity and community-level toxic impact tests of benzo[a]pyrene using lake zooplankton community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Sakamoto, Masaki; Nagata, Takamaru; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Miyabara, Yuichi; Hanazato, Takayuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Isobe, Tomohiko; Kim, Jun-Woo; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon

    2013-02-01

    We estimated acute toxicity of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) using two cladoceran species, Ceriodaphnia reticulata and Daphnia magna, and also analyzed its impact on zooplankton community throughout an exposure experiment using small-scale mesocosms. LC(50) of B[a]P for C. reticulata and D. magna was 4.3 and 4.7 µg/l, respectively. However, individuals fed with Chlorella showed higher LC(50), 6.1 µg/l for C. reticulata and 8.0 µg/l for D. magna. In the exposure experiment, we examined the impact of B[a]P on zooplankton community using conceivable concentrations in the environment (5 and 10 µg/l) using typical zooplankton community in eutrophicated systems. Despite the residence time of B[a]P in the water column was short as recovery pattern was different among cladocerans and rotifers. Consequently, B[a]P showed insecticide-like impacts, suppressing cladoceran populations and inducing the dominance of rotifers particularly under high concentration (10 µg/l). Results have suggested that, even such short duration of B[a]P in the water body can have impact on zooplankton abundance and community structure. Since B[a]P easily precipitate to the bottom and rapidly disappears from the water body, careful monitoring and further assessment of the potential toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are necessary. PMID:23358147

  16. PPCP degradation by UV/chlorine treatment and its impact on DBP formation potential in real waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Sun, Jianliang; Fu, Wenjie; Shang, Chii; Li, Yin; Chen, Yiwei; Gan, Wenhui; Fang, Jingyun

    2016-07-01

    The ultraviolet/chlorine (UV/chlorine) water purification process was evaluated for its ability to degrade the residues of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) commonly found in drinking water sources. The disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed after post-chlorination were documented. The performance of the UV/chlorine process was compared with that of the UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) process in treating three types of sand-filtered natural water. Except caffeine and carbamazepine residues, the UV/chlorine process was found to be 59-99% effective for feed water with a high level of dissolved organic carbon and alkalinity, and 27-92% effective for water with a high ammonia content. Both chlorine radicals and hydroxyl radicals were found to contribute to the observed PPCP degradation. The removal efficiencies of chlorine- and UV-resistant PPCPs such as carbamazepine and caffeine were 2-3 times greater than in the UV/H2O2 process in waters not enriched with ammonia. UV/chlorine treatment slightly enhanced the formation chloral hydrate (CH), haloketone (HK) and trichloronitromethane (TCNM). It reduced haloacetonitrile (HAN) formation during the post-chlorination in comparison with the UV/H2O2 process. In waters with high concentrations of ammonia, the UV/chlorine process was only 5-7% more effective than the UV/H2O2 process, and it formed slightly more THMs, HKs and TCNM along with reduced formation of CH and HAN. The UV/chlorine process is thus recommended as a good alternative to UV/H2O2 treatment for its superior PPCP removal without significantly enhancing DBP formation. PMID:27110887

  17. HYDROCARBONS IN SOIL FROM BASRA OIL-RICH GOVERNORATE

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Abdul Al-Zahra Douabul; Wisam Abdul Ameer Farid; Hamid Talib Al-Saad; Sama Sameer AlMaarofi

    2012-01-01

    Basra is a rich-oil region; its soil is expected to be contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. However, there is no previous study that has estimated the levels of hydrocarbons in Basra soil. After 2003 numerous operations by several international oil companies are underway. Therefore, the determination of background levels of petroleum hydrocarbons is a priority from environmental point of view. The present study was carried out to determine the distribution and seasonal variations of petr...

  18. Development and in situ implementation of a chemical process for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in polluted aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    Betelu, Stéphanie; Rodrigues, Romain; Noel, Cécile; Colombano, Stéfan; Simon, Apolline; Epardeau, Patrick; Marion, Roland; Ignatiadis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    International audience Reductive dechlorination (RDC), using strong reducers, is one of the most important emerging remediation techniques for chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC). RDC by Nanosized Zero Valent Iron (NZVI) is a powerful electrochemical redox system that has shown promising experimental results for the development of remediation technologies to treat contaminated sites [1, 2]. Although NZVI has excellent characteristics as environmental reactant, its application to the contaminate...

  19. Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, a chemical sensor was developed which showed almost perfect selectivity to vapors of chlorinated solvents. When interfaced to an instrument, a chemical analyzer will be produced that has near- absolute selectivity to vapors of volatile chlorinated organic compounds. TRI has just completed the second of a 2-phase program to develop this new instrument system, which is called the RCL MONITOR. In Phase II, this instrument was deployed in 5 EM40 operations. Phase II applications covered clean-up process monitoring, environmental modeling, routine monitoring, health and safety, and technology validation. Vapor levels between 0 and 100 ppM can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.5 ppM using the hand-portable instrument. Based on the favorable performance of the RCL MONITOR, the commercial instrument was released for commercial sales on Sept. 20, 1996

  20. Salmonella mutagenicity assessment of airborne particulate matter collected from urban areas of Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, differing in anthropogenic influences and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tatiana S; Gotor, Gemma N; Beltrami, Laiana S; Nolla, Celia G; Rocha, Jocelita A V; Broto, Francesc P; Comellas, Lluis R; Vargas, Vera M F

    2010-09-30

    Urban areas are both major sources and major targets of air pollution. The atmospheric environment receives diverse chemical substances, including genotoxic agents that may affect human health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the atmospheric quality in two urban areas in Rio Grande do Sul State (Brazil), under the influence of greater (Site 1) or lesser (Site 2) anthropogenic sources. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of environmental interest were quantified and the Salmonella/microsome assay was used for the measurement of mutagenicity. Organic compounds extracted from the airborne particulate matter were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to detect PAHs of interest (known or possible carcinogens). The organic extracts were also tested for mutagenic and cytotoxic activity in the Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA98, TA100, YG1021 and YG1024, with or without S9 activation. At Site 1, benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP) and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (IP) were found at higher concentrations and mutagenicity (revertants per μg extract) varied from 1.0±0.25 (TA98, no S9) to 5.2±0.45 (TA98, S9). At Site 2, BghiP and IP were present in larger amounts and the mutagenic responses ranged from 0.6 to 3.7 revertants per μg (both in TA98, S9). The occurrence of BghiP and IP may be related to vehicular emissions. These and the other PAHs studied, as well as the nitro compounds, may contribute to the mutagenicity found in these airborne particles. PMID:20643224

  1. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  2. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  3. A comparison of the virucidal properties of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, G R; Butler, M

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine were compared with chlorine as virucidal agents. Under optimal conditions all disinfectants were effective at low concentrations, but each disinfectant responded differently to acidity and alkalinity. Disinfection by chlorine was impaired by the presence of ammonia, but the other disinfectants retained much of their potency. Disinfection of poliovirus by iodine resulted in structural changes in the virions as seen by electron micrroscopy, but the ...

  4. Formation of Chloroform and Other Chlorinated Byproducts by the Chlorination of Antibacterial Products

    OpenAIRE

    Fiss, Edward Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Triclosan is a widely used antibacterial agent found in many personal hygiene products. While it has been established that pure triclosan and free chlorine readily react, interactions between triclosan-containing products and free chlorine have not previously been analyzed. Sixteen double-blinded solutions including both triclosan-containing (1.14-3.12 mg triclosan/g product) and triclosan-free products were contacted with free chlorine. Products detected included (chlorophenoxy)phenols, ...

  5. Chlorine demand studies: a need for optimisation of chlorine doses for biofouling control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on chlorine demand, chlorine decay, rate of HOBr formation and speciation of chlorine residuals of cooling water from Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) were carried out. April to September was found to be a high demand period. The rate of reaction is faster and also initial demand is relatively high for this seawater as compared to other sea areas. Decay occurs in two phases, the first being instantaneous and the second being very slow. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  6. Combined toxicity effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton. Progress report, February 1, 1975--September 15, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J. H.; Goldman, J. C.

    1975-10-01

    Research on the combined effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton have been carried out for 7/sup 1///sub 2/ months. Continuous-flow bioassay units have been constructed for larval species, juvenile fish, and phytoplankton. A detailed study on lobster (Homarus americanus) larvae and other studies on killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) larvae and juveniles, and juvenile scup (Stenotomus versicolor) and winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) have been performed. Results to date indicate that there is an apparent and, as yet undetermined, chlorine demand of seawater; there is a differential toxic effect of chlorine and chloramines--lobsters were more sensitive to chloramines, whereas the fish species were more affected by free chlorine; respiration results indicate that significant stress occurs at toxicant levels below the onset of mortality, thus raising questions regarding the applicability of standard bioassay data; temperature elevation exerts a strong synergistic effect on chlorine-chloramine toxicity; and effects of exposure to halogen toxicity appear irreversible as revealed by persistent reductions in metabolic activity. It appears that chlorine toxicity to marine biota can occur even though chlorine residuals cannot be detected by current analytical techniques. These results support the findings of others that chlorine toxicity is a serious environmental pollutant. (auth)

  7. Chlorination of organic material in different soil types

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavsson, Malin

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that formation of chlorinated organic matter occurs naturally and that organic chlorine is as abundant as the chloride ion in organic soils. A large number of organisms are known to convert inorganic chloride (Clin) to organic chlorine (Clorg) (e.g. bacteria, lichen, fungi and algae) and some enzymes associated to these organisms are capable of chlorinating soil organic matter. The aim with the study was to compare organic matter chlorination rates in soils from several dif...

  8. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  9. Effects of Chlorine Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm and Analysis of Related Gene Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekeç, Özge; Gökalsın, Barış; Karaltı, İskender; Kayhan, Figen Esin; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine is deployed worldwide to clean waters and prevent water-originated illnesses. However, chlorine has a limited disinfection capacity against biofilms. Microorganisms form biofilms to protect themselves from biological threats such as disinfectant chemicals. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and its biofilm form attaches to surfaces, living buried into exopolysaccharides, can be present in all watery environments including tap water and drinking water. This research aimed to study the biofilm trigger mechanism of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, which is known to form biofilm in water supply systems and human body, under chlorine stress levels. In addition to biofilm staining, certain genes that are relevant to the stress condition were selected for gene expression analysis. The bacteria cultures were grown under chlorine stress with concentrations of 0.5, 0.7 and 1 mg/l. Six gene regions were determined related to biofilm and stress response: rpoS, bifA, migA, katB, soxR, and algC. Biofilm formation was analyzed by basic fuchsin staining, and gene expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. According to the results, highest biofilm production was observed in P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild strain under no stress conditions. Higher biofilm amounts were observed for bacteria under 0.5 and 0.7 mg/l chlorine stress compared to 1 mg/l chlorine stress. PMID:27146505

  10. Radiolytic removal of trihalomethane in chlorinated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling is one of the major operational problems in seawater cooling systems. It is controlled by application of chlorine based biocides in the range of 0.5-2.0 mg L-1. The bromide in seawater reacts with the added chlorine and forms hypobromous acid. The brominated residual biocides react with natural organic matter present in the seawater, resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) such as bromoform (CHBr3), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl) bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2). Though THMs represent a small fraction of the added chlorine, they are relatively more persistent than residual chlorine, and hence pose a potential hazard to marine life because of their reported mutagenicity. There have been few reports on removal of THMs from chlorinated seawater. In this work, the efficacy of gamma irradiation technique for the removal of THMs from chlorine-dosed seawater was investigated. Experiments were carried out using seawater collected from Kalpakkam. Irradiation study was conducted in chlorinated (1, 3, and 5 mg L-1 of Cl2) seawater by applying various dosages (0.4-5.0 kGy) of gamma radiation using a 60Co Gamma Chamber 5000. Bromoform showed a faster rate of degradation as compared to other halocarbons like bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane. This shows the change in total THM concentration with variation in the radiation dose and initial Cl2 dosing. When the percentage degradation of all the three trihalomethane species was compared with applied doses, it was found that the maximum reduction occurred at a dose of 2.5 kGy. The reduction was almost similar for all the three doses (1, 3, 5 ppm of Cl2) used for chlorination. With a further increase in radiation dose to 5.0 kGy, a slight increase in reduction was observed

  11. Spatial distribution, temporal variation and risks of parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in urban surface water in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhui; Gao, Lihong; Shi, Yali; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Jiemin; Cai, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of 13 target compounds, including eight parabens, four chlorinated parabens and p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), were detected in surface water samples at 35 sampling sites in the Beijing River system, China. The surface water samples were collected from the main rivers and lakes in the urban area monthly from July 2013 to June 2014 (except the frozen period). Laboratory analyses revealed that parabens were ubiquitous in the surface water of Beijing. PHBA was the predominant compound in the surface water samples, with the average concentration of 239ngL(-1), followed by the total amount of chlorinated parabens (average 50.1ng/L) and parabens (average 44.3ng/L). It is noteworthy that octylparaben with longer chain was firstly detected in the surface water. Significant difference was observed for paraben concentrations from different sampling sites, and the highest level of parabens was found in the Xiaotaihou River, which was mainly due to the untreated sewage discharge. Seasonal variation of target compounds in the urban surface water was also studied, and parabens exhibited a different temporal variation from chlorinated derivatives. A combination of factors including high residual chlorine level and water temperature as well as intense ultraviolet radiation might enhance the persistence of chlorinated parabens in chlorinated water during the wet season. Risk assessment showed that parabens and their chlorinated derivatives are not likely to produce biological effects on aquatic ecosystems at current levels in the surface water of Beijing. PMID:26363399

  12. HYDROCARBONS IN SOIL FROM BASRA OIL-RICH GOVERNORATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdul Al-Zahra Douabul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Basra is a rich-oil region; its soil is expected to be contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. However, there is no previous study that has estimated the levels of hydrocarbons in Basra soil. After 2003 numerous operations by several international oil companies are underway. Therefore, the determination of background levels of petroleum hydrocarbons is a priority from environmental point of view. The present study was carried out to determine the distribution and seasonal variations of petroleum hydrocarbons in ten sites in Basra Governorate, southern Iraq. The results obtained in this study can service as baseline for future environmental impact assessment of oil operations."

  13. A new formulation of equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Newman

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC is a convenient parameter to quantify the effects of halogens (chlorine and bromine on ozone depletion in the stratosphere. We show and discuss a new formulation of EESC that now includes the effects of age-of-air dependent fractional release values and an age-of-air spectrum. This new formulation provides quantitative estimates of EESC that can be directly related to inorganic chlorine and bromine throughout the stratosphere. Using this EESC formulation, we estimate that human-produced ozone depleting substances will recover to 1980 levels in 2041 in the midlatitudes, and 2067 over Antarctica. These recovery dates are based upon the assumption that the international agreements for regulating ozone-depleting substances are adhered to. In addition to recovery dates, we also estimate the uncertainties in the estimated time of recovery. The midlatitude recovery of 2041 has a 95% confidence uncertainty from 2028 to 2049, while the 2067 Antarctic recovery has a 95% confidence uncertainty from 2056 to 2078. The principal uncertainties are from the estimated mean age-of-air, and the assumption that the mean age-of-air and fractional release values are time independent. Using other model estimates of age decrease due to climate change, we estimate that midlatitude recovery may be accelerated from 2041 to 2031.

  14. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  15. Derivation of validated methods of sampling and analysis for intermediate and final products of the anaerobic material utilization of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (LCFC) in groundwater in the context of analyses of contaminated soils; Ableitung validierter Probenahme- und Analysenmethoden fuer Zwischen- und Endprodukte der anaeroben Stoffverwertungsprozesse von Leichtfluechtigen Chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffen (LCKW) im Grundwasser im Rahmen von Altlastenuntersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorgerloh, Ute; Becker, Roland; Win, Tin [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Theissen, Hubert [IMAGO GbR (Germany)

    2010-06-17

    The results of the project ''Methods of sampling and analysis of intermediate and final products of the anaerobic degradation of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in groundwater in frame of analysis of contaminated sites'' of the German Federal States Program ''Water, Soil, Waste'' (Laenderfinanzierungsprogramm ''Wasser, Boden, Luft'') LFP B2.08 are presented in these report. Different methods of sampling and analysis for the determination of hydrogen, methane, ethene and vinyl chloride in groundwater are developed and validated: For the sampling are described and discussed: i. active sampling: purge and sample of water samples and purging of solvated gases in groundwater in gas sampling tubes ii. passive sampling: diffusion sampling in polyethylene diffusion bags (PDB) and plastic syringes as diffusion sampler for solvated gases The use of active (purge and sample, downhole sampler) and passive (diffusion sampling) sampling techniques for the quantification of VOC, ethene, and methane are evaluated from the viewpoint of public authorities and regarding the reproducibility of measurement results. Based on a groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene, 1,2-dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride it is shown that passive sampling is restricted by low groundwater flow and biological activity inside the well casing. Therefore, active sampling is to be preferred in case of unknown or insufficient flow conditions in the aquifer. The methods of chromatography for the determination of the compounds are validated and compared with other appropriate analytical methods: I. Headspace-GC-FID for the determination of methane, ethene and vinyl chloride in water of the purged sample (i) and the water of the PDB (ii) II. Direct injection - GC-PDD for the determination of hydrogen from the collected gas samples of the gas sampling tube (i) and the plastic syringes (ii) The gas chromatographic procedure for vinyl chloride using

  16. SCENARIOS EVALUATION TOOL FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENT MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell

    2006-08-16

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  17. Photostability of different chlorine photosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report the photodegradation of three different chlorine photosensitizers (Photoditazine®, Radachlorin®, and Foscan®). The photosensitizer degradation was analyzed by changes in the fluorescence spectrum during illumination. The rate of fluorescence variation was normalized to the solution absorption and the photon energy resulting in the determination of the necessary number of photons to be absorbed to induce photosensitizer photodegradation. The parameter for rate of the molecules decay, the photon fluence rate and optical properties of the solution allow us to determine the photosensitizer stability in solution during illumination. The results show that the order of susceptibility for photodegradation rate is: Radachlorin® < Photoditazine® < Foscan®. This difference in the photodegradation rate for Foscan can be explained by the high proportion of aggregates in solution that inhibit the photo-oxidative process that impede the singlet oxygen formation. We hypothesize that there is a correlation between photodegradation rate and photodynamic efficacy witch is governed by the singlet oxygen formation responsible for the most relevant reaction of the cell death photodynamic induction. Then its is important to know the photostability of different types of drugs since the photodegradation rate, the photodegradation as well as the photodynamic efficacy are strong correlated to the oxygen concentration in the tissue

  18. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maas, Z G; Hinkle, K

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H$^{35}$Cl at 3.69851 $\\mu$m. The high resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m telescope. The average [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with --0.72$<$[Fe/H]$<$0.20 is [$^{35}$Cl/Fe]=(--0.10$\\pm$0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16$\\pm$0.15) dex. The [$^{35}$Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of $\\sim$0.35 dex above model predictions suggesting chemical evolution models are under producing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and \\ion{H}{2} regions. In one star where both H$^{35}$Cl a...

  19. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    three to five times, leading to a more rapid clean-up of the DNAPL zone. The most favored electron donor to add is one which partitions well with the chlorinated solvent or can be concentrated near it. Unfortunately, an ideal electron donor, such as vegetable oil, is difficult to introduce and mix with DNAPL in the ground, doing this properly remains an engineering challenge. Numerical model studies have indicated that several factors may significantly influence the rate and extent of enhancement, including the inhibitory effects of PCE and cDCE, the level of ED concentration, DNAPL configuration, and competition for ED. Such factors need to be considered when contemplating engineered DNAPL bioremediation. Pseudomonas stuzeri KC is an organism that transforms CT to carbon dioxide and chloride without the formation of the hazardous intermediate, chloroform. This is accomplished by production and secretion of a molecule called PDTC. This study was direct ed towards determining how PDTC works. Cu (II) at a ratio of 1:1 Cu to PDTC was found to result in the most rapid CT transformation, confirming that the PDTC-Cu complex is both a reactant and a catalyst in CT transformation. CT degradation requires that the PDTC be in a reduced form, which is generated by contact with cell components. Fe(II) inhibits CT transformation by PDTC. Studies indicated that this inhibition is enhanced by some compound or factor in the supernatant with molecular weight greater than 10,000 Da. We have made progress in determining what this factor might be, but have not yet been able to identify it. In related studies, we found that CT transformation by another organism, Shewanella oneidensis MR1, also involves an excreted factor, but this factor is different from PDTC and results in chloroform transformation as an intermediate. Our studies have indicated that this factor is similar to vitamin K2, and we have also confirmed that vitamin K2 does transform C T into chloroform

  20. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, P. L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig, S.

    2003-12-11

    three to five times, leading to a more rapid clean-up of the DNAPL zone. The most favored electron donor to add is one which partitions well with the chlorinated solvent or can be concentrated near it. Unfortunately, an ideal electron donor, such as vegetable oil, is difficult to introduce and mix with DNAPL in the ground, doing this properly remains an engineering challenge. Numerical model studies have indicated that several factors may significantly influence the rate and extent of enhancement, including the inhibitory effects of PCE and cDCE, the level of ED concentration, DNAPL configuration, and competition for ED. Such factors need to be considered when contemplating engineered DNAPL bioremediation. Pseudomonas stuzeri KC is an organism that transforms CT to carbon dioxide and chloride without the formation of the hazardous intermediate, chloroform. This is accomplished by production and secretion of a molecule called PDTC. This study was direct ed towards determining how PDTC works. Cu (II) at a ratio of 1:1 Cu to PDTC was found to result in the most rapid CT transformation, confirming that the PDTC-Cu complex is both a reactant and a catalyst in CT transformation. CT degradation requires that the PDTC be in a reduced form, which is generated by contact with cell components. Fe(II) inhibits CT transformation by PDTC. Studies indicated that this inhibition is enhanced by some compound or factor in the supernatant with molecular weight greater than 10,000 Da. We have made progress in determining what this factor might be, but have not yet been able to identify it. In related studies, we found that CT transformation by another organism, Shewanella oneidensis MR1, also involves an excreted factor, but this factor is different from PDTC and results in chloroform transformation as an intermediate. Our studies have indicated that this factor is similar to vitamin K2, and we have also confirmed that vitamin K2 does transform C T into chloroform.

