WorldWideScience

Sample records for chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant

  1. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in arctic marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norstrom, R J; Muir, D C

    1994-09-16

    By 1976, the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) had been demonstrated in fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), ringed seal (Phoca hispida), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), walrus (Obdobenus rosmarus divergens), beluga (Delphinapterus leucas), porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in various parts of the Arctic. In spite of this early interest, very little subsequent research on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals was undertaken until the mid-1980s. Since that time, there has been an explosion of interest, resulting in a much expanded data base on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals. Except in the Russian Arctic, data have now been obtained on the temporospatial distribution of PCBs and other contaminants in ringed seal, beluga and polar bear. Contaminants in narwhal (Monodon monoceros) have also now been measured. On a fat weight basis, the sum of DDT-related compounds (S-DDT) and PCB levels are lowest in walrus (< 0.1 microgram/g), followed by ringed seal, (0.1-1 microgram/g range). Levels are an order of magnitude higher in beluga and narwhal (1-10 micrograms/g range). It appears that metabolism and excretion of S-DDT and PCBs may be less efficient in cetaceans, leading to greater biomagnification. Polar bears have similar levels of PCBs as cetaceans (1-10 micrograms/g), but with a much simpler congener pattern. DDE levels are lowest in polar bear, indicating rapid metabolism. Effects of age and sex on residue levels are found for all species where this was measured. Among cetaceans and ringed seal, sexually mature females have lower levels than males due to lactation. Although PCB levels in adult male polar bears are about twice as high as females, there is only a trivial age effect in either sex apart from an initial decrease from birth to sexual maturity (age 0-5). Comparison of levels of S-DDT and PCBs in Arctic beluga and ringed seal with those in beluga in the Gulf of St

  2. Solidification of sediment contaminated with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, E.J. [Anchor QEA LLC, Portland, OR (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A series of bench-scale treatability tests were used to evaluate the effectiveness of various solidification reagents in treating sediments contaminated with high concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The effectiveness of Portland cement, cement kiln dust, lime kiln dust, fly ash, and a combination of silica and lime were was assessed relative to their ability to reduce the leaching of contaminants, increase the strength of the contaminated sediment, and reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the sediments. The aim of the study was to develop a design for treating sediments in a stagnant water body located on the grounds of an industrial facility. The sediments were predominantly fine-grained and high in organic content. Preliminary tests identified Portland cement and the silica and lime mixture as achieving the desired strength and resistance to leaching. The solidification reagents were used to solidify more than 11,000 cubic yards of sediment with a mixture of 2 fly ashes. The full-scale solidification project surpassed the required standards for strength and permeability. 10 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  3. Application of compound specific 13C isotope investigations of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Chlorinated hydrocarbons are one of the most common pollutants found in groundwater. Due to complex contamination situations with overlapping contamination plumes the assessment of the organic contaminants requires the installation of expensive observation wells and high analytical effort. Here the determination of the stable isotope ratio 13C/12C of the organic compounds offers a promising and efficient tool to investigate the origin and the biodegradation characteristics of the chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater. The application of the method is based on characteristic isotope fingerprints, differing in chlorinated solvents. This isotope fingerprint is derived from different production pathways and is not influenced by transport or by retardation processes in the underground. Due to the fact, that two different contaminations can easily be distinguished by isotope ratios, an improved distinction of spatially and temporally different contamination plumes might be possible. In course of biologically mediated degradation processes a shift of the isotope ratios between the precursor and the product can frequently be observed, such as with denitrification or sulfate reduction processes. The isotope fractionation is due to a preferential reaction of the bonds formed by the lighter isotopes and leads to a progressive enrichment of the heavy isotopes in the precursor while the product becomes depleted in the heavy isotopes. Biological degradation of the highly chlorinated hydrocarbons is due to a co-metabolic dechlorinisation. Tetrachloroethene (PCE) for example degrades under anoxic conditions via trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Subsequent degradation to vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene may appear under aerobic as well as reducing environments depending on the site specific conditions. In several laboratory studies it has been shown, that biodegradation of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is accompanied by an isotope fractionation of

  4. Effect of reduced iron on the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated soil and ground water: A review of publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

    2014-02-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons are among the most hazardous organic pollutants. The traditional remediation technologies, i.e., pumping of contaminated soil- and groundwater and its purification appear to be costly and not very efficient as applied to these pollutants. In the last years, a cheaper method of destroying chlorine-replaced hydrocarbons has been used based on the construction of an artificial permeable barrier, where the process develops with the participation of in situ bacteria activated by zerovalent iron. The forced significant decrease in the redox potential (Eh) down to -750 mV provides the concentration of electrons necessary for the reduction of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A rise in the pH drastically accelerates the dechlorination process. In addition to chlorine-organic compounds, ground water is often contaminated with heavy metals. The influence of the latter on the effect of zerovalent iron may be different: both accelerating its degradation (Cu) and inhibiting it (Cr). Most of the products of zerovalent iron corrosion, i.e., green rust, magnetite, ferrihydrite, hematite, and goethite, weaken the efficiency of the Fe0 barrier by mitigating the dechlorination and complicating the water filtration. However, pyrrhotite FeS, on the contrary, accelerates the dechlorination of chlorine hydrocarbons.

  5. Reproductive and morphological condition of wild mink (Mustela vison) and river otters (Lutra canadensis) in relation to chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, L E; Harris, M L; Stephen, C. R.; Elliott, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    We assessed chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of mink and river otters on the Columbia and Fraser River systems of northwestern North America, in relation to morphological measures of condition. We obtained carcasses of mink and river otters from commercial trappers during the winters 1994-1995 and 1995-1996. Necropsies included evaluation of the following biological parameters: sex, body mass and length, age, thymus, heart, liver, lung, spleen, pancreas, kidney, gonad, omentum, adrenal g...

  6. Use of tree rings to investigate the onset of contamination of a shallow aquifer by chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanosky, T.M.; Hansen, B.P.; Schening, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Oaks (Quercus velutina Lam.) growing over a shallow aquifer contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons were studied to determine if it was possible to estimate the approximate year that contamination began. The annual rings of some trees downgradient from the contaminant release site contained elevated concentrations of chloride possibly derived from dechlorination of contaminants. Additionally, a radial-growth decline began in these trees at approximately the same time that chloride became elevated. Growth did not decline in trees that contained smaller concentrations of chloride. The source of elevated chloride and the corresponding reductions in tree growth could not be explained by factors other than contamination. On the basis of tree-ring evidence alone, the release occurred in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Contaminant release at a second location apparently occurred in the mid- to late 1970s, suggesting that the area was used for disposal for at least 5 years and possibly longer. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. A biogeochemical transport model to simulate the attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant fluxes across the groundwater-surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Binning, Philip John; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons originating from point sources are amongst the most prevalent contaminants of ground water and surface water resources. Riparian zones may play an important role in the attenuation of contaminant concentrations when contaminant plumes flow from groundwater to surface water...... because of the occurrence of redox gradients, strongly reductive conditions and high biological activity. In order to meet the expectations of the EU Water Framework Directive, an evaluation of the impact of such plumes on surface water is needed. The aim of this work is to develop a groundwater transport...... and biogeochemical transformation model of the discharge of a TCE plume into a stream, and to determine which parameters most strongly affect pollutant discharge concentrations. Here biological kinetics and the interaction with the soil matrix are implemented in PHREEQC. The ability of PHREEQC to deal...

  8. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, Stuart E.

    2002-06-01

    Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

  9. Natural attenuation of chlorinated-hydrocarbon contamination at Fort Wainwright, Alaska; a hydrogeochemical and microbiological investigation workplan

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Lilly, Michael R.; Braddock, Joan F.; Hinzman, Larry D.

    1998-01-01

    Natural attenuation processes include biological degradation, by which microorganisms break down contaminants into simpler product compounds; adsorption of contaminants to soil particles, which decreases the mass of contaminants dissolved in ground water; and dispersion, which decreases dissolved contaminant concentrations through dilution. The primary objectives of this study are to (1) assess the degree to which such natural processes are attenuating chlorinated-hydrocarbon contamination in ground water, and (2) evaluate the effects of ground-water/surface-water interactions on natural-attenuation processes in the area of the former East and West Quartermasters Fueling Systems for Fort Wainwright, Alaska. The study will include investigations of the hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological processes occurring at this site that influence the transport and fate of chlorinated hydrocarbons in ground water. To accomplish these objectives, a data-collection program has been initiated that includes measurements of water-table elevations and the stage of the Chena River; measurements of vertical temperature profiles within the subsurface; characterization of moisture distribution and movement in the unsaturated zone; collection of ground-water samples for determination of both organic and inorganic chemical constituents; and collection of ground-water samples for enumeration of microorganisms and determination of their potential to mineralize contaminants. We will use results from the data-collection program described above to refine our conceptual model of hydrology and contaminant attenuation at this site. Measurements of water-table elevations and river stage will help us to understand the magnitude and direction of ground-water flow and how changes in the stage of the Chena River affect ground-water flow. Because ambient ground water and surface water typically have different temperature characteristics, temperature monitoring will likely provide further insight

  10. Assessment of semi-empirical mass transfer correlations for pervaporation treatment of wastewater contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Sean X.; PENG Ming

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of mass transfer characteristics of pervaporation (PV) treatment of wastewater contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons is of great importance for water treatment plant operators conducting initial evaluation, process optimization,and process economics. While a membrane plays a central role in pervaporation processes and separation efficiency, the mass transfer in the liquid layer next to the membrane surface is of equal, if not greater importance. It is one of the few process parameters that can be adjusted in situ to manipulate the outcome ora pervaporation process. In this study, a bench scale pervaporation experiment of removing a common chlorinated hydrocarbon from water was carried out and the results of it were compared to the ones based on well-known semi-empirical correlations. The mass transfer coefficients from the experiments, ranging from 0.8×10-5~2.5×10-5 m/s under the operating conditions, are higher than those predicted by the correlation. The corresponding separation factors under varying flow velocities are determined to be between 310~950.

  11. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Strand

    2004-09-27

    The research objectives for this report are: (1) Transform poplar and other tree species to extend and optimize chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) oxidative activities. (2) Determine the mechanisms of CHC oxidation in plants. (3) Isolate the genes responsible for CHC oxidation in plants. We have made significant progress toward an understanding of the biochemical mechanism of CHC transformation native to wild-type poplar. We have identified chloral, trichloroethanol, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid as products of TCE metabolism in poplar plants and in tissue cultures of poplar cells.(Newman et al. 1997; Newman et al. 1999) Use of radioactively labeled TCE showed that once taken up and transformed, most of the TCE was incorporated into plant tissue as a non-volatile, unextractable residue.(Shang et al. 2001; Shang and Gordon 2002) An assay for this transformation was developed and validated using TCE transformation by poplar suspension cells. Using this assay, it was shown that two different activities contribute to the fixation of TCE by poplar cells: one associated with cell walls and insoluble residues, the other associated with a high molecular weight, heat labile fraction of the cell extract, a fixation that was apparently catalyzed by plant enzymes.

  12. The effect of remedial measures upon groundwater quality in connection with soil contamination by chlorinated hydrocarbons and the related costs - by example of the City of Hanover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of remedial actions on the groundwater quality was investigated in the aquifer of the City of Hannover. The improvement of groundwater quality was related to the costs for the remedial actions. The attention was focussed on groundwater pollution by chlorinated hydrocarbons as the most important contaminants of groundwater in urban areas. (orig.)

  13. Anaerobic Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Groundwater Aquifers or "Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation"

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, R. Brent; Jay D Keasling

    1997-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE), is a major concern throughout the United States. A developing strategy for the remediation of PCE and TCE contaminated aquifers is anaerobic biodegradation. From a TCE contaminated groundwater site, microorganisms were enriched with the ability to anaerobically convert PCE and TCE completely to ethene. Kinetic studies performed with this culture showed that degradation of PCE, TCE...

  14. Microbial biomass and activities associated with subsurface environments contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil microcosms and enrichment cultures from subsurface sediments and ground waters contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) were examined. Total lipids, (1-C14)acetate incorporation into lipids, and (Me3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA were determined in these subsurface environments. In heavily TCE-contaminated zones radioisotopes were not incorporated into lipids or DNA. Radioisotope incorporation occurred in sediments both above and below the TCE plume. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were not detected, i.e., < 0.5 pmol/L in heavily contaminated groundwater samples. In less contaminated waters, extracted PLFA concentrations were greater than 100 pmol/L and microbial isolates were readily obtained. Degradation of 30-100 mg/L TCE was observed when sediments were amended with a variety of energy sources. Microorganisms in these subsurface sediments have adapted to degrade TCE at concentrations greater than 50 mg/L. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Contamination of Omnivorous Freshwater Fish Species and Sediments by Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niewiadowska Alicja

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs were determined in 158 muscle samples of bream (Abramis brama and roach (Rutilus rutilus, and 84 samples of sediments collected from 10 river and lake sampling sites in 2011 and 2012. The concentrations of DDTs (p,p’-DDT, o,p’-DDT, p,p’-DDE, and p,p’-DDD, HCH isomers (a-, ß-, and y-HCH, HCB, and PCBs (six indicator PCB congeners 28, 52, 101, 138, 153 and 180 were determined using the capillary gas chromatography. The mean concentrations of DDTs in bream and roach were in the range of 11.2-654 and 4.5-121 ug/kg wet weight respectively, and PCBs were in the range of 1.3-75.9 and 1.1-112 ug/kg wet weight, respectively. Mean concentrations of DDTs and PCBs in sediments were 0.5-270 ug/kg dry weight and ⋋0.1-2.2 ug/kg dry weight respectively. The study showed clear spatial differences in the levels of organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in fish and sediments from different aquatic ecosystems. The highest levels of contaminants were detected in fish and sediments from the Vistula River in vicinity of Cracow. The possible risk to the fish meat consumers and ecological risk were evaluated.

  16. Application of BGPR tomography investigate the Soil and Groundwater Contaminated with Chlorinated Hydrocarbon:Case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. C.; Lin, C. P.; Dong, T. H.; Yang, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The success of an environmental contaminated project is often determined by the extent to which it is able to ascertain and control subsurface conditions. At present, site managers have limited tools to gain detailed information on the distribution of possible underground barriers or anomalous bodies. The technology employed in Taiwan to evaluate or confirm subsurface anomalies relies primarily on surface geophysical surveys, borehole drillings, or past records. Surface ground-penetrating radar GPR survey is among the most popular of these methods. Surface GPR technique can be used in many ways, but this method is not always the best suited to Taiwan's conditions. Surface GPR surveys are adversely affected by the conductivity of silty/clayey sediment and cultural noises. As a result, when surface GPR surveys are used, both detection and resolution of subsurface anomalies will decrease with depth. In order to overcome these obstacles, the use of borehole GPR BGPR with a few boreholes may provide a more direct and effective way to detect an underground target. Recent improvement in the quality of BGPR contributes to the suitability of this type of survey work when implemented on construction sites. This paper ues the BGPR geophysical technology has been developed to overcome above limitations. The information of multi-wells logging could be used to interpret the permeability of subsurface, the dominate flow path and the hot-spot for evaluating the distribution of pollution and the efficiency of remediation in different time sequences.

  17. Distributions and fate of chlorinated pesticides, biomarkers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments along a contamination gradient from a point-source in San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, W.E.; Hostettler, F.D.; Rapp, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution and fate of chlorinated pesticides, biomarkers, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surficial sediments along a contamination gradient in the Lauritzen Canal and Richmond Harbor in San Francisco Bay was investigated. Compounds were identified and quantified using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry. Biomarkers and PAHs were derived primarily from weathered petroleum. DDT was reductively dechlorinated under anoxic conditions to DDD and several minor degradation products, DDMU, DDMS, and DDNU. Under aerobic conditions, DDT was dehydrochlorinated to DDE and DBP. Aerobic degradation of DDT was diminished or inhibited in zones of high concentration, and increased significantly in zones of lower concentration: Other chlorinated pesticides identified in sediment included dieldrin and chlordane isomers. Multivariate analysis of the distributions of the DDTs suggested that there are probably two sources of DDD. In addition, DDE and DDMU are probably formed by similar mechanisms, i.e. dehydrochlorination. A steep concentration gradient existed from the Canal to the Outer Richmond Harbor, but higher levels of DDD than those found in the remainder of the Bay indicated that these contaminants are transported on particulates and colloidal organic matter from this source into San Francisco Bay. Chlorinated pesticides and PAHs may pose a potential problem to biota in San Francisco Bay.

  18. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons at cold temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study of the viability of intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons at cold temperatures, at a former landfill site, some 300 km northeast of Edmonton. The landfill was also used for disposing of various hydrocarbon-based products of environmental concern.The project was conducted in four phases, i. e. site investigation, analysis of contaminant concentration, microbial study in the laboratory, and computer fate and transport modeling, with the primary focus being on the effect of cold temperatures on the rate of reductive dechlorination. Preliminary analysis of the results shows considerable evidence for the biodegradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and confirms intrinsic bioremediation as a viable option for cold temperature sites. 20 refs., 7 figs

  20. Reproductive success and chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination of resident great blue herons (Ardea herodias) from coastal British Columbia, Canada, 1977 to 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human disturbance and loss of nesting habitat were more important factors than chlorinated hydrocarbons in changing heron reproductive success. - Over the period 1977-2000, eggs of Pacific great blue heron (Ardea herodias fannini) were collected from 23 colonies along the southern coast of British Columbia, Canada, and analyzed for persistent organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Concentrations of OC pesticides in eggs declined sharply in the late 1970s, after which there were minimal changes. The sums of PCB congeners were not reduced appreciably during the 1980s and 1990s, but Aroclor 1260 concentrations suggested a sharp decline in PCB contamination of eggs in the late 1970s, similar to that shown for OC pesticides. Eggs collected along or near the Fraser River delta showed higher levels of most pesticides compared to other monitored colonies. Although the delta lands support a long-standing agricultural economy, the primary factors influencing OC levels in the delta colonies were thought to be driven by estuarine processes. We suggest two possible influencing factors were: 1) a greater rate of bioaccumulation in the estuary due to the deposition of particulates collected over a vast area encompassed by the Fraser River watershed; or 2) a higher rate of biomagnification in the estuary due to species differences at lower trophic levels of the heron food chain. Eggs from urban colonies contained higher levels of PCBs. The congener pattern was not clearly different from that observed in less contaminated eggs from rural and pulp mill-influenced colonies, except that colonies in Vancouver had greater proportions of PCB-66, suggesting a local source of Aroclor 1242. Productivity in the coastal heron colonies was highly variable over the period of study, with 71% of recorded colony-wide reproductive failures occurring in colonies near pulp mills. However, the predominant factors influencing reproductive success were probably disturbance

  1. Environmental Behavior, Sources, and Effects of Chlorinated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohura

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental sources and behaviors of chlorinated 2- to 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs. ClPAHs are ubiquitous contaminants found in urban air, vehicle exhaust gas, snow, tap water, and sediments. The concentrations of ClPAHs in each of these environments are generally higher than those of dioxins but markedly lower than the concentrations of the parent compounds, PAHs. Environmental data and emission sources analysis for ClPAHs reveal that the dominant process of generation is by reaction of PAHs with chlorine in pyrosynthesis. This secondary reaction process also occurs in aquatic environments. Certain ClPAHs show greater toxicity, such as mutagenicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity, than their corresponding parent PAHs. Investigation of the sources and environmental behavior of ClPAHs is of great importance in the assessment of human health risks.

  2. Radiolytic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolytic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloroform, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene) in water was carried out. Water solutions of the chlorinated hydrocarbons with different concentrations were irradiated with γ rays. Concentrations of methane, ethane, CO, CO2, H2, and O2 after the irradiation were determined by gas chromatography. Concentration of chloride ion in the irradiated sample was determined by ion chromatography. Experimental results show that radiolytic degradation of the chlorinated hydrocarbon increased with the radiation dose. Methane, ethane, CO2, H2, and Cl- concentrations increased with the radiation dose and the sample concentration. On the other hand, O2 concentration decreased with the radiation dose and the sample concentration. When sample concentration was high, dissolved oxygen might be not enough for converting most of the C atoms in the sample into CO2. This resulted in a low decomposition ratio. Addition of H2O2 as an oxygen resource could increase the decomposition ratio greatly. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was applied to identify some intermediates of the radiolytic dehalogenation. Radiolytic degradation mechanisms are also discussed. (author)

  3. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M.E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent

  4. Application of Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1 for the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Hage, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    The large-scale application of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) has resulted in many cases of groundwater contamination. Contaminated groundwater can be remediated by pump-and-treat: the groundwater is pumped to the surface and treated. The groundwater can be treated in bioreactors, in which the contaminants are biodegraded. Since extracted groundwater is often anaerobic, it has to be oxygenated in order to allow aerobic biodegradation of the contaminants. However, direct oxygenation...

  5. Supported metal nanoparticles for the remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrick, Bettina

    Zero valent iron filings are currently being used in pilot scale field studies to dehalogenate toxic chlorinated hydrocarbons from contaminated surface- and groundwater. Iron filings reduce trichloroethylene (TCE), a model contaminant, via two interconnected degradation pathways: (a) reductive beta-elimination and (b) sequential hydrogenolysis, in which each chlorine atom is sequentially replaced by hydrogen. For the latter pathway, problems arise because the dehalogenation rate decreases as the number of chlorine atoms in the molecule decreases. Therefore, some of the products formed, such as vinyl chloride (VC), are more toxic than the parent compound (TCE), and are only slowly reduced by iron. To improve the rate, cost and technique of remediation for chlorinated hydrocarbons, zero valent nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) nanoparticles have been developed. To elucidate the dehalogenation reaction and particularly the product distributions from a mechanistic standpoint, the roles that nickel and iron play in the dehalogenation of TCE were studied. On the bimetallic particles, the reaction occurs by nickel-catalyzed hydrodechlorination. As the iron actively corrodes, the cathodically protected nickel surface chemisorbs hydrogen ions, and TCE adsorbed to the Ni surface is thus hydrogenated. This reaction competes kinetically with the evolution of molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenolysis of the C-Cl bond results in the formation of linear, as well as branched saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Dispersing the nanometals onto high surface area supports, such as hydrophilic carbon or polyacrylic acid (PAA), provides a delivery vehicle for the reactive nanoparticles. The support acts as a nanometal carrier, and may also help preconcentrate the toxins, and provide a conductive pathway for electron transfer. In general, supports are expected to stabilize the nanoparticles and give an increased surface to volume ratio. The carbon- and PAA-supported nanometals form a permanent suspension

  6. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    OpenAIRE

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M. E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent formation of less desirable side-products. For example, mixtures of chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons are still formed as by-products in industrial processes such as the production of vinyl chlor...

  7. Characterization of Preferential Ground-Water Seepage From a Chlorinated Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer to West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcher, Emily H.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Lorah, Michelle M.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands act as natural transition zones between ground water and surface water, characterized by the complex interdependency of hydrology, chemical and physical properties, and biotic effects. Although field and laboratory demonstrations have shown efficient natural attenuation processes in the non-seep wetland areas and stream bottom sediments of West Branch Canal Creek, chlorinated volatile organic compounds are present in a freshwater tidal creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volatile organic compound concentrations in surface water indicate that in some areas of the wetland, preferential flow paths or seeps allow transport of organic compounds from the contaminated sand aquifer to the overlying surface water without undergoing natural attenuation. From 2002 through 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division of the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, characterized preferential ground-water seepage as part of an ongoing investigation of contaminant distribution and natural attenuation processes in wetlands at this site. Seep areas were discrete and spatially consistent during thermal infrared surveys in 2002, 2003, and 2004 throughout West Branch Canal Creek wetlands. In these seep areas, temperature measurements in shallow pore water and sediment more closely resembled those in ground water than those in nearby surface water. Generally, pore water in seep areas contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds had lower methane and greater volatile organic compound concentrations than pore water in non-seep wetland sediments. The volatile organic compounds detected in shallow pore water in seeps were spatially similar to the dominant volatile organic compounds in the underlying Canal Creek aquifer, with both parent and anaerobic daughter compounds detected. Seep locations characterized as focused seeps contained the highest concentrations of chlorinated parent compounds

  8. Proceedings of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book reports on hydrogen contaminated soils and groundwater. Topics covered include: perspectives on hydrocarbon contamination; emerging hydrocarbon contamination issues; analytical methodologies and site assessment for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; environmental fate and modeling; remedial technologies for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; and risk assessment and risk management

  9. Microbial and molecular techniques to evaluate and to implement in-situ biodegradation potential and activity at sites contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karg, F. [HPC Envirotec / France and HPC AG (Germany); Henkler, Ch. [Planreal (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    Intrinsic bio-remediation harnesses the ability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade contaminants that are present in soil and groundwater. Over the past decade many environmental regulatory agencies especially in Europe have come to recognize the importance of these natural processes in contaminant attenuation. In order to use in-situ bio-remediation to clean up a site successfully it is necessary to investigate the indigenous microbial population and its potential activity to degrade the contaminants of concern (COCs). The evaluation of naturally-occurring degradative activity in initial screening of soil and groundwater samples using recently developed molecular and microbial methods may allow for the implementation of a contaminant reduction and management program without the need for fully engineered remediation intervention. Limited engineering approaches (nutrient delivery etc.) can be implemented to support naturally-occurring bio-restoration processes to achieve a controlled, dynamic attenuation of COCs. Techniques for monitoring pollutant-degrading microorganisms were previously limited to standard culturing techniques. More recently, techniques based upon detection of genetic elements and metabolic activities have been developed in collaboration with university partners Europe, especially in France. The modern techniques are more sensitive for monitoring microbial populations, metabolic activity and the genetic potential to degrade the COCs, and avoid the need for cultivation of microbes under artificial conditions in the laboratory. Especially the application of PCR-Tests (Polymerase Chain Reaction) are able to quantify the Genetic Potential of Pollutant Microbiological Degradation on a contaminated site. This enables to use very economic in-situ site rehabilitation strategies as for example (Dynamic Natural Attenuation). For this modern application of these new strategies PLANREAL created with HPC Envirotec and together with a French University

  10. Microbial and molecular techniques to evaluate and to implement in-situ biodegradation potential and activity at sites contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrinsic bio-remediation harnesses the ability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade contaminants that are present in soil and groundwater. Over the past decade many environmental regulatory agencies especially in Europe have come to recognize the importance of these natural processes in contaminant attenuation. In order to use in-situ bio-remediation to clean up a site successfully it is necessary to investigate the indigenous microbial population and its potential activity to degrade the contaminants of concern (COCs). The evaluation of naturally-occurring degradative activity in initial screening of soil and groundwater samples using recently developed molecular and microbial methods may allow for the implementation of a contaminant reduction and management program without the need for fully engineered remediation intervention. Limited engineering approaches (nutrient delivery etc.) can be implemented to support naturally-occurring bio-restoration processes to achieve a controlled, dynamic attenuation of COCs. Techniques for monitoring pollutant-degrading microorganisms were previously limited to standard culturing techniques. More recently, techniques based upon detection of genetic elements and metabolic activities have been developed in collaboration with university partners Europe, especially in France. The modern techniques are more sensitive for monitoring microbial populations, metabolic activity and the genetic potential to degrade the COCs, and avoid the need for cultivation of microbes under artificial conditions in the laboratory. Especially the application of PCR-Tests (Polymerase Chain Reaction) are able to quantify the Genetic Potential of Pollutant Microbiological Degradation on a contaminated site. This enables to use very economic in-situ site rehabilitation strategies as for example (Dynamic Natural Attenuation). For this modern application of these new strategies PLANREAL created with HPC Envirotec and together with a French University

  11. Proceedings of hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the 1980s witnessed a concentrated effort toward identifying the scientific concerns associated with hydrocarbon contaminated soils, the 1990s offer the hope that even more reliable solutions, both scientific and regulatory, will emerge. The hope for this transition from problem identification to problems solution is evident in these papers from the 5th Annual Conference on Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils (formerly called Petroleum Contaminated Soils), as the presentations more clearly reflect the maturation of a rapidly evolving field in the areas of chemical analysis, fate, remediation, public health, and regulatory evaluation. This book attempts to address the multidimensional facets of soil contamination by providing various current general perspectives as well as those from the regulatory and the international communities. Technical information is also provided in specific contamination areas such as diesel fuel, as well as analysis and site assessment, remediation, risk assessment, and management

  12. Emission of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons from combustion of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission of simple chlorinated compounds has been analyzed at five different cases at the district heating plant in Tranaas. The aim of this project has been to investigate the possibilities of finding a method for continuous monitoring of the emissions of chlorinated organic compounds from combustion. Samples were taken only after flue gas condensation. Three easily detectable chlorinated compounds could be quantified in spite of extremely low chlorine content in the fuel: * trichloroethylene, * tetrachloroethylene, * mono chlorinated benzene. Total amount of these compounds were > 0.2 mg/nm3. It is hard to find correlations between the emissions of chlorinated hydrocarbons and combustion conditions. One reason can be the sampling method which did not come up to our expectations. The high volatility of the solvent caused ice in the sampling train and most probably there has been great losses of the most volatile compounds. In spite of the fact that the combustion parameters in several samples were very good with low values of CO (0.2 mg/nm3 of monochlorinated benzene could be detected in the flue gas. Due to the unsatisfactory sampling method the real concentrations of the detected compounds are probably higher than the reported values. The amounts of chlorinated compounds detected are, in this plant, too low for continuous measurements. ( 6 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.)

  13. Session 6: The catalytic oxidation of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oszczudlowski, J. [Institute of Chemistry, Swietokrzyska Academy, Kielce (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The catalytic oxidation of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons was investigated in the presence of natural zeolites modified with 3M HCl and chromium and lanthanum from aqueous solutions. Natural zeolites of the structure of clinoptilolite or mordenite possess unique physical and chemical properties such as high sorptive capacity and ion-exchange selectivity, relatively high heat and mechanical resistance. The activation of samples of natural zeolites was carried out in a 3M aqueous solution of HCl using a Soxhlet apparatus, whereas the ion exchange from aqueous solutions of chromium (III) and lanthanum (III) nitrates. Samples of activated zeolites were calcinated at 500 C with a programmable temperature increase within 4 hours The amounts of Cr and La on zeolite were 3,0 % wt and 4,5 % wt, respectively. Catalytic tests were conducted in a micro-reactor coupled with a gas chromatograph. The conditions of reaction were as follows: temperature range: 473-723 K, substrate composition: chlorinated hydrocarbon (1000-10000 ppm), steam (0-10000 ppm) and air. Under standard conditions volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons were introduced into a gas flux as vapours, whereas low-volatile ones in a mixture with n-hexane or cyclohexane. The quantity of the deposits on the surface of a catalyst was analysed by the thermogravimetric and GC-MS methods. The composition of oxidation products of chlorinated hydrocarbons was chromatographically analysed indirectly with the techniques SPME-GC-ECD and SPME-GCFID. The total quantity of the products was stored in gas containers-Tedlars and the quantitative and qualitative composition was analysed by the method SPME-HS-GC-ECD (solid phase micro-extraction-headspace-gas chromatography-electron capture detector). The total oxidation of CCl{sub 4} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6} in the presence of the Cr/zeolite catalyst occurs at 400 C. The conversion of the catalytic oxidation of chloro-olefins in the presence of the La/zeolite catalyst increases within

  14. Metabolism of volatile chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbergh, P A; Kunka, B S

    1988-01-01

    A Pseudomonas fluorescens strain designated PFL12 was isolated from soil and water that were contaminated with various chloroaliphatic hydrocarbons. The isolate was able to metabolize 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 2,2-dichloropropane, and trichloroethylene.

  15. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallgren, Paul

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of

  16. Enhanced reductive dechlorination in clay till contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most frequently found contaminants in groundwater. In fractured media, chlorinated ethenes and ethanes are transported downwards through preferential pathways with subsequent diffusion into the sediment matrix. Due to slow back diffusion it can serve as a long...... the potential for development of degradation throughout the entire clay matrix. When ERD is applied in a low permeability settings one of the major constraints is to obtain the necessary contact between electron donor, bacteria and contaminants to achieve reasonable remediation timeframes. Two injection methods...

  17. Biotransformation of monoaromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons at an aviation-gasoline spill site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of petroleum products from underground storage tanks, pipelines, and accidental spills are major sources of contamination of unsaturated soils, aquifer solids, and a shallow water table aquifer under the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station at Traverse City, MI, has acclimated to the aerobic and anaerobic transformation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons (BTX) released from an aviation gasoline spill. The aquifer also exhibits reductive dechlorination of a chlorinated solvent spill adjacent to the aviation gasoline spill. The groundwater is buffered near neutrality. The aviation gasoline plume is methanogenic and the aquifer contains enough iron minerals to support significant iron solubilization. Field evidence of both aerobic and anaerobic biotransformation of monoaromatics was confirmed by laboratory studies of aquifer material obtained from the site. In the laboratory studies, the removal of the monoaromatics in the anaerobic material was rapid and compared favorable with removal in the aerobic material. The kinetics of anaerobic removal of monoaromatics in the laboratory were similar to the kinetics at field scale in the aquifer. Biotransformation of the chlorinated solvents was not observed until late in the study, when daughter products from reductive dechlorination of the chlorinated solvents were identified by GC/MS

  18. Bioremediation of soils containing petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench-scale treatability investigations, pilot-scale and full-scale bioremediation projects were conducted to evaluate Daramend trademark bioremediation of soils containing petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy oils, paraffins, chlorinated phenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Bench-scale investigations were conducted using glass microcosms. Pilot-scale and full-scale demonstrations were conducted at industrial sites and included treatment of excavated soils and sediments in on-site cells constructed using synthetic liners and covered by steel/polyethylene structures as well as in-situ treatment. A total of approximately 5,000 tons of soil was treated. The soil treatment included organic soil amendments, specialized tillage/aeration apparatus, and strict control of soil moisture. The amendments are composed of naturally-occurring organic materials prepared to soil-specific particle size distributions, nutrient profiles, and nutrient-release kinetics. Bench-scale work indicated that in refinery soil containing high concentrations of heavy oils, extractable hydrocarbon concentrations could be rapidly reduced to industrial clean-up criteria, and that the hydrocarbons were fully mineralized with release of CO2

  19. Volatile Short-chain Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in the Groundwater of the City of Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijanović-Rajčić, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the quality of the groundwater sampled from private wells and the public water-supply system in terms of estimating the contamination caused by short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons, as well as to estimate the exposure of the citizens dwelling in different suburbs to these pollutants of their drinking water (Fig. 1. The aim of the study was also to determine which suburb is supplied through the public water-supply system with water originating from the Sašnak spring that is contaminated with volatile chlorinated short-chain hydrocarbons.Drinking water samples were taken from 3 private wells and 1 public water-supply system situated in 3 Zagreb suburbs - Pešćenica, Trnje, and Trešnjevka. The sampling was carried out during 2003 and was undertaken on a seasonal basis. Short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons - 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethene and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene - were determined by gas chromatography, following "liquid-liquid extraction" in pentane. For that purpose, we applied the gas chromatograph equipped with an electron-capture detector, thermo-programmable operations, and a suitable capillary column. The technique applied was that of split-injection.The groundwater of the City of Zagreb was found to be contaminated with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons. The concentration level of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, determined in most of the samples, was found to be low (Fig. 2. On the other hand, 1,1,2-trichloroethene was present in all samples in concentrations of about 1 µg l-1- (Fig. 3. Only the drinking water samples taken from private wells in the suburb of Trnje contained somewhat higher mass concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, with the peak value of 19.03 µg l-1, measured in the winter season. In the samples taken from private wells in Trnje, the mass concentrations of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene rangedfrom 15.30 µg l-1 to 18.65 µg l-1, as measured in autumn

  20. Investigating hydrocarbon contamination using ground penetrating radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing costs of remediating contaminated sites has stimulated research for cost reducing techniques in soil investigation and clean-up techniques. Under the traditional approach soil borings and groundwater wells are used to investigate contaminated soil. These are useful tools to determine the amount and characteristics of the contamination, but they are inefficient and costly in providing information on the location and extent of contamination as they only give information on one point. This often leads to uncertainty in estimating clean-up costs or, even worse, to unsuccessful clean-ups. MAP Environmental Research has developed a technology using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) in combination with in-house developed software to locate and define the extent of hydrocarbon contamination. With this technology, the quality of site investigation is increased while costs are reduced. Since 1994 MAP has been improving its technology and has applied it to over 100 projects, which all have been checked afterwards by conventional drilling. This paper gives some general characteristics of the method and presents a case study. The emphasis of this paper lies on the practical application of GPR to hydrocarbon contamination detection

  1. Chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in biota, sediments and water collected from the Ligurian Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of samples were collected for measurement of DDT and its derivatives DDE and DDD, lindane and polychlorinated biphenyls and for assessment of their presence in biota, sediments and water of the Ligurian sea. Retention times of chlorinated hydrocarbons relative to that of aldrin in the samples are reported. Comparisions are made of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations in fresh and freeze dried samples and also in zooplankton and seaplant. The hydrocarbon concentrations are measured in mussels, Mytillus galloprovincialis, sediments and water. The Σ DDT/PCB ratios are determined for mussels and sediment samples

  2. HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION IN BREAST MILK: PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mercogliano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mainly formed by anthropogenic activities, are ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Due to environmental contamination and their chemical properties they migrate through the human food chain, and can be transferred from mother to infant via breastfeeding. The presence of PAHs in breast milk collected from 16 lactating women living in urban and rural areas of Campania (Italy was investigated. Results showed the presence of 14 hydrocabons. Carcinogenic benzo(apyrene and potential carcinogenic dibenzo(ahanthracene were found at concentrations rancing from 0.3 to 37.6 μg/kg and from 0.5 to 47.0, respectively.

  3. Quantification of Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Saturated Low Permeability Sediments Using Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Philipp; Parker, Beth L; Chapman, Steven W; Aravena, Ramon; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    This field and modeling study aims to reveal if degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in low permeability sediments can be quantified using compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). For that purpose, the well-characterized Borden research site was selected, where an aquifer-aquitard system was artificially contaminated by a three component chlorinated solvent mixture (tetrachloroethene (PCE) 45 vol %, trichloroethene (TCE) 45 vol %, and chloroform (TCM) 10 vol %). Nearly 15 years after the contaminant release, several high-resolution concentration and CSIA profiles were determined for the chlorinated hydrocarbons that had diffused into the clayey aquitard. The CSIA profiles showed large shifts of carbon isotope ratios with depth (up to 24‰) suggesting that degradation occurs in the aquitard despite the small pore sizes. Simulated scenarios without or with uniform degradation failed to reproduce the isotope data, while a scenario with decreasing degradation with depth fit the data well. This suggests that nutrients had diffused into the aquitard favoring stronger degradation close to the aquifer-aquitard interface than with increasing depth. Moreover, the different simulation scenarios showed that CSIA profiles are more sensitive to different degradation conditions compared to concentration profiles highlighting the power of CSIA to constrain degradation activities in aquitards. PMID:27153381

  4. Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons: Ugly duckling to beautiful swan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, G.F.

    1999-10-01

    For many years anaerobic biological processes were reputed to be more sensitive than aerobic processes to toxic substances such as chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) and thus a poor choice for treating water containing these compounds. This was especially true for water containing perchloroethylene (PCE) or trichloroethylene (TCE) because vinyl chloride, a human carcinogen, is produced when these two compounds are degraded anaerobically. Aerobic treatment with organisms containing oxygenase enzyme systems, which could fortuitously degrade a wide variety of chlorinated aliphatics (but not PCE), was favored. Recently, however, several enrichments and organisms have been isolated that will convert PCE and TCE into ethene and ethane, as shown by field data. Because of this evidence, anaerobic processes are now considered a significant alternative treatment for CAH contamination. Recent work at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, has focused on the effect of mixtures of CAHs on biotransformation of individual organic compounds and the potential for a combined methanogen-iron (Fe(0)) system to improve CAH bioremediation. At the concentration ranges tested, the presence of a mixture of CAHs seems to decrease rate of transformation of individual organics. However, there are important exceptions; in some cases a mixture of CAHs seems to facilitate transformation of an individual organic compound. Combination of an active methanogenic population with Fe(0) increases the rate and extent of transformation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. Results with PCE and 1,1,1-trichloroethane are less clear.

  5. Sustainable treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated industrial land

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Colin John

    2012-01-01

    Land contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons is a widespread and global environmental pollution issue from recovery and refining of crude oil and the ubiquitous use of hydrocarbons in industrial processes and applications. Sustainable treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated industrial land was considered with reference to seven published works on contaminated railway land including the track ballast, crude oil wastes and contaminated refinery soils. A methodology was developed...

  6. Heavy metal and chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in California sea loins (Zalophus californianus californianus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhler, D.R.; Claeys, R.R.; Mate, B.R.

    1975-12-01

    Samples of various tissues and organs from healthy California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) and sick animals (apparently with leptospirosis) collected along the central Oregon coast in 1970, 1971, and 1973 were analyzed for total mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Maximum mercury concentrations of 74 to 170 ppM occurred in sea lion liver, but only 1.6 to 3.7 percent of this was present as methylmercury. Cadmium was concentrated primarily in the kidney which contained 7.2 to 12.0 ppM of the metal. Chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in sea lion fat ranged between 253 to 475 ppM DDE, and 21.2 and 34.1 ppM PCB. Although mercury, cadmium, and chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in some of the sick sea lions were significantly higher than those present in healthy animals, it is not possible to relate these differences to the onset of leptospirosis.

  7. Biological detoxification of a hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soil quality of an industrial site chronically contaminated by 39000 mg/kg of oil was detrimentally affected. Soil treatments by bio-pile and land-farming resulted in a reduction of the level of contamination exceeding 90% of the original values, but without reaching regulatory limits. However, the bio-remediation treatments dramatically reduced the mobility of the contaminants and, accordingly, microbial tests clearly indicate that the soil quality improved to acceptable levels, similar to those typically observed in unaltered soils. Hydrocarbon mobility was estimated by the use of water and mild extractants (methanol and sodium dodecyl sulphate) to leach the contaminants from the soil; soil quality was evaluated by comparing the values of selected microbial and enzymatic parameters of the treated soil samples to reference values determined for natural soils. Microbial assessments included: measurement of the nitrification potential, dehydrogenase activity, measures of respiration and lipase activity, microbial counts (MPN on rich media) and MicrotoxTM assays of the water elutriate. Dermal absorption potential was evaluated using absorption on C18 disks

  8. Biological detoxification of a hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, F.; Lucchese, G.; Nardella, A. [E. Ramarini Eni Technologie, Monterotondo (RM), Roma (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    The soil quality of an industrial site chronically contaminated by 39000 mg/kg of oil was detrimentally affected. Soil treatments by bio-pile and land-farming resulted in a reduction of the level of contamination exceeding 90% of the original values, but without reaching regulatory limits. However, the bio-remediation treatments dramatically reduced the mobility of the contaminants and, accordingly, microbial tests clearly indicate that the soil quality improved to acceptable levels, similar to those typically observed in unaltered soils. Hydrocarbon mobility was estimated by the use of water and mild extractants (methanol and sodium dodecyl sulphate) to leach the contaminants from the soil; soil quality was evaluated by comparing the values of selected microbial and enzymatic parameters of the treated soil samples to reference values determined for natural soils. Microbial assessments included: measurement of the nitrification potential, dehydrogenase activity, measures of respiration and lipase activity, microbial counts (MPN on rich media) and Microtox{sup TM} assays of the water elutriate. Dermal absorption potential was evaluated using absorption on C{sub 18} disks.

  9. Kinetics of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Toxicity of Trichloroethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhuis, Roelof; Oedzes, Johannes Y.; Waarde, Jacob J. van der; Janssen, Dick B.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and seven other chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were studied. All experiments were performed with cells grown under copper stress and thus expressing soluble methane monooxygenase. Compounds that were re

  10. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Múčka, V.; Buňata, M.; Čuba, V.; Silber, R.; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, Jul (2015), s. 108-116. ISSN 0969-806X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28721S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chlorinated hydrocarbons * TCE * PCE * PCBs * dechlorination * gamma irradiation * modifiers * cell membrane permeability Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 1.380, year: 2014

  11. Chlorinated contaminants in chorio-allantoic membranes from great blue heron eggs at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, G P; Norman, D M; Miller, M W; Brewer, L W; Johnston, R K

    1995-01-01

    Chorio-allantoic membranes (CAMs) were collected and analyzed for chlorinated hydrocarbons as part of a wildlife toxicology demonstration project at Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island, Washington, USA. Concentrations of DDT, DDE, DDD, Aroclor 1254, and Aroclor 1260 were found at concentrations below 0.4 ppm for 13 of 14 samples. The low correlations among DDT and its metabolites in CAMs suggest herons are not being exposed to a consistent source of these compounds. Comparison of chlorinated hydrocarbon data for CAMs from three Puget Sound heron colonies, NAS Whidbey, Samish Island and Dumas Bay, indicates contaminant burdens in herons from NAS Whidbey and Samish Island are significantly lower than burdens in herons from Dumas Bay. PMID:7874465

  12. In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons: Three case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ biodegradation of organic contaminants is one of the most cost-effective means of site remediation. This method has proven successful in soils, ground water, and slurries. Bacteria capable of degrading organic contaminants within an aquifer include many species from a wide spectrum of genera, e.g. Pseudomonas, Corynebacterium, Bacillus, etc. In most cases, a mixture of bacterial strains is required to completely oxidize a complex organic contaminant. Each strain of an organism may target a specific compound, working together with other organisms to ultimately degrade each intermediate until complete degradation, also known as mineralization, occurs. One or more of the following mechanisms are utilized by bacteria for organic chemical degradation: (1) aerobic, (2) anaerobic, and (3) co-metabolic. During aerobic oxidation of organic chemicals, bacteria utilize the pollutant as an electron and hydrogen source and oxygen acts as the electron and hydrogen acceptor, resulting in water. As the bacterial enzymes cleave the compound, oxidized products are produced along with energy for the reaction to proceed. This is the most rapid and widely utilized mechanism. Dehalogenation occurs under aerobic, or perhaps more often, under anoxic conditions. This process occurs in the presence of alternate electron acceptors and replaces chlorine with hydrogen. The mechanism of co-metabolism can be aerobic or anaerobic, but is more often aerobic. This process requires a separate energy source for the bacterial cell because the pollutant is not utilized as an energy source. The role of bioremediation in site remediation is demonstrated below by three case studies: (1) a refinery, (2) a municipal landfill and (3) a pesticide formulation plant

  13. Control and assessment of the hydrocarbon contamination of Ukrainian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, N. N.

    2008-05-01

    Regularities governing the self-purification of soils from oil hydrocarbons, as well as migration of hydrocarbons, and the effect on the water-physical properties and fertility of soils were revealed in a series of experiments. A system of ecological, economic, and reclamation standards was proposed for regulating economic activities in the case of soil contamination with hydrocarbons.

  14. Chemical fingerprinting of hydrocarbon-contamination in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Esther Sørensen; Nejrup, Jens; Jensen, Julie K.;

    2015-01-01

    Chemical fingerprinting analyses of 29 hydrocarbon-contaminated soils were performed to assess the soil quality and determine the main contaminant sources. The results were compared to an assessment based on concentrations of the 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pointed out by the U...... assessing weathering trends of hydrocarbon contamination in the soils. Multivariate data analysis of sum-normalized concentrations could as a stand-alone tool distinguish between hydrocarbon sources of petrogenic and pyrogenic origin, differentiate within petrogenic sources, and detect weathering trends....... Diagnostic ratios of PACs were not successful for source identification of the heavily weathered hydrocarbon sources in the soils. The fingerprinting of contaminated soils revealed an underestimation of PACs in petrogenic contaminated soils when the assessment was based solely on EPAPAH16. As alkyl...

  15. Comparison of Phytoscreening and Direct-Push- Based Site Investigation at a Rural Megasite Contaminated with Chlorinated Ethenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Arno; Holm, Olaf; Trapp, Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    The reliable characterization of subsurface contamination of spatially extended contaminated sites is a challenging task, especially with an unknown history of land use. Conventional technologies often fail due to temporal and financial constraints and thus hinder the redevelopment of abandoned...... areas in particular. Here we compare two site screening techniques that can be applied quickly at relatively low cost, namely Direct Push (DP)-based groundwater sampling and tree core sampling. The effectiveness of both methods is compared for a rural megasite contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons....... Unexpected pollution hot spots could be identified using both of these methods, while tree coring even enabled the delineation of the contaminant plume flowing into an adjacent wetland inaccessible for DP units. Both methods showed a good agreement in revealing the spatial pattern of the contamination...

  16. Kinetics of aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of chlorinated and brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, João; Frascari, Dario; Pozdniakova, Tatiana; Danko, Anthony S

    2016-05-15

    This review analyses kinetic studies of aerobic cometabolism (AC) of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) from 2001-2015 in order to (i) compare the different kinetic models proposed, (ii) analyse the estimated model parameters with a focus on novel HAHs and the identification of general trends, and (iii) identify further research needs. The results of this analysis show that aerobic cometabolism can degrade a wide range of HAHs, including HAHs that were not previously tested such as chlorinated propanes, highly chlorinated ethanes and brominated methanes and ethanes. The degree of chlorine mineralization was very high for the chlorinated HAHs. Bromine mineralization was not determined for studies with brominated aliphatics. The examined research period led to the identification of novel growth substrates of potentially high interest. Decreasing performance of aerobic cometabolism were found with increasing chlorination, indicating the high potential of aerobic cometabolism in the presence of medium- and low-halogenated HAHs. Further research is needed for the AC of brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons, the potential for biofilm aerobic cometabolism processes, HAH-HAH mutual inhibition and the identification of the enzymes responsible for each aerobic cometabolism process. Lastly, some indications for a possible standardization of future kinetic studies of HAH aerobic cometabolism are provided. PMID:26874310

  17. Assessing breeding potential of peregrine falcons based on chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations in prey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J.E. [Canadian Wildlife Service, Pacific Wildlife Research Centre, 5421 Robertson Rd., RR no. 1, Delta, British Columbia, V4K 3N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: john.elliott@ec.gc.ca; Miller, M.J. [Iolaire Ecological Consulting, 7899 Thrasher St., Mission, British Columbia, V2V 5H3 (Canada); Wilson, L.K. [Canadian Wildlife Service, Pacific Wildlife Research Centre, 5421 Robertson Rd., RR no. 1, Delta, British Columbia, V4K 3N2 (Canada)

    2005-03-01

    Peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) now breed successfully in most areas of North America from which they were previously extirpated. The loss during the mid-part of the last century of many of the world's peregrine populations was largely a consequence of impaired reproduction caused by the effects of DDE on eggshell quality and embryo hatchability. Population recovery has been attributed to re-introduction efforts, coupled with regulatory restrictions on the use of organochlorine pesticides. Peregrines have not returned to breed in some areas, such as the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia. That region has been extensively planted in fruit orchards which were treated annually with DDT during the early 1950s to the 1970s. Ongoing contamination of avian species, including potential peregrine prey, inhabiting orchards has been documented. In response to an initiative to release peregrines around the city of Kelowna in the Okanagan Valley, we collected potential peregrine prey species and analyzed whole bodies for chlorinated hydrocarbon residues. We used a simple bioaccumulation model to predict concentrations of DDE in peregrine eggs using concentrations in prey and estimates of dietary makeup as input. Peregrines would be expected to breed successfully only if they fed on a diet primarily of doves. Feeding on as little as 10% of other species such as starlings, robins, gulls and magpies would produce DDE concentrations in peregrine eggs greater than the threshold of 15 mg/kg. We also estimated the critical concentration of DDE in total prey to be about 0.5 mg/kg, one half of the previous most conservative criterion for peregrine prey. Concentrations of dieldrin and PCBs in peregrine prey are less than suggested critical levels. - Based on the level of DDE contamination of prey items, it seems unlikely that peregrine falcons could breed successfully throughout most of the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia.

  18. Modelling of the natural chlorine cycling in a coniferous stand: implications for chlorine-36 behaviour in a contaminated forest environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considered as one of the most available radionuclide in soil–plant system, 36Cl is of potential concern for long-term management of radioactive wastes, due to its high mobility and its long half-life. To evaluate the risk of dispersion and accumulation of 36Cl in the biosphere as a consequence of a potential contamination, there is a need for an appropriate understanding of the chlorine cycling dynamics in the ecosystems. To date, a small number of studies have investigated the chlorine transfer in the ecosystem including the transformation of chloride to organic chlorine but, to our knowledge, none have modelled this cycle. In this study, a model involving inorganic as well as organic pools in soils has been developed and parameterised to describe the biogeochemical fate of chlorine in a pine forest. The model has been evaluated for stable chlorine by performing a range of sensitivity analyses and by comparing the simulated to the observed values. Finally a range of contamination scenarios, which differ in terms of external supply, exposure time and source, has been simulated to estimate the possible accumulation of 36Cl within the different compartments of the coniferous stand. The sensitivity study supports the relevancy of the model and its compartments, and has highlighted the chlorine transfers affecting the most the residence time of chlorine in the stand. Compared to observations, the model simulates realistic values for the chlorine content within the different forest compartments. For both atmospheric and underground contamination scenarios most of the chlorine can be found in its organic form in the soil. However, in case of an underground source, about two times less chlorine accumulates in the system and proportionally more chlorine leaves the system through drainage than through volatilisation. - Highlights: ► 36Cl is of potential concern for long-term management of radioactive wastes. ► There is a need for an appropriate understanding of the Cl

  19. Ecogenomics of microbial communities in bioremediation of chlorinated contaminated sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farai Maphosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Organohalide compounds such as chloroethenes, chloroethanes and polychlorinated benzenes are among the most significant pollutants in the world. These compounds are often found in contamination plumes with other pollutants such as solvents, pesticides and petroleum derivatives. Microbial bioremediation of contaminated sites, has become commonplace whereby key processes involved in bioremediation include anaerobic degradation and transformation of these organohalides by organohalide respiring bacteria and also via hydrolytic, oxygenic and reductive mechanisms by aerobic bacteria. Microbial ecogenomics has enabled us to not only study the microbiology involved in these complex processes but also develop tools to better monitor and assess these sites during bioremediation. Microbial ecogenomics have capitalized on recent advances in high-throughput and -output genomics technologies in combination with microbial physiology studies to address these complex bioremediation problems at a system level. Advances in environmental metagenomics, transcriptomics and proteomics have provided insights into key genes and their regulation in the environment. They have also given us clues into microbial community structures, dynamics and functions at contaminated sites. These techniques have not only aided us in understanding the lifestyles of common organohalide respirers, for example Dehalococcoides, Dehalobacter and Desulfitobacterium, but also provided insights into novel and yet uncultured microorganisms found in organohalide respiring consortia. In this paper we look at how ecogenomic studies have aided us to understand the microbial structures and functions in response to environmental stimuli such as the presence of chlorinated pollutants.

  20. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions containing the active carbon (AC) or cupric oxide (CuO) as the modifiers was studied. The obtained results were compared to the previously studied dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both modifiers were found to decrease the efficiency of dechlorination. The AC modifier acts mainly via adsorption of the aliphatic (unlike the aromatic) hydrocarbons and the CuO oxide mainly inhibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. The results presented in this paper will be also helpful for the studies of the impact of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the membrane permeability of living cells. - Highlights: • The active carbon affects negatively the dechlorination of aliphatic hydrocarbons. • The inhibition effect is connected with the adsorption of hydrocarbons. • The CuO oxide ihibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. • None of the two modifiers changes the reaction order of radiation induced dechlorination

  1. Hydrocarbon contamination of different ruthenium surface orientations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Nam; Gusenleitner, Sina; Ernst, Marius; Wetzstein, Holger; Reinert, Friedrich [University of Wuerzburg, Experimental Physics VII, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Ehm, Dirk [Carl Zeiss SMT AG, Rudolf-Eber-Str. 2, 73447 Oberkochen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer mirrors for Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography applications are threatened by various damaging processes. During exposure, the dominating contamination processes are carbonization and oxidation due to adsorption of hydrocarbons and oxygen and their reaction with the mirror surface, reducing the mirror lifetime. One possibility to limit these lifetime risks is to coat the mirror with a dedicated capping material, such as Si, Ti, Mo, Pd, Ru, or their oxides. To study the general interaction mechanisms of adsorbates with the capping materials, organic model molecules are used. In this work, the interaction of 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) with single crystalline Ru(0001) and Ru(anti 1100) surfaces as well as evaporated thin Ru films is presented. PTCDA molecules are deposited on the Ru surfaces by organic molecular beam epitaxy. The structural and electronic properties of the resulting interfaces are investigated by various surface analytical techniques, including low energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS).