  1. Efeito da cloração da água de beber e do nível energético da ração sobre o ganho de peso e consumo de água em frangos de corte Effect of drinking water chlorination and dietary energy level on body weight gain and water intake in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Luis Furlan

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Dois experimentos foram realizados com o objetivo de pesquisar o efeito da adição de cloro à água de beber e dos diferentes níveis de energia na ração sobre o ganho de peso e consumo de água em frangos de corte. No experimento 1, as aves foram alimentadas com dois níveis de energia metabolizável na ração (2900 e 3200 kcal EM/kg em cada fase da criação. Foi observado que o nível energético não influi no consumo de água e no ganho de peso dos frangos de corte. No experimento 2, o nível de energia metabolizável da ração foi de 3200 kcal EM/kg e a água de beber foi clorada com hipoclorito de sódio a 11%, correspondendo a 5 ppm de cloro. O consumo de água foi menor nas aves que receberam água clorada. Apesar de o consumo de água ter sido menor, não houve redução no ganho de peso das aves que receberam hipoclorito de sódio. A adição de cloro à água de beber melhorou os índices bacteriológicos. Os resultados obtidos nestes experimentos evidenciam que os níveis energéticos das rações testadas não influenciaram o consumo de água dos frangos de corte; entretanto, a adição de cloro reduziu a ingestão de água, porém sem influir no ganho de peso nas aves tratadas.Two experiments were conducted to study the effect of adding chlorine on drinking water and different dietary energy levels on the body weight gain and water intake in broiler chickens. In Experiment 1, broilers were fed diets containing two levels of energy (2900 and 3200 kcal ME/kg in each growing phase. The dietary energy level did not affect the water intake and the body weight gain of the broilers. In experiment 2, the dietary metabolizable energy level was 3200 kcal ME/kg and drinking water was treated with sodium hypochlorine at 11% corresponding to 5 ppm of chloride. The water intake was reduced in the birds that received chlorated drinking water, however, there was no reduction on body weight gain in birds that received sodium hypochlorine

  2. Uptake, turnover and distribution of chlorinated fatty acids in aquatic biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoern, Helena

    1999-09-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids (CIFAs) are the major contributors of extractable, organically bound chlorine in fish lipids. A known anthropogenic source of CIFAs is chlorine bleached pulp production. Additional anthropogenic sources may exist, e.g., chlorine-containing discharge from industrial and household waste and they may also occur naturally. CIFAs have a wide geographic distribution. They have, for instance, been identified in fish both from Alaskan and Scandinavian waters. In toxicological studies of CIFAs, the most pronounced effects have been found in reproductive related processes. CIFAs have also been shown to disrupt cell membrane functions. The present study was carried out to further characterise the ecotoxicological properties of CIFAs and their presence in biota. To investigate the biological stability of CIFAs, two experiments were carried out using radiolabelled chlorinated and non-chlorinated fatty acids. In both experiments, CIFAs were taken up from food by fish and assimilated to lipids. From the first experiment it was concluded that the chlorinated fatty acid investigated was turned over in the fish to a lower degree than the non-chlorinated analogue. In the second experiment, the transfer of a chlorinated fatty acid was followed over several trophic levels and the chlorinated fatty acid was transferred to the highest trophic level. In samples with differing loads of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from both fish and marine mammals, high concentrations and diversity of CIFAs were detected. This was also observed in samples with low POP concentration. Chlorohydroxy fatty acids made up a considerable portion of the CIFAs in certain samples, both from limnic fish and marine mammals. CIFAs in fish were found to be bound in complex lipids such as triacylglycerols (storage lipids) and phospholipids, as well as in acyl sterols (membrane lipids). In the marine mammals investigated, high concentrations of CIFAs were mainly bound in phospholipids. If

  3. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection. PMID:23591108

  4. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    isolation tubes with crude oil. Three isolates tested showed positive hydrophobicity of cell walls as judged by the Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. Addition of Bombay High crude oil to nutrient broth slightly enhanced growth of the protists...

  5. Petroleum hydrocarbon concentration in sediments along northern west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ram, A.; Kadam, A.N.

    Gas chromatography revealed that nonpolar material extracted from surface sediments collected along the northern west coast of India was originated from petroleum hydrocarbon residue. Petroleum hydrocarbon levels as determinEd. by fluorescence...

  6. Influencing factors and degradation products of antipyrine chlorination in water with free chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiquan Cai; Liqiu Zhang; Fei Qi; Li Feng

    2013-01-01

    Owing to its low cost,free chlorine is one of the most common disinfectants for wastewater and drinking water treatment.However,the formation of disinfection byproducts has been found to occur after free chlorine disinfection in recent decades.Antipyrine (ANT),an anti-inflammatory analgesic,has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment.In this work.the removal efficiency of ANT by free chlorine oxidation in ultrapure water was investigated with batch experiments.The influencing factors on the removal of ANT were explored at initial concentrations of ANT from 0.04 to 0.64 mg/L,free chlorine dosage from 0.30 to 1.31 mg/L,and pH from 1.5 to 9.0.The main degradation products were identified by solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.The results showed that ANT reacted rapidly with free chlorine in ultrapure water systems and up to 90.6% removal efficiency of ANT was achieved after 25 sec (initial free chlorine 1 mg/L,ANT 0.5 mg/L,pH 7.0).Higher oxidant dosage,lower ANT initial concentration and low pH favor the ANT removal.The main degradation product in ANT chlorination was a monochlorine substitution product (4-chloro-l,2-dihydro1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-one),which can be further chlorinated by free chlorine.In addition,the total organic carbon result indicated that ANT is difficult to be mineralized using chlorine.

  7. 3.6. Chlorination of alumina containing waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination of alumina containing waste products is considered in this article. Based on conducted studies following optimal conditions of chlorination of alumina containing waste products with reducer - coal were found: temperature - 750-850 deg C, chlorination duration -1-1,5 hours, quantity of reducer - 30% and size of particles - 0,1 mm. Based on conducted studies following optimal conditions of chlorination of alumina containing waste products with reducer - natural gas were found: temperature - 650-750 deg C, chlorination duration - 2 hours, chlorine to methane ratio is 4:1 and size of particles - 0,2-0,3 mm.

  8. Correlation between work process-related exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and urinary levels of alpha-naphthol, beta-naphthylamine and 1-hydroxypyrene in iron foundry workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Omland, Øyvind; Poulsen, O M;

    1994-01-01

    the sum of six selected airborne carcinogenic PAH compounds were found for melting, casting and machine and hand molding. As seen in other working environments involving low-level PAH exposure, the content of naphthalene was high, in general exceeding 85% of the total content of PAH compounds. The...... higher risk of lung cancer, the present study suggests that the elevated risk may be due to exposure to carcinogenic PAH compounds in iron foundries, particularly in some high-risk work processes, e.g. casting and molding. In addition, the present study suggests that biological monitoring of 1...... correlated to levels of 1-hydroxypyrene, alpha-naphthol and beta-naphthylamine in the urine of exposed workers. The highest total airborne PAH concentrations (sum of 15 selected PAH compounds: 9.6-11.2 micrograms/m3) were associated with casting, machine molding, and shake-out. The highest concentrations of...

  9. Bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts and exposure to environmental and occupational sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Influence of susceptibility genotypes on adduct level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabro Nielsen, P.

    1996-12-31

    PAH exposure, whether it is of occupational or environmental origin, is thought to result in an elevated risk of cancer especially in the lungs. DNA damage is considered an important step in the carcinogenic effect of PAH. Hence, methods that elucidate the steps in the carcinogenic process are important to understand the action of PAH. It may prove useful in the exposure assessment and in combination with classical epidemiological methods give better basis for risk estimation. The objective in this thesis was to evaluate the feasibility of the {sup 32}P-postlabeling method to detect carcinogen-DNA adducts for assessing exposure to DNA damaging compounds in different occupationally and environmentally exposed groups. The studies included groups, that have an elevated cancer risk due to occupational exposure to PAH. Exposure levels were supposed to be relatively low according to reports on occupational and environmental air quality programs. Another aim was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in metabolizing enzyme genes on DNA adduct levels. A third objective was to establish some kind of baseline DNA adduct level for individuals with supposed low exposure, and compare it to the more exposed groups. A fourth aim in these studies was to examine if biomarkers of genotoxic exposure could be useful in epidemiological studies to identify groups at risk and thereby contribute with better exposure estimates in the study of PAH related cancer risk. (EG).

  10. Bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts and exposure to environmental and occupational sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Influence of susceptibility genotypes on adduct level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAH exposure, whether it is of occupational or environmental origin, is thought to result in an elevated risk of cancer especially in the lungs. DNA damage is considered an important step in the carcinogenic effect of PAH. Hence, methods that elucidate the steps in the carcinogenic process are important to understand the action of PAH. It may prove useful in the exposure assessment and in combination with classical epidemiological methods give better basis for risk estimation. The objective in this thesis was to evaluate the feasibility of the 32P-postlabeling method to detect carcinogen-DNA adducts for assessing exposure to DNA damaging compounds in different occupationally and environmentally exposed groups. The studies included groups, that have an elevated cancer risk due to occupational exposure to PAH. Exposure levels were supposed to be relatively low according to reports on occupational and environmental air quality programs. Another aim was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in metabolizing enzyme genes on DNA adduct levels. A third objective was to establish some kind of baseline DNA adduct level for individuals with supposed low exposure, and compare it to the more exposed groups. A fourth aim in these studies was to examine if biomarkers of genotoxic exposure could be useful in epidemiological studies to identify groups at risk and thereby contribute with better exposure estimates in the study of PAH related cancer risk. (EG)

  11. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs

  12. Phosphate valorization by dry chlorination route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanari N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the extraction of phosphorus chlorinated compounds from phosphate materials using chlorination with gaseous chlorine. An industrial sample of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, after transformation into calcium pyrophosphate (Ca2P2O7, is subjected to reactions with Cl2+CO+N2 and Cl2+C+N2 at temperatures ranging from 625 to 950°C using boat experiments. Gathering results of the thermodynamic predictions and TG/DT analysis with those of SEM and XRD examinations of the chlorinated residues allowed the interpretation of phenomena and reactions mechanism occurring during the calcium pyrophosphate carbochlorination. Reaction rate of Ca2P2O7 by Cl2+CO+N2 at 950°C is slowed down due to the formation of a CaCl2 liquid layer acting as a barrier for the diffusion of the reactive gases and further reaction progress. While, the carbochlorination with Cl2+C+N2 led to almost full chlorination of Ca2P2O7 at 750°C and the process proceeds with an apparent activation energy of about 104 kJ/mol between 625 and 750°C. Carbochlorination technique can be considered as an alternative and selective route for the valorization of low grade phosphates and for the phosphorus extraction from its bearing materials.

  13. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, W.N. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. They probably entered the water as leachates from chemical waste dumps and as effluents from manufacturing. Hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorobenzene are commonly present in Herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from the Great Lakes, and some of the isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene are occasionally detected at low concentrations. Hexachlorobenzene, which was formerly used as a fungicide, has been the most thoroughly studied chlorinated benzene, and has been detected in many species. Its use as a fungicide in the United States was canceled in 1984. Since about 1975 hexachlorobenzene has been formed mainly in the production of chlorinated solvents. It is highly persistent in the environment and some species are poisoned by hexachlorobenzene at very low chronic dietary exposures. As little as 1 ppm in the diet of mink (Mustela vison) reduced the birth weights of young, and 5 ppm in the diet of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) caused slight liver damage. This paper describes a long-term (26 wk) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to length of exposure and three 8 wk experiments relating concentration to the concentration in soil the soil organic matter content, and the degree of chlorination. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Studies concerning thermodynamics and kinetics of the absorption of halogenated hydrocarbons relevant to environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the research project the scrubbing of air contaminated by peculiar volatile organic compounds was investigated using the absorption technique by means of high boiling organics as washing liquids. Eight chlorinated hydrocarbons well known from technical processes were chosen to be representative for the volatile organic compounds. Eleven absorption media were selected on the basis of their physical properties. For the determination of the solubility data of the absorption media due to chlorinated hydrocarbons, nitrogen as well as a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen were used as carrier gas. The influence of the dipole moment of the absorption media on the amount of solubility - expressed as enrichment factor - was studied, too. Concerning the technical application, the thermostability and the stability against diluted inorganic acids were studied as well. (orig.). 56 figs., 8 tabs., 63 refs

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal from flue gas by electron beam treatment - Pilot plant tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from coal combustion belong to aliphatic, chlorinated, aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes and but as the most dangerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are considered. Many of them are involved in the formation of photochemical smog and depletion of stratospheric ozone. Some PAHs are mutagenic, carcinogenic or both. Tests at the pilot plant constructed at coal-fired power station were performed to estimate the influence of electron beam on PAHs concentration in flue-gas. The influence of electron beam dose on the global toxicity of flue gas components has been analyzed. The concentrations of PAHs decreased after irradiation. (author)

  16. Indoor-outdoor levels of size segregated particulate matter and mono/polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among urban areas using solid fuels for heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliucininkas, Linas; Krugly, Edvinas; Stasiulaitiene, Inga; Radziuniene, Inga; Prasauskas, Tadas; Jonusas, Arunas; Kauneliene, Violeta; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2014-11-01

    Emissions from the fuel combustion in the energy production are causes of concern due to associated health risks, but little information is available on the impact of residential fuel burning on indoor air quality, where most of the human exposure occurs. In this complex study, concentrations of size-segregated particulate matter (PM), monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic compounds (MAHs and PAHs) at indoor and outdoor sites in six urban homes in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania, were determined over winter and summer sampling campaigns, specifically targeting the impact of the local fuel burning to the indoor air quality. PM levels observed in Kaunas during winter measurement campaign were higher compared to those in many other European settlements utilizing biomass for energy production. The particle size distribution analysis revealed that the major part of the PM mass in winter period consisted of fine particles (PM2.5). Both MAH and PAH levels were higher in winter. The indoor to outdoor ratios (I/O) of MAHs and PAHs revealed specific patterns depending on the presence of emissions sources indoors. Irrespectively of the season, I/O values were <1, suggesting that in case of the absence of an indoor pollution, the dominant source of organic compounds was from the outdoor environment. In homes with no PAH source inside, the I/O ratio equalled ranged from 0.05 to 0.36, suggesting the penetrated portion of outdoor combustion particles to the indoor air.

  17. Phytoscreening of BTEX and chlorinated solvents by tree coring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Broholm, Mette Martina; Trapp, Stefan;

    chlorinated solvents. The method was applied at various European sites contaminated with PCE/TCE or BTEXs due to former site activities (industrial production, gas stations, air base or gas plant). Tree core samples were collected in fall 2013 and analyzed by HS-GC/MS. Results were used to map the plume...... level in the subsurface and plumes may be mapped. Various plants can be used for phytoscreening, however trees are preferable to smaller plants as their large root system can absorb chemicals from a broader and deeper area. Approach/Activities. In this study tree coring is tested for fuel components and...

  18. Spectrometric methods for the determination of chlorine in crude oil and petroleum derivatives — A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, Adriana [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, Gávea, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22451-900 (Brazil); Saavedra, Alvaro; Tristão, Maria Luiza B.; Mendes, Luiz A.N. [Leopoldo Américo Miguez de Mello Research Center — Petrobras (CENPES), Cidade Universitária, Quadra 7, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro 21949-900 (Brazil); Aucélio, Ricardo Q., E-mail: aucelior@puc-rio.br [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, Gávea, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22451-900 (Brazil)

    2013-08-01

    Chlorine determination in crude oil is made in order to guarantee that the oil does not contain levels of this element that might cause damages in the oil processing equipment. In petroleum products, the determination of chlorine is made, for instance, to evaluate if there are proper concentrations of organochloride compounds, which are used as additives. Such determinations are currently performed following official guidelines from the ASTM International and from the United States Environmental Protection Agency as well as protocols indicated by the Universal Oil Products. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy plays an important role in many of these official methods. In contrast, other spectrometric methods based on optical and mass detection are plagued by limitations related to both the fundamental characteristics of non-metals and to the complex sample matrices, which reflects in the small number of articles devoted to these applications. In this review, the current status of the spectrometric methods, especially the role played by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, is evaluated in terms of the determination of chlorine in crude oil and petroleum derivatives. Comparison of the performance of the methods, limitations and potential new approaches to ensure proper spectrometric determinations of chlorine is indicated. - Highlights: • Critical evaluation of spectrometric methods for chlorine in petroleum products. • Reviews on element determination in petroleum have not address the case of chlorine. • Peculiarities of the spectrometric determination of Cl in petroleum are discussed. • The spectrometric approaches are detailed and compared to the official methods. • New trends in chlorine determination in petroleum products are indicated.

  19. Microbial community response to chlorine conversion in a chloraminated drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Proctor, Caitlin R; Edwards, Marc A; Pryor, Marsha; Santo Domingo, Jorge W; Ryu, Hodon; Camper, Anne K; Olson, Andrew; Pruden, Amy

    2014-09-16

    Temporary conversion to chlorine (i.e., "chlorine burn") is a common approach to controlling nitrification in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems, yet its effectiveness and mode(s) of action are not fully understood. This study characterized occurrence of nitrifying populations before, during and after a chlorine burn at 46 sites in a chloraminated distribution system with varying pipe materials and levels of observed nitrification. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene markers present in nitrifying populations indicated higher frequency of detection of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) (72% of samples) relative to ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) (28% of samples). Nitrospira nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were detected at 45% of samples, while presence of Nitrobacter NOB could not be confirmed at any of the samples. During the chlorine burn, the numbers of AOA, AOB, and Nitrospira greatly reduced (i.e., 0.8-2.4 log). However, rapid and continued regrowth of AOB and Nitrospira were observed along with nitrite production in the bulk water within four months after the chlorine burn, and nitrification outbreaks appeared to worsen 6-12 months later, even after adopting a twice annual burn program. Although high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed a distinct community shift and higher diversity index during the chlorine burn, it steadily returned towards a condition more similar to pre-burn than burn stage. Significant factors associated with nitrifier and microbial community composition included water age and sampling location type, but not pipe material. Overall, these results indicate that there is limited long-term effect of chlorine burns on nitrifying populations and the broader microbial community. PMID:25118569

  20. Cleaning effectiveness of chlorine-free detergents for use on dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Martin; Christiansson, Anders; Lindahl, Cecilia; Wahlund, Lotten; Birgersson, Carol

    2011-02-01

    A method for evaluating cleaning effect based on Bacillus cereus spores was developed and tested in a model system designed to resemble actual farm conditions. A test rig with four removable sampling plates was mounted in a milk line. The plates were attached at the end of T-junctions protruding either 1·5 or 3-times the milk pipe diameter from the main loop to reflect different levels of cleaning difficulty. In each cleaning test, B. cereus spores were applied to the four sampling plates to simulate soil. A series of cleaning tests was conducted at 35, 45, 55 and 65°C with six commercial chlorine-free, alkaline detergents; three liquid and three powder-based products. A commercial alkaline detergent with chlorine, a sodium hydroxide solution, a sodium hydroxider/hypochlorite solution and pure water were also tested. Triplicate tests were performed with each cleaning solution, giving a total of 120 cleaning tests. The cleaning effect was evaluated by comparing the number of spores before and after cleaning. At all temperatures, the two chlorine-based cleaning solutions gave significantly greater reductions in B. cereus spores than the chlorine-free products. All six commercial chlorine-free, alkaline detergents generally gave similar cleaning effects, with no differences in the performance of powder-based and liquid forms. The mechanical spore reduction effect with water alone was greater (1·5-1·8 log-units) than the additional chemical effect of sodium hydroxide or chlorine-free detergents (0·5-1·2 log-units). The chlorine-based solutions had a considerably more powerful chemical effect (2-4 log-units depending on temperature). In general, an increase in cleaning solution temperature up to 55°C gave a greater reduction in spores. A further increase to 65°C did not improve cleaning effectiveness. PMID:21134310

  1. Spectrometric methods for the determination of chlorine in crude oil and petroleum derivatives — A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine determination in crude oil is made in order to guarantee that the oil does not contain levels of this element that might cause damages in the oil processing equipment. In petroleum products, the determination of chlorine is made, for instance, to evaluate if there are proper concentrations of organochloride compounds, which are used as additives. Such determinations are currently performed following official guidelines from the ASTM International and from the United States Environmental Protection Agency as well as protocols indicated by the Universal Oil Products. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy plays an important role in many of these official methods. In contrast, other spectrometric methods based on optical and mass detection are plagued by limitations related to both the fundamental characteristics of non-metals and to the complex sample matrices, which reflects in the small number of articles devoted to these applications. In this review, the current status of the spectrometric methods, especially the role played by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, is evaluated in terms of the determination of chlorine in crude oil and petroleum derivatives. Comparison of the performance of the methods, limitations and potential new approaches to ensure proper spectrometric determinations of chlorine is indicated. - Highlights: • Critical evaluation of spectrometric methods for chlorine in petroleum products. • Reviews on element determination in petroleum have not address the case of chlorine. • Peculiarities of the spectrometric determination of Cl in petroleum are discussed. • The spectrometric approaches are detailed and compared to the official methods. • New trends in chlorine determination in petroleum products are indicated

  2. Separation of niobium from ferroniobium by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation of niobium from ferroniobium by chlorine metallurgy were investigated. The chlorination of ferroniobium by chlorine gas was carried out under several thermodynamic conditions and the effective conditions were determined. Preliminary separation of niobium pentachloride from ferric chloride is possible by selective condensation with temperature gradient techniques. Selective reduction of ferric chloride to ferrous chloride by iron powder was done to separate niobium pentachloride by their volatility difference. Separation of niobium pentachloride from ferric chloride using organic solvent was tested. The niobium pentachloride with high purity could be separated effectively from ferroniobium chlorides by selective reduction of ferric chloride and selective dissolution of niobium pentachloride in organic solvent. A new dry process which has the possibility of industrial application is presented. (Author

  3. Investigation of molybdenum pentachloride interaction with chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Raman spectra of molybdenum pentachloride solutions in liquid chlorine lines were recorded in case of 397, 312, 410, 217 and 180 cm-1 vibrations of ν1(A1'), ν2(A1'), ν5(E'), ν6(E') and ν8(E'') monomer (symmetry D3h) molecules of MoCl5. Interaction of molten molybdenum pentachloride with chlorine at increased (up to 6 MPa) pressures of Cl2 was studied. In Raman spectra of its vapour distillation in liquid chlorine alongside with MoCl5 lines appearance of new lines at 363 and 272 cm-1, similar in their frequency to the ones calculated for the vibrations ν1(A1g) and ν2(Eg) of MoCl6 molecules (symmetry Oh), was observed

  4. Occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, Maria M; Olsen, Jorn; Villeneuve, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF).......To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF)....