  2. Fenton process for degradation of selected chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons exemplified by trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene and chloroform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimin QIANG; Weiwei BEN; ChinPao HUANG

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of selected chlorinated ali-phatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) exemplified by trichloroethy-lene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (DCE), and chloroform (CF) was investigated with Fenton oxidation process. The results indicate that the degradation rate was primarily affected by the chemical structures of organic contami-nants. Hydroxyl radicals (·OH) preferred to attack the organic contaminants with an electron-rich structure such as chlorinated alkenes (i.e., TCE and DCE). The dosing mode of Fenton's reagent, particularly of Fe2+, significantly affected the degradation efficiency of studied organic compound. A new "time-squared" kinetic model, C = Coexp(-kobst2), was developed to express the degrada-tion kinetics of selected CAHs. This model was applicable to TCE and DCE, but inapplicable to CF due to their varied reaction rate constants towards ·OH. Chloride release was monitored to examine the degree of dechlorina- tion during the oxidation of selected CAHs. TCE was more easily dechlorinated than DCE and CF. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) was identified as the major reaction intermediate in the oxidation of TCE, which could be completely removed as the reaction proceeded. No reaction intermedi- ates or byproducts were identified in the oxidation of DCE and CF. Based on the identified intermediate, the reaction mechanism of TCE with Fenton's reagent was proposed.

  3. Kinetics of chlorinated hydrocarbon degradation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and toxicity of trichloroethylene.

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenhuis, Roelof; Oedzes, Johannes Y.; Waarde, Jacob J. van der; Janssen, Dick B.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and seven other chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were studied. All experiments were performed with cells grown under copper stress and thus expressing soluble methane monooxygenase. Compounds that were readily degraded included chloroform, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, and TCE, with V(max) values of 550, 330, and 290 nmol min-1 mg of cells-1, respectively. 1,1-Dichloroethylene was a very poor substra...

  4. Riverine input of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the coastal pollution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; Everaarts, J.M.

    This chapter presents an overview of the contamination of the coastal ecosystem of the North Sea, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, East China Sea, Atlantic Sea, Aegean Sea, East Java Sea, Australian coast and the Mediterranean Sea due to riverine input...

  5. Polar non-hydrocarbon contaminants in reservoir core extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett B; Larter SR

    2000-01-01

    A geochemical investigation of oils in sandstone core plugs and drill stem test oils was carried out on samples from a North Sea reservoir. A sample of diesel used as a constituent of the drilling fluids was also analysed. The aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and polar non-hydrocarbons were isolated using solid phase extraction methods. GC analysis of the hydrocarbon fraction of the core extract indicated that contamination may be diesel derived. From analysis of diesel some compound clas...

  6. Natural attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in a freshwater wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Michelle M.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Smith, Barrett L.

    1997-01-01

    Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) occurs as ground water discharges from a sand aquifer to a freshwater wetland at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Field and laboratory results indicate that biotransformation in the anaerobic wetland sediments is an important attenuation process. Relatively high concentrations of the parent compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (PCA) and low or undetectable concentrations of daughter products were measured in the aquifer. In contrast, relatively high concentrations of the daughter products cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (12DCE); vinyl chloride (VC); 1,1,2-trichloroethane (112TCA); and 1,2-dichloroethane (12DCA) were measured in ground water in the wetland sediments, although total VOC concentrations decreased upward from about 1 mu mol/L (micromoles per liter) at the base of the wetland sediments to less than 0.2 near the surface. Microcosm experiments showed that 12DCE and VC are produced from anaerobic degradation of both TCE and PCA; PCA degradation also produced 112TCA and 12DCA.

  7. Chlorine Stabilizer T-128 enhances efficacy of chlorine against cross contamination by E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in fresh-cut lettuce processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    During fresh produce processing, organic materials released from cut tissues can rapidly react with free chlorine in the wash solution, leading to the potential survival of foodborne bacterial pathogens and cross-contamination when the free chlorine is depleted. A reported chlorine stabilizer, T128...

  8. Numerical simulation of the thermal destruction of some chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, E M; Koshland, C P

    1990-10-01

    We have numerically modeled the breakdown of small quantities of several chlorinated hydrocarbons (CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, C2H3Cl, and C2H5Cl) in a lean mixture of combustion products between 800 and 1480 K. This simulates the fate of poorly atomized waste in a liquid-injection incinerator. Kinetics calculations were performed using the CHEMKIN and SENKIN programs, with a reaction mechanism that was developed at Louisiana State University to model flat-flame burner experiments. A 99.99-percent destruction efficiency was attained in one second at temperatures ranging from 1280 to 960 K, with CCl4 requiring the highest temperature for destruction and C2H5Cl the lowest. For all compounds except C2H5Cl, there was a range of temperatures at which byproducts accounted for several percent of the elemental chlorine at the outlet. The more heavily chlorinated compounds formed more byproducts even though the amount of elemental chlorine was the same in all cases. The sensitivity of results to residence time, equivalence ratio, temperature profile, and the presence of additional chlorine, was examined for the case of CHCl3. PMID:2257126

  9. Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons at cold temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of intrinsic bioremediation in cold climates was evaluated based on studies on a former landfill site at Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake. This site has been used in the past as a disposal site for various hydrocarbon products, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX), dichloroethanes, and dichlorobenzenes. Computer models based on the results of the investigation suggest that reductive dechlorination and BTEX mineralization has occurred and is occurring at this site despite the colder in-situ temperatures. Further studies of the complex redox environment required to facilitate reductive dechlorination is recommended before intrinsic bioremediation can be considered with certainty as a viable remedial option in cold temperature environments. 17 refs., 7 figs

  10. Chitosan application as a biocoagulant in wastewater contaminated with hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Juan M. Álava

    2015-01-01

    The environment contamination in Ecuador, done by the production, transport and commercialization of hydrocarbons, requires further research regarding new treatment alternatives that use biodegradable substances. In this study, abdominal shrimp shell waste, Litopenaeus vannamei was used to obtain chitosan and then apply it as a biocoagulant to a wastewater sample contaminated with hydrocarbon products. The produced chitosan was characterised by potentiometric titration, resulting in a deacety...

  11. Microbial Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminants: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Nilanjana Das; Preethy Chandran

    2010-01-01

    One of the major environmental problems today is hydrocarbon contamination resulting from the activities related to the petrochemical industry. Accidental releases of petroleum products are of particular concern in the environment. Hydrocarbon components have been known to belong to the family of carcinogens and neurotoxic organic pollutants. Currently accepted disposal methods of incineration or burial insecure landfills can become prohibitively expensive when amounts of contaminants are lar...

  12. Biodegradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in a vapor phase reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bench scale gas lift loop reactor was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradative microorganisms being used to treat TCE contaminated air. Two different microorganisms were used as biocatalysts in this reactor. After proper operating conditions were established for use of this reactor/biocatalyst combination, both microorganisms could degrade 95% of inlet TCE at air flow rates of up to 3% of the total reactor volume per minute. TCE concentrations of between 300 μg/L (60ppmv) and 3000 μg/L (600 ppmv) were degraded with 95% or better efficiency. Preliminary economic evaluations suggest that bioremediation may be the low cost alternative for treating certain TCE contaminated air streams and field trials of a scaled-up reactor system based on this technology are currently underway

  13. Application of Chlorine Dioxide to Lessen Bacterial Contamination during Broiler Defeathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to escape of contaminated gut contents, the number of Campylobacter spp. recovered from broiler carcasses increases during feather removal. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is approved for use as an antimicrobial treatment during poultry processing. A chlorine dioxide generator was placed in a commerci...

  14. A hand-portable instrument system for the real-time analysis of chlorinated organic compound contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Working with the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Transducer Research, Inc. (TRI) recently developed a new chemical monitor which responds selectively to vapors of chlorinated solvents. No response is observed with common hydrocarbon organic compounds such as BTXs (benzene, toluene, xylene) or POLs (petroleum, oil, lubricants), and in fact, no nonhalogen containing chemical has been identified which induces a measurable response. This instrument, the RCL MONITOR, was designed to analyze individual samples or monitor an area with automated repetitive analyses. Vapor levels between 0 and 500 ppm can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ppm using the hand-portable instrument. In addition to the development of the RCL MONITOR, advanced sampler systems are being developed to: (1) extend the dynamic range of the instrument through autodilution of the vapor and (2) allow chemical analyses to be performed on groundwater with a unique closed-loop sampler. When interfaced to the samplers, the RCL MONITOR is capable of measuring chlorinated solvent contamination in the vapor phase up to 5,000 ppm and in water and other condensed media from 10 to over 10,000 ppbwt. The performance of RCL MONITOR was demonstrated at several DOE facilities and applications have been identified in which the selective and sensitive measurement and monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons is essential. Case studies are currently underway at DOE Hanford and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  15. Comparison of purge and trap GC/MS and purgeable organic chloride analysis for monitoring volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Thurman, E. Michael; Takahashi, Yoshi; Noriega, Mary C.

    1992-01-01

    A combined field and laboratory study was conducted to compare purge and trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (PT-GC/MS) and purgeable organic chloride (POCl) analysis for measuring volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCH) in ground water. Distilled-water spike and recovery experiments using 10 VCH indicate that at concentrations greater than 1 ??g/l recovery is more than 80 percent for both methods with relative standard deviations of about 10 percent. Ground-water samples were collected from a site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where a shallow unconfined aquifer has been contaminated by VCH, and were analyzed by both methods. Results for PT-GC/MS and POCl analysis of the ground-water samples were not significantly different (alpha = 0.05, paired t-test analysis) and indicated little bias between the two methods. Similar conclusions about concentrations and distributions of VCH in the ground-water contamination plume were drawn from the two data sets. However, only PT-GC/MS analysis identified the individual compounds present and determined their concentrations, which was necessary for toxicological and biogeochemical evaluation of the contaminated ground water. POCl analysis was a complimentary method for use with PT-GC/MS analysis for identifying samples with VCH concentrations below the detection limit or with high VCH concentrations that require dilution. Use of POCl as a complimentary monitoring method for PT-GC/MS can result in more efficient use of analytical resources.

  16. Natural attenuation of diesel aliphatic hydrocarbons in contaminated agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diesel fuel spill at a concentration of 1 L m-2 soil was simulated on a 12 m2 plot of agricultural land, and natural attenuation of aliphatic hydrocarbons was monitored over a period of 400 days following the spill after which the aliphatic hydrocarbon concentrations were found to be below the legal contamination threshold for soil. The main fraction of these compounds (95%) remained at the surface layer (0-10 cm). Shortly after the spill (viz. between days 0 and 18), evaporation was the main origin of the dramatic decrease in pollutant concentrations in the soil. Thereafter, soil microorganisms used aliphatic hydrocarbons as sources of carbon and energy, as confirmed by the degradation ratios found. Soil quality indicators, soil microbial biomass and dehydrogenase activity, regained their original levels about 200 days after the spill. - The effect of aliphatic hydrocarbons contamination on soil quality was monitored over a period of 400 days after a Diesel fuel spill

  17. Phytoremediation of Soils Contaminated by Chlorinnated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, C.; Sung, K.; Corapcioglu, M.

    2001-12-01

    In recent years, the possible use of deep rooted plants for phytoremediation of soil contaminants has been offered as a potential alternative for waste management, particularly for in situ remediation of large volumes of contaminated soils. Major objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of a warm season grass (Eastern Gamagrass) and a cool season prairie grass (Annual Ryegrass) in the phytoremediation of the soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds e.g., trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) and to determine the main mechanisms of target contaminant dissipation. The preliminary tests and laboratory scale tests were conducted to identify the main mechanisms for phytoremediation of the target contaminants, and to apply the technique in green house application under field conditions. The results of microcosm and bioreactor experiments showed that volatilization can be the dominant pathway of the target contaminant mass losses in soils. Toxicity tests, conducted in nutrient solution in the growth room, and in the greenhouse, showed that both Eastern gamagrass and Annual ryegrass could grow without harmful effects at up to 400 ppm each of all three contaminants together. Preliminary greenhouse experimentw were conducted with the 1.5 m long and 0.3 m diameter PVC columns. Soil gas concentrations monitored and microbial biomass in bulk and rhizosphere soil, root properties, and contaminant concentration in soil after 100 days were analyzed. The results showed that the soil gas concentration of contaminants has rapidly decreased especially in the upper soil and the contaminant concentraitons in soil were also significantly decreased to 0.024, 0.228, and 0.002 of C/Co for TCE, PCE and TCA, respectively. Significant plant effects were not found however showed contaminant loss through volatilization and plant contamination by air.

  18. Polar non-hydrocarbon contaminants in reservoir core extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett B

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available A geochemical investigation of oils in sandstone core plugs and drill stem test oils was carried out on samples from a North Sea reservoir. A sample of diesel used as a constituent of the drilling fluids was also analysed. The aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and polar non-hydrocarbons were isolated using solid phase extraction methods. GC analysis of the hydrocarbon fraction of the core extract indicated that contamination may be diesel derived. From analysis of diesel some compound classes are less likely to be affected by contamination from diesel itself including: steranes, hopanes, aromatic steroid hydrocarbons, benzocarbazoles and C0–C3-alkylphenols. Large quantities of sterols (ca. 30 mg g-1 total soluble extract were identified in the polar non-hydrocarbon fractions of the core extract petroleum, presumably resulting from contamination. The origin of sterols is likely to be due to an additive introduced into the drilling fluid. Sterols are surface active compounds and in significant quantities may affect engineering core property measurements including wettability determinations. In addition, bulk petroleum composition screening methods, such as Iatroscan, used for determining saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, resins and asphaltenes (SARA content of core extract petroleum may also be affected.

  19. Chemical contamination and transformation of soils in hydrocarbon production regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamotaev, I. V.; Ivanov, I. V.; Mikheev, P. V.; Nikonova, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    The current concepts of soil pollution and transformation in the regions of hydrocarbon production have been reviewed. The development of an oil field creates extreme conditions for pedogenesis. Tendencies in the radial migration, spatial distribution, metabolism, and accumulation of pollutants (oil, oil products, and attendant heavy metals) in soils of different bioclimatic zones have been analyzed. The radial and lateral mobility of pollution halos is a universal tendency in the technogenic transformation of soils and soil cover in the regions of hydrocarbon production. The biodegradation time of different hydrocarbon compounds strongly varies under different landscape conditions, from several months to several tens of years. The transformation of original (mineral and organic) soils to their technogenic modifications (mechanically disturbed, chemically contaminated, and chemo soils and chemozems) occurs in the impact zone of technogenic hydrocarbon fluxes under any physiographical conditions. The integrated use of the existing methods for the determination of the total content and qualitative composition of bituminous substances and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in combination with the chromatographic determination of normal alkanes and hydrocarbon gases, as well as innovative methods of studies, allows revealing new processes and genetic relationships in soils and studying the functioning of soils and soil cover. The study of the hydrocarbon contamination of soils is important for development of restoration measures and lays the groundwork for the ecological and hygienic regulation based on the zonation of soil and landscape resistance to different pollutants.

  20. Synergistic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons with microorganisms and zero valent iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöftner, Philipp; Summer, Dorothea; Leitner, Simon; Watzinger, Andrea; Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC) are located mainly within build-up regions. Therefore in most cases only in-situ technologies without excavation of soil material can be used for remediation. This project examines a novel in-situ remediation method, in which the biotic degradation via bacteria is combined with abiotic degradation via zero-valent iron particles (ZVI). ZVI particles are injected into the aquifer where CHC-molecules are reductively dechlorinated. However Fe0 is also oxidized by reaction with water leading to generation of H2 without any CHC degradation. To achieve biotic degradation often strictly anaerobic strains of the bacteria Dehalococcoides are used. These bacteria can dechlorinate CHC by utilizing H2. By combining these processes the H2, produced during the anaerobic corrosion of Fe0, could be used by bacteria for further CHC degradation. Therefore the amount of used Fe0 and as a consequence also remediation costs could be reduced. Additionally the continuous supply of H2 could make the bacterial degradation more controllable. Different Fe0 particles (nano- and micro-scale) were tested for their perchloroethene (PCE) degradation rate and H2 production rate in microcosms. PCE-degradation rate by different bacterial cultures was investigated in the same microcosm system. In course of these experiments the 13C enrichment factors of the PCE degradation of the different particles and cultures were determined to enable the differentiation of biotic and abiotic degradation. Preliminary results showed, that the nano-scale particles reacted faster with PCE and water than their micro-scaled counterparts. The PCE degradation via micro-scaled particles lead to 13C enrichment factors in the range of -3,6 ‰ ± 0,6 to -9,5 ‰ ± 0,2. With one of the examined bacterial cultures a fast reduction of PCE to ethene was observed. Although PCE and TCE were completely degraded by this culture the metabolites DCE and VC could still be detected

  1. Geological and hydrogeological features affecting migration, multi-phase partitioning and degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons through unconsolidated porous media.

    OpenAIRE

    Filippini, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents are the most ubiquitous organic contaminants found in groundwater since the last five decades. They generally reach groundwater as Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL). This phase can migrate through aquifers, and also through aquitards, in ways that aqueous contaminants cannot. The complex phase partitioning to which chlorinated solvent DNAPLs can undergo (i.e. to the dissolved, vapor or sorbed phase), as well as their transformations (e.g. degradation), depend on the...

  2. Biological regeneration of carrier material for the adsorption of halogen hydrocarbons in plants for cleaning up contaminated groundwater. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halogen hydrocarbons and above all chlorinated hydrocarbons are widespread harmful substances in soils and in groundwater. When cleaning up groundwater contamination, the contaminants are brought into the gas phase by strip processes. From the gas phase, the contaminants can be adsorbed on different carrier materials, mostly active carbon. One was searching for ways to regenerate this adsorption material. The mixed culture from a sea sediment most suitable for the decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons was optimized regarding its decomposition performance and was later used on the technical scale. In the decomposition experiments on the large technical scale, the cultures were lodged on filling bodies which has a much higher amount of gaps. In this case, an optimum supply of the micro-organisms with oxygen and methane is guaranteed, which is used as co-substrate. No intermediate product was found in a gas chromatography examination. The biologically occupied stage is situated between a desorption column and the active carbon filters, and reduces the load of harmful substances which can no longer be brought into the gas phase by stripping out. This has the advantage that it can be integrated in existing plants and can be adapted to any case of contamination by lodging adapted micro-organisms on it. The basis for each application must be separately researched. (orig.)

  3. Enhancement of in situ Remediation of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmroth, M.

    2006-07-01

    Approximately 750 000 sites of contaminated land exist across Europe. The harmful chemicals found in Finnish soils include heavy metals, oil products, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorophenols, and pesticides. Petroleum and petroleum products enter soil from ruptured oil pipelines, land disposal of refinery products, leaking storage tanks and through accidents. PAH contamination is caused by the spills of coal tar and creosote from coal gasification and wood treatment sites in addition to oil spills. Cleanup of soil by bioremediation is cheaper than by chemical and physical processes. However, the cleaning capacity of natural attenuation and in situ bioremediation is limited. The purpose of this thesis was to find feasible options to enhance in situ remediation of hydrocarbon contaminants. The aims were to increase the bioavailability of the contaminants and microbial activity at the subsurface in order to achieve higher contaminant removal efficiency than by intrinsic biodegradation alone. Enhancement of microbial activity and decrease of soil toxicity during remediation were estimated by using several biological assays. The performance of these assays was compared in order to find suitable indicators to follow the progress of remediation. Phytoremediation and chemical oxidation are promising in situ techniques to increase the degradation of hydrocarbons in soil. Phytoremediation is plant-enhanced decontamination of soil and water. Degradation of hydrocarbons is enhanced in the root zone by increased microbial activity and through the detoxifying enzymes of plants themselves. Chemical oxidation of contaminants by Fenton's reaction can produce degradation products which are more biodegradable than the parent compounds. Fenton's reaction and its modifications apply solutions of hydrogen peroxide and iron for the oxidation of organic chemicals. The cost of oxidation can be reduced by aiming at partial instead of full

  4. Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chlorine gas are inhaled. Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) that may be delayed for a few hours ... health problems such as fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) following the initial exposure. How people can protect ...

  5. Prediction of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils and Sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, M.P.; Clemens, R.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, several laboratory methods have been developed for the prediction of contaminant bioavailability. So far, none of these methods has been extensively tested for petroleum hydrocarbons. In the present study we investigated solid-phase extraction and persulfate oxidation for the prediction of

  6. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Xuhui; Wang, James; Ciblak, Ali; Cox, Evan E.; Riis, Charlotte; Terkelsen, Mads; Gent, David B.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-01-01

    Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK–enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solven...

  7. ENVIROMENTAL HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION IN RICOTTA AND MOZZARELLA DI BUFALA CHEESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Cortesi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mainly formed by anthropogenic activities, are ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Due to environmental contamination and their chemical properties they migrate through the human food chain. Aim of this study was the evaluation of PAHs in ricotta and mozzarella di bufala cheese, produced by milk of buffalo collected in three farms, located in a high contaminated area in Campania because of a waste treatment plant and illegal waste incineration. 11 PAHs were identified both in milk and dairy products. Carcinogenic hydrocarbon benzo(apyrene were found in a range including 0.42- 12.96 μg/kg and dibenzo(ahanthracene 0.21-10.08 μg/kg. Anthracene showed higher concentrations than the other PAHs (45.23-436.85 μg/kg.

  8. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in fish-eating birds wintering in the Gdansk Bay, Baltic Sea, 1980-81

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falandysz, J. (Veterinary Hygiene Research Station, Gdansk, Poland); Szefer, P.

    1982-04-01

    Further samples of the chlorinated hydrocarbon content in adipose tissue of fish-eating birds wintering in the South Baltic show high concentrations of PCB compared with ..sigma..DDT, HCB, alpha- and gamma-BHC. The great crested grebe presently examined had approximately four times higher PCB/..sigma..DDT ratios than specimens taken during 1975-76.

  9. Sand amendment enhances bioelectrochemical remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Zhang, Yueyong; Li, Nan; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-12-01

    Bioelectrochemical system is an emerging technology for the remediation of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. However, performance of such systems can be limited by the inefficient mass transport in soil. Here we report a new method of sand amendment, which significantly increases both oxygen and proton transports, resulting to increased soil porosity (from 44.5% to 51.3%), decreased Ohmic resistance (by 46%), and increased charge output (from 2.5 to 3.5Cg(-1)soil). The degradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons increased by up to 268% in 135d. The degradation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with high molecular weight was accelerated, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed that the microbial community close to the air-cathode was substantially stimulated by the induced current, especially the hydrocarbon degrading bacteria Alcanivorax. The bioelectrochemical stimulation imposed a selective pressure on the microbial community of anodes, including that far from the cathode. These results suggested that sand amendment can be an effective approach for soil conditioning that will enhances the bioelectrochemical removal of hydrocarbons in contaminated soils. PMID:26135976

  10. Distinguishing natural hydrocarbons from anthropogenic contamination in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differentiation between natural and anthropogenic sources of ground-water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons is necessary in areas where natural hydrocarbons may be present in the subsurface. Because of the similarity in composition between natural and refined petroleum, the use of statistical techniques to discern trends is required. In this study, both multivariate plotting techniques and principal component analysis were used to investigate the origin of hydrocarbons from a variety of study sites. Ground-water and gas samples were collected from the Niagara Falls area and from three gasoline stations where leaking underground storage tanks had been found. Although soil gas surveys are used to indicate the presence of hydrocarbons, they were not useful in differentiating between natural and anthropogenic sources of contamination in ground water. Propane and pentene were found to be the most useful chemical parameters in discriminating between the natural and anthropogenic sources. These chemicals are not usually measured in investigations of ground-water contamination, yet analysis can be conducted by most environmental laboratories using conventional methods

  11. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (less than 150 micrometers), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of approximately 50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of approximately 0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the

  12. Bioremediation: Technology for treating hydrocarbon-contaminated wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towprayoon, S.; Kuntrangwattana, S. [King Mongkut`s Institute of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1996-12-31

    Cutting oil wastewater from an iron and steel factory was applied to the soil windrow. Self-remediation was then compared with remediation with acclimatized indigenous microbes. The incremental reduction rate of the microorganisms and hydrocarbon-degradable microbes was slower in self-remediation than in the latter treatment. Within 30 days, when the acclimatized indigenous microbes were used, there was a significant reduction of the contaminated hydrocarbons, while self-remediation took longer to reduce to the same concentration. Various nitrogen sources were applied to the soil pile, namely, organic compost, chemical fertilizer, ammonium sulfate, and urea. The organic compost induced a high yield of hydrocarbon-degradable microorganisms, but the rate at which the cutting oil in the soil decreased was slower than when other nitrogen sources were used. The results of cutting oil degradation studied by gas chromatography showed the absence of some important hydrocarbons. The increment of the hydrocarbon-degradable microbes in the land treatment ecosystem does not necessarily correspond to the hydrocarbon reduction efficiency. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Chromatographic study of gamma-ray irradiated degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbon in gamma ray irradiation was examined in order to get information on treatment of groundwater. Water chloroform was sealed into a vial irradiated with gamma ray. Both gas chromatography and ion chromatography were applied for determination of degradation products. Carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane and chloride ion were detected in the irradiated system. Effect of radiation dose on the gamma ray induced chloroform degradation was investigated. The elimination of chloride ion and the degradation of chloroform were promoted by gamma irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. The G(CHCl3), which was defined as the number of degraded chloroform molecules when absorbed 100eV, was inferred to be 3.1. The degradation mechanism of chloroform irradiated with gamma ray seemed to involve that chloroform reacted with electron from radiolysis of water and the elimination of chloride ion occurred. (author)

  14. Petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons in water from Lake Manzala and associated canals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badawy, M.I.; Wahaab, R.A.; Abou Waly, H.F. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    1995-08-01

    Lake Manzala is located at the north eastern edge of Nile Delta in Egypt. It is separated from the Mediterranean sea by a sandy beach ridge. However, the lake is in connection with the sea through three opening nearby Port Said. The area of the lake is about 769 Km{sup 2} and relatively shallow with an average depth of 1.3 m. The lake is of high economic value as a natural resource, for fishery, reacreation and for migratory birds. The lake is highly polluted as it receives wastewaters discharged by several canal. The present investigation aimed to assess the residue levels of petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in the lake water as well as in Hadous canal, Fariskur canal and Bahr-El-Baqar canal. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Rush-hour aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons in selected subway stations of Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Li, Chunlei; Wang, Xinming; Guo, Hai; Feng, Yanli; Chen, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Air samples were collected simultaneously at platform, mezzanine and outdoor in five typical stations of subway system in Shanghai, China using stainless steel canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD) after cryogenic preconcentration. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) at the platforms and mezzanines inside the stations averaged (10.3 +/- 2.1), (38.7 +/- 9.0), (19.4 +/- 10.1) and (30.0 +/- 11.1) microg/m3, respectively; while trichloroethylene (TrCE), tetrachloroethylene (TeCE) and para-dichlorobenzene (pDCB), vinyl chloride and carbon tetrachloride were the most abundant chlorinated hydrocarbons inside the stations with average levels of (3.6 +/- 1.3), (1.3 +/- 0.5), (4.1 +/- 1.1), (2.2 +/- 1.1) and (1.2 +/- 0.3) microg/m3, respectively. Mean levels of major aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons were higher indoor (platforms and mezzanines) than outdoor with average indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios of 1.1-9.5, whereas no significant indoor/outdoor differences were found except for benzene and TrCE. The highly significant mutual correlations (p tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a marker of traffic-related emission without other indoor and outdoor sources, indicated that BTEX were introduced into the subway stations from indoor/outdoor air exchange and traffic emission should be their dominant source. TrCE and pDCB were mainly from indoor emission and TeCE might have both indoor emission sources and contribution from outdoor air, especially in the mezzanines. PMID:22783624

  16. Rush-hour aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons in selected subway stations of Shanghai, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanli Zhang; Chunlei Li; Xinming Wang; Hai Guo; Yanli Feng; Jianmin Chen

    2012-01-01

    Air samples were collected simultaneously at platform,mezzanine and outdoor in five typical stations of subway system in Shanghai,China using stainless steel canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD) after cryogenic preconcentration.Benzene,toluene,ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) at the platforms and mezzanines inside the stations averaged (10.3± 2.1),(38.7 ± 9.0),(19.4 ± 10.1) and (30.0 ± 11.1) μg/m3,respectively; while trichloroethylene (TrCE),tetrachloroethylene (TeCE)and para-dichlorobenzene (pDCB),vinyl chloride and carbon tetrachloride were the most abundant chlorinated hydrocarbons inside the stations with average levels of (3.6 ± 1.3),(1.3 ± 0.5),(4.1 ± 1.1),(2.2 ± 1.1) and (1.2 ± 0.3) μg/m3,respectively.Mean levels of major aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons were higher indoor (platforms and mezzanines) than outdoor with average indoor/outdoor (I/O)ratios of 1.1-9.5,whereas no significant indoor/outdoor differences were found except for benzene and TrCE.The highly significant mutual correlations (p < 0.01) for BTEX between indoor and outdoor and their significant correlation (p < 0.05) with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE),a marker of traffic-related emission without other indoor and outdoor sources,indicated that BTEX were introduced into the subway stations from indoor/outdoor air exchange and traffic emission should be their dominant source.TrCE and pDCB were mainly from indoor emission and TeCE might have both indoor emission sources and contribution from outdoor air,especially in the mezzanines.

  17. Hydrocarbon status of soils under different ages of oil contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennadiev, A. N.; Pikovskii, Yu. I.; Kovach, R. G.; Koshovskii, T. S.; Khlynina, N. I.

    2016-05-01

    Modifications of the hydrocarbon status (HCS) of soils at the stages of the injection input of oil pollutants and the subsequent self-purification of the soil layer from technogenesis products have been revealed in studies conducted on an oil field. Comparison with the HCS of background soils has been performed. Changes in the composition and concentration of bitumoids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and hydrocarbon gases have been established. The HCS of a freshly contaminated soil is characterized by the predominance of butane (the highest component) in the gaseous phase, an abrupt increase in the concentration of second-kind bitumoids, and a 100-fold increase in the content of PAHs compared to the background soil. In the old contaminated soil, free and fixed methane becomes the predominant gas; the content of bitumoids in the upper soil horizons is lower than in the freshly contaminated soils by two orders of magnitude but higher than in the background soil by an order of magnitude; the PAH composition in the soil with old residual contamination remains slightly more diverse than in the background soil.

  18. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in tuna homogenate IAEA-351: Results of a world-wide exercise. ILMR intercalibration exercise report no. 44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present intercalibration exercise provides, once again, strong evidence for insufficient data quality for chlorinated hydrocarbons in marine samples. This comment must be considered in perspective. The principle aim of these exercises is not just to obtain narrower confidence intervals for a given parameter moreover it is to guarantee that the data generated by monitoring exercises is of sufficient quality to evaluate contaminant levels, gradients and trends in the environment. All data should be accurate but precision (expressed as confidence limits) may vary according to its application. It is clearly not the same problem to measure DDT for human health protection (legal concentration limits in seafood range from about 1000-5000 ng/g) as it is to monitor environmental trends where values in biota are commonly one to three orders of magnitude lower. Even the 8 laboratories achieving 'good' data for pp'DDT would not be able to statistically distinguish a 35% increase of the concentration of this parameter from 30-41 ng/g on the basis of the precision observed in the present exercise. Fortunately spatial gradients for DDTs tend to be much larger than this and significant changes could be easily detected by the 'good' labs provided that they use adequate quality control procedures

  19. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuhui; Wang, James; Ciblak, Ali; Cox, Evan E; Riis, Charlotte; Terkelsen, Mads; Gent, David B; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-04-30

    Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solvents is evaluated. Dehalococcoides (Dhc) bacterial strain and lactate ions are uniformly injected in contaminated clay and complete dechlorination of chlorinated ethene is observed in laboratory experiments. The injected bacteria can survive, grow, and promote effective dechlorination under EK conditions and after EK application. The distribution of Dhc within the clay suggests that electrokinetic transport of Dhc is primarily driven by electroosmosis. In addition to biodegradation due to bioaugmentation of Dhc, an EK-driven transport of chlorinated ethenes is observed in the clay, which accelerates cleanup of chlorinated ethenes from the anode side. Compared with conventional advection-based delivery, EK injection is significantly more effective for establishing microbial reductive dechlorination capacity in low-permeability soils. PMID:22365139

  20. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticles without Chlorine Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium tin oxide (In2Sn1-xO5-y) nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal method from stable indium tin acetylacetone complexes and post annealing at 600 .deg. C. The absence of chlorine ions shortened the synthesis process, decreased the particle agglomeration and improved the particle purity. The introduced complexing ligand acetylacetone decreased the obtained nanoparticle size. The improved powder properties accelerated the sintering of the In2Sn1-xO5-y nanoparticles and reached a relative density of 96.4% when pressureless sintered at 1400 .deg. C

  1. Novel method for cleaning a vacuum chamber from hydrocarbon contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method for cleaning a high vacuum chamber is presented. This method is based on concurrent in situ high-energetic UV light activation of contaminants located in the residual gas and at the vacuum chamber surfaces as well as the in situ generation of highly reactive ozone. Ozone oxidizes the contaminants to volatile species. Investigations by energy-dispersive x-ray analysis of residual gas depositions and mass-spectroscopy measurements of the residual gas in the vacuum chamber identify the contaminant species as hydrocarbons. After a cleaning period of 8 h, a decrease in measured chamber contamination by about 90% could be achieved according to atomic force microscope analysis. Mass spectroscopy measurements using a residual gas analyzer indicate the creation of volatile, carbonaceous species during the cleaning process.

  2. Chitosan application as a biocoagulant in wastewater contaminated with hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Álava

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The environment contamination in Ecuador, done by the production, transport and commercialization of hydrocarbons, requires further research regarding new treatment alternatives that use biodegradable substances. In this study, abdominal shrimp shell waste, Litopenaeus vannamei was used to obtain chitosan and then apply it as a biocoagulant to a wastewater sample contaminated with hydrocarbon products. The produced chitosan was characterised by potentiometric titration, resulting in a deacetylation degree (%DD of 87.18%– 93.72% and by intrinsic viscosimetry, obtaining an average molecular weight (g/mol of 5.2x105 –5.4x105. The application of chitosan was done in a jar test, for which a completely randomised factorial design 2k was set, resulting in an evident statistically significant effect for all the factor studied, that is, pH (Initial, chitosan type and agitation method, using the turbidity percentage removal as the response variable. As a result, a pH of 5.5, a 2 mg(Chitosan/L(sample and a fast agitation method were applied to a contaminated sample reducing the turbidity in 98.19%, the oxygen chemical demand in 78.17%, color in 91.45% and total petroleum hydrocarbon in 99.09%.

  3. Ecogenomics of microbial communities in bioremediation of chlorinated contaminated sites

    OpenAIRE

    Maphosa, Farai; Lieten, Shakti H.; Dinkla, Inez; Stams, Alfons J.; Smidt, Hauke; Fennell, Donna E.

    2012-01-01

    Organohalide compounds such as chloroethenes, chloroethanes, and polychlorinated benzenes are among the most significant pollutants in the world. These compounds are often found in contamination plumes with other pollutants such as solvents, pesticides, and petroleum derivatives. Microbial bioremediation of contaminated sites, has become commonplace whereby key processes involved in bioremediation include anaerobic degradation and transformation of these organohalides by organohalide respirin...

  4. Ecogenomics of microbial communities in bioremediation of chlorinated contaminated sites

    OpenAIRE

    FaraiMaphosa; ShaktiHLieten; DonnaE.Fennell

    2012-01-01

    Organohalide compounds such as chloroethenes, chloroethanes and polychlorinated benzenes are among the most significant pollutants in the world. These compounds are often found in contamination plumes with other pollutants such as solvents, pesticides and petroleum derivatives. Microbial bioremediation of contaminated sites, has become commonplace whereby key processes involved in bioremediation include anaerobic degradation and transformation of these organohalides by organohalide respiring ...

  5. Bench scale studies: Ozonation as a potential treatment for waters contaminated with hydrocarbons or dioxins and furans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the bench scale studies was to examine the destruction efficiency and efficacy of ozone on chemicals of concern (COC's) commonly found in contaminated ground water and rhenoformer wash water. The ground water used in these tests contained aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and mineral spirits. The rhenoformer wash water used in these tests contained a variety of dioxins (including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) and furans. Summaries are presented of the bench scale studies by describing the COCs, methodologies, test reactors, observations, and results. The summaries also detail which applications hold promise with respect to ozonation and which ones do not. Bench test results for the experiments in which aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and mineral spirits where the COCs were relatively successful. Concentrations for the COCs ranging from 300 to 3,400 micrograms per liter (microg/L) were brought below levels specified for storm sewer discharge per the National Priority Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) permit requirements. Bench test results for the experiments in which dioxins and furans were the COCs were less promising and revealed that additional processes would have to be used in conjunction with ozonation to bring the concentration of COCs within the targeted ranges. It was realized, however, that the effectiveness and efficacy of ozonation were diminished by the presence of particulates, to which some of the dioxin and furan compounds adhered

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe – investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G; A. Holubová Šmejkalová; J. Klánová; P. Přibylová; Váňa, M.

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. Σ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m−3 and below analytical method detection limit (< MDL) to 2.1 × 103 ng L−1. The concentrations of PCBs and CPs in rainwater were < MDL. Σ PCB and Σ CP concentrations in air ranged fr...

  7. Ecological risk assessment of a site contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aquatic and terrestrial health risks associated with petroleum contamination on a decommissioned military base, contaminated with products ranging from Bunker C oil to aviation fuel, were assessed using a methodology whereby an analytical measurement of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) could be correlated with compositional characterization and thus with toxicity. The constituents of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination represent wide ranges of physical-chemical properties, environmental fate, and toxicity. The composition of TPH can vary greatly, dependent on the sources or fuel types and the interaction of age as well as site- and chemical-specific characteristics in determining the impact of weathering processes. Therefore, a bulk sum analysis of TPH cannot be related to toxicity without characterization of its composition and association of the constituents, and therefore composition, with actual toxicity data. To address this need, the constituents of TPH were represented by surrogate chemicals, with selection based on structure-activity relationships and available toxicity data. Toxicological profiles were developed from governmental regulations and on the published literature for both the aquatic and terrestrial media. Risk characterization consisted of a comparison of water concentration limits and exposure limits, developed for each surrogate, to estimated surrogate concentrations throughout the site. The concentrations of surrogates were extrapolated from TPH composition characterization analyses, conducted at a select number of sampling locations, to bulk sum analyses of TPH at related sampling locations

  8. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Xuhui, E-mail: x.mao@neu.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Wang, James [Geosyntec Consultants, Columbia, MA (United States); Ciblak, Ali [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Cox, Evan E. [Geosyntec Consultants, Columbia, MA (United States); Riis, Charlotte [NIRAS A/S, Alleroed (Denmark); Terkelsen, Mads [Capital Region of Denmark, Hilleroed (Denmark); Gent, David B. [Environmental Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), US Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Alshawabkeh, Akram N., E-mail: aalsha@neu.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous delivery of electron donors and bacteria into low permeability clays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bacteria injection, growth and consequent transformation of contaminants are viable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EK injection is more effective than advection-based injection for clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electroosmosis appears to be the driving mechanism for bacteria injection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both EK transport and biodegradation contribute the removal of VOCs in clay. - Abstract: Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solvents is evaluated. Dehalococcoides (Dhc) bacterial strain and lactate ions are uniformly injected in contaminated clay and complete dechlorination of chlorinated ethene is observed in laboratory experiments. The injected bacteria can survive, grow, and promote effective dechlorination under EK conditions and after EK application. The distribution of Dhc within the clay suggests that electrokinetic transport of Dhc is primarily driven by electroosmosis. In addition to biodegradation due to bioaugmentation of Dhc, an EK-driven transport of chlorinated ethenes is observed in the clay, which accelerates cleanup of chlorinated ethenes from the anode side. Compared with conventional advection-based delivery, EK injection is significantly more effective for establishing microbial reductive dechlorination capacity in low-permeability soils.

  9. The Reaction Specificity of Nanoparticles in Solution: Application to the Reaction of Nanoparticulate Iron and Iron-Bimetallic Compounds with Chlorinated Hydrocarbons and Oxyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prospect for better remediation technologies using nanoparticles of iron, iron oxides, and iron with catalytic metals (i.e., bimetallics) has potentially transformative implications for environmental management of DOE sites across the country. Of particular interest is the potential to avoid undesirable products from the degradation of chlorinated solvents by taking advantage of the potential selectivity of nanoparticles to produce environmentally benign products from CCl4. Chlorinated solvents are the most frequently reported subsurface contaminants across the whole DOE complex, and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is the chlorinated solvent that is of greatest concern at Hanford (U. S. Department Energy 2001). In evaluating technologies that might be used at the site, a critical concern will be that CCl4 reduction usually occurs predominantly by hydrogenolysis to chloroform (CHCl3) and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2), both of which are nearly as problematic as CCl4 (National Research Council, 1978). Competing reaction pathways produce the more desirable products carbon monoxide (CO) and/or formate (HCOO-), and possibly CO2, but the proportion of reaction that occurs by these pathways is highly variable. Iron-based metallic and oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have enhanced reactivity towards a variety of chemical species, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible oxyanions. Possibly of greater importance is the ability of nanoparticles to select for specific reaction products, potentially facilitating the formation of more environmentally acceptable products. The purpose of this study is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanism responsible for the overall particle reactivity and reaction selectivity of reactive metal and oxide nanoparticles. To achieve this objective the project involves the synthesis (using solution and vacuum synthesis methods) and characterization of well-defined nanoparticles, measurements of particle reactivity in

  10. Isotopic control of methods for the determination of residues of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of residues of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides is of importance mainly in case of foods of animal origin. However, this determination is made slower or even inhibited by a number of difficulties. Extraction and clean-up procedures are of primary importance even in case of the most polished methods of pesticide analysis problems. The isotopic method was used for testing the mentioned steps. Experiments were carried out with radioactive C-14 isotope. According to the results of control tests, data varying within relatively wide limits have been obtained, depending on the applied method. In each case where the boiling point of the solvent permits, the use of the Kuderna--Danish instrument is advisable. In case of a solvent of higher boiling point a combined method is more expedient. For this purpose a method has been suggested which enables the evaporation of the sample to be carried out without any practical loss of agent, thus the obtained analytical results can be considered as perfectly reliable ones. (P.J.)

  11. Biotreatment of hydrocarbons contaminated soils by addition of activated sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated sludges from the wastewater treatment of an oil refinery were characterized in order to improve the biotreatment of soils contaminated with hydrocarbons. The objective was to evaluate whether such industrial wastes that are being sent to landfills could be used for any useful purposes. A sand pit soil that contained 416 mg PAHs/kg and a gas station soil containing 1 mg PAHs/kg were evaluated. The study showed that activated sludges contain high concentration of oil and grease. Activated sludges were also found to be a valuable source of nitrogen and adapted bacteria

  12. Chlorinated hydrocarbons- (CHC) and PCDD/F-levels in sediments and breams (Abramis brama) from the river Elbe (contribution to the German Environmental Specimen Banking)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxynos, K. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Schramm, K.W. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Marth, P. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Schmitzer, J. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Kettrup, A. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons have been determined in sediments and breams (Abramis brama) from different locations along the river Elbe, starting from the border to the Czech Republic down-stream up to Cumlosen (river km 470), near the frontier of the former German Democratic Republic. High levels of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) have been found in sediments. HCB, DDT-metabolites and octachlorostyrene (OCS) have been the most dominant compounds in bream, especially fish from eastern sampling sites have been heavily contaminated. Furthermore, sediments from 1991-1993 have been analysed to determine polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F). The CHC-burden of the river Elbe declines downstream, whereas the PCDD/F-content increases in that direction. (orig.)

  13. Bioavailability and bioaccessibility of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated site soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the bioavailability and/or bioaccessibility of contaminants in soil can be measured by various ecological receptors, the methods that are suitable for metals do not necessarily work well for petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs). In this study, several biological and chemical methods were used at various PHC contaminated sites to find the most fitting method for different soil types in terms of predicting the biological responses of organisms as measured by standard single species toxicity tests. Organisms such as plants, earthworms, and collembolan were exposed to soils with different PHC concentrations. Multiple endpoints were then measured to evaluate the biological responses. The exposure concentrations for the 4 CCME hydrocarbon fractions were measured using hexane:acetone extraction as well as extractions with cyclodextrin, and a mixture of enzymes to simulate the gastro-intestinal fluid of an earthworm. The estimated exposure concentrations depended on the extraction method. The study showed that existing methodologies must be modified in order to better estimate the biological effect of PHCs in soil. Comparative data was presented and discussed along with proposed methodological modifications.

  14. Evaluation of Biostimulation (Nutrients) in hydrocarbons contaminated soils by respirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biostimulation process was evaluated in a hydrocarbon contaminated soil by respirometry after amendment with inorganic compound fertilizer (ICF) (N: P: K 28:12:7) and simple inorganic salts (SIS) (NH4NO3 and K2HPO4). The soil was contaminated with oily sludge (40.000 MgTPH/Kgdw). The oxygen uptake was measured using two respirometers (HACH 2173b and OXITOP PF 600) during thirteen days (n=3). Two treatments (ICF and SIS) and three controls (abiotic, reference substance and without nutrients) were evaluated during the study. Physicochemical (pH, nutrients, and TPH) and microbiological analysis (heterotrophic and hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms) were obtained at the beginning and at the end of each assay. Higher respiration rates were recorded in sis and without nutrient control. Results were 802.28 and 850.72-1d-1, MgO2kgps-1din HACH, while in OXITOP were 936.65 and 502.05 MgO2 Kgps respectively. These data indicate that amendment of nutrients stimulated microbial metabolism. ICF had lower respiration rates (188.18 and 139.87 MgO2 kgps-1d-1in HACH and OXITOP, respectively) as well as counts; this could be attributed to ammonia toxicity.

  15. Bioavailability and bioaccessibility of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated site soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, G.; Angell, R.; Strive, E.; Ma, W. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Although the bioavailability and/or bioaccessibility of contaminants in soil can be measured by various ecological receptors, the methods that are suitable for metals do not necessarily work well for petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs). In this study, several biological and chemical methods were used at various PHC contaminated sites to find the most fitting method for different soil types in terms of predicting the biological responses of organisms as measured by standard single species toxicity tests. Organisms such as plants, earthworms, and collembolan were exposed to soils with different PHC concentrations. Multiple endpoints were then measured to evaluate the biological responses. The exposure concentrations for the 4 CCME hydrocarbon fractions were measured using hexane:acetone extraction as well as extractions with cyclodextrin, and a mixture of enzymes to simulate the gastro-intestinal fluid of an earthworm. The estimated exposure concentrations depended on the extraction method. The study showed that existing methodologies must be modified in order to better estimate the biological effect of PHCs in soil. Comparative data was presented and discussed along with proposed methodological modifications.

  16. Eco-toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingchun Tang; Min Wang; Fei Wang; Qing Sun; Qixing Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) contaminated soil samples were collected from Shengli Oilfield of China.Toxicity analysis was carried out based on earthworm acute toxicity, plant growth experiment and luminescent bacteria test.The soil was contaminated bypetroleum hydrogcarbons with TPH concentration of 10.57%.With lethal and sub-lethal rate as endpoint, earthworm test showed that the LD50 (lethal dose 50%) values in 4 and 7 days were 1.45% and 1.37% respectively, and the inhibition rate of earthworm body weight increased with higher oil concentration.TPH pollution in the soil inhibited seed germination in both wheat and maize experiment when the concentration of petroleum was higher than 0.1%.The EC50 (effective concentration 50%) for germination is 3.04% and 2.86% in maize and wheat, respectively.While lower value of ECs0 for root elongation was to be 1.11% and 1.64% in maize and wheat,respectively, suggesting higher sensitivity of root elongation on petroleum contamination in the soil.The ECs0 value in luminescent bacteria test was 0.47% for petroleum in the contaminated soil.From the experiment result, it was concluded that TPH content of 1.5% is considered to be a critical value for plant growth and living of earthworm and 0.5% will affect the activity of luminescent bacteria.

  17. Bioavailability enhanced rhizosphere remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    contain were analyzed by gas chromatography method. Four bioassays were used to measure toxicity during bio-remediation of soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons: Microtox(R) test, SOSchromotest, lettuce seed germination and sheep red blood cell (RBS) hemolysis assay. Rhizosphere remediation was found to be effective for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) from soil with the use of alfalfa inoculated by the Pseudomonas stutzeri MEV-S1 strain (RU 2228952 patent) and oats inoculated by the Pseudomonas alcaligenes MEV strain (RU 2228953 patent) in vegetation and field experiments. The reduction of the TPH and PAH concentrations in soil was accompanied by the reduction of integral toxicity and genotoxicity, evaluated by bio-testing. It is conceivable, therefore, that a possible way to optimize petroleum hydrocarbons phyto-remediation is the use of selected plants and microbial inoculants with specific chemotactic affinities and bio-surfactant production. The proposed technology for soil bio-remediation with the use of integrated plant-microbial system is ecologically and toxicologically safe and economically attractive

  18. Bioavailability enhanced rhizosphere remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, A.; Vorobyov, A.; Zharikov, G.; Ermolenko, Z.; Dyadishchev, N.; Borovick, R.; Sokolov, M. [Research Centre for Toxicology and Hygienic Regulation of Biopreparations, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Ortega-Calvo, J.J. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia, CSIC, Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    contain were analyzed by gas chromatography method. Four bioassays were used to measure toxicity during bio-remediation of soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons: Microtox(R) test, SOSchromotest, lettuce seed germination and sheep red blood cell (RBS) hemolysis assay. Rhizosphere remediation was found to be effective for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) from soil with the use of alfalfa inoculated by the Pseudomonas stutzeri MEV-S1 strain (RU 2228952 patent) and oats inoculated by the Pseudomonas alcaligenes MEV strain (RU 2228953 patent) in vegetation and field experiments. The reduction of the TPH and PAH concentrations in soil was accompanied by the reduction of integral toxicity and genotoxicity, evaluated by bio-testing. It is conceivable, therefore, that a possible way to optimize petroleum hydrocarbons phyto-remediation is the use of selected plants and microbial inoculants with specific chemotactic affinities and bio-surfactant production. The proposed technology for soil bio-remediation with the use of integrated plant-microbial system is ecologically and toxicologically safe and economically attractive.

  19. A stable isotope approach for source apportionment of chlorinated ethene plumes at a complex multi-contamination events urban site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Schmidt, Marie; Pellegatti, Eleonora; Paramatti, Enrico; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Gargini, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of chlorinated aliphatic compounds such as chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethenes was examined as an intrinsic fingerprint for apportionment of sources. A complex field site located in Ferrara (Italy), with more than 50years history of use of chlorinated aliphatic compounds, was investigated in order to assess contamination sources. Several contamination plumes were found in a complex alluvial sandy multi-aquifer system close to the river Po; sources are represented by uncontained former industrial and municipal dump sites as well as by spills at industrial areas. The carbon stable isotope signature allowed distinguishing 2 major sources of contaminants. One source of chlorinated aliphatic contaminants was strongly depleted in ¹³C (methane for synthesis. The other source had typical carbon isotope compositions of >-40‰ which is commonly observed in recent production of chlorinated solvents. The degradation processes in the plumes could be traced interpreting the isotope enrichment and depletion of parent and daughter compounds, respectively. We demonstrate that, under specific production conditions, namely when highly chlorinated ethenes are produced as by-product during chloromethanes production, ¹³C depleted fingerprinting of contaminants can be obtained and this can be used to track sources and address the responsible party of the pollution in urban areas. PMID:24077332

  20. Feasibility studies: UV/chlorine advanced oxidation treatment for the removal of emerging contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichel, C; Garcia, C; Andre, K

    2011-12-01

    UV/chlorine (UV/HOCl and UV/ClO(2)) Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were assessed with varying process layout and compared to the state of the art UV/H(2)O(2) AOP. The process comparison focused on the economical and energy saving potential of the UV/chlorine AOP. Therefore the experiments were performed at technical scale (250 L/h continuous flow reactor) and at process energies, oxidant and model contaminant concentrations expected in full scale reference plants. As model compounds the emerging contaminants (ECs): desethylatrazine, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, diclofenac, benzotriazole, tolyltriazole, iopamidole and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were degraded at initial compound concentrations of 1 μg/L in tap water and matrixes with increased organic load (46 mg/L DOC). UV/chlorine AOP organic by-product forming potential was assessed for trihalomethanes (THMs) and N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). A process design was evaluated which can considerably reduce process costs, energy consumption and by-product generation from UV/HOCl AOPs. PMID:22000058

  1. Hydrogeological factors affecting the multiple plumes of chlorinated contaminants in an industrial complex, Wonju, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Kaown, D.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.

    2010-12-01

    Apparent plume attenuations of multiple chlorinated contaminants such as TCE, carbon tetrachloride, and its daughter products at an industrial complex, Wonju, Korea were examined through various hydraulic tests and six rounds of groundwater quality analyses. Aquifer media properties and hydrogeologic factors affecting the distribution and attenuation of multiple contaminants were investigated and key attributes were evaluated. The study area has vertically heterogeneous properties from top alluvial layer to crystalline rocks while the weathered fractured layer above intact Jurassic biotite granite acts as the main layer for groundwater flow and aqueous phase multiple contaminants migration. Aerial heterogeneity in surface conditions plays an important role for groundwater recharge because the industrial complex is mostly paved by asphalt and concrete. Due to limited recharge area and concentrated precipitation in summer season, seasonal effects of contaminant plume distribution diminish as the distance increase from the area of recharge. This study analyzed how differently the solute and contaminant concentrations response to the seasonal recharge. For the analyses, the study site was divided into three zones and four transects were established. Groundwater and solute mass balances were estimated by computing groundwater and solute mass flux through transects. The effects of groundwater pumping, groundwater flow and contaminant degradation were examined to simulate the solutes and contaminant concentrations. General tendency of the water quality and contaminant concentration were reproducible with the effects of major components such as groundwater recharge, pumping and estimated degradation rate.

  2. Derivation of validated methods of sampling and analysis for intermediate and final products of the anaerobic material utilization of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (LCFC) in groundwater in the context of analyses of contaminated soils; Ableitung validierter Probenahme- und Analysenmethoden fuer Zwischen- und Endprodukte der anaeroben Stoffverwertungsprozesse von Leichtfluechtigen Chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffen (LCKW) im Grundwasser im Rahmen von Altlastenuntersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorgerloh, Ute; Becker, Roland; Win, Tin [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Theissen, Hubert [IMAGO GbR (Germany)

    2010-06-17

    The results of the project ''Methods of sampling and analysis of intermediate and final products of the anaerobic degradation of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in groundwater in frame of analysis of contaminated sites'' of the German Federal States Program ''Water, Soil, Waste'' (Laenderfinanzierungsprogramm ''Wasser, Boden, Luft'') LFP B2.08 are presented in these report. Different methods of sampling and analysis for the determination of hydrogen, methane, ethene and vinyl chloride in groundwater are developed and validated: For the sampling are described and discussed: i. active sampling: purge and sample of water samples and purging of solvated gases in groundwater in gas sampling tubes ii. passive sampling: diffusion sampling in polyethylene diffusion bags (PDB) and plastic syringes as diffusion sampler for solvated gases The use of active (purge and sample, downhole sampler) and passive (diffusion sampling) sampling techniques for the quantification of VOC, ethene, and methane are evaluated from the viewpoint of public authorities and regarding the reproducibility of measurement results. Based on a groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene, 1,2-dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride it is shown that passive sampling is restricted by low groundwater flow and biological activity inside the well casing. Therefore, active sampling is to be preferred in case of unknown or insufficient flow conditions in the aquifer. The methods of chromatography for the determination of the compounds are validated and compared with other appropriate analytical methods: I. Headspace-GC-FID for the determination of methane, ethene and vinyl chloride in water of the purged sample (i) and the water of the PDB (ii) II. Direct injection - GC-PDD for the determination of hydrogen from the collected gas samples of the gas sampling tube (i) and the plastic syringes (ii) The gas chromatographic procedure for vinyl chloride using

  3. Use of bioremediation to resolve a petroleum hydrocarbon contamination lawsuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation was selected to remediate a public works site in the South Bay of San Diego County, California. The soil and groundwater at this site was contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and was the subject of extensive litigation. The parties agreed to resolve the dispute by using a combination of bioremediation and excavation/disposal. This paper includes an overview of the legal and technical issues involved in addressing the problems that were encountered and how those problems were solved. A model is presented for economically resolving environmental disputes in which the parties jointly agree to remediation of a site using bioremediation or similar techniques. This case study addresses the problems encountered because of the differing needs and goals of the legal and scientific communities. Notwithstanding the conflicts, it is demonstrated that the parties can, in most cases, work together toward remediation and resolution

  4. Geophysical assessment of salt and hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, L.R.; Hayley, K.; Gharibi, M.; Forte, S.A.; MacDonald, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geoscience; Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Water Science and Technology Directorate

    2007-07-01

    This presentation described a 3 year study at an active remediation site where a pipeline had leaked hydrocarbons. The objective was to develop practical protocols for evaluating the distribution and evolution of salt and hydrocarbons in soils and groundwater. The geometry of the contaminated area was determined in detail in order to improve the remediation design and to monitor the remediation process. Problem areas were identified for early intervention. Two-dimensional resistivity imaging was used to estimate salt concentrations. The changing environmental conditions required corrections for differences in temperature and soil moisture conditions. This presentation summarized the field acquisition campaigns from July 2004 to Oct 2006. The redistribution of salt was observed using time-lapse electric resistivity imaging. It was determined that auxiliary data and corrections for varying environmental conditions are necessary and that 3-D surveys are often needed for quantitative estimates. It was concluded that the uneven leaching distributions beneath depressions may indicate a need for occasional recontouring. tabs., figs.