  5. Review of chlorination of zirconium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of chlorination zirconium dioxide is presented.used semi batch process with vertical reactor, horizontal reactor and fluidized reactor. The feed were zircon dioxide from Aldrich, direct zircon sand and briquette of zircon sand. From the study it is obtained that the best reactor is vertical reactor.It needs modification of chlorination reactor and sublimator to obtain the larger conversion. It is come to reality that zirconium tetrachloride preparation by process is significant with zirconium tetrachloride from Aldrich. It needs the sequel research to get the best result of process. (author)

  6. Chlorinated organic compounds produced by Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize, not only reduces grain yield and degrades quality but also produces mycotoxins in the infected grain. Focus has been on mycotoxins because of the human and animal health hazards associated with them. In addition to work done on mycotoxins, chemical profiling of F. graminearum to identify other compounds produced by this fungus remains critical. With chemical profiling of F. graminearum the entire chemistry of this fungus can be understood. The focus of this work was to identify chlorinated compounds produced by F. graminearum. Various chlorinated compounds were detected and their role in F. graminearum is yet to be understood. PMID:27165533

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at traffic and urban background sites of northern Greece: source apportionment of ambient PAH levels and PAH-induced lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Evangelia; Kouras, Athanasios; Karagkiozidou, Olga; Argyropoulos, Georgios; Voutsa, Dimitra; Samara, Constantini

    2016-02-01

    Thirteen particle-phase PAHs, including nine >4-ring congeners [Benz[a]anthracene (BaAn), Chrysene (Chry), Benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF), Benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF), Benzo[e]pyrene (BeP), Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene (dBaAn), Benzo[g,h,i]perylene (BghiPe), Indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene (IP)], listed by IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as class 1, class 2A, and 2B carcinogens, plus four ≤4-ring congeners [Phenanthrene (Ph), Anthracene (An), Fluoranthene (Fl), Pyrene (Py)], were concurrently measured in inhalable and respirable particle fractions (PM10 and PM2.5) at a heavy-traffic and an urban background site in Thessaloniki, northern Greece, during the warm and the cold period of the year. Carcinogenic and mutagenic potencies of the PAH-bearing particles were calculated, and the inhalation cancer risk (ICR) for local population was estimated. Finally, Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) modeling was employed for the source apportionment of ambient PAH levels and the estimated lung cancer risk. Resulted inhalation cancer risk during winter was found to be equivalent in the city center and the urban background area suggesting that residential wood burning may offset the benefits from minor traffic emissions. PMID:26490935

  8. Electronic properties, doping and defects in chlorinated silicon nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    de Carvalho, A.; Öberg, S; Rayson, M. J.; Briddon, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals with diameters between 1 and 3 nm and surfaces passivated by chlorine or a mixture of chlorine and hydrogen were modeled using density functional theory, and their properties compared with those of fully hydrogenated nanocrystals. It is found that fully and partially chlorinated nanocrystals are stable, and have higher electron affinity, higher ionization energy and lower optical absorption energy threshold. As the hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals, chlorinated silicon na...

  9. Attacks of Asthma due to Chlorinized Water: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Eyup Berdan; Ercan Gocgeldi; Sami Ozturk; Ali Kutlu

    2008-01-01

    The presence of a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma-like symptoms in swimmers has been reported. But, attacks of asthma which is related to chlorinized water is rare. Chlorine, a strong oxidizing agent, is an important toxic gas that the swimmer can breath during swimming and a worker can exposed to chlorine while he or she was using water with chlorine at home. We describe a persistent increase in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness following chronic exposure ...

  10. Immunofluorescence and morphology of Giardia lamblia cysts exposed to chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Sauch, J F; Berman, D

    1991-01-01

    Giardia cyst-like objects detected by immunofluorescence in chlorinated water samples often cannot be positively identified by their morphological appearance. To determine the effect of chlorine on cyst immunofluorescence and morphology, Giardia lamblia cysts were exposed to chlorine for 48 h. The majority of cysts exposed to chlorine concentrations of 1 to 11 mg/liter at 5 and 15 degrees C lost their internal morphological characteristics necessary for identification, but most of them were s...

  11. Chlorine-rich plasma polymer coating for the prevention of attachment of pathogenic fungal cells onto materials surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont-Friedrich, Stephanie J.; Michl, Thomas D.; Giles, Carla; Griesser, Hans J.; Coad, Bryan R.

    2016-07-01

    The attachment of pathogenic fungal cells onto materials surfaces, which is often followed by biofilm formation, causes adverse consequences in a wide range of areas. Here we have investigated the ability of thin film coatings from chlorinated molecules to deter fungal colonization of solid materials by contact killing of fungal cells reaching the surface of the coating. Coatings were deposited onto various substrate materials via plasma polymerization, which is a substrate-independent process widely used for industrial coating applications, using 1,1,2-trichloroethane as the process vapour. XPS surface analysis showed that the coatings were characterized by a highly chlorinated hydrocarbon polymer nature, with only a very small amount of oxygen incorporated. The activity of these coatings against human fungal pathogens was quantified using a recently developed, modified yeast assay and excellent antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Plasma polymer surface coatings derived from chlorinated hydrocarbon molecules may therefore offer a promising solution to preventing yeast and mould biofilm formation on materials surfaces, for applications such as air conditioners, biomedical devices, food processing equipment, and others.

  12. Differences in field effectiveness and adoption between a novel automated chlorination system and household manual chlorination of drinking water in Dhaka, Bangladesh: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Amy J; Crider, Yoshika; Amin, Nuhu; Bauza, Valerie; Unicomb, Leanne; Davis, Jennifer; Luby, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    The number of people served by networked systems that supply intermittent and contaminated drinking water is increasing. In these settings, centralized water treatment is ineffective, while household-level water treatment technologies have not been brought to scale. This study compares a novel low-cost technology designed to passively (automatically) dispense chlorine at shared handpumps with a household-level intervention providing water disinfection tablets (Aquatab), safe water storage containers, and behavior promotion. Twenty compounds were enrolled in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and randomly assigned to one of three groups: passive chlorinator, Aquatabs, or control. Over a 10-month intervention period, the mean percentage of households whose stored drinking water had detectable total chlorine was 75% in compounds with access to the passive chlorinator, 72% in compounds receiving Aquatabs, and 6% in control compounds. Both interventions also significantly improved microbial water quality. Aquatabs usage fell by 50% after behavioral promotion visits concluded, suggesting intensive promotion is necessary for sustained uptake. The study findings suggest high potential for an automated decentralized water treatment system to increase consistent access to clean water in low-income urban communities. PMID:25734448

  13. Differences in field effectiveness and adoption between a novel automated chlorination system and household manual chlorination of drinking water in Dhaka, Bangladesh: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J Pickering

    Full Text Available The number of people served by networked systems that supply intermittent and contaminated drinking water is increasing. In these settings, centralized water treatment is ineffective, while household-level water treatment technologies have not been brought to scale. This study compares a novel low-cost technology designed to passively (automatically dispense chlorine at shared handpumps with a household-level intervention providing water disinfection tablets (Aquatab, safe water storage containers, and behavior promotion. Twenty compounds were enrolled in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and randomly assigned to one of three groups: passive chlorinator, Aquatabs, or control. Over a 10-month intervention period, the mean percentage of households whose stored drinking water had detectable total chlorine was 75% in compounds with access to the passive chlorinator, 72% in compounds receiving Aquatabs, and 6% in control compounds. Both interventions also significantly improved microbial water quality. Aquatabs usage fell by 50% after behavioral promotion visits concluded, suggesting intensive promotion is necessary for sustained uptake. The study findings suggest high potential for an automated decentralized water treatment system to increase consistent access to clean water in low-income urban communities.

  14. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors

  15. Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones, Robert MD

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:151-156.

  16. Blends of caprolactam/caprolactone copolymers and chlorinated polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberda van Ekenstein, G.O.R.; Deuring, H.; ten Brinke, G.; Ellis, T.S.

    1997-01-01

    The phase behaviour of blends of chlorinated polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and chlorinated PVC with random copolymers of caprolactone and caprolactam has been investigated and the results correlated with a binary interaction model. The known miscibility of polycaprolactone in the chlorinate

  17. Dechlorination pathways of diverse chlorinated aromatic pollutants conducted by Dehalococcoides sp. strain CBDB1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Gui-Ning [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tao, Xue-Qin [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering, Guangzhou 510225 (China); Huang, Weilin [Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Dang, Zhi, E-mail: chzdang@scut.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Li, Zhong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Liu, Cong-Qiang [The State Key Lab of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic pollutants (CAPs) has become a major issue in recent decades. This paper reported a theoretical indicator for predicting the reductive dechlorination pathways of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), chlorobenzenes and chlorophenols transformed by Dehalococcoides sp. strain CBDB1. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level for all related CAPs and Mulliken atomic charges on chlorine atoms (Q{sub Cl(n)}) were adopted as the probe of the dechlorination reaction activity. Q{sub Cl(n)} can consistently indicate the main dechlorination daughter products of PCDDs, chlorobenzenes and chlorophenols conducted by strain CBDB1. The dechlorination reaction favors elimination of the chlorine atoms having greater Q{sub Cl(n)} values. The chlorine atom with the greatest Q{sub Cl(n)} value tends preferentially to be eliminated, whereas the chlorine atom with the smallest Q{sub Cl(n)} value tends unlikely to be eliminated or does not react at all. For a series of compounds having similar structure, the maximal Q{sub Cl(n)} of each molecular can be used to predict the possibility of its daughter product(s). In addition, the difference ({Delta}Q{sub Cl(n)}) between the maximal Q{sub Cl(n)} and the next maximal Q{sub Cl(n)} of the same molecule can be used to assess the possibility of formation of multiple dechlorination products.

  18. Formation potentials of typical DBPs and changes of genotoxicity for chlorinated tertiary effluent pretreated by ozone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Nan; MIAO Tingting; LI Kuixiao; ZHANG Yu; YANG Min

    2009-01-01

    The effects of ozonation on the formation potential of typical disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and the changes of genotoxicity during post chlorination of tertiary effluent from a sewage treatment plant were investigated. Ozonation enhanced the yields of all detected chlorine DBPs except CHCl3. At a chlorine dose of 5 mg/L, the three brominated THMs and five HAAs increased, while chloroform decreased with the increase of ozone dose from 0 to 10 mg/L (ozone dose in consumption base). At a chlorine dose of 10 mg/L, the two mixed bromochloro species THMs and two dominant HAAs (DCAA and TCAA) firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of ozone dose, with the turning point approximately occurring at an ozone dose of 5 mg/L. The genotoxicity detected using umu test, on the other hand, was removed from 7 μg 4-NQO/L to a negligible level by ozonation under an ozone dose of 5 mg/L. Chlorination could further remove the genotoxicity to some extent. It was found that SUVA (UV absorbance divided by DOC concentration) might be used as an indicative parameter for monitoring the removal of genotoxicity during the oxidation.

  19. Halogenated volatile organic compounds from the use of chlorine-bleach-containing household products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Mustafa

    2008-03-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and many organic chemicals contained in household cleaning products may react to generate halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Halogenated VOC emissions from eight different chlorine bleach containing household products (pure and diluted) were investigated by headspace experiments. Chloroform and carbon tetrachloride were the leading compounds along with several halogenated compounds in the headspace of chlorine bleach products. One of the most surprising results was the presence of carbon tetrachloride (a probable human carcinogen and a powerful greenhouse gas that was banned for household use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration) in very high concentrations (up to 101 mg m(-3)). By mixing surfactants or soap with NaOCl, it was shown that the formation of carbon tetrachloride and several other halogenated VOCs is possible. In addition to quantitatively determined halogenated VOCs (n = 15), several nitrogen-containing (n = 4), chlorinated (n = 10), oxygenated compounds (n = 22), and hydrocarbons (n = 14) were identified in the headspace of bleach products. Among these, 1,1-dichlorobutane and 2-chloro-2-nitropropane were the most abundant chlorinated VOCs, whereas trichloronitromethane and hexachloroethane were the most frequently detected ones. Indoor air halogenated VOC concentrations resulting from the use of four selected household products were also measured before, during, and 30 min after bathroom, kitchen, and floor cleaning applications. Chloroform (2.9-24.6 microg m(-3)) and carbon tetrachloride (0.25-459 microg m(-3)) concentrations significantly increased during the use of bleach containing products. During/ before concentration ratios ranged between 8 and 52 (25 +/- 14, average +/- SD) for chloroform and 1-1170 (146 +/- 367, average +/- SD) for carbon tetrachloride, respectively. These results indicated that the bleach use can be important in terms of inhalation exposure to carbon tetrachloride, chloroform and

  20. Development and evaluation of analytical techniques for total chlorine in used oils and oil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A current EPA regulation prohibits the sale for burning in nonindustrial boilers of used oils and oil fuels. This paper discusses how analytical techniques for determining total chlorine were evaluated to provide regulatory agencies and the regulated community with appropriate chlorine test methods. The techniques evaluated included oxygen bomb combustion followed by chemical titration or ion chromatography, instrumental microcoulometry, field test kits, and instrumental furnace/specific ion electrode determinator, a device based on the Beilstein reaction, and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. These techniques were subjected to interlaboratory testing to estimate their precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. Virgin and used crankcase oils, hydraulic and metalworking oils, oil fuels and oil fuel blends with used oils were tested. The bomb techniques, one of the test kits, microcoulometry and all but one x-ray analyzer were found to be suitable for this application. The chlorine furnace and the Beilstein device were found to be inapplicable at the levels of interest

  1. HYDROCARBONS DIAGNOSTIC OF POLLUTED SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Arad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum hydrocarbons are known as carcinogenic and may contaminate the environment (water, air and soil. In this study, a diagnostic of polluted soils by petroleum hydrocarbons is carried out in order to know the effect of their accumulation as well as their behavior in time. The aging factor, a source of significant changing in hydrocarbon behavior, is integrated on two sites of an industrial refinery as experimental samples. The first site is recently polluted by hydrocarbons while the second is a previously polluted site.The results indicate that the concentration of hydrocarbons on the surface of the first site is greater and remains stable in time, as for the second site, hydrocarbons concentration on the surface is also important and undergoes a weak reduction. At a depth of one meter hydrocarbons exist at a greater concentration. This shows that obstinate hydrocarbons are an environmental danger for fauna and flora.

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... desired rate of discharge, provided the air or gas is oil-free and thoroughly dried by passing it over activated aluminum oxide, silica gel, or other acceptable drying agent, and provided the supply pressure is...-resistant to chlorine in either the gas or liquid phase. Cast or malleable iron shall not be used....

  3. Chlorinated tyrosine derivatives in insect cuticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    2004-01-01

    , not-yet sclerotized cuticle of adult femur and tibia, the amounts increased rapidly during the first 24 h after ecdysis and more slowly during the next two weeks. Control analyses using stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry have confirmed that the chlorinated tyrosines are not artifacts formed...

  4. Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

  5. Anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of wastewaters from chlorine and total chlorine-free bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidal, G.; Soto, M.; Field, J.; Mendez-Pampin, R.; Lema, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Chlorine bleaching effluents are problematic for anaerobic wastewater treatment due to their high methanogenic toxicity and low biodegradability. Presently, alternative bleaching processes are being introduced, such as elemental chlorine-free (ECF) and total chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching. The methan

  6. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested o...

  7. Derivation of a radionuclide inventory for irradiated graphite-chlorine-36 inventory determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation of materials in nuclear reactors results in neutron activation of component elements. Irradiated graphite wastes arise from their use in UK gas-cooled research and commercial reactor cores, and in fuel element components, where the graphite has acted as the neutron moderator. During irradiation the residual chlorine, which was used to purify the graphite during manufacture, is activated to chlorine-36. This isotope is long-lived and poorly retarded by geological barriers, and may therefore be a key radionuclide with respect to post-closure disposal facilities performance. United Kingdom Nirex Limited, currently responsible for the development of a disposal route for intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK, carried out a major research programme to support an overall assessment of the chlorine-36 activity of all wastes including graphite reactor components. The various UK gas cooled reactors reactors have used a range of graphite components made from diverse graphite types; this has necessitated a systematic programme to cover the wide range of graphite and production processes. The programme consisted of: precursor measurements - on the surface and/or bulk of representative samples of relevant materials, using specially developed methods; transfer studies - to quantify the potential for transfer of Cl-36 into and between waste streams during irradiation of graphite; theoretical assessments - to support the calculational methodology; actual measurements - to confirm the modelling. For graphite, a total of 458 measurements on samples from 57 batches were performed, to provide a detailed understanding of the composition of nuclear graphite. The work has resulted in the generation of probability density functions (PDF) for the mean chlorine concentration of three classes of graphite: fuel element graphite; Magnox moderator and reflector graphite and AGR reflector graphite; AGR moderator graphite. Transfer studies have shown that a significant

  8. Worldwide overview of hydrocarbons and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication presents and comments data regarding the share of hydrocarbons in the world energy consumption, hydrocarbon trade flows, the new situation created by the emergence of shale hydrocarbons and the consequences for the world economy, and possible risks. The authors first comment the evolution of energy consumption and outline that the objectives of CO2 and greenhouse gas emission will not be reached (these emissions increased in 2012 and in 2013). They indicate the emission situation in the USA and Japan, and notice that the objectives defined by the IEA are quite different from those defined by the EU. They analyse the evolutions by distinguishing different periods: 2005-2008 as a reference period, 2008-2012 as a period of change, and the current period as a period of flow inversion. Then, the authors propose two different scenarios of evolution of economic and energy policies. The evolution of hydrocarbon demand is commented, and the levels of reserves (oil, conventional gas, coal, nuclear fuels) are discussed. The market evolution is also discussed, not only from an economic point of view, but also in relationship with geopolitics. The authors notably outline that the energy price is different from one country to the other, discuss the issue of hydrocarbon refining, the role of CO2 tax

  9. Selecting hydrocarbon rocket propulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Past studies have shown that the dry weight of future earth-to-orbit vehicles can be reduced by the combined use of hydrogen and hydrocarbon propulsion compared to all-hydrogen propulsion. This paper shows that the use of certain hydrocarbon engines with hydrogen engines produces the lowest vehicle dry mass. These hydrocarbon engines use propane or RP-1 fuel, hydrogen cooling, and hydrogen-rich gas generators. Integration of the hydrogen and hydrocarbon nozzles is also beneficial.

  10. HYDROCARBONS DIAGNOSTIC OF POLLUTED SOILS

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Arad; Abdelkader Anouzla; Mohamed Safi; Salah Souabi; Hicham Rhbal

    2010-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are known as carcinogenic and may contaminate the environment (water, air and soil). In this study, a diagnostic of polluted soils by petroleum hydrocarbons is carried out in order to know the effect of their accumulation as well as their behavior in time. The aging factor, a source of significant changing in hydrocarbon behavior, is integrated on two sites of an industrial refinery as experimental samples. The first site is recently polluted by hydrocarbons while the s...

  11. Evidence for heterogeneous chlorine activation in the tropical UTLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Hobe

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne in-situ observations of ClO in the tropics were made during the TROCCINOX (Aracatuba, Brasil, February 2005 and SCOUT-O3 (Darwin, Australia, November/December 2005 field campaigns. While during most flights significant amounts of ClO (≈10–20 parts per trillion, ppt were present only in aged stratospheric air, instances of enhanced ClO mixing ratios of up to 40 ppt – significantly exceeding those expected from gas phase chemistry – were observed in air masses of a more tropospheric character. Most of these observations concur with low temperatures or with the presence of cirrus clouds (often both, suggesting that cirrus ice particles and/or liquid aerosol at low temperatures may promote significant heterogeneous chlorine activation in the tropical upper troposphere lower stratosphere (UTLS. In two case studies, particularly high levels of ClO observed were reproduced by chemistry simulations only under the assumption that significant denoxification had occurred in the observed air. At least for one of these flights, a significant denoxification is in contrast to the observed NO levels suggesting that the coupling of chlorine and nitrogen compounds in the tropical UTLS may not be completely understood.

  12. Evidence for heterogeneous chlorine activation in the tropical UTLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Hobe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne in-situ observations of ClO in the tropics were made during the TROCCINOX (Aracatuba, Brazil, February 2005 and SCOUT-O3 (Darwin, Australia, November/December 2005 field campaigns. While during most flights significant amounts of ClO (≈10–20 parts per trillion, ppt were present only in aged stratospheric air, instances of enhanced ClO mixing ratios of up to 40 ppt – significantly exceeding those expected from gas phase chemistry – were observed in air masses of a more tropospheric character. Most of these observations are associated with low temperatures or with the presence of cirrus clouds (often both, suggesting that cirrus ice particles and/or liquid aerosol at low temperatures may promote significant heterogeneous chlorine activation in the tropical upper troposphere lower stratosphere (UTLS. In two case studies, particularly high levels of ClO observed were reproduced by chemistry simulations only under the assumption that significant denoxification had occurred in the observed air. However, to reproduce the ClO observations in these simulations, O3 mixing ratios higher than observed had to be assumed, and at least for one of these flights, a significant denoxification is in contrast to the observed NO levels, suggesting that the coupling of chlorine and nitrogen compounds in the tropical UTLS may not be completely understood.

  13. Application of PGNAA to preincineration assay of combustible waste for chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Pawelko, R.J.; Greenwood, R.C. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis method is being developed for on-stream pre-incineration assay of low level radioactive combustible waste for it`s chlorine content. The assay system consists of three californium 252 sources and a germanium or scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer.

  14. A new formulation of equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Newman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC is a convenient parameter to quantify the effects of halogens (chlorine and bromine on ozone depletion in the stratosphere. We show, discuss, and analyze a new formulation of EESC that now includes the effects of age-of-air dependent fractional release values and an age-of-air spectrum. This EESC can be more appropriately applied to various parts of the stratosphere because of this dependence on mean age-of-air. This new formulation provides quantitative estimates of EESC that can be directly related to inorganic chlorine and bromine throughout the stratosphere. In this paper, we first provide a detailed description of the EESC calculation. We then use this EESC formulation to estimate that human-produced ozone depleting substances will recover to 1980 levels in 2041 in the midlatitudes, and 2067 over Antarctica. These recovery dates are based upon the assumption that the international agreements for regulating ozone-depleting substances are adhered to. In addition to recovery dates, we also estimate the uncertainties and possible problems in the estimated times of recovery. The midlatitude recovery of 2041 has a 95% confidence uncertainty from 2028 to 2049, while the 2067 Antarctic recovery has a 95% confidence uncertainty from 2056 to 2078. The principal uncertainties are from the estimated mean age-of-air and fractional release values, and the assumption that these quantities are time independent. Using other model estimates of age decrease due to climate change, we estimate that midlatitude recovery may be significantly accelerated.