  5. Chemical additive to enhance antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine and control cross-contamination during immersion chill of broiler carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immersion chilling during broiler processing can be a site for cross contamination between the occasional highly contaminated carcass and those that are co-chilled. Chlorine is often used as a chill tank antimicrobial but it can be overcome with heavy organic loads associated with the constant supp...

  6. Study of remobilization polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) originate from many pyrolysis processes. They are widespread environmental pollutants because some of them present toxic and genotoxic properties. In coal pyrolysis sites such as former manufactured gas plants and coke production plants, coal tar is a major source of PAHs. The management of such sites requires better understanding of the mechanisms that control release of PAHs to the biosphere. Determining total PAH concentrations is not sufficient since it does not inform about the pollutants availability to environmental processes. The fate and transport of PAHs in soil are governed by sorption and microbial processes which are well documented. Globally, enhancing retention of the compounds by a solid matrix reduces the risk of pollutant dispersion, but decreases their accessibility to microbial microflora. Conversely, the remobilization of organics from contaminated solid matrices represents a potential hazard since these pollutants can reach groundwater resources. However the available data are often obtained from laboratory experiments in which many field parameters can not be taken into account (long term, temperature, co-pollution, ageing phenomenon, heterogenous distribution of pollution). The present work focuses on the influence assessment and understanding of some of these parameters on PAHs remobilization from heavily polluted matrices in near-field conditions (industrial contaminated matrices, high contact time, ..). Results concerning effects of temperature and physical state of pollution (dispersed among the soil or condensed in small clusters or in coal tar) are presented. (authors)

  7. Comparison of reactive transport model predictions for natural attenuation processes occurring at chlorinated solvent contaminated site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, H. M.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of an analytical model and numerical model, namely BIOCLOR and HYDRODEOCHEM, for a test scenario involving the natural attenuations of dissolved solvent at chlorinated contaminated site are compared. Two models make same predictions for PCE, TCE and DCE and considerable different predictions for VC and ETH for the case of all species having identical retardation factors. Significant discrepancies between two models are observed for all species when retardation coefficients are considered to be different for all species. These differences can be attributed to the basic assumption that all the species have the same retardation factors embedded in BIOCHLOR.

  8. Two-stage bioreactor to destroy chlorinated and nonchlorinated organic groundwater contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both chlorinated and nonchlorinated volatile organic compounds are found as common contaminants of groundwater across the nation. Two field-pilot bioreactors successfully treated contaminated groundwater at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). The fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) effectively removed >97% of the 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) and >95% of the benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene(s) (BTEX) from more than 210,000 gal of contaminated groundwater. The FBR removed 84% of the trichloroethylene (TCE), also found in this groundwater, based on a total mass balance beyond carbon adsorption. Enhanced operational stability was demonstrated for the gas-phase reactor (GPR) with 10 months of continuous operation in the laboratory and 2 months in the field. TCE concentrations in contaminated air entering the pilot GPR were reduced by 75% on average. Capital and operating costs for the FBR system were compared to other treatment options including ultraviolet (UV)-peroxidation, air stripping with carbon adsorption, and wet carbon adsorption. GPR economics were compared to carbon adsorption at two TCE concentrations. These bioreactor systems provide economical, destructive technologies for treating either contaminated water or contaminated air originating from air stripping, air sparging, or soil vapor extraction operations and will be effective remedial options at many sites

  9. Mineralisation of target hydrocarbons in three contaminated soils from former refinery facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the microbial degradation of 14C-labelled hexadecane, octacosane, phenanthrene and pyrene and considered how degradation might be optimised in three genuinely hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from former petroleum refinery sites. Hydrocarbon mineralisation by the indigenous microbial community was monitored over 23 d. Hydrocarbon mineralisation enhancement by nutrient amendment (biostimulation), hydrocarbon degrader addition (bioaugmentation) and combined nutrient and degrader amendment, was also explored. The ability of indigenous soil microflora to mineralise 14C-target hydrocarbons was appreciable; ≥16% mineralised in all soils. Generally, addition of nutrients or degraders increased the rates and extents of mineralisation of 14C-hydrocarbons. However, the addition of nutrients and degraders in combination had a negative effect upon 14C-octacosane mineralisation and resulted in lower extents of mineralisation in the three soils. In general, the rates and extents of mineralisation will be dependent upon treatment type, nature of the contamination and adaptation of the ingenious microbial community. - Research highlights: → Indigenous microbes actively degrade 14C-hydrocarbons in field contaminated soils. → Addition of nutrients or degraders enhance mineralisation in contaminated soils. → Biodegradation is related to the presence of hydrocarbons and microbial activity. - Bioremediation strategy, native hydrocarbon concentrations and prior exposure histories of the microbial community influence hydrocarbon degradation in soil.

  10. Mineralisation of target hydrocarbons in three contaminated soils from former refinery facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towell, Marcie G. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Bellarby, Jessica; Paton, Graeme I. [Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Coulon, Frederic; Pollard, Simon J.T. [School of Applied Sciences, Sustainable Systems Department, Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom); Semple, Kirk T., E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.u [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    This study investigated the microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-labelled hexadecane, octacosane, phenanthrene and pyrene and considered how degradation might be optimised in three genuinely hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from former petroleum refinery sites. Hydrocarbon mineralisation by the indigenous microbial community was monitored over 23 d. Hydrocarbon mineralisation enhancement by nutrient amendment (biostimulation), hydrocarbon degrader addition (bioaugmentation) and combined nutrient and degrader amendment, was also explored. The ability of indigenous soil microflora to mineralise {sup 14}C-target hydrocarbons was appreciable; {>=}16% mineralised in all soils. Generally, addition of nutrients or degraders increased the rates and extents of mineralisation of {sup 14}C-hydrocarbons. However, the addition of nutrients and degraders in combination had a negative effect upon {sup 14}C-octacosane mineralisation and resulted in lower extents of mineralisation in the three soils. In general, the rates and extents of mineralisation will be dependent upon treatment type, nature of the contamination and adaptation of the ingenious microbial community. - Research highlights: Indigenous microbes actively degrade {sup 14}C-hydrocarbons in field contaminated soils. Addition of nutrients or degraders enhance mineralisation in contaminated soils. Biodegradation is related to the presence of hydrocarbons and microbial activity. - Bioremediation strategy, native hydrocarbon concentrations and prior exposure histories of the microbial community influence hydrocarbon degradation in soil.

  11. Stable carbon isotopic characterization of hydrocarbons in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective management of risks at sites featuring refractory hydrocarbon wastes is often constrained by the limitations of conventional analytical methodologies. Stable carbon isotope analysis was therefore evaluated as an alternative means of characterizing the composition, source and weathering of hydrocarbon contaminants. Bulk δ13C of selected heavy oils (boiling range 50 to 500 C) of varying component class distribution decreased from -28.9 to -27.4 per-thousand as oil saturate class content decreased (from 70.6 to 31.7%w/w) and polar/asphaltene content increased (from 7.4 to 50.5%w/w). Class δ13C increased by up to 2.5 per-thousand as follows: saturates (ca. -29 per-thousand) 13C. Plots of oil δ13C vs. saturate and polar/asphaltene content confirmed this relationship, returning linear correlation coefficients (r2) of 0.93 and 0.99, respectively. Characteristic isotopic fingerprints of heavy oils, crude oils and acid tar wastes may also provide a valuable means of differentiating between possible source terms. Unweathered, 25%, 50% and 75% weathered reference oils were analyzed by compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA). n-Alkane (C13-C23) δ13C were often 1--2 per-thousand lower in the weathered samples (e.g., δ13C of C15 = -27.14 per-thousand (fresh), -26.86 per-thousand at 25%, -25.36 per-thousand at 50%, undetected at 75%). CSIA of established oil biomarkers, detected by GC/MS, facilitated the creation of a index for quantifying the extent of weathering undergone. Subsequent work investigating the effects of biotransformation on selected oil δ13C is underway

  12. Microbial Diversity and Bioremediation of a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo A. Massol-Deyá

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources has become a major environmental and human health concern in many parts of the world. Our objectives were to employ both culture and culture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbial community structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate a diesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normal operating conditions, 97 to 99% of total hydrocarbons were removed with only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultures were isolated from the treatment unit (96% which utilized diesel constituents as sole carbon source. Approximately 20% of the isolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with most belonging to the ∝, β and γ subdivision of the Proteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the genetic constitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple time points with a Functional Gene Array (FGA containing over 12,000 probes for genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemical cycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using an isothermal φ29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, and hybridized to the arrays in 50% formimide overnight at 50°C. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course of treatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbial community. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation (including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane, biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene; and 333 genes involved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases [nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB], potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase [pmoA] were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE

  13. The use of nuclear magnetic resonance for studying and detecting hydrocarbon contaminants in porous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to assess the use of NMR for studying and detecting hydrocarbon contaminants in porous rocks. specific interest was in using NMR to determine the degree of surface interaction between a contaminant and the rock surface, the volume of contaminant present in the rock, the pore-scale location of the contaminant, and the detection of the contaminant while it coexists with water in the rock. Gasoline was the selected hydrocarbon contaminant. Gasoline/rock data clearly showed that gasoline does not as readily wet, or interact with the solid surface to the extent that water does; this was quantified by calculating the surface sink parameter for the two systems. Calculation from laboratory NMR data appears to be an effective means of quantifying contaminant/solid interaction, ans is a technique that could be readily applied to any solid/hydrocarbon system

  14. Ecotoxicity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, I C; Rast, C; Veber, A M; Vasseur, P

    2007-06-01

    Soil samples from a former cokery site polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed for their toxicity to terrestrial and aquatic organisms and for their mutagenicity. The total concentration of the 16 PAHs listed as priority pollutants by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) was 2634+/-241 mg/kgdw in soil samples. The toxicity of water-extractable pollutants from the contaminated soil samples was evaluated using acute (Vibrio fischeri; Microtox test, Daphnia magna) and chronic (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Ceriodaphnia dubia) bioassays and the EC values were expressed as percentage water extract in the test media (v/v). Algal growth (EC50-3d=2.4+/-0.2% of the water extracts) and reproduction of C. dubia (EC50-7d=4.3+/-0.6%) were the most severely affected, compared to bacterial luminescence (EC50-30 min=12+/-3%) and daphnid viability (EC50-48 h=30+/-3%). The Ames and Mutatox tests indicated mutagenicity of water extracts, while no response was found with the umu test. The toxicity of the soil samples was assessed on the survival and reproduction of earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and collembolae (Folsomia candida), and on the germination and growth of higher plants (Lactuca sativa L.: lettuce and Brassica chinensis J.: Chinese cabbage). The EC50 values were expressed as percentage contaminated soil in ISO soil test medium (weight per weight-w/w) and indicated severe effects on reproduction of the collembola F. candida (EC50-28 d=5.7%) and the earthworm E. fetida (EC50-28 d=18% and EC50-56 d=8%, based on cocoon and juvenile production, respectively). Survival of collembolae was already affected at a low concentration of the contaminated soil (EC50-28 d=11%). The viability of juvenile earthworms was inhibited at much lower concentrations of the cokery soil (EC50-14 d=28%) than the viability of adults (EC50-14 d=74%). Only plant growth was inhibited (EC50-17d=26%) while germination was not. Chemical analyses of water extracts allowed

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubová Šmejkalová, A.; Klánová, J.; Přibylová, P.; Váňa, M.

    2014-10-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. Σ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m-3 and below analytical method detection limit (particulate matter and rainwater properties were investigated. The concentrations of ionic species in particulate matter and rainwater were significantly correlated, highlighting the importance of particle scavenging process. Overall, higher scavenging efficiencies were found for relatively less volatile PAHs, underlining the effect of analyte gas-particle partitioning on scavenging process. The PAH wet scavenging was more effective when the concentrations of ionic species were high. In addition, the elemental and organic carbon contents of the particulate matter were found to influence the PAH scavenging.

  16. Remediation of hydrocarbon contaminants in cold environments : electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation and biodegradable oil sorbents

    OpenAIRE

    Suni, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the vast amounts of oil in the world, oil spills are common on land as well as at sea. In addition to oil products, other industrially used hydrocarbons, such as creosote, also contaminate soils. Most hydrocarbons are biodegradable. Hence, bioremediation is an attractive alternative for cleaning up hydrocarbon spills. In cold climate areas, however, biodegradation is often a slow process. The aim of this thesis was to develop efficient, cost-effective, and ecologically sound techniqu...

  17. Petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites: a review of investigation and remediation regulations and processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epelbaum, Michel; Claudio, Jair R. [Bureau Veritas do Brasil Sociedade Classificadora e Certificadora Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    This paper discusses alternatives on remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites which include groundwater remediation techniques and soil remediation techniques. Finally, the work points out some trends of sites remediation in Brazil and abroad. 6 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  18. STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

  19. Characterization of the vadose zone above a shallow aquifer contaminated with gas condensate hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas production site in the Denver Basin near Ft. Lupton, Colorado has leaked gas condensate hydrocarbons from an underground concrete tank used to store produced water. The leak has contaminated a shallow aquifer. Although the source of pollution has been removed, a plume of hydrocarbon contamination still remains for nearly 46 m from the original source. An extensive monitoring program was conducted in 1993 of the groundwater and saturated sediments. The objective was to determine if intrinsic aerobic or anaerobic bioremediation of hydrocarbons occurred at the site at a rate that would support remediation. Geochemical indicators of hydrogen biodegradation by microorganisms in the saturated zone included oxygen depletion, increased alkalinity, sulfate depletion, methane production and Fe2+ production associated with hydrogen contamination. The presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogens was also much higher in the contaminated sediments. Degraded hydrocarbon metabolites were found in contaminated groundwater. An extensive characterization of the vadose zone was conducted in which the vadose zone was sample in increments of 15 cm from the surface to the water table at contaminated and non contaminated sites. The samples were tested for individual C3+ hydrocarbons, methane, CO2, total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, and total petroleum hydrocarbons. The vadose zone consisted of an active and aerobic bioreactor fueled by condensate hydrocarbons transported into the unsaturated zone by evaporation of hydrocarbons at the water table. It was concluded that the unsaturated zone makes an important contribution to the natural attenuation of gas condensate hydrocarbons in the area. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 28 figs

  20. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ13C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ37Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ37Cl and δ13C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA (13C,35Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer

  1. SIMULATION OF PERFORMANCE OF CHLORINE-FREE FLURORINATED ETHERS AND FLUORINATED HYDROCARBONS TO REPLACE CFC-11 AND CFC-114 IN CHILLERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses simulation of the performance of chlorine-free fluorinated ethers and fluorinated hydrocarbons as potential long-term replacements for CFC-11 and -114. Modeling has been done with in-house refrigeration models based on the Carnahan-Starling-DeSantis Equation o...

  2. Successional and spatial patterns of bacterial communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and Populus rhizosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Shinjini

    2014-01-01

    Ever-increasing urbanization and industrialization have led to contamination of a vast numbers of terrestrial sites with petroleum hydrocarbons. Petroleum hydrocarbon pollution has a deleterious impact on biotic and abiotic properties of ecosystem and can thereby affect some valuable ecosystem services. Microbes have the ability to metabolize various components of these harmful contaminants; this unique ability has been harnessed for decades in form of bioremediation and rhizoremediation, wit...

  3. Bioremediation of marine sediments contaminated by hydrocarbons: experimental analysis and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Regoli, Francesco; Dell'Anno, Antonio

    2010-10-15

    This work deals with bioremediation experiments on harbor sediments contaminated by aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), investigating the effects of a continuous supply of inorganic nutrients and sand amendments on the kinetics of microbial growth and hydrocarbon degradation. Inorganic nutrients stimulated microbial growth and enhanced the biodegradation of low and high molecular weight hydrocarbons, whereas sand amendment increased only the removal of high molecular weight compounds. The simultaneous addition of inorganic nutrients and sand provided the highest biodegradation (>70% for aliphatic hydrocarbons and 40% for PAHs). A semi-empirical kinetic model was successfully fitted to experimental temporal changes of hydrocarbon residual concentrations and microbial abundances. The estimated values for parameters allowed to calculate a doubling time of 2.9 d and a yield coefficient biomass/hydrocarbons 0.39 g C biomass g-1C hydrocarbons, for the treatment with the highest hydrocarbon biodegradation yield. A comparison between the organic carbon demand and temporal profiles of hydrocarbons residual concentration allowed also to calculate the relative contribution of contaminants to carbon supply, in the range 5-32%. This suggests that C availability in the sediments, influencing prokaryotic metabolism, may have cascade effects on biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons. Even if these findings do not represent a general rule and site-specific studies are needed, the approach used here can be a relevant support tool when designing bioremediation strategies on site. PMID:20609514

  4. Polynuclear aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons in mussels from the coastal zone of Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Oscar A; Comoglio, Laura I; Sericano, José L

    2011-03-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis chilensis) were collected from 12 coastal locations in Ushuaia Bay, Argentina, and the surrounding area in October 1999 and again in October 2003. Concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and selected chlorinated pesticides were determined to assess the impact of a fast-growing population in the area. Total PAH concentrations ranged from 2.24 to an extremely high concentration of 2,420 µg/g lipid measured in mussels collected near an oil jetty used to discharge to shore storage tanks. The composition of PAHs in these samples indicates that the source of these compounds inside Ushuaia Bay is predominantly petrogenic, with some pyrogenic background, whereas mostly pyrogenic-related PAHs were evident in areas outside the bay. Total concentrations of PCBs ranged between 12.8 and 8,210 ng/g lipid, with the highest concentration, detected inside Ushuaia harbor, representing a 10-fold increase when compared with historical data. Chlorinated pesticides were detected at comparatively lower concentrations, with 4-4'- 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene being the most common. The aggressive increase in population and related activities observed in the city of Ushuaia over the last two decades might have affected the environmental quality of the local bay. Moreover, the oceanographic and atmospheric conditions existing in Ushuaia Bay and surrounding areas may favor the accumulation and long-term presence of these organic pollutants in all compartments of this fragile environment. PMID:21128271

  5. Correlation between index properties and electrical resistivity of hydrocarbon contaminated periodic marine clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, P.; Shah, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination is a measure issue of concern as it adversely affects the soil inherent properties viz. index properties and strength properties.The main objective of this research work is to determine Electrical resistivity to study and correlate with soil index properties and engineering propertiescontaminated with hydrocarbon at the rate of 3%, 6% and 9% for the period of 15, 30 45 and 60 days and compare it with the results obtained for non-contaminated marine clay. Electrical resistivity of virgin marine clay (bentonite which is expansive in nature) and hydrocarbon contaminated clay for each percent of contamination is obtained in the laboratory for each period and its co-relation with index properties and engineering properties is proposed. CEC, EDAX tests were performed to evaluate the effect of ions of montmorillonite clays and their penetrability into hydrocarbon- clay matrix. The correlations at the end of each period for each percentage of contamination thus enabled to integrate index properties of non-contaminated and hydrocarbon contaminated marine clays with Electrical resistivity.

  6. Comparison of the environmental impacts of two remediation technologies used at hydrocarbon contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation and remediation of contaminated sites has rapidly increased in Finland during the last decade. Public organisations as well as private companies are investigating and remediating their properties, e.g. redevelopment or business transactions. Also numerous active and closed gasoline stations have been investigated and remediated during the last few years. Usually the contaminated sites are remediated to limit values regardless of the risk caused by contamination. The limit values currently used in Finland for hydrocarbon remediation at residential or ground water areas are 300 mg/kg of total hydrocarbons and 100 mg/kg of volatile hydrocarbons (boiling point < appr. 200 deg C). Additionally, compounds such as aromatic hydrocarbons have specific limit values. Remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites is most often carried out by excavating the contaminated soil and taking it to a landfill by lorries. As distances from the sites to landfills are generally rather long, from tens of kilometres to few hundred kilometres, it is evident that this type of remediation has environmental impacts. Another popular technology used at sites contaminated by volatile hydrocarbons is soil vapour extraction (SVE). SVE is a technique of inducing air flow through unsaturated soils by vapour extraction wells or pipes to remove organic contaminants with an off-gas treatment system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate some of the environmental impacts caused by remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Energy consumption and air emissions related remedial activities of the two methods were examined in this study. Remediation of the sites used in this study were carried out by Golder Associates Oy in different parts of Finland in different seasons. Evaluation was made by using life cycle assessment based approach

  7. Field-scale assessment of phytotreatment of soil contaminated with weathered hydrocarbons and heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmroth, M.R.T.; Koskinen, P.E.P.; Tuhkanen, T.A.; Puhakka, J.A. [Inst. of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Tampere Univ. of Tech., Tampere (Finland); Pichtel, J. [Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Ball State Univ., Muncie, IN (United States); Vaajasaari, K. [Pirkanmaa Regional Environment Centre, Tampere (Finland); Joutti, A. [Finnish Environment Inst., Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-08-15

    Background, Aims, and Scope. Phytoremediation is remediation method which uses plants to remove, contain or detoxify environmental contaminants. Phytoremediation has successfully been applied for the removal of fresh hydrocarbon contamination, but removal of aged hydrocarbons has proven more difficult. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the subsurface can be enhanced by the presence of plant roots, i.e. the rhizosphere effect. Phytostabilization reduces heavy metal availability via immobilization in the rhizosphere. Soils contaminated by both hydrocarbons and heavy metals are abundant and may be difficult to treat. Heavy metal toxicity can inhibit the activity of hydrocarbon-degrading micro-organisms and decrease the metabolic diversity of soil bacteria. In this experiment, weathered hydrocarbon- and heavy metal-contaminated soil was treated using phytoremediation in a 39-month field study in attempts to achieve both hydrocarbon removal and heavy metal stabilization. Methods. A combination of hydrocarbon degradation and heavy metal stabilization was evaluated in a field-scale phytoremediation study of weathered contaminants. Soil had been contaminated over several years with hydrocarbons (11,400{+-}4,300 mg kg dry soil){sup -1} and heavy metals from bus maintenance activities and was geologically characterized as till. Concentrations of soil copper, lead and zinc were 170{+-}50 mgkg{sup -1}, 1,100{+-}1,500 mg kg{sup -1} and 390{+-} 340 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. The effect of contaminants, plant species and soil amendment (NPK fertilizer or biowaste compost) on metabolic activity of soil microbiota was determined. Phytostabilization performance was investigated by analyses of metal concentrations in plants, soil and site leachate as well as acute toxicity to Vibrio fischeri and Enchtraeus albidus. Results. Over 39 months hydrocarbon concentrations did not decrease significantly (P=0.05) in non-amended soil, although 30% of initial hydrocarbon concentrations were

  8. California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) have lower chlorinated hydrocarbon contents in northern Baja California, Mexico, than in California, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Toro, Ligeia [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California (UABC), Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Investigacion y Conservacion de Mamiferos Marinos de Ensenada, A.C., Placido Mata 2309 Depto. D-5, Condominio Las Fincas, Ensenada, Baja California 22810 (Mexico); Heckel, Gisela [Investigacion y Conservacion de Mamiferos Marinos de Ensenada, A.C., Placido Mata 2309 Depto. D-5, Condominio Las Fincas, Ensenada, Baja California 22810 (Mexico) and Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, B.C. Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico)]. E-mail: gheckel@cicese.mx; Camacho-Ibar, Victor F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanologicas, UABC, Apdo. Postal 453, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico); Schramm, Yolanda [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California (UABC), Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Investigacion y Conservacion de Mamiferos Marinos de Ensenada, A.C., Placido Mata 2309 Depto. D-5, Condominio Las Fincas, Ensenada, Baja California 22810 (Mexico)

    2006-07-15

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) were determined in blubber samples of 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) that stranded dead along Todos Santos Bay, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, January 2000-November 2001. {sigma}DDTs were the dominant group (geometric mean 3.8 {mu}g/g lipid weight), followed by polychlorinated biphenyls ({sigma}PCBs, 2.96 {mu}g/g), chlordanes (0.12 {mu}g/g) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (0.06 {mu}g/g). The {sigma}DDTs/{sigma}PCBs ratio was 1.3. We found CH levels more than one order of magnitude lower than those reported for California sea lion samples collected along the California coast, USA, during the same period as our study. This sharp north-south gradient suggests that Z. californianus stranded in Ensenada (most of them males) would probably have foraged during the summer near rookeries 500-1000 km south of Ensenada and the rest of the year migrate northwards, foraging along the Baja California peninsula, including Ensenada, and probably farther north. - Results suggest that sea lion prey must also have lower hydrocarbons in Baja California than in California in the USA.

  9. California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) have lower chlorinated hydrocarbon contents in northern Baja California, Mexico, than in California, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) were determined in blubber samples of 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) that stranded dead along Todos Santos Bay, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, January 2000-November 2001. ΣDDTs were the dominant group (geometric mean 3.8 μg/g lipid weight), followed by polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCBs, 2.96 μg/g), chlordanes (0.12 μg/g) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (0.06 μg/g). The ΣDDTs/ΣPCBs ratio was 1.3. We found CH levels more than one order of magnitude lower than those reported for California sea lion samples collected along the California coast, USA, during the same period as our study. This sharp north-south gradient suggests that Z. californianus stranded in Ensenada (most of them males) would probably have foraged during the summer near rookeries 500-1000 km south of Ensenada and the rest of the year migrate northwards, foraging along the Baja California peninsula, including Ensenada, and probably farther north. - Results suggest that sea lion prey must also have lower hydrocarbons in Baja California than in California in the USA

  10. A study of chlorinated solvent contamination of the aquifers of an industrial area in central Italy: a possibility of bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FEDERICA eMATTEUCCI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Perchloroethene, Trichloroethene, and other chlorinated solvents are widespread groundwater pollutants. They form Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs that sink through permeable groundwater aquifers until non-permeable zone is reached. In Italy there are many situations of serious contamination of groundwater that might compromise their use in industry, agriculture, private, as the critical case of a Central Italy valley located in the province of Teramo (Val Vibrata, characterized by a significant chlorinated solvents contamination. Data from the various monitoring campaigns that have taken place over time were collected, and new samplings were carried out, resulting in a complete database. The data matrix was processed with a multivariate statistic analysis (in particular Principal Components Analysis, PCA and was then imported into Geographic Information System (GIS, to obtain a model of the contamination. A microcosm anaerobic study was utilized to assess the potential for in situ natural or enhanced bioremediation. Most of the microcosms were positive for dechlorination, particularly those inoculated with a mineral medium. This indicate the presence of an active native dechlorinating population in the subsurface, probably inhibited by co-contaminants in the groundwater, or more likely by the absence or lack of nutritional factors. Among the tested electron donors (i.e., yeast extract, lactate, and butyrate lactate and butyrate enhanced dechlorination of chlorinated compounds. PCA and GIS studies allowed delimiting the contamination; the microcosm study helped to identify the conditions to promote the bioremediation of the area.

  11. Plant-bacteria partnerships for the remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sumia; Afzal, Muhammad; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M

    2013-01-01

    Plant-bacteria partnerships have been extensively studied and applied to improve crop yield. In addition to their application in agriculture, a promising field to exploit plant-bacteria partnerships is the remediation of soil and water polluted with hydrocarbons. Application of effective plant-bacteria partnerships for the remediation of hydrocarbons depend mainly on the presence and metabolic activities of plant associated rhizo- and endophytic bacteria possessing specific genes required for the degradation of hydrocarbon pollutants. Plants and their associated bacteria interact with each other whereby plant supplies the bacteria with a special carbon source that stimulates the bacteria to degrade organic contaminants in the soil. In return, plant associated-bacteria can support their host plant to overcome contaminated-induced stress responses, and improve plant growth and development. In addition, plants further get benefits from their associated-bacteria possessing hydrocarbon-degradation potential, leading to enhanced hydrocarbon mineralization and lowering of both phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration of volatile hydrocarbons. A better understanding of plant-bacteria partnerships could be exploited to enhance the remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils in conjunction with sustainable production of non-food crops for biomass and biofuel production. PMID:23058201

  12. Assessing chlorinated ethene degradation in a large scale contaminant plume by dual carbon–chlorine isotope analysis and quantitative PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunkeler, D.; Abe, Y.; Broholm, Mette Martina;

    2011-01-01

    pyrite oxidation as confirmed by the depleted sulfur isotope signature of SO4 2−. In the same zone, PCE and trichloroethene (TCE) disappeared and cis- 1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) became the dominant chlorinated ethene. PCE and TCE were likely transformed by reductive dechlorination rather than abiotic...... reduction by pyrite as indicated by the formation of cDCE and stable carbon isotope data. TCE and cDCE showed carbon isotope trends typical for reductive dechlorination with an initial depletion of 13C in the daughter products followed by an enrichment of 13C as degradation proceeded. At 1000 m downgradient...

  13. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.palau@unine.ch [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Marchesi, Massimo [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chambon, Julie C.C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Aravena, Ramon [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canals, Àngels [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ{sup 13}C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ{sup 37}Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ{sup 37}Cl and δ{sup 13}C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA ({sup 13}C,{sup 35}Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer.

  14. Microbial treatment of soils with mixed contaminations from radioactive residues and hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of contaminated soils often is complicated due to the presence of different pollutants. A remediation process must take into consideration the requirements of each of these contaminants. From uranium mining activities a great number of sites remained contaminated with hydrocarbons and radioactive residues which have to be treated for environmental protection reasons. The concept of a treatment process for these kinds of mixed contaminations is introduced. First, the hydrocarbons are removed biologically with help of on or off-site technologies. After the degradation, the soil, now only contaminated with radionuclides, can be disposed like other radioactive wastes. For the biological treatment process, conventional methods can be applied which, however, have to be modified to consider radiation protection

  15. Changes in the microstructure of clayey soils after contamination with hydrocarbons and use of tensides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In laboratory experiments the influence of aliphatic and aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons on the microstructure of undisturbed Keuper clay and on clay dominated by different clay minerals was investigated. The densified clays of different water content were placed in a double-ring permeameter and perfused with the pollutants. Changes in microstructure upon contamination with the unpolar hydrocarbons were measured by porosimetry; the resulting differences in permeability were documented. (orig.)

  16. Intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was designed to determine if the intrinsic bioremediation of gas condensate hydrocarbons represented an important fate process in a shallow aquifer underlying a natural gas production site. For over 4 yr, changes in the groundwater, sediment, and vadose zone chemistry in the contaminated portion of the aquifer were interpreted relative to a background zone. Changes included decreased dissolved oxygen and sulfate levels and increased alkalinity, Fe(II), and methane concentrations in the contaminated groundwater, suggesting that aerobic heterotrophic respiration depleted oxygen reserves leaving anaerobic conditions in the hydrocarbon-impacted subsurface. Dissolved hydrogen levels in the contaminated groundwater indicated that sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were predominant biological processes, corroborating the geochemical findings. Furthermore, 10--1000-fold higher numbers of sulfate reducers and methanogens were enumerated in the contaminated sediment relative to background. Putative metabolites were also detected in the contaminated groundwater, including methylbenzylsuccinic acid, a signature intermediate of anaerobic xylene decay. Laboratory incubations showed that benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and each of the xylene isomers were biodegraded under sulfate-reducing conditions as was toluene under methanogenic conditions. These results coupled with a decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations in contaminated sediment confirm that intrinsic bioremediation contributes to the attenuation of hydrocarbons in this aquifer

  17. High bacterial biodiversity increases degradation performance of hydrocarbons during bioremediation of contaminated harbor marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated changes of bacterial abundance and biodiversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on oxic and anoxic marine harbor sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Oxic sediments, supplied with inorganic nutrients, were incubated in aerobic conditions at 20 °C and 35 °C for 30 days, whereas anoxic sediments, amended with organic substrates, were incubated in anaerobic conditions at the same temperatures for 60 days. Results reported here indicate that temperature exerted the main effect on bacterial abundance, diversity and assemblage composition. At higher temperature bacterial diversity and evenness increased significantly in aerobic conditions, whilst decreased in anaerobic conditions. In both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, biodegradation efficiencies of hydrocarbons were significantly and positively related with bacterial richness and evenness. Overall results presented here suggest that bioremediation strategies, which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity rather than the selection of specific taxa, may significantly increase the efficiency of hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated marine sediments. - Highlights: ► Bioremediation performance was investigated on hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. ► Major changes in bacterial diversity and assemblage composition were observed. ► Temperature exerted the major effect on bacterial assemblages. ► High bacterial diversity increased significantly biodegradation performance. This should be considered for sediment remediation by bio-treatments. - Bioremediation strategies which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity may significantly increase the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in contaminated marine sediments.

  18. Using Geophysical Signatures to Investigate Temporal Changes Due to Source Reduction in the Subsurface Contaminated with Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the geophysical response to subsurface hydrocarbon contamination source removal. Source removal by natural attenuation or by engineered bioremediation is expected to change the biological, chemical, and physical environment associated with the contaminated matrix....

  19. Incineration process for chlorinated alpha-contaminated wastes: industrial application to the Valduc project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has pursued a broad research and development program for a number of years concerning the incineration of chlorinated α-contaminated wastes produced by work in confined atmosphere. This program has now reached the stage where an alternative solution is available to the conventional direct cement embedding method currently used for such wastes. The proposed solution is based on a two-step incineration process offering a significant volume reduction that constitutes a serious economic advantage for geological disposal. Moreover, the process produces ashes of a quality suitable for direct online vitrification, or for Pu recovery by dissolution with silver II. The process was developed under nonradioactive conditions in the IRIS incineration pilot facility operated by the CEA's Fuel Cycle Division (CEA/DCC), opening the way for the first industrial facility, planned for the VALDUC Research Center. USSI is the prime contractor in this 36-month project. The basic design work has now been completed, and the French safety authorities have authorized construction of the incinerator, based in large part on the experience and expertise acquired by the process licenser CEA/DCC. (author). 6 figs., 3 tabs

  20. A study of chlorinated solvent contamination of the aquifers of an industrial area in central Italy: a possibility of bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, Federica; Ercole, Claudia; del Gallo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    Perchloroethene, trichloroethene, and other chlorinated solvents are widespread groundwater pollutants. They form dense non-aqueous phase liquids that sink through permeable groundwater aquifers until non-permeable zone is reached. In Italy, there are many situations of serious contamination of groundwater that might compromise their use in industry, agriculture, private, as the critical case of a Central Italy valley located in the province of Teramo (“Val Vibrata”), characterized by a signi...

  1. Peroxone activated persulfate treatment of 1,4-dioxane in the presence of chlorinated solvent co-contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Dylan; Ball, Raymond; Boving, Thomas B

    2016-02-01

    1,4-dioxane is often found as a co-contaminant with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at solvent release sites such as landfills, solvent recycling facilities, or fire training areas. Historically, soil and groundwater samples were not routinely analyzed for 1,4-dioxane and therefore the number of known 1,4-dioxane sites is still increasing. Due to its co-occurrence with chlorinated compounds, remediation strategies are needed that simultaneously treat both 1,4-dioxane as well as chlorinated VOC co-contaminants. In this proof of concept laboratory study, the fate of 1,4-dioxane was examined during the targeted destruction of aqueous phase VOC, using a peroxone activated persulfate (PAP) chemical oxidation method. Bench-scale experiments were carried out to evaluate the treatability of 1,4-dioxane as both a single-contaminant and in the presence of trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA). Possible dependencies on oxidant concentration and reaction kinetics were studied. The oxidative destruction of 1,4-dioxane, TCE and 1,1,1-TCA in single-contaminant batch systems followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics and even at the most dilute oxidant concentration lasted for at least 13 days. The rate of oxidation for each contaminant increased linearly with increasing persulfate concentration over the range of oxidant concentrations tested. The rate of oxidative destruction, from most easily degraded to least, was: TCE > 1,4-dioxane > 1,1,1-TCA. Oxidation rates were up to 87% slower in a mixture of these three compounds. Although additional tests are necessary, our data suggest that PAP oxidation of 1,4-dioxane might aid in the cleanup of VOC contaminated sites. PMID:26408980

  2. Application of in situ chemical oxidation technique with potassium permanganate for the remediation of a shallow aquifer contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Alaine Santos da Cunha; Reginaldo Antonio Bertolo

    2012-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation is a method that is frequently being used for the remediation of contaminated areas, since it presents an adequate efficiency in the reduction of the contaminant mass, particularly chlorinated ethenes, in a relatively short period of time. This manuscript presents the results of the application of this method, using the injection of potassium permanganate as the remediation agent, in an impacted area with chlorinated organic compounds, especially 1,1-dichloroethene....

  3. THE GEOLOGICAL CONDITIONING OF HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS RESULTING FROM SOIL CONTAMINATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa J. Lipińska

    2014-01-01

    Synchronization economy of oil mining and mineral waters is associated with planning the functions of spa treatment. Environmental protection of the spa areas also applies to preserve their technical and cultural heritage. This article attempts to determine the places of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon pollution substances. Their presence in the soil affects the quality of the environment. As a result, maps are produced showing directions of research: (1) the natural background of biodi...

  4. Potential of phytoremediation for the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated salt marsh sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Mucha, Ana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2014-05-01

    Degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in colonized and un-colonized sediments by salt marsh plants Juncus maritimus and Phragmites australis collected in a temperate estuary was investigated during a 5-month greenhouse experiment. The efficiency of two bioremediation treatments namely biostimulation (BS) by the addition of nutrients, and bioaugmentation (BA) by addition of indigenous microorganisms was tested in comparison with hydrocarbon natural attenuation in un-colonized and with rhizoremediation in colonized sediments. Hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms and root biomass were assessed as well as hydrocarbon degradation levels. During the study, hydrocarbon degradation in un-colonized sediments was negligible regardless of treatments. Rhizoremediation proved to be an effective strategy for hydrocarbon removal, yielding high rates in most experiments. However, BS treatments showed a negative effect on the J. maritimus potential for hydrocarbon degradation by decreasing the root system development that lead to lower degradation rates. Although both plants and their associated microorganisms presented a potential for rhizoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated salt marsh sediments, results highlighted that nutrient requirements may be distinct among plant species, which should be accounted for when designing cleanup strategies. PMID:24584003

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutheina Gargouri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

  6. HIgh volume collection of chlorinated hydrocarbons in urban air using three solid adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, W. Neil; Bidleman, Terry F.

    Airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and chlorinated pesticides were measured in Columbia, SC; Denver, CO and over a landfill at New Bedford, MA. At each location comparative sampling was carried out using porous polyurethane foam (PPF), Tenax-GC resin and XAD-2 resin. Concentrations of light and heavy PCB (Aroclors 1016 and 1254), p, p'-DDE, chlordane and toxaphene measured using the different adsorbents agreed well, with average relative standard deviations of 11-15%. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was poorly collected by PPF, but well retained by the resins. HCB concentrations measured using Tenax and XAD-2 agreed within 6 % average relative standard deviation, and were several times higher than those found using PPF. The breakthrough of Aroclor 1016 on PPF was studied in detail for over 30 field sampling experiments. Penetration of 1016 through a PPF bed depends on total air volume and ambient temperature. Breakthrough from the front to backup traps was best correlated with the temperature-weighted air volume, where the temperature factor was derived from PCB vapor pressures at the ambient sampling temperature and at 20 °C.

  7. Thermal decomposition of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons during gas combustion in fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olek Malgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of thermal decomposition of dichloromethane (DCM and chlorobenzene (MCB during the combustion in an inert, bubbling fluidized bed, supported by LPG as auxiliary fuel, have been studied. The concentration profiles of C6H5CI, CH2Cl2, CO2, CO, NOx, COCl2, CHCl3, CH3Cl, C2H2, C6H6, CH4 in the flue gases were specified versus mean bed temperature. Results The role of preheating of gaseous mixture in fluidized bed prior to its ignition inside bubbles was identified as important factor for increase the degree of conversion of DCM and MCB in low bed temperature, in comparison to similar process in the tubular reactor. Conclusions Taking into account possible combustion mechanisms, it was identified that autoignition in bubbles rather than flame propagation between bubbles is needed to achieve complete destruction of DCM and MCB. These condition occurs above 900°C causing the degree of conversion of chlorine compounds of 92-100%.

  8. Optimisation of an integrated optical evanescent wave absorbance sensor for the determination of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, J; Bürck, J; Ache, H J

    1996-03-01

    The suitability of an integrated optical chemical sensor for the determination of highly volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous solutions has been proven. The analytes are detected by NIR absorption spectrometry in the evanescent field of an integrated optical strip waveguide generated in a BGG31 (Schott, Germany) glass substrate, which is coated with a hydrophobic polymer superstrate as sensing layer. It has been shown that the sensitivity increases when the refractive index of the superstrate is increased from 1.333 up to 1.46. Different UV-cured polysiloxanes with low cross sensitivity to water have been prepared. Due to the good light transmission properties of the IO-sensors prepared by this method, quantitative measurements have been performed with the model system trichloroethene (TCE) in water. A detection limit of 22 ppm has been found and the sensor response times (t(90)-value) are between five and fourteen minutes for a coating thickness of around 30 microm. The sensor response is totally reversible. The analyte desorbes in air within 2 min. The enrichment of trichloroethene in the polysiloxane coating can be described by film diffusion through the aqueous boundary layer as rate determining step. PMID:15048399

  9. Local and seasonal variations in concentrations of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with particles in a Japanese megacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohura, Takeshi; Kamiya, Yuta; Ikemori, Fumikazu

    2016-07-15

    Concentrations of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and chlorinated PAHs (ClPAHs) were measured in different seasons at five sampling stations in Nagoya, a Japanese megacity. The annual mean total ClPAH and total PAH concentrations were 43.3-92.6pg/m(3) and 5200-8570pg/m(3), respectively. The concentrations of total ClPAHs were significantly variable than those of total PAHs, and both total concentrations through the seasons did not significantly correlate at any of the stations. Principal component analysis was used to characterize the ClPAH sources, resulted that ClPAHs were found to be associated with the sources of high-molecular-weight PAHs in the warmer seasons and of low-molecular-weight PAHs in the colder seasons. These findings suggest that principal sources of particle-bound ClPAHs are present in the local area, and change in the seasons. Toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations were estimated to assess the risks associated with exposure to ClPAHs in air. The TEQ concentrations in the samples were 0.05-0.32pg-TEQ/m(3). The TEQ concentrations in summer were approximately half the TEQ concentrations in the other seasons at all of the stations. PMID:27037480

  10. REDUCTION OF OIL CONTAMINATION ON HARD DISK DRIVE PARTS USING AUTOMATIC HYDROCARBON WASHING MACHINE

    OpenAIRE

    Somkiat Tangjitsitcharoen; Nuntawat Nunya

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of the Taguchi method and response surface analysis to minimize the proportion of defectives by oil contamination on one product of hard disk drive parts by using an automatic hydrocarbon washing machine. The experiments are conducted by using the Taguchi method and the matrices of washing conditions include nine parameters. The effect on the proportion of defectives by oil contamination is evaluated and determined. A second-order model is developed based on the p...

  11. Root adaptive responses of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) growing in sand treated with petroleum hydrocarbon contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramaniyam, Anuluxshy

    2012-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a green technique used to restore polluted sites through plant-initiated biochemical processes. Its effectiveness, however, depends on the successful establishment of plants in the contaminated soil. Soils that are contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), especially low molecular weight, mobile PAHs such as naphthalene pose a significant challenge to this. Plant roots growing in these soils exhibit changes to their structure, physiology and growth pattern...

  12. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils: are treatability and ecotoxicity endpoints related?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if there is a relationship between biotreatability and ecotoxicity endpoints in a wide range of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, including medium and heavy crude oil-contaminated flare pit wastes and lubrication oil contaminated soil, research was conducted. Each test material was analyzed for pH, water repellency, electrical conductivity, available N and P, total extractable hydrocarbons, oil and grease, and toxicity to seedling emergence, root elongation in barley, lettuce and canola, earthworm survival and luminescent bacteria (Microtox), prior to, and following three months of bioremediation in the laboratory. By monitoring soil respiration, progress of the bioremediation process and determination of a treatment endpoint were assessed. The time required to attain a treatment endpoint under laboratory conditions can range from 30 days to 100 days depending on the concentration of hydrocarbons and degree of weathering. Most flare pits are biotreatable, averaging a loss of 25-30% of hydrocarbons during bioremediation. Once a treatment endpoint is achieved, residual hydrocarbons contents almost always exceeds Alberta Tier I criteria for mineral oil and grease. As a result of bioremediation treatments, hydrophobicity is often reduced from severe to low. Many flare pit materials are still moderately to extremely toxic after reaching a treatment endpoint. (Abstract only)

  13. Bioremediation of hydrocarbons contaminating sewage effluent using man-made biofilms: effects of some variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mailem, D M; Kansour, M K; Radwan, S S

    2014-11-01

    Biofilm samples were established on glass slides by submerging them in oil-free and oil-containing sewage effluent for a month. In batch cultures, such biofilms were effective in removing crude oil, pure n-hexadecane, and pure phenanthrene contaminating sewage effluent. The amounts of the removed hydrocarbons increased with increasing biofilm surface area exposed to the effluent. On the other hand, addition of the reducing agent thioglycollate dramatically inhibited the hydrocarbon bioremediation potential of the biofilms. The same biofilm samples removed contaminating hydrocarbons effectively in three successive batch bioremediation cycles but started to become less effective in the cycles thereafter, apparently due to mechanical biofilm loss during successive transfers. As major hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, the biofilms harbored species belonging to the genera Pseudomonas, Microvirga, Zavarzinia, Mycobacterium, Microbacterium, Stenotrophomonas, Gordonia, Bosea, Sphingobium, Brachybacterium, and others. The nitrogen fixer Azospirillum brasilense and the microalga Ochromonas distigma were also present; they seemed to enrich the biofilms, with nitrogenous compounds and molecular oxygen, respectively, which are known to enhance microbiological hydrocarbon degradation. It was concluded that man-made biofilms based upon sewage microflora are promising tools for bioremediation of hydrocarbons contaminating sewage effluent. PMID:25146193

  14. Assessment of in situ degradation of chlorinated ethenes and bacterial community structure in a complex contaminated groundwater system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imfeld, Gwenaël; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Nikolausz, Marcell; Zeiger, Simone; Paschke, Heidrun; Drangmeister, Jörg; Grossmann, Jochen; Richnow, Hans H; Weber, Stefanie

    2008-02-01

    The occurrence of in situ degradation of chlorinated ethenes was investigated using an integrated approach in a complex groundwater system consisting of several geological units. The assessment of hydrogeochemistry and chlorinated ethenes distribution using principal component analysis (PCA) in combination with carbon stable isotope analysis revealed that chlorinated ethenes were subjected to substantial biodegradation. Shifts in isotopic values up to 20.4 per thousand, 13.9 per thousand, 20.1 per thousand and 31.4 per thousand were observed between geological units for tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC), respectively. The use of specific biomarkers (16S rRNA gene) indicated the presence of Dehalococcoides sp. DNA in 20 of the 33 evaluated samples. In parallel, the analysis of changes in the bacterial community composition in the aquifers using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated the predominant influence of the chlorinated ethene concentrations (56.3% of the variance, P=0.005). The integrated approach may open new prospects for the assessment of spatial and temporal functioning of bioattenuation in contaminated groundwater systems. PMID:17915287

  15. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated surface water, groundwater, and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation is currently receiving considerable attention as a remediation option for sites contaminated with hazardous organic compounds. There is an enormous amount of interest in bioremediation, and numerous journals now publish research articles concerning some aspect of the remediation approach. A review of the literature indicates that two basic forms of bioremediation are currently being practiced: the microbiological approach and the microbial ecology approach. Each form has its advocates and detractors, and the microbiological approach is generally advocated by most of the firms that practice bioremediation. In this paper, the merits and disadvantages of these forms are reviewed and a conceptual approach is presented for assessing which form may be most useful for a particular contaminant situation. I conclude that the microbial ecology form of bioremediation may be the most useful for the majority of contaminant situations, and I will present two case histories in support of this hypothesis

  16. Change of magnetic properties due to fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater in unconsolidated sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal, Moti L; Appel, Erwin; Petrovský, Eduard; Blaha, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Sediments affected by fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater were studied at a former military site. Due to remediation, groundwater table fluctuation (GWTF) extends over approximately one meter. Three cores were collected, penetrating through the GWTF zone. Magnetic parameters, sediment properties and hydrocarbon content were measured. We discovered that magnetic concentration parameters increased towards the top of the GWTF zone. Magnetite is responsible for this enhancement; rock magnetic parameters indicate that the newly formed magnetite is in a single domain rather than a superparamagnetic state. The presence of hydrocarbons is apparently essential for magnetite to form, as there is clearly less magnetic enhancement in the core, which is outside of the strongly contaminated area. From our results we conclude that the top of the fluctuation zone has the most intensive geomicrobiological activity probably responsible for magnetite formation. This finding could be relevant for developing methods for simply and quickly detecting oil spills. PMID:19954870

  17. Ecotoxicity monitoring of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil during bioremediation: a case study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hubálek, Tomáš; Vosáhlová, S.; Matějů, V.; Kováčová, Nora; Novotný, Čeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2007), s. 1-7. ISSN 0090-4341 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B030; GA AV ČR KJB600200514 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : bioremediation * ecotoxicity * hydrocarbon-contaminated soil Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.620, year: 2007

  18. Hydrocarbon contamination affects deep-sea benthic oxygen uptake and microbial community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, C. E.; Ruhl, H. A.; Jones, D. O. B.; Yool, A.; Thornton, B.; Mayor, D. J.

    2015-06-01

    Accidental oil well blowouts have the potential to introduce large quantities of hydrocarbons into the deep sea and disperse toxic contaminants to midwater and seafloor areas over ocean-basin scales. Our ability to assess the environmental impacts of these events is currently impaired by our limited understanding of how resident communities are affected. This study examined how two treatment levels of a water accommodated fraction of crude oil affected the oxygen consumption rate of a natural, deep-sea benthic community. We also investigated the resident microbial community's response to hydrocarbon contamination through quantification of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and their stable carbon isotope (δ13C) values. Sediment community oxygen consumption rates increased significantly in response to increasing levels of contamination in the overlying water of oil-treated microcosms, and bacterial biomass decreased significantly in the presence of oil. Multivariate ordination of PLFA compositional (mol%) data showed that the structure of the microbial community changed in response to hydrocarbon contamination. However, treatment effects on the δ13C values of individual PLFAs were not statistically significant. Our data demonstrate that deep-sea benthic microbes respond to hydrocarbon exposure within 36 h.

  19. Effect of hydrocarbon-contaminated fluctuating groundwater on magnetic properties of shallow sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ameen, N. N.; Klueglein, N.; Appel, E.; Petrovský, Eduard; Kappler, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2014), s. 442-460. ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13042 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : environmental magnetism * magnetic susceptibility * groundwater table fluctuation * hydrocarbon contamination * magnetite formation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.806, year: 2014

  20. Change of magnetic properties due to fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater in unconsolidated sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rijal, M. L.; Appel, E.; Petrovský, Eduard; Blaha, U.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 5 (2010), s. 1756-1762. ISSN 0269-7491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : hydrocarbon contamination * groundwater table fluctuation * magnetic properties * environmental magnetism Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.395, year: 2010

  1. Weathering and toxicity of marine sediments contaminated with oils and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.T.O.; Sinke, A.; Brils, J.M.; Murk, A.J.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Many sediments are contaminated with mixtures of oil residues and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but little is known about the toxicity of such mixtures to sediment-dwelling organisms and the change in toxicity on weathering. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a seminatur

  2. Improvement of Bioremediation Performance for the Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rocchetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcosm bioremediation strategies were applied to sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Experiments were performed in aerobic conditions in a single-step treatment and in a two-step anaerobic-aerobic treatment. In aerobic conditions, either inorganic nutrients or composts were added to the microcosms, while, in the first anaerobic phase of the two-step experiment, acetate and/or allochthonous sulfate-reducing bacteria were used. After the treatment under anaerobic conditions, samples were exposed to aerobic conditions in the presence of compost. In the aerobic treatments, 81% hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed after 43 days in the presence of inorganic nutrients. In aerobic conditions in the presence of mature compost, hydrocarbon biodegradation was 51% after 43 days of treatment, whereas it was 47% after 21 days with fresh compost. The two-step experiment allowed us to obtain a hydrocarbon degradation of 91%, after a first anaerobic step with an inoculum of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes.

  3. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C.; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:27471499

  4. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:27471499

  5. Technology selection for remediation of lead and hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a methodology for selection of a technology for remediation of 70,000 tons of lead and hydrocarbon impacted soil resulting from an excavation at the Mobil Torrance Refinery. This methodology resulted from over two years of extensive research and technology evaluation. Twelve technologies and combination of technologies were evaluated, which often included bench scale testing, to determine the most cost effective and technically feasible remediation option. The results of the studies for each technology are discussed and presented in tabular form. The technologies investigated include: fixation/stabilization, soil washing, solvent washing, heap leach extraction, froth flotation, bioremediation, thermal desorption, electrokinetic extraction, asphalt incorporation, vitrification, off-site treatment, and off-site disposal. The associated costs and technical feasibility of each of the remediation options evaluated are presented. Laboratory analyses of the excavated soil indicate hydrocarbons range from non-detect to 11,000 ppm with an average of 2,600 ppm, soluble lead (CA test-not TCLP) range from 1.4 ppm to 100 ppm with an average of 29 ppm, and low levels of organic lead are present. Average grain size of the soil ranges from number-sign 200 to number-sign 120 mesh, and permeability averages 10--4 cm/sec. Significant odors, likely caused by hydrogen sulfide and thiophenes, were detected when the soil was excavated and control of odors during the remediation phase is a critical concern

  6. The bio-remediation of the contamination with hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the oil industry comprise many processes that represent environmental risks, usually the pollution of the ecosystems with hydrocarbons. When bulky spills occur, the first measure used for damage repair is the physical gathering, but scattered quantities of oil even remain. The last is typical of chronic leakage's when is necessary to make use of other procedures for the environmental restoration. The bioremediation is an effective and economic technique useful in these cases that rest upon natural processes of the detritivorous tropic chain in all the ecosystems. There are over one-hundred species of bacteria and fungi able to profit the hydrocarbons as energy source for feeding, diminishing the pollutant to levels harmless to the physical, chemical and biological properties of the ecosystems. The current weariest stock belongs to the bacteria species pseudomonas aeruginosa. To apply properly this technique is necessary to know the nature of the pollutant, the properties of the substratum and the indigenous microbiological communities. Moreover it is required to control the environmental conditions, mainly aeration, moisture, temperature, pH, and nutrients status of the substratum

  7. Hydrodynamic and isotopic characterization of a site contaminated by chlorinated solvents: Chienti River Valley, Central Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The fate of chlorinated solvents in groundwater in an alluvial aquifer has been investigated. ► Heterogeneity of the aquifer sediments causes vertical components of groundwater flow. ► Multilevel data shows the VOC’s stratification in the aquifer. ► Concentration and δ13C and δ37Cl data showed that dilution controls the VOC’s distribution. ► Biodegradation has been confirmed by isotope data only in low permeability layers. - Abstract: Contaminant sources have been attributed to shoe manufacturers in an alluvial aquifer located along 26 km2 in the Chienti River Valley, Central Italy. During the 1980s and 1990s, the main chlorinated compound used in the study area was 1,1,1-Trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA), which was substituted by Perchloroethene (PCE) in the last 15 years. A hydrogeological conceptual model has been developed for the alluvial aquifer taking into account the presence of low permeability lenses, forming a multilayer semi-confined aquifer. Hydrodynamic tests (pumping and flowmeter heat-pulse tests) coupled with standard and multilevel hydrochemical and isotopic samplings were performed. Flowmeter tests showed the existence of vertical flow between aquifer levels having different permeability. Physical–chemical parameter logs agreed with the existence of a multilayer aquifer. Concentration data collected in 21 wells located downgradient of the different sources revealed VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) levels lower than 100 μg/L in the upper part of the valley and levels reaching about 200 μg/L in the near shore areas. PCE is the main compound present in the aquifer. No evidence of the presence of TCA was found in the upper areas of the Chienti Valley, but in the areas near the shore, TCA and its degradation products are predominant. Data collected at multilevels located at two sites (upper and near shore areas) to refine the results obtained in the regional survey show a stratification of the VOC concentrations; values of

  8. A critical assessment of asphalt batching as a viable remedial option for hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot mix asphalt production equipment has been successfully utilized in the remediation of soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. This paper reports that there are two major ways in which this equipment can be used to remediate the petroleum contaminated soils; by incorporating the contaminated soil in the hot mix asphalt product or by using the equipment to clean the soil thermally of the contaminant, leaving a clean soil material. Both of these processes have limitations encompassing technical, political, and certainly liability problems. The remediation of contaminated soil in hot mix asphalt facilities is primarily a physical phenomenon relying on laws of heat and mass transfer. Although chemical changes do occur, the primary function of the process is to cause a physical separation of the contaminant from the soils

  9. Hydrocarbon Hysteria: Differentiating Approaches to Consumption and Contamination in Regulatory Frameworks Governing Unconventional Hydrocarbon Extraction.

    OpenAIRE

    John Pearson

    2015-01-01

    A variety of methods of extracting natural resources and, in particular, those utilised to produce energy from hydrocarbons,1 provide facts and statistics (of both questionable and acclaimed origin) which shock and appal, or garner considerable support. However, as more research and consideration is given to these, the more realism inevitably emerges in relation to their regulation. In an interesting study of risk it was submitted by Jaeger that, “There can be little doubt that ...

  10. BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANTS IN MARINE HABITATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioremediation is being increasingly seen as an effective environmentally benign treatment for shorelines contaminated as a result of marine oil spills. Despite a relatively long history of research on oil-spill bioremediation, it remains an essentially empirical technology and m...

  11. [Removal of Waste Gas Containing Mixed Chlorinated Hydrocarbons by the Biotrickling Filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong-zhi; Miao, Xiao-ping; Ouyang, Du-juan; Ye, Jie-xu; Chen, Jian-meng

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation on purification of waste gas contaminated with a mixture of dichloromethane (DCM) and dichloroethane(1,2-DCA) was conducted in a biotrickling filter (BTF) inoculated with activated sludge of pharmaceuticals industry. Stable removal efficiency(RE) above 80% for DCM and above 75% for 1,2-DCA were achieved after 35 days, indicating that biofilm was developed. The best elimination capacity (EC) of DCM and 1,2-DCA were 13 g.(m3.h)-1 and 10 g.(m3.h)-1 respectively. And there was a linear relationship between the production of CO2 and mixed gas EC, the maximum mineralization rate of mixed gas stabled at 61. 2%. The interaction test indicated that DCM and 1,2-DCA would inhibit with each other. The changing of biomass of BTF during the operation process was also been studied. PMID:26717675

  12. Quantification of temperature impacts on the dissolution of chlorinated hydrocarbons into groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koproch, Nicolas; Popp, Steffi; Köber, Ralf; Beyer, Christof; Bauer, Sebastian; Dahmke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Shallow thermal energy storage has great potential for heat storage especially in urban and industrial areas. However, frequently existing organic groundwater contaminations in such areas were currently seen as exclusion criteria for thermal use of the shallow subsurface, since increased contaminant discharge is feared as consequence of heating. Contaminant discharge is influenced by a complex interaction of processes and boundary conditions as e.g. solubility, dispersion, viscosity and degradation, where there is still a lack of experimental evidence of the temperature dependent interaction. Even existing studies on basic influencing factors as e.g. temperature dependent solubilities show contradictory results. Such knowledge gaps should be reduced to improve the basis and liability of numerical model simulations and the knowledge base to enable a more differentiated and optimized use of resources. For this purpose batch as well as 1- and 2-dimensional experimental studies concerning the temperature dependent release of TCE (trichloroethylene) from a NAPL (non aqueous phase liquid) source are presented and discussed. In addition, this experimental studies are accompanied by a numerical model verification, where extensions of existing numerical model approaches on basis of this obtained experimental results are developed. Firstly, temperature dependent TCE solubility data were collected using batch experiments with significantly better temperature resolution compared to earlier studies, showing a distinct minimum at 35°C and increased solubility towards 5°C and 70°C. Secondly, heated 1-dimensional stainless steel columns homogenously filled with quartz sand were used to quantify source zone depletion and contaminant discharge at 10-70°C. Cumulative mass discharge curves indicated two blob categories with distinct differences in dissolution kinetics. Increasing the temperature showed here an increase of the amount of fast dissolving blobs indicating higher NAPL

  13. THE GEOLOGICAL CONDITIONING OF HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS RESULTING FROM SOIL CONTAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa J. Lipińska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization economy of oil mining and mineral waters is associated with planning the functions of spa treatment. Environmental protection of the spa areas also applies to preserve their technical and cultural heritage. This article attempts to determine the places of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon pollution substances. Their presence in the soil affects the quality of the environment. As a result, maps are produced showing directions of research: (1 the natural background of biodiversity, and (2 potential anthropogenic pollution. They are assessed in the context of the health and human life, protection of the environment and the possibility of damage to the environment. Research is conducted in communes of the status of the spa – for special protection.

  14. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon and brine contaminated topsoil : annual report (1992-93)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study which examined the remediation of hydrocarbon and brine contaminated topsoil in a field-based bioreactor at a gas processing plant in Nevis, Alberta during 1992 and 1993. The hydrocarbon and brine contaminated topsoil was placed in the Bio-Reactor and treated for eleven months. Four treatments were applied to eight Bio-Reactor cells: (1) ambient temperature/no forced aeration, (2) ambient temperature/forced aeration, (3) optimum temperature/no forced aeration and (4) optimum temperature/forced aeration. The ninth cell was filled with 30 cm contaminated topsoil and maintained under optimum temperature/forced aeration. The contaminated topsoil was kept moist throughout the experiment by an automatic irrigation system. The contaminated topsoil in the heated cells lost 40 per cent of its original hydrocarbon content in one year; the soil in the non-heated cells lost between 25 and 29 per cent in the same period. Results showed that the Bio-Reactor offered an inexpensive means for promoting a natural process for degrading organic compounds by microorganisms in soil. Equally important, it is capable of handling the large volumes of waste produced by the oil and gas industry. 64 refs., 35 tabs., 46 figs

  15. Investigations on potential bacteria for the bioremediation treatment of environments contaminated with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazar, I.; Voicu, A.; Dobrota, S.; Stefanescu, M. [Institute of Biology of Romanian Academy, Bucharest (Romania)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In Romania after more than 135 years of oil production and processing, some severe environmental pollution problems have accumulated. In this context a joint research group from Institute of Biology Bucharest and S.C. Petrostar S.A. Ploiesti became involved in a research project on bioremediation of an environment contaminated with hydrocarbon waste. In the first stage of this project, investigations on microbial communities occurring in environments contaminated with oil were carried out. In the second stage, the hundreds of bacterial strains and populations isolated from soils, slops, and water sites contaminated with waste oil and water waste oil mix were submitted to a screening program, to select a naturally occurring mixed culture with a high ability to degrade hydrocarbons.

  16. REDUCTION OF OIL CONTAMINATION ON HARD DISK DRIVE PARTS USING AUTOMATIC HYDROCARBON WASHING MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somkiat Tangjitsitcharoen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the use of the Taguchi method and response surface analysis to minimize the proportion of defectives by oil contamination on one product of hard disk drive parts by using an automatic hydrocarbon washing machine. The experiments are conducted by using the Taguchi method and the matrices of washing conditions include nine parameters. The effect on the proportion of defectives by oil contamination is evaluated and determined. A second-order model is developed based on the parameters of the automatic hydrocarbon washing machine and the proportion of defectives of oil contamination determined by using the response surface method. The experimental results show that the parameters are significant. The developed model can be used effectively to predict the response.

  17. Microbial contamination of stored hydrocarbon fuels and its control

    OpenAIRE

    Gaylarde Christine C.; Bento Fátima M.; Kelley Joan

    1999-01-01

    The major microbial problem in the petroleum refining industry is contamination of stored products, which can lead to loss of product quality, formation of sludge and deterioration of pipework and storage tanks, both in the refinery and at the end-user. Three major classes of fuel are discussed in this article - gasoline, aviation kerosene and diesel, corresponding to increasingly heavy petroleum fractions. The fuel that presents the most serious microbiological problems is diesel. The many m...

  18. Canned fish products contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Ciecierska; Mieczysław Obiedziński

    2007-01-01

    According to the Commission Recommendation 20005/108/EC further analyses of 15 genotoxic PAHs (listed by The Scientific Committee on Food) in food are necessary. The objective of this research was to study contamination of canned smoked fish products in oil by these 15 PAHs. The material investigated were canned smoked sprats in oil available in Warsaw agglomeration. Both oils from canned food and sprats itself were analysed. Among all products under investigation it was shown that oils deriv...

  19. Bioremediation of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Iron Park Superfund site, North Billerica, Massachusetts, is located within a 553 acre operating industrial complex and railyard located approximately 20 miles northwest of Boston. Fifteen acres of this site are designated as the Wastewater Lagoon Area containing lagoons and materials previously dredged from those lagoons. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the Iron Horse Park facility on its National Priorities List in 1984, and a Remedial Investigation (RI) for the site as a whole began n 1985. In September 1988, responding to the presence of these site contaminants, the EPA issued the first Superfund Record of Decision (ROD) in EPA Region I that specified bioremediation as the remedial technology. Specifically, the EPA stipulated biological land treatment cell with an impervious lower liner. In this form of biotreatment, sludges and contaminated soil are placed in the cell in lifts (i.e. layers approximately one foot thick) and the lifts are frequently aerated by tilling while nutrients are applied at optimal levels to stimulate the degradation of organic contaminants by indigenous microorganisms. In its Administrative Order (September 1989), the EPA stipulated cleanup goals to be achieved, and required that a Predesign Evaluation be initiated to ascertain which soil/sludge piles would require treatment. The design and execution of this remediation-focused site evaluation by ENSR forms the subject of this paper

  20. Hydrocarbon degradation potential in reference soils and soils contaminated with jet fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleum degradation in surface and subsurface soils is affected by such factors as moisture content, pH, soil type, soil organics, temperature, and oxygen concentrations. In this paper, the authors determine the degradation rates of 14C-labeled hydrocarbons added to soils collected from a contaminated surface site, contaminated subsurface sites, and a clean reference site. The radiolabeled hydrocarbons used include benzene, toluene, naphthalene, 1-methynaphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene, anthracene, chrysene, and hexadecane. Microbial degradation rates were based on determination of mineralization rates (production of 14CO2) of hydrocarbons that were added to soil samples. Since water was added and oxygen was not limiting, the hydrocarbon rates determined are likely to be higher than those occurring in situ. Using radiolabeled hydrocarbons, information can be provided on differences in the degradation rates of various petroleum compounds in different types of soils at a site, on possible production of petroleum metabolites in the soil, and on the importance of anaerobic petroleum degradation and the effects of nutrient, water, and surfactant addition on biodegradation rates

  1. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION LEVELS IN COLLECTED SAMPLES FROM VICINITY OF A HIGHWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Samimi ، R. Akbari Rad ، F. Ghanizadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tehran as the biggest city of Iran with a population of more than 10 millions has potentially high pollutant exposures of gas oil and gasoline combustion from vehicles that are commuting in the highways every day. The vehicle exhausts contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are produced by incomplete combustion and can be directly deposited in the environment. In the present study, the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination in the collected samples of a western highway in Tehran was investigated. The studied location was a busy highway in Tehran. High performance liquid chromatography equipped with florescence detector was used for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons concentrations in the studied samples. Total concentration of the ten studied polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons compounds ranged from 11107 to 24342 ng/g dry weight in the dust samples and increased from 164 to 2886 ng/g dry weight in the soil samples taken from 300 m and middle of the highway, respectively. Also the average of Σ PAHs was 1759 ng/L in the water samples of pools in parks near the highway. The obtained results indicated that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination levels were very high in the vicinity of the highway.

  2. Efficiency of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-10-01

    This study describes the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from the soil samples collected from industrial dumping site. High concentrations of heavy metals (like iron, lead, nickel, cadmium, copper, cobalt and zinc) and petroleum hydrocarbons were present in the contaminated soil samples. Lipopeptide biosurfactant, consisting of surfactin and fengycin was obtained from Bacillus subtilis A21. Soil washing with biosurfactant solution removed significant amount of petroleum hydrocarbon (64.5 %) and metals namely cadmium (44.2 %), cobalt (35.4 %), lead (40.3 %), nickel (32.2 %), copper (26.2 %) and zinc (32.07 %). Parameters like surfactant concentration, temperature, agitation condition and pH of the washing solution influenced the pollutant removing ability of biosurfactant mixture. Biosurfactant exhibited substantial hydrocarbon solubility above its critical micelle concentration. During washing, 50 % of biosurfactant was sorbed to the soil particles decreasing effective concentration during washing process. Biosurfactant washed soil exhibited 100 % mustard seed germination contradictory to water washed soil where no germination was observed. The results indicate that the soil washing with mixture of lipopeptide biosurfactants at concentrations above its critical micelle concentration can be an efficient and environment friendly approach for removing pollutants (petroleum hydrocarbon and heavy metals) from contaminated soil. PMID:23681773

  3. Validation of an integrative methodology to assess and monitor reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in contaminated aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia-Estelle eTarnawski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation of tetra-and trichloroethene-contaminated aquifers is frequently hampered due to incomplete dechlorination to the more toxic dichloroethene (DCE and vinyl chloride (VC, indicating insufficient knowledge about the biological mechanisms related to aquifer functioning. A methodology based on the joint analysis of geochemical and microbiological datasets was developed to assess the presence of the biochemical potential for complete reductive dechlorination to harmless ethene and to explain the reasons for which degradation often stalls at the more toxic intermediates. This methodology is composed of three successive steps, with i the acquisition of geochemical data including chlorinated ethenes, ii the detailed analysis of the bacterial community structures as well as the biochemical potential for complete dechlorination using microcosms and molecular detection of organohalide-respiring bacteria and key reductive dehalogenases, and iii a statistical Multiple Factor Analysis combining the above mentioned abiotic and biotic variables in a functional modelling of the contaminated aquifer. The methodology was validated by analyzing two chlorinated ethenes-contaminated sites. Results from the first site showed that the full biochemical potential for ethene production was present in situ. However, redox potential was overall too high and locally manganese reduction out-competed chlorinated ethenes reduction, explaining the reasons for the local accumulation of DCE and VC to a lesser extent. The second contaminated aquifer was under bioremediation by successive cheese whey injections. Analysis demonstrated that cheese whey additions led to increasingly reduced redox conditions and that hampered reductive dechlorination was not due to competition with other anaerobic respiration processes. Complete reductive dechlorination to ethene was preferentially occurring under methanogenic conditions. DCE and VC accumulation was probably induced first

  4. Prospects for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to assist in phytoremediation of soil hydrocarbon contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajtor, Monika; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form mutualistic associations with the roots of 80-90% of vascular plant species and may constitute up to 50% of the total soil microbial biomass. AMF have been considered to be a tool to enhance phytoremediation, as their mycelium create a widespread underground network that acts as a bridge between plant roots, soil and rhizosphere microorganisms. Abundant extramatrical hyphae extend the rhizosphere thus creating the hyphosphere, which significantly increases the area of a plant's access to nutrients and contaminants. The paper presents and evaluates the role and significance of AMF in phytoremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites. We focused on (1) an impact of hydrocarbons on arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, (2) a potential of AMF to enhance phytoremediation, (3) determinants that influence effectiveness of hydrocarbon removal from contaminated soils. This knowledge may be useful for selection of proper plant and fungal symbionts and crucial to optimize environmental conditions for effective AMF-mediated phytoremediation. It has been concluded that three-component phytoremediation systems based on synergistic interactions between plant roots, AMF and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms demonstrated high effectiveness in dissipation of organic pollutants in soil. PMID:27487095

  5. Contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term 'Contaminated sites' refers to soil and groundwater contamination caused by local sources such as landfills or industrial sites. As of July 2002, there were in Austria 2,372 sites registered as potentially contaminated sites, from them: 165 sites required remediation, for 55 sites non remedial measures were necessary and to date 65 sites were remediated with a cost of 700,000 M Euro. An overview about funding of remedial measures, estimation of the extent of the problem (remediation requirements, chlorinated hydrocarbons accidents), deficits (lack of legal harmonization, slow implementation of remedial measures, etc.) is presented. Table 1. (nevyjel)

  6. Canned fish products contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ciecierska

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the Commission Recommendation 20005/108/EC further analyses of 15 genotoxic PAHs (listed by The Scientific Committee on Food in food are necessary. The objective of this research was to study contamination of canned smoked fish products in oil by these 15 PAHs. The material investigated were canned smoked sprats in oil available in Warsaw agglomeration. Both oils from canned food and sprats itself were analysed. Among all products under investigation it was shown that oils derived from canned smoked sprats had statistically significant higher total content of PAHs than sprats from this canned fish product.

  7. Inverse analyses of transport of chlorinated hydrocarbons subject to sequential transformation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, F X; Simůnek, J

    2001-01-01

    Chemical and biological transformations can significantly affect contaminant transport in the subsurface. To better understand such transformation reactions, an equilibrium-nonequilibrium sorption transport model, HYDRUS-1D, was modified by including inverse solutions for multiple breakthrough curves resulting from the transport of solutes undergoing sequential transformations. The inverse solutions were applied to miscible-displacement experiments involving dissolved concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) undergoing reduction and/or transformations in the presence of zero-valent metal porous media (i.e., iron or copper-coated iron filings) to produce ethylene. The inverse model solutions provided a reasonable description of the transport and transformation processes. Simultaneous fitting of multiple breakthrough curves of TCE and ethylene placed additional constraints on the inverse solution and improved the reliability of parameter estimates. Confidence intervals of optimized parameters were reduced significantly in comparison with those obtained by fitting TCE breakthrough curves independently. Further evidence for accurate parameter estimates was given when the parameter values agreed with previously reported values from independent batch and degradation experiments. Optimized values of the normalized degradation rates for the equilibrium (1.4 x 10(-4) to 7.2 x 10(-5) L h(-1)m(-2)) and nonequilibrium (1.2 x 10(-4) to 5.5 x 10(-5)L h(-1)m(-2)) models compared well with values (0.03 to 6.5 x 10(-5) L h(-1) m(-2)) obtained from previous studies. The estimated TCE-iron sorption coefficients (0.52 to 2.85 L kg(-1)) were also consistent with a previously reported value (1.47 L kg(-1)). PMID:11476514

  8. Development and application of techniques for monitoring the bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of tests was designed to examine bioremediation potential in soil and to monitor performance during the treatment operation. Physical and chemical characterization of the soil provides information on the types of organics, their concentrations, and whether interfering materials are present. Microbiological assessment involves culturing of bacterial populations in the soil and examination of the colonies to determine which have the genetic potential to degrade the soil contaminants. Catabolic gene probes are used to survey viable bacteria from petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. Such soils consistently demonstrate the presence of bacteria possessing the genetic capability to degrade simple straight-chain alkanes and aromatics. Mineralization and respirometric studies are indicators of the biological activity in the soil, and can be directed at microbial activity towards specific substrates. Gene probe monitoring of a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil during biopile treatment demonstrated that hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial numbers and activity were temperature dependent. The results showed that the activity of the indigenous bacteria as measured by hexadecane mineralization also correlated with the disappearance of the oil and grease. The application of this protocol has provided a useful means to screen contaminated soils for bacteria with desirable catabolic properties and to monitor pollutant-degrading bacteria during biotreatment. 15 refs., 10 figs

  9. The levels and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contamination in bottom sediments in Manila Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration levels of 18 PAH compounds extracted from 19 bottom sediments from the Limay coast and 16 bottom sediments from the coast along Metro Manila and Cavite province of Manila Bay were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The PAH contamination, the levels of other non-PAH petroleum hydrocarbon compounds, and total organic content in the sediments were assessed in relation to the location and depth of the sampling sites. The PAH concentrations and the levels of other petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediments showed that the spatial distribution of PAH and other hydrocarbon contamination in Manila Bay is largely dependent on the proximity of the sediment deposition site to known point sources of pollution. On the western side, the highest levels of PAH contamination normalized to % TOC (1.29 x 104 at L12, 1.28 x 104 at L16, 0.55 at L13, and 0.54 at L15) were obtained from sediments collected at deposition sites near the outfall of the Petron Oil Refinery. On the eastern side, sediments located at the effluent zones of the Paranaque and Malabon rivers showed excessively higher levels of PAH normalized to %TOC (3.32 x 104 and 2.87 x 104; respectively) compared to those obtained from other sites in the area. The PAH contamination in the sediments from Manila Bay is dominated by alkylated naphthalenes and phenanthrenes which are associated with petrogenic sources. This indicates that the surface sediments in Manila Bay are exposed to chronic contamination of petroleum hydrocarbons introduced mainly by direct spillage on the western side and by urban run-off on the eastern side. (Author)

  10. The Levels and Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH Contamination in Bottom Sediments in Manila Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangeline Santiago

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The concentration levels of 18 PAH compounds extracted from 19 bottom sediments from the Limay Coast and 16 bottom sediments from the coast along Metro Manila and Cavitc Province of Manila Bay were determined by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.The PAH contamination, the levels of other non-PAH petroleum hydrocarbon compounds. and total organic content in the sediments were assessed in relation to the location and depth of the sampling sites. The PAH concentrations and the levels of other petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediments showed that the spatial distribution of PAH and other hydrocarbon contamination in Manila Bay is largely dependent on the proximity of the sediment deposition site to known point sources of pollution. On the western side, the highest levels of PAH contamination normalized to % TOC (1.29 X 104 at Ll2, 1.28 x 104 at Ll6, 0.55 at Ll3, and 0.54 at Ll5 were obtained from sediments collected at deposition sites near the outfall of the Petron Oil Refinery. On the eastern side. sediments located at the effiuent zones of the Paranaque and Malabon Rivers showed excessively higher levels of PAH normalized to % TOC (3.32 x 104 and 2.87 x 104: respectively compared to those obtained from other sites in the area.The PAH contamination in the sediments from Manila Bay is dominated by alkylated naphthalenes and phenanthrenes which are associated with petrogenic sources. This indicates that the surface sediments in Manila Bay are ex-posed to chronic contamination of petroleum hydrocarbons introduced mainly by direct spillage on the western side and by urban run-off on the eastern side.

  11. Enzymatic bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons by fungal consortia enriched from petroleum contaminated soil and oil seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, V; Arulazhagan, P; Ebenezer, P

    2014-05-01

    The present study focuses on fungal strains capable of secreting extracellular enzymes by utilizing hydrocarbons present in the contaminated soil. Fungal strains were enriched from petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil samples collected from Chennai city, India. The potential fungi were isolated and screened for their enzyme secretion such as lipase, laccase, peroxidase and protease and also evaluated fungal enzyme mediated PAHs degradation. Total, 21 potential PAHs degrading fungi were isolated from PAHs contaminated soil, which belongs to 9 genera such as Aspergillus, Curvularia, Drechslera, Fusarium, Lasiodiplodia, Mucor Penicillium, Rhizopus, Trichoderma, and two oilseed-associated fungal genera such as Colletotrichum and Lasiodiplodia were used to test their efficacy in degradation of PAHs in polluted soil. Maximum lipase production was obtained with P. chrysogenum, M. racemosus and L. theobromae VBE1 under optimized cultural condition, which utilized PAHs in contaminated soil as sole carbon source. Fungal strains, P. chrysogenum, M. racemosus and L. theobromae VBE1, as consortia, used in the present study were capable of degrading branched alkane isoprenoids such as pristine (C17) and pyrene (C18) present in PAHs contaminated soil with high lipase production. The fungal consortia acts as potential candidate for bioremediation of PAHs contaminated environments. PMID:24813008

  12. State of subsoil in a former petrol station: physicochemical characterization and hydrocarbon contamination evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    María Rosales, Rosa; Martinez-Pagán, Pedro; Faz, Ángel; Bech, Jaume

    2013-04-01

    Former petrol stations are, possibly, potential hydrocarbon contaminated soil areas due to leakage in Underground Storage Tanks and fuel dispensing activities. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in gasoline, like benzene and semi-volatile organics in diesel, are carcinogenic and very toxic substances which can involve a serious risk for ecosystem and human health. Based on Electrical Resistivity Tomography 2D results from a previous work, there have been selected three potentially contaminated goal areas in a former petrol station located in SE Spain in order to obtain soil samples by drilling and to assess the gasoline and diesel contamination. A special sampling design was carried out and soil samples for VOCs were preserved at field with a KCl solution to minimize volatilization losses. It had been chosen Headspace-GC-MS as the better technique to quantify individual VOCs and GC-FID to get a Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) assessment after a solid/fluid pressurized extraction. The physicochemical characterization of the subsoil was performed to know how humidity, clay content or pH data could be related to the presence of hydrocarbons in the soil samples. Results show that VOCs concentrations in subsoil samples of the petrol station are around ppb levels. TPH ranged between 17 mg/kg soil and 93 mg/kg soil (ppm levels) what involves diesel and gasoline leaks due to these detected residual concentrations in the subsoil. The maximum value was found at 6 m deep in an intermediate zone between Underground Storage Tanks positions (located at 4 m deep). Therefore, these results confirm that organic compounds transference with strong vertical component has taken place. It has been observed that humidity minimum values in the subsoil are related to TPH maximum values that could be explained because of the vapour phase and the retention of hydrocarbon in soil increases when humidity goes down. Adsorption of hydrocarbons in the subsoil tend to be pH-dependent and clay

  13. Monochloramine and chlorine dioxide for controlling Legionella pneumophila contamination: biocide levels and disinfection by-product formation in hospital water networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Isabella; Ferranti, Greta; Bargellini, Annalisa; Marchegiano, Patrizia; Predieri, Guerrino; Stout, Janet E; Borella, Paola

    2013-12-01

    Legionella colonization in hospital hot water distribution networks was evaluated following 36 months of continuous treatment with monochloramine and compared with chlorine dioxide. Nitrite, nitrate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids as well as the biocide concentration at sampled points were measured. Only 8/84 samples treated with monochloramine were found contaminated and after the first 8 months of treatment no Legionella was isolated. Chlorine dioxide was associated with a strong reduction in Legionella contamination compared to pre-treatment, but differences according to the device were observed. Monochloramine between 2 and 3 mg l(-1) and chlorine dioxide between 0.50 and 0.70 mg l(-1) were needed to control Legionella colonization. Comparing no- and post-flush samples, a higher frequency of no-flush positive samples was noted using chlorine dioxide, suggesting an increased risk for patients when they open the tap. No increase in chlorite levels and no water nitrification occurred by using monochloramine. Chlorite at levels exceeding the limit requested for drinking water was measured when chlorine dioxide was applied. In conclusion, we highlight that continuous injection of monochloramine should be considered as an effective alternative to chlorine dioxide in controlling legionellae contamination inside hospital water distribution systems. PMID:24334848

  14. Pilot-scale feasibility of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil in situ bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An environmental project was conducted to evaluate in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils on Kwajalein Island, a US Army Kwajalein Atoll base in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Results of laboratory column studies determined that nutrient loadings stimulated biodegradation rates and that bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils at Kwajalein was possible using indigenous microbes. The column studies were followed by an ∼10-month on-site demonstration at Kwajalein to further evaluate in situ bioremediation and to determine design and operating conditions necessary to optimize the process. The demonstration site contained low levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel fuel) in the soil near the ground surface, with concentrations increasing to ∼10,000 mg/kg in the soil near the groundwater. The demonstration utilized 12 in situ plots to evaluate the effects of various combinations of water, air, and nutrient additions on both the microbial population and the hydrocarbon concentration within the treatment plots as a function of depth from the ground surface

  15. Selection of biosurfactan/bioemulsifier-producing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Viramontes-Ramos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons are among the most persistent soil contaminants, and some hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms can produce biosurfactants to increase bioavailability and degradation. The aim of this work was to identify biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated sites, and to evaluate their biosurfactant properties. The drop-collapse method and minimal agar added with a layer of combustoleo were used for screening, and positive strains were grown in liquid medium, and surface tension and emulsification index were determined in cell-free supernantant and cell suspension. A total of 324 bacterial strains were tested, and 17 were positive for the drop-collapse and hydrocarbon-layer agar methods. Most of the strains were Pseudomonas, except for three strains (Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Rhodococcus. Surface tension was similar in cell-free and cell suspension measurements, with values in the range of 58 to 26 (mN/m, and all formed stable emulsions with motor oil (76-93% E24. Considering the variety of molecular structures among microbial biosurfactants, they have different chemical properties that can be exploited commercially, for applications as diverse as bioremediation or degradable detergents.

  16. Selection of biosurfactan/bioemulsifier-producing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viramontes-Ramos, Sabina; Cristina Portillo-Ruiz, Martha; Ballinas-Casarrubias, María de Lourdes; Torres-Muñoz, José Vinicio; Rivera-Chavira, Blanca Estela; Nevárez-Moorillón, Guadalupe Virginia

    2010-07-01

    Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons are among the most persistent soil contaminants, and some hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms can produce biosurfactants to increase bioavailability and degradation. The aim of this work was to identify biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated sites, and to evaluate their biosurfactant properties. The drop-collapse method and minimal agar added with a layer of combustoleo were used for screening, and positive strains were grown in liquid medium, and surface tension and emulsification index were determined in cell-free supernantant and cell suspension. A total of 324 bacterial strains were tested, and 17 were positive for the drop-collapse and hydrocarbon-layer agar methods. Most of the strains were Pseudomonas, except for three strains (Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Rhodococcus). Surface tension was similar in cell-free and cell suspension measurements, with values in the range of 58 to 26 (mN/m), and all formed stable emulsions with motor oil (76-93% E24). Considering the variety of molecular structures among microbial biosurfactants, they have different chemical properties that can be exploited commercially, for applications as diverse as bioremediation or degradable detergents. PMID:24031542

  17. Hydrocarbon and Toxic Metal Contamination from Tank Installations in a Northwest Greenlandic Village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen;

    2012-01-01

    Tasiusaq were analysed for the total content of hydrocarbons (THC), lead, cadmium and organic content in the soil. Concentrations up to 77,000 mg/kg DW THC were found, mainly as weathered oil products. Elevated levels of lead and cadmium were also found in many of the samples, with concentrations up to 300...... and 2 mg/kg DW, respectively. The tank installation areas were contaminated by THC, lead and cadmium compared to the reference site, and parts of the areas were highly contaminated, exceeding the Danish environmental quality criteria. The correlation between lead and cadmium concentrations was...... significant (p<0.01), while no correlation existed between THC and organic matter. Small spills from daily use of the tank installations are suggested to be the source of the THC contamination, whereas the lead and cadmium contamination is suggested to originate primarily from the plume of smoke from waste...

  18. Contamination of soils in the urbanized areas of Belarus with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukharchyk, T. I.; Khomich, V. S.; Kakareka, S. V.; Kurman, P. V.; Kozyrenko, M. I.

    2013-02-01

    The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soils of urbanized areas, including the impact zones of Belarus, were studied. The concentrations of 16 PAHs in the soils were determined for individual and high-rise building zones, forests, and forest parks of Belarus. The levels of the PAH accumulation in the soils of different industrial enterprises and boiler stations were analyzed. Possible sources of soil contamination with PAHs were considered, and the structure of the PAHs in the soils was shown. The levels of the soil contamination were determined from the regulated parameters for individual compounds and the sum of 16 PAHs.

  19. Biodegradation potential of petroleum hydrocarbons by bacteria and mixed bacterial consortium isolated from contaminated sites

    OpenAIRE

    PRAKASH, Ajeet; Bisht, Sandeep; SINGH, Jagvijay; TEOTIA, Priyanku

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate, characterize, and evaluate the potential of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC)-degrading bacterial strains from oil-contaminated soil in the Meerut region. Among 59 oil-degrading bacterial cultures isolated from the oil-contaminated soil samples, 1 Bacillus species, 2 species of Pseudomonas, and 1 species of Micrococcus, identified on the basis of biochemical and 16s rDNA sequencing, were found to have the ability to utilize PHCs such as benzene, diesel, t...

  20. The potential of microbial ecological indicators to guide ecosophisticated management of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils

    OpenAIRE

    Mikkonen, Anu

    2012-01-01

    Soil is an unrenewable natural resource under increasing anthropogenic pressure. One of the main threats to soils, compromising their ability to provide us with the goods and ecosystem services we expect, is pollution. Oil hydrocarbons are the most common soil contaminants, and they disturb not just the biota but also the physicochemical properties of soils. Indigenous soil micro-organisms respond rapidly to changes in the soil ecosystem, and are chronically in direct contact with the hydroph...

  1. Recycling of solvent used in a solvent extraction of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Guozhong; Li, XinGang; Coulon, Frederic; LI Hong; Lian, Jingyan; Sui, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The application of water washing technology for recycling an organic composite solvent consisting of hexane and pentane (4:1; TU-A solvent) was investigated for extracting total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) from contaminated soil. The effects of water volume, water temperature, washing time and initial concentration of solvent were evaluated using orthogonal experiments followed by single factor experiments. Our results showed that the water volume was a statistically signif...

  2. Improvement of Bioremediation Performance for the Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Rocchetti; Francesca Beolchini; Maurizio Ciani; Antonio Dell'Anno

    2011-01-01

    Microcosm bioremediation strategies were applied to sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Experiments were performed in aerobic conditions in a single-step treatment and in a two-step anaerobic-aerobic treatment. In aerobic conditions, either inorganic nutrients or composts were added to the microcosms, while, in the first anaerobic phase of the two-step experiment, acetate and/or allochthonous sulfate-reducing bacteria were used. After the treatment under anaerobic conditions, samples we...

  3. The Effect of Urban Fuel Stations on Soil Contamination with Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Parvizi Mosaed; Soheil Sobhanardakani; Hajar Merrikhpour; Abbas Farmany; Mehrdad Cheraghi; Sanaz Ashorlo

    2015-01-01

    Background:A critical environmental impact of the petroleum industry is the contamination of soil by oil and other related products which are highly toxic and exhibit molecular recalcitrance. Therefore, this study focused on investigating the total amount of petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in soil of urban fuel stations in Hamedan City, Iran. Methods:Thirteen high traffic urban fuel stations were selected and random soil samples were collected from surface soils at selected fuel stations. T...

  4. The Levels and Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) Contamination in Bottom Sediments in Manila Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Evangeline Santiago

    1997-01-01

    The concentration levels of 18 PAH compounds extracted from 19 bottom sediments from the Limay Coast and 16 bottom sediments from the coast along Metro Manila and Cavitc Province of Manila Bay were determined by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.The PAH contamination, the levels of other non-PAH petroleum hydrocarbon compounds. and total organic content in the sediments were assessed in relation to the location and depth of the sampling sites. The PAH concentrations and the levels of other...

  5. Field screening for petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in soils with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field screening is commonly used at petroleum contamination sites to delineate contaminated from clean soil, thereby minimizing the need for costly, time-consuming, laboratory analysis. Field screening methods currently employed include visual and olfactory observations, and measurement of volatile organic vapors using jar headspace analysis. These methods have proved effective at petroleum contamination sites where soils contain significant concentrations of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination. To complement existing field screening techniques (particularly at petroleum contamination sites with low concentrations of VOCs in soils), a method based on the fluorescence of hydrocarbons under ultraviolet light is being tested. This methodology is based on a technique that has been used for decades in the petroleum exploration industry to identify oil shows in drill cuttings. This paper presents the results of limited testing that has been conducted to identify petroleum hydrocarbons in soils with low VOCs using ultraviolet light. Included are: a description of the methods used, results of the initial testing, and a discussion of the potential applications and additional testing that is ongoing

  6. Evaluation of solid polymeric organic materials for use in bioreactive sediment capping to stimulate the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashgahi, Siavash; Maphosa, Farai; De Vrieze, Jo; Haest, Pieter Jan; Boon, Nico; Smidt, Hauke; Springael, Dirk; Dejonghe, Winnie

    2014-03-01

    In situ bioreactive capping is a promising technology for mitigation of surface water contamination by discharging polluted groundwater. Organohalide respiration (OHR) of chlorinated ethenes in bioreactive caps can be stimulated through incorporation of solid polymeric organic materials (SPOMs) that provide a sustainable electron source for organohalide respiring bacteria. In this study, wood chips, hay, straw, tree bark and shrimp waste, were assessed for their long term applicability as an electron donor for OHR of cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) in sediment microcosms. The initial release of fermentation products, such as acetate, propionate and butyrate led to the onset of extensive methane production especially in microcosms amended with shrimp waste, straw and hay, while no considerable stimulation of VC dechlorination was obtained in any of the SPOM amended microcosms. However, in the longer term, short chain fatty acids accumulation decreased as well as methanogenesis, whereas high dechlorination rates of VC and cDCE were established with concomitant increase of Dehalococcoides mccartyi and vcrA and bvcA gene numbers both in the sediment and on the SPOMs. A numeric simulation indicated that a capping layer of 40 cm with hay, straw, tree bark or shrimp waste is suffice to reduce the groundwater VC concentration below the threshold level of 5 μg/l before discharging into the Zenne River, Belgium. Of all SPOMs, the persistent colonization of tree bark by D. mccartyi combined with the lowest stimulation of methanogenesis singled out tree bark as a long-term electron donor for OHR of cDCE/VC in bioreactive caps. PMID:23955471

  7. In situ remediation of ground water contaminated with chromate and chlorinated solvents using zero-valent iron: A field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puls, R.W.; Paul, C.J. [Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada, OK (United States); Powell, R.W. [ManTech Environmental Research Services Corp., Ada, OK (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A small-scale field test was recently initiated to evaluate the in situ remediation of ground water contaminated with chromate and chlorinated organics using a permeable reactive barrier. The barrier was composed of an iron metal-coarse sand-native aquifer solid mixture, and was installed using a staggered {open_quotes}fence{close_quotes} design through large hollow-stem augers. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the ability of the cylinders or {open_quotes}fence posts{close_quotes} to remove contaminants from solution immediately downgradient and adjacent to the iron cylinders, evaluate the resultant changes in aqueous geochemistry induced by the presence of the zero-valent iron, and identify chemical, physical and biological processes which may affect long-term performance of such remedial technologies.

  8. Soil sealing degree as factor influencing urban soil contamination with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendyk Łukasz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine role of soil sealing degree as the factor influencing soil contamination with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The study area included four sampling sites located within the administrative boundaries of the Toruń city, Poland. Sampling procedure involved preparing soil pits representing three examples of soil sealing at each site: non-sealed soil as a control one (I and two degrees of soil sealing: semi-pervious surface (II and totally impervious surface (III. Together with basic properties defined with standard procedures (particle size distribution, pH, LOI, content of carbonates content of selected PAHs was determined by dichloromethane extraction using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS. Obtained results show that urban soils in the city of Toruń are contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Soil sealing degree has a strong influence on the soil contamination with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Totally sealed soils are better preserved from atmospheric pollution including PAHs. Combustion of grass/wood/coal was the main source of determined PAHs content in examined soils.

  9. Intercalibration of analytical methods on marine environmental samples. Results of MEDPOL-II exercise for the intercalibration of chlorinated hydrocarbon measurements on mussel homogenate (MA-M-2/OC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussels have been considered as good indicators of chlorinated hydrocarbon pollution of the marine environment and this led to the development of mussel watch programmes in many countries in the late seventies. These intercalibration exercises were arranged in order to increase the quality of analytical capabilities of environmental laboratories. The samples MA-M-2/0C of Mediterranean mussels with chlorinated hydrocarbon content were checked by 27 laboratories. It was judged highly suitable for these laboratories to have at their disposal a reference material made of mussel tissue with robust estimations of the true values with respect to several chlorinated hydrocarbons. Such a material would allow chemists to check the validity of new analytical procedures

  10. Organochlorine, Trace Element, and Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminants Investigation of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, 1985-1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Organochlorine, trace element, and petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants were examined in sediment and biota from the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas. The study was...

  11. Quantifying Contamination by radioactive chlorine, selenium and iodine in Agricultural Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to now, the behavior of radioactive chlorine, selenium and iodine in agricultural systems has only been the subject of very limited studies and publications in the field of radioecology. The Fortress project, co-funded by the IRSN and Andra, sought to fill this knowledge gap by determining, under experimental conditions, the translocation coefficients of these radionuclides, from the leaves to the edible parts of plants. (author)

  12. Development and field testing of a mobile chlorine dioxide generation system for the decontamination of buildings contaminated with Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Joseph P., E-mail: wood.joe@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Homeland Security Research Center, MC-E343-06, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Blair Martin, G., E-mail: martin.blair@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, MC-E340-C, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2009-05-30

    The numerous buildings that became contaminated with Bacillus anthracis (the bacterium causing the disease anthrax) in 2001, and more recent B. anthracis - related events, point to the need to have effective decontamination technologies for buildings contaminated with biological threat agents. The U.S. Government developed a portable chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) generation system to decontaminate buildings contaminated with B. anthracis spores, and this so-called mobile decontamination trailer (MDT) prototype was tested through a series of three field trials. The first test of the MDT was conducted at Fort McClellan in Anniston, AL. during October 2004. Four test attempts occurred over two weekends; however, a number of system problems resulted in termination of the activity prior to any ClO{sub 2} introduction into the test building. After making several design enhancements and equipment changes, the MDT was subjected to a second test. During this test, extensive leak checks were made using argon and nitrogen in lieu of chlorine gas; each subsystem was checked for functionality, and the MDT was operated for 24 h. This second test demonstrated the MDT flow and control systems functioned satisfactorily, and thus it was decided to proceed to a third, more challenging field trial. In the last field test, ClO{sub 2} was generated and routed directly to the scrubber in a 12-h continuous run. Measurement of ClO{sub 2} levels at the generator outlet showed that the desired production rate was not achieved. Additionally, only one of the two scrubbers performed adequately with regard to maintaining ClO{sub 2} emissions below the limit. Numerous lessons were learned in the field trials of this ClO{sub 2} decontamination technology.

  13. Development and field testing of a mobile chlorine dioxide generation system for the decontamination of buildings contaminated with Bacillus anthracis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerous buildings that became contaminated with Bacillus anthracis (the bacterium causing the disease anthrax) in 2001, and more recent B. anthracis - related events, point to the need to have effective decontamination technologies for buildings contaminated with biological threat agents. The U.S. Government developed a portable chlorine dioxide (ClO2) generation system to decontaminate buildings contaminated with B. anthracis spores, and this so-called mobile decontamination trailer (MDT) prototype was tested through a series of three field trials. The first test of the MDT was conducted at Fort McClellan in Anniston, AL. during October 2004. Four test attempts occurred over two weekends; however, a number of system problems resulted in termination of the activity prior to any ClO2 introduction into the test building. After making several design enhancements and equipment changes, the MDT was subjected to a second test. During this test, extensive leak checks were made using argon and nitrogen in lieu of chlorine gas; each subsystem was checked for functionality, and the MDT was operated for 24 h. This second test demonstrated the MDT flow and control systems functioned satisfactorily, and thus it was decided to proceed to a third, more challenging field trial. In the last field test, ClO2 was generated and routed directly to the scrubber in a 12-h continuous run. Measurement of ClO2 levels at the generator outlet showed that the desired production rate was not achieved. Additionally, only one of the two scrubbers performed adequately with regard to maintaining ClO2 emissions below the limit. Numerous lessons were learned in the field trials of this ClO2 decontamination technology.

  14. Estimation of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in gasoline-contaminated sediment from measured respiration rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R.J.; Baehr, A.L.; Lahvis, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    An open microcosm method for quantifying microbial respiration and estimating biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in gasoline-contaminated sediment samples has been developed and validated. Stainless-steel bioreactors are filled with soil or sediment samples, and the vapor-phase composition (concentrations of oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and selected hydrocarbons) is monitored over time. Replacement gas is added as the vapor sample is taken, and selection of the replacement gas composition facilitates real-time decision-making regarding environmental conditions within the bioreactor. This capability allows for maintenance of field conditions over time, which is not possible in closed microcosms. Reaction rates of CO2 and O2 are calculated from the vapor-phase composition time series. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation are either measured directly from the hydrocarbon mass balance, or estimated from CO2 and O2 reaction rates and assumed reaction stoichiometries. Open microcosm experiments using sediments spiked with toluene and p-xylene were conducted to validate the stoichiometric assumptions. Respiration rates calculated from O2 consumption and from CO2 production provide estimates of toluene and p- xylene degradation rates within about ??50% of measured values when complete mineralization stoichiometry is assumed. Measured values ranged from 851.1 to 965.1 g m-3 year-1 for toluene, and 407.2-942.3 g m-3 year-1 for p- xylene. Contaminated sediment samples from a gasoline-spill site were used in a second set of microcosm experiments. Here, reaction rates of O2 and CO2 were measured and used to estimate hydrocarbon respiration rates. Total hydrocarbon reaction rates ranged from 49.0 g m-3 year-1 in uncontaminated (background) to 1040.4 g m-3 year-1 for highly contaminated sediment, based on CO2 production data. These rate estimates were similar to those obtained independently from in situ CO2 vertical gradient and flux determinations at the

  15. Electrokinetic remediation and microbial community shift of β-cyclodextrin-dissolved petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunli; Du, Maoan; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Ma, Wencheng; Zheng, Lina

    2011-03-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) migration of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), which is inclusive of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), is an economically beneficial and environmentally friendly remediation process for oil-contaminated soils. Remediation studies of oil-contaminated soils generally prepared samples using particular TPHs. This study investigates the removal of TPHs from, and electromigration of microbial cells in field samples via EK remediation. Both TPH content and soil respiration declined after the EK remediation process. The strains in the original soil sample included Bacillus sp., Sporosarcina sp., Beta proteobacterium, Streptomyces sp., Pontibacter sp., Azorhizobium sp., Taxeobacter sp., and Williamsia sp. Electromigration of microbial cells reduced the biodiversity of the microbial community in soil following EK remediation. At 200 V m(-1) for 10 days, 36% TPH was removed, with a small population of microbial cells flushed out, demonstrating that EK remediation is effective for the present oil-contaminated soils collected in field. PMID:21052991

  16. Electrokinetic remediation and microbial community shift of {beta}-cyclodextrin-dissolved petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Chunli; Du, Maoan; Yang, Xue; Ma, Wencheng [Harbin Institute of Technology (China). School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering; Lee, Duu-Jong [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Zheng, Lina [Dalian Ocean Univ. (China). College of Marine Environmental Engineering

    2011-03-15

    Electrokinetic (EK) migration of {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}-CD), which is inclusive of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), is an economically beneficial and environmentally friendly remediation process for oil-contaminated soils. Remediation studies of oil-contaminated soils generally prepared samples using particular TPHs. This study investigates the removal of TPHs from, and electromigration of microbial cells in field samples via EK remediation. Both TPH content and soil respiration declined after the EK remediation process. The strains in the original soil sample included Bacillus sp., Sporosarcina sp., Beta proteobacterium, Streptomyces sp., Pontibacter sp., Azorhizobium sp., Taxeobacter sp., and Williamsia sp. Electromigration of microbial cells reduced the biodiversity of the microbial community in soil following EK remediation. At 200 V m{sup -1} for 10 days, 36% TPH was removed, with a small population of microbial cells flushed out, demonstrating that EK remediation is effective for the present oil-contaminated soils collected in field. (orig.)

  17. Ground-water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons: Natural biodegradation in a dynamic hydrologic and geochemical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A surficial aquifer contaminated with gasoline was studied as part of the US Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program to determine how ground-water chemistry is controlled by microbial degradation processes. This paper presents a study of the temporal changes in hydrologic and geochemical conditions in an aquifer in the Atlantic coastal plain that was affected by hydrocarbon contaminants. The biogeochemical reactions and the resulting chemical composition of shallow ground water were controlled by (1) microbially-mediated reactions that occurred at a small spatial scale, and by (2) changes in these reactions over time due to mixing with infiltrating water, and rising and falling water levels. The concentration gradients observed in contaminated ground water were complicated by seasonal changes in the local hydrology that caused variability in the availability of electron acceptors. Shifts in the biogeochemical reactions occurred rapidly in response to these changes in the hydrogeochemical conditions

  18. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The overall objective of the basic research grant is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. The three major lines of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects. and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at a variety of DOE sites that need to be examined for endocrine disrupting effects. By relating results obtained from this research project to contamination problems at various DOE sites. CBR will provide data and information on endocrine disrupting contaminants to DOE for consideration in risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities needed at the sites.'

  19. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    'The overall objective of the basic research grant is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. The three major lines of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects. and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at a variety of DOE sites that need to be examined for endocrine disrupting effects. By relating results obtained from this research project to contamination problems at various DOE sites. CBR will provide data and information on endocrine disrupting contaminants to DOE for consideration in risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities needed at the sites.'

  20. Bacterial Endophytes Isolated from Plants in Natural Oil Seep Soils with Chronic Hydrocarbon Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumactud, Rhea; Shen, Shu Yi; Lau, Mimas; Fulthorpe, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum, and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species. The isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, with class Actinobacteria as the dominant group in all species except S. canadensis, which was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Microbacterium foliorum and Plantibacter flavus were present in all the plants, with M. foliorum showing predominance in D. glomerata and both endophytic bacterial species dominated T. aureum. More than 50% of the isolates demonstrated degradative capabilities for octanol, toluene, naphthalene, kerosene, or motor oil based on sole carbon source growth screens involving the reduction of tetrazolium dye. P. flavus isolates from all the sampled plants showed growth on all the petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) substrates tested. Mineralization of toluene and naphthalene was confirmed using gas-chromatography. 16S based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed significant differences between the endophytic bacterial communities showing them to be plant host specific at this site. To our knowledge, this is the first account of the degradation potential of bacterial endophytes in these commonly occurring pioneer plants that were not previously known as phytoremediating plants. PMID:27252685

  1. XPS study of the effect of hydrocarbon contamination on polytetrafluoroethylene (teflon) exposed to atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Cormia, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of hydrocarbon contamination on the surface of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) markedly affects the oxygen uptake, and hence the wettability, of this polymer when exposed to an oxygen plasma. As revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, the oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C) for such a polymer can increase sharply, and correspondingly the fluorine-to-carbon ratio (F/C) can decrease sharply, at very short exposure times; at longer times, however, such changes in the O/C and F/C ratios reverse direction, and these ratios then assume values similar to those of the unexposed PTFE. The greater the extent of hydrocarbon contamination in the PTFE, the larger are the amplitudes of the 'spikes' in the O/C- and F/C-exposure time plots. In contrast, a pristine PTFE experiences a very small, monotonic increase of surface oxidation or O/C ratio with time of exposure to oxygen atoms, while the F/C ratio is virtually unchanged from that of the unexposed polymer (2.0). Unless the presence of adventitious hydrocarbon is taken into account, anomalous surface properties relating to polymer adhesion may be improperly ascribed to PTFE exposed to an oxygen plasma.

  2. Bacterial endophytes isolated from plants in natural oil seep soils with chronic hydrocarbon contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea eLumactud

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species. The isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, with class Actinobacteria as the dominant group in all species except Solidago canadensis, which was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Microbacterium foliorum and Plantibacter flavus were present in all the plants, with M. foliorum showing predominance in D. glomerata and both endophytic bacterial species dominated T. aureum. More than 50% of the isolates demonstrated degradative capabilities for octanol, toluene, naphthalene, kerosene or motor oil based on sole carbon source growth screens involving the reduction of tetrazolium dye. P. flavus isolates from all the sampled plants showed growth on all the petroleum hydrocarbons substrates tested. Mineralization of toluene and naphthalene was confirmed using gas-chromatography. 16S based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed significant differences between the endophytic bacterial communities showing them to be plant host specific at this site. To our knowledge, this is the first account of the degradation potential of bacterial endophytes in these commonly occurring pioneer plants that were not previously known as phytoremediating plants.