  15. Suppression of chlorine activation on aviation-produced volatile particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Meilinger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effect of nanometer-sized aircraft-induced aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4/H2O particles on atmospheric ozone as a function of temperature. Our calculations are based on a previously derived parameterization for the regional-scale perturbations of the sulfate surface area density due to air traffic in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC and a chemical box model. We confirm large scale model results that at temperatures T>210 K additional ozone loss -- mainly caused by hydrolysis of BrONO2 and N2O5 -- scales in proportion with the aviation-produced increase of the background aerosol surface area. However, at lower temperatures (2O and HNO3 uptake enhance scavenging losses of aviation-produced liquid particles and (2 the Kelvin effect efficiently limits chlorine activation on the small aircraft-induced droplets by reducing the solubility of chemically reacting species. These two effects lead to a substantial reduction of heterogeneous chemistry on aircraft-induced volatile aerosols under cold conditions. In contrast we find contrail ice particles to be potentially important for heterogeneous chlorine activation and reductions in ozone levels. These features have not been taken into consideration in previous global studies of the atmospheric impact of aviation. Therefore, to parameterize them in global chemistry and transport models, we propose the following parameterisation: scale the hydrolysis reactions by the aircraft-induced surface area increase, and neglect heterogeneous chlorine reactions on liquid plume particles but not on ice contrails and aircraft induced ice clouds.

  16. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  17. Reaction products of aquatic humic substances with chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J D; Christman, R F; Norwood, D L; Millington, D S

    1982-01-01

    A major concern of the chlorination of aquatic humic materials is the ubiquitous production of trihalomethanes. A large number of other chlorinated organic compounds, however, have been shown to be formed by chlorine's reaction with humic substances. In this study, humic material was concentrated from a coastal North Carolina lake and chlorinated at a chlorine to carbon mole ratio of 1.5 at pH 12. A high pH was necessary for complete dissolution of the humic material and for production of ade...

  18. Chlorination-induced genotoxicity in the mussel Perna viridis: assessment by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Pooja; Kumar, Rajesh; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2016-08-01

    Mussels are important fouling organisms in the cooling water systems of coastal power plants. Continuous low-dose chlorination (CLDC) is being practiced as an effective method to control mussel biofouling in power plant cooling water systems. CLDC effectively controls mussel fouling by discouraging larval settlement rather than by killing the larvae or adults. Mussels are an integral part of the natural benthic community in the receiving water body where the coolant water is discharged. Hence, from a toxicological point of view, they can serve as both target and non-target organisms. Previous researchers have indicated that chlorine residual, rather than elevated temperature, can be the major stress factor in the effluents released from coastal power plants. However, very little data are available on the sub-lethal effects of low level chlorination on representative benthic fauna. In this study, we used native and transplanted mussels (Perna viridis) to study lethal and sub-lethal effects of chlorination in the cooling water circuit of an operating power plant. Experiments involving comet assay suggested that CLDC can cause DNA damage in treated mussels. However, activation of DNA repair appeared to get initiated after the accrued damage reached a threshold. The results indicate that, at chlorine residual levels observed at the discharge point, exposure to chlorinated effluents is unlikely to cause significant genetic damage to mussels in the recipient water body. PMID:27155389

  19. Method and apparatus for pyrolytically cracking hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skraba, F.W.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a method for pyrolytically cracking a hydrocarbon vapor feedstock in a hydrocarbon pyrolysis unit to produce an olefinic hydrocarbon product. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon vapor feedstock, then, cracking the hydrocarbon vapor feedstock in the presence of the vaporized water in a pyrolysis furnace to produce a furnace effluent stream comprised of an olefinic hydrocarbon product gas and the vaporized water.

  20. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  1. Occurence of chlorinated aromatic compounds in filter deposits of an incinerator plant for radioactive waste. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filter deposits of an incinerator plant for radioactive waste were investigated for their organic components. The concentrated Soxhlet extracts of the deposits were separated by gas chromatography. Detection was performed by an electron capture detector (ECD) connected in series to a flame ionization detector (FID). For compound identification the samples were analyzed in addition by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GS/MS). Besides polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and a few polycyclic heteroaromatics (N-, S-, O-PACs) relative high concentrations of chlorine compounds were found. These about 30 partly isomeric derivatives of a few parent PAHs had up to 4 chlorosubstituents. The reference substances necessary to verify the interpretation of the mass spectra were prepared by catalytic chlorination of the parent PAHs. (Author)

  2. Production and distribution of chlorination by-products in the cooling water system of a coastal power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    bromodichloromethane and chloroform were also produced. It was also observed that bromoform was stable up to 120 h. As it is known that dissolved organic matter in water can influence THM formation, the role of algal metabolites (exudates) on THM formation was also studied in laboratory experiments. Chlorine (1-3 mgL-1) was dosed in filtered seawater samples amended with algal metabolites (concentration ranging from 0.2-2 mgL-1). It was observed that with an increase in algal metabolite concentration, the total THM formation also increased. The results indicate that low level continuous chlorination, as currently practised at MAPS, leads to the formation of certain CBP's and that their concentration levels in the sea are comparable to those reported from elsewhere. (author)

  3. Unsaturated medium hydrocarbons pollution evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the so called porous unsaturated medium, that's the vertical subsoil section between both the ground and water-table level, is interested by a hydrocarbons spill, the problem to evaluate the pollution becomes difficult: considering, essentially, the natural coexistence in it of two fluids, air and water, and the interactions between them. This paper reports that the problems tend to increase when a third fluid, the pollutant, immiscible with water, is introduced into the medium: a three-phases flow, which presents several analogies with the flow conditions present in an oil-reservoir, will be established. In such a situation, it would be very useful to handle the matter by the commonly used parameters in the oil reservoirs studies such as: residual saturation, relative permeability, phases mobility, to derive a first semiquantitative estimation of the pollution. The subsoil pollution form hydrocarbons agents is one of the worldwide more diffused causes of contamination: such events are generally referable to two main effects: accidental (oil pipeline breakdowns, e.g.), and continuous (underground tanks breaks, industrial plants leakages, e.g.)

  4. Heterogeneous chlorine activation on stratospheric aerosols and clouds in the Arctic polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wegner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine activation in the Arctic is investigated by examining different parameterizations for uptake coefficients on stratospheric aerosols, high-resolution in-situ measurements and vortex-wide satellite observations. The parameterizations for heterogeneous chemistry on liquid aerosols are most sensitive to temperature with the reaction rates doubling for every 1 K increase in temperature. However, differences between the currently available parameterizations are negligible. For Nitric Acid Trihydrate particles (NAT the major factors of uncertainty are the number density of nucleated particles and different parameterizations for heterogeneous chemistry. These two factors induce an uncertainty that covers several orders of magnitude on the reaction rate. Nonetheless, since predicted reaction rates on liquid aerosols always exceed those on NAT, the overall uncertainty for chlorine activation is small. In-situ observations of ClOx from Arctic winters in 2005 and 2010 are used to evaluate the heterogeneous chemistry parameterizations. The conditions for these measurements proved to be very different between those two winters with HCl being the limiting reacting partner for the 2005 measurements and ClONO2 for the 2010 measurements. Modeled levels of chlorine activation are in very good agreement with the in-situ observations and the surface area provided by Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs has only a limited impact on modeled chlorine activation. This indicates that the parameterizations give a good representation of the processes in the atmosphere. Back-trajectories started on the location of the observations in 2005 indicate temperatures on the threshold for PSC formation, hence the surface area is mainly provided by the background aerosol. Still, the model shows additional chlorine activation during this time-frame, providing cautionary evidence for chlorine activation even in the absence of PSCs. Vortex-averaged satellite

  5. Petroleum hydrocarbons in northwest coastal waters of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kadam, A.N.; Bhangale, V.P.

    Impact of domestic and industrial wastewaters on coastal waters was studiEd. by monitoring petroleum hydrocarbon concentration (PHC) up to 25 km distance from shore, along Okha-Ratnagiri Coast, Maharashtra, India during 1989-92. Average PHC levels...

  6. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  7. Antiradiation effectiveness of the chlorine C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present ever more attention of the experimenters in the field of search of high-effective antiray means - is directed to development of preparations from bio-active substances of a natural origin. In this connection all greater interest is caused by researches of antiray activity of these compounds, distinguished, as a rule, from known preparations of synthetic manufacture of low toxicity, absence of expressed collateral effects and possibility of course application. It has biological (antiray) activity in dozes 5-10 mg/kg and chlorine C which is derivative of chlorophil A. At present it passes tests in oncology. Porphyrines (synthetic and natural) are recently subjected to wide study as potential medicinal means, due to their ability to be accumulated in bodies of the reticulo-endothelial system and proliferous tissues, as well as their physical-chemical characteristics (fluorescence, photosensitizing action, colouring). All this testifies for the benefit of perspective use of porphyrin for treatment and diagnostics of tumors. According to the above described properties of porphyrines there is that fact, that for some of them radioprotective properties are revealed during the injections as well as before and after radiation treatment. The above said has formed the basis for study of antiray properties of the chlorine C during the experiments on small-sized laboratory animals. Antiradiation effectivity of chlorine C was studied on the mice (CBA x C57 B1) F1. Chlorine C was applied in a wide range of dozes with its' use in 3 variants: before radiation treatment, after radiation treatment, combined (before and after radiation treatment). Radioprotective activity of chlorine C reduces at an increase of a time of the injection before radiation treatment and at other ways of injection (intramuscularly, subcutaneously, per os). Studies of medical activity of chlorine C in experiments on mice have shown, that the compound does not possess medical activity. The death of

  8. Inferential monitoring of chlorinated solvents through Raman spectroscopic observation of the vibrational modes of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinfield, Joseph V; Monwuba, Chike

    2016-02-01

    Recent improvements in diode laser, fiber optic, and data acquisition technology have rejuvenated interest in field applications of Raman spectroscopy in a wide range of settings. One such application involves the observation of chlorinated solvents to facilitate the practice of "monitored natural attenuation." In this context, this manuscript focuses on means to improve the sensitivity of in-situ Raman analysis of chlorinated solvents. In particular, the work explores the performance limits of a Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy (TRRS) system employed to observe chlorinated solvents in aqueous samples via laboratory tests conducted on both liquid standards of trichloroethylene (TCE) and simulated biodegraded field samples. Quantitative assessment of TCE in solution is carried out through both direct observation of TCE Raman functional groups (381 cm(-1) (δ skeletal), 840 cm(-1) (νCCl) and 1242 cm(-1) (δCH)) and indirect observation of the broad OH stretching (2700-3800 cm(-1)) Raman modes of water. Results from tests on simple solutions show that the TRRS system can detect TCE at aqueous concentrations as low as 70 ppm by directly monitoring the 381 cm(-1) TCE line, whereas observation of the OH stretching line of water (3393 cm(-1)) provides an indirect indication of TCE presence with nearly a 9× improvement in detection level. This unique and counterintuitive mechanism to detect the presence of chlorinated compounds in solution takes advantage of the influence of chlorine on the vibrational modes of water. This influence, which is believed to be attributed to the formation of hydrogen bonds and their resultant interactions with the solvation shell, may serve as a more sensitive and robust indication of the presence of aggregate chlorinated solvent contamination in aqueous systems. Tests performed on simulated biodegraded field samples demonstrate that the indirect detection mechanism is apparent even in complex samples representative of typical field

  9. Oxidation of pharmaceuticals by chlorine dioxide in biologically treated wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, G.; Grabic, R.; Ledin, A.;

    2012-01-01

    nitrogen removal (low COD) and one without (high COD). About one third of the tested APIs resisted degradation even at the highest ClO2 dose (20mg/L), while others were reduced by more than 90% at the lowest ClO2 level (0.5mg/L). In the low COD effluent, more than half of the APIs were oxidized at 5mg/L Cl......Biologically treated wastewater spiked with a mixture of 56 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) was treated with 0–20mg/L chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution in laboratory-scale experiments. Wastewater effluents were collected from two wastewater treatment plants in Sweden, one with extended......O2, while in high COD effluent a significant increase in API oxidation was observed after treatment with 8mg/L ClO2. This study illustrates the successful degradation of several APIs during treatment of wastewater effluents with chlorine dioxide....

  10. Comparative efficacy of chlorine and chlorine dioxide regimes for condenser slime control in seawater cooled heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination has long been used as an effective and economic biocide for biofouling control in seawater cooling systems. However, the efficacy of chlorine is reduced in the presence of organic content of seawater and the inability of chlorine to effectively penetrate biofilms. Chlorine dioxide is being projected as a possible alternative to chlorine. Experiments were carried out with the help of a seawater circulating facility, in which direct comparison of the efficacy of the two biocides was possible using test condenser tube assemblies. The test condenser tubes made of titanium, SS 316L and Cu-Ni 90/10 were dosed with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. Each dose was evaluated for 30 days. Continuous and intermittent additions of chlorine (0.38 - 0.45 mg L-1 TRO) and chlorine dioxide (0.4 - 0.5 mg L-1) were used, along with control. The flow velocity in the tubes was maintained at 1.5 m/s. Results of the study showed that the efficacy of the biocide to control biofilms depended on the biocide and the material. Continuous chlorination resulted in 75% reduction of viable counts on titanium, followed by 24% reduction on CuNi and 6% reduction on SS 316L surfaces, as compared to the control. When compared to continuous chlorination, increase in bacterial density in the tubes was observed at different regimes of intermittent chlorination. On SS 316L and Cu-Ni surfaces, intermittent chlorination for 1h, once every 3 h, appeared to give adequate protection. Continuous addition of chlorine dioxide resulted in 99% reduction of viable counts on titanium surfaces, followed by 28% reduction on SS 316 L surfaces and 52% reduction on Cu-Ni surfaces, as compared to the controls. The data indicate that the efficacy of biocides to control biofilms depend on not only the biocide and its frequency of application but also the material of construction. (author)

  11. Comparative efficacy of chlorine and chlorine dioxide regimes for condenser slime control in seawater cooled heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, P.S.; Veeramani, P.; Ershath, M.; Rajamohan, R.; Harinath, Y.V.; Mohan, T.V.K.; Venugopalan, V.P. [BARC Facilities, Water and Steam Chemistry Div., Kalpakkam, Tamil nadu (India)

    2010-07-01

    Chlorination has long been used as an effective and economic biocide for biofouling control in seawater cooling systems. However, the efficacy of chlorine is reduced in the presence of organic content of seawater and the inability of chlorine to effectively penetrate biofilms. Chlorine dioxide is being projected as a possible alternative to chlorine. Experiments were carried out with the help of a seawater circulating facility, in which direct comparison of the efficacy of the two biocides was possible using test condenser tube assemblies. The test condenser tubes made of titanium, SS 316L and Cu-Ni 90/10 were dosed with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. Each dose was evaluated for 30 days. Continuous and intermittent additions of chlorine (0.38 - 0.45 mg L{sup -1} TRO) and chlorine dioxide (0.4 - 0.5 mg L{sup -1}) were used, along with control. The flow velocity in the tubes was maintained at 1.5 m/s. Results of the study showed that the efficacy of the biocide to control biofilms depended on the biocide and the material. Continuous chlorination resulted in 75% reduction of viable counts on titanium, followed by 24% reduction on CuNi and 6% reduction on SS 316L surfaces, as compared to the control. When compared to continuous chlorination, increase in bacterial density in the tubes was observed at different regimes of intermittent chlorination. On SS 316L and Cu-Ni surfaces, intermittent chlorination for 1h, once every 3 h, appeared to give adequate protection. Continuous addition of chlorine dioxide resulted in 99% reduction of viable counts on titanium surfaces, followed by 28% reduction on SS 316 L surfaces and 52% reduction on Cu-Ni surfaces, as compared to the controls. The data indicate that the efficacy of biocides to control biofilms depend on not only the biocide and its frequency of application but also the material of construction. (author)

  12. Effects of the temperature and the irradiation on the behaviour of chlorine 37 in nuclear graphite: consequences on the mobility of chlorine 36 in irradiated graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the studies of the management of irradiated graphite wastes issued from the dismantling of the UNGG French reactors. This work focuses on the behavior of 36Cl. This radionuclide is mainly issued through the neutron activation of 35Cl by the reaction 35Cl(n, γ)36Cl, pristine chlorine being an impurity of nuclear graphite, present at the level of some at.ppm. 36Cl is a long lived radionuclide (about 300,000 years) and is highly soluble in water and mobile in concrete and clay. The solubilization of 36Cl is controlled by the water accessibility into irradiated graphite pores as well as by factors related to 36Cl itself such as its chemical speciation and its location within the irradiated graphite. Both speciation and chlorine location should strongly influence its behaviour and need to be taken into account for the choice of liable management options. However, data on radioactive chlorine features are difficult to assess in irradiated graphite and are mainly related to detection sensitivity problems. In this context, we simulated and evaluated the impact of the temperature, the irradiation and the radiolytic oxidation on the chlorine 36 behaviour. In order to simulate the presence of 36Cl, we implanted 37Cl into virgin nuclear graphite. Ion implantation has been widely used to study the lattice location, the diffusion and the release of fission and activation products in nuclear materials. Our results on the comparative effects of the temperature and the irradiation show that chlorine occurs in irradiated graphite on temperature and electronic and nuclear irradiation improve this effect. (author)

  13. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  14. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  15. Biogeochemistry of Halogenated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaens, P.; Gruden, C.; McCormick, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    Halogenated hydrocarbons originate from both natural and industrial sources. Whereas direct anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere and biosphere are often easy to assess, particularly when they are tied to major industrial activities, the attribution of emissions to other human activities (e.g., biomass burning), diffuse sources (e.g., atmospheric discharge, run off), and natural production (e.g., soils, fungi, algae, microorganisms) are difficult to quantify. The widespread occurrence of both alkyl and aryl halides in groundwater, surface water, soils, and various trophic food chains, even those not affected by known point sources, suggests a substantial biogeochemical cycling of these compounds (Wania and Mackay, 1996; Adriaens et al., 1999; Gruden et al., 2003). The transport and reactive fate mechanisms controlling their reactivity are compounded by the differences in sources of alkyl-, aryl-, and complex organic halides, and the largely unknown impact of biogenic processes, such as enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter, fungal production of halogenated hydrocarbons, and microbial or abiotic transformation reactions (e.g., Asplund and Grimvall, 1991; Gribble, 1996; Watling and Harper, 1998; Oberg, 2002). The largest source may be the natural halogenation processes in the terrestrial environment, as the quantities detected often exceed the amount that can be explained by human activities in the surrounding areas ( Oberg, 1998). Since biogeochemical processes result in the distribution of a wide range of halogenated hydrocarbon profiles, altered chemical structures, and isomer distributions in natural systems, source apportionment (or environmental forensics) can often only be resolved using multivariate statistical methods (e.g., Goovaerts, 1998; Barabas et al., 2003; Murphy and Morrison, 2002).This chapter will describe the widespread occurrence of halogenated hydrocarbons, interpret their distribution and biogeochemical cycling in light of

  16. Recent Achievements in the Radiation-Catalysed Chlorination of Chlorinated Pentane Derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-catalysed chlorination of the so-called tetrachloro-cyclopentane, the product obtained from cyclopentadiene by addition of chlorine, has already been studied earlier by the authors with success. On maintaining an adequate dosage rate, no ring cleavage occurs, and, mainly for stereochemical reasons, octachloro-cyclopentene forms as an end product - similarly to conventional chlorination carried out at high temperature (400-500oC), but at substantially lower temperature (170oC) and without any resin formation. It is known that besides other end products, octachloro-cyclopentene forms also from perchlorinated pentane, under simultaneous cyclization. In their recent experiments presented here, the authors investigated how and to what extent the yield of octachloro-cyclopentene is affected by additional chlorination of pentane, previously chlorinated under cooling (at 10 to 30oC). The experiments were carried out with a Co60 radiation source of 330 c at a dosage rate of 8 x 103 to 8 x 104r/hr, in a heated reaction mixture, mixed with a chlorine stream for periods not exceeding 30 hr. It was found that also this type of chlorination and cyclization takes place at a temperature substantially lower than the conventional 500-600oC. According to the experiments, in this case it is advisable to raise the initial temperature of 170oC of the reaction gradually to 220oC with the progress of the reaction, in order to promote the cyclization reaction. It was found, namely, that first the paraffin chain was further chlorinated and later the perchlorinated pentane derivatives cyclize partly to octachloro-cyclopentene, under formation of other chlorinated alkane and alkene derivatives. This reaction mechanism was also supported by thermodynamical calculations. The end product contains three main components; its content of octachloro-cyclopentene ranges between 25 and 35%. The data required for the evaluation of the economy of the method will be available only on the

  17. Revisiting the thermochemistry of chlorine fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, H R

    2016-01-01

    In this work, accurate calculations of standard enthalpies of formation of chlorine fluorides (ClF$_n$, n=1--7; Cl$_2$F and Cl$_3$F$_2$) were performed through the isodesmic reactions scheme. It is argued that, for many chlorine fluorides, the gold standard method of quantum chemistry (CCSD(T)) is not capable to predict enthalpy values nearing chemical accuracy if atomization scheme is used. This is underpinned by a thorough analysis of total atomization energy results and the inspection of multireference features of these compounds. Other thermodynamic quantities were also calculated at different temperatures. In order to complement the energetic description, elimination curves were studied through density functional theory as a computationally affordable alternative to highly correlated wave function-based methods.