  3. Pyrolytic Treatment and Fertility Enhancement of Soils Contaminated with Heavy Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidonish, Julia E; Zygourakis, Kyriacos; Masiello, Caroline A; Gao, Xiaodong; Mathieu, Jacques; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2016-03-01

    Pyrolysis of contaminated soils at 420 °C converted recalcitrant heavy hydrocarbons into "char" (a carbonaceous material similar to petroleum coke) and enhanced soil fertility. Pyrolytic treatment reduced total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) to below regulatory standards (typically <1% by weight) within 3 h using only 40-60% of the energy required for incineration at 600-1200 °C. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was not observed, with post-pyrolysis levels well below applicable standards. Plant growth studies showed a higher biomass production of Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa (Simpson black-seeded lettuce) (80-900% heavier) in pyrolyzed soils than in contaminated or incinerated soils. Elemental analysis showed that pyrolyzed soils contained more carbon than incinerated soils (1.4-3.2% versus 0.3-0.4%). The stark color differences between pyrolyzed and incinerated soils suggest that the carbonaceous material produced via pyrolysis was dispersed in the form of a layer coating the soil particles. Overall, these results suggest that soil pyrolysis could be a viable thermal treatment to quickly remediate soils impacted by weathered oil while improving soil fertility, potentially enhancing revegetation. PMID:26284736

  4. Bacterial Endophytes Isolated from Plants in Natural Oil Seep Soils with Chronic Hydrocarbon Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumactud, Rhea; Shen, Shu Yi; Lau, Mimas; Fulthorpe, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum, and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species. The isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, with class Actinobacteria as the dominant group in all species except S. canadensis, which was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Microbacterium foliorum and Plantibacter flavus were present in all the plants, with M. foliorum showing predominance in D. glomerata and both endophytic bacterial species dominated T. aureum. More than 50% of the isolates demonstrated degradative capabilities for octanol, toluene, naphthalene, kerosene, or motor oil based on sole carbon source growth screens involving the reduction of tetrazolium dye. P. flavus isolates from all the sampled plants showed growth on all the petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) substrates tested. Mineralization of toluene and naphthalene was confirmed using gas-chromatography. 16S based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed significant differences between the endophytic bacterial communities showing them to be plant host specific at this site. To our knowledge, this is the first account of the degradation potential of bacterial endophytes in these commonly occurring pioneer plants that were not previously known as phytoremediating plants. PMID:27252685

  5. Combined nano-biotechnology for in-situ remediation of mixed contamination of groundwater by hexavalent chromium and chlorinated solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Němeček, Jan; Pokorný, Petr; Lhotský, Ondřej; Knytl, Vladislav; Najmanová, Petra; Steinová, Jana; Černík, Miroslav; Filipová, Alena; Filip, Jan; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-09-01

    The present report describes a 13month pilot remediation study that consists of a combination of Cr(VI) (4.4 to 57mg/l) geofixation and dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes (400 to 6526μg/l), achieved by the sequential use of nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles and in situ biotic reduction supported by whey injection. The remediation process was monitored using numerous techniques, including physical-chemical analyses and molecular biology approaches which enabled both the characterization of the mechanisms involved in pollutant transformation and the description of the overall background processes of the treatment. The results revealed that nZVI was efficient toward Cr(VI) by itself and completely removed it from the groundwater (LOQ 0.05mg/l) and the subsequent application of whey resulted in a high removal of chlorinated ethenes (97 to 99%). The persistence of the reducing conditions, even after the depletion of the organic substrates, indicated a complementarity between nZVI and the whey phases in the combined technology as the subsequent application of whey phase partially assisted the microbial regeneration of the spent nZVI by promoting its reduction into Fe(II), which further supported remediation conditions at the site. Illumina sequencing and the detection of functional vcrA and bvcA genes documented a development in the reducing microbes (iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing and chlororespiring bacteria) that benefited under the conditions of the site and that was probably responsible for the high dechlorination and/or Cr(VI) reduction. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility and high efficiency of the combined nano-biotechnological approach of nZVI and whey application in-situ for the removal of Cr(VI) and chlorinated ethenes from the groundwater of the contaminated site. PMID:26850861

  6. Studies estimating the dermal bioavailability of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from manufactured plant tar-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro percutaneous absorption studies were performed with contaminated soils or organic extracts of contaminated soils collected at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The MGP tar contaminated soils were found to contain a group of targeted polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at levels ranging from 10 to 2400 mg/kg. The soil extracts contained target PAH at levels ranging from 12 000 - 34 000 mg/kg. Dermal penetration rates of target PAH from the MGP tar-contaminated soils/soil extracts were determined experimentally through human skin using 3H-benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) as a surrogate. Results from three MGP sites showed reductions of 2-3 orders of magnitude in PAH absorption through human skin from the most contaminated soils in comparison to the soil extracts. Reduction in PAH penetration can be attributed to PAH concentration and (soil) matrix properties. PAH dermal flux values are used to determine site-specific dermally absorbed dose (DAD) and chronic daily intake (CDI) which are essential terms required to estimate risk associated with human exposure to MGP tar and MGP tar-contaminated soils. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater in the vicinity of an oil refinery -- A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater in the vicinity of an oil refinery in Algeria was found to be contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Free floating product, which was found after analysis to be crude oil, was noticed in some of the domestic water supply wells, and also in some irrigation wells which were situated close to the refinery. It was observed that the water in none of the shallow dug wells was contaminated. On the other hand, most of the borewells had contaminated groundwater. The studies included detailed hydrogeological investigations, verification of all the installations carrying crude oil, such as reservoirs and pipe lines. Due to the huge withdrawals from the regional water supply wells, steep hydraulic gradients were observed towards the well field. By modifying the pattern of groundwater withdrawals in the area a provisional containment of the contamination was achieved. The above ground storage tanks were found to be heavily pitted, and corroded at the bottom. Nine monitoring wells were drilled around the storage tanks. Soil and groundwater samples were analyzed from these monitoring wells. From these analyses, the contaminant plume was delineated. Tracer tests in these monitoring wells were conducted to determine the groundwater flow direction. To remediate the problems, the existing crude oil tanks were verified, cleaned and painted with non corrosive paints; the contaminated wells were pumped and the water was treated in the normal treatment system installed at the refinery. Groundwater quality was monitored over a period of six months to ensure the quality of water

  8. Screening of extremotolerant fungi for the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyntner, Caroline; Blasi, Barbara; Prenafeta, Francesc; Sterflinger, Katja

    2015-04-01

    Bioremediation can be used to treat contaminated sites, by taking advantage of microorganisms which have the potential to degrade a wide range of contaminants. While research has been focused mainly on bacteria, the knowledge on other microorganisms, especially fungal communities, is still limited. However, the use of fungi may have advantages compared to bacteria. Extremophile fungi like the black yeasts can withstand high levels of environmental stress (e.g. range of pH, water availability and temperature, presence of toxic chemicals). Therefore they might be applicable in situations, where bacterial communities show limited performance. In order to identify fungi which are good candidates for bioremediation application, a selection of 163 fungal strains, mostly from the group of the black yeasts, was tested for their capability to degrade three different pollutants: hexadecane, toluene, and polychlorinated biphenyl 126, which were used as model compounds for aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. These chemicals are frequently found in sites contaminated by oil, gas and coal. The screening was based on a two-step selection approach. As a first step, a high throughput method was developed to screen the relatively large amount of fungal strains regarding their tolerance to the contaminants. A microtiter plate based method was developed for monitoring fungal growth in the presence of the selected contaminants photometrically with a Tecan reader. Twenty five strains out of 163, being species of the genera Cladophilaophora, Scedosporium and Exophiala, showed the ability to grow on at least 2 hydrocarbons, and are therefore the most promising candidates for further tests. In a second step, degradation of the contaminants was investigated in more detail for a subset of the screened fungi. This was done by closing the carbon balance in sealed liquid cultures in which the selected pollutant was introduce as the sole source of carbon

  9. Quantitative assessment of hydrocarbon contamination in soil using reflectance spectroscopy: a "multipath" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Guy; Ben-Dor, Eyal; Eshel, Gil

    2013-11-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are contaminants of great significance. The commonly used analytic method for assessing total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil samples is based on extraction with 1,1,2-Trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113), a substance prohibited to use by the Environmental Protection Agency. During the past 20 years, a new quantitative methodology that uses the reflected radiation of solids has been widely adopted. By using this approach, the reflectance radiation across the visible, near infrared-shortwave infrared region (400-2500 nm) is modeled against constituents determined using traditional analytic chemistry methods and then used to predict unknown samples. This technology is environmentally friendly and permits rapid and cost-effective measurements of large numbers of samples. Thus, this method dramatically reduces chemical analytical costs and secondary pollution, enabling a new dimension of environmental monitoring. In this study we adapted this approach and developed effective steps in which hydrocarbon contamination in soils can be determined rapidly, accurately, and cost effectively solely from reflectance spectroscopy. Artificial contaminated samples were analyzed chemically and spectrally to form a database of five soils contaminated with three types of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), creating 15 datasets of 48 samples each at contamination levels of 50-5000 wt% ppm (parts per million). A brute force preprocessing approach was used by combining eight different preprocessing techniques with all possible datasets, resulting in 120 different mutations for each dataset. The brute force was done based on an innovative computing system developed for this study. A new parameter for evaluating model performance scoring (MPS) is proposed based on a combination of several common statistical parameters. The effect of dividing the data into training validation and test sets on modeling accuracy is also discussed. The results of this study clearly show

  10. Remediation of hydrocarbon contaminants in cold environments - Electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation and biodegradable oil sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suni, S. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental and Ecological Sciences

    2006-07-01

    Owing to the vast amounts of oil in the world, oil spills are common on land as well as at sea. In addition to oil products, other industrially used hydrocarbons, such as creosote, also contaminate soils. Most hydrocarbons are biodegradable. Hence, bioremediation is an attractive alternative for cleaning up hydrocarbon spills. In cold climate areas, however, biodegradation is often a slow process. The aim of this thesis was to develop efficient, cost-effective, and ecologically sound techniques for cold climate areas for the treatment of both oil spills on water or solid surfaces and for subsurface contamination. For subsurface hydrocarbon spills, the approach was to use electrokinetics in order to deliver nutrients and possibly microorganisms to contaminated soils, and in order to heat the soil to increase contaminant bioavailability and microbial activity. Electroosmosis proved to be an effective method to disperse bacteria and nutrients in medium- or fine-grained soils, where uncharged particles migrated with water through the soil towards the cathode. Creosote degradation proceeded faster with electroosmotically added nutrients than in controls without additions. However, inoculation with enriched creosote-degraders was not necessary because the indigenous microbes of the soil were well adapted to the creosote contaminants. For small-scale oil spills, the usual remediation method involves absorption with oil sorbents. Most sorbents in use today are synthetic and incineration is the only method for their disposal. A biodegradable sorbent, however, could be processed, for instance, in compost-like systems. Cotton grass is a common plant in peat bogs and its water-repellent fibre is a by-product of peat excavation. Cotton grass proved to be an excellent oil sorbent especially for spills on the surface of water: It absorbed up to three times as much oil as a commercial, synthetic oil sorbent. Cotton grass performed extremely well also in conditions simulating

  11. Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-03-06

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic

  12. Biodegradation Of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons In Petroleum Oil Contaminating The Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants in urban atmospheres (Chen et al., 2013). PAHs enter the environment via incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and accidental leakage of petroleum products, and as components of products such as creosote (Muckian et al., 2009). Due to PAHs carcinogenic activity, they have been included in the European Union (EU) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) priority pollutant lists. Human exposure to PAHs occurs in three ways, inhalation, dermal contact and consumption of contaminated foods, which account for 88-98% of such contamination; in other words, diet is the major source of human exposure to these contaminants (Rey-Salgueiro et al., 2008). Both the World Health Organization and the UK Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards (EPAQS) have considered benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) as a marker of the carcinogenic potency of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) mixture (Delgado-Saborit et al., 2011). Polycyclic aromatic and heavier aliphatic hydrocarbons, which have a stable recalcitrant molecular structure, exhibit high hydrophobicity and low aqueous solubility, are not readily removed from soil through leaching and volatilization (Brassington et al., 2007). The hydrophobicity of PAHs limits desorption to the aqueous phase (Donlon et al., 2002). Six main ways of dissipation, i.e. disappearance, are recognized in the environment: volatilization, photooxidation, Aim of the Work chemical oxidation, sorption, leaching and biodegradation. Microbial degradation is considered to be the main process involved in the dissipation of PAH (Yuan et al., 2002). Thus, more and more research interests are turning to the biodegradation of PAHs. Some microorganisms can utilize PAHs as a source of carbon and energy so that PAHs can be degraded to carbon dioxide and water, or transformed to other nontoxic or low-toxic substances (Perelo, 2010). Compared with other physical and chemical methods such as combustion

  13. Effects of humic acid on phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil simultaneously contaminated with heavy metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soyoung Park; Ki Seob Kim; Jeong-Tae Kim; Daeseok Kang; Kijune Sung

    2011-01-01

    The use of humic acid (HA) to enhance the efficiency of phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel was evaluated in this study.A sample of soil was artificially contaminated with commercially available diesel fuel to an initial total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) concentration of 2300 mg/kg and four heavy metals with concentrations of 400 mg/kg for Pb,200 mg/kg for Cu,12 mg/kg for Cd,and 160 mg/kg for Ni.Three plant species,Brassica campestris,Festuca arundinacea,and Helianthus annuus,were selected for the phytodegradation experiment.Percentage degradation of TPH in the soil in a control pot supplemented with HA increased to 45% from 30% without HA.The addition of HA resulted in an increases in the removal of TPH from the soil in pots planted with B.campestris,F.arundinacea,and H.annuus,enhancing percentage degradation to 86%,64%,and 85% from 45%,54%,and 66%,respectively.The effect of HA was also observed in the degradation of n-alkanes within 30 days.The rates of removal of n-alkanes in soil planted with B.campestris and H.annuus were high for n-alkanes in the range of C11-C28.A dynamic increase in dehydrogenase activity was observed during the last 15 days of a 30-day experimental period in all the pots amended with HA.The enhanced biodegradation performance for TPHs observed might be due to an increase in microbial activities and bioavailable TPH in soils caused by combined effects of plants and HA.The results suggested that HA could act as an enhancing agent for phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel and heavy metals.

  14. Microbial changes in rhizospheric soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons after bioremediation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xin; LI Pei-jun; ZHOU Qi-xing; XU Hua-xia; ZHANG Hai-rong

    2004-01-01

    Effects of bioremediation on microbial communities in soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons are a scientific problem to be solved. Changes in dominate microbial species and the total amount of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi in rhizospheric soils after bioremediation were thus evaluated using field bioremediation experiments. The results showed that there were changed dominant microorganisms including 11 bacterial strains which are mostly Gram positive bacteria and 6 fungal species which were identified. The total amount of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi increased after bioremediation of microbial agents combined with planting maize. On the contrary, fungi in rhizospheric soils were inhibited by adding microbial agents combined with planting soybean.

  15. Interrelationship of Pyrogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH Contamination in Different Environmental Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Un Hyuk Yim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Interrelationships between pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were assessed in air, soil, water, sediment, and tree leaves by using multi-media monitoring data. Concurrent concentration measurements were taken bimonthly for a year for the multi-media at urban and suburban sites. PAH level correlations between air and other media were observed at the urban site but were less clear at the suburban site. Considering a closer PAHs distribution/fate characteristics to soil than suspended solids, contamination in sediment seemed to be governed primarily by that in soil. The partitioning of PAHs in waters could be better accounted for by sorption onto black carbon and dissolved organic carbon.

  16. Biodegradation of organ chlorine pesticides in contaminated soil collected from Yen Tap, Cam Khe, Phu Tho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradation of POPs contaminant in soil collected from Phu Tho province and Nghe An province had carried out. The process comprises treating soil, which contains anaerobic and aerobic microbes capable of transforming lindane and DDT into harmless material and being under anaerobic and aerobic steps. Significant biodegradation of POPs contaminants occurred in there tests. But some of toxic organic compounds remained. (author)

  17. Using Different Tolerant Plant for Phytoremediation of Contaminated Soils with Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda Masu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The extraction activity, transportation and processing of crude oil caused soil contamination with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH. The develop phytoremediation process of contaminated soils with 2.8 % TPH, were studied in pots, with a tolerant grass species, Lolium perenne. Four treatments, each consisting of three replicates, were realized in randomized block design. The experimental variants are: control, uncontaminated soil, untreated and treated contaminated soil with anaerobic stabilized sewage sludge (50 t/ha in absence/presence volcanic indigenous tuff amendment (5 t/ha. Removal efficiencies of TPH from the contaminated soils variants treated with organic fertilizer without volcanic indigenous tuff and mixed with tuff after eight months was 73.4 % and 78.9 % respectively. The results are supported by healthy plants with roots system well developed. The green biomass harvested from the variant fertilized with sludge mixed with volcanic tuff was similar to the harvested from control variant, 15.1-17.9 g / pot of vegetation The obtained results show that, the tolerant grass species, Lolium perenne must be applied safely to phytoremediation, on TPH contaminated soil.

  18. Chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger - formation of halogenated phenols and subsequent environmental risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melbye, Alf G.; Faksness, Liv-Guri; Knudsen, Boerre Leif

    2006-03-15

    Formation of halogenated phenols as side products from treatment of produced water with aqueous chlorine dioxide has been investigated. The literature describes formation of halogenated hydrocarbons in effluent treatment using chlorine, hypochlorite and chlorine dioxide. A new chlorine dioxide product, originally intended as a H2S scavenger in the oil and gas industry, has been tested both as a phenol scavenger and H2S-scavenger for produced water applications. The concern about the possible formation of halogenated by-products initiated laboratory testing of chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger for produced water applications. The tests also included synthetic matrixes containing phenols, and the tests show that halogenated phenols, mainly brominated species, are found in produced water after treatment with chlorine dioxide. Due to potential environmental risk from halogenated organic contaminants, the use of chlorine dioxide as phenol and H2S scavenger is not recommended. (Author)

  19. EVALUATION OF FUSED-SILICA CAPILLARY COLUMNS FOR GC/ECD (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ELECTRON CAPTURE DETECTION) ANALYSIS OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS LISTED IN EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) METHOD 8120 (JOURNAL VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four mega-bore, one wide-bore, and one narrow-bore fused-silica capillary columns were evaluated for their applicability to the GC/ECD analysis of 22 chlorinated hydrocarbons, some of which are currently targeted by EPA Method 8120. No one column can resolve all 22 compounds. Fou...

  20. On-site and in situ remediation technologies applicable to petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites in the Antarctic and Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    Camenzuli, Danielle; Freidman, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites, associated with the contemporary and legacy effects of human activities, remain a serious environmental problem in the Antarctic and Arctic. The management of contaminated sites in these regions is often confounded by the logistical, environmental, legislative and financial challenges associated with operating in polar environments. In response to the need for efficient and safe methods for managing contaminated sites, several technologies have been a...

  1. Regional contamination versus regional dietary differences: Understanding geographic variation in brominated and chlorinated contaminant levels in polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, M.A.; Letcher, R.J.; Aars, J.; Born, E.W.; Branigan, M.; Dietz, R.; Evans, T.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Muir, D.C.G.; Peacock, E.; Sonne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The relative contribution of regional contamination versus dietary differences to geographic variation in polar bear (Ursus maritimus) contaminant levels is unknown. Dietary variation between Alaska Canada, East Greenland, and Svalbard subpopulations was assessed by muscle nitrogen and carbon stable isotope (?? 15N, ?? 13C) and adipose fatty acid (FA) signatures relative to their main prey (ringed seals). Western and southern Hudson Bay signatures were characterized by depleted ?? 15N and ??13C, lower proportions of C20 and C22 monounsaturated FAs and higher proportions of C18 and longer chain polyunsaturated FAs. East Greenland and Svalbard signatures were reversed relative to Hudson Bay. Alaskan ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments using microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► One of the 1st studies on sediments MFC-enhanced hydrocarbon degradation. ► MFCs realizes close-to-aerobic biodegradation in anaerobic sediments. ► MFC-enhanced in situ biodegradation is 12× fold of the background sediments. ► Wicking electrode design increases DO in sediments while enhancing degradation. ► Results offers a passive, effective remedy for cleaning HC contaminated sediments. - Abstract: A sediment microbial fuel cell (MFC) was tested to determine if electron transfer from the anaerobic zone of contaminated sediments to the overlying aerobic water could facilitate an enhanced and aerobic equivalent degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Results indicate that voltages as high as 190 mV (2162 mW/m3) were achieved in a sediment MFC with an anode buried in sediments containing TPH concentrations at approximately 16,000 mg kg−1. Additionally, after approximately 66 days, the TPH degradation rates were 2% and 24% in the open-circuit control sediment MFC and active sediment MFC, respectively. Therefore, it appears that applying MFC technology to contaminated sediments enhances natural biodegradation by nearly 12 fold. Additionally, a novel sediment MFC was designed to provide a cost-effective method of passive oxidation or indirect aerobic degradation of contaminants in an otherwise anaerobic environment. In addition, the use of a wicking air cathode in this study maintained dissolved oxygen concentrations 1–2 mg l−1 higher than submerged cathodes, demonstrating that this technology can be applied to environments with either aerobic or anaerobic overlying water and an anaerobic matrix, such as shallow lagoon, ponds, and marshes, and groundwater.

  3. Application of data fusion in human health risk assessment for hydrocarbon mixtures on contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exposure and toxicological data used in human health risk assessment are obtained from diverse and heterogeneous sources. Complex mixtures found on contaminated sites can pose a significant challenge to effectively assess the toxicity potential of the combined chemical exposure and to manage the associated risks. A data fusion framework has been proposed to integrate data from disparate sources to estimate potential risk for various public health issues. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed data fusion framework, an illustrative example for a hydrocarbon mixture is presented. The Joint Directors of Laboratories Data Fusion architecture was selected as the data fusion architecture and Dempster–Shafer Theory (DST) was chosen as the technique for data fusion. For neurotoxicity response analysis, neurotoxic metabolites toxicological data were fused with predictive toxicological data and then probability-boxes (p-boxes) were developed to represent the toxicity of each compound. The neurotoxic response was given a rating of “low”, “medium” or “high”. These responses were then weighted by the percent composition in the illustrative F1 hydrocarbon mixture. The resulting p-boxes were fused according to DST's mixture rule of combination. The fused p-boxes were fused again with toxicity data for n-hexane. The case study for F1 hydrocarbons illustrates how data fusion can help in the assessment of the health effects for complex mixtures with limited available data

  4. Application of data fusion in human health risk assessment for hydrocarbon mixtures on contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Roberta; Islam, M Shafiqul; Zargar, Amin; Mohapatra, Asish; Sadiq, Rehan

    2013-11-16

    The exposure and toxicological data used in human health risk assessment are obtained from diverse and heterogeneous sources. Complex mixtures found on contaminated sites can pose a significant challenge to effectively assess the toxicity potential of the combined chemical exposure and to manage the associated risks. A data fusion framework has been proposed to integrate data from disparate sources to estimate potential risk for various public health issues. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed data fusion framework, an illustrative example for a hydrocarbon mixture is presented. The Joint Directors of Laboratories Data Fusion architecture was selected as the data fusion architecture and Dempster-Shafer Theory (DST) was chosen as the technique for data fusion. For neurotoxicity response analysis, neurotoxic metabolites toxicological data were fused with predictive toxicological data and then probability-boxes (p-boxes) were developed to represent the toxicity of each compound. The neurotoxic response was given a rating of "low", "medium" or "high". These responses were then weighted by the percent composition in the illustrative F1 hydrocarbon mixture. The resulting p-boxes were fused according to DST's mixture rule of combination. The fused p-boxes were fused again with toxicity data for n-hexane. The case study for F1 hydrocarbons illustrates how data fusion can help in the assessment of the health effects for complex mixtures with limited available data. PMID:23219588

  5. Enhanced bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil using pilot-scale bioelectrochemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pilot bioelectrochemical system showed high-performance hydrocarbon remediation. • Radius of influence characterization demonstrated system efficacy. • Current serves as degradation indicator. - Abstract: Two column-type bioelectrochemical system (BES) modules were installed into a 50-L pilot scale reactor packed with diesel-contaminated soils to investigate the enhancement of passive biodegradation of petroleum compounds. By using low cost electrodes such as biochar and graphite granule as non-exhaustible solid-state electron acceptors, the results show that 82.1–89.7% of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was degraded after 120 days across 1–34 cm radius of influence (ROI) from the modules. This represents a maximum of 241% increase of biodegradation compared to a baseline control reactor. The current production in the BESs correlated with the TPH removal, reaching the maximum output of 70.4 ± 0.2 mA/m2. The maximum ROI of the BES, deducting influence from the baseline natural attenuation, was estimated to be more than 90 cm beyond the edge of the reactor (34 cm), and exceed 300 cm should a non-degradation baseline be used. The ratio of the projected ROI to the radius of BES (ROB) module was 11–12. The results suggest that this BES can serve as an innovative and sustainable technology for enhanced in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in large field scale, with additional benefits of electricity production and being integrated into existing field infrastructures

  6. Enhanced bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil using pilot-scale bioelectrochemical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lu; Yazdi, Hadi [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Jin, Song [Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Zuo, Yi [Chevron Energy Technology Company, San Ramon, CA (United States); Fallgren, Paul H. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO (United States); Ren, Zhiyong Jason, E-mail: jason.ren@colorado.edu [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Pilot bioelectrochemical system showed high-performance hydrocarbon remediation. • Radius of influence characterization demonstrated system efficacy. • Current serves as degradation indicator. - Abstract: Two column-type bioelectrochemical system (BES) modules were installed into a 50-L pilot scale reactor packed with diesel-contaminated soils to investigate the enhancement of passive biodegradation of petroleum compounds. By using low cost electrodes such as biochar and graphite granule as non-exhaustible solid-state electron acceptors, the results show that 82.1–89.7% of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was degraded after 120 days across 1–34 cm radius of influence (ROI) from the modules. This represents a maximum of 241% increase of biodegradation compared to a baseline control reactor. The current production in the BESs correlated with the TPH removal, reaching the maximum output of 70.4 ± 0.2 mA/m{sup 2}. The maximum ROI of the BES, deducting influence from the baseline natural attenuation, was estimated to be more than 90 cm beyond the edge of the reactor (34 cm), and exceed 300 cm should a non-degradation baseline be used. The ratio of the projected ROI to the radius of BES (ROB) module was 11–12. The results suggest that this BES can serve as an innovative and sustainable technology for enhanced in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in large field scale, with additional benefits of electricity production and being integrated into existing field infrastructures.

  7. Investigation of chlorine radical chemistry in the Eyjafjallajkull volcanic plume using observed depletions in non-methane hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Baker; Rauthe-Schch, A.; T. J. Schuck; C. A. M. Brenninkmeijer; van Velthoven, P.F.J.; A. Wisher; D. E. Oram

    2011-01-01

    As part of the effort to understand volcanic plume composition and chemistry during the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajkull, the CARIBIC atmospheric observatory was deployed for three special science flights aboard a Lufthansa passenger aircraft. Measurements made during these flights included the collection of whole air samples, which were analyzed for non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). Hydrocarbon concentrations in plume samples were found to be reduced to levels below backgrou...

  8. Effects of prokaryotic diversity changes on hydrocarbon degradation rates and metal partitioning during bioremediation of contaminated anoxic marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated changes of prokaryotic diversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on anoxic marine sediments characterized by high hydrocarbon and metal content. Microcosms containing contaminated sediments were amended with lactose and acetate and incubated in anaerobic conditions up to 60 d at 20 or 35 °C. Microcosms displaying higher degradation efficiency of hydrocarbons were characterized by the dominance of Alphaproteobacteria and Methanosarcinales and the lack of gene sequences belonging to known hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. Multivariate analyses support the hypothesis that Alphaproteobacteria are important for hydrocarbon degradation and highlight a potential synergistic effect of archaea and bacteria in changes of metal partitioning. Overall, these results point out that the identification of changes in the prokaryotic diversity during bioremediation of contaminated marine sediments is not only important for the improvement of bio-treatment performance towards hydrocarbons, but also for a better comprehension of changes occurring in metal partitioning which affect their mobility and toxicity.

  9. Changes in Magnetic Mineralogy Through a Depth Sequence of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, N. N.; Klüglein, N.; Appel, E.; Petrovsky, E.; Kappler, A.

    2013-12-01

    Sediments, soils and groundwater can act as a natural storage for many types of pollution. This study aims to investigate ferro(i)magnetic phase formation and transformation in the presence of organic contaminants (hydrocarbons) and its relation to bacterial activity, in particular in the zone of fluctuating water levels. The work extends previous studies conducted at the same site. The study area is a former military air base at Hradčany, Czech Republic (50°37'22.71"N, 14°45'2.24"E). Due to leaks in petroleum storage tanks and jet fuelling stations over years of active use the site was heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, until the base was closed in 1991. This site is one of the most important sources of high quality groundwater in the Czech Republic. During remediation processes the groundwater level in the sediments fluctuated, driving the hydrocarbon contaminants to lower depth levels along with the groundwater and leading to magnetite formation (Rijal et al., Environ.Pollut., 158, 1756-1762, 2010). In our study we drilled triplicate cores at three locations which were studied earlier. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) profiles combined with other magnetic properties were analyzed to obtain the ferro(i)magnetic concentration distributions along the depth sections. Additionally the sediment properties, hydrocarbon content and bacterial activity were studied. The triplicate cores were used to statistically discriminate outliers and to recognize significant magnetic signatures with depth. The results show that the highest concentration of ferrimagnetic phases (interpreted as newly formed magnetite) exists at the probable top of the groundwater fluctuation (GWF) zone. For example at one of the sites this zone is found between 1.4-1.9 m depth (groundwater table at ~2.3 m depth). High S-ratio and the correlation of ARM with MS values confirm the contribution of magnetite for the ferro(i)magnetic enhancement in the GWF zone. In the previous studies the MS

  10. In situ remediation of hydrocarbon contamination using an injection-extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecosite Inc. has developed a soil treatment technology to be applied in situ using an injection-extraction system (IES). This new restoration process uses custom-designed equipment for recovering free-phase hydrocarbons and for injection/recovery of different treatment solutions through cyclic manipulation of the water table level. Process development applied the basic principles of soil washing with improved distribution of the washing solution and improved hydraulic control using air sparging and vacuum capability. In this case study, free-phase recovery and soil washing have been used successfully to remediate the site. During the fall and winter of 1993--94, in situ restoration of soil contaminated with cutting oil below a machine shop was begun. The contamination extended from 1.83 to 4.27 m underneath the concrete slab. This represents a volume of 1,800 m3 of oil-laden soil with concentrations reaching 200,000 mg/kg. Moreover, free-floating phase hydrocarbons up to 1 m thick were observed. To clean the site, 400 injection/recovery points were arranged into three networks. A data collection system was used to monitor the water table level. A total of 160,000 kg of oil was extracted from the subsoil in less than 110 days of operation

  11. Use of field screening test kits to delineate hydrocarbon contamination of an abandoned fuel distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field screening test kits were recently used to delineate hydrocarbon contamination in soils 3,000-ft-long abandoned fuel line and distribution system. The purpose of using the kits was to minimize characterization expenses while providing reliable and cost-effective information. More than 200 tests were run on soils at depths from surface to 10 ft below the land surface. The total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) test used immunoassay technology to detect TPH values below 10 ppm. Fixed-base laboratory analyses were performed on 36% of the samples collected for field screening. A review of the screening results and the fixed-based laboratory results show that the field tests were replicated by a problem that was encountered as a result of heat-damage to the test kits, but the end results showed that the information obtained from the immunoassay results could still be used to drive the investigation and help determine the conclusion of the field effort. As a result of this screening effort, future site characterization efforts will be able to focus on specific areas of soil contamination. The test kit selected and used was PETRO RIS reg-sign Soil Test, manufactured by EnSys Environmental Products, Inc. Using this technology eliminated the delay in waiting for laboratory results and the higher costs associated with gas chromatography. Immunoassay kits are an important tool in field screening efforts and save time and monies

  12. Influence of oil contamination levels on hydrocarbon biodegradation in sandy sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del' Arco, J.P.; Franca, F.P. de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Bioquimica

    2001-07-01

    The influence of oil concentration on hydrocarbon biodegradation in a sandy sediment was studied in polyvinyl chloride reactors (0.45x0.28x0.31 m) containing 76.8 kg of beach sand in natura, where the upper layer was artificially contaminated with petroleum. The oil-degrading microorganisms used consisted of a mixed culture named N{sub D}, obtained from landfarming and associated with indigenous microorganisms. On the 28th day of the process, the degradation in reactors containing sandy sediment contaminated with light Arabian oil and presenting an initial oil content of 14, 21 or 28 g kg{sup -1} reached the following levels (%): 33.7, 32.9 and 28.9 for oil and grease; up to 88.3, 35.3 and 13.0 for C{sub 14}-C{sub 26} n-alkanes; and 100, 61.3 and 59.4 for pristane, respectively. Phytane removal (37.1%) was only detected in the reactor contaminated with the lowest oil concentration studied. These results, together with the expressive bacterial growth observed (from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 11} cfu g{sup -1}) give strong support to the argument that biodegradation was the dominant component of the remediation process. Susceptibility to biodegradation was inversely proportional to increasing oil contamination. The degradation of branched alkane: pristane was not repressed by the presence of n-alkanes. (Author)

  13. Remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and groundwater at a building construction site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of new buildings is proposed in two different areas at Fort Myer in Arlington, Virginia. Investigations conducted in these areas revealed the presence of active and inactive underground storage tanks (USTs). Contents of these USTs were gasoline, diesel fuel and heating oil. Many of these USTs were found to be leaking. Based on sampling and analyses, the soil and groundwater were found to be contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Before constructing any buildings in these contaminated areas, remediation must be conducted in accordance with State, Federal and other applicable regulations. Due to the scheduled construction, a fast track project was conducted to characterize the contamination, conduct the remediation and begin construction. Investigative techniques included Hydropunch trademark, Field Screening using Immunoassay Tests, delineation of a perched water zone, and conduct of a pilot scale test for dual phase extraction. Additional monitoring wells were installed and more soil and water samples were analyzed. In addition to other reports, a Corrective Action Plan and a Site Clearance Report were prepared. This paper discusses: (a) field activities for a site where leaking underground storage tanks were found; (b) the methodology adopted in the Risk Assessment to calculate Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs); (c) delineation of contamination; (d) development of various remedial alternatives; (e) selection of preferred alternatives to remediate soil and groundwater; and (f) consideration of various regulatory issues

  14. Ex situ treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil using biosurfactants from Lactobacillus pentosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldes, Ana Belén; Paradelo, Remigio; Rubinos, David; Devesa-Rey, Rosa; Cruz, José Manuel; Barral, María Teresa

    2011-09-14

    The utilization of biosurfactants for the bioremediation of contaminated soil is not yet well established, because of the high production cost of biosurfactants. Consequently, it is interesting to look for new biosurfactants that can be produced at a large scale, and it can be employed for the bioremediation of contaminated sites. In this work, biosurfactants from Lactobacillus pentosus growing in hemicellulosic sugars solutions, with a similar composition of sugars found in trimming vine shoot hydrolysates, were employed in the bioremediation of soil contaminated with octane. It was observed that the presence of biosurfactant from L. pentosus accelerated the biodegradation of octane in soil. After 15 days of treatment, biosurfactants from L. pentosus reduced the concentration of octane in the soil to 58.6 and 62.8%, for soil charged with 700 and 70,000 mg/kg of hydrocarbon, respectively, whereas after 30 days of treatment, 76% of octane in soil was biodegraded in both cases. In the absence of biosurfactant and after 15 days of incubation, only 1.2 and 24% of octane was biodegraded in soil charged with 700 and 70,000 mg/kg of octane, respectively. Thus, the use of biosurfactants from L. pentosus, as part of a well-designed bioremediation process, can provide mechanisms to mobilize the target contaminants from the soil surface to make them more available to the microbial population. PMID:21797277

  15. Assessment of the role of plants in the bioremediation of two hydrocarbon-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytoremediation has been considered as a viable alternative for cleaning up contaminated soils. A study was conducted to examine the potential for plant-assisted bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils using wheat, canola, sunflower, fababean, and alsike clover. Crops were grown to maturity in greenhouses. Creosote and oil contaminated soils were used. The soils and plant tissues were then extracted and measured for dichloromethane-extractable organic (DEO) materials. The concentrations of DEO within the soil was them compared with non-planted samples. The study showed that at the end of a three month period there was no major difference in DEO concentrations in any of the soils. After six months, the DEO concentrations of the greenhouse soils had decreased compared to the reserved samples, but there was no major change in concentration due to the presence of any of the plant species. The results indicate that the role of plants in bioremediation systems, both as enhancers of bioremediation systems and as the possible sinks of contaminant C, should be further studied. 22 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  16. Cleaning of contaminated soils with hydrocarbons by biocell; Saneamiento de suelos contaminados con hidrocarburos mediante biopilas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturbe-Arguelles, R.; Flores-Torres, C; Chavez-Lopez, C.; Roldan-Martin, A [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-03-01

    In 1990 the Instituto de Ingenieria de la UNAM, initiated an evaluation through the soil and groundwater sampling and a risk health assessment in a Mexican refinery. An extended area was found contaminated with hydrocarbons. This area requires a soil remediation, taking into account that some zones present more than 30 000 mg/kg of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). Biopile system was recommended as the best remediation method to diminish TPG and some poliaromathic hydrocarbons (PAH). Therefore an experimental biopile of 30 m3 was constructed with contaminated soil. After 22 weeks, results show more than 80 % of TPH and PAH remotion. [Spanish] El grupo de saneamiento de suelos y acuiferos del Instituto de Ingenieria de la UNAM, inicio en 1999 la evaluacion de la contaminacion del subsuelo de una refineria en una zona costera del pais, mediante el muestreo de 425 puntos a 1.5 m de profundidad y con el analisis de los siguientes parametros: hidrocarburos totales del petroleo (HTP), hidrocarburo poliaromaticos (HAP), diesel, gasolina, metilterbutileter (MTBE) y los metales hierro, vanadio, zinc, cadmio, cromo y plomo. Asimismo, se lleva a cabo una evaluacion de riesgo a la salud a fin de determinar los niveles de limpieza de las areas contaminadas. Una vez realizado el estudio se propuso probar a nivel piloto dos tecnicas de saneamiento para las areas contaminadas con valores superiores a 30 000 mg/Kg de http, o bien, para las zonas en donde la evaluacion de riesgo a la salud indica la existencia de riesgo para uno o mas compuestos. Las tecnicas propuesta son biopilas y lavado de suelos con surfactantes. En este trabajo se presenta la prueba piloto con biopilas, de la cual se obtuvo una eficiencia de remocion de http del 80 porciento con cinco meses de operacion. Se muestra las partes de una biopila y se dan los resultados de la biopila experimental en la refineria Francisco I. Madero.

  17. On-site and in situ remediation technologies applicable to petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites in the Antarctic and Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Camenzuli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites, associated with the contemporary and legacy effects of human activities, remain a serious environmental problem in the Antarctic and Arctic. The management of contaminated sites in these regions is often confounded by the logistical, environmental, legislative and financial challenges associated with operating in polar environments. In response to the need for efficient and safe methods for managing contaminated sites, several technologies have been adapted for on-site or in situ application in these regions. This article reviews six technologies which are currently being adapted or developed for the remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites in the Antarctic and Arctic. Bioremediation, landfarming, biopiles, phytoremediation, electrokinetic remediation and permeable reactive barriers are reviewed and discussed with respect to their advantages, limitations and potential for the long-term management of soil and groundwater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons in the Antarctic and Arctic. Although these technologies demonstrate potential for application in the Antarctic and Arctic, their effectiveness is dependent on site-specific factors including terrain, soil moisture and temperature, freeze–thaw processes and the indigenous microbial population. The importance of detailed site assessment prior to on-site or in situ implementation is emphasized, and it is argued that coupling of technologies represents one strategy for effective, long-term management of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites in the Antarctic and Arctic.

  18. Remediation and its effect represented on long term monitoring data at a chlorinated ethenes contaminated site, Wonju, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Sun; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2016-04-01

    A research for the contamination of chlorinated ethenes such as trichloroethylene (TCE) at an industrial complex, Wonju, Korea, was carried out based on 17 rounds of groundwater quality data collection from 2009 to 2015. Remediation technologies such as soil vapor extraction, soil flushing, biostimulation, and pump-and-treat have been applied to eliminate the contaminant sources of trichloroethylene (TCE) and to prevent the migration of TCE plume from remediation target zones to groundwater discharge area like a stream. The remediation efficiency according to the remedial actions was evaluated by tracing a time-series of plume evaluation and temporal mass discharge at three transects (Source, Transect-1, Transect-2) which was assigned along the groundwater flow path. Also, based on long term monitoring data, dissolved TCE concentration and mass of residual TCE in the initial stage of disposal were estimated to evaluate the efficiency of in situ remediation. The results of temporal and spatial monitoring before remedial actions showed that a TCE plume originating from main and local source zones continues to be discharged to a stream. However, from the end of intensive remedial actions from 2012 to 2013, the aqueous concentrations of TCE plume present at and around the main source areas decreased significantly. Especially, during the intensive remediation period, the early average mass discharge (26.58 g/day) at source transect was decreased to average 4.99 g/day. Estimated initial dissolved concentration and residual mass of TCE in the initial stage of disposal decreased rapidly after an intensive remedial action in 2013 and it is expected to be continuously decreased from the end of remedial actions to 2020. This study demonstrates that long term monitoring data are useful in assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions at chlorinated ethenes contaminated site. Acknowledgements This project is supported by the Korea Ministry of Environment under "The GAIA

  19. Heavy metal-immobilizing organoclay facilitates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in mixed-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel metal-immobilizing organoclay (MIOC) synthesized and characterized. • MIOC immobilizes toxic metals and reduces metal bioavailability. • It enhances PAH-bioavailability to soil bacteria. • It improves microbial growth and activities in mixed-contaminated soils. • MIOC facilitates PAH-biodegradation in metal co-contaminated soils. - Abstract: Soils contaminated with a mixture of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pose toxic metal stress to native PAH-degrading microorganisms. Adsorbents such as clay and modified clay minerals can bind the metal and reduce its toxicity to microorganisms. However, in a mixed-contaminated soil, an adsorption process more specific to the metals without affecting the bioavailability of PAHs is desired for effective degradation. Furthermore, the adsorbent should enhance the viability of PAH-degrading microorganisms. A metal-immobilizing organoclay (Arquad® 2HT-75-bentonite treated with palmitic acid) (MIOC) able to reduce metal (cadmium (Cd)) toxicity and enhance PAH (phenanthrene) biodegradation was developed and characterized in this study. The MIOC differed considerably from the parent clay in terms of its ability to reduce metal toxicity (MIOC > unmodified bentonite > Arquad–bentonite). The MIOC variably increased the microbial count (10–43%) as well as activities (respiration 3–44%; enzymatic activities up to 68%), and simultaneously maintained phenanthrene in bioavailable form in a Cd-phenanthrene mixed-contaminated soil over a 21-day incubation period. This study may lead to a new MIOC-assisted bioremediation technique for PAHs in mixed-contaminated soils

  20. Heavy metal-immobilizing organoclay facilitates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in mixed-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia); Mandal, Asit [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095 (Australia); Division of Soil Biology, Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh (India); Naidu, Ravi [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel metal-immobilizing organoclay (MIOC) synthesized and characterized. • MIOC immobilizes toxic metals and reduces metal bioavailability. • It enhances PAH-bioavailability to soil bacteria. • It improves microbial growth and activities in mixed-contaminated soils. • MIOC facilitates PAH-biodegradation in metal co-contaminated soils. - Abstract: Soils contaminated with a mixture of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pose toxic metal stress to native PAH-degrading microorganisms. Adsorbents such as clay and modified clay minerals can bind the metal and reduce its toxicity to microorganisms. However, in a mixed-contaminated soil, an adsorption process more specific to the metals without affecting the bioavailability of PAHs is desired for effective degradation. Furthermore, the adsorbent should enhance the viability of PAH-degrading microorganisms. A metal-immobilizing organoclay (Arquad{sup ®} 2HT-75-bentonite treated with palmitic acid) (MIOC) able to reduce metal (cadmium (Cd)) toxicity and enhance PAH (phenanthrene) biodegradation was developed and characterized in this study. The MIOC differed considerably from the parent clay in terms of its ability to reduce metal toxicity (MIOC > unmodified bentonite > Arquad–bentonite). The MIOC variably increased the microbial count (10–43%) as well as activities (respiration 3–44%; enzymatic activities up to 68%), and simultaneously maintained phenanthrene in bioavailable form in a Cd-phenanthrene mixed-contaminated soil over a 21-day incubation period. This study may lead to a new MIOC-assisted bioremediation technique for PAHs in mixed-contaminated soils.

  1. 挥发性氯代烃在土壤中的吸附行为研究进展%A REVIEW OF STUDIES ON SORPTION BEHAVIORS OF VOLATILE CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS IN NATURAL SOIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锐; 孟凡勇; 文晓刚; 陈吕军; 张永明

    2012-01-01

    挥发性氯代烃(Volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons,VCHs)是工业污染场地的常见污染物,在非饱和带存在于土壤气相、水相、固相或以高密度非水相液体(Dense non-aqueous phase liquids,DNAPL)的形式存在,形成一个动态平衡系统.土壤对VCHs的吸附不仅影响土壤中的污染物浓度,而且极大地影响VCHs的迁移转化行为.根据VCHs在土壤中的吸附机制,可以对土壤中的VCHs浓度进行预测,优化各种模型参数,指导污染修复及管理工作.本文总结了VCHs在非饱和带土壤中的相间分配特征,吸附机制及其影响因素,特别探讨了土壤有机碳、矿物及水分对吸附的影响,提出了当前研究中存在的问题,并对将来研究进行了展望.%Volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs) are common pollutants in industrial polluted sites, existing in aqueous phase, gaseous phase, solid phase or the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids ( DNAPL) , in unsaturated zones of the soil, forming a dynamic equilibrium system. The sorption of VCHs by the soil not only influences concentration of the pollutants in the soil, but also affects substantially migration and fate of VCHs. Understanding the mechanisms of VCHs sorption by the soil may help predict their concentrations in the soil, optimize the parameters of pertinent models, and guide remediation and management of the contaminated soil. A review is presented to summarize characteristics of the distribution of VCHs between these phases in soils of unsaturated zones, their sorption mechanisms as well as their affecting factors, and to elaborate in particular influences of soil organic carbon, minerals, and soil water on their sorption. Meanwhile, existent problems are pointed out in the current researches and an outlook is described of the future researches.

  2. Influence of soil and hydrocarbon properties on the solvent extraction of high-concentration weathered petroleum from contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Hong; Hua, Zhengtao; Li, Xingang; Li, Hong; Wu, Guozhong

    2014-05-01

    Petroleum ether was used to extract petroleum hydrocarbons from soils collected from six oil fields with different history of exploratory and contamination. It was capable of fast removing 76-94 % of the total petroleum hydrocarbons including 25 alkanes (C11-C35) and 16 US EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soils at room temperature. The partial least squares analysis indicated that the solvent extraction efficiencies were positively correlated with soil organic matter, cation exchange capacity, moisture, pH, and sand content of soils, while negative effects were observed in the properties reflecting the molecular size (e.g., molecular weight and number of carbon atoms) and hydrophobicity (e.g., water solubility, octanol-water partition coefficient, soil organic carbon partition coefficient) of hydrocarbons. The high concentration of weathered crude oil at the order of 10(5) mg kg(-1) in this study was demonstrated adverse for solvent extraction by providing an obvious nonaqueous phase liquid phase for hydrocarbon sinking and increasing the sequestration of soluble hydrocarbons in the insoluble oil fractions during weathering. A full picture of the mass distribution and transport mechanism of petroleum contaminants in soils will ultimately require a variety of studies to gain insights into the dynamic interactions between environmental indicator hydrocarbons and their host oil matrix. PMID:24442962

  3. Microbial communities in a chlorinated solvent contaminated tidal freshwater wetland: molecular techniques for assessing potentially important biodegrading organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshtein, J. D.; Voytek, M. A.; Lorah, M m

    2001-05-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground MD (APG) is a hazardous waste site where a chlorinated solvent plume discharges into anaerobic sediments in a tidal freshwater wetland. Wetlands can be ideal sites for intrinsic remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to availability of organic substrates and the wide range of redox zones. And indeed natural attenuation of these compounds appears to be an important process at this site. The biodegradation of chlorinated VOCs such as PCA can follow several pathways: 1) sequential hydrogenolysis of PCA to ethane or ethene via TCA 2) dichloroelimation of TCA to vinyl chloride (VC) or 3) dichloroelimination of PCA to DCE, and hydrogenolysis of DCE to VC. Pathways 2 and 3 can result in the accumulation of VC which is considered more hazardous than the original parent compounds. Identifying microbial components involved in the series of degradation steps of each pathway can provide a better understanding of factors controlling the intrinsic bioremediation of these compounds. PCA-amended microcosm experiments were conducted during two seasons, March-April, and July-August 1999 at APG using wetland sediments collected from two distinct sites (one is methanogenic and one is both iron reducing and methanogenic). During the course of the experiments, VOCs, methane, ferrous iron and sulfate were measured. Terminal restriction fragment polymorphism (tRFLP) analysis provides a molecularly-derived microbial "fingerprint" and was used to document the total microbial abundance and characterize the diversity of the bacterial and methanogen communities. Higher rates of degradation observed during the spring sampling were associated with higher biomass and microbial diversity. As the microcosm proceeded, shifts in redox conditions and associated degradation rates and pathways were observed. These shifts were tracked by changes in the microbial community. Three phylotypes were identified that appear to be important in controlling the

  4. Complete genome sequence of Sphingorhabdus sp. M41, a versatile hydrocarbon degrader, isolated from crude oil-contaminated costal sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hye Im; Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-06-10

    Sphingorhabdus sp. M41, capable of degrading aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, was isolated from crude oil-contaminated costal sediment by an enrichment culture and its complete genome was sequenced. The genome of strain M41 has a chromosome with a size of 3,324,420bp, including 44 tRNAs, 6 rRNAs, and 3118 protein-coding genes. In addition, many potential genes responsible for the biodegradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were identified from the genome. This is the first complete genome of the genus Sphingorhabdus, which will provide insights into the bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated costal sediment by strain M41. PMID:27080446

  5. 水中氯代烃单体碳同位素分析中预富集方法进展%Review on Pre-enrichment Methods in Compound Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌媛; 黄毅; 尚文郁; 谢曼曼; 刘舒波; 孙青

    2011-01-01

    Highly accurate determination of Compound Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis ( CSIA ) of chlorinated hydrocarbons is of great significance in tracing the source and revealing the biodegradating progress of pollutants. The isotopic composition of organic contaminations may be stable or varied in the process of environmental transformation. We can trace the source of contaminations if the composition is stable and can evaluate the probability and degree of degradation of contaminations. This paper summarizes solid-phase microextraction, static headspace analysis, purge and trap method and compound specific isotope analyses of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water, using combinations of these pretreatment methods, Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry ( GC-C-IRMS ), and comparesthe three methods. Compared with liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase micro extraction, static headspace analysis, purge and trap method are all solvent-free enrichment techniques, producing no secondary pollution, less interference, and the resolution and accuracy of the analysis of GC-C-IRMS is improved. No, or little, isotopic mass fractionation occurred during the isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water by combining these solvent-free enrichment techniques with GC-C-IRMS, of which the precision of the analysis is less than l%e. The detection limit decreased along with the methods of static headspace analysis, solid-phase micro extraction, purge and trap method. Purge and trap is the most popular method because of its good reproducibility and low detection limit for the compound specific isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbon in Water. The combinations of in-needle microextraction, in-tube microextraction, stir bar sorptive extraction or headspace sorptive extraction with GC-C-IRMS have a bright future.%高精度准确测定氯代烃单体碳同位素对示踪污染物来源,了解污染物的生物降解过程具有重要意义.在环境转化过程中,

  6. Evaluation of a coagulation/flocculation-lamellar clarifier and filtration-UV-chlorination reactor for removing emerging contaminants at full-scale wastewater treatment plants in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Víctor; Salvadó, Victòria

    2013-03-15

    The presence and elimination of 25 emerging contaminants in two full-scale Spanish wastewater treatment plants was studied. The tertiary treatment systems consisted of coagulation, flocculation lamellar settlement and filtration (pulsed-bed sand filters) units, and disinfection was carried out by medium pressure UV light lamps and chlorination. Diclofenac and carbamazepine were found to be the emerging contaminants with the highest concentrations in secondary effluents. Photodegradable emerging contaminants (e.g. ketoprofen, triclosan and diclofenac) were removed by filtration-UV light radiation-chlorination whereas most hydrophobic compounds (e.g. galaxolide and tonalide) were eliminated by coagulation-flocculation followed by lamellar clarification, a unit in which a seasonal trend was observed. Overall mass removal efficiency was about 60%. 1-(8-Chlorocarbazolyl) acetic acid, an intermediate product of the photodegradation of diclofenac, was detected after filtration-UV-chlorination, but not after coagulation-flocculation and lamellar clarification. This study demonstrated potential for general applicability of two established tertiary treatment systems to eliminate emerging contaminants. PMID:23353882

  7. Concentration of Petroleum-Hydrocarbon Contamination Shapes Fungal Endophytic Community Structure in Plant Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdel, Guillaume; Roy-Bolduc, Alice; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Plant-root inhabiting fungi are a universal phenomenon found in all ecosystems where plants are able to grow, even in harsh environments. Interactions between fungi and plant roots can vary widely from mutualism to parasitism depending on many parameters. The role of fungal endophytes in phytoremediation of polluted sites, and characterization of the endophytic diversity and community assemblages in contaminated areas remain largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated the composition of endophytic fungal communities in the roots of two plant species growing spontaneously in petroleum-contaminated sedimentation basins of a former petro-chemical plant. The three adjacent basins showed a highly heterogeneous pattern of pollutant concentrations. We combined a culture-based isolation approach with the pyrosequencing of fungal ITS ribosomal DNA. We selected two species, Eleocharis erythropoda Steud. and Populus balsamifera L., and sampled three individuals of each species from each of three adjacent basins, each with a different concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons. We found that contamination level significantly shaped endophytic fungal diversity and community composition in E. erythropoda, with only 9.9% of these fungal Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) retrieved in all three basins. However, fungal community structure associated with P. balsamifera remained unaffected by the contamination level with 28.2% of fungal OTUs shared among all three basins. This could be explained by the smaller differences of pollutant concentrations in the soil around our set of P. balsamifera sampless compared to that around our set of E. erythropoda samples. Our culture-based approach allowed isolation of 11 and 30 fungal endophytic species from surface-sterilized roots of E. erythropoda and P. balsamifera, respectively. These isolates were ribotyped using ITS, and all were found in pyrosequensing datasets. Our results demonstrate that extreme levels of pollution reduce fungal

  8. Concentration of Petroleum-Hydrocarbon Contamination Shapes Fungal Endophytic Community Structure in Plant Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdel, Guillaume; Roy-Bolduc, Alice; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Plant-root inhabiting fungi are a universal phenomenon found in all ecosystems where plants are able to grow, even in harsh environments. Interactions between fungi and plant roots can vary widely from mutualism to parasitism depending on many parameters. The role of fungal endophytes in phytoremediation of polluted sites, and characterization of the endophytic diversity and community assemblages in contaminated areas remain largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated the composition of endophytic fungal communities in the roots of two plant species growing spontaneously in petroleum-contaminated sedimentation basins of a former petro-chemical plant. The three adjacent basins showed a highly heterogeneous pattern of pollutant concentrations. We combined a culture-based isolation approach with the pyrosequencing of fungal ITS ribosomal DNA. We selected two species, Eleocharis erythropoda Steud. and Populus balsamifera L., and sampled three individuals of each species from each of three adjacent basins, each with a different concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons. We found that contamination level significantly shaped endophytic fungal diversity and community composition in E. erythropoda, with only 9.9% of these fungal Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) retrieved in all three basins. However, fungal community structure associated with P. balsamifera remained unaffected by the contamination level with 28.2% of fungal OTUs shared among all three basins. This could be explained by the smaller differences of pollutant concentrations in the soil around our set of P. balsamifera sampless compared to that around our set of E. erythropoda samples. Our culture-based approach allowed isolation of 11 and 30 fungal endophytic species from surface-sterilized roots of E. erythropoda and P. balsamifera, respectively. These isolates were ribotyped using ITS, and all were found in pyrosequensing datasets. Our results demonstrate that extreme levels of pollution reduce fungal

  9. Effects of electrokinetics and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide [CTAB] on the hydrocarbon removal and retention from contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, R Sri; Qian, Y; Krishnapillai, M

    2006-07-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminated soil and groundwater is considered to be a leading cause for increased health risk and environmental contamination. Therefore, an efficient technique is needed to retard the movement or enhance the removal of the contaminant depending on the remediation objective. The goals of this study were to evaluate the impact of the addition of a cationic surfactant on the movement of hydrocarbons within a contaminated clay soil subjected to electrokinetic treatment. Water-flushing and surfactant-flushing experiments were conducted on one-dimensional soil columns. The model diesel fuel was composed of a mixture of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes [BTEX] and three selected polycyclic hydrocarbons [PAHs]. In the water-flushing experiments, the application of an electrokinetic treatment was found to enhance the removal of PAHs from the clay columns by about 20%. In contrast, the application of an electrokinetic treatment, when coupled with cationic surfactant-flushing, retarded the movement of BTEX and the three selected PAHs in the clay columns. Hydraulic columns with surfactant (CTAB) removed 17% more naphthalene and 11% more 2-methylnaphthalene compared to columns subjected to electrokinetic treatment with CTAB. The flux through the electrokinetic columns during water flushing as well as surfactant flushing was higher than the flux due to hydraulic gradient alone. As the solubility of hydrocarbons increased, they moved farther with electrokinetic treatment without CTAB. However, with CTAB the electrokinetic treatment tends to retard the movement. Use of a cationic surfactant coupled with electrokinetic treatment was found to retard the movement of contaminants. PMID:16894821

  10. Risk assessment of urban soils contamination: The particular case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachada, A; da Silva, E Ferreira; Duarte, A C; Pereira, R

    2016-05-01

    The assessment of soil quality and characterization of potential risks to the environment and human health can be a very difficult task due to the heterogeneity and complexity of the matrix, the poor understanding about the fate of contaminants in the soil matrix, scarcity of toxicological/ecotoxicological data and variability of guidelines. In urban soils these difficulties are enhanced by the patchy nature of urban areas and the presence of complex mixtures of organic and inorganic contaminants resulting from diffuse pollution caused by urban activities (e.g. traffic, industrial activity, and burning of carbon sources for heating). Yet, several tools are available which may help to assess the risks of soil contamination in a simpler, cost effective and reliable way. Within these tools, a tiered risk assessment (RA) approach, first based on a chemical screening in combination with geostatistical tools, may be very useful in urban areas. However, there is still much to improve and a long way to go in order to obtain a reliable RA, especially in the case of hydrophobic organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This paper aims at proposing a RA framework to assess the environmental and human health risks of PAHs present in urban soils, based on existing models. In addition, a review on ecotoxicological, toxicological, and exposure assessment data was made, as well as of the existing soil quality guidelines for PAHs that can be used in the RA process. PMID:26878639

  11. In situ electro-osmotic cleanup of tar contaminated soil—Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ana T.

    2012-12-01

    An in situ electro-osmosis experiment was set up in a tar contaminated clay soil in Olst, the Netherlands, at the site of a former asphalt factory. The main goal of this experiment was to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the contaminated clay layer by applying an electric gradient of 12 V m-1 across the soil over an electrode distance of 1 m. With the movement of water by electro-osmosis and the addition of a non-ionic surfactant (Tween 80), the non-polar PAHs were dragged along by convection and removed from the fine soil fraction. Soil samples were taken at the start and after 159 days at the end of the experiment. Water at the electrode wells was sampled regularly during the course of the experiment. The results reflect the heterogeneity of the soil characteristics and show the PAH concentrations within the experimental set up. After first having been released into the anolyte solution due to extraction by Tween 80 and subsequent diffusion, PAH concentrations increased significantly in the electrode reservoirs at the cathode side after 90 days of experiment. Although more detailed statistical analysis is necessary to quantify the efficiency of the remediation, it can be concluded that the use of electro-osmosis together with a non-ionic surfactant is a feasible technique to mobilize non-polar organic contaminants in clayey soils. Crown Copyright © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of contaminant lability during phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon impacted soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recalcitrant compounds, some of which are known carcinogens, often found in high residual soil concentrations at industrial sites. Recent research has confirmed that phytoremediation holds promise as a low-cost treatment method for PAH contaminated soil. In this study, the lability of soil bound PAHs in the rhizosphere was estimated using solid phase extraction resin. An extraction time of 14 days was determined to be appropriate for this study. Resin-extractable PAHs, which are assumed to be more bioavailable, decreased during plant treatments. Significant reductions in the labile concentrations of several PAH compounds occurred over 12 months of plant growth. The differences in concentration between the unplanted and the planted soil indicate that the presence of plant roots, in addition to the passage of time, contributes to reduction in the bioavailability of target PAHs. - The lability of sorbed contaminants is modified by the presence of plants. Remediation coupled with plant treatment can change the bioavailability of contaminants in soil

  13. Biodegradation efficiency and optimum growth conditions of bacterial strains isolated from a petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil: Evaluation of the selected strain efficiency for contaminated soil bioremediation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kotas, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory scale batch studies were performed in order to determine the optimum growth conditions and diesel oil biodegradation ability of the selected strain isolated from petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil. These results were used to evaluate the potential of the selected strain for in situ application in PRB remediation technology.

  14. Assessment of the mass of pollutant in a soil contaminated with chlorinated solvents.

    OpenAIRE

    Gautier, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    The scarcity of housing has led more and more developers to turn to the conversion of former industrial areas into residential areas. Brownfield redevelopment involves the cleanup of contaminated soil to eliminate any health or environmental risk. The quantification of the amount of pollutant in soil is essential to carry out an efficient remediation. It involves sampling and analyzing the soil to determine the concentration of pollutant at a finite number of locations. It is therefore necess...

  15. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Toledo Ángeles; Rodríguez-Vázquez Refugio

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against...