  18. Chlorine-Free Red-Burning Pyrotechnics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Koch, Ernst-Christian; Poret, Jay C; Moretti, Jared D; Harbol, Seth M

    2015-09-01

    The development of a red, chlorine-free pyrotechnic illuminant of high luminosity and spectral purity was investigated. Red-light emission based solely on transient SrOH(g) has been achieved by using either 5-amino-1H-tetrazole or hexamine to deoxidize the combustion flame of a Mg/Sr(NO3 )2 /Epon-binder composition and reduce the amount of both condensed and gaseous SrO, which emits undesirable orange-red light. The new formulations were found to possess high thermal onset temperatures. Avoiding chlorine in these formulations eliminates the risk of the formation of PCBs, PCDDs, and PCDFs. This finding, hence, will have a great impact on both military pyrotechnics and commercial firework sectors. PMID:26333055

  19. Spectrographic determination of chlorine and fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental conditions have been investigated in order to obtain the highest sensitivity in spectrographic determination of chlorine and fluorine using the Fassel method of excitation in an inert atmosphere. The influence of the nature of the atmosphere, of the discharge conditions and of the matrix material has been investigated. The following results have been established: 1. chlorine determination is definitely possible: a working curve has been drawn between 10 μg and 100 μg, the detection limit being around 5 μg; 2. fluorine determination is not satisfactory: the detection limit is still of the order of 80 μg. The best operating conditions have been defined for both elements. (author)

  20. Bacterial responses to reactive chlorine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research. PMID:23768204

  1. Chlorine diffusion in CdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadaiyandi, K.; Ramachandran, K. (School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj Univ. (India))

    1991-06-01

    The experimental results of chlorine diffusion in CdTe reveal that the dominant mechanism for diffusion is through neutral defect pair such as (V{sub Cd}V{sub Te}){sup *}. Here, theoretical calculations are carried out for all the possible mechanisms such as single vacancy, single interstitial, neutral defect pair, and Frenkel defect pair. The results suggest that the most possible mechanism for Cl diffusion in CdTe is that through neutral defect pair, supporting the experiment. (orig.).

  2. Chlorine requirement for Japanese laying quails

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Guilherme Perazzo Costa; Jalceyr Pessoa Figueiredo Júnior; Denise Fontana Figueiredo Lima; Cláudia de Castro Goulart; José Humberto Vilar da Silva; Matheus Ramalho de Lima; Sarah Gomes Pinheiro; Valéria Pereira Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the chlorine nutritional requirement of Japanese Quails during the laying phase, based on performance and egg quality parameters. A total of 240 Japanese quails were distributed according to a randomized block design, with five treatments and six replicates, with 8 birds each. The experiment lasted 84 days, divided in four cycles of 21 days each. Treatments consisted of a basal diet formulated to meet the nutritional requirements, except for chlori...

  3. Comparison of commercial analytical techniques for measuring chlorine dioxide in urban desalinated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, T A; Abid, K Y; El-Bindary, A A; El-Sonbati, A Z

    2015-12-01

    Most drinking water industries are closely examining options to maintain a certain level of disinfectant residual through the entire distribution system. Chlorine dioxide is one of the promising disinfectants that is usually used as a secondary disinfectant, whereas the selection of the proper monitoring analytical technique to ensure disinfection and regulatory compliance has been debated within the industry. This research endeavored to objectively compare the performance of commercially available analytical techniques used for chlorine dioxide measurements (namely, chronoamperometry, DPD (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine), Lissamine Green B (LGB WET) and amperometric titration), to determine the superior technique. The commonly available commercial analytical techniques were evaluated over a wide range of chlorine dioxide concentrations. In reference to pre-defined criteria, the superior analytical technique was determined. To discern the effectiveness of such superior technique, various factors, such as sample temperature, high ionic strength, and other interferences that might influence the performance were examined. Among the four techniques, chronoamperometry technique indicates a significant level of accuracy and precision. Furthermore, the various influencing factors studied did not diminish the technique's performance where it was fairly adequate in all matrices. This study is a step towards proper disinfection monitoring and it confidently assists engineers with chlorine dioxide disinfection system planning and management. PMID:26608759

  4. Power-plant discharges: toward more reasonable effluent limits on chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for restricting chlorine in power-plant effluents to environmentally safe levels. Development of this method was stimulated by the controversy between electric utilities and regulatory agencies over the justification of the present universally applied limits. The scientific literature conclusivey demonstrates the effects of physical, chemical, and biotic factors on chlorine toxicity. The method proposed includes these factors, to the extent currently possible, to set limits based on site-specific aquatic conditions and plant design and operation specifications. In these effluent limits, the organisms considered are those which are entrained into the plume or which maintain themselves within the plume during chlorination. In each instance the time course of exposure concentration is divided into small time intervals. Weighted mean concentrations for successively larger time intervals following initial exposure are then calculated. Exposures resulting from releases at various levels are compared either graphically or mathematically with acute and chronic mortality thresholds to find the highest discharge concentration that does not cause mortality. The thresholds are derived from existing toxicity data and are different for marine and freshwater organisms. This method is based on the latest literature available and can incorporate further data concerning chemistry, toxicity, and behavior as they become available. The method also is amenable to coupling with models of chemical dispersion and population dynamics to permit more complete analysis. This approach serves to permit use of chlorine for biofouling control at power plants, while ensuring that this use will not be inimical to the environment

  5. Petroleum hydrocarbon concentration in surface sediments in continental shelf region along the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ram, A.; Kadam, A.N.

    Gas chromatography revealed that nonpolar material extracted from surface sediments collected along the northern west coast of India was originated from petroleum hydrocarbon residue. Petroleum hydrocarbon levels as determinEd. by fluorescence...

  6. Radioimmunoassay for chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides a double-antibody radioimmunoassay method for the determination of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, particularly, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, in environmental samples including animal tissues such as monkey liver and adipose tissues. The limit of detection is approximately 25 picograms for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin. Assuming an appropriate cleanup procedure is used, chlorinated dibenzofurans are the only likely interferences, and these can be distinguished through the use of two antisers of different dibenzo-furan/dibenzodioxin selectivities. The invention includes the preparation of a reproducible antigen, an appropriate radiolabeled hapten, and effective sample extracts. A feature of the assay method is the use of a nonionic detergent (e.g., ''cutscum'' or ''triton x-305'') to solubilize the extremely hydrophobic dibenzo-p-dioxins in a manner permitting their binding by antibodies. The immunoassay is applicable to screening samples in order to minimize the demand for mass spectrometric screening, and to routine monitoring for exposure to known chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins in potentially contaminated environments

  7. Chlorination and Carbochlorination of Cerium Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorination and carbochlorination of cerium oxide were studied by thermogravimetry under controlled atmosphere (TG) in the 7000C 9500C temperature range.Both reactants and products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (RX), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Thermodynamic calculations were performed by computer assisted software.The chlorination starts at a temperature close to 8000C.This reaction involves the simultaneous formation and evaporation of CeCl3.Both processes control the reaction rate and their kinetic may not be easily separated.The apparent chlorination activation energy in the 8500C-9500C temperature range is 172 to 5 kJ/ mole.Carbon transforms the CeO2-Cl2 into a more reactive system: CeO2-C-Cl2, where the effects of the carbon content, total flow rate and temperature were analyzed.The carbochlorination starting temperature is 7000C.This reaction is completed in one step controlled by mass transfer with an apparent activation energy of 56 to 5 kJ/mole in the 8500C-9500C temperature range

  8. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels; Kloorattujen orgaanisten yhdisteiden muodostuminen kierraetyspolttoaineiden leijukerrospoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  9. Examination of the potential of chlorine dioxide for use in zebra mussel veliger control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusznak, L.; Smolik, N.; Hale, L.; Freymark, S. [Ashland Chemical Company, Drew Division, Boonton, NJ (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Dreissena polymorpha (zebra mussel) veligers were treated with various concentrations of chlorine dioxide and exposed at several time intervals to determine the effectiveness of this oxidant as a veliger control agent. The direction of this testing was based on previous studies which determined the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide as a molluscicide for adult zebra mussel control. Zebra mussel veligers were collected from the Niagara River shoreline at an untreated site and tested using filtered river water from the same source. All testing was conducted on site at an industrial plant in order to insure the integrity of veligers collected for this study. The plankton wheel method was used to examine the effects of chlorine dioxide. This methodology involves intense microscopic examination of the test organism prior to and after chemical exposure todeterminen molluscicidal efficacy. Veliger mortality was determined based on observations of veliger movement. Typical criteria for the determination of mortality was expanded to include four categories; veliger actively swimming, internal musculature movement, no internal musculature movement observed, however not necessarily indicating a mortality and obviously a mortality. The treatment levels ranged from 0.75 ppm - 2.0 ppm which are considered to simulate treatment levels in actual applications. Mortality levels ranged on average from 16%-42% based on 30 minute or 60 minute exposure times. The determination exposure time was based on water flow time intervals in actural applications. Sodium hypochlorite was also evaluated in order to compare the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide against this known veliger control agent. Testing resulted in chlorine dioxide providing significantly better veliger control than sodium hypochlorite under similar conditions.

  10. Decomposition of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial off-gas by electron beams: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron beam induced decomposition of volatile organic compounds (e.g. aromatic compounds, esters, chlorinated hydrocarbons) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g. chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins) in industrial off gas has been investigated by several research groups in Germany and Japan. The method was shown to be effective for cleaning the waste gas of a paint factory, the waste air discharged from an automobile tunnel, the off gas cleaning from a groundwater remediation plant and the flue gas of a waste incinerator. The electron beam process achieves high removal efficiencies for volatile organic compounds. Reaction models have been developed, which suggest that the organic compounds are oxidized by hydroxyl radicals. The electron beam process may treat very large off-gas volumes at ambient temperatures and has a low energy consumption. The production of secondary wastes can be avoided or minimized. Compared to conventional methods the investment and operation costs of the process seem to be attractive for selected applications

  11. Attacks of Asthma due to Chlorinized Water: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Eyup Berdan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma-like symptoms in swimmers has been reported. But, attacks of asthma which is related to chlorinized water is rare. Chlorine, a strong oxidizing agent, is an important toxic gas that the swimmer can breath during swimming and a worker can exposed to chlorine while he or she was using water with chlorine at home. We describe a persistent increase in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness following chronic exposure to strong respiratory irritant with chlorinized water in two subjects with no past history of asthma or atopy. We conclude that airway hyperresponsiveness can develop or increase after chronic inhalation of high concentrations of irritants such as chlorinized water an indoor irritant factor and that these changes may be prolonged. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(1: 87-90

  12. Attacks of Asthma due to Chlorinized Water: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Eyup Berdan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma-like symptoms in swimmers has been reported. But, attacks of asthma which is related to chlorinized water is rare. Chlorine, a strong oxidizing agent, is an important toxic gas that the swimmer can breath during swimming and a worker can exposed to chlorine while he or she was using water with chlorine at home. We describe a persistent increase in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness following chronic exposure to strong respiratory irritant with chlorinized water in two subjects with no past history of asthma or atopy. We conclude that airway hyperresponsiveness can develop or increase after chronic inhalation of high concentrations of irritants such as chlorinized water an indoor irritant factor and that these changes may be prolonged. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000: 87-90

  13. Electric plasma discharge combustion synthesis of chlorine dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the production of chlorine dioxide comprises feeding an inert gas to a reaction zone and applying an electrical discharge to the inert gas to produce a high temperature plasma. Chlorine gas and oxygen gas are supplied simultaneously to the reaction zone and reacted in the plasma to produce a gaseous mixture comprised of chlorine dioxide, chlorine, oxygen and inert gas, the molar ratio of oxygen to chlorine in the reaction zone being at least about 2.5;1. The gaseous mixture is recovered from the reaction zone. Chlorine dioxide, which may be recovered as a gas or reacted to produce an alkali metal chlorite, is employed as a bleaching agent and a water treatment agent

  14. Chlorine Gas Inhalation: Human Clinical Evidence of Toxicity and Experience in Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    White, Carl W; James G Martin

    2010-01-01

    Humans can come into contact with chlorine gas during short-term, high-level exposures due to traffic or rail accidents, spills, or other disasters. By contrast, workplace and public (swimming pools, etc.) exposures are more frequently long-term, low-level exposures, occasionally punctuated by unintentional transient increases. Acute exposures can result in symptoms of acute airway obstruction including wheezing, cough, chest tightness, and/or dyspnea. These findings are fairly nonspecific, a...

  15. Treatment of algae-induced tastes and odors by chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate

    OpenAIRE

    Buffin, Lisa Webster

    1992-01-01

    Chlorine (C12(sq»' chlorine dioxide (Cl02 ) and potassium permanganate (KMn04) were evaluated as oxidants for the removal of grassy and cucumber odors associated with the pure compounds, cis-3-hexenol and trans-2, cis-6-nonadienal, respectively, and for the removal of fishy odors associated with a culture of an alga, Synura petersenii. The effects of the oxidants on the pure compounds were assessed both by Flavor Profile Analysis (FPA) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The ef...

  16. Some kinetics aspects of chlorine-solids reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kanari, N.; Mishra, D.; Mochón, J.; Verdeja, L. F.; Diot, F.; Allain, E.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes detailed kinetics investigations on some selected chlorine-solid reactions through thermogravimetric measurements. The solids studied in this article include chemical pure oxides and sulfides as well as their natural bearing materials. The chlorinating agents employed are gaseous mixtures of Cl2+N2 (chlorination), Cl2+O2 (oxychlorination), and Cl2+CO (...

  17. The removal of phenols from oily wastewater by chlorine dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Chung-Jung

    1988-01-01

    Treatability studies were performed on oily wastewaters produced by petroleum and canning industries. Chlorine dioxide was used for the removal of phenolic compounds from these oily wastewaters. Most of phenolic compounds can be destroyed by chlorine dioxide within 15 minutes if CI02-to-phenol ratios of higher than 5.0 are provided. Factors such as pH, temperature, and COD have little effect on phenol removal. The effectiveness of chlorine dioxide treatment depends critic...

  18. Palau’chlor: A Practical and Reactive Chlorinating Reagent

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Rodrigo A.; Pan, Chung-Mao; Yabe, Yuki; Kawamata, Yu; Eastgate, Martin D.; Baran, Phil S.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike its other halogen atom siblings, the utility of chlorinated arenes and (hetero)arenes are twofold: they are useful in tuning electronic structure as well as acting as points for diversification via cross-coupling. Herein we report the invention of a new guanidine-based chlorinating reagent, CBMG or “Palau’chlor”, inspired by a key chlorospirocyclization en route to pyrrole imidazole alkaloids. This direct, mild, operationally simple, and safe chlorinating method is compatible with a ra...

  19. Blends of caprolactam/caprolactone copolymers and chlorinated polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Alberda van Ekenstein, G.O.R.; Deuring, H.; ten Brinke, G.; Ellis, T. S.

    1997-01-01

    The phase behaviour of blends of chlorinated polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and chlorinated PVC with random copolymers of caprolactone and caprolactam has been investigated and the results correlated with a binary interaction model. The known miscibility of polycaprolactone in the chlorinated polymers is not compromised until a relatively high lactam content in the copolymer is attained. The incorporation of segmental interaction parameters, derived from separate studies involving pol...

  20. Energy additivity in branched and cyclic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, H.; Bader, R.F.W. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Cortes-Guzman, F. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, (Mexico). Dept. de Fisicoquimica

    2009-11-15

    This paper reported on a study of the energetic relationships between hydrocarbon molecules and the heats of formation. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) was used to investigate the degree to which branched hydrocarbons obey a group additivity scheme for energy and populations. The QTAIM defined the properties of the chemical groups. The experimental and theoretical transferability of the methyl and methylene groups of the linear hydrocarbons was also explored. The calculations were performed using a large basis set at the restricted Hartree-Fock and MP2(full) levels of theory. The study also investigated the deviations from additivity, noted for small ring hydrocarbons leading to the definition of strain energy. The QTAIM energies recovered the experimental values. The paper included details regarding the delocalization of the electron density over the surface of the cyclopropane ring, responsible for its homoaromatic properties. The calculations presented in this study satisfied the virial theorem for the atomic definition of energy. The paper discussed the problems associated with the use of the density functional theory (DFT) resulting from its failure to satisfy the virial theorem. 44 refs., 9 tabs., 2 figs.

  1. EVALUATION OF EPA METHOD 8120 FOR DETERMINATION OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method 8120 of EPA Manual SW-846 has been evaluated in a single-laboratory study. Modifications made to the current method invlude expansion of the list of target compounds from 15 to 22; replacement of the packed gas chromatographic columns with 2 megabore fused-silica open tubu...

  2. [Removal of Waste Gas Containing Mixed Chlorinated Hydrocarbons by the Biotrickling Filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong-zhi; Miao, Xiao-ping; Ouyang, Du-juan; Ye, Jie-xu; Chen, Jian-meng

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation on purification of waste gas contaminated with a mixture of dichloromethane (DCM) and dichloroethane(1,2-DCA) was conducted in a biotrickling filter (BTF) inoculated with activated sludge of pharmaceuticals industry. Stable removal efficiency(RE) above 80% for DCM and above 75% for 1,2-DCA were achieved after 35 days, indicating that biofilm was developed. The best elimination capacity (EC) of DCM and 1,2-DCA were 13 g.(m3.h)-1 and 10 g.(m3.h)-1 respectively. And there was a linear relationship between the production of CO2 and mixed gas EC, the maximum mineralization rate of mixed gas stabled at 61. 2%. The interaction test indicated that DCM and 1,2-DCA would inhibit with each other. The changing of biomass of BTF during the operation process was also been studied. PMID:26717675

  3. Microbial biomass and activities associated with subsurface environments contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil microcosms and enrichment cultures from subsurface sediments and ground waters contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) were examined. Total lipids, (1-C14)acetate incorporation into lipids, and (Me3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA were determined in these subsurface environments. In heavily TCE-contaminated zones radioisotopes were not incorporated into lipids or DNA. Radioisotope incorporation occurred in sediments both above and below the TCE plume. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were not detected, i.e., < 0.5 pmol/L in heavily contaminated groundwater samples. In less contaminated waters, extracted PLFA concentrations were greater than 100 pmol/L and microbial isolates were readily obtained. Degradation of 30-100 mg/L TCE was observed when sediments were amended with a variety of energy sources. Microorganisms in these subsurface sediments have adapted to degrade TCE at concentrations greater than 50 mg/L. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Application of BGPR tomography investigate the Soil and Groundwater Contaminated with Chlorinated Hydrocarbon:Case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. C.; Lin, C. P.; Dong, T. H.; Yang, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The success of an environmental contaminated project is often determined by the extent to which it is able to ascertain and control subsurface conditions. At present, site managers have limited tools to gain detailed information on the distribution of possible underground barriers or anomalous bodies. The technology employed in Taiwan to evaluate or confirm subsurface anomalies relies primarily on surface geophysical surveys, borehole drillings, or past records. Surface ground-penetrating radar GPR survey is among the most popular of these methods. Surface GPR technique can be used in many ways, but this method is not always the best suited to Taiwan's conditions. Surface GPR surveys are adversely affected by the conductivity of silty/clayey sediment and cultural noises. As a result, when surface GPR surveys are used, both detection and resolution of subsurface anomalies will decrease with depth. In order to overcome these obstacles, the use of borehole GPR BGPR with a few boreholes may provide a more direct and effective way to detect an underground target. Recent improvement in the quality of BGPR contributes to the suitability of this type of survey work when implemented on construction sites. This paper ues the BGPR geophysical technology has been developed to overcome above limitations. The information of multi-wells logging could be used to interpret the permeability of subsurface, the dominate flow path and the hot-spot for evaluating the distribution of pollution and the efficiency of remediation in different time sequences.

  5. Temperature Dependence of the Inhibition of Positronium by Chlorine- Substituted Hydrocarbons in Non-Polar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikander, G.; Mogensen, O.E.; Pedersen, Niels Jørgen

    1984-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectra were measured for solutions of 1,2,3,5-C6H2Cl4 in hexane, toluene, m-xylene and mesitylene, CCl4 in hexane and toluene, and C2HCl3 in n-hexane for concentrations below 1 M and at various temperatures between −30°C and 67°C. The Ps inhibition by C6H2Cl4 was...... roughly 14 times stronger at −30°C than at 67°C in toluene, m-xylene, and mesitylene, while that of CCl4 displayed hardly any temperature dependence in hexane and toluene. Previously, the Ps inhibition by C6H2Cl4 in various liquids at 20°C was explained by a competition between electron pick off by the...

  6. ANAEROBIC BIOTRANSFORRNATION OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS: UGLY DUCKLING TO BEAUTIFUL SWAN. (R825549C044)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. ANAEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS: UGLY DUCKLING TO BEAUTIFUL SWAN. (R825549C053)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Biodegradation of chlorinated and unsaturated hydrocarbons in relation to biological waste-gas treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmans, S.

    1993-01-01

    The original goal of the research described in this thesis was to develop a biological process for the removal of vinyl chloride from waste gases. The gaseous and carcinogenic vinyl chloride is used to produce the plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC). During this production process waste gases containin

  9. Quantification of temperature impacts on the dissolution of chlorinated hydrocarbons into groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koproch, Nicolas; Popp, Steffi; Köber, Ralf; Beyer, Christof; Bauer, Sebastian; Dahmke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Shallow thermal energy storage has great potential for heat storage especially in urban and industrial areas. However, frequently existing organic groundwater contaminations in such areas were currently seen as exclusion criteria for thermal use of the shallow subsurface, since increased contaminant discharge is feared as consequence of heating. Contaminant discharge is influenced by a complex interaction of processes and boundary conditions as e.g. solubility, dispersion, viscosity and degradation, where there is still a lack of experimental evidence of the temperature dependent interaction. Even existing studies on basic influencing factors as e.g. temperature dependent solubilities show contradictory results. Such knowledge gaps should be reduced to improve the basis and liability of numerical model simulations and the knowledge base to enable a more differentiated and optimized use of resources. For this purpose batch as well as 1- and 2-dimensional experimental studies concerning the temperature dependent release of TCE (trichloroethylene) from a NAPL (non aqueous phase liquid) source are presented and discussed. In addition, this experimental studies are accompanied by a numerical model verification, where extensions of existing numerical model approaches on basis of this obtained experimental results are developed. Firstly, temperature dependent TCE solubility data were collected using batch experiments with significantly better temperature resolution compared to earlier studies, showing a distinct minimum at 35°C and increased solubility towards 5°C and 70°C. Secondly, heated 1-dimensional stainless steel columns homogenously filled with quartz sand were used to quantify source zone depletion and contaminant discharge at 10-70°C. Cumulative mass discharge curves indicated two blob categories with distinct differences in dissolution kinetics. Increasing the temperature showed here an increase of the amount of fast dissolving blobs indicating higher NAPL-water contact areas. Thirdly, heatable 2D-tanks (40 cm x 25 cm x 10 cm) homogenously filled with quartz sand and percolated by distilled H2O were used to investigate the dissolution behavior and plume development of TCE from a residual source zone (5 cm x 5 cm x 10 cm) at 10-70°C. Using NAPL source zone saturation of 5% (Case A) and 20% (Case B) two exemplary cases of a depleted and a fresh source zone were investigated. TCE outflow concentrations in case A increased continuously with increasing temperature, but were controlled by the temperature-dependent solubility in Case B. The experimental results showed that the TCE mass transfer rate has a minimum at about 40°C, if dissolution is non-rate limited and a continuous increase with increasing temperature for rate-limited systems. Implementation of temperature dependent NAPL dissolution and two different blob categories with different mass transfer rate coefficients in the OpenGeoSys code proved successful in reproducing the experimental results. Acknowledgments: The presented work is part of the ANGUS+ project (03EK3022) funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF).

  10. Degradation of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b Expressing Soluble Methane Monooxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhuis, Roelof; Vink, Ruud L.J.M.; Janssen, Dick B.; Witholt, Bernard

    1989-01-01

    Degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) by the methanotrophic bacterium Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was studied by using cells grown in continuous culture. TCE degradation was a strictly cometabolic process, requiring the presence of a cosubstrate, preferably formate, and oxygen. M. trichosporium

  11. Inverse analyses of transport of chlorinated hydrocarbons subject to sequential transformation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, F X; Simůnek, J

    2001-01-01

    Chemical and biological transformations can significantly affect contaminant transport in the subsurface. To better understand such transformation reactions, an equilibrium-nonequilibrium sorption transport model, HYDRUS-1D, was modified by including inverse solutions for multiple breakthrough curves resulting from the transport of solutes undergoing sequential transformations. The inverse solutions were applied to miscible-displacement experiments involving dissolved concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) undergoing reduction and/or transformations in the presence of zero-valent metal porous media (i.e., iron or copper-coated iron filings) to produce ethylene. The inverse model solutions provided a reasonable description of the transport and transformation processes. Simultaneous fitting of multiple breakthrough curves of TCE and ethylene placed additional constraints on the inverse solution and improved the reliability of parameter estimates. Confidence intervals of optimized parameters were reduced significantly in comparison with those obtained by fitting TCE breakthrough curves independently. Further evidence for accurate parameter estimates was given when the parameter values agreed with previously reported values from independent batch and degradation experiments. Optimized values of the normalized degradation rates for the equilibrium (1.4 x 10(-4) to 7.2 x 10(-5) L h(-1)m(-2)) and nonequilibrium (1.2 x 10(-4) to 5.5 x 10(-5)L h(-1)m(-2)) models compared well with values (0.03 to 6.5 x 10(-5) L h(-1) m(-2)) obtained from previous studies. The estimated TCE-iron sorption coefficients (0.52 to 2.85 L kg(-1)) were also consistent with a previously reported value (1.47 L kg(-1)). PMID:11476514

  12. Thermal decomposition of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons during gas combustion in fluidized bed

    OpenAIRE

    Olek Malgorzata; Baron Jerzy; Zukowski Witold

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The process of thermal decomposition of dichloromethane (DCM) and chlorobenzene (MCB) during the combustion in an inert, bubbling fluidized bed, supported by LPG as auxiliary fuel, have been studied. The concentration profiles of C6H5CI, CH2Cl2, CO2, CO, NOx, COCl2, CHCl3, CH3Cl, C2H2, C6H6, CH4 in the flue gases were specified versus mean bed temperature. Results The role of preheating of gaseous mixture in fluidized bed prior to its ignition inside bubbles was identified...

  13. Session 6: Catalytic Dechlorination Reaction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons with Water Using nano-structured Alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Khaleel [United Arab Emirates Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Al-Ain (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Herein, we report our recent results from a study on the catalytic dechlorination reactions of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) and carbon tetrachloride (CTC) with water using HSA-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the catalyst. The obtained experimental results are explained. (O.M.)

  14. Influence of Plants on Chlorine Cycling in Terrestrial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelius, Malin; Thiry, Yves; Marang, Laura; Ranger, Jacques; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Svensson, Teresia; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Chlorine (Cl), one of the 20 most abundant elements on Earth, is crucial for life as a regulator of cellular ionic strength and an essential co-factor in photosynthesis. Chlorinated organic compounds (Clorg) molecules are surprisingly abundant in soils, in fact many studies during the last decades show that Clorg typically account for more than 60% of the total soil Cl pool in boreal and temperate forest soils and frequently exceed chloride (Cl-) levels. The natural and primarily biotic formation of this Clorg pool has been confirmed experimentally but the detailed content of the Clorg pool and the reasons for its high abundance remains puzzling and there is a lack of Cl budgets for different ecosystems. Recently, the radioisotope 36Cl has caused concerns because of presence in radioactive waste, a long half-life (301 000 years), potential high mobility, and limited knowledge about Cl residence times, speciation and uptake by organisms in terrestrial environments. The chlorination of organic molecules may influence the pool of available Cl- to organisms and thereby the Cl cycling dynamics. This will prolong residence times of total Cl in the soil-vegetation system, which affects exposure times in radioactive 36Cl isotope risk assessments. We tested to what extent the dominating tree species influences the overall terrestrial Cl cycling and the balance between Cl- and Clorg. Total Cl and Clorg were measured in different tree compartments and soil horizons in the Breuil experimental forest, Bourgogne, established in 1976 and located at Breuil-Chenue in Eastern France. The results from this field experiment show how the dominating tree species affected Cl cycling and accumulation over a time period of 30 years. Cl uptake by trees as well as content of both total Cl and Clorg in soil humus was much higher in experimental plots with coniferous forests compared to deciduous forests. The amounts of Clorg found in plant tissue indicate significant Clorg production inside

  15. Mechanisms of inactivation of poliovirus by chlorine dioxide and iodine.

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, M E; O'Brien, R T

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide and iodine inactivated poliovirus more efficiently at pH 10.0 than at pH 6.0. Sedimentation analyses of viruses inactivated by chlorine dioxide and iodine at pH 10.9 showed that viral RNA separated from the capsids, resulting in the conversion of virions from 156S structures to 80S particles. The RNAs release from both chlorine dioxide- and iodine-inactivated viruses cosedimented with intact 35S viral RNA. Both chlorine dioxide and iodine reacted with the capsid proteins of p...

  16. Water splitting processes of the iron-chlorine family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-step processes for thermal water splitting comprise individual chemical reactions which, as far as the iron-chlorine family is concerned, may be generalized: hydrolysis, chlorination, dechlorination, reduction, regeneration of chlorinating agent. These categories comprise series of chemical equations which can be combined to water splitting cycles in different configurations. A systematic estimation of the chemical equations of the five categories is given instead of treating several hundred water-splitting processes of the iron-chlorine family. The individual chemical equations are estimated from published data, by laboratory experiments, and by operating conditions of technical processes. (author)

  17. Organohalogen products from chlorination of cooling water at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight nuclear power units at seven locations in the US were studied to determine the effects of chlorine, added as a biocide, on the composition of cooling water discharge. Water, sediment and biota samples from the sites were analyzed for total organic halogen and for a variety of organohalogen compounds. Haloforms were discharged from all plants studied, at concentrations of a few μg/L (parts-per-billion). Evidence was obtained that power plants with cooling towers discharge a significant portion of the haloforms formed during chlorination to the atmosphere. A complex mixture of halogenated phenols was found in the cooling water discharges of the power units. Cooling towers can act to concentrate halogenated phenols to levels approaching those of the haloforms. Examination of samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry did not result in identification of any significant concentrations of lipophilic base-neutral compounds that could be shown to be formed by the chlorination process. Total concentrations of lipophilic (Bioabsorbable) and volatile organohalogen material discharged ranged from about 2 to 4 μg/L. Analysis of sediment samples for organohalogen material suggests that certain chlorination products may accumulate in sediments, although no tissue bioaccumulation could be demonstrated from analysis of a limited number of samples. 58 references, 25 figures, 31 tables

  18. Solid recovered fuel: influence of waste stream composition and processing on chlorine content and fuel quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velis, Costas; Wagland, Stuart; Longhurst, Phil; Robson, Bryce; Sinfield, Keith; Wise, Stephen; Pollard, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Solid recovered fuel (SRF) produced by mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) of municipal waste can replace fossil fuels, being a CO(2)-neutral, affordable, and alternative energy source. SRF application is limited by low confidence in quality. We present results for key SRF properties centered on the issue of chlorine content. A detailed investigation involved sampling, statistical analysis, reconstruction of composition, and modeling of SRF properties. The total chlorine median for a typical plant during summer operation was 0.69% w/w(d), with lower/upper 95% confidence intervals of 0.60% w/w(d) and 0.74% w/w(d) (class 3 of CEN Cl indicator). The average total chlorine can be simulated, using a reconciled SRF composition before shredding to plants; and a lower 95% confidence limit of net calorific value (NCV) at 14.5 MJ kg(ar)(-1). The data provide, for the first time, a high level of confidence on the effects of SRF composition on its chlorine content, illustrating interrelationships with other fuel properties. The findings presented here allow rational debate on achievable vs desirable MBT-derived SRF quality, informing the development of realistic SRF quality specifications, through modeling exercises, needed for effective thermal recovery. PMID:22191490

  19. Organohalogen products from chlorination of cooling water at nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, R.M.

    1983-10-01

    Eight nuclear power units at seven locations in the US were studied to determine the effects of chlorine, added as a biocide, on the composition of cooling water discharge. Water, sediment and biota samples from the sites were analyzed for total organic halogen and for a variety of organohalogen compounds. Haloforms were discharged from all plants studied, at concentrations of a few ..mu..g/L (parts-per-billion). Evidence was obtained that power plants with cooling towers discharge a significant portion of the haloforms formed during chlorination to the atmosphere. A complex mixture of halogenated phenols was found in the cooling water discharges of the power units. Cooling towers can act to concentrate halogenated phenols to levels approaching those of the haloforms. Examination of samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry did not result in identification of any significant concentrations of lipophilic base-neutral compounds that could be shown to be formed by the chlorination process. Total concentrations of lipophilic (Bioabsorbable) and volatile organohalogen material discharged ranged from about 2 to 4 ..mu..g/L. Analysis of sediment samples for organohalogen material suggests that certain chlorination products may accumulate in sediments, although no tissue bioaccumulation could be demonstrated from analysis of a limited number of samples. 58 references, 25 figures, 31 tables.

  20. Effect of nitrite on the formation of halonitromethanes during chlorination of organic matter from different origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huachang; Qian, Lingya; Xiao, Zhuoqun; Zhang, Jianqing; Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun; Yu, Haiying; Shen, Liguo; Liang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Occurrence of halonitromethanes (HNMs) in drinking water has been a public concern due to the potential risks to human health. Though quite a lot of work has been carried out to understand the formation of HNMs, the relationship between HNMs formation and the nitrite remains unclear. In this study, the effects of nitrite on the formation of HNMs during chlorination of organic matter from different origin were assessed. Organic matter (OM) derived from phoenix tree (fallen leaves: FLOM; green leaves: GLOM) and Microcystis aeruginosa (intracellular organic matter: IOM) were used to mimic the allochthonous and autochthonous organic matter in surface water, respectively. Results showed that HNMs yields were significantly enhanced with the addition of nitrite, and the highest enhancement was observed for FLOM, successively followed by GLOM and IOM, suggesting that the contribution of nitrite to HNMs formation was positively related with SUVA (an indicator for aromaticity) of OM. Therefore, the nitrite contamination should be strictly controlled for the source water dominated by allochthonous OM, which may significantly reduce the formation of HNMs during chlorination. Moreover, given a certain nitrite level, the higher pH resulted in higher stimulation of HNM formation, yet the chlorine dose (always added in excess resulting in residual reactive chlorine), reaction time and temperature did not show obvious influence.

  1. Chlorine leak on Mumbai port trust′s Sewri yard: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical emergencies involving hazardous chemicals are not uncommon in India. More than 25 incidents have been identified in National Disaster Management Guidelines - Chemical (Industrial Disaster Management, released in May 2007. In a recent occurrence on the morning of 14 July 2010, nearly at 3:00 a.m., chlorine leak was reported from a gas cylinder referred as turner, weighing about 650 kg, corroding with time at the Haji Bunder hazardous cargo warehouse in Mumbai Port Trust, Sewri, affecting over 120 people in the neighborhood, including students, laborers, port workers and fire fighters, of whom 70 were reported critical. It has been observed to be a blatant case of ignorance and negligence as well as contraventions to the safety and environmental safeguard requirements under existing statues as well as non-maintenance of failsafe conditions at the site requisite for chlorine storage. The analysis revealed significant gaps in the availability of neutralization mechanism and the chlorine stored in open increased the possibility of formation of ingress mixture due to busting of chlorine filled tankers. The Government of India has institutionalized emergency preparedness framework at national, state and district level as envisaged in Disaster Management Act, 2005, to prepare the nation to mitigate such incidences, if all the preventive safety provisions fail. Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF is preparing National Action Plan-Chemical (Industrial Disaster Management based on National Guidelines to implement all the mechanisms of capacity development across the country.

  2. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J.; De Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutageni...

  3. Thermal degradation of sucralose: a combination of analytical methods to determine stability and chlorinated byproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Diogo N.; de Menezes, Maico; Catharino, Rodrigo R.

    2015-04-01

    In the late years, much attention has been brought to the scientific community regarding the safety of sucralose and its industrial applications. Although it is the most used artificial sweetener in foods and pharmaceuticals, many questions still arise on its potential to form chlorinated byproducts in high temperatures, as demonstrated by several recent studies. In the present contribution, we use a combination of differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with infrared spectroscopy (DSC/TGA/IR), Hot-stage microscopy (HSM) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) on samples submitted to water bath at mild temperatures to evaluate a broad spectrum of hazardous compounds formed in the degradation of this product. TGA/IR has revealed that there is effective decomposition in form of CO2 along with the formation of hydrogen chloride and other minor compounds. HSM results have provided accurate information, where the melting of the crystals was observed, followed by decomposition. Chlorinated derivatives, including polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons (PCAHs) were also confirmed by HRMS. These findings not only corroborate the suspected instability of sucralose to high temperatures, but also indicate that even exposed to mild conditions the formation of hazardous polychlorinated compounds is observed.

  4. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  5. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  6. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  7. Transformation of avobenzone in conditions of aquatic chlorination and UV-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebše, Polonca; Polyakova, Olga V; Baranova, Maria; Kralj, Mojca Bavcon; Dolenc, Darko; Sarakha, Mohamed; Kutin, Alexander; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-09-15

    Emerging contaminants represent a wide group of the most different compounds. They appear in the environment at trace levels due to human activity. Most of these compounds are not yet regulated. Sunscreen UV-filters play an important role among these emerging contaminants. In the present research the reactions of 4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzoylmethane (avobenzone), the most common UV filter in the formulation of sunscreens, were studied under the combined influence of active chlorine and UV-irradiation. Twenty five compounds were identified by GC/MS as transformation products of avobenzone in reactions of aquatic UV-irradiation and chlorination with sodium hypochlorite. A complete scheme of transformation of avobenzone covering all the semivolatile products is proposed. The identification of the two primary chlorination products (2-chloro-1-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanedione and 2,2-dichloro-1-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanedione) was confirmed by their synthesis and GC/MS and NMR analysis. Although the toxicities of the majority of these products remain unknown substituted chlorinated phenols and acetophenones are known to be rather toxic. Combined action of active chlorine and UV-irradiation results in the formation of some products (chloroanhydrides, chlorophenols) not forming in conditions of separate application of these disinfection methods. Therefore caring for people «well-being» it is of great importance to apply the most appropriate disinfection method. Since the primary transformation products partially resist powerful UV-C irradiation they may be treated as stable and persistent pollutants. PMID:27258620

  8. Polar Stratospheric Cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modelled by ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nakajima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs by CALIPSO and of HCl, ClO and HNO3 by MLS along air mass trajectories to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels, and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/10 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT and super-cooled ternary solution (STS mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed, and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an airmass encountered PSCs. The observed and modelled dependence of the rate of chlorine activation on the PSC composition class was small. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  9. Diterpenoid tetracyclic hydrocarbons of petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorob' eva, N.S.; Zemskova, Z.K.; Pekh, T.I.; Petrov, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    Diterpenoid hydrocarbons are fairly widespread in various caustobioliths. However, if petroleums contain mainly acyclic diterpenoids (phytane, pristane and norpristane), cyclic diterpaenes such as fichtelite, pimarane, iosene (kaurane) and hibbane are often found in hydrocarbons isolated from coal and shale. Recent advances in the chemistry of diterpenoids isolated from caustobioliths, are described in a separate paper. Much less is known about petroleum polycyclic diterpenoid hydrocarbons, particularly those with four saturated rings. A series of tetracyclic hydrocarbons C/sub 19/H/sub 32/ (molar mass 260), found in a number of light petroleums and gas condensates from the Jura deposits of Central Kara-Kum (Turkmen S.S.R.), are examined here. These hydrocarbons are present in petroleums and condensates from the Davaly, Erden, Ortakak, Southern Beuideshik deposits, they are always identical and occur in the same ratios. The composition of the tretracyclanes isolated from the Ortakak gas condensates (well 17) will be examined in detail.

  10. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  11. Some kinetics aspects of chlorine-solids reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanari, N.; Mishra, D.; Mochon, J.; Verdeja, L. F.; Diot, F.; Allain, E.

    2010-07-01

    The present paper describes detailed kinetics investigations on some selected chlorine-solid reactions through thermogravimetric measurements. The solids studied in this article include chemical pure oxides and sulfides as well as their natural bearing materials. The chlorinating agents employed are gaseous mixtures of Cl{sub 2}+N{sub 2} (chlorination), Cl{sub 2}+O{sub 2} (oxy chlorination), and Cl{sub 2}+CO (carbochlorination). Results are presented as effects of various parameters on the reaction rate of these solids with these chlorinating agents. It was observed that the reactivity of these solids towards different chlorinating agents varied widely. Sulfides could be chlorinated at room temperature, while carbochlorination of chromium (III) oxide was possible only above 500 degree centigrade. The variation of the chlorination rate of these complex materials with respect to gas velocity, composition and temperature enabled us to focus some light on the plausible reaction mechanisms and stoichiometries. The obtained results were used for selective removal of iron from chromite concentrates, extraction of valuable metals from sulfide materials, purification of MgO samples, etc.. (Author) 12 refs.

  12. Chlorine-heavy metals interaction on toxicity and metal accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objectives of this study with rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were: to determine whether acute toxic interaction of chlorine, nickel, and temperature is additive, synergistic, antagonistic, or if no interaction occurs; to provide a biological explanation of the mechanisms of the toxic interactions; and to develop a mortality model of the toxic interaction. Twenty chlorine-nickel toxicity tests and a bioaccumulation study, both with and without chlorine, were conducted to accomplish these objectives. Studies using 63Ni were conducted to monitor the effects of chlorine on nickel accumulation in the tissues of trout under conditions similar to those of multiple toxicant studies. The presence of 0.018 ppM TRC (total residual chlorine) increased nickel accumulation in tissues from fish exposed to chlorine and 63Ni. This may be due to an increase in the permeability of the gill to nickel during chlorine exposure. Chlorine and nickel had a synergistic toxic interaction. Mortality in these groups was significantly higher. Temperature did not influence toxicity as strongly

  13. Chlorine Dioxide Induced Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: MMPI Validity Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This paper discusses Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data obtained from individuals exposed to chlorine dioxide in the workplace who developed Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The paper explores current research on chlorine dioxide exposed persons who were misdiagnosed on the basis of MMPI interpretations. Difficulties…

  14. UASB reactor effluent disinfection by ozone and chlorine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro da Silvia, G.H.; Bruning, H.; Gerrity, D.; Daniel, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    This research studied the sequential ozone and chlorine process with respect to, the inactivation of indicator bacteria and the formation of ozone disinfection byproducts in sanitary wastewater effluent. The applied ozone doses were 5, 8 and 10 mg.O3.L-1, followed by chlorine doses of 10, 20 and 30

  15. Chlorine-containing natural compounds in higher plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    More than 130 chlorine-containing compounds have been isolated from higher plants and ferns; about half are polyacetylenes, thiophenes and sesquiterpene lactones from the Asteraceae. A chlorinated chlorophyll may be an important part of photosystem 1. High biological activity is found in 4...

  16. 78 FR 66767 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of September 10, 2013 (78 FR 55293). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Japan of chlorinated isocyanurates, provided for...

  17. Recent evolution of stratospheric inorganic chlorine (Cly) inferred from long-term ground-based FTIR observations of HCl and ClONO2

    OpenAIRE

    Mahieu, Emmanuel; Duchatelet, Pierre; Zander, Rodolphe; Wood, S W; Smale, D.; R. Ruhnke; Wiehle, M.; Rinsland, C. P.; Demoulin, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decades, the increase of the stratospheric inorganic chlorine (Cly) loading has been the major cause for the ozone layer depletion, a matter of particular concern because of its anthropogenic nature. Fortunately, appropriate decisions have been defined and put into force at the international level, leading to regulations adopted within the frame of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments and Adjustments, and aiming at the suppression of all chlorine-bearing source gas emissions...