  16. 'Mussel Watch' and chemical contamination of the coasts by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) enter the coastal marine environment from three general categories of sources; pyrogenic, petrogenic (or petroleum), and natural diagenesis. PAH from different sources appear to have differential biological availability related to how the PAH are sorbed, trapped, or chemically bound to particulate matter, including soot. Experience to date with bivalve sentinel organism, or 'Mussel Watch', monitoring programs indicates that these programs can provide a reasonable general assessment of the status and trends of biologically available PAH in coastal ecosystems. As fossil fuel use increases in developing countries, it is important that programs such as the International Mussel Watch Program provide assessments of the status and trends of PAH contamination of coastal ecosystems of these countries. (author)

  17. Geoelectrical characterization of a site with hydrocarbon contamination caused by pipeline leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Rodriguez, Omar; Shevnin, Vladimir; Ochoa-Valdes, Jesus [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ryjov, Albert [Moscow State Geological Prospecting Academy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-15

    Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) method is used extensively in environmental impact studies including hydrocarbon contamination. In this work, the results of the geoelectrical characterization of a contaminated site caused by pipeline leakage are presented. Geoelectrical study was performed with multi-electrode technology and 2D profile data interpretation. VES results from six parallel profiles were presented in resistivity sections and maps. Layered model of the site was found including aquifer and aquitard layers. Although the contamination grade of the site is low, we found two contaminated zones into sandy aquifer. Aquifer and aquitard were characterized by its resistivity, clay content, porosity and cation exchange capacity values. Recalculation of resistivity data into petrophysical sections and maps was performed by an inversion algorithm taking into account pore water salinity. Petrophysical parameters for uncontaminated areas estimated from resistivity are close to real values; meanwhile, in contaminated zones petrophysical parameters have anomalous values. Similar effects of contamination influence on petrophysical parameters were found in laboratory by resistivity measurements made at clean and contaminated sand samplers. [Spanish] El metodo Sondeo Electrico Vertical (SEV) es ampliamente utilizado en estudios de impacto ambiental incluyendo el caso de contaminacion por hidrocarburos. En este trabajo se presentan los resultados de la caracterizacion geoelectrica de un sitio contaminado por hidrocarburos relacionado con una fuga en linea de ducto. El estudio geoelectrico fue realizado utilizando el metodo SEV en la variante de tomografia, realizandose una interpretacion 2D de los datos observados. Seis perfiles paralelos de SEV fueron medidos y presentados sus resultados en secciones y mapas. Se determino un modelo estratificado que incluye acuitardo y acuifero. Aunque el grado de contaminacion en este sitio es bajo fue posible localizar dos zonas

  18. The Effect of Urban Fuel Stations on Soil Contamination with Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Parvizi Mosaed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:A critical environmental impact of the petroleum industry is the contamination of soil by oil and other related products which are highly toxic and exhibit molecular recalcitrance. Therefore, this study focused on investigating the total amount of petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs in soil of urban fuel stations in Hamedan City, Iran. Methods:Thirteen high traffic urban fuel stations were selected and random soil samples were collected from surface soils at selected fuel stations. The physical and chemical proper-ties of the soil samples were determined in the laboratory. The concentration of TPHs in soils was determined by GC/MC. Results: Results showed that concentration of TPHs in all stations was more than the stand-ard level in soil (2000 mg kg-1. The minimum and maximum TPHs concentration observed in No. 5 and No.13 fuel station, respectively. Conclusion: The results showed that spillage in urban fuel stations has clear effect on the content of TPH in soil, as concentration TPH in all of fuel stations was in the upper limit of the standard levels in soil. .Soil pollution with petroleum hydrocarbons has clear effects on soil biological, chemical and physical characteristics and results in decreasedg food elements, productivity and soil plant productions.

  19. Magnetic Parameter Changes in Soil and Sediments in the Presence of Hydrocarbon Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, E.; Porsch, K.; Rijal, M. L.; Ameen, N. N.; Kappler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic proxies were successfully used for fast and non-destructive detection of fly ash related heavy metal pollution. Correlations of magnetic signals with organic contaminants in soils and sediments were also reported; however, their significance is unclear because of co-existing heavy metal pollution. At a hydrocarbon (HC) contaminated former military airbase (Hradcany, Czech Rep.), where heavy metal contents are insignificant, we detected clearly higher magnetic concentrations at the top of the groundwater fluctuation (GWF) zone. Frequent GWF by up to ca. one meter was caused through remediation by air sparging. In this study and all previous ones magnetite was identified as the dominant phase for higher magnetic concentrations. To determine the importance of microbial activity and soil parameters on changes in magnetic susceptibility (MS) laboratory batch experiments with different microbially active and sterile soils without carbon addition and with gasoline amendment were setup. MS of these microcosms was followed weekly. Depending on the soil MS either increased or decreased by up to ~7% and remained constant afterwards. The main findings were that MS changes were mainly microbially driven and influenced by the bioavailable Fe content, the initial MS and the organic carbon content of the soils. Moreover, we tested magnetic changes in laboratory columns, filled with sand from the field site Hradcany, by simulating water level changes. The observed changes were small and hardly statistically significant. Our laboratory studies revealed that different factors influence changes in magnetic properties of soil/sediments after HC contamination, with much smaller effects than expected from anomalies observed at field sites. With the present results, the ambitious goal of using magnetic monitoring for detecting HC contaminations by oil spills seem far from practical application.

  20. Large Scale Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Waste at Various Installations of ONGC. India: Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajoy Kumar Mandal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In situ and ex situ bioremediation of oil contaminated effluent pits, sludge pits, oil spilled land and tank bottom, and effluent treatment plant (ETP oily sludge was carried out at Ankleshwar, Mehsana, Assam and Cauvery Asset of Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited (ONGC, India. The types of contaminant were heavy paraffinic, asphaltic and light crude oil and emulsified oily sludge /contaminated soil. An indigenous microbial consortium was developed by assembling four species of bacteria, isolated from various oil contaminated sites of India, which could biodegrade different fractions of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH of the oily waste to environment friendly end products. The said consortium was on a large scale field applied to the above oil installations and it successfully bioremediated 30,706 tonnes of different types of oily waste. In 65 case studies of different batch size of in situ and ex situ bioremediation processes, the initial TPH content varying from 69.20 to 662.70 g/kg of oily waste has been biodegraded to 5.30 – 16.90 g/kg of oily waste in a range of 2 to 33 months. Biodegradation rate varied in the range of 0.22 – 1.10 Kg TPH /day/m2 area due to the climatic condition of the treatment zone and the type of waste treated. The bioremediated soil was non-toxic and natural vegetation was found to be grown on the same ground. Successful eco-restoration of one large effluent pit of 26,000 m2 area was carried out by cultivation of local fish species after completion of bioremediation. Bioremediation technology has helped ONGC with the management of their hazardous oily wastes in an environment friendly manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.68.2.5632

  1. A Risk-Based Decision tool to support remediation decision-making for groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selection of remediation alternatives for large groundwater plumes containing chlorinated solvents are often complex and difficult, in part because they involve competing objectives, e.g. reduction of health risk vs. increased cost. The Department of Energy (DOE) supported development of a Decision Tool to provide a risk-based process for evaluating and comparing remedial options fairly and consistently. The Decision Tool is also intended to provide a process for constructive discussion of alternatives among the appropriate stakeholders. To use the Decision Tool, which is implemented in an Excel spreadsheet, a site manager must evaluate each alternative being considered against six objectives using detailed performance metrics. The impacts of each alternative on the individual objectives are combined through a formal multi-attribute utility analysis. Predetermined or user-specified relative weights for the objectives can be used, and a variety of visual outputs are generated. The usefulness and validity of the Decision Tool was demonstrated through a Pilot Study application for the A-Area Burning Rubble Pits/Miscellaneous Chemical Basin groundwater plume at the DOE Savannah River Site. The Pilot Study results provided a new perspective on the alternatives and objectives by demonstrating: 1) the relatively small public health risks associated with groundwater contamination at this site, 2) that more active approaches had benefits over monitored natural attenuation (MNA) in reducing time required to meet the maximum contaminant level (MCL) and maximizing regulatory responsiveness, 3) that MNA has acceptable public and worker health and safety risks, while enabling a reduction in costs. Use of the Decision Tool also promoted valuable discussion among the various stakeholders, and provided options for sensitivity analyses that can quickly be visualized to assess relative benefits of each of the alternatives. (authors)

  2. Pilot-scale bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated clayey soil from a sub-Arctic site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Aeration and moisture addition alone caused extensive hydrocarbon biodegradation. • 30-day slurry reactor remediation endpoints attained in 385 days in biopiles. • High nitrogen concentrations inhibited hydrocarbon degradation. • Inhibition of biodegradation linked to lack of shifts in soil microbial community. - Abstract: Bioremediation is a potentially cost-effective solution for petroleum contamination in cold region sites. This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (C16–C34) in a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15 °C for periods up to 385 days, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. Although several studies on bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from cold region sites have been reported for coarse-textured, sandy soils, there are limited studies of bioremediation of petroleum contamination in fine-textured, clayey soils. Our results indicate that aeration and moisture addition was sufficient for achieving 47% biodegradation and an endpoint of 530 mg/kg for non-volatile (C16–C34) petroleum hydrocarbons. Nutrient amendment with 95 mg-N/kg showed no significant effect on biodegradation compared to a control system without nutrient but similar moisture content. In contrast, in a biopile amended with 1340 mg-N/kg, no statistically significant biodegradation of non-volatile fraction was detected. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of alkB and 16S rRNA genes revealed that inhibition of hydrocarbon biodegradation was associated with a lack of change in microbial community composition. Overall, our data suggests that biopiles are feasible for attaining the bioremediation endpoint in clayey soils. Despite the significantly lower biodegradation rate of 0.009 day−1 in biopile tank compared to 0.11 day−1 in slurry bioreactors for C16–C34 hydrocarbons, the biodegradation extents for this fraction were

  3. Pilot-scale bioremediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated clayey soil from a sub-Arctic site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis, E-mail: subhasis.ghoshal@mcgill.ca

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Aeration and moisture addition alone caused extensive hydrocarbon biodegradation. • 30-day slurry reactor remediation endpoints attained in 385 days in biopiles. • High nitrogen concentrations inhibited hydrocarbon degradation. • Inhibition of biodegradation linked to lack of shifts in soil microbial community. - Abstract: Bioremediation is a potentially cost-effective solution for petroleum contamination in cold region sites. This study investigates the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (C16–C34) in a pilot-scale biopile experiment conducted at 15 °C for periods up to 385 days, with a clayey soil, from a crude oil-impacted site in northern Canada. Although several studies on bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from cold region sites have been reported for coarse-textured, sandy soils, there are limited studies of bioremediation of petroleum contamination in fine-textured, clayey soils. Our results indicate that aeration and moisture addition was sufficient for achieving 47% biodegradation and an endpoint of 530 mg/kg for non-volatile (C16–C34) petroleum hydrocarbons. Nutrient amendment with 95 mg-N/kg showed no significant effect on biodegradation compared to a control system without nutrient but similar moisture content. In contrast, in a biopile amended with 1340 mg-N/kg, no statistically significant biodegradation of non-volatile fraction was detected. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of alkB and 16S rRNA genes revealed that inhibition of hydrocarbon biodegradation was associated with a lack of change in microbial community composition. Overall, our data suggests that biopiles are feasible for attaining the bioremediation endpoint in clayey soils. Despite the significantly lower biodegradation rate of 0.009 day{sup −1} in biopile tank compared to 0.11 day{sup −1} in slurry bioreactors for C16–C34 hydrocarbons, the biodegradation extents for this fraction

  4. Assessing biodegradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in a river sediment by conservative and reactive isotope tracers (2H, 18O, 13C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study is part of the joint project SEDBARCAH, which investigates the intrinsic capacity of microbial communities in eutrophic river sediments as natural biobarriers against the release of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) from polluted ground water into surface water. The study site is located in an industrial area in Vilvoorde (Belgium) and characterized by heavily CAH-contaminated groundwater, which infiltrates the sediments of the eutrophic river Zenne. The stable isotopic compositions (δ2H, δ18O) of ground water, interstitial water, and Zenne surface water were used as conservative tracers to distinguish between river sediment zones, which are characterized by (i) ground water influx and exfiltration and (ii) river water infiltration and mixing between ground and surface water. Interstitial water was sampled in 3 longitudinal river sediment profiles in up to 3 depths in a 45 m long section of the Zenne. The δ2H- and δ18O-data show that ground water and Zenne surface water are isotopically clearly distinct. Interstitial water mostly exhibits δ2H- and δ18O-values identical or close to ground water, indicating influx of ground water into the sediments and exfiltration into the surface water at these positions. However, at several sampling positions and depths δ2H- and δ18O-values of interstitial water approaches or attains those of Zenne surface water. This testifies to surface water infiltration into the river sediments and mixing with ascending groundwater. These findings thus reflect the existence of small- to mid-scale hydraulic heterogeneities in the sediment and/or differences in the basal river flow velocities, which led to the establishment of zones of rapid as well as slow or even suppressed discharge of CAH-contaminated ground water into the Zenne surface water. At present, the CAH-pollution in the ground and interstitial water consists of vinyl chloride (VC), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and 1,1-dichloroethane (1

  5. Field—Based Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Hydrocarbons at Industrially Contaminated Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Rigou

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Examination of organic pollutants in groundwaters should also consider the source of the pollution, which is often a solid matrix such as soil, landfill waste, or sediment. This premise should be viewed alongside the growing trend towards field-based characterisation of contaminated sites for reasons of speed and cost. Field-based methods for the extraction of organic compounds from solid samples are generally cumbersome, time consuming, or inefficient. This paper describes the development of a field-based supercritical fluid extraction (SFE system for the recovery of organic contaminants (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from soils. A simple, compact, and robust SFE system has been constructed and was found to offer the same extraction efficiency as a well-established laboratory SFE system. Extraction optimisation was statistically evaluated using a factorial analysis procedure. Under optimised conditions, the device yielded recovery efficiencies of >70% with RSD values of 4% against the standard EPA Soxhlet method, compared with a mean recovery efficiency of 48% for a commercially available field-extraction kit. The device will next be evaluated with real samples prior to field deployment.

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Contamination in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus : Analysis in Liver and Bile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voravit Cheevaporn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mainly from petroleum products, are a source of worldwide contamination, and it is in the present study, we exposed Nile Tilapia in aquaria to No-Observed-Effect-Levels (NOELs of naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene for periods up to 9 days in a continuous flow system. Additional studies were carried out on fish exposed to lubricating oil, gasoline and diesel oil. Two methods were used to measure the levels of these PAHs: determination of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD activity in liver extracts, and fixed wavelength fluorescence (FF of PAH in bile. Optimal excitation wavelengths for FF analyses were determined to 290, 260 and 341 nm for naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene, respectively. The optimal emission wavelengths were 335, 380 and 383 nm, respectively. EROD activity and fluorescence intensity increased with increasing PAH concentrations and increasing exposure times. Similar results were obtained after exposure to lubricating oil, gasoline, or diesel oil. There was a high and significant correlation between the two methods. In view of its higher accuracy, lower cost, and convenience FF offered better possibilities than EROD determination to monitor PAH contamination in fish.

  7. Breakdown of low-level total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in contaminated soil using grasses and willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Patrick; Kuzovkina, Yulia A; Schulthess, Cristian P; Guillard, Karl

    2016-01-01

    A phytoremediation study targeting low-level total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was conducted using cool- and warm-season grasses and willows (Salix species) grown in pots filled with contaminated sandy soil from the New Haven Rail Yard, CT. Efficiencies of the TPH degradation were assessed in a 90-day experiment using 20-8.7-16.6 N-P-K water-soluble fertilizer and fertilizer with molasses amendments to enhance phytoremediation. Plant biomass, TPH concentrations, and indigenous microbes quantified with colony-forming units (CFU), were assessed at the end of the study. Switchgrass grown with soil amendments produced the highest aboveground biomass. Bacterial CFU's were in orders of magnitude significantly higher in willows with soil amendments compared to vegetated treatments with no amendments. The greatest reduction in TPH occurred in all vegetated treatments with fertilizer (66-75%) and fertilizer/molasses (65-74%), followed sequentially by vegetated treatments without amendments, unvegetated treatments with amendments, and unvegetated treatments with no amendment. Phytoremediation of low-level TPH contamination was most efficient where fertilization was in combination with plant species. The same level of remediation was achievable through the addition of grasses and/or willow combinations without amendment, or by fertilization of sandy soil. PMID:26553847

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubová Šmejkalová, Adéla; Klánová, J.; Přibylová, P.; Váňa, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2015), s. 1795-1805. ISSN 1680-7316 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2263; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : persistent organic pollutants * atmospheric deposition * dry deposition * precipitation * aerosol * PAHS * transports * areas * contaminants Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.053, year: 2014

  9. Effects of climatic modalities on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) availability and attenuation in historically contaminated Technosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagois, Robin; Schwartz, Christophe; Faure, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Since the decline of industrial activities in France, large areas of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs)-contaminated soils have remained derelict. Thus, the fate of PAHs in such soils through natural attenuation process needs to be assessed. On the long-term scale (10-100 years), climate will greatly contribute to the evolution of soil physico-chemical properties and by consequences PAHs availability. In our study, we examined the effect of three contrasted climatic conditions (freeze-thawing, wetting-drying and high temperature) on soil aging processes of 11 historically contaminated soils and consequences on the availability of polycyclic aromatic compounds (including the 16 priority pollutants PAHs). Batch experiments were set-up for each modality; freeze-dried soil underwent variation of humidity and/or temperature. In a first step, PACs availability was roughly evaluated, with a water-extraction method using a H2O2 + CaCl2 solution. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content was measured in these extracts before and after applying the climatic modalities. Difference in DOC indicated an effect of the climatic modality on PACs availability. If an effect was noticed, available PACs was then accurately measured using (i) an hydrogen-peroxide oxidation on the soils followed (ii) a dichloromethane (DCM) extraction and a Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) quantification of the remaining PACs (i.e. unavailable). Variation of PACs availability will greatly help to understand the mechanisms associated between PACs desorption/sequestration and the abiotic influence of climate. Results of this work will further help understanding and predict the rate of natural attenuation of PACs in contaminated soils for the incoming decades.

  10. Biomagnification of persistent chlorinated and brominated contaminants in food web components of the Yellow Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PCBs, OCPs, and PBDEs were analyzed for 32 marine species in the Yellow Sea. • Their bioaccumulation potentials were assessed in combination with stable isotopes. • Pelagic and benthic food-chain components were separated by their δ13C values. • Pelagic food chain was a major bioaccumulation pathway for selected PCBs and OCPs. • The other compounds displayed low bioaccumulation potentials through food chains. -- Abstract: Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured in 32 species inhabiting the Yellow Sea to assess their bioaccumulation potentials. The concentrations in these samples were lower than those reported for other countries or locations. Relatively high levels of BDE 209 in biota suggest an ongoing source of deca-BDE technical mixing within the Yellow Sea. The accumulation profiles of PCBs were uniform between species, but the concentrations of OCPs and PBDEs varied widely. Pelagic and benthic food-chain components were separated by their δ13C values. Significant positive correlations between δ15N and PCB 153, PCB 138, p,p′-DDE, oxy-chlordane, and trans-nonachlordane were found only for pelagic consumers, indicating that the pelagic food chain is an important bioaccumulation pathway for selected PCB and OCP compounds. The other compounds did not show any biomagnification through benthic and pelagic food chains, suggesting the lower bioaccumulation potentials of these contaminants

  11. Maternal transfer of chlorinated contaminants in the leatherback turtles, Dermochelys coriacea, nesting in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirlet, Elodie; Das, Krishna; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Girondot, Marc

    2010-04-01

    We examined the maternal transfer of organochlorine contaminants (OCs), pesticides (DDTS and HCHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and the temporal variation of blood and eggs concentrations from 38 leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) nesting in French Guiana. PCBs were found to be the dominant OCs with respective mean concentrations of 55.14 ng g(-1) lipid-mass for egg and 1.26 ng mL(-1) wet-mass for blood. OC concentrations were lower than concentrations measured in other marine turtles which might be due to the lower trophic position (diet based on gelatinous zooplankton) and to the location of their foraging and nesting grounds. All OCs detected in leatherback blood were detected in eggs, suggesting a maternal transfer of OCs. This transfer was shown to depend on female blood concentration for SigmaDDTs and for the most prevalent PCB congeners, since significant relationships were found between paired blood-egg concentrations. During the nesting season, OC concentrations in eggs and the percentage of lipid in eggs were found to decline in successive clutches, highlighting a process of offloading from females to their eggs and a decreasing investment of lipid from females into their clutches. OCs in eggs tended to be higher in females spending 3 years in the foraging grounds between two nesting seasons than in those spending 2 years, suggesting an impact of time spacing two breeding seasons, called remigration interval, and of location of the foraging grounds. PMID:20362323

  12. Control by isotopes of the methods for the determination of residues of pesticides of chlorinated hydrocarbon Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The restriction of the use of pesticides of organochlorine type did not give the desired results because the decrease of the level of contamination was much smaller than expected. In contrast to that, the degree of the acceptable contamination is lowered more and more internationally. This makes reasonable the adoption methods which are reliable and can be applied in routine tests. On the basis of recovery values of 98 +-2% the control of the Book of Methods of AOAC issued in 1975 carried out with the use of 14C-DDT and 14C-DDE, respectively, proved unequivocally the suitability of this book in Hungary. (author)

  13. Concentration of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination shapes fungal endophytic community structure in plant roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eBourdel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant-root inhabiting fungi are a universal phenomenon found in all ecosystems where plants are able to grow, even in harsh environments. Interactions between fungi and plant roots can vary widely from mutualism to parasitism depending on many parameters. The role of fungal endophytes in phytoremediation of polluted sites, and characterization of the endophytic diversity and community assemblages in contaminated areas remain largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated the composition of endophytic fungal communities in the roots of two plant species growing spontaneously in petroleum-contaminated sedimentation basins of a former petro-chemical plant. The three adjacent basins showed a highly heterogeneous patterns of pollutant concentrations. We combined a culture-based isolation approach with the pyrosequencing of fungal ITS ribosomal DNA. We selected two species, Eleocharis erythropoda Steud. and Populus balsamifera L., and sampled three individuals of each species from each of three adjacent basins, each with a different concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons. We found that contamination level significantly shaped endophytic fungal diversity and community composition in E. erythropoda, with only 9.9% of these fungal Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs retrieved in all three basins. However, fungal community structure associated with P. balsamifera remained unaffected by the contamination level with 28.2% of fungal OTUs shared among all three basins. This could be explained by the smaller differences of pollutant concentrations in the soil around our set of P. balsamifera sampless compared to that around our set of E. erythropoda samples. Our culture-based approach allowed isolation of 11 and 30 fungal endophytic species from surface-sterilized roots of E. erythropoda and P. balsamifera, respectively. These isolates were ribotyped using ITS, and all were found in pyrosequensing datasets. Our results demonstrate that extreme levels of

  14. Bacterial communities of surface and deep hydrocarbon-contaminated waters of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Nigro, L. M.; McKay, L.; Ziervogel, K.; Gutierrez, T.; Teske, A.

    2010-12-01

    We performed a 16S rRNA gene sequencing survey of bacterial communities within oil-contaminated surface water, deep hydrocarbon plume water, and deep water samples above and below the plume to determine spatial and temporal patterns of oil-degrading bacteria growing in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. In addition, we are reporting 16S rRNA sequencing results from time series incubation, enrichment and cultivation experiments. Surface oil slick samples were collected 3 nautical miles from ground zero, (5/6/10, RV Pelican) and were added to uncontaminated surface water (collected within a 30 nautical mile radius of ground zero, 5/6/10 - 5/9/10, RV Pelican). This mixture was incubated for 20 days in a rolling bottle at 25°C. 16S rRNA clone libraries from marine snow-like microbial flocs that had formed during the incubation yielded a highly diverse bacterial community, predominately composed of the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, and a smaller number of Planktomycetes and other bacterial lineages. The most frequently recovered proteobacterial sequences were closely related to cultured species of the genus Cycloclasticus, specialists in aerobic oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. These time series incubation results will be compared to the microbial community structure of contaminated surface water, sampled on the same cruise with RV Pelican (5/6/10-5/9/10) and frozen immediately. Stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments with C13-labelled alkanes and polycyclic aromatic substrates and gulf water samples have yielded different enrichments. With naphthalene, predominantly Alteromonas-related clones and a smaller share of Cycloclasticus clones were recovered; phenanthrene yielded predominantly clones related to Cycloclasticus, and diverse other Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria. Analyses of SIP experiments with hexadecane are in progress. The microbial community composition of the deep hydrocarbon plume was characterized using water column profile samples taken

  15. Different behavioral effect dose–response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: Influence of structural and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umezu, Toyoshi, E-mail: umechan2@nies.go.jp; Shibata, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yshibata@nies.go.jp

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose–response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose–response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose–response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose–response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose–response profiles. - Highlights: • We examine effects of 4 chlorinated hydrocarbons on 6 behavioral endpoints in mice. • The behavioral effect dose–response profiles for the 4 compounds are different. • We utilize regression analysis to clarify probable causes of the different profiles. • The compound's physicochemical properties probably produce the different profiles.

  16. Different behavioral effect dose–response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: Influence of structural and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose–response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose–response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose–response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose–response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose–response profiles. - Highlights: • We examine effects of 4 chlorinated hydrocarbons on 6 behavioral endpoints in mice. • The behavioral effect dose–response profiles for the 4 compounds are different. • We utilize regression analysis to clarify probable causes of the different profiles. • The compound's physicochemical properties probably produce the different profiles

  17. Microbial diversity and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation potential in an oil-contaminated mangrove sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Luiza L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mangrove forests are coastal wetlands that provide vital ecosystem services and serve as barriers against natural disasters like tsunamis, hurricanes and tropical storms. Mangroves harbour a large diversity of organisms, including microorganisms with important roles in nutrient cycling and availability. Due to tidal influence, mangroves are sites where crude oil from spills farther away can accumulate. The relationship between mangrove bacterial diversity and oil degradation in mangrove sediments remains poorly understood. Results Mangrove sediment was sampled from 0–5, 15–20 and 35–40 cm depth intervals from the Suruí River mangrove (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, which has a history of oil contamination. DGGE fingerprinting for bamA, dsr and 16S rRNA encoding fragment genes, and qPCR analysis using dsr and 16S rRNA gene fragment revealed differences with sediment depth. Conclusions Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity revealed changes with depth. DGGE for bamA and dsr genes shows that the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community profile also changed between 5 and 15 cm depth, and is similar in the two deeper sediments, indicating that below 15 cm the anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading community appears to be well established and homogeneous in this mangrove sediment. qPCR analysis revealed differences with sediment depth, with general bacterial abundance in the top layer (0–5 cm being greater than in both deeper sediment layers (15–20 and 35–40 cm, which were similar to each other.

  18. Estimating release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal-tar contaminated soil at manufactured gas plant sites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of EPRI's goals regarding the environmental behavior of organic substances consists of developing information and predictive tools to estimate the release potential of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soils at manufactured gas (MGP) plant sites. A proper assessment of the distribution of contaminants under equilibrium conditions and the potential for mass-transfer constraints is essential in evaluating the environmental risks of contaminants in the subsurface at MGP sites and for selecting remediation options. The results of this research provide insights into estimating maximum release concentrations of PAHs from MGP soils that have been contaminated by direct contact with the tar or through years of contact with contaminated groundwater. Attention is also given to evaluating the use of water-miscible cosolvents for estimating aqueous phase concentrations, and assessing the role of mass-transfer constraints in the release of PAHs from MGP site soils

  19. Contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons in two semi-enclosed areas along the arabian gulf coast of the United Arab Emirates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater, sediments, and three important commercial fish species, i.e.: Rastrelliger kanagurta, Siganus cannliculatus; Plectohynchus scholtaf from two shallow semi-enclosed and highly productive coastal areas of U.A.E. The concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in seawater of the whole area varied from 1.6 to 16.0 μgl-1 without any significant differences between Abu Dhabi (mean: 5.5 μgl-1) and Dubai creeks (7.2 μgl-1). Moreover, no significant differences were also found between surface (means: 5.7 and 7.9 μgl-1) and bottom layers (means: 5.2 and 6.6 μgl-1) in both areas. In contrast, sediment analysis indicated more pronounced variations between stations of Dubai creek (7.6.70.6 μgl-1) compared to Abu Dhabi Creek (1.1-8.8 μgl-1). Although no distinct distribution was observed in Abu Dhabi, the distribution in Dubai indicated more oil contamination in the innermost stations and less contamination in the outer stations of the creek. Moreover, the concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediments of Dubai were 9.5 times larger than those measured in Abu Dhabi sediments indicating more oil contamination in Dubai creek. The significant relationships found between petroleum hydrocarbons and organic carbon contents in sediments indicated that oil contamination was one of the possible sources for increasing the concentrations of organic materials in sediments. The concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons, on the other hand, showed no significant variations between fish species, i.e. Rastrelliger kanagurta (mean: 1.0 μgl-1), Siganus cannliculatus: (mean: 0.7 μgl-1), Plectohynchus scholtaf: (mean: 1.6 μgl-1). The study of relationships between petroleum hydrocarbons and weights or lengths indicated that these fish species do not concentrate these compounds in their tissues. Except for the concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in Dubai sediments, a direct comparison between the

  20. Microbial activity in an acid resin deposit: Biodegradation potential and ecotoxicology in an extremely acidic hydrocarbon contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acid resins are residues produced in a recycling process for used oils that was in use in the forties and fifties of the last century. The resin-like material is highly contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons, extremely acidic and co-contaminated with substituted and aromatic hydrocarbons, and heavy metals. To determine the potential for microbial biodegradation the acid resin deposit and its surroundings were screened for microbial activity by soil respiration measurements. No microbial activity was found in the core deposit. However, biodegradation of hydrocarbons was possible in zones with a lower degree of contamination surrounding the deposit. An extreme acidophilic microbial community was detected close to the core deposit. With a simple ecotoxicological approach it could be shown that the pure acid resin that formed the major part of the core deposit, was toxic to the indigenous microflora due to its extremely low pH of 0-1. - Acidity is the major toxic factor of the extremely hydrophobic and acidic mixed contamination found in an acid resin deposit

  1. Slurry-phase ozonation for remediation of sediments contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yu; Hong, P K Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of toxic, persistent, bioaccumulating organic compounds containing two or more fused aromatic rings. They are listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as priority pollutants because of their carcinogenicity and toxicity. Employing ozonation as a remediation technique, this work investigated the treatability of a sediment sample from a freshwater boat slip subjected to coal tar contamination over a long period. The contaminated sediment sample contained high levels of PAHs in the forms of naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene, among other byproducts present in the humic and solid phases of the sediment. The objectives of this work were to examine (1) the degradation of PAHs in the contaminated sediment as treated by ozonation in the slurry form, (2) the effects of ozonation upon the soil matrix and the biodegradability of the resultant PAH intermediates, and (3) the feasibility of a combined technique using O3 as a pretreatment followed by biological degradation. The sediment was made into 3% w/w soil slurries and ozonated in a 1.7-L semi-batch, well-stirred reactor equipped with pH control and a cold trap for the gaseous effluent. Samples were collected after different ozonation durations and tested for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), UV absorbance, and toxicity, along with quantitative and qualitative determinations of the parent and daughter intermediates using gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID), GC/mass spectrometry (MS), and ion chromatography (IC) techniques. The GC/MS technique identified 16 compounds associated with the humic and solid phases of the sediment. Intermediates identified at different ozonation times suggested that the degradation of PAHs was initiated by an O3 attack resulting in ring cleavage, followed by the intermediates' oxidation reactions with O3 and the concomitant OH radical toward their mineralization. Results

  2. Development of a solid-phase microextraction-based method for sampling of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons in an urbanized coastal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Eddy Y; Tsukada, David; Diehl, Dario W

    2004-11-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has been used as an in situ sampling technique for a wide range of volatile organic chemicals, but SPME field sampling of nonvolatile organic pollutants has not been reported. This paper describes the development of an SPME-based sampling method employing a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated (100-microm thickness) fiber as the sorbent phase. The laboratory-calibrated PDMS-coated fibers were used to construct SPME samplers, and field tests were conducted at three coastal locations off southern California to determine the equilibrium sampling time and compare the efficacy of the SPME samplers with that of an Infiltrex 100 water pumping system (Axys Environmental Systems Ltd., Sidney, British Columbia, Canada). p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE were the components consistently detected in the SPME samples among 42 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and 17 chlorinated pesticidestargeted. SPME samplers deployed attwo locations with moderate and high levels of contamination for 18 and 30 d, respectively, attained statistically identical concentrations of p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE. In addition, SPME samplers deployed for 23 and 43 d, respectively, at a location of low contamination also contained statistically identical concentrations of p,p'-DDE. These results indicate that equilibrium could be reached within 18 to 23 d. The concentrations of p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDE, or p,p'-DDD obtained with the SPME samplers and the Infiltrex 100 system were virtually identical. In particular, two water column concentration profiles of p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE acquired by the SPME samplers at a highly contaminated site on the Palos Verdes Shelf overlapped with the profiles obtained by the Infiltrex 100 system in 1997. The field tests not only reveal the advantages of the SPME samplers compared to the Infiltrex 100 system and other integrative passive devices but also indicate the need to improve the sensitivity of the SPME-based sampling technique. PMID:15575294

  3. Cancer risk assessments of Hong Kong soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, Yu Bon [School of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Lin’an, Zhejiang 311300 (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution - Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University and City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Kang, Yuan [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution - Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University and City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, Higher Education Mega Center, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Hong Sheng [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution - Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University and City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Department of Microbial and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Lau, Winifred; Li, Hui; Sun, Xiao Lin [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution - Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University and City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Giesy, John P. [Department of Biology and Chemistry and State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Chow, Ka Lai [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution - Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University and City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wong, Ming Hung, E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.hk [School of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Lin’an, Zhejiang 311300 (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution - Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University and City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► High levels of soil organic matter in soils render PAHs more resistant to degradation. ► Open burning site contain high concentrations of PAHs in Hong Kong. ► Car dismantling workshop can increase potential cancer risk on human. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate soils from 12 different land use types on human cancer risks, with the main focus being on human cancer risks related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fifty-five locations were selected to represent 12 different types of land use (electronic waste dismantling workshop (EW (DW)); open burning site (OBS); car dismantling workshop (CDW) etc.). The total concentrations of 16 PAHs in terms of total burden and their bioaccessibility were analysed using GC/MS. The PAHs concentrations were subsequently used to establish cancer risks in humans via three exposure pathways, namely, accident ingestion of soil, dermal contact soil and inhalation of soil particles. When the 95th centile values of total PAH concentrations were used to derive ingestion and dermal cancer risk probabilities on humans, the CDW land use type indicated a moderate potential for cancerous development (244 × 10{sup −6} and 209 × 10{sup −6}, respectively). Bioaccessible PAHs content in soil samples from CDW (3.60 × 10{sup −6}) were also classified as low cancer risk. CDW soil possessed a higher carcinogenic risk based on PAH concentrations. Bioremediation is recommended to treat the contaminated soil.

  4. Cancer risk assessments of Hong Kong soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► High levels of soil organic matter in soils render PAHs more resistant to degradation. ► Open burning site contain high concentrations of PAHs in Hong Kong. ► Car dismantling workshop can increase potential cancer risk on human. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate soils from 12 different land use types on human cancer risks, with the main focus being on human cancer risks related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fifty-five locations were selected to represent 12 different types of land use (electronic waste dismantling workshop (EW (DW)); open burning site (OBS); car dismantling workshop (CDW) etc.). The total concentrations of 16 PAHs in terms of total burden and their bioaccessibility were analysed using GC/MS. The PAHs concentrations were subsequently used to establish cancer risks in humans via three exposure pathways, namely, accident ingestion of soil, dermal contact soil and inhalation of soil particles. When the 95th centile values of total PAH concentrations were used to derive ingestion and dermal cancer risk probabilities on humans, the CDW land use type indicated a moderate potential for cancerous development (244 × 10−6 and 209 × 10−6, respectively). Bioaccessible PAHs content in soil samples from CDW (3.60 × 10−6) were also classified as low cancer risk. CDW soil possessed a higher carcinogenic risk based on PAH concentrations. Bioremediation is recommended to treat the contaminated soil

  5. Treatability assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated marine sediments using permanganate, persulfate and Fenton oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-05-01

    Various chemical oxidation techniques, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8), Fenton (H2O2/Fe(2+)), and the modified persulfate and Fenton reagents (activated by ferrous complexes), were carried out to treat marine sediments that were contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dredged from Kaohsiung Harbor in Taiwan. Experimental results revealed that KMnO4 was the most effective of the tested oxidants in PAH degradation. Owing to the high organic matter content in the sediment that reduced the efficiencies of Na2S2O8 and regular Fenton reactions, a large excess of oxidant was required. Nevertheless, KH2PO4, Na4P2O7 and four chelating agents (EDTA, sodium citrate, oxalic acid, and sodium oxalate) were utilized to stabilize Fe(II) in activating the Na2S2O8 and Fenton oxidations, while Fe(II)-citrate remarkably promoted the PAH degradation. Increasing the molecular weight and number of rings of PAH did not affect the overall removal efficiencies. The correlation between the effectiveness of the oxidation processes and the physicochemical properties of individual PAH was statistically analyzed. The data implied that the reactivity of PAH (electron affinity and ionization potential) affected its treatability more than did its hydrophobicity (Kow, Koc and Sw), particularly using experimental conditions under which PAHs could be effectively oxidized. PMID:26915591

  6. Evaluation of landfarm remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at the Inveresk Railyard, Launceston, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cost of landfarm bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at a disused railyard site in Tasmania, Australia is reported. The landfarm area was enclosed in an impermeable clay embankment and where necessary the base was also rolled with clay. Microbial inoculation was not deemed to be necessary since suitable degrading biota were found to be present in site samples prior to commencement of the landfarming. Fertilizer amendment comprised primarily ammonium sulphate and superphosphate to give a C:N ratio (TPH:fertilizer) of 28:1 and a C:P ratio of 200:1. The soil was turned regularly and watered as required for the 12-month duration of the operation. Over this period levels of TPH showed a linear decline from a mean of 4,644 mg/kg to near 100 mg/kg or less, with greatest losses being in the chain lengths C10-C28. The cost was determined to be $A13.40c per m3, which is at the lower end of the spectrum of reported landfarming costs. The cost of such operations is important since the reported economics will influence others' choice of bioremediation techniques

  7. Organic solvents improve hydrocarbon desorption and biodegradation in highly contaminated weathered soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rivero, M. [Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Ecatepec, Mexico City (Mexico); Saucedo-Casteneda, G.; Gutierrez-Rojas, M. [Autonoma Metropolitan Univ., Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. of Biotechnology

    2007-07-15

    A toluene-based microbial slurry phase system was used to remediate hydrocarbons (HC) in highly contaminated soil samples collected from a site next to a working refinery in Mexico. Initial HC concentrations of the samples were 237.2 {+-} 16,6 g kg{sup -1} in dry soil. The microbial consortium consisted of 10 different strains in a mineral solution. Non-polar solvents used in the phase system included hexane, benzene, and toluene. Polar solvents included n-butanol, acetone, and methanol. The bioavailability of the HCs was increased using both polar and nonpolar solvents in order to promote desorption from the soil and to enhance overall HC biodegradation. HC desorption was analyzed in an abiotic system. Respiration and residual HCs were examined after a period of 30 days in order to compare the effects of the 2 solvents. The biodegradation extracts were then fractionated in a silica gel column to determine if the solvents actually enhanced the biodegradation of specific HC fractions. The study showed that induced dipole interactions forces resulted when nonpolar molecules were dissolved into a nonpolar solvent. Results for desorption and solubility varied among the 6 solvents. Higher dielectric constants resulted in higher solubility and desorption of HCs for nonpolar solvents, while the opposite effect was observed for polar solvents. It was concluded that toluene produced better biodegradation results than any of the milder solvents. 34 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  8. Intrinsic bioremediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater at a petroleum-hydrocarbon spill site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. F.; Kao, C. M.; Chen, T. Y.; Weng, C. H.; Tsai, C. T.

    2006-06-01

    An oil-refining plant site located in southern Taiwan has been identified as a petroleum-hydrocarbon [mainly methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)] spill site. In this study, groundwater samples collected from the site were analyzed to assess the occurrence of intrinsic MTBE biodegradation. Microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of biodegrading MTBE by indigenous microorganisms under aerobic, cometabolic, iron reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results from the field investigation and microbial enumeration indicate that the intrinsic biodegradation of MTBE and BTEX is occurring and causing the decrease in MTBE and BTEX concentrations. Microcosm results show that the indigenous microorganisms were able to biodegrade MTBE under aerobic conditions using MTBE as the sole primary substrate. The detected biodegradation byproduct, tri-butyl alcohol (TBA), can also be biodegraded by the indigenous microorganisms. In addition, microcosms with site groundwater as the medium solution show higher MTBE biodegradation rate. This indicates that the site groundwater might contain some trace minerals or organics, which could enhance the MTBE biodegradation. Results show that the addition of BTEX at low levels could also enhance the MTBE removal. No MTBE removal was detected in iron reducing and methanogenic microcosms. This might be due to the effects of low dissolved oxygen (approximately 0.3 mg/L) within the plume. The low iron reducers and methanogens (bioremediation using indigenous microorganisms would be a feasible technology to clean up this MTBE-contaminated site.

  9. Biodegradation of used lubricating engine oil contaminated water using indigenous hydrocarbon degrading microbes in a fixed bed bioreactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a mixed population of hydrocarbon-degrading microbes in removing hydro-carbon contaminant in water was investigated using a fixed bed bioreactor system. The hydrocarbon-degrading microbes used for the study were isolated from oil-contaminated soil and further cultured in a nutrient medium. Sample concentrations of 500 mg/L, 1000 mg/L, 2000 mg/L and 6000 mg/L were studied. Each sample concentration was studied at loading rates of 0.5 L/min, 1.0 L/min, and 2.0 L/min for a week. Total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity and the microbial population density were measured to ascertain the progress of microbial degradation of the oil contaminant in the water. A minimum degradation rate of 36. 83 ± 0.00% was achieved at the least administered loading rate of 0.5 L/min at 1000 mg/L oil concentration. Maximum degradation rate of 93.85 ± 0.00% was also achieved at loading rate of 1.0 L/min at the highest oil concentration of 6000 mg/L. The minimum and maximum degradation rates were achieved at microbial populations of 1. 53E + 13 ± 0.00 and 1.50E+13 ± 0.00, respectively. The hydrocarbon degradation occurred in an optimum pH range of 6.63 ± 0.20 and 7.32 ± 0.11 and a temperature range of 27.3 ± 0. 76 and 29.9 ± 0.41 degrees celsius. (au)

  10. ESCA study of the effect of hydrocarbon contamination on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) exposed to atomic oxygen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Cormia, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The ESCA spectra and data obtained by Morra et al. (1989) on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) exposed to atomic oxygen plasma are closely reexamined. It is shown that the spikes observed in Morra et al. plots of O/C or F/C versus time of the exposure of PTFE to atomic oxygen plasma were not characteristic of PTFE per se but were instead a result of a contamination by hydrocarbon present in their PTFE samples. This was demonstrated experimentally by comparing data derived for a very clean PTFE sample exposed for 10, 20, and 30 min to oxygen plasma with data obtained on PTFE samples with very small amounts of hydrocarbon contamination.

  11. Procedure manual: protocol for regulation of petroleum hydrocarbons in water under the special waste and contaminated sites regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document details the regulation governing numerical standards for petroleum hydrocarbons in water under the special waste and contaminated sites regulations of British Columbia. Groundwater containing benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene or xylenes in excess of the leachate standards is exempted from the regulatory regime of the Special Waste Regulation. The document contains a description of the conditions that apply to the management of petroleum hydrocarbons in water at contaminated sites. Some definitions are included, followed by an overview of the regulation. The third section deals with authorization and mandatory conditions, while additional requirements that might apply are enumerated in section four. This protocol directly affects the Environmental Management, and the Environmental Protection Regional Operations organizations. 1 tab

  12. Characteristic levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons and trace metals in fish from coastal waters of North and Baltic sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckas, B; Harms, U

    1987-01-01

    During investigations on the occurrence and distribution of contaminants in coastal waters of the North Sea and the Baltic organochlorine compounds such as hexachlorobenzene (HCB), octachlorostyrene (OCS), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCH), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT) and its metabolites and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metals such as mercury, cadmium and lead were determined in a selected flatfish species (flounder, Platichthys flesus L.). The sampling network covered the outer estuaries of the rivers Weser and Elbe, the German Bight, the Danish North Sea coast and coastal regions of the south-western Baltic. Organochlorine compounds were determined by high-resolution glass capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detector after sample pretreatment and clean up. For the determination of heavy metals a multi-stage analytical procedure was used, in which graphite furnace (for Cd and Pb) resp. cold vapour (for Hg) atomic absorption spectrometry was combined with pre-instrumental separation and enrichment techniques. Evaluation of the data from the programme made obvious significant geographical differences in the levels and the pattern with regard to the substances involved. For HCB, OCS and Hg a crucial point of contamination within the German Bright was recognized that was apparently influenced to a large extent by the inflow of waters from the Elbe. PMID:2439467

  13. A quantitative PCR approach for quantification of functional genes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Taha, Mohamed; Ball, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major pollutants globally and due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic properties their clean-up is paramount. Bioremediation or using PAH degrading microorganisms (mainly bacteria) to degrade the pollutants represents cheap, effective methods. These PAH degraders harbor functional genes which help microorganisms use PAHs as source of food and energy. Most probable number (MPN) and plate counting methods are widely used for counting PAHs degraders; however, as culture based methods only count a small fraction (contaminated soil samples in few hours.•This protocol provides valuable information about the natural attenuation potential of contaminated soil and can be used to monitor the bioremediation process. PMID:27054096

  14. Soil pollution in the railway junction Niš (Serbia) and possibility of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Larisa; Aleksic, Gorica; Radosavljevic, Milan; Onjia, Antonije

    2015-04-01

    Mineral oil leaking from vehicles or released during accidents is an important source of soil and ground water pollution. In the railway junction Niš (Serbia) total 90 soil samples polluted with mineral oil derivatives were investigated. Field work at the railway Niš sites included the opening of soil profiles and soil sampling. The aim of this work is the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons concentration in the soil samples and the investigation of the bioremediation technique for treatment heavily contaminated soil. For determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil samples method of gas-chromatography was carried out. On the basis of measured concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil it can be concluded that: Obtained concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in 60% of soil samples exceed the permissible values (5000 mg/kg). The heavily contaminated soils, according the Regulation on the program of systematic monitoring of soil quality indicators for assessing the risk of soil degradation and methodology for development of remediation programs, Annex 3 (Official Gazette of RS, No.88 / 2010), must be treated using some of remediation technologies. Between many types of phytoremediation of soil contaminated with mineral oils and their derivatives, the most suitable are phytovolatalisation and phytostimulation. During phytovolatalisation plants (poplar, willow, aspen, sorgum, and rye) absorb organic pollutants through the root, and then transported them to the leaves where the reduced pollutants are released into the atmosphere. In the case of phytostimulation plants (mulberry, apple, rye, Bermuda) secrete from the roots enzymes that stimulates the growth of bacteria in the soil. The increase in microbial activity in soil promotes the degradation of pollutants. Bioremediation is performed by composting the contaminated soil with addition of composting materials (straw, manure, sawdust, and shavings), moisture components, oligotrophs and

  15. Tryptophan Oxidative Metabolism Catalyzed by Geobacillus Stearothermophilus: A Thermophile Isolated from Kuwait Soil Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hassan, Jassim M.; Samira Al-Awadi; Sosamma Oommen; Abdulaziz Alkhamis; Mohammad Afzal

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophan metabolism has been extensively studied in humans as well as in soil. Its metabolism takes place mainly through kynurenine pathway yielding hydroxylated, deaminated and many other products of physiological significance. However, tryptophan metabolism has not been studied in an isolated thermophilic bacterium. Geobacillus stearothermophilus is a local thermophile isolated from Kuwait desert soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The bacterium grows well at 65 °C in 0.05 M ph...

  16. Apparent Contradiction: Psychrotolerant Bacteria from Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Arctic Tundra Soils That Degrade Diterpenoids Synthesized by Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zhongtang; Stewart, Gordon R.; Mohn, William W.

    2000-01-01

    Resin acids are tricyclic terpenoids occurring naturally in trees. We investigated the occurrence of resin acid-degrading bacteria on the Arctic tundra near the northern coast of Ellesmere Island (82°N, 62°W). According to most-probable-number assays, resin acid degraders were abundant (103 to 104 propagules/g of soil) in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, but they were undetectable (

  17. Human health risk due to consumption of vegetables contaminated with carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sardar [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Inst. of Urban Environment; Peshawar Univ. (Pakistan). Dept. of Environmental Science; Cao, Qing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-Environemntal Sciences

    2012-02-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are persistent, toxic, and carcinogenic contaminants present in soil ecosystem globally. These pollutants are gradually accumulating in wastewater-irrigated soils and lead to the contamination of vegetables. Food chain contamination with PAH is considered as one of the major pathways for human exposure. This study was aimed to investigate the concentrations of PAH in soils and vegetables collected from wastewater-irrigated fields from metropolitan areas of Beijing, China. Origin of PAH, daily intake, and health risks of PAH through consumption of contaminated vegetables were studied. Soil samples were collected from the upper horizon (0-20 cm) of both wastewater-irrigated and reference sites and sieved (<2 mm mesh) and then followed by freeze-drying at -50 C and 123 {+-} 2 Pa. Standing vegetables were also collected from the same sites used for soil sampling and divided into roots and shoots, thoroughly washed with deionized water, and freeze-dried. PAH were extracted using the Soxhlet method with 200 mL DCM for 24 h, and the extracts were cleaned with silica adsorption chromatography prepared with silica gel, alumina, and capped with anhydrous sodium. The final concentrated extracts (soil and vegetable) were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Agilent 6890). Bioaccumulation factors, daily intake of PAH, and carcinogenicity of PAH were calculated by different statistical equations. Results indicate that the soils and grown vegetables were contaminated with all possible carcinogenic PAH (declared by USEPA 2002) except indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene. The highest concentration (242.9 {mu}g kg{sup -1}) was found for benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), while lowest (79.12 {mu}g kg{sup -1}) for benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). The emission sources of PAH were both pyrogenic and petrogenic in nature. However, the total concentrations of PAH were lower than the permissible limits set by different countries like Canada, Denmark and Germany

  18. Natural attenuation in contaminated soils with hydrocarbons; Atenuacion natural en suelos contaminados con hidrocarburos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona Ramirez, L.; Iturbide Arguelles, R. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-06-01

    A contaminated soil experiment was performed using simples from a refinery, containing oil derivative hydrocarbons, specifically those with high concentrations of polyaromathic hydrocarbons (PAH). The testing consisted in 7 pans with 7 kg of soil, the preparation of 6 pans under specific conditions and one as a blank, the conditions were: water content (15 y 30%), addition a non-ionic surfactant. The process consisted in the daily aeration and water control of the samples. The PAH were analyzed: anthracene, benzo(a) pyrene, chrysene, phenanthrene and naphthalene. The results after 8 weeks showed a gradual degradation of PAH, indicating a better removal obtained when the water content was 30% with nutrients addition. [Spanish] Se realizo un experimento con suelo contaminado proveniente de una refineria, el cual contaba con hidrocarburos derivados de petroleo, especificamente con concentraciones elevadas de hidrocarburos poliaromaticos (HAP). El estudio consistio en preparar 7 cajones con 7 kg de suelo, cada uno con las siguientes condiciones: S1suelo contaminado con hidrocarburos y 15% de contenido de agua. S2 suelo contaminado con hidrocarburo y adicion de Nitrogeno y Fosforo (N y P) con 15% de contenido de agua. S3 suelo contaminado con hidrocarburo y adicion de N y P mas un surfactante no ionico, Emulgin W600, con 15% de contenido de agua. S4 igual a S1 pero con 30% de contenido de agua. S5 igual a S2, con 30% de contenido de agua. S6 igual S3 con 30% de contenido de agua. S7 suelo contaminado testigo, sin control de humedad y sin aireacion. La experimentacion consistio en airear el suelo diariamente y controlar el contenido de agua de manera que este fuera constante. Los resultados, indican que la mejor remocion se obtuvo para el contenido de agua de 30%, con adicion de nutrientes y surfactante. Los compuestos con mayor eficiencia de remocion para todas las opciones son naftaleno y antraceno. Por lo tanto, de acuerdo con los resultados, los compuestos

  19. Changes in hydrocarbon groups, soil ecotoxicity and microbiology along horizontal and vertical contamination gradients in an old landfarming field for oil refinery waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horizontal and vertical contaminant gradients in an old landfarming field for oil refinery waste were characterised with the aim to assess parallel changes in hydrocarbon groups and general, microbiological and ecotoxicological soil characteristics. In the surface soil polar compounds were the most prevalent fraction of heptane-extractable hydrocarbons, superseding GC–FID-resolvable and high-molar-mass aliphatics and aromatics, but there was no indication of their relatively higher mobility or toxicity. The size of the polar fraction correlated poorly with soil physical, chemical and microbiological properties, which were better explained by the total heptane-extractable and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Deleterious effects on soil microbiology in situ were observed at surprisingly low TPH concentrations (0.3%). Due to the accumulation of polar and complexed degradation products, TPH seems an insufficient measure to assess the quality and monitor the remediation of soil with weathered hydrocarbon contamination. - Highlights: ► Weathered hydrocarbon contamination and soil quality on landfarm site were studied. ► Silica fractionation of hydrocarbons separated aliphatics, aromatics and polars. ► Polar hydrocarbon metabolites had accumulated in the surface soil. ► Total hydrocarbons and TPH correlated with soil quality changes better than polars. ► Toxic response of soil microbial biomass and activity were seen at low TPH (<0.5%). - Polar metabolites constitute the largest fraction of crude oil-derived contaminants in a landfarming site, but TPH better explains soil microbial and ecotoxicological responses.

  20. Enhanced remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated desert soil fertilized with organic carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertilising an oily desert soil sample with a mixture of glucose and peptone resulted in enhancing hydrocarbon disappearance in that soil. The magnitude of hydrocarbon attenuation was too high to be attributed to the nitrogen content of the added peptone alone. Fertilisation with KNO3 containing the same amount of nitrogen as in peptone, brought about an enhanced hydrocarbon attenuation affect, but lower in magnitude than fertilisation with glucose/peptone. Addition of glucose/peptone to a clean desert soil with hydro-carbon utilising microorganisms resulted in dramatic increase in their numbers. After 13 days, the microorganisms had depleted all the added organic matter and their numbers decreased. In the oily desert soil, glucose/peptone addition also increased microbial numbers, but after utilisation of the glucose/peptone, microbial numbers remained high and enhanced attenuation of hydrocarbons was found. The use of sea water instead of fresh water in these experiments blocked the hydrocarbon attenuation effect. (Author)

  1. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palau, Jordi; Marchesi, Massimo; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia;

    2014-01-01

    pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources...

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Boutheina Gargouri; Najla Mhiri; Fatma Karray; Fathi Aloui; Sami Sayadi

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, ...

  3. Application of in situ chemical oxidation technique with potassium permanganate for the remediation of a shallow aquifer contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaine Santos da Cunha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In situ chemical oxidation is a method that is frequently being used for the remediation of contaminated areas, since it presents an adequate efficiency in the reduction of the contaminant mass, particularly chlorinated ethenes, in a relatively short period of time. This manuscript presents the results of the application of this method, using the injection of potassium permanganate as the remediation agent, in an impacted area with chlorinated organic compounds, especially 1,1-dichloroethene. The effectiveness of this remediation method is related to the complexity of the conceptual model of the contaminated site and to the conduction of specific studies in laboratory and pilot tests in field scale, prior to the accomplishment of the full-scale remediation. Therefore, this work contributes presenting a description of the procedures that are commonly used for conducting this kind of studies. In the case under study, it was estimated that the mass of 1.1-dichloroethene (1.1-DCE was reduced from 15.53 to 1.81 kg in groundwater 22 months after the injection of potassium permanganate in the aquifer. The average concentrations of 1.1-DCE in groundwater decreased from 200 to 24 g/L, which value is lower than the environmental standard limit and also to the calculated target of remediation based on human-health risk assessment. Significant contamination rebounds were not identified in the aquifer after the injection of the chemical oxidant. The suitable results of the remediation in this case may be related to the relatively low aquifer heterogeneity and low original concentrations of the contaminant.

  4. Source identification of hydrocarbon contaminants and their transportation over the Zonguldak shelf, Turkish Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, S.; Alpar, B.