  18. Compositional and stable carbon isotopic fractionation during non-autocatalytic thermochemical sulfate reduction by gaseous hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinyu; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Tang, Yongchun

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of autocatalysis during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by gaseous hydrocarbons was investigated by examination of previously reported laboratory and field data. This reaction was found to be a kinetically controlled non-autocatalytic process, and the apparent lack of autocatalysis is thought to be due to the absence of the required intermediate species. Kinetic parameters for chemical and carbon isotopic fractionations of gaseous hydrocarbons affected by TSR were calculated and found to be consistent with experimentally derived values for TSR involving long-chain hydrocarbons. Model predictions based on these kinetic values indicate that TSR by gaseous hydrocarbon requires high-temperature conditions. The oxidation of C2–5 hydrocarbons by sulfate reduction is accompanied by carbon isotopic fractionation with the residual C2–5 hydrocarbons becoming more enriched in 13C. Kinetic parameters were calculated for the stable carbon isotopic fractionation of gaseous hydrocarbons that have experienced TSR. Model predictions based on these kinetics indicate that it may be difficult to distinguish the effects of TSR from those of thermal maturation at lower levels of hydrocarbon oxidation; however, unusually heavy δ13C2+ values (>−10‰) can be diagnostic of high levels of conversion (>50%). Stoichiometric and stable carbon isotopic data show that methane is stable under the investigated reaction conditions and is likely a product of TSR by other gaseous hydrocarbons rather than a significant reactant. These results indicate that the overall TSR reaction mechanism for oxidation of organic substrates containing long-chain hydrocarbons involves three distinct phases as follows: (1) an initial slow and non-autocatalytic stage characterized by the reduction of reactive sulfate by long-chain saturated hydrocarbons; (2) a second autocatalytic reaction phase dominated by reactions involving reduced sulfur species and partially oxidized hydrocarbons; (3

  19. Biodegradability of Chlorinated Anilines in Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO WANG; GUAN-GHUA LU; YAN-JIE ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To identify the bacteria tolerating chlorinated anilines and to study the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline and its coexistent compounds. Methods Microbial community of complex bacteria was identified by plate culture observation techniques and Gram stain method. Bacterial growth inhibition test was used to determine the tolerance of complex bacteria to toxicant. Biodegradability of chlorinated anilines was determined using domesticated complex bacteria as an inoculum by shaking-flask test. Results The complex bacteria were identified, consisting of Xanthomonas, Bacillus alcaligenes,Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Actinomycetaceae nocardia. The obtained complex bacteria were more tolerant to o-chloroaniline than mixture bacteria in natural river waters. The effects of exposure concentration and inoculum size on the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline were analyzed, and the biodegradation characteristics of single o-chloroaniline and 2,4-dichloroaniline were compared with the coexistent compounds. Conclusion The biodegradation rates can be improved by decreasing concentration of compounds and increasing inoculum size of complex bacteria. When o-chloroaniline coexists with aniline, the latter is biodegraded prior to the former, and as a consequence the metabolic efficiency of o-chloroaniline is improved with the increase of aniline concentration. Meanwhile, when o-chloroaniline coexists with 2,4-dichloroaniline, the metabolic efficiency of 2,4-dichloroaniline is markedly improved.

  20. New infrared spectroscopic database for chlorine nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of chlorine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 500-1330 cm-1 at 0.002-0.008 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 23 spectra covering the temperature range from 190 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 150 hPa. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 190 and 296 K. The sample was synthesized from N2O5 and Cl2O. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample. Quality assurance included measurements with different sample pressures, spectroscopic purity check of the sample, comparison of integrated absorption cross sections over entire band systems, and assessment of residuals from remote-sensing retrievals. Multiplicative and additive errors were considered giving an overall uncertainty of +2.5/-3.5%. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The worst-case error for the interpolated data is +4.5/-5.5%. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric chlorine nitrate error budget substantially

  1. Chlorine-36 and the initial value problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Stanley N.; Cecil, DeWayne; Zreda, Marek; Sharma, Pankaj

    Chlorine-36 is a radionuclide with a half-life of 3.01×105a. Most 36Cl in the hydrosphere originates from cosmic radiation interacting with atmospheric gases. Large amounts were also produced by testing thermonuclear devices during 1952-58. Because the monovalent anion, chloride, is the most common form of chlorine found in the hydrosphere and because it is extremely mobile in aqueous systems, analyses of both total Cl- as well as 36Cl have been important in numerous hydrologic studies. In almost all applications of 36Cl, a knowledge of the initial, or pre-anthropogenic, levels of 36Cl is useful, as well as essential in some cases. Standard approaches to the determination of initial values have been to: (a) calculate the theoretical cosmogenic production and fallout, which varies according to latitude; (b) measure 36Cl in present-day precipitation and assume that anthropogenic components can be neglected; (c) assume that shallow groundwater retains a record of the initial concentration; (d) extract 36Cl from vertical depth profiles in desert soils; (e) recover 36Cl from cores of glacial ice; and (f) calculate subsurface production of 36Cl for water that has been isolated from the atmosphere for more than one million years. The initial value from soil profiles and ice cores is taken as the value that occurs directly below the depth of the easily defined bomb peak. All six methods have serious weaknesses. Complicating factors include 36Cl concentrations not related to cosmogenic sources, changes in cosmogenic production with time, mixed sources of chloride in groundwater, melting and refreezing of water in glaciers, and seasonal groundwater recharge that does not contain average year-long concentrations of 36Cl. Résumé Le chlore-36 est un radionucléide de période 3.01×105a. Pour l'essentiel, le 36Cl dans l'hydrosphère provient des effets du rayonnement cosmique sur les gaz atmosphériques. De grandes quantités de 36Cl ont aussi été produites au cours des

  2. Release of chlorine from biomass at gasification conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the project was to investigate the influence of different gasifying atmospheres on the release of chlorine from biomass during gasification conditions. Furthermore, the purpose was also to try and identify the formed chloro compounds. The results showed that O2, H2O and CO2 had negligible effect on the chlorine release at temperatures under 700 deg C. At temperatures above 800 deg C the reactivity towards CO2 increased and could be seen as higher chlorine release and less solid residue. No chloro organic compounds (aliphatic one to six carbons or aromatic one to two rings) could be detected in the tar or the fuel gas produced during pyrolysis/gasifying. On the other hand, comparable amounts of chlorinated benzenes were found in the cooling section during combustion of lucerne and of synthetic waste, indicating that oxygen is essential for chlorination reactions. 11 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  3. Chlorine dioxide: An ideal preprocedural mouthrinse in dental set-up

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiv Saini

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aerosols generated during ultrasonic scaling is a potential risk factor for cross-contamination in dental settings. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the efficacy of commercially available chlorine dioxide as preprocedural mouthrinses in reducing the level of viable bacteria in aerosols. Materials and Methods : This single-center clinical double-blinded study was conducted over a period of 4 months. A total of 80 patients were divided randomly into two groups (A and...

  4. Pollution-enhanced reactive chlorine chemistry in the eastern tropical Atlantic boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Lawler, M J; B. D. Finley; Keene, W. C.; A. A. P. Pszenny; Read, K. A.; Von Glasow, R.; E. S. Saltzman

    2009-01-01

    This study examines atmospheric reactive chlorine chemistry at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory in the eastern tropical Atlantic. During May–June, 2007, Cl2 levels ranged from below detection (∼2 ppt) to 30 ppt. Elevated Cl2 was associated with high HNO3 (40 to 120 ppt) in polluted continental outflow transported in the marine boundary layer (MBL) to the site. Lower Cl2 was observed in recently subsided air masses with multiday free tropospheric oceanic trajectories and in air containin...

  5. Feasibility and efficacy of in-home water chlorination in rural North-eastern Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchhoff, L. V.; McClelland, K. E.; Do Carmo Pinho, M.; Araujo, J G; De Sousa, M. A.; Guerrant, R L

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability and effect of an in-home water chlorination programme in a rural village. Previous studies at this site showed high levels of faecal coliforms in household water, high diarrhoea rates in children, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and rotaviruses were the most common pathogens isolated from patients. Household water came from a pond and was stored in clay pots. No homes had sanitary facilities. A blind, cross-over trial...

  6. Natural attenuation of diesel aliphatic hydrocarbons in contaminated agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diesel fuel spill at a concentration of 1 L m-2 soil was simulated on a 12 m2 plot of agricultural land, and natural attenuation of aliphatic hydrocarbons was monitored over a period of 400 days following the spill after which the aliphatic hydrocarbon concentrations were found to be below the legal contamination threshold for soil. The main fraction of these compounds (95%) remained at the surface layer (0-10 cm). Shortly after the spill (viz. between days 0 and 18), evaporation was the main origin of the dramatic decrease in pollutant concentrations in the soil. Thereafter, soil microorganisms used aliphatic hydrocarbons as sources of carbon and energy, as confirmed by the degradation ratios found. Soil quality indicators, soil microbial biomass and dehydrogenase activity, regained their original levels about 200 days after the spill. - The effect of aliphatic hydrocarbons contamination on soil quality was monitored over a period of 400 days after a Diesel fuel spill

  7. Chlorine detection in cement with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the infrared and ultraviolet spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant parameter to monitor the status of concrete buildings like bridges or parking garages is the determination of the depth profile of the chlorine concentration below the exposed concrete surface. This information is required to define the needed volume of restoration for a construction. Conventional methods like wet chemical analysis are time- and cost-intensive so an alternative method is developed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The idea is to deploy LIBS to analyze drill cores by scanning the sample surface with laser pulses. Chlorine spectral lines in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)-range were studied for chlorine detection in hydrated cement samples. The excitation energies of these spectral lines are above 9.2 eV. Hence high plasma temperatures and pulse energies in the range of some hundred millijoules are needed to induce sufficient line intensity levels at the required working distance. To further increase the line intensity and to lower the detection limit (LOD) of chlorine a measuring chamber is used where different ambient pressures and gases can be chosen for the measurements. The influences on the line intensity for pressures between 5 mbar and 400 mbar using helium as process gas and the influence of different laser burst modi like single and collinear double pulses are investigated. For the first time a LOD according to DIN 32 645 of 0.1 mass% was achieved for chlorine in hydrated cement using the UV line 134.72 nm.

  8. Effects of chlorine or chlorine dioxide during immersion chilling on recovery of bacteria from broiler carcasses and chiller water

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to determine the microbiological impact of immersion chilling broiler carcasses with chlorine or chlorine dioxide. Eviscerated, pre-chill commercial broiler carcasses were cut into left and right halves along the keel bone, and each half was rinsed (HCR) in 100 mL of 0.1% pept...

  9. Synergetic Inactivation of Microorganisms in Drinking Water by Short-term Free Chlorination and Subsequent Monochloramination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To introduce synergetic inactivation of microorganisms in drinking water by short-term free chlorination for less than 15 minutes followed by monochloramination. Methods Indicator microorganisms such as Escherichia coli,Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and spores of Bacillus subtilis were used to assess the efficiency of sequential chlorination and free chlorination. Results The sequential chlorination was more efficient in inactivating these microorganisms than free chlorination, indicating that synergy was provided by free chlorine and monochloramine. Ammonia addition time, temperature and pH had influences on this synergy. Conclusion The possible mechanism of this synergy might involve three aspects: free chlorine causing sublethal injury to microorganisms and monochloramine further inactivating them; different ability of free chlorine and monochloramine to penetrate and inactivate microorganism congeries; and higher concentration of residual chlorine in sequential chlorination than in free chlorination.

  10. Characterization and Monitoring of Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Ground Water: A Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutshall, N. H.; Gilmore, T.; Looney, B. B.; Vangelas, K. M.; Adams, K. M.; Sink, C. H.

    2006-05-01

    Like many US industries and businesses, the Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for remediation and restoration of soils and ground water contaminated with chlorinated ethenes. Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is an attractive remediation approach and is probably the universal end-stage technology for removing such contamination. Since 2003 we have carried out a multifaceted program at the Savannah River Site designed to advance the state of the art for MNA of chlorinated ethenes in soils and groundwater. Three lines of effort were originally planned: 1) Improving the fundamental science for MNA, 2) Promoting better characterization and monitoring (CM) techniques, and 3) Advancing the regulatory aspects of MNA management. A fourth line, developing enhanced attenuation methods based on sustainable natural processes, was added in order to deal with sites where the initial natural attenuation capacity cannot offset contaminant loading rates. These four lines have been pursued in an integrated and mutually supportive fashion. Many DOE site-cleanup program managers view CM as major expenses, especially for natural attenuation where measuring attenuation is complex and the most critical attenuation mechanisms cannot be determined directly. We have reviewed new and developing approaches to CM for potential application in support of natural attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in ground water at DOE sites (Gilmore, Tyler, et al., 2006 WSRC-TR- 2005-00199). Although our project is focused on chlorinated ethenes, many of the concepts and strategies are also applicable to a wider range of contaminants including radionuclides and metals. The greatest savings in CM are likely to come from new management approaches. New approaches can be based, for example, on conceptual models of attenuation capacity, the ability of a formation to reduce risks caused by contaminants. Using the mass balance concept as a guide, the integrated mass flux of contaminant is compared to

  11. Hydrocarbon emissions speciation in diesel and biodiesel exhausts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payri, Francisco; Bermúdez, Vicente R.; Tormos, Bernardo; Linares, Waldemar G.

    Diesel engine emissions are composed of a long list of organic compounds, ranging from C 2 to C 12+, and coming from the hydrocarbons partially oxidized in combustion or produced by pyrolisis. Many of these are considered as ozone precursors in the atmosphere, since they can interact with nitrogen oxides to produce ozone under atmospheric conditions in the presence of sunlight. In addition to problematic ozone production, Brookes, P., and Duncan, M. [1971. Carcinogenic hydrocarbons and human cells in culture. Nature.] and Heywood, J. [1988. Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals.Mc Graw-Hill, ISBN 0-07-1000499-8.] determined that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in exhaust gases are dangerous to human health, being highly carcinogenic. The aim of this study was to identify by means of gas chromatography the amount of each hydrocarbon species present in the exhaust gases of diesel engines operating with different biodiesel blends. The levels of reactive and non-reactive hydrocarbons present in diesel engine exhaust gases powered by different biodiesel fuel blends were also analyzed. Detailed speciation revealed a drastic change in the nature and quantity of semi-volatile compounds when biodiesel fuels are employed, the most affected being the aromatic compounds. Both aromatic and oxygenated aromatic compounds were found in biodiesel exhaust. Finally, the conservation of species for off-side analysis and the possible influence of engine operating conditions on the chemical characterization of the semi-volatile compound phase are discussed. The use of oxygenated fuel blends shows a reduction in the Engine-Out emissions of total hydrocarbons. But the potential of the hydrocarbon emissions is more dependent on the compositions of these hydrocarbons in the Engine-Out, to the quantity; a large percent of hydrocarbons existing in the exhaust, when biodiesel blends are used, are partially burned hydrocarbons, and are interesting as they have the maximum

  12. Quantification of chlorine in zirconium oxide and biological samples by instrumental NAA utilizing PCF of Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently studies on chlorine contents in various samples are being pursued due to its corrosive nature. Chlorine present at trace level in various finished products as well as powder is used as a raw material for production of different types of zircaloys used as structural materials in nuclear technology. As a part of quality assurance program, it is necessary to quantify chlorine accurately with suitable and simple technique. In the present work we have applied instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) utilizing its short-lived activation product (38Cl, 37 min, 1642 and 2168 keV) for its estimation. Pneumatic Carrier Facility (PCF) of Dhruva reactor, BARC was used sample irradiation of zirconium oxide dry powder, synthetic wax and IAEA RMs 1515 (Apple leaves) and Lichen 336. (author)

  13. Recent developments in hydrocarbon separator interface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjertaker, Bjorn T.; Johansen, Geir A.; Jackson, Peter

    2001-02-01

    Level monitoring instrumentation is an essential part of hydrocarbon processing facilities, and has together with separator technology been widely addressed over the last decade. Key issues are production capacity, product enhancement and well-flow control. The reliability and accuracy of the level instrumentation, and its ability to monitor the thickness of the foam and the oil-water emulsion, are particularly important when considering the level instrumentation as the main sensing element in the automatic control of the separation vessel. Lately industry focus has been placed on optimal automatic control to improve the quality of the production output, and to minimize the use of expensive and environmentally undesirable separation enhancing chemicals. Recent developments in hydrocarbon production includes subsea separation stations, where the constraints placed on the reliability and accuracy of the level instrumentation are especially severe. This paper discuss the most common existing level monitoring technologies, and present some recent level monitoring developments for three-phase separators. In order to clarify the issue of cross sectional metering the notion tomometry is introduced in this paper. Tomometry denotes multipoint cross sectional metering aiming to acquire cross sectional information on the distribution of the substances in the process vessel for control purposes, not mainly to create a cross sectional reconstructed image of the process in question.

  14. Synergetic catalysis in hydrocarbon generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabate, R.W. [San`Doil Exploration L.C., New Orleans, LA (United States); Baker, C.C. [Consulting Petroleum Geologist, Metairie, LA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Thermogenesis as the sole origin of hydrocarbons has been questioned by Gulf Coast geologists for two reasons: (1) lack of thermally mature source beds except on the basin`s Mesozoic rim and (2) persuasive empirical evidence of shallow, early generation, migration, and emplacement. Enigmatically, even subsequent deeper burial of the reservoirs has not resulted in thermal maturity. However, recent laboratory research has identified several natural catalysts that significantly lower temperatures needed for conversion of organic materials into hydrocarbons. Perhaps synergism among these or as-yet-undiscovered catalysts, together with geologic reaction times, is capable of producing hydrocarbons at temperatures low enough for early emplacement.

  15. Synergetic catalysis in hydrocarbon generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabate, R.W. [San`Doil Exploration L.C., New Orleans, LA (United States); Baker, C.C. [NAC of FINDING, Slidell, LA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Thermogenesis as the sole origin of hydrocarbons has been questioned by Gulf Coast petroleum geologists for two reasons: (1) lack of thermally mature source beds except on the basin`s Mesozoic rim and (2) persuasive empirical evidence of shallow, early migration and emplacement. Enigmatically, even subsequent deeper burial of the reservoirs has not resulted in thermal maturity. However, recent laboratory research has identified several natural catalysts that significantly lower temperatures needed for conversion of organic materials into hydrocarbons. Perhaps synergism among these or as yet undiscovered catalysts, together with geologic reaction times, is capable of producing hydrocarbons at temperatures low enough for early emplacement.

  16. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  17. Reduction of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 in shredded iceberg lettuce by chlorination and gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettuce was inoculated with a six-strain cocktail of acid-adapted Escherichia coli 0157:H7 at a level of 1x107 CFU/g. Following chlorination at 200 μg/ml, the lettuce was irradiated at 0.15, 0.38, or 0.55 kGy using a 60Co source. Survival of E. coli 0157:H7, aerobic mesophiles and yeast and molds were measured over a period of 10 days. For quality analysis, chlorinated lettuce was subjected to irradiation at 0.33 and 0.53 kGy and stored at 1.0 deg. C, 4.0 deg. C or 7.0 deg. C. Changes in texture and color were determined by instrumental means and changes in flavor, odor, and visual quality were determined by sensory testing. Chlorination plus irradiation at 0.55 kGy produced a 5.4-log reduction in E. coli 0157:H7 levels. Chlorination alone reduced the E. coli 0157:H7 counts by 1-2 logs. Irradiation at 0.55 kGy was also effective in reducing standard plate counts and yeast and mold counts. Irradiation at this level did not cause softening of lettuce and sensory attributes were not adversely affected. In general, appearance and flavor were affected more by the length of storage than by temperature conditions. The 5+log reduction in E. coli counts and lack of adverse effects on sensory attributes indicate that low-dose irradiation can improve the safety and shelf-life of fresh-cut iceberg lettuce for retail sale or food service

  18. Reduction of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 in shredded iceberg lettuce by chlorination and gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, D.M. E-mail: dfoley@chapman.edu; Dufour, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Caporaso, F.; Prakash, A

    2002-03-01

    Lettuce was inoculated with a six-strain cocktail of acid-adapted Escherichia coli 0157:H7 at a level of 1x10{sup 7} CFU/g. Following chlorination at 200 {mu}g/ml, the lettuce was irradiated at 0.15, 0.38, or 0.55 kGy using a {sup 60}Co source. Survival of E. coli 0157:H7, aerobic mesophiles and yeast and molds were measured over a period of 10 days. For quality analysis, chlorinated lettuce was subjected to irradiation at 0.33 and 0.53 kGy and stored at 1.0 deg. C, 4.0 deg. C or 7.0 deg. C. Changes in texture and color were determined by instrumental means and changes in flavor, odor, and visual quality were determined by sensory testing. Chlorination plus irradiation at 0.55 kGy produced a 5.4-log reduction in E. coli 0157:H7 levels. Chlorination alone reduced the E. coli 0157:H7 counts by 1-2 logs. Irradiation at 0.55 kGy was also effective in reducing standard plate counts and yeast and mold counts. Irradiation at this level did not cause softening of lettuce and sensory attributes were not adversely affected. In general, appearance and flavor were affected more by the length of storage than by temperature conditions. The 5+log reduction in E. coli counts and lack of adverse effects on sensory attributes indicate that low-dose irradiation can improve the safety and shelf-life of fresh-cut iceberg lettuce for retail sale or food service.

  19. Chlorine gas inhalation: human clinical evidence of toxicity and experience in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carl W; Martin, James G

    2010-07-01

    Humans can come into contact with chlorine gas during short-term, high-level exposures due to traffic or rail accidents, spills, or other disasters. By contrast, workplace and public (swimming pools, etc.) exposures are more frequently long-term, low-level exposures, occasionally punctuated by unintentional transient increases. Acute exposures can result in symptoms of acute airway obstruction including wheezing, cough, chest tightness, and/or dyspnea. These findings are fairly nonspecific, and might be present after exposures to a number of inhaled chemical irritants. Clinical signs, including hypoxemia, wheezes, rales, and/or abnormal chest radiographs may be present. More severely affected individuals may suffer acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Up to 1% of exposed individuals die. Humidified oxygen and inhaled beta-adrenergic agents are appropriate therapies for victims with respiratory symptoms while assessments are underway. Inhaled bicarbonate and systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids also have been reported anecdotally to be beneficial. Chronic sequelae may include increased airways reactivity, which tends to diminish over time. Airways hyperreactivity may be more of a problem among those survivors that are older, have smoked, and/or have pre-existing chronic lung disease. Individuals suffering from irritant-induced asthma (IIA) due to workplace exposures to chlorine also tend to have similar characteristics, such as airways hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, and to be older and to have smoked. Other workplace studies, however, have indicated that workers exposed to chlorine dioxide/sulfur dioxide have tended to have increased risk for chronic bronchitis and/or recurrent wheezing attacks (one or more episodes) but not asthma, while those exposed to ozone have a greater incidence of asthma. Specific biomarkers for acute and chronic exposures to chlorine gas are currently lacking. Animal models for chlorine gas

  20. LC clean-up and GC/MS analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in river sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An LC clean-up procedure based upon a complexation between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and silica with chemically bonded 2,4-dinitroaniline has been combined with GC/MS. The LC pre-separation makes it possible to obtain a relatively clean fraction of PAHs free from alkanes, alkylbenzenes and naphthalenes, PCBs, chlorinated pesticides and many other interfering compounds. This fraction has been analyzed using capillary GC and mass selective detector (MSD). Substantial improvement of the MS spectra of PAHs with three or more fused benzene rings is achieved. (orig.)