    2009-04-01

    Under great anthropogenic pressure due to the substantial freshwater input from the surrounding industrial and agricultural areas, especially central and middle-Eastern Europe, the Black Sea basin is ranked among the most ecologically threatened water bodies of the world. Oil levels are unacceptable in many coastal areas perilously close to polluted harbors and many river mouths; the places presenting the highest levels of bio-diversity and having a high socio-economic importance due to human use of coastal resources. There are about sixty sources of pollution which resulted in "hot spots" having disastrous impacts on sensitive marine and coastal areas and needing immediate priorities for action. Beyond such land-based sources, trans-boundary pollution sources from Black Sea riparian countries, heavy maritime traffic, particularly involving petroleum transports and fishing boats, and the improper disposal of ballast and bilge waters and solid waste are also important marine sources of pollution. Found in fossil fuels such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons are generated by incomplete combustion of organic matter. In order to estimate their distribution in sediment and their sources, they were monitored from the bottom samples offshore the Zonguldak industry region, one of the most polluted spots in the Turkish Black Sea. There the budget of pollutants via rivers is not precisely known due to an evident lack of data on chemical and granulometric composition of the river runoff and their fluxes. Therefore the marine sediments, essential components of marine ecosystems, are very important in our estimating the degree of the damage given to the ecosystem by such inputs. Realization of the sources and transport of these contaminants will be a critical tool for future management of the Zonguldak industry region and its watershed. The sea bottom in study area is composed of mainly sand and silt mixtures with small amount of clay. Geochemical analyses have shown that oil

  5. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

  6. Development of an analysis method for determining chlorinated hydrocarbons in marine sediments and suspended matter giving particular consideration to supercritical fluid extraction; Entwicklung eines Analysenverfahrens zur Bestimmung von chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffen in marinen Sedimenten und Schwebstoffen unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung der ueberkritischen Fluidextraktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterzenbach, D.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop an analysis method for chlorinate hydrocarbons in marine environments using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) instead of conventional approaches. In order to apply this extraction method the available SFE device had to be extended and all the individual steps of the analysis method had to be optimised and adapted. As chlorinated hydrocarbons only occur at very low concentrations in marine environments (ppm to ppt range) the analysis method had to be extremely sensitive. High sensitivity, in town, is generally associated with a high susceptibility of an analysis method to faults through contamination or losses. This meant that the entire method and all its individual steps had to scrutinised for such weak points and improved where necessary. A method for sampling suspended matter in marine environments had to be developed which permits efficient separation of the smallest possible particles from seawater. The designated purpose of the developed analysis method is to deal with topical aspects of marine chemistry relating to sources, transport, distribution, and the fate of chlorinated hydrocarbons in marine environments. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit ist, ein Analysenverfahren fuer chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe in der marinen Umwelt zu entwickeln. Dabei soll die ueberkritische Fluidextraktion (SFE) anstelle herkoemmlicher Verfahren eingesetzt werden. Fuer die Anwendung dieser Extraktionsmethode ist es erforderlich, das zur Verfuegung stehende SFE-Geraet zu erweitern und saemtliche Teilschritte des Analysenverfahrens zu optimieren und auf diese Methode abzustimmen. Der Umstand, dass die chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffe nur in sehr geringen Konzentrationen in der marinen Umwelt vorkommen (ppm- bis ppt-Bereich), erfordert eine sehr hohe Empfindlichkeit des Analysenverfahrens. Eine hohe Empfindlichkeit bedingt eine grosse Stoeranfaelligkeit des Analysenverfahrens durch Kontaminationen oder Verluste. Aus

  7. Assessing the correlation between anaerobic toluene degradation activity and bssA concentrations in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazy, Sufia K; Monier, Amy L; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2010-09-01

    The assessment of biodegradation activity in contaminated aquifers is critical to demonstrate the performance of bioremediation and natural attenuation and to parameterize models of contaminant plume dynamics. Real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to target the catabolic bssA gene (coding for benzylsuccinate synthase) and a 16S rDNA phylogenetic gene (for total Bacteria) as potential biomarkers to infer on anaerobic toluene degradation rates. A significant correlation (P = 0.0003) was found over a wide range of initial toluene concentrations (1-100 mg/l) between toluene degradation rates and bssA concentrations in anaerobic microcosms prepared with aquifer material from a hydrocarbon contaminated site. In contrast, the correlation between toluene degradation activity and total Bacteria concentrations was not significant (P = 0.1125). This suggests that qPCR targeting of functional genes might offer a simple approach to estimate in situ biodegradation activity, which would enhance site investigation and modeling of natural attenuation at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. PMID:20204467

  8. Partial characterization of biosurfactant from Lactobacillus pentosus and comparison with sodium dodecyl sulphate for the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldes, A B; Paradelo, R; Vecino, X; Cruz, J M; Gudiña, E; Rodrigues, L; Teixeira, J A; Domínguez, J M; Barral, M T

    2013-01-01

    The capability of a cell bound biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus pentosus, to accelerate the bioremediation of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, was compared with a synthetic anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate SDS-). The biosurfactant produced by the bacteria was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) that clearly indicates the presence of OH and NH groups, C=O stretching of carbonyl groups and NH nebding (peptide linkage), as well as CH2-CH3 and C-O stretching, with similar FTIR spectra than other biosurfactants obtained from lactic acid bacteria. After the characterization of biosurfactant by FTIR, soil contaminated with 7,000 mg Kg(-1) of octane was treated with biosurfactant from L. pentosus or SDS. Treatment of soil for 15 days with the biosurfactant produced by L. pentosus led to a 65.1% reduction in the hydrocarbon concentration, whereas SDS reduced the octane concentration to 37.2% compared with a 2.2% reduction in the soil contaminated with octane in absence of biosurfactant used as control. Besides, after 30 days of incubation soil with SDS or biosurfactant gave percentages of bioremediation around 90% in both cases. Thus, it can be concluded that biosurfactant produced by L. pentosus accelerates the bioremediation of octane-contaminated soil by improving the solubilisation of octane in the water phase of soil, achieving even better results than those reached with SDS after 15-day treatment. PMID:23691515

  9. A case history comparing in situ bioventing versus ex situ bioventing of volatile fuel hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally, the more efficient a bioremediation technology is at controlling oxygenation, mass transfer of the contaminant, etc., the higher the biodegradation or treatment rate of the system. Thus, ex situ bioremediation is expected to produce higher degradation rates compared to in situ bioremediation techniques due to a higher level of control over process parameters. However, a comparison between ex situ and in situ bioventing treatment rates of volatile fuel hydrocarbons in this case study indicates that the treatment rate of the ex situ bioventing system can be slower than the in situ bioventing system. Originally, ex situ bioventing of volatile fuel hydrocarbon contaminated soil was planned to remediate soils thought to be contaminated by a leaking underground gasoline storage tanks to 20 feet below ground surface. Once the impact of the contamination seemed to be deeper than the limits of the excavation equipment, in situ bioventing was initiated for the soils that remained in the subsurface. Presented within this paper is a case history of the project. The case history includes soil shredding to add nutrients prior to construction of the ex situ bioventing system, the impact of an oil field methane formation during the design and construction of the in situ bioventing system, the effects of gaseous ammonia injection into the subsurface, and operating conditions and treatment rates for both systems

  10. Site profiles of low-volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons - cause-oriented monitoring in aquatic media. Vol.2. Low-volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in surface water, sediments, suspended matter and fish of the Elbe river and its tributaries; Standortprofile schwerfluechtiger chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe (SCKW) - ursachenorientiertes Monitoring in aquatischen Medien. Bd. 2. SCKW in Oberflaechenwasser, Sediment, Schwebstoffen und Fischen aus der Elbe und Nebenfluessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, E.; Kettrup, A.; Gebefuegi, I.; Martens, D.; Bergheim, W.; Wenzel, S.

    2001-07-01

    Evaluating the primary data from ARGE ELBE, LAU Halle/Saale and the Environmental Specimen Banking (Umweltprobenbank) as well from publications from the Czech Republic (CHMU) the concentrations of the following low volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons were established for surface water, sediment, breams and eels from the rivers Elbe, Schwarze Elster, Mulde and Saale partly from 1989 till 1999: DDT and its metabolites DDE and DDD, partly as 2,4'- and 4,4' isomers; HCH ({alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}- and {delta} isomers); chlorinated benzenes with 1-6 Cl atoms and octachlorostyrene. The data evaluated were drawn up into tables - comprehensive in a separate supplement, in short versions within the text - and consolidated into graphs. Aim of the paper was a cause-oriented monitoring. The by far most important emission sources, found from the distance and time profiles as well as from special assessments of the substance patterns, were chemical plants. (orig.) [German] Durch Auswertung von Primaerdaten der ARGE ELBE, des LAU Halle/Saale und der Umweltprobenbank sowie von Publikationen aus Tschechien (CHMU) wurden fuer Oberflaechenwasser, Sediment, Brassen/Bleien und Aale aus der Elbe, Schwarzen Elster, Mulde und Saale fuer die Jahre von z.T. 1989 bis 1999 die Konzentrationen der folgenden schwerfluechtigen Kohlenwasserstoffe (SCKW) ermittelt: DDT und seine Metabolite DDE und DDD, z.T. als 2,4'- und 4,4'-Isomere; HCH ({alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}- und {delta}-Isomere); chlorierte Benzole mit 1-6 Cl-Atomen und Octachlorstyrol. Die ausgewerteten Daten wurden zu Tabellen - ausfuehrlich in einem gesonderten Tabellenanhang und verkuerzt im Textteil - zusammengestellt sowie zu Grafiken verdichtet. Ziel der Arbeit war ein ursachenorientiertes Monitoring. Als mit Abstand wesentlichste Emissionsquellen konnten anhand von Streckenprofilen und Zeitrastern sowie durch spezielle Auswertungen der Stoffmusterverteilungen Chemibetriebe ermittelt werden. (orig.)

  11. Accumulation, metabolism, and food-chain transfer of chlorinated and brominated contaminants in subadult white whales (Delphinapterus leucas) and narwhals (Monodon monoceros) from Svalbard, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkers, H; Lydersen, C; Kovacs, K M; Burkow, I; van Bavel, B

    2006-01-01

    The concentrations and patterns of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were studied in white whales (Delphinapterus leucas) and narwhals (Monodon monoceros) from Svalbard, Norway. In addition, their main food items were included in the study. In the whales, a broad range of pollutants was found in relatively high concentrations. PCBs and pesticides were approximately 3000 and 8000 ng/g lipid, respectively, for white whales and three times higher for narwhals. PBDEs 47 were approximately 70 ng/g lipid for white whales and 170 ng/g lipid for narwhals. Compared with other marine mammals from the same area, contaminant levels are among the highest levels ever measured. These high levels are likely in part because of a decreased capacity to metabolize contaminants. Metabolic indices indicated that most compounds accumulate to the same degree in white whales and narwhals, but for some toxaphenes and chlordanes, narwhals might have a decreased metabolism and consequently a higher accumulation. The three-times-higher contaminant levels in blubber of narwhals was further explained by substantially higher contaminant levels in their more benthic diet. The high levels and broad pattern of accumulating pollutants make white whales and narwhals excellent indicators for a wide range of contaminants in the Arctic. PMID:16237494

  12. Development and in situ implementation of a chemical process for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in polluted aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    Betelu, Stéphanie; Rodrigues, Romain; Noel, Cécile; Colombano, Stéfan; Simon, Apolline; Epardeau, Patrick; Marion, Roland; Ignatiadis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    International audience Reductive dechlorination (RDC), using strong reducers, is one of the most important emerging remediation techniques for chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC). RDC by Nanosized Zero Valent Iron (NZVI) is a powerful electrochemical redox system that has shown promising experimental results for the development of remediation technologies to treat contaminated sites [1, 2]. Although NZVI has excellent characteristics as environmental reactant, its application to the contaminate...

  13. Use of dissolved and vapor-phase gases to investigate methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, R.T.; Mayer, K.U.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Williams, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] At many sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, methanogenesis is a significant degradation pathway. Techniques to estimate CH4 production, consumption, and transport processes are needed to understand the geochemical system, provide a complete carbon mass balance, and quantify the hydrocarbon degradation rate. Dissolved and vapor-phase gas data collected at a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated site near Bemidji, Minnesota, demonstrate that naturally occurring nonreactive or relatively inert gases such as Ar and N2 can be effectively used to better understand and quantify physical and chemical processes related to methanogenic activity in the subsurface. In the vadose zone, regions of Ar and N2 depletion and enrichment are indicative of methanogenic and methanotrophic zones, and concentration gradients between the regions suggest that reaction-induced advection can be an important gas transport process. In the saturated zone, dissolved Ar and N2 concentrations are used to quantify degassing driven by methanogenesis and also suggest that attenuation of methane along the flow path, into the downgradient aquifer, is largely controlled by physical processes. Slight but discernable preferential depletion of N2 over Ar, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones near the free-phase oil, suggests reactivity of N2 and is consistent with other evidence indicating that nitrogen fixation by microbial activity is taking place at this site. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal wheat inoculation promotes alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation: Microcosm experiment on aged-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrid, Lenoir; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Frédéric, Laruelle; Yolande, Dalpé; Joël, Fontaine

    2016-06-01

    Very few studies reported the potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to dissipate hydrocarbons in aged polluted soils. The present work aims to study the efficiency of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonized wheat plants in the dissipation of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Our results demonstrated that the inoculation of wheat with Rhizophagus irregularis allowed a better dissipation of PAHs and alkanes after 16 weeks of culture by comparison to non-inoculated condition. These dissipations observed in the inoculated soil resulted from several processes: (i) a light adsorption on roots (0.5% for PAHs), (ii) a bioaccumulation in roots (5.7% for PAHs and 6.6% for alkanes), (iii) a transfer in shoots (0.4 for PAHs and 0.5% for alkanes) and mainly a biodegradation. Whereas PAHs and alkanes degradation rates were respectively estimated to 12 and 47% with non-inoculated wheat, their degradation rates reached 18 and 48% with inoculated wheat. The mycorrhizal inoculation induced an increase of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by 56 and 37% compared to the non-inoculated wheat. Moreover, an increase of peroxidase activity was assessed in mycorrhizal roots. Taken together, our findings suggested that mycorrhization led to a better hydrocarbon biodegradation in the aged-contaminated soil thanks to a stimulation of telluric bacteria and hydrocarbon metabolization in mycorrhizal roots. PMID:26995451

  15. On-site investigations of hydrocarbon contaminated soil by the Pollut-Eval methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pollut-Eval method is based on the Rock-Eval pyrolysis method, founded on an IFP patent that has been used for decades for oil prospecting in sedimentary basins all over the world. This equipment provides data on the quantity and the quality of organic matter in sedimentary rocks. With the increasing demand for cost effective and rapid contaminated site diagnosis, it became obvious that the field of application of the Rock-Eval technology should be enlarged to environmental problematic. The Pollut-Eval methodology was developed since 1996 and firstly qualified through the design of a laboratory version. Compared to the previous apparatus dedicated to the geochemistry, innovations allow acquisition of data for accurate quantification of complex organic pollutants and mineral carbon distribution. New methods were developed especially for the characterisation of hydrocarbon pollutants in soil. Compared to kerogen analysis, the characterisation of light petroleum cuts entrapped in soil as pollutants was available by the design of an adapted refrigerated auto-sampler. The prevention of the loss of the high vapour tension pollutants couldn't be avoided for the new environmental field of applications. Site after site, the various experiments involving the 'laboratory' version of the Pollut-Eval analyser extended the application field of the methodology. The efficiency of the thermal extraction applied directly on the soil showed useful advantages compared to conventional solvent extraction techniques, especially for pollutants originating from former gas plants. The method was especially suitable for the determination of the complete carbon mass balance in the case of non-extractable organic pollutant such as coal tar or for heavy petroleum cut such as heavy fuel, vacuum distillation residue and bitumen. By the way, the Pollut-Eval method became rapidly complementary to more conventional GC quantification dedicated to complex organic pollution characterisation. By the

  16. Using Iron to Treat Chlorohydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchens, G. Duncan; Hodko, Dalibor; Kim, Heekyung; Rogers, Tom; Singh, Waheguru Pal; Giletto, Anthony; Cisar, Alan

    2004-01-01

    A method of in situ remediation of soil contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents involves injection of nanometer-size iron particles. The present method exploits a combination of prompt chemical remediation followed by longer-term enhanced bioremediation and, optionally, is practiced in conjunction with the method of bioremediation described earlier. Newly injected iron particles chemically reduce chlorinated hydrocarbons upon contact. Thereafter, in the presence of groundwater, the particles slowly corrode via chemical reactions that effect sustained release of dissolved hydrogen. The hydrogen serves as an electron donor, increasing the metabolic activity of the anaerobic bacteria and thereby sustaining bioremediation at a rate higher than the natural rate.

  17. Biodegradation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Volatile Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Soils and Ground Water in Field Condition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaštánek, František; Demnerová, K.; Pazlarová, J.; Burkhard, J.; Maléterová, Ywetta

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (1999), s. 39-47. ISSN 0964-8305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : reductive dechlorination * river sediments * enrichment Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.568, year: 1999

  18. A biogeochemical transport model to simulate the attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant fluxes across the groundwater-surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Binning, Philip John; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    because of the occurrence of redox gradients, strongly reductive conditions and high biological activity. In order to meet the expectations of the EU Water Framework Directive, an evaluation of the impact of such plumes on surface water is needed. The aim of this work is to develop a groundwater transport...... and biogeochemical transformation model of the discharge of a TCE plume into a stream, and to determine which parameters most strongly affect pollutant discharge concentrations. Here biological kinetics and the interaction with the soil matrix are implemented in PHREEQC. The ability of PHREEQC to deal...

  19. GammaProteobacteria as a potential bioindicator of a multiple contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in agricultural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of a multiple contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was studied on permanent grassland soil, historically presenting low contamination (i.e. less than 1 mg kg−1). Soil microcosms were spiked at 300 mg kg−1 with either single or a mixture of seven PAHs. While total dissipation of the phenanthrene was reached in under 90 days, only 60% of the PAH mixture were dissipated after 90 days. Interestingly, after 30 days, the abundance of the GammaProteobacteria class (assessed by qPCR) become significantly higher in microcosms spiked with the PAH mixture. In addition, the specific abundance of the cultivable Pseudomonas spp., which belong to the GammaProteobacteria class, increased earlier and transiently (after 8 days) in the microcosms spiked with the PAH mixture. Consequently, we propose to use the GammaProteobacteria as a bioindicator to detect the impact on the bacterial community of a multiple contamination by PAHs in agricultural soils. -- The abundance of the GammaProteobacteria class increases significantly in response to a spiking by a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixture

  20. Landfill mining from a deposit of the chlorine/organochlorine industry as source of dioxin contamination of animal feed and assessment of the responsible processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, João Paulo Machado; Leite, Claudio; Krauss, Thomas; Weber, Roland

    2013-04-01

    In 1997, the Polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxin (PCDD)/Polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF) concentrations in dairy products in Germany and other European countries increased. The PCDD/PCDF source was contaminated lime used in Brazilian citrus pulp pellets. The contaminated lime was mined from an industrial dump site. However, the detailed origin of the PCDD/PCDFs in the lime was not revealed. This paper investigates the contamination origin and describes the link between lime milk from the dumpsite of a chlorine/organochlorine industry and the contaminated lime. The contaminated lime stem from mining at the corporate landfill of Solvay Indupa in Sao Paulo. The landfill was used for 40 years for deposition of production residues and closed in 1996. The factory operated/operates at least two processes with potentially high PCDD/PCDFs releases namely the oxychlorination process for production of ethylene dichloride (EDC) and the chlor-alkali process. The main landfilled waste was lime milk (1.4 million tons) from the vinyl chloride monomer production (via the acetylene process) along with residues from other processes. The PCDD/PCDF fingerprint revealed that most samples from the chemical landfill showed an EDC PCDD/PCDF pattern with a characteristic octachlorodibenzofuran dominance. The PCDD/PCDF pattern of a Rio Grande sediment samples downstream the facility showed a chlor-alkali pattern with a minor impact of the EDC pattern. The case highlights that PCDD/PCDF- and persistent organic pollutants-contaminated sites need to be identified in a comprehensive manner as required by the Stockholm Convention (article 6) and controlled for their impact on the environment and human health. Landfill mining and reuse of materials from contaminated deposits should be prohibited. PMID:22828923

  1. Contamination of agricultural lands by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Tver region, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkin, Andrey; Koshovskii, Timur; Gennadiev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    It is important to study sources and concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the agriculture soils within areas without intensive contaminations. Our studied object was soil and snow cover in the taiga zone (Tver region, Russia). A total of 52 surface (0-30 cm) and 31 subsurface (30-50 cm) soil samples, and 13 snow samples were collected in 35 soil pits, located in forest, crop and layland soils. Studied concentrations of the following 11 individual compounds: two-ring compounds (diphenyl and naphthalene homologues); three-ring compounds (fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene); four-ring compounds (chrysene, pyrene, tetraphene); five-ring compounds (perylene, benzo[a]pyrene); and six-ring compounds (benzo[ghi]perylene). Analyses made by specrtofluorometry method at the temperature of liquid nitrogen. The total concentrations of all PAHs in soil samples ranged from 9 to 770 ng*g‑1 with a median of 96 ng*g‑1. The sum of high molecular weight PAHs was significantly lower than the sum of low molecular weight PAHs in the studied soils. The phenanthrene concentration was highest and ranged from 1.2 to 720 ng*g‑1 (medium 72 ng*g‑1). Compared PAHs reserves in snow cover (μg*m-2) with the reserves in topsoil layer (μg*m-2 in the upper 30 cm). Low molecular weight PAHs (fluorene, phenanthrene, diphenyl, naphthalene) reserves in snow was less than 20% from the reserves in the soil surface layer. High molecular weight PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, perylene, pyrene and tetraphene) reserves in snow was about 50-70% from the reserves in soil surface layer. High molecular weight PAHs (benzo[ghi]perylene and anthracene) reserves in snow was more than in topsoil. PAHs vertical distribution in soil profiles was statistically examined. The total concentration of all PAHs decreased with depth in all studied forest soils. In the arable soils was no significant trend in domination of PAHs total concentrations in the plowing and subsoil layers. The ratio of

  2. Microcosm Studies to Evaluate Aerobic Cometabolism of Low Concentrations of 1,4-Dioxane by Isobutane-utilizing Microorganisms in the Presence of Chlorinated Solvent Co-contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, H. M.; Azizian, M.; Hyman, M. R.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its use as a stabilizer for chlorinated solvents, 1,4-dioxane (1,4D), a probable human carcinogen, is a common co-contaminant in solvent spills at industrial and military sites and landfills. Its persistence in large groundwater plumes at low concentrations makes it a relevant candidate for in-situ bioremediation via cometabolism. Microcosm studies are being performed to evaluate the capability of aerobic microorganisms to cometabolize mixtures of 1,4D and chlorinated solvents, such as trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), and 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1DCE), with isobutane as the primary substrate. Microcosms were constructed using aquifer solids from Fort Carson, Colorado, a site contaminated with 1,4D and TCE, to assess the isobutane uptake and transformation of 1,4D and chlorinated solvents by microorganisms native to the site. Additional microcosms were augmented with Rhodococcus rhodochrous, a bacterium shown to cometabolize 1,4D and chlorinated solvents. Results indicate that native microcosms cometabolized 1,4D upon stimulation with isobutane after a lag period of about 15 days. TCE was also transformed, but at significantly slower rates. The presence of 1,4D and TCE at 500 and 300 ppb, respectively, did not inhibit the growth of native microorganisms on isobutane, with isobutane uptake and 1,4D transformation occurring simultaneously. Bioaugmented microcosms transformed 1,4D immediately after inoculation with R. rhodochrous. Tests in bioaugmented microorganisms indicated that the presence of TCE at low concentrations inhibits but does not block the transformation of 1,4D. Results from the microcosms will be used to design field tests to be performed at Fort Carson. Additional microcosm studies will compare the stimulation of native and bioaugmented microcosms and the transformation of mixtures of 1,4D, 1,1,1TCA and 1,1DCE. Molecular methods will analyze the monoxygenase enzymes expressed in the native and bioaugmented microcosms.

  3. Identification of persulfate oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon during remediation of contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent of PAH transformation, the formation and transformation of reaction byproducts during persulfate oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coking plant soil was investigated. Pre-oxidation analyses indicated that oxygen-containing PAHs (oxy-PAHs) existed ...

  4. Molecular Analysis of Surfactant-Driven Microbial Population Shifts in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil†

    OpenAIRE

    Colores, Gregory M.; Macur, Richard E.; Ward, David M.; Inskeep, William P

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of surfactant addition on hydrocarbon mineralization kinetics and the associated population shifts of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms in soil. A mixture of radiolabeled hexadecane and phenanthrene was added to batch soil vessels. Witconol SN70 (a nonionic, alcohol ethoxylate) was added in concentrations that bracketed the critical micelle concentration (CMC) in soil (CMC′) (determined to be 13 mg g−1). Addition of the surfactant at a concentration below the CMC′ (2...

  5. Chemical aspects of incinerating highly chlorinated and actinide α contaminated organic waste: application to the Iris process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fraction of the waste produced by nuclear activities is combustible, and thus suitable for incineration to produce gases, ash and fines. A typical composition representative of actual organic waste mixtures was defined for the purpose of investigating possible heat treatment processes; the composition is identified according to components Table 1 and elements Table II. The high polyvinyl chloride (PVC) content is responsible for the high chlorine potential in the process equipment. The quantity and quality of the resulting solid residue depends entirely on the inorganic load of the organic waste, whose behavior is entirely conditioned by the process conditions. For example, pure polyethylene is totally converted to gases (water and carbon dioxide), while the composition shown in Table II produces a range of oxides and chlorides. The high chlorine content results in partial chlorination of the inorganic compounds, but can also lead to interactions with the process equipment. The temperature dependent variation of the chlorination equilibrium constants of various metals clearly shows that all the elements of technological alloys may be subject to active corrosion by hydrochloric acid. However, the corresponding oxides-notably alumina-are much less sensitive to corrosion; aluminum-based alloys are therefore preferred for incinerator construction and to limit corrosion by hydrochloric acid. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies led to the development of the IRIS three-step process. Gas emissions occurring during processing of solid materials are completely oxidized in the after-burning step at 1100 deg C, and are then ducted to a HERA filtration system capable of retaining all the actinide α radionuclides. Although corrosion-related problems are attenuated in the two-step process chlorine can combine with the inorganic waste material to form chlorides with potentially damaging effects on the system; this is the case for zinc chloride and for volatile chlorides in

  6. Sample preparation and characterization for a study of environmentally acceptable endpoints for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, the interdisciplinary research effort required to investigate the acceptable cleanup endpoints for hydrocarbon-impacted soils has been limited by the lack of standardized soils for testing. To support the efforts of the various researchers participating in the EAE research initiative, soil samples were collected from ten sites representing hydrocarbon-impacted soils typical of exploration/production, refinery, and bulk storage terminal operations. The hydrocarbons in the standard soils include crude oil, mixed refinery products, diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Physical characterization included analysis of soil texture, water retention, particle density, nanoporosity, pH, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, buffer capacity, organic carbon, sodium adsorption ratio, and clay mineralogy. Chemical characterization included analysis of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and metals, and TCLP for metals and organics. An analysis of the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions was performed on each soil to support the use of various models for assessing soil toxicity. Screening-level toxicity tests were conducted using Microtox trademark, plant seed germination and growth, and earthworm mortality and growth. Biodegradability screening tests were performed in slurry shake flasks to estimate the availability of hydrocarbon fractions to soil microorganisms

  7. Dual phase vacuum extraction technology for the recovery of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination from the subsurface : a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallur, V.G.; Agar, J.G.; Wong, T.T.; Naus, J. [O' Connor Associates Environmental Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Michielsen, A.P. [Imperial Oil Ltd., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents a case history concerning the application of dual phase vacuum extraction (DPVE) technology for the remediation of subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contamination in silty soils at a service station site located in Vancouver, British Columbia. It also summarized the design and performance monitoring results for the site, in conjunction with the performance monitoring results from similar DPVE systems in operation at 7 other sites in western Canada. Each of these sites is underlain by both fine-grained and coarser grained sandy soils. The study offers useful design guidance and insight on the practical limitations of DPVE technology for PHC remediation. 2 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs.

  8. Novel application of cyclolipopeptide amphisin: feasibility study as additive to remediate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groboillot, Anne; Portet-Koltalo, Florence; Le Derf, Franck; Feuilloley, Marc J G; Orange, Nicole; Poc, Cécile Duclairoir

    2011-01-01

    To decontaminate dredged harbor sediments by bioremediation or electromigration processes, adding biosurfactants could enhance the bioavailability or mobility of contaminants in an aqueous phase. Pure amphisin from Pseudomonas fluorescens DSS73 displays increased effectiveness in releasing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) strongly adsorbed to sediments when compared to a synthetic anionic surfactant. Amphisin production by the bacteria in the natural environment was also considered. DSS73's growth is weakened by three model PAHs above saturation, but amphisin is still produced. Estuarine water feeding the dredged material disposal site of a Norman harbor (France) allows both P. fluorescens DSS73 growth and amphisin production. PMID:21673923

  9. Novel Application of Cyclolipopeptide Amphisin: Feasibility Study as Additive to Remediate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH Contaminated Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Groboillot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To decontaminate dredged harbor sediments by bioremediation or electromigration processes, adding biosurfactants could enhance the bioavailability or mobility of contaminants in an aqueous phase. Pure amphisin from Pseudomonas fluorescens DSS73 displays increased effectiveness in releasing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs strongly adsorbed to sediments when compared to a synthetic anionic surfactant. Amphisin production by the bacteria in the natural environment was also considered. DSS73’s growth is weakened by three model PAHs above saturation, but amphisin is still produced. Estuarine water feeding the dredged material disposal site of a Norman harbor (France allows both P. fluorescens DSS73 growth and amphisin production.

  10. Heavy Metals and Petroleum Hydrocarbons Contamination of Bottom Sediments of Gulf of Oman area, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musallam, A.; El Tokhi, M.; Abed, S. Al; Mahmoud, B.

    2012-04-01

    The concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), total organic carbon (%TOC) and petroleum related heavy metals beside the grain size distribution of 4 stations in Gulf of Oman area (Khor Kalbaa , Debba ,Khor Fakan and Fujairah) , UAE were determined in the bottom sediment. Copper, zinc, nickel, lead, cadmium and vanadium concentration were found within the lowest effect, The contamination levels were found due to petrogenic origin and their sources are either weathered or highly weathered crude oils and or used lubricating oil. Their detection gives an indication of recent and continuous petroleum inputs.

  11. Enhanced Bioremediation of Soil Artificially Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons after Amendment with Capra aegagrus hircus (Goat) Manure

    OpenAIRE

    Nwogu, T. P.; Azubuike, C. C.; C. J. Ogugbue

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the biostimulant potentials of Capra aegagrus hircus manure for bioremediation of crude oil contaminated soil (COCS) under tropical conditions. 1 kg of COCS sample was amended with 0.02 kg of C. a. hircus manure and monitored at 14-day intervals for total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), nutrient content, and changes in microbial counts. At the end of the study period, there was 62.08% decrease in the concentration of TPH in the amended sample compared to 8....

  12. Remediation of inorganic contaminants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soils polluted by municipal solid waste incineration residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobin, Philippe; Coudert, Lucie; Taillard, Vincent; Blais, Jean-Francois; Mercier, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Three soils polluted by municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration residues and containing various concentrations of Cu, Pb, Sb, Sn and Zn were treated using magnetism, gravity separation (jig and shaking table) and flotation/leaching. The process removed between 18% and 39% of the contaminants present in soil 1, between 31% and 53% of the contaminants present in soil 2 and between 42% and 56% of the contaminants present in soil 3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were present only in soil 3, and the process removed 64% of its PAHs total content. Magnetism seemed to be the most efficient technique to remove metals from contaminated soils, followed by gravity separation and finally flotation/leaching. The global efficiency of the process was higher when the initial contaminant concentrations were lower (smaller proportions of MSW incineration residues). The estimated costs of the process, including direct and indirect costs, varied from $82 to $88 per ton of treated soil depending on the proportion of MSW incineration residues mixed with the soil. PMID:26729603

  13. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin enhanced biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated microbial activity in contaminated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingming Sun; Yongming Luo; Peter Christie; Zhongjun Jia; Zhengao Li; Ying Teng

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a widespread environmental problem and the remediation of PAHs from these areas has been a major concern.The effectiveness of many in situ bioremediation systems may be constrained by low contaminant bipavailability due to limited aqueous solubility or a large magnitude of sorption.The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) on bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp.strain HPD-2 of an aged PAH-contaminated soil.When 10% (W/W) MCD amendment was combined with bioaugmentation by the PAH-degrading bacterium Paracoccus sp.strain HPD-2,the percentage degradation of total PAHs was significantly enhanced up to 34.8%.Higher counts of culturable PAH-degrading bacteria and higher soil dehydrogenase and soil polyphenol oxidase activities were observed in 10% (W/W) MCD-assisted bioaugmentation soil.This MCD-assisted bioaugmentation strategy showed significant increases (p < 0.05) in the average well color development (AWCD) obtained by the BIOLOG Eco plate assay,Shannon-Weaver index (H) and Simpson index (λ) compared with the controls,implying that this strategy at least partially restored the microbiological functioning of the PAH-contaminated soil.The results suggest that MCD-aided bioaugmentation by Paracoccus sp.strain HPD-2 may be a promising practical bioremediation strategy for aged PAH-contaminated soils.

  14. Desorption and release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated aquifer materials

    OpenAIRE

    Merkel, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Contaminations of aquifer material in the subsurface by PAHs are a widespread source of groundwater contaminations at practically all former manufactured gas plants and coking plants. Possible risks that arise for the groundwater quality in the vicinity of such sites depend largely on the release rates of contaminants from the site into the adjacent groundwater body. Recent field studies and laboratory experiments indicate that the emission of contaminants appears to be controlled by two majo...

  15. Methodology for the detection of contamination by hydrocarbons and further soil sampling for volatile and semi-volatile organic enrichment in former petrol stations, SE Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa María Rosales Aranda; Pedro Martinez Pagán; Angel Faz Cano

    2012-01-01

    The optimal detection and quantification of contamination plumes in soil and groundwater by petroleum organic compounds, gasoline and diesel, is critical for the reclamation of hydrocarbons contaminated soil at petrol stations. Through this study it has been achieved a sampling stage optimization in these scenarios by means of the location of potential contamination areas before sampling with the application of the 2D electrical resistivity tomography method, a geophysical non destructive tec...

  16. Evaluating the Effects of Bioremediation on Genotoxicity of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil Using Genetically Engineered, Higher Eukaryotic Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Jing HU; Nakamura, Jun; Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation is one of the commonly applied remediation strategies at sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, remediation goals are typically based on removal of the target contaminants rather than on broader measures related to health risks. We investigated changes in the toxicity and genotoxicity of PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site before and after two simulated bioremediation processes: a sequencing batch bioreactor system ...

  17. The hydrogen concentration as parameter to identify natural attenuation processes of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in ground water; Die Wasserstoffkonzentration als Parameter zur Identifizierung des natuerlichen Abbaus von leichtfluechtigen Chlorkohlenwasserstoffen (LCKW) im Grundwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alter, M.D.

    2006-06-15

    In this study, the hydrogen concentration as parameter to identify natural attenuation processes of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons was investigated. The currently accepted and recommended bubble strip method for hydrogen sampling was optimized, and a storage method for hydrogen samples was developed. Furthermore batch experiments with a dechlorinating mixed culture and pure cultures were carried out to study H{sub 2}-concentrations of competing redox processes. The extraction of hydrogen from ground water was optimized by a reduced inlet diameter of the usually applied gas sampling bulbs, allowing a maximal turbulent ow and gas transfer. With a gas volume of 10 ml and flow rates of 50 to 140 ml/min, the course of extraction almost followed the theoretical course of equilibration. At flow rates > 100 ml/min a equilibrium of 98% was achieved within 20 min. Until recently it was generally accepted that hydrogen samples can be stored only for 2 hours and therefore have to be analyzed immediately in the eld. Here, it was shown that eld samples can be stored for 1-3 days until analysis. For the dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE), a hydrogen threshold concentration of 1-2 nM was found with the dechlorinating mixed culture as well as with a pure culture of Sulfurospirillum multivorans in combination with another pure culture Methanosarcina mazei. No dechlorination was detectable below this concentration. With the dechlorinating mixed culture, this finding is valid for all successive dechlorination steps until ethene. The hydrogen threshold concentration for denitrification were below the detection limit of 0,2 nM with the dechlorinating mixed culture. A threshold concentration of 3,1-3,5 nM was found for sulphate reduction and a threshold of 7-9 nM H{sub 2} for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. This implies that the natural dechlorination at contaminated sites is preferred to competing processes like sulphate reduction and methanogenesis. The threshold

  18. Study on Equilibrium Adsorption of Volatile Chlorinated Hydrocarbons on Humid Soils%挥发性氯代烃在湿润土壤中的平衡吸附研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟凡勇; 刘锐; 小林刚; 万梅; 余素林; 陈吕军

    2012-01-01

    吸附是挥发性氯代烃(volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons,VCHs)赋存于土壤的主要机制之一.开展动态吸附实验,研究了4种常见VCHs污染物在我国8种典型土壤中的吸附平衡关系.结果表明,土壤在干燥条件下对VCHs气体的吸附能力要远大于湿润条件,且随含水率的升高吸附能力急剧下降,在含水率达到10%以后土壤吸附量趋于稳定.湿润土壤对三氯乙烯(TCE)、四氯乙烯(PCE)、1,1,1-三氯乙烷(MC)气体的吸附等温线符合Henry型吸附等温式,而1,1,2-三氯乙烷(1,1,2-TCA)符合Freundlich模型.VCHs在湿润土壤中的吸附量总体上与土壤有机碳(soil organic carbon,SOC)含量呈正相关,且受SOC类型和化合物极性影响较大.弱极性的TCE、PCE在土壤中的吸附能力与SOC含量呈严格正相关,而极性的MC、1,1,2-TCA在黑土等高碳土壤中不仅与SOC含量有关,还受到SOC物质组成的影响.建立了TCE和PCE在湿润土壤中的平衡吸附量预测模型,预测值与实测值相关性良好(n=80,R2=0.98).%Adsorption is one of the principal mechanisms for soil contamination by volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons(VCHs).Dynamic adsorption experiments were carried out to study the equilibrium adsorption of four common VCHs pollutants onto eight typical soils in China.Results showed that dry soils had far greater adsorption capacity than humid soils.The soil adsorption capacity sharply decreased with the increase in the soil water content,and then reached a plateau as the water content rose to 10% or above.The adsorption isotherms of trichloroethylene(TCE),tetrachloroethylene(PCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane(MC) could be fitted with Henry's equation,while the adsorption isotherms of 1,1,2-trichloroethane(1,1,2-TCA) could be fitted with Freundlich model.The adsorption capacities of VCHs on humid soils were principally influenced by the content of soil organic carbon(SOC),but sometimes also

  19. A quantitative PCR approach for quantification of functional genes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Taha, Mohamed; Ball, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major pollutants globally and due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic properties their clean-up is paramount. Bioremediation or using PAH degrading microorganisms (mainly bacteria) to degrade the pollutants represents cheap, effective methods. These PAH degraders harbor functional genes which help microorganisms use PAHs as source of food and energy. Most probable number (MPN) and plate counting methods are widely used for counting PAHs degraders; however, as culture based methods only count a small fraction (soil samples.•This protocol enables us to screen a vast number of PAH contaminated soil samples in few hours.•This protocol provides valuable information about the natural attenuation potential of contaminated soil and can be used to monitor the bioremediation process. PMID:27054096

  20. Laboratory screening evaluation on the utilization of hydrogen peroxide for enhanced biological treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the laboratory study was to evaluate the benefit of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) addition to soil as a source of molecular oxygen for enhanced removal of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contaminants (JP-5, diesel fuel, and lubricating oil) by the indigenous microflora. Upflow soil columns containing PHC-spiked soil (sand and humus) and previously contaminated sandy soils were used for the study. Changes in bacterial population density and concentration-independent indicators of PHC biodegradation (n-C17/pristane, n-C18/phytane, and resolved alkane/unresolved alkane ratios) between test and control columns were used as the test parameters. Test and control columns received Dworkin-Foster medium which is a basal salts solution for supporting microbial growth; test columns received increasing concentrations of H2O. The benefit of H2O2 addition to soil in test columns was demonstrated which suggested that oxygen was limiting microbial growth on available PHCs

  1. Bioremediation of soils contaminated by hydrocarbons at the coastal zone of “Punta Majagua”.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelvys Bermúdez Acosta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to describe and assess the main results in the process of bioremediation of 479 m3 of petroleum residuals spilled on the soil and restrained into four deposits of fuel on the coastal zone of “Punta Majagua”, Cienfuegos. The volume of hydrocarbons spilled and contained into the tanks was determined by means of their previous mixture with fertile ground in a ratio of 3/1. The hydrocarbons were disposed in a bioremediation area of 115 m X 75m built in situ. In turn 54, 5 m3 of BIOIL - FC were applied, which were fermented in an industrial bioreactor of 12000 L. An initial sampling was carried out registering values of total hydrocarbons (HTP higher than 41880 mg/kg, with high concentrations of Saturated hydrocarbons, aromatics, resins, asphaltens (SARA. Three subsequent samples were taken with a sampling interval of 0, 45, 90 and 120 days of the application. An average concentration of 1884.57 mg/kg of total hydrocarbons was obtained at 120 days with an average removal rate of 94.8%, moreover values of 94.6%, 90.78%, 86.99% y 79.9% of SARA were respectively reported.

  2. In vitro degradation of dicyclopentadiene by microbial consortia isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD), an extremely odoriferous by-product of the production of hydrocarbon feed stocks in petrochemical plants, was discussed. A laboratory study was described in which DCPD was degraded to carbon dioxide and oxygenated intermediates were established. More than 100 isolated organisms and cultures were screened for DCPD degradation using BIOLOGTM MT plates incubated in an atmosphere containing the test hydrocarbon. No single colony isolate readily mineralized DCPD, but mixed cultures produced 14CO2 when incubated with [14C]DCPD. For bioremediation purposes, the objective was to remove odor. In the presence of a hydrocarbon degradation medium, the complete degradation to CO2 was achieved in less than 6 months. 15 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  3. An evaluation of soil-gas surveying for H2S for locating subsurface hydrocarbon contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A soil-gas survey was conducted at a gasoline service station and a former fire training facility to determine if surveying for hydrogen sulfide could be useful in locating nonaqueous phase hydrocarbon fuel in the subsurface. Relative to total organic vapor, oxygen, and carbon dioxide distributions, detectable hydrogen sulfide concentrations were much more restricted to the suspected source vicinity at both sites. Appreciable levels of soil-gas hydrogen sulfide, up to 600 Vppb, were observed in areas characterized by anaerobic or microaerophilic conditions having bulk oxygen levels below 4 percent. Based on the hydrogen sulfide distribution, nonaqueous phase hydrocarbon fuel was located at each site. These results suggest that soil-gas surveying for hydrogen sulfide may help locate mobile or residual gasoline and other nonaqueous phase hydrocarbons in the subsurface

  4. Natural degradation of hydrocarbons in sandy soils and its potential application to disposal of oil-contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrocarbon-degrading micro-organisms are found in marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments. Investigations of possible cost-effective methods of disposal of oil-contaminated beach sand (OBS) relying on the enrichment and activity of these micro-organisms in sandy coastal soils have been carried out. A range of scales has been used; from small scale experiments to field trials, using both contaminated beach sand from an actual oil spill and artificially prepared OBS. Consistent results have been obtained, indicating rapid development of soil microbial populations, providing quick and effective breakdown of a significant proportion of weathered oil without the application of cultured organisms or the addition of fertiliser. Patterns of degradation of weathered oils consistently follow a power function under field conditions, without the application of special cultures, or the addition of fertiliser. Evidence is presented to show that environmental risk from movement of hydrocarbons into surrounding soil or groundwater are minimal. Advantages and limitations associated with this potential clean-up and disposal method are discussed. (author)

  5. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa DSVP20 isolated from petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and its physicochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Adgaba, Nuru; Khan, Khalid Ali; Pruthi, Vikas; Al-Waili, Noori

    2015-11-01

    Among 348 microbial strains isolated from petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, five were selected for their ability to produce biosurfactant based on battery of screening assay including hemolytic activity, surface tension reduction, drop collapse assay, emulsification activity, and cell surface hydrophobicity studies. Of these, bacterial isolate DSVP20 was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCBI GenBank accession no. GQ865644) based on biochemical characterization and the 16S rDNA analysis, and it was found to be a potential candidate for biosurfactant production. Maximum biosurfactant production recorded by P. aeruginosa DSVP20 was 6.7 g/l after 72 h at 150 rpm and at a temperature of 30 °C. Chromatographic analysis and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) revealed that it was a glycolipid in nature which was further confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bioremediation studies using purified biosurfactant showed that P. aeruginosa DSVP20 has the ability to degrade eicosane (97%), pristane (75%), and fluoranthene (47%) when studied at different time intervals for a total of 7 days. The results of this study showed that the P. aeruginosa DSVP20 and/or biosurfactant produced by this isolate have the potential role in bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. PMID:26146372

  6. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles, Martínez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil. PMID:24294259

  7. Potential of vetiver (vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) for phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Regine; Merkl, Nicole; Schultze-Kraft, Rainer; Infante, Carmen; Broll, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Venezuela is one of the largest oil producers in the world. For the rehabilitation of oil-contaminated sites, phytoremediation represents a promising technology whereby plants are used to enhance biodegradation processes in soil. A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the tolerance of vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) to a Venezuelan heavy crude oil in soil. Additionally, the plant's potential for stimulating the biodegradation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons was tested under the application of two fertilizer levels. In the presence of contaminants, biomass and plant height were significantly reduced. As for fertilization, the lower fertilizer level led to higher biomass production. The specific root surface area was reduced under the effects of petroleum. However, vetiver was found to tolerate crude-oil contamination in a concentration of 5% (w/w). Concerning total oil and grease content in soil, no significant decrease under the influence of vetiver was detected when compared to the unplanted control. Thus, there was no evidence of vetiver enhancing the biodegradation of crude oil in soil under the conditions of this trial. However, uses of vetiver grass in relation to petroleum-contaminated soils are promising for amelioration of slightly polluted sites, to allow other species to get established and for erosion control. PMID:17305302

  8. Impact of bacterial and fungal processes on 14C-hexadecane mineralisation in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the impact of bacterial and fungal processes on 14C-hexadecane mineralisation was investigated in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The extent of 14C-hexadecane mineralisation varied depending on the bioremediation strategy employed. Under enhanced natural attenuation conditions, 14C-hexadecane mineralisation after 98 days was 8.5 ± 3.7% compared to 14C-hexadecane mineralisation was further enhanced through Tween 80 amendments (28.9 ± 2.4%) which also promoted the growth of a Phanerochaete chyrsosporium fungal mat. Although fungal growth in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil could be promoted through supplementing additional carbon sources (Tween 80, sawdust, compost, pea straw), fungal 14C-hexadecane mineralisation was negligible when sodium azide was added to soil microcosms to inhibit bacterial activity. In contrast, when fungal activity was inhibited through nystatin additions, 14C-hexadecane mineralisation ranged from 6.5 ± 0.2 to 35.8 ± 3.8% after 98 days depending on the supplied amendment. Bacteria inhibition with sodium azide resulted in a reduction in bacterial diversity (33–37%) compared to microcosms supplemented with nystatin or microcosms without inhibitory supplements. However, alkB bacterial groups were undetected in sodium azide supplemented microcosms, highlighting the important role of this bacterial group in 14C-hexadecane mineralisation. - Highlights: ► The roles of different microbial groups in hydrocarbon mineralisation was assessed. ► Inhibiting fungal growth did not affect 14C-hexadecane mineralisation. ► Inhibiting bacterial growth resulted in negligible 14C-hexadecane mineralisation. ► alkB bacterial groups were undetected in sodium azide supplemented microcosms. ► The importance of alkB groups in 14C-hexadecane mineralisation was highlighted.

  9. Cleaning of contaminated grounds with hydrocarbons by means of biopile; Saneamiento de suelos contaminados con hidrocarburos mediante biopilas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturbe Arguelles, R.; Flores Torres, C.; Chavez Lopez, C.; Roldan Martin, A. [Instituto de Ingenieria, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-03-01

    In 1999, the Instituto de Ingenieria of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), initiated an evaluation through the soil and groundwater sampling and a risk health assessment in a Mexican refinery. An extended area was found contaminated with hydrocarbons. This area requires a soil remediation, taking into account that some zones present more than 30 000 mg/kg of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). Biopile system was recommended as the best remediation method to diminish TPH and some poliaromathic hydrocarbons (PAH). Therefore, an experimental biopile of 30 m{sup 3} was constructed with contaminated soil. After 22 weeks, results show more than 80% of TPH and PAH remove. [Spanish] El grupo de saneamiento de suelos y acuiferos del Instituto de Ingenieria de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), inicio en 1999 la evaluacion de la contaminacion del subsuelo de una refineria en una zona costera del pais, mediante el muestreo de 325 puntos a 1.5 m de profundidad y con el analisis de los siguientes parametros: hidrocarburos totales del petroleo (HTP), hidrocarburos poliaromaticos (HAP), diesel, gasolina, metilterbutileter (MTBE) y los metales hierro, vanadio, zinc, cadmio, cromo y plomo. Asimismo, se llevo a cabo una evaluacion de riesgo a la salud a fin de determinar los niveles de limpieza de las areas contaminadas. Una vez realizado el estudio se propuso probar a nivel piloto dos tecnicas de saneamiento para las areas contaminadas con valores superiores a 30 000 mg/Kg de HTP, o bien, para las zonas en donde la evaluacion de riesgo a la salud indica la existencia de riesgo para uno o mas compuestos (Iturbe et al., 2000). Las tecnicas propuestas son biopilas y lavado de suelo con surfactantes. En este trabajo se presenta la prueba piloto con biopilas, de la cual se obtuvo una eficiencia de remocion de HTP del 80 porciento en cinco meses de operacion.

  10. A multi-process phytoremediation system for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve phytoremediation processes, multiple techniques that comprise different aspects of contaminant removal from soils have been combined. Using creosote as a test contaminant, a multi-process phytoremediation system composed of physical (volatilization), photochemical (photooxidation) and microbial remediation, and phytoremediation (plant-assisted remediation) processes was developed. The techniques applied to realize these processes were land-farming (aeration and light exposure), introduction of contaminant degrading bacteria, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), and plant growth of contaminant-tolerant tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Over a 4-month period, the average efficiency of removal of 16 priority PAHs by the multi-process remediation system was twice that of land-farming, 50% more than bioremediation alone, and 45% more than phytoremediation by itself. Importantly, the multi-process system was capable of removing most of the highly hydrophobic, soil-bound PAHs from soil. The key elements for successful phytoremediation were the use of plant species that have the ability to proliferate in the presence of high levels of contaminants and strains of PGPR that increase plant tolerance to contaminants and accelerate plant growth in heavily contaminated soils. The synergistic use of these approaches resulted in rapid and massive biomass accumulation of plant tissue in contaminated soil, putatively providing more active metabolic processes, leading to more rapid and more complete removal of PAHs. - Persistent PAH contaminants in soils can be removed more completely and rapidly by using multiple remediation processes

  11. A multi-process phytoremediation system for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Xiaodong; El-Alawi, Yousef; Penrose, Donna M.; Glick, Bernard R.; Greenberg, Bruce M

    2004-08-01

    To improve phytoremediation processes, multiple techniques that comprise different aspects of contaminant removal from soils have been combined. Using creosote as a test contaminant, a multi-process phytoremediation system composed of physical (volatilization), photochemical (photooxidation) and microbial remediation, and phytoremediation (plant-assisted remediation) processes was developed. The techniques applied to realize these processes were land-farming (aeration and light exposure), introduction of contaminant degrading bacteria, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), and plant growth of contaminant-tolerant tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Over a 4-month period, the average efficiency of removal of 16 priority PAHs by the multi-process remediation system was twice that of land-farming, 50% more than bioremediation alone, and 45% more than phytoremediation by itself. Importantly, the multi-process system was capable of removing most of the highly hydrophobic, soil-bound PAHs from soil. The key elements for successful phytoremediation were the use of plant species that have the ability to proliferate in the presence of high levels of contaminants and strains of PGPR that increase plant tolerance to contaminants and accelerate plant growth in heavily contaminated soils. The synergistic use of these approaches resulted in rapid and massive biomass accumulation of plant tissue in contaminated soil, putatively providing more active metabolic processes, leading to more rapid and more complete removal of PAHs. - Persistent PAH contaminants in soils can be removed more completely and rapidly by using multiple remediation processes.

  12. Differentiation of naturally-occurring vs. artificial hydrocarbons in a landfill groundwater investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interpretation of groundwater sampling data at a large municipal/industrial landfill indicates contamination by both artificial and naturally-occurring hydrocarbons. Site hydrogeology consists of three different water bearing zones. The uppermost (shallow) aquifer is an unconfined unit consisting of silt, clay, and sand deposits. An intermediate depth semiconfined aquifer underlies the unconfined unit, and consists of a chert rubble zone and the upper portion of a fractured and solution-enhanced limestone formation. A regionally-extensive organic-rich shale underlies the semiconfined aquifer and separates it from the deep confined aquifer, which also consists of limestone. Groundwater investigations at the landfill have detected chlorinated and non-chlorinated hydrocarbons in the different aquifer intervals. Chlorinated hydrocarbons detected include tetrachloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride and occur almost exclusively in the shallow aquifer. Aromatic hydrocarbons detected include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) and-occur in the intermediate and deep aquifers. The landfill was originally interpreted as the source of the contaminants. The observation of free-phase liquid hydrocarbons in the intermediate aquifer at the site, and high dissolved BTEX levels in the deep and intermediate aquifers upgradient of the landfill suggest that the aromatics were derived from a source other than the landfill. A potential source of BTEX contamination may be abandoned (pre-1930) natural gas wells located near the landfill. An additional BTEX source may be the organic-rich shale formation (a documented petroleum source rock)

  13. About the order in aerobic heterotrophic microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    The organizational structure of communities of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria was studied by means of physiological and molecular typing of the members of arbitrary samples of isolates, ASsI. The isolate sample assay (ISA) was applied to three different hydrocarbon-polluted sites: a dry windrow pile

  14. Influence of the bioaccessible fraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the ecotoxicity of historically contaminated soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čvančarová, Monika; Křesinová, Zdena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 254, JUN 15 (2013), s. 116-124. ISSN 0304-3894 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218; GA TA ČR TA01020106 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bioavailability * Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * Ecotoxicity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.331, year: 2013

  15. Distinguishing and quantifying petrogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons in contaminated and background soils (PERD Project): finger printing of oil hydrocarbons and other biogenic organic compounds (BOC) in oil-contaminated samples (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with how naturally occurring biogenic matter (BOC) is often mistakenly identified as petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) by the Canadian Council of the Ministers of Environment (CCME), leading to an overestimation of contamination levels and cleanup costs. The objective of this study is to provide guidelines and scientific procedures to distinguish between these two components. More than forty soil samples from different sources and oil sites were examined. Oil contamination levels in the samples were obtained using a recognized chemical process, GC-MS, paired with a derivatisation technique. After extracting and analyzing the oil components, it was shown that the oil contaminated samples showed lower levels of carbon preference index than did the plant and soil samples, indicating the presence of petroleum based alkanes. Moreover, they exhibited higher levels of PAH and oil biomarkers. In general, it was proposed that such indications, along with other parameters, play a major role in the process of judging the predominance of one species or the other.

  16. Distinguishing and quantifying petrogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons in contaminated and background soils (PERD Project): finger printing of oil hydrocarbons and other biogenic organic compounds (BOC) in oil-contaminated samples (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhendi; Yang, Z.; Yang, C.; Hollebone, B.; Brown, C.E.; Landriault, M.; Sun, J. [Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada (Canada)], email: zhendi.wang@ec.gc.ca; Mudge, S.M. [Bangor University (United Kingdom); Kelly-Hooper, F.; Dixon, D.G. [University of Waterloo (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This study deals with how naturally occurring biogenic matter (BOC) is often mistakenly identified as petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) by the Canadian Council of the Ministers of Environment (CCME), leading to an overestimation of contamination levels and cleanup costs. The objective of this study is to provide guidelines and scientific procedures to distinguish between these two components. More than forty soil samples from different sources and oil sites were examined. Oil contamination levels in the samples were obtained using a recognized chemical process, GC-MS, paired with a derivatisation technique. After extracting and analyzing the oil components, it was shown that the oil contaminated samples showed lower levels of carbon preference index than did the plant and soil samples, indicating the presence of petroleum based alkanes. Moreover, they exhibited higher levels of PAH and oil biomarkers. In general, it was proposed that such indications, along with other parameters, play a major role in the process of judging the predominance of one species or the other.

  17. Radiochemical analysis of chlorine-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to propose a radiochemical separation method of chlorine-36 from other beta-gamma emitters based on an oxidation technique where chlorine is trapped by NaOH. Chlorine-36 beta emissions are measured by liquid scintillation counting by the dual label technique in order to avoid the contamination produced by carbon-14 which is also trapped by NaOH and it is the main contaminant present in graphite samples. The sensitivity of this radiochemical method is high enough to achieve the needed thresholds for the radiological characterization of the radioactive materials in which this method can be applied

  18. Depth zoning and specialized processing methods for electromagnetic geophysical surveys to remote sense hydrocarbon type ground water contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The professional who plans the remediation of properties which may contain organic hydrocarbon based contaminants in the soils and ground water at a site is faced with a difficult task: determining the location and extent of organic contamination within a specified budget and often in a limited time frame too. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate to the environmental professional how this task can be made simpler, and how accessment costs can be lowered while additional information is learned about a site. The lowering of site accessment costs is achieved by reducing the drilling at a site by preventing the majority of open-quotes dryclose quotes (non-contaminant intersecting) monitoring wells. The additional information obtained by utilizing electromagnetic (EM) surveys is often pertinent at a site, the macro perspective offered by EM methods is a good balance to the extremely exacting nature of chemical test data, which spatially contains data from a small area immediately around a bore hole. On a recent project a client was able to begin remediation procedures after an EM survey and consultation was complete, since this information combined with previous site work gave a clear picture of the site. The site referred to in this paper is a former coal gasification plant, and has associated coal tar contamination. The outlook of this paper is to present coherent data from this site while at the same time describing figuratively what is actually measured and why this measurement describes organic ground water contamination. The paper will outline briefly the theory of EM surveying, state the objectives of the survey, describe the data acquisition and processing steps, and discuss the results

  19. Hexadecane-degradation by Teskumurella and Stenotrophomonas Strains Isolated From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Tebyanian; Mehdi Hassanshahian; Ashraf Kariminik

    2013-01-01

    Background: Petroleum hydrocarbons are mix compounds and divided into four groups: Saturates, Aromatics, Resins and Asphalten. Among various phases of crude-oil, the alkanes with medium length chain are favorable substrates that rapidly degraded, although short-chain alkanes are very toxic and long-chain alkanes have low solubility in water that reduce its bioavailability and make resistant to biodegradation.Objectives: The main goal of this study is the isolation, molecular identification an...

  20. Effects of hydrocarbon contamination on ozone generation with dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose L.; Vezzu, Guido; Freilich, Alfred; Paolini, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    The increasing usage of the feed gases of lower grade liquid oxygen (LOX) containing higher levels of trace hydrocarbon impurities in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) for ozone generation requires a better understanding of the kinetics of the by-product formation resulting from reactions involving these hydrocarbon impurities. As a case study of hydrocarbon impurities, the kinetics of CH4 conversion in DBDs and the subsequent HNO3 formation were investigated by means of gas-phase plasma diagnostics, supported by detailed process modeling, and extensive in-situ and ex-situ by-product analysis. The by-products formation in the plasma with the presence of CH4, were found to differ significantly in oxygen-fed generators as compared to generators fed with oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. The amount of HNO3 formed depends on the concentration of NOx formed in the plasma and the amount of CH4 that is converted, but not on the O3 concentration. In the present work we have investigated CH4 concentrations of up to 1.95 wt% of the feed gas. The rate of deterioration of the overall ozone generator performance was found to be affected by the concentration of nitrogen in the oxygen/nitrogen mixture.

  1. Assessment of sediment hydrocarbon contamination from the 2009 Montara oil blow out in the Timor Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kathryn A; Jones, Ross

    2016-04-01

    In August 2009, a blowout of the Montara H1 well 260 km off the northwest coast of Australia resulted in the uncontrolled release of about 4.7 M L of light crude oil and gaseous hydrocarbons into the Timor Sea. Over the 74 day period of the spill, the oil remained offshore and did not result in shoreline incidents on the Australia mainland. At various times slicks were sighted over a 90,000 km(2) area, forming a layer of oil which was tracked by airplanes and satellites but the slicks typically remained within 35 km of the well head platform and were treated with 183,000 L of dispersants. The shelf area where the spill occurred is shallow (100-200 m) and includes off shore emergent reefs and cays and submerged banks and shoals. This study describes the increased inputs of oil to the system and assesses the environmental impact. Concentrations of hydrocarbon in the sediment at the time of survey were very low (total aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranged from 0.04 to 31 ng g(-1)) and were orders of magnitude lower than concentrations at which biological effects would be expected. PMID:26774768

  2. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales. PMID:27594854

  3. Chronic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contamination Is a Marginal Driver for Community Diversity and Prokaryotic Predicted Functioning in Coastal Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanbille, Mathilde; Gury, Jérôme; Duran, Robert; Tronczynski, Jacek; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Agogué, Hélène; Saïd, Olfa Ben; Taïb, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Garnier, Cédric; Auguet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Benthic microorganisms are key players in the recycling of organic matter and recalcitrant compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal sediments. Despite their ecological importance, the response of microbial communities to chronic PAH pollution, one of the major threats to coastal ecosystems, has received very little attention. In one of the largest surveys performed so far on coastal sediments, the diversity and composition of microbial communities inhabiting both chronically contaminated and non-contaminated coastal sediments were investigated using high-throughput sequencing on the 18S and 16S rRNA genes. Prokaryotic alpha-diversity showed significant association with salinity, temperature, and organic carbon content. The effect of particle size distribution was strong on eukaryotic diversity. Similarly to alpha-diversity, beta-diversity patterns were strongly influenced by the environmental filter, while PAHs had no influence on the prokaryotic community structure and a weak impact on the eukaryotic community structure at the continental scale. However, at the regional scale, PAHs became the main driver shaping the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic communities. These patterns were not found for PICRUSt predicted prokaryotic functions, thus indicating some degree of functional redundancy. Eukaryotes presented a greater potential for their use as PAH contamination biomarkers, owing to their stronger response at both regional and continental scales.

  4. Development of a biotreatment system for the remediation of groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbons and trichloroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inadvertent release of fuels and solvents into soil has resulted in groundwater contamination across the United States. This paper reports on the development of biologically based systems for treating mixtures of chemical contaminants which often requires knowledge of both degradative pathways and interactions between individual chemicals. These issues may necessitate the use of specialized microorganisms and/or treatment systems designed to overcome these limitations. One strategy for the treatment of chemical mixtures which cannot be source separated, such as contaminated groundwater, is a modular system to sequentially biodegrade groups of compatible chemicals. A two-stage bioreactor system was constructed for the treatment of groundwater contaminated with benzene and TCE. This treatment system is undergoing development for a field pilot demonstration. Successful implementation of this system should result in significant cost and time savings compared to competitive technologies

  5. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs

  6. Soil-Water Repellency and Critical Humidity as Cleanup Criteria for Remediation of a Hydrocarbon Contaminated Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Francisco Javier; Adams, Randy H.

    2010-05-01

    The majority of soil remediation programs focus mainly on reducing the hydrocarbon concentration, based on the assumption that the primary impact is toxicity and/or leachates and that these are directly proportional to concentration. None-the-less, interference with natural soil-water interactions are frequently more damaging, especially for sites contaminated with very viscous, weathered hydrocarbons. Therefore, the kind of hydrocarbons present in the soil and their interactions with soil surfaces may be more important than the overall hydrocarbon concentration in terms of soil restoration. One recently patented technology, the Chemical-Biological Stabilization process, focuses specifically on restoring soil fertility as the main objective for remediation of sites with agricultural use. This method was recently validated at an industrial scale by the treatment of 150 cubic meters of bentonitic drilling muds (70,5% fines) from an old sulphur mine, which were contaminated with very weathered oil (4° API), consisting of 31% asphaltenes. This material was treated by adding 4% (w/w, dry) of calcium hydroxide, followed by 4% (w/w, dry) of sugar cane cachasse (a fine fibered agricultural waste), thoroughly mixing between additions using an excavator. After the soil had dried sufficiently and the pH was ethanol molarity functions (Rx=0,99). Additionally, water penetration times were measured at different humidities to determine critical moisture levels for absorption in <5s and <60s. Initially, the FC increased from 24,9%H to 33,8%H (in 4½ months), probably due to the addition of the organic amendment. Over the next 6½ months, the FC dropped to 25,6% H, likely due to organic matter decomposition. However, during the following year+ (13½ months) the FC increased to 33,8%H probably due to an increase of soil humic substances while a vigorous vegetative growth was established. During two years of treatment the MED values were reduced 30% from 5,13 to 3,58M, and WDPT

  7. Assessing the Impact of Chlorinated-Solvent Sites on Metropolitan Groundwater Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Narter, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated-solvent compounds are among the most common groundwater contaminants in the U.S.A. The majority of the many sites contaminated by chlorinated-solvent compounds are located in metropolitan areas, and most such areas have one or more chlorinated-solvent contaminated sites. Thus, contamination of groundwater by chlorinated-solvent compounds may pose a potential risk to the sustainability of potable water supplies for many metropolitan areas. The impact of chlorinated-solvent sites on...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Staphylococcus saprophyticus Strain CNV2, Isolated from Crude Oil-Contaminated Soil from the Noonmati Oil Refinery, Guwahati, Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arghya; Chettri, Bobby; Langpoklakpam, James S; Singh, Arvind K; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 2.6 Mb draft genome sequence of hydrocarbon-degrading Staphylococcus saprophyticus strain CNV2, isolated from oil-contaminated soil in Guwahati, India. CNV2 contains 2,545 coding sequences and has a G+C content of 33.2%. This is the first report of the genome sequence of an S. saprophyticus adapted to an oil-contaminated environment. PMID:27174281

  9. Characterization of the contamination produced by uncontrolled dumping of aromatic hydrocarbons; Caracterizacion de la contaminacion producida por el vertido incontrolado de hidrocarburos aromaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Flores, A.; Collado Fernandez, D.

    1996-08-01

    Uncontrolled dumping of aromatic hydrocarbons (m, o and p-xylen, ethylbenzene, etc) in the Tenes Valley aquifer (Besos river bassin) has produced a very important contamination of alluvial aquifer, that shows high concentrations of m, p xylen (41 mg/l) in groundwater, at a very vulnerable area. site characterization shows high concentrations of Fe, Mn and Ba in groundwater, originated by degradation of organic pollutants. Numerical simulation of plume movement shows a conditioned mobilization contaminants by biodegradation process. (Author) 11 refs.

  10. Parameters describing nonequilibrium transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through contaminated soil columns: Estimability analysis, correlation, and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Viet V.; Michel, Julien; Gujisaite, Valérie; Latifi, Abderrazak; Simonnot, Marie-Odile

    2014-03-01

    The soil and groundwater at former industrial sites polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produce a very challenging environmental issue. The description of PAH transport by means of mathematical models is therefore needed for risk assessment and remediation strategies at these sites. Due to the complexity of release kinetics and transport behavior of the PAHs in the aged contaminated soils, their transport is usually evaluated at the laboratory scale. Transport parameters are then estimated from the experimental data via the inverse method. To better assess the uncertainty of optimized parameters, an estimability method was applied to firstly investigate the information content of experimental data and the possible correlations among parameters in the two-site sorption model. These works were based on the concentrations of three PAHs, Acenaphthene (ACE), Fluoranthene (FLA) and Pyrene (PYR), in the leaching solutions of the experiments under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions.

  11. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils: comparison of biosolids addition, carbon supplementation, and monitored natural attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods of biostimulation were compared in a laboratory incubation study with monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) degradation in diesel-contaminated Tarpley clay soil with low carbon content. One method utilized rapid-release inorganic fertilizers rich in N and P, and the other used sterilized, slow-release biosolids, which added C in addition to N and P. After 8 weeks of incubation, both biostimulation methods degraded approximately 96% of TPH compared to MNA, which degraded 93.8%. However, in the first week of incubation, biosolids-amended soils showed a linear two orders of magnitude increase in microbial population compared to MNA, whereas, in the fertilizer-amended soils, only a one order of magnitude increase was noted. In the following weeks, microbial population in the fertilizer-amended soils dropped appreciably, suggesting a toxic effect owing to fertilizer-induced acidity and/or NH3 overdosing. Results suggest that biosolids addition is a more effective soil amendment method for biostimulation than the commonly practiced inorganic fertilizer application, because of the abilities of biosolids to supplement carbon. No statistically significant difference was observed between the biostimulation methods and MNA, suggesting that MNA can be a viable remediation strategy in certain soils with high native microbial population. - Addition of biosolids is a potentially effective method of biostimulation for degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils

  12. Enhanced Bioremediation of Soil Artificially Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons after Amendment with Capra aegagrus hircus (Goat Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Nwogu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the biostimulant potentials of Capra aegagrus hircus manure for bioremediation of crude oil contaminated soil (COCS under tropical conditions. 1 kg of COCS sample was amended with 0.02 kg of C. a. hircus manure and monitored at 14-day intervals for total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH, nutrient content, and changes in microbial counts. At the end of the study period, there was 62.08% decrease in the concentration of TPH in the amended sample compared to 8.15% decrease in the unamended sample, with significant differences (P<0.05 in TPH concentrations for both samples at different time intervals. Similarly, there was a gradual decrease in the concentrations of total organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in both samples. The culturable hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria (CHUB increased steadily from 8.5 × 105 cfu/g to 2.70 × 106 cfu/g and from 8.0 × 105 cfu/g to 1.78 × 106 cfu/g for both samples. Acinetobacter, Achromobacter, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Klebsiella, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, and Staphylococcus were isolated from amended sample with Pseudomonas being the predominant isolated bacterial genus. This study demonstrated that C. a. hircus manure is a good biostimulant, which enhanced the activities of indigenous hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria resulting in significant decrease in TPH concentration of COCS.

  13. Enhanced Bioremediation of Soil Artificially Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons after Amendment with Capra aegagrus hircus (Goat) Manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwogu, T. P.; Azubuike, C. C.; Ogugbue, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the biostimulant potentials of Capra aegagrus hircus manure for bioremediation of crude oil contaminated soil (COCS) under tropical conditions. 1 kg of COCS sample was amended with 0.02 kg of C. a. hircus manure and monitored at 14-day intervals for total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), nutrient content, and changes in microbial counts. At the end of the study period, there was 62.08% decrease in the concentration of TPH in the amended sample compared to 8.15% decrease in the unamended sample, with significant differences (P < 0.05) in TPH concentrations for both samples at different time intervals. Similarly, there was a gradual decrease in the concentrations of total organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in both samples. The culturable hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria (CHUB) increased steadily from 8.5 × 105 cfu/g to 2.70 × 106 cfu/g and from 8.0 × 105 cfu/g to 1.78 × 106 cfu/g for both samples. Acinetobacter, Achromobacter, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Klebsiella, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, and Staphylococcus were isolated from amended sample with Pseudomonas being the predominant isolated bacterial genus. This study demonstrated that C. a. hircus manure is a good biostimulant, which enhanced the activities of indigenous hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria resulting in significant decrease in TPH concentration of COCS. PMID:26770830

  14. ZVI-Clay remediation of a chlorinated solvent source zone, Skuldelev, Denmark: 2. Groundwater contaminant mass discharge reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Lange, Ida Vedel; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup;

    2012-01-01

    dense network of multilevel samplers (640 samples). The hydraulic gradient and conductivity were determined. Depletion of the contaminant source is described in the companion paper (Fjordbøge et al., 2012). Field data showed four distinct phases for PCE mass discharge: (1) baseline conditions, (2...... properties in the source zone after soil mixing. The subsequent phases depended on the changed accessibility of the contaminant mass after mixing, the rate of source depletion, and the concentration gradient at the boundaries of the mixed source zone. Overall, ZVI-Clay soil mixing resulted in a significant...

  15. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Toledo Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus, P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients. The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p < 0.019 between TPH concentration (mg/kg and surface tension (mN/m, When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p < 0.009 was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil.

  16. Baseline ecological risk assessment and remediation alternatives for a hydrocarbon-contaminated estuarine wetland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to a property transaction, the groundwater at an industrial refinery site in New Jersey was found to be contaminated with a variety of petroleum-based organic compounds. The highly built-up site included an on-site estuarine wetland and was located in a developed, industrialized area near ecologically important estuarine marshes. A preliminary ecological risk assessment was developed on the basis of available data on site contamination and ecological resources. The onsite wetland and its user fauna were identified as the sensitive receptors of concern and the primary contaminant pathways wee identified. The ecological significance of the contamination was assessed with regard to the onsite wetland and in the context of its position within the landscape and surrounding land uses. The wetland exhibited a combination of impact and vitality, i.e., there were clearly visible signs of contaminant impact as well as a relatively complex and abundant food web. Because of its position within the developed landscape, the onsite wetland appeared to function as a refugium for wildlife despite the level of disturbance. The feasibility of achieving regulatory compliance through natural remediation was also examined with respect to the findings of the risk assessment and the resultant conclusions are discussed

  17. Removal of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons from contaminated soils by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory studies were conducted using hexane for the removal of light crude oil from contaminated sand, peat, and clay soils. The bench-scale process tested consists of three major steps: solvent washing, settling/decantation/filtration of extract, and solvent recycle. The results indicate that the use of solvent extraction for cleanup of oil-contaminated soils is an effective technology at the bench-scale level. Using a 1,000 g batch system, extremely high oil removal efficiencies were obtained from contaminated sand (up to 98.9%) and peat soil (up to 83.9%). The final oil contaminant concentration for sand varied between 0.06% and 0.39%, while that for peat soil varied between 1.52% and 5.21%. The guidelines for the decommissioning and cleanup of sites in Ontario for oil and grease (1 wt %) were met in all instances for the treated sand. Hexane recovery from diesel-contaminated sand and peat soil experiments was ca 81% and 67% respectively. 4 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs

  18. Comparison of rapid solvent extraction systems for the GC–MS/MS characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aged, contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleyur, Nagalakshmi; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Mansur, Abdulatif A.; Koshlaf, Eman; Morrison, Paul D.; Osborn, A. Mark; Ball, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major class of organic hydrocarbons with high molecular weight that originate from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sixteen PAHs are included in the U.S Environmental Protection agency list of priority pollutants due to their mutagenic, carcinogenic, toxic and teratogenic properties. In this study, the development and optimization of a simplified and rapid solvent extraction for the characterisation of 16 USEPA priority poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aged contaminated soils was established with subsequent analysis by GC–MS/MS. • Five different extraction solvent systems: dichloromethane: acetone, chloroform: methanol, dichloromethane, acetone: hexane and hexane were assessed in terms of their ability to extract PAHs from aged PAH-contaminated soils. • Highest PAH concentrations were extracted using acetone: hexane and chloroform: methanol. Given the greater toxicity associated with chloroform: methanol, acetone: hexane appears the best choice of solvent extraction system. • This protocol enables efficient extraction of PAHs from aged weathered soils. PMID:27200269

  19. Persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons (PHC) - end products and intermediate products of technical synthesis processes in surface water of the Rhine region. Vol. 5: Site profiles of persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons - source-oriented monitoring in aquatic media; Persistente chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe (PCKW) - End- und Zwischenprodukte technischer Synthesen in Gewaessern der Rheinregion. Band 5 der Reihe: Standortprofile persistenter chlorierter Kohlenwasserstoffe - ursachenorientiertes Monitoring in aquatischen Medien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, E.; Kettrup, A.; Bergheim, W.; Wenzel, S.

    2003-07-01

    By evaluating the primary data from 20 regional institutions in the period 1984-2002 about persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons (PCHC) in fishes (eels, Anguilla anguilla; breams, Abramis brama; barbs, Barbus barbus and reaches, Rutilus rutilus), sediment and suspended matter it was tried to mark the burdens and substance profiles for sampling sites on the river Rhine and rivers in BW, Hess, RP and NRW. The compounds investigated were the isomere di-, tri- and tetrachlorobenzenes, penta- and hexachlorobenzene, octachlorostyrene (OCS), hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) as well as the 6 DIN (IUPAC, Ballschmiter) congeners of the PCB, substances which were - as to the REACH - described as PBT, partly as vPvB substances and regarded as ''priority harmful substances'' (PCBz; HCB, HCBD), respectively. The statistically elaborated single data were summarized in distance profiles and time series, aiming at marking local and regional immissions as well as hints to their origin and current importance. The background of these efforts is the lack of specialized publications about technical synthesis or compulsory yield of the compounds concerning kind, amount and period. Especially tetrachlorobenzene (mainly 1,2,4,5-TeCBz) and HCBD could be defined as indicator substances for past and recent technical synthesis of chloroorganic compounds. The higher chlorinated PCB congeners no. 138, 153 and 180 (HPCB) proved very persistent. The sites of chemical industry in the vicinity of the sampling points Rheinfelden, Grenzach, Lampertheimer Altrhein, Biebesheimer Rhein, Muendung Schwarzbach, Bischofsheim and Griesheim (Main), Hitdorf, Duisburg-Homberg und Huels (Lippe) could be made transparent by maxima and special substance patterns. (orig.) [German] Durch Auswertung von Primaerdaten ueber persistente chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe (PCKW) in Fischen (Aale, Anguilla anguilla; Brachsen, Abramis brama; Barben, Barbus barbus und Rotaugen, Rutilus rutilus), Sediment und

  20. ZVI-Clay remediation of a chlorinated solvent source zone, Skuldelev, Denmark: 1. Site description and contaminant source mass reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Riis, Charlotte; Christensen, Anders G.;

    2012-01-01

    4.6% to 2.1% on average over a depth of 5m; hence, there is a potential for optimization of the delivery method. Most in situ technologies are limited by subsurface heterogeneities, whereby the successful dispersion of geological units and contaminants holds great promise for remediation of DNAPL...

  1. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of the Effect of Hydrocarbon Contamination on Poly(Tetrafluoroethylene) Exposed to a Nitrogen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Morton A.; Lopata, Eugene S.; Finney, Lorie S.

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown that unless the surface of poly(tetrafluoroethylene)(PTFE) is free of hydrocarbon contamination, anomalous changes in the oxygen and fluorine contents, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and hence also the surface properties, may be improperly ascribed to a PTFE film exposed to a oxygen plasma.

  2. Start-up of two moving bed membrane bioreactors treating saline wastewater contaminated by hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, R; Di Prima, N; Freni, G; Giustra, M G; Di Bella, G

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to assess the acclimation of microorganisms to a gradual increase of salinity and hydrocarbons, during the start-up of two moving bed membrane bioreactors (MB-MBRs) fed with saline oily wastewater. In both systems an ultrafiltration membrane was used and two types of carriers were employed: polyurethane sponge cubes (MB-MBRI) and polyethylene cylindrical carriers (MB-MBRII). A decreasing dilution factor of slops has been adopted in order to allow biomass acclimation. The simultaneous effect of salinity and hydrocarbons played an inhibitory role in biomass growth and this resulted in a decrease of the biological removal efficiencies. A reduction of bound extracellular polymeric substances and a simultaneous release of soluble microbial products (SMPs) were observed, particularly in the MB-MBRII system, probably due to the occurrence of a greater suspended biomass stress as response to the recalcitrance of substrate. On the one hand, a clear attachment of biomass occurred only in MB-MBRI and this affected the fouling deposition on the membrane surface. The processes of detachment and entrapment of biomass, from and into the carriers, significantly influenced the superficial cake deposition and its reversibility. On the other hand, in MB-MBRII, the higher production of SMPs implied a predominance of the pore blocking. PMID:26901712

  3. Contamination of aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental samples after the Nakhodka oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 6,200 kl of C-heavy oil, a type of fuel oil, was spilled from the Nakhodka into the Sea of Japan on January 2, 1997, and drifted to the sea coasts of eight prefectures in Japan. Monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the oil, beach sand, sea water, fishes and air were determined for a period of almost one year after the oil spill. The concentration of naphthalene was the highest among the above compounds in the Nakhodka oil and its concentration in the air might have been high just after the spill. The concentrations of PAHs having less than four rings decreased in the oil and sand, while PAHs having four or more rings first increased and then decreased. A decreasing tendency was observed for benzo[a]pyrene in sea water. However, the concentration was higher at the seashores where the oil was still present than at seashores where the oil had been quickly removed. In addition, the Nakhodka oil showed indirect-acting mutagenicity in the Ames test using the S. typhimurium strains. PAHs contributed to the mutagenicity. (author)

  4. Key players and team play: anaerobic microbial communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Schleinitz, Kathleen M; Vogt, Carsten

    2012-05-01

    Biodegradation of anthropogenic pollutants in shallow aquifers is an important microbial ecosystem service which is mainly brought about by indigenous anaerobic microorganisms. For the management of contaminated sites, risk assessment and control of natural attenuation, the assessment of in situ biodegradation and the underlying microbial processes is essential. The development of novel molecular methods, "omics" approaches, and high-throughput techniques has revealed new insight into complex microbial communities and their functions in anoxic environmental systems. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of molecular methods to study anaerobic microbial communities in contaminated terrestrial subsurface ecosystems. We focus on current approaches to analyze composition, dynamics, and functional diversity of subsurface communities, to link identity to activity and metabolic function, and to identify the ecophysiological role of not yet cultured microbes and syntrophic consortia. We discuss recent molecular surveys of contaminated sites from an ecological viewpoint regarding degrader ecotypes, abiotic factors shaping anaerobic communities, and biotic interactions underpinning the importance of microbial cooperation for microbial ecosystem services such as contaminant degradation. PMID:22476263

  5. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an aged coal tar contaminated soil under in-vessel composting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-vessel composting of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in contaminated soil from a manufactured gas plant site was investigated over 98 days using laboratory-scale in-vessel composting reactors. The composting reactors were operated at 18 different operational conditions using a 3-factor factorial design with three temperatures (T, 38 deg. C, 55 deg. C and 70 deg. C), four soil to green waste ratios (S:GW, 0.6:1, 0.7:1, 0.8:1 and 0.9:1 on a dry weight basis) and three moisture contents (MC, 40%, 60% and 80%). PAH losses followed first order kinetics reaching 0.015 day-1 at optimal operational conditions. A factor analysis of the 18 different operational conditions under investigation indicated that the optimal operational conditions for degradation of PAHs occurred at MC 60%, S:GW 0.8:1 and T 38 deg. C. Thus, it is recommended to maintain operational conditions during in-vessel composting of PAH-solid waste close to these values. - Maximum degradation of PAHs in an aged coal tar contaminated soil can be achieved using optimal operational conditions during composting

  6. Estimating aqueous releases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal tar contaminated soils at manufactured gas plant sites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One component of EPRI research on the Environmental Behavior of Organic Substances is to develop methods to estimate releases of monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) to groundwater from coal tars and contaminated soils at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. This report contains results on the release of PAHs from contaminated soils at five MGP sites. Several methods exist for estimating the concentration of PAH in the groundwater in contact with these soils. These include: (a) pure compound solubility; (b) direct measurement of the interstitial water, and (c) the use of partition coefficients. The objective of this research was to evaluate laboratory procedures that can be used for such estimation. In addition to serving as a reliable analytical tool, a well defined protocol can help ensure consistency in results from different sites and for different conditions. In this research, the partition coefficients between the soil and water phases were determined for 16 PAH compounds utilizing five soils from MGP sites. A table lists the properties of the 16 PAH compounds examined in this project. The partition coefficients were determined by two approaches and the coefficients were used to estimate the concentrations of PAH in the soil pore-water

  7. Microbial Degradation of Phenols and Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Creosote-contaminated Groundwater Under Nitrate-reducing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, John; Arvin, Erik; Jensen, Bjørn K.;

    1993-01-01

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the biodegradation of phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons under anaerobic, nitrate-reducing conditions in groundwater from a creosote-contaminated site at Fredensborg, Denmark. The bacteria in the creosote-contaminated groundwater degraded a mixture...... of toluene, phenol, the cresols (o-, m- and p-cresol) and the dimethylphenols 2,4-DMP and 3,4-DMP at both 10° and 20°C. Benzene, the xylenes, napthalene, 2,3-DMP, 2,5-DMP, 2,6-DMP and 3,5-DMP were resistant to biodegradation during 7–12 months of incubation. It was demonstrated that the degradation...... indicated that in addition to the phenols are toluene other carbon sources present in the groundwater contributed to the consumption of nitrate. If the groundwater was incubated under anaerobic conditions without nitrate, sulphate-reducing conditions evolved after ∼ 1 month at 20°C and ∼2 months at 10°C. In...

  8. The change of microbial community from chlorinated solvent-contaminated groundwater after biostimulation using the metagenome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chih-Ming; Liao, Hung-Yu; Chien, Chih-Ching; Tseng, Yi-Kuan; Tang, Petrus; Lin, Chih-En; Chen, Ssu-Ching

    2016-01-25

    The compositions of bacterial community in one site contaminated with PCE/TCE after the slow polycolloid-releasing substrate (SPRS) (contained vegetable oil, cane molasses, and surfactants) addition were analyzed. Results show that SPRS caused a rapid enhancement of reductive dechlorination of TCE. The transformation of PCE/TCE into ethene was observed after 20 days of operation. To compare the change of bacterial communities before and after SPRS addition, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing using the metagenome analysis was performed. Results demonstrated the detection of the increased amounts of Dehalogenimonas by 2.2-fold, Pseudomonas by 3.4-fold and Sulfuricurvum by 4-fold with the analysis of the ribosomal database project (RDP). Metagenomic DNA was extracted from PCE/TCE-contaminated groundwater after SPRS addition, and subjected to sequencing. Results obtained from metagenomic sequencing indicate that genes from Dehalococcoides mccartyi was ranked as the second abundant bacteria among all of the detected bacteria via the analysis of the lowest common ancestor (LCA). Abundance of these bacterial groups, as shown above suggests their role in TCE biodegradation. Functional analysis of the metagenome, with the specific reference to chloroalkane and chloroalkene degradation, revealed the presence of some genes responsible for TCE biodegradation. Overall, results of this study provided new insights for a better understanding of the potential of biostimulation on TCE-contaminated sites. PMID:26474376

  9. The ecological and physiological responses of the microbial community from a semiarid soil to hydrocarbon contamination and its bioremediation using compost amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, F; Jehmlich, N; Lima, K; Morris, B E L; Richnow, H H; Hernández, T; von Bergen, M; García, C

    2016-03-01

    The linkage between phylogenetic and functional processes may provide profound insights into the effects of hydrocarbon contamination and biodegradation processes in high-diversity environments. Here, the impacts of petroleum contamination and the bioremediation potential of compost amendment, as enhancer of the microbial activity in semiarid soils, were evaluated in a model experiment. The analysis of phospholipid fatty-acids (PLFAs) and metaproteomics allowed the study of biomass, phylogenetic and physiological responses of the microbial community in polluted semiarid soils. Petroleum pollution induced an increase of proteobacterial proteins during the contamination, while the relative abundance of Rhizobiales lowered in comparison to the non-contaminated soil. Despite only 0.55% of the metaproteome of the compost-treated soil was involved in biodegradation processes, the addition of compost promoted the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkanes up to 88% after 50 days. However, natural biodegradation of hydrocarbons was not significant in soils without compost. Compost-assisted bioremediation was mainly driven by Sphingomonadales and uncultured bacteria that showed an increased abundance of catabolic enzymes such as catechol 2,3-dioxygenases, cis-dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. For the first time, metaproteomics revealed the functional and phylogenetic relationships of petroleum contamination in soil and the microbial key players involved in the compost-assisted bioremediation. PMID:26225916

  10. Field—Based Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Hydrocarbons at Industrially Contaminated Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Peggy Rigou; Steven John Setford; Selwayan Saini

    2002-01-01

    Examination of organic pollutants in groundwaters should also consider the source of the pollution, which is often a solid matrix such as soil, landfill waste, or sediment. This premise should be viewed alongside the growing trend towards field-based characterisation of contaminated sites for reasons of speed and cost. Field-based methods for the extraction of organic compounds from solid samples are generally cumbersome, time consuming, or inefficient. This paper describes the development of...

  11. Modeling technique for optimal recovery of immiscible light hydrocarbons as free product from contaminated aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Grant S., Jr.; Peralta, R C; Kaluarachchi, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Contamination sites associated with light non-aqueous phase liquids {LNAPL) are numerous and represent difficult cleanup problems. Remediation methods for cleanup of LNAPL fluids in subsurface systems are continuously evolving with the development of various technologies for pump.-and~treat, soil venting, and in-situ bioremediation. Evaluating the effectiveness of remediation techniques as well as attempting to improve their efficiency has been a focus of many researchers, These efforts have ...

  12. Bioavailability of residual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons following enhanced natural attenuation of creosote-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhasz, Albert L., E-mail: albert.juhasz@unisa.edu.a [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095 (Australia); Smith, Euan [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095 (Australia); Waller, Natasha [CSIRO Land and Water, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Stewart, Richard [Remediate, Kent Town, SA 5067 (Australia); Weber, John [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    The impact of residual PAHs (2250 +- 71 mug total PAHs g{sup -1}) following enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) of creosote-contaminated soil (7767 +- 1286 mug total PAHs g{sup -1}) was assessed using a variety of ecological assays. Microtox{sup TM} results for aqueous soil extracts indicated that there was no significant difference in EC{sub 50} values for uncontaminated, pre- and post-remediated soil. However, in studies conducted with Eisenia fetida, PAH bioaccumulation was reduced by up to 6.5-fold as a result of ENA. Similarly, Beta vulgaris L. biomass yields were increased 2.1-fold following ENA of creosote-contaminated soil. While earthworm and plant assays indicated that PAH bioavailability was reduced following ENA, the residual PAH fraction still exerted toxicological impacts on both receptors. Results from this study highlight that residual PAHs following ENA (presumably non-bioavailable to bioremediation) may still be bioavailable to important receptor organisms such as earthworms and plants. - Residual PAHs in creosote-contaminated soil following enhanced natural attenuation impacted negatively on ecological receptors.

  13. Bioavailability of residual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons following enhanced natural attenuation of creosote-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of residual PAHs (2250 ± 71 μg total PAHs g-1) following enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) of creosote-contaminated soil (7767 ± 1286 μg total PAHs g-1) was assessed using a variety of ecological assays. MicrotoxTM results for aqueous soil extracts indicated that there was no significant difference in EC50 values for uncontaminated, pre- and post-remediated soil. However, in studies conducted with Eisenia fetida, PAH bioaccumulation was reduced by up to 6.5-fold as a result of ENA. Similarly, Beta vulgaris L. biomass yields were increased 2.1-fold following ENA of creosote-contaminated soil. While earthworm and plant assays indicated that PAH bioavailability was reduced following ENA, the residual PAH fraction still exerted toxicological impacts on both receptors. Results from this study highlight that residual PAHs following ENA (presumably non-bioavailable to bioremediation) may still be bioavailable to important receptor organisms such as earthworms and plants. - Residual PAHs in creosote-contaminated soil following enhanced natural attenuation impacted negatively on ecological receptors.

  14. Relationship between heavy fuel oil phytotoxicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in Salicornia fragilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meudec, Anna; Poupart, Nathalie; Deslandes, Eric [Laboratoire d' Ecophysiologie et de Biotechnologie des Halophytes et des Algues Marines (LEBHAM), UPRES EA 3877, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Technopole Brest Iroise, Place Nicolas Copernic, 29280 Plouzane (France); Dussauze, Jacques [Institut Departemental d' analyses, de conseil et d' expertise en Hygiene alimentaire, Eau et environnement et Sante Animale (IDHESA), 120 rue Alexis de Rochon, BP52, 29280 Plouzane (France)

    2007-08-01

    Greenhouse experiments were carried out to study the effects of heavy fuel oil contamination on the growth and the development of Salicornia fragilis Ball and Tutin, a salt-marsh edible species. Plants were sampled in spring at the 'Aber du Conquet' (Finistere, France), and artificially exposed by coating shoot sections with N 6 fuel oil or by mixing it in their substratum. The impact of petroleum on plant development was followed by phytotoxicity assessments and PAH shoots assays. The plants exhibited visual symptoms of stress, i.e. chlorosis, yellowing, growth reduction and perturbations in developmental parameters. The contamination of plants by shoot coating appeared to be less than through soil. Moreover, the increase of the degree of pollution induced more marked effects on plants, likely because of the physical effects of fuel. However, bioaccumulation of PAHs in shoot tissues was also found to be significant, even at very low levels of contamination, and highly related to the conditions of exposure to oil. The strong relationships between the PAH contents of Salicornia plants and growth reduction suggest a chemical toxicity of fuel oil, compounds like PAHs being known to inhibit physiological processes in plants. (author)

  15. Radio-wave-supported cleaning of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil: Results of a field test and general conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, U.; Holzer, F.; Buchenhorst, D.; Kopinke, F.D. [UFZ - Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Dept. of Environmental Technology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The potential of soil heating using radio waves (RW) for the enhancement of various remediation techniques was exemplarily tested for an original soil heavily contaminated with a variety of hydrocarbons (mineral oil constituents, PAHs, phenols) and additionally exhibiting an extraordinarily high initial pH value (11.6). The long-term experiment lasted more than 300 days and three different clean-up options, namely (i) enhancement of biodegradation at moderate temperatures (about 35 deg. C), (ii) activation of thermophilic microorganisms (at about 60 deg. C) and (iii) thermodesorption of VOCs and SVOCs (up to 125 deg. C), were evaluated in succession. Additionally, correlated with the evaporation of water, stripping effects were utilized. For all these temperature regimes, RW heating was successfully applied to a soil volume of 10 cubic metres. The removal of organic contaminants was much more efficient in the case of the RW-heated soil (in comparison to a non-heated reference reactor) as shown especially for n-alkanes and phenols. At the end of the whole process, the degradation of pollutants in the RW-heated reactor was almost complete whereas a significant residual concentration (about 20 % of the initial value) remained in the reference reactor. The removal of the alkanes was mainly due to microbiological processes, as unambiguously shown by the comparison of n- and iso-alkanes having similar boiling points (e.g. n-C{sub 17} and n-C{sub 18} compared to iso-C{sub 19} [pristane]). In conclusion, RW heating was demonstrated to be an adequate tool for improving the remediation of polluted soil, especially by accelerating the process and being able to remove complex contaminations under in situ, on-site and ex situ conditions. (authors)

  16. Radio-wave-supported cleaning of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil: Results of a field test and general conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of soil heating using radio waves (RW) for the enhancement of various remediation techniques was exemplarily tested for an original soil heavily contaminated with a variety of hydrocarbons (mineral oil constituents, PAHs, phenols) and additionally exhibiting an extraordinarily high initial pH value (11.6). The long-term experiment lasted more than 300 days and three different clean-up options, namely (i) enhancement of biodegradation at moderate temperatures (about 35 deg. C), (ii) activation of thermophilic microorganisms (at about 60 deg. C) and (iii) thermodesorption of VOCs and SVOCs (up to 125 deg. C), were evaluated in succession. Additionally, correlated with the evaporation of water, stripping effects were utilized. For all these temperature regimes, RW heating was successfully applied to a soil volume of 10 cubic metres. The removal of organic contaminants was much more efficient in the case of the RW-heated soil (in comparison to a non-heated reference reactor) as shown especially for n-alkanes and phenols. At the end of the whole process, the degradation of pollutants in the RW-heated reactor was almost complete whereas a significant residual concentration (about 20 % of the initial value) remained in the reference reactor. The removal of the alkanes was mainly due to microbiological processes, as unambiguously shown by the comparison of n- and iso-alkanes having similar boiling points (e.g. n-C17 and n-C18 compared to iso-C19 [pristane]). In conclusion, RW heating was demonstrated to be an adequate tool for improving the remediation of polluted soil, especially by accelerating the process and being able to remove complex contaminations under in situ, on-site and ex situ conditions. (authors)

  17. Impact of erosion and transfer processes in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon contamination of water bodies in the Seine River basin (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateuille, David; Evrard, Olivier; Moreau-Guigon, Elodie; Chevreuil, Marc; Mouchel, Jean-Marie

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) reach problematic concentrations in water and sediment of numerous streams of the world. In the Seine River (France), they prevent to achieve the good chemical status enforced by European law. However, the provenance and the fate of PAHs found in rivers are still poorly understood. Here, we combined chemical and fallout radionuclide measurements conducted on a large number of suspended sediment (SS) (n = 231) and soil (n = 37) samples collected at 62 sites during an entire hydrological year. A model was developed to estimate mean PAH concentration in sediment from the population density in the drainage area and good relationships were found during both low stage and flood periods. Influence of human population also appeared to be stronger during the latter period. However, some discrepancies between measured and modeled PAH concentrations were observed and the role of the origin of SS was investigated. During the low flow period, the observed differences were explained by the provenance of river sediment (agricultural topsoil vs. eroded channel banks). Time-averaged PAH concentrations measured in suspended sediment collected in the catchments where erosion of agricultural topsoil dominated were systematically higher than the predicted values. On the contrary, in the catchments where erosion mainly occurred in deep soil or river embankment, the supply of particles protected from atmospheric fallout contamination led to measure concentrations below the predicted values. As this relationship between population density and SS contamination was no longer valid during the flood period, the role of transfer times was also investigated. The percentages of freshly eroded sediment in samples were determined by comparing the 7Be/210Pb ratio in rainfall and SS. An annual turn-over cycle of sediment was observed but no relationship was found between PAH contamination and residence times of particles within rivers. This result suggested

  18. Effect of humic deposit (leonardite) on degradation of semi-volatile and heavy hydrocarbons and soil quality in crude-oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay, Oguz Can; Erdogan, Esin Eraydın; Karaca, Ayten

    2010-11-01

    In order to investigate the bioremedial potential of humic deposit (leonardite), the effects of the treatments of leonardite and a commercial bioaugmentation agent on the degradation of a variety of petroleum hydrocarbons (C13-C31) and soil enzyme activities (urease acid-alkaline phosphatase and dehydrogenase) were tested within a soil incubation experiment lasting 120 days. Experimentally crude-oil-contaminated soil (2.5%) was regulated to a C:N:P ratio (100:15:1; Oilcon), amended with 5% of leonardite and regulated to the same C:N:P ratio (Oilcon-L) or mixed with a commercial bioaugmentation product (Oilcon-B), respectively. In the short period of incubation (60 days), Oilcon and Oilcon-B treatments showed higher hydrocarbon degradations, whereas Oilcon-L showed higher hydrocarbon degradation over Oilcon and Oilcon-B treatments in the long-term (120 days). Applying contaminated soil with leonardite increased urease (LSD, 4.978, *Pacid and alkaline phosphatase activities showed no certain inclination between different treatments. Dehydrogenase seemed to be more related to hydrocarbon degradation process. Overall results showed that leonardite enhanced biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons and also stimulated soil ecological quality measured as soil enzyme activities. PMID:19888662

  19. [Evaluation of chlorine dioxide concentrations needed to effectively control contamination by Legionella spp in hospital hot water distribution systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaroli, Paolo; Ravaioli, Cinzia; Gabutti, Giovanni; Caroli, Maria; Stefanati, Armando

    2016-01-01

    This aim of the study was to identify effective levels of ClO2 for control of Legionella spp. contamination in the hot water (45-55 °C.) distribution system of a 579-bed hospital in Ravenna (Italy). Overall, 663 hot water samples were collected from the hospital's sinks and shower taps and were analyzed. Trend line analysis, which describes the trend in the number of positive samples collected according to disinfectant concentration, shows that the lowest number of positive samples was achieved with concentrations of ClO2 between 0.22 and 0, 32 mg /l. PMID:27336956

  20. A quantum cascade laser infrared spectrometer for CO2 stable isotope analysis: Field implementation at a hydrocarbon contaminated site under bio-remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimbaud, Christophe; Noel, Cécile; Chartier, Michel; Catoire, Valéry; Blessing, Michaela; Gourry, Jean Christophe; Robert, Claude

    2016-02-01

    Real-time methods to monitor stable isotope ratios of CO2 are needed to identify biogeochemical origins of CO2 emissions from the soil-air interface. An isotope ratio infra-red spectrometer (IRIS) has been developed to measure CO2 mixing ratio with δ(13)C isotopic signature, in addition to mixing ratios of other greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O). The original aspects of the instrument as well as its precision and accuracy for the determination of the isotopic signature δ(13)C of CO2 are discussed. A first application to biodegradation of hydrocarbons is presented, tested on a hydrocarbon contaminated site under aerobic bio-treatment. CO2 flux measurements using closed chamber method is combined with the determination of the isotopic signature δ(13)C of the CO2 emission to propose a non-intrusive method to monitor in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons. In the contaminated area, high CO2 emissions have been measured with an isotopic signature δ(13)C suggesting that CO2 comes from petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation. This first field implementation shows that rapid and accurate measurement of isotopic signature of CO2 emissions is particularly useful in assessing the contribution of contaminant degradation to the measured CO2 efflux and is promising as a monitoring tool for aerobic bio-treatment. PMID:26969546

  1. In-situ treatment of hydrocarbons contamination through enhanced bio-remediation and two phase extraction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aglietto, I.; Brunero Bronzin, M. [Studio Aglietto s.r.l., Torino (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    It happens frequently to find industrial site affected by contamination of subsoil and groundwater with consequent presence of free phase product floating on the water table. The remediation technologies in this case shall be properly selected and coordinated in a way that the interactions between each activities will help to decontaminate the site. The case study deals with an industrial site located near Turin, in Italy, of about 50 hectares of extension where has been found an area of about 4000 square meters with contamination of subsoil and groundwater. The compounds with higher concentrations are petroleum hydrocarbons found both in soil and in groundwater. Another big problem is represented by the presence of a layer of free product floating on the water table with a maximum measured thickness of 70 cm; this situation can be considered in fact one of the major difficulty in management of selected remediation technologies because the complete recover of the free phase is a priority for any kind of remediation system to apply subsequently. The present work is based upon the selection and implementation of a multiple treatment for definitive remediation of subsoil and groundwater. Free product recovery has been faced with a two-phase extraction technology, then for the remediation of subsoil we implemented a bio-venting system to improve biodegradation processes and finally for groundwater treatment we apply an enhanced in situ bio-remediation injecting oxygen release compounds directly into the aquifer. To reach these choices we have to pass through a complex activity of investigation of the site made up of more than 40 sampling point, 8 monitoring wells, about 140 analysis on subsoil samples and 10 on groundwater samples and one well used for an aquifer test. The preliminary design of the remediation system was therefore based on an extensive site characterization that included geological and geochemical, microbiological and hydrological data, together with

  2. In-situ treatment of hydrocarbons contamination through enhanced bio-remediation and two phase extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It happens frequently to find industrial site affected by contamination of subsoil and groundwater with consequent presence of free phase product floating on the water table. The remediation technologies in this case shall be properly selected and coordinated in a way that the interactions between each activities will help to decontaminate the site. The case study deals with an industrial site located near Turin, in Italy, of about 50 hectares of extension where has been found an area of about 4000 square meters with contamination of subsoil and groundwater. The compounds with higher concentrations are petroleum hydrocarbons found both in soil and in groundwater. Another big problem is represented by the presence of a layer of free product floating on the water table with a maximum measured thickness of 70 cm; this situation can be considered in fact one of the major difficulty in management of selected remediation technologies because the complete recover of the free phase is a priority for any kind of remediation system to apply subsequently. The present work is based upon the selection and implementation of a multiple treatment for definitive remediation of subsoil and groundwater. Free product recovery has been faced with a two-phase extraction technology, then for the remediation of subsoil we implemented a bio-venting system to improve biodegradation processes and finally for groundwater treatment we apply an enhanced in situ bio-remediation injecting oxygen release compounds directly into the aquifer. To reach these choices we have to pass through a complex activity of investigation of the site made up of more than 40 sampling point, 8 monitoring wells, about 140 analysis on subsoil samples and 10 on groundwater samples and one well used for an aquifer test. The preliminary design of the remediation system was therefore based on an extensive site characterization that included geological and geochemical, microbiological and hydrological data, together with

  3. POLYCICLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATION IN WELS CATFISH (SILURUS GLANIS CAUGHT IN THE PO RIVER BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Giorgi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this investigation was to evaluate IPA contamination in samples of Silurus glanis caught in Po river. N. 54 muscle samples were collected and analyzed. Five samples exceeded the maximum limit set by CE Regulation 1881/2006 for Benzo(apirene. Therefore, 10% of Silurus fished turned out to be not adequate and potentially harmful for consumers. In order to estimate the real risk for human health it is necessary to enforce this study, correlating the results with the effective fish consumption.

  4. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sites in northern regions: a synthesis of full-scale projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of a proprietary technology (biopiling) developed by BIOGENIE INC, a firm specializing in contaminated site remediation, is discussed. The technology has been applied at more than 20 different sites located in northern regions, or operated under winter conditions. The sites treated ranged in size from 80 to 90,000 tons, some under very difficult conditions ( no roads, no electricity, etc). In all cases, the process produced successful results and achieved compliance with environmental regulations. The paper provides details of the biopile system, and describes some of the projects and results obtained since the technology was introduced in 1991. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  5. Vertical-flow constructed wetlands treating domestic wastewater contaminated by hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Isawi, R H K; Sani, A; Almuktar, S A A A N; Scholz, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare the impact of different design (aggregate size) and operational (contact time, empty time and chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading) variables on the long-term and seasonal performance of vertical-flow constructed wetland filters operated in tidal flow mode before and after a one-off spill of diesel. Ten different vertical-flow wetland systems were planted with Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. (common reed). Approximately 130 g of diesel fuel was poured into four wetland filters. Before the spill, compliance with secondary wastewater treatment standards was achieved by all wetlands regarding ammonia-nitrogen (NH4-N), nitrate-nitrogen (NO₃-N) and suspended solids (SS), and non-compliance was recorded for biochemical oxygen demand and ortho-phosphate-phosphorus (PO₄-P). Higher COD inflow concentrations had a significantly positive impact on the treatment performance for COD, PO₄-P and SS. The wetland with the largest aggregate size had the lowest mean NO₃-N outflow concentration. However, the results were similar regardless of aggregate size and resting time for most variables. Clear seasonal outflow concentration trends were recorded for COD, NH4-N and NO₃-N. No filter clogging was observed. The removal efficiencies dropped for those filters impacted by the diesel spill. The wetlands system shows a good performance regarding total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal. PMID:25812105

  6. Wheat straw biochar amendments on the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanan; Yang, Baoshan; Song, Ziheng; Wang, Hui; He, Fei; Han, Xuemei

    2016-08-01

    Soil amendments of wheat straw biochar (BC), lignocellulosic substrate (LS), BC+LS, and BC+LS+BR (surfactant Brij30) were investigated for the first time in order to remedy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-polluted soil using pilot scale microcosm incubation. We hypothesized that the removal of PAHs could be inhibited due to the adsorption and immobilization of biochar and the inhibition depends on the molecular-weight of PAHs. The removal rates of phenanthrene (PHE) and Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) ranked as C=BC>LS=LS+BC=LS+BC+BR and C=BC=LS+BC+BR>LS=LS+BC. Wheat straw biochar inhibited the removal of PHE and accelerated BaP removal. The activity of Dehydrogenase (DH) was depressed by the addition of the biochar while the activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was stimulated. Lignocellulose and surfactant are favourable to sustain soil microbiological activity and the removal of PAHs although the diversity of bacterial community was not significantly changed. The findings implied that the components of PAHs are necessary to consider when the amendments are implemented by associated biochar in PAH-polluted soil. PMID:27151675

  7. Phytoremediation of a petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated shallow aquifer in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Elizabeth Guthrie; Cook, Rachel L.; Landmeyer, James E.; Atkinson, Brad; Malone, Donald R.; Shaw, George; Woods, Leilani

    2014-01-01

    A former bulk fuel terminal in North Carolina is a groundwater phytoremediation demonstration site where 3,250 hybrid poplars, willows, and pine trees were planted from 2006 to 2008 over approximately 579,000 L of residual gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. Since 2011, the groundwater altitude is lower in the area with trees than outside the planted area. Soil-gas analyses showed a 95 percent mass loss for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and a 99 percent mass loss for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). BTEX and methyl tert-butyl ether concentrations have decreased in groundwater. Interpolations of free-phase, fuel product gauging data show reduced thicknesses across the site and pooling of fuel product where poplar biomass is greatest. Isolated clusters of tree mortalities have persisted in areas with high TPH and BTEX mass. Toxicity assays showed impaired water use for willows and poplars exposed to the site's fuel product, but Populus survival was higher than the willows or pines on-site, even in a noncontaminated control area. All four Populus clones survived well at the site.

  8. [Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminations in surface sediments from Zhalong wetland, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Wen; Xie, Qi-Lai; Wang, Yan; Xu, Yue; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2011-08-01

    Soxhlet extraction, silica gel alumina column for separation and clean up and gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for qualitative and quantitative analysis were used for study environmental behavior of 15 priority PAHs of twelve surface sediment samples collected from Zhalong wetland, Heilongjiang Province. The objectives of this study were to identify the PAHs contamination level, composition pattern, pollution sources and pathways, and to assess the ecological risk of PAHs to aquatic life in Zhalong wetland. The total concentrations of 15 priority PAHs ranged form 31.9 to 290 ng/g (dry weight), with a mean value of 130 ng/g. The PAHs profiles were dominated by two-to four-ring compounds which accounted for 90% of total PAHs. Phenanthrene, fluorine, fluoranthene, and pyrene represented the highest fractions in all surface sediment samples. Comparing with other results from wetlands and lakes in China or other countries, the PAH concentrations level in Zhalong wetland surface sediments were relatively low, in the same range of Lharu wetland. The linear regression analysis showed that the concentrations of PAHs were significantly correlated to the sediment total organic carbon (TOC) content (R2 = 0.87). PAHs contamination might mainly came from biomass and coal combustion. After long range atmospheric transport and deposition, the released PAHs finally accumulated into wetland sediment. Ecology risk assessment indicated that phenanthrene and fluorine had exhibited a tendency of accumulation on surface sediment of Zhalong wetland, which would exert negative toxic effect on aquatic organism. PMID:22619977

  9. Methodology for the detection of contamination by hydrocarbons and further soil sampling for volatile and semi-volatile organic enrichment in former petrol stations, SE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Rosales Aranda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal detection and quantification of contamination plumes in soil and groundwater by petroleum organic compounds, gasoline and diesel, is critical for the reclamation of hydrocarbons contaminated soil at petrol stations. Through this study it has been achieved a sampling stage optimization in these scenarios by means of the location of potential contamination areas before sampling with the application of the 2D electrical resistivity tomography method, a geophysical non destructive technique based on resistivity measurements in soils. After the detection of hydrocarbons contaminated areas, boreholes with continuous coring were performed in a petrol station located in Murcia Region (Spain. The drillholes reached depths down to 10 m and soil samples were taken from each meter of the drilling. The optimization in the soil samples handling and storage, for both volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds determinations, was achieved by designing a soil sampler to minimize volatilization losses and in order to avoid the manual contact with the environmental samples during the sampling. The preservation of soil samples was performed according to Europe regulations and US Environmental Protection Agency recommendations into two kinds of glass vials. Moreover, it has been taken into account the determination techniques to quantify the hydrocarbon pollution based on Gas Chromatography with different detectors and headspace technique to reach a liquid-gas equilibrium for volatile analyses.

  10. Carcinogenic potential of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Xiamen metropolis, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chao; Zhang, Youchi; Reid, Brian J; Nunes, Luis M

    2012-12-01

    Xiamen is one of China's most rapidly developing metropolises. The objectives of the present study were: (1) to establish the levels and spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil across the Xiamen metropolis, (2) to evaluate the extent to which PAH concentrations were elevated in the high urbanization area (HUA) of the island and how these compared with those in the low urbanization area (LUA) of the mainland, and (3) to evaluate the PAH hazard based upon their Carcinogenic Potential (CP), defined as toxicity equivalence of ∑PAHs. Twenty two alternative relative carcinogenic potency schemes were used and compared. Results demonstrated PAH concentrations to be greatly elevated across the entire metropolis. Significantly, the most enriched compounds represented the greatest concern with respect to carcinogenicity. The CP of more than 25% of the industrial samples from the island surpassed the Canadian guidance threshold value (600 μg kg⁻¹) for an excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) of 1 in 10⁻⁶. While soil samples from the remaining land uses on the island were all below this threshold, PAH levels in soil were nonetheless elevated (enrichment factors of between 4.1 ± 1.9 and 16.3 ± 12.4 in the HUA, and between 1.3 ± 0.7 and 10.8 ± 4.4 in the LUA). Results relating to agricultural locations on the island indicated 75% of the samples in HUA and 28% of the samples in LUA to be above the USEPA guidance value for BaP (15 μg kg⁻¹). Given the exceptionally high population density on the island there is a need for further research to evaluate multiple pathway PAH exposure risks. PMID:23092998

  11. Accumulation and bioconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a nearshore estuarine environment near a Pensacola (Florida) creosote contamination site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, J.F.; Dresler, P.V.

    1988-01-01

    Long-term accumulation of creosote wastes at a wood-preserving facility near Pensacola, Florida, has produced high levels of organic contamination of groundwaters near Pensacola Bay. Impacts of this contamination on the nearshore environment of the bay were examined by analysis of water, sediment and tissues of two mollusc species. One of the species (Thais haemastoma) was native to the study area. Individuals of the other test species (Crassostrea virginica) were placed in cages at the test sites for a 6-week period. Contamination at the nearshore estuarine sites was assessed by comparison to a control site in an uncontaminated area of the bay, as well as a small stream which forms a direct surface-water link between the creosote storage ponds and the bay. The study focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the primary components of creosote. Very little PAH in water or in the surface layer of estuarine sediments was detected, despite heavy pollution of the stream sediments. This is attributed to various degradation processes which attack the PAH compounds once they discharge into the estuary, and to the likelihood of intermittent and localised release of contaminants to the estuary. Examination of sediment cores and mollusc tissues, which provide a record integrated over time and space, revealed some accumulation of a few PAH, notably fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene and phenanthrene. In the sediments, the highest concentrations of these compounds appeared below the surface, within a depth range of 8-13 cm. Bioaccumulation of fluoranthene, pyrene and phenanthrene in both mollusc species was up to ten times greater at test sites than at the control site. This contrasts with naphthalene, the bioaccumulation of which was no greater at test sites than at the control site. These differences in bioaccumulation factors relate to structural chemistry of the compounds which control their solubility, bioavailability, susceptibility to degradation

  12. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS OF MUTAGENIC EXTRACTS OF AQUEOUS CHLORINATED HUMIC ACID. A COMPARISON OF THE BYPRODUCTS TO DRINKING WATER CONTAMINANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formation of mutagenic compounds as a result of aqueous chlorination of humic acids has been demonstrated. Solvent extracts responding positively to the Ames test were analyzed by GC/MS in an attempt to identify the mutagenic components. Aliquots of the chlorinated humic solution...

  13. Bioremediation of Petroleum hydrocarbon by using Pseudomonas