  1. Chlorination of calcium tungstate by mixture of chlorine and sulfur dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of thermodynamic calculations and experimental investigations of interaction of calcium tungstate with Cl2+SO2 mixture at 400-850 deg C are presented. It is shown that the processes passes through several sequential and parallel stages with formation of tungsten (6) oxide and calcium chloride as intermediate products. Peculiarities of the process are determined by the ratio of rates of WO3 formation and chlorination stages

  2. An investigation into the sensitivity of the atmospheric chlorine and bromine loading using a globally averaged mass balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, David C.; Matthews, G. Peter; Wells, Ian

    Two globally averaged mass balance models have been developed to investigate the sensitivity and future level of atmospheric chlorine and bromine as a result of the emission of 14 chloro- and 3 bromo-carbons. The models use production, growth, lifetime and concentration data for each of the halocarbons and divide the production into one of eight uses, these being aerosol propellants, cleaning agents, blowing agents in open and closed cell foams, non-hermetic and hermetic refrigeration, fire retardants and a residual "other" category. Each use category has an associated emission profile which is built into the models to take into account the proportion of halocarbon retained in equipment for a characteristic period of time before its release. Under the Montreal Protocol 3 requirements, a peak chlorine loading of 3.8 ppb is attained in 1994, which does not reduce to 2.0 ppb (the approximate level of atmospheric chlorine when the ozone hole formed) until 2053. The peak bromine loading is 22 ppt, also in 1994, which decays to 12 ppt by the end of next century. The models have been used to (i) compare the effectiveness of Montreal Protocols 1, 2 and 3 in removing chlorine from the atmosphere, (ii) assess the influence of the delayed emission assumptions used in these models compared to immediate emission assumptions used in previous models, (iii) assess the relative effect on the chlorine loading of a tightening of the Montreal Protocol 3 restrictions, and (iv) calculate the influence of chlorine and bromine chemistry as well as the faster phase out of man-made methyl bromide on the bromine loading.

  3. Novel drug form of chlorin e6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumova, O. Y.; Baum, Rudolf P.; Ermakova, Natalia Y.; Gradyushko, A. T.; Guseva-Donskaya, T. N.; Karmenyan, Artashes V.; Koraboyev, U. M.; Laptev, V. P.; Mechkov, V. M.; Mikhailova, L. M.; Panferova, N. G.; Rebeko, Aleksei G.; Reshetnickov, Andrei V.; Ryabov, M. V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Tsvetkova, Tatyana A.; Zhukova, O. S.

    1999-12-01

    A novel stable water-soluble form of well known photosensitizer chlorin e6 named `Photodithazine' has been obtained from Spirulina Platensis cyanobacteria as a noncovalent complex with N-methyl-D-glucosamine, and its biological characteristics evaluate, which proved to be as follows: in vitro photocytotoxicity was 1 (mu) M (EC50) as determined by the extent of DNA synthesis inhibition in CaOv cells after irradiation with 650 - 900 nm light, and 5 (mu) M (EC65) as determined using MTT test on PC12 cells after irradiation with 670 nm laser light at the doses of 15 and 20 J/cm2, respectively, with Al-sulfophthalocyanine `Photosense' (Russia; oligomerized hematoporphyrin-IX mixture `Photogen', Russia) being used as permitted reference drugs.

  4. Thermal and under irradiation diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work concerns the study of the thermal and radiation enhanced diffusion of 36Cl in uranium dioxide. We simulated the presence of 36Cl by implanting a quantity of 37Cl comparable to the impurity content of chlorine in UO2. In order to evaluate the diffusion properties of chlorine in the fuel and in particular to assess the influence of the irradiation defects, we performed two kinds of experiments: - the influence of the temperature was studied by carrying out thermal annealings in the temperature range 900 - 1300 C; we showed that implanted chlorine was mobile from temperatures as low as 1000 C and determined a thermal diffusion coefficient D1000 C around 10-16 cm2s-1 - the influence of the irradiation by fission products were studied by irradiating the samples with 127I (energy of 63.5 MeV). We could determine that the diffusion of the implanted chlorine under irradiation and in the range of temperature 30 - 250 C was not purely athermal. We calculated a diffusion coefficient under irradiation D250 C of about 0-14 cm2.s-1. We showed the importance of the implantation and irradiation defects as preferential paths for a fast chlorine transport. We carried out ab initio calculations showing that chlorine is preferentially located in a substitutional site. This is in favour of a Frank-Turnbull diffusion mechanism or a vacancy/chlorine. (author)

  5. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  6. Does chlorination of seawater reverse osmosis membranes control biofouling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Hong, Pei-Ying; Nada, Nabil; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full-scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations. PMID:25917390

  7. Removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti and mutagenicity with chlorine dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Jin-long; CUI Fu-yi; QU Bo; ZHU Gui-bing

    2006-01-01

    Mesocyclops leukarti of zooplankton propagates excessively in eutrophic water body and it cannot be effectively inactivated by the conventional drinking water treatment process. In order to tackle this problem, a study of removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti with chlorine dioxide in a waterworks was performed. The results showed that Mesocyclops leukarti could be effectively removed from water by 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide preoxidation combined with the conventional drinking water treatment process.Higher oxidizability and molecular state of chlorine dioxide in water is the key to the inactivation of Mesocyclops leukarti. The chlorite, disinfection by-products (DBPs) of chlorine dioxide, was stable at 0.45 mg/L, which is lower than that critical value of the USEPA. GC-MS examination showed that the quantity of organic substance in the water treated by chlorine dioxide obviously decreased. Ames test further revealed that the mutagenicity was reduced by chlorine dioxide with respect to prechlorine. The propagation ofMesocyclops leukarti can be inactivated effectively and safely by chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation.

  8. Proceedings of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book reports on hydrogen contaminated soils and groundwater. Topics covered include: perspectives on hydrocarbon contamination; emerging hydrocarbon contamination issues; analytical methodologies and site assessment for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; environmental fate and modeling; remedial technologies for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; and risk assessment and risk management

  9. Corrosion of copper by chlorine trifluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research described called for a considerable amount of preliminary development of the test methods and equipment in order that the various measurements and observations could be carried out without contaminating either the samples or this highly reactive gas. The chlorine trifluoride was highly purified before use, its purity being checked by gas-phase chromatography, micro-sublimation and infrared spectrography. The tests were carried out on copper samples of various purities, in particular a 99.999 per cent copper in the form of mono-crystals. They involved kinetic measurements and the characterization of corrosion products under different temperature and pressure conditions. The kinetics showed reactions of the same order of magnitude as those obtained with elementary fluorine. At atmospheric pressure there occurs formation of cupric fluoride and cuprous chloride. The presence of this latter product shows that it is not possible to consider ClF3 simply as a fluorinating agent. At low pressures an unknown product has been characterized. There are strong grounds for believing that it is the unstable cuprous fluoride which it has not yet been possible to isolate. A germination phenomenon has been shown to exist indicating an analogy between the initial phases of fluorination and those of oxidation. Important effects resulting from the dissociation of the copper fluorides and the solubility of chlorine in this metal have been demonstrated. Finally, tests have shown the considerable influence of the purity of the gas phase and of the nature of the reaction vessel walls on the rates of corrosion which can in certain cases be increased by a factor of several powers of ten. (author)

  10. Hydrocarbon Leak Detection Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT is proposing the development of a sensor to detect the presence of hydrocarbons in turbopump Inter-Propellant Seals (IPS). The purpose of the IPS is to prevent...

  11. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27295623

  12. Quantitative structure retention relationship studies for predicting relative retention times of chlorinated phenols on gas chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new method of quantitative structure-retention relationship(QSRR) studies was reported for predicting gas chromatography(GC) relative retention times(RRTs) of chlorinated phenols (CPs) using a DB-5 column.Chemical descriptors were calculated from the molecular structure of CPs and related to their gas chromatographic RRTs by using multiple linear regression analysis.The proposed model had a multiple square correlation coefficient R2 = 0.970,standard error SE = 0.0472,and significant level P = 0.0000.The QSRR model also reveals that the gas chromatographic relative retention times of CPs are associated with physicochemical property interactions with the stationary phase,and influenced by the number of chlorine and oxygen in the CP melecules.

  13. Evidence That Chlorinated Auxin Is Restricted to the Fabaceae But Not to the Fabeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hong Kiat; McAdam, Scott A M; McAdam, Erin L; Ross, John J

    2015-07-01

    Auxin is a pivotal plant hormone, usually occurring in the form of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). However, in maturing pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, the level of the chlorinated auxin, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA), greatly exceeds that of IAA. A key issue is how plants produce halogenated compounds such as 4-Cl-IAA. To better understand this topic, we investigated the distribution of the chlorinated auxin. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that 4-Cl-IAA is found in the seeds of Medicago truncatula, Melilotus indicus, and three species of Trifolium. Furthermore, we found no evidence that Pinus spp. synthesize 4-Cl-IAA in seeds, contrary to a previous report. The evidence indicates a single evolutionary origin of 4-Cl-IAA synthesis in the Fabaceae, which may provide an ideal model system to further investigate the action and activity of halogenating enzymes in plants. PMID:25971549

  14. First measurements of total chlorine and bromine in the lower stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total halogen collection system employing ultra-pure activated charcoal traps has been developed for use in the stratosphere aboard aircraft and balloon sampling platforms. Neutron activation techniques for low-level chlorine, bromine, and iodine analysis within the activated charcoal sampling matrix were developed. Initial results from six aircraft flights and one balloon mission in the lower stratosphere are presented for latitudes ranging from 160N to 670N. Little variability was observed in twelve total, gaseous and particulate chlorine (Cl/sub tot/) determinations as a function of latitude at 20 km with values ranging between 2.7 +- 9 ppbV and 3.2 +- .7 ppbV. Five total bromine (Br/sub tot/) values showed substantial variability ranging from 7 +- 4 pptV to 40 +- 11 pptV. No iodine was observed in any samples but a calculated I/sub tot/ upper limit of < 3 pptV was determined

  15. Experimental evidence of large changes in terrestrial chlorine cycling following altered tree species composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelius, Malin; Thiry, Yves; Marang, Laura; Ranger, Jacques; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Svensson, Teresia; Bastviken, David

    2015-04-21

    Organochlorine molecules (Clorg) are surprisingly abundant in soils and frequently exceed chloride (Cl(-)) levels. Despite the widespread abundance of Clorg and the common ability of microorganisms to produce Clorg, we lack fundamental knowledge about how overall chlorine cycling is regulated in forested ecosystems. Here we present data from a long-term reforestation experiment where native forest was cleared and replaced with five different tree species. Our results show that the abundance and residence times of Cl(-) and Clorg after 30 years were highly dependent on which tree species were planted on the nearby plots. Average Cl(-) and Clorg content in soil humus were higher, at experimental plots with coniferous trees than in those with deciduous trees. Plots with Norway spruce had the highest net accumulation of Cl(-) and Clorg over the experiment period, and showed a 10 and 4 times higher Cl(-) and Clorg storage (kg ha(-1)) in the biomass, respectively, and 7 and 9 times higher storage of Cl(-) and Clorg in the soil humus layer, compared to plots with oak. The results can explain why local soil chlorine levels are frequently independent of atmospheric deposition, and provide opportunities for improved modeling of chlorine distribution and cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:25811074

  16. Maritime hydrocarbon pollution: Intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of oil spills is of great concern to Canada because of the large quantities of petroleum that are shipped along its long coastline, the economic importance of fishing and other industries that could be affected by an oil spill, and the severity of climatic conditions in Canadian waters. Measures implemented to handle oil spill emergencies include relevant provisions in the merchant marine laws, establishment of a compensation fund for oil spill cleanup and damage, and provision of oil spill-related services by the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), whose activities in this regard are summarized. The CCG has a fleet of 119 ships, 4 hydrofoils, 35 helicopters, and various small craft as well as oil spill pollution cleanup equipment worth $35 million stationed at 55 locations across Canada and staff specialists in oil spill emergencies. The CCG is responsible for enforcing the merchant marine law and has created a service for intervening in maritime emergencies. The CCG's equipment includes units for pumping out tankers in an emergency situation, shoreline cleanup devices, skimmers, containment booms, and facilities for adding dispersants to spills. A description of the behavior of hydrocarbons in an oil spill at sea is also included. 26 figs

  17. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  18. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  19. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  20. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  1. Chlorination of niobium oxide in the presence of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorination kinetics of niobium pentoxide in the presence of carbon monoxide between 500-8000C of temperature is studied. The following variable that influences on the reaction rate are analysed: gas flow, geometry and volume of the Nb2O5 samples, reaction temperature and composition of the chlorinated mixture. At the same time, two other materials were studied: the CaO.Nb2O5 (synthetized in laboratory) and pyrochlorine concentrates. The three materials are compared for the chlorination method used. (M.A.C.)

  2. Effect of sulfur dioxide on indium (3) oxide chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of thermodynamic calculations and kinetic investigations, it is established that in the temperature range from 550 to 800 deg C in the In2O3-Cl2-SO2 system coupled reactions of InCl3 and In2(SO4)3 formation accompanying by further In2(SO4)3 chlorination with gaseous chlorine are main processes, SO2 accelerates considerably In2O3 chlorination at a temperature below 800 deg C, its influence on the process of chloride sublimation at a temperature higher than 800 deg C is not so noticeable

  3. Chlorine Dioxide Gas Treatment of Cantaloupe and Residue Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Simran

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a selective oxidant and powerful antimicrobial agent. Previous work has shown that treatment of cantaloupe with chlorine dioxide gas at 5 mg/L for 10 minutes results in a 4.6 and 4.3 log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes respectively. A significant reduction (p Current analytical methods for chlorine dioxide and chloroxyanions are only applicable to aqueous samples. Some of these methods have been used to determine surface residues in treated products by...

  4. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Olivieri, V P; Snead, M C; Krusé, C W; Kawata, K.

    1986-01-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants--free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide--when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic p...

  5. Effect of Chlorine on Giardia lamblia Cyst Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Jarroll, Edward L.; Bingham, Alan K.; Meyer, Ernest A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of chlorine concentration on Giardia lamblia cyst viability was tested under a variety of conditions. The ability of Giardia cysts to undergo excystation was used as the criterion of viability. The experimental variables employed included temperature (25, 15, and 5°C), pH (6, 7, and 8), chlorine-cyst contact time (10, 30, and 60 min), and chlorine concentration (1 to 8 mg/liter). In the pH range studied, cyst survival generally was observed to increase as buffer pH increased. Water...

  6. INFRARED VIBRATIONAL SPECTRA OF CHLORINATED AND HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Kalem, S; Chevallier, J.; Al Dallal, S.; Bourneix, J.

    1981-01-01

    The infrared spectra of chlorinated and hydrogenated amorphous silicon have been measured. In addition to the hydrogen induced bands at 2110, 1990, 885, 840 and 640 cm-1, we observe two new modes at 545 cm-1 (Si-Cl stretching) and 500 cm-1 ( Si TO modes induced by chlorine). Observation of the 545 cm-1 band proves that chlorine acts as a dangling bond terminator. Upon annealing, some of the Si-Cl groups transform into SiCl4 molecules (SiCl4 stretching at 615 cm-1). A good agreement is found b...

  7. Effect of the temperature and the chlorine pressure, over the aluminium chlorides obtained by direct chlorination of the 6061 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aluminium chloride is synthesized by direct chlorination of aluminium, in agreement with the following reaction: Al(s) + 3/2 Cl2 AlCl3 (s,g).The present work focuses on the preparation of aluminium chlorides by two methods: (a) Chlorination of 6061 aluminium alloy with gaseous chlorine in sealed containers, filled with different pressures of gas, from 0.8 to 74 Kpa and in the range of temperature between 2000 and 5000C.(b) Chlorination of the same alloy in chlorine flow between 1500 and 4000C.In the sealed systems, the hexahydrated aluminium trichloride predominated over the anhydrous form. For pressures lower than 14 Kpa and temperatures under 2500C, the chloride didn't appear.The residues were rich in aluminium, chlorine and magnesium.In the other systems, the anhydrous chloride was found in the areas of the reactor of temperatures above 1000C, for all the thermal treatments. The waste was composed by CrCl3 and AlCl3.6H2O.The influence of the chlorine pressures and the heating temperature over the characteristics of the product, was studied.The characterization techniques were x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy, and the evolution of the structure was followed by scanning electron microscopy

  8. Characterization and source identification of hydrocarbons in water samples using multiple analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted in which several analytical techniques were used to identify and characterize trace petroleum-related hydrocarbons and other volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples that were collected from a bedrock aquifer used for drinking water. A previous study had confirmed the presence of chlorinated compounds in the groundwater. The study presented in this paper was aimed at confirming the presence or absence of gasoline or other petroleum products in those samples. A service station was operated on this site for about 10 years and the adjacent property was owned by a chemicals handling company. Both operations were considered to be potentially responsible parties to the contamination of the aquifer. The difference in contaminants at different depths of the aquifer was examined using a variety of analytical techniques such as gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, flame-ionization detection, solid-phase-micro-extractor and head space. Chemical characterization results showed that the hydrocarbons found in the water samples near the surface were either gasoline or heavy petroleum products. The significant distribution of 5 target petroleum-characteristic alkylated polyaromatic hydrocarbon homologues and biomarkers confirmed the presence of another heavy petroleum product. The concentrations of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and BTEX were found to be 1070 and 155 μg/kg of water for the samples near the surface. Results also showed that the deep groundwater samples collected at a depths ranging between 15 to 60 metres were also contaminated but to a much lesser degree. The concentrations of the TPH and BTEX were found to be only 130 and 2.6 μg/kg of water for the deep groundwater samples. The study also revealed that the groundwater was contaminated by a variety of volatile chlorinated compounds. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  9. Non-methane hydrocarbons over the Eastern Mediterranean during summer, measured from northwest Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, Carina; Derstroff, Bettina; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Keßel, Stephan; Thorenz, Ute; Baker, Angela; Williams, Jonathan; Lelieveld, Jos

    2015-04-01

    In summer 2014 the CYprus Photochemistry EXperiment (CYPHEX) field campaign took place at an elevated (600m) measurement site in the north western part of Cyprus close (10 km) to the coast (35,96N, 32,4E) in order to investigate the photochemistry and air mass transport of the eastern Mediterranean. Non-methane hydrocarbons were measured with a commercial GC-FID (AMA instruments GmbH, Ulm, Germany) with a final dataset consisting of two weeks of continuous, hourly measurements for 10 NMHC. NMHCs are a class of volatile organic compounds (VOC) which are emitted by both anthropogenic and natural sources. Their predominant sink in the atmosphere is photochemically driven oxidation by OH radicals. Their atmospheric lifetimes, which range from a few days for more reactive compounds such as pentanes and butanes and up to a month for less reactive ones like ethane, make it possible to deduce photochemical histories and transport regimes from NMHC observations. Furthermore, in the presence of NOx they are important precursors for tropospheric ozone. Backward trajectories show that the airmasses reaching the measurement site had been influenced periodically by emissions from western continental Europe (France, Spain) that crossed the Mediterranean Sea and from eastern continental Europe (Greece and Turkey) more recently influenced by industrial emissions. Varying patterns in NMHC data delineates these two regimes very well, with aged western European air masses being characterized by low level ethane and with toluene and benzene being higher and more variable in plumes from eastern Europe. Additionally, atypical n-butane and i-butane ratios suggest a deviation from the expected predominant oxidation by OH, possibly indicating reaction with chlorine radicals (Cl). The dataset has been evaluated with respect to NMHC sources and oxidative history using different methods of approach.

  10. Assessing the Impact of Chlorinated-Solvent Sites on Metropolitan Groundwater Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Narter, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated-solvent compounds are among the most common groundwater contaminants in the U.S.A. The majority of the many sites contaminated by chlorinated-solvent compounds are located in metropolitan areas, and most such areas have one or more chlorinated-solvent contaminated sites. Thus, contamination of groundwater by chlorinated-solvent compounds may pose a potential risk to the sustainability of potable water supplies for many metropolitan areas. The impact of chlorinated-solvent sites on...

  11. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  12. TOXICITY OF RESIDUAL CHLORINE COMPOUNDS TO AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory studies on the acute and chronic toxicity of chlorine and inorganic chloramines to trout, salmon, minnows, bullhead, largemouth bass, and bluegill were conducted. Acute toxicity under continuous and intermittent patterns of exposure as well as behavioral, reproduction,...

  13. Complete Non-Radioactive Operability Tests for Cladding Hull Chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Jared A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylton, Tom D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brunson, Ronald Ray [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunt, Rodney Dale [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bradley, Eric Craig [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Non-radioactive operability tests were made to test the metal chlorination reactor and condenser and their accessories using batch chlorinations of non-radioactive cladding samples and to identify optimum operating practices and components that need further modifications prior to installation of the equipment into the hot cell for tests on actual used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding. The operability tests included (1) modifications to provide the desired heating and reactor temperature profile; and (2) three batch chlorination tests using, respectively, 100, 250, and 500 g of cladding. During the batch chlorinations, metal corrosion of the equipment was assessed, pressurization of the gas inlet was examined and the best method for maintaining solid salt product transfer through the condenser was determined. Also, additional accessing equipment for collection of residual ash and positioning of the unit within the hot cell were identified, designed, and are being fabricated.

  14. MICROEMULSION OF MIXED CHLORINATED SOLVENTS USING FOOD GRADE (EDIBLE) SURFACTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground water contamination frequently consists of mixed chlorinated solvents [e.g., tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and trans-1,2- dichloroethylene (DCE)]. In this research, mixtures of the food grade (edible) surfactants bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinat...

  15. The chlorination kinetics of zirconium dioxide mixed with carbon black

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, the effects of chlorine gas at different chlorine partial pressures and carbon concentrations on the carbochlorination of zirconia were studied. It was found that in briquettes containing 18.7 %wt carbon, in a chlorine partial pressure range of 0.25-0.75 atm and for a reacted fraction of less than 0.7, the chemical reaction model was dominant for the carbochlorination process of zirconia. The order of reaction into chlorine gas (n) in this situation was 0.57. Moreover, the best weight ratio of carbon to zirconia was 40/60. In this case, the activation energy of the reaction was 209.9 kJ mol-1 in a temperature range of 1023-1223 K, and the dominant model was the chemical reaction model.

  16. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeability, solubility and diffusion coefficients of chlorine dioxide for high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), nylon, and multilayer of ethylene viny...

  17. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells

  18. Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, Z.

    2015-01-01

      Subjects: bioremediation; biodegradation; environmental biotechnology, subsurface and groundwater contamination; biological processes; geochemistry; microbiology The combination of enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and aquife

  19. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  20. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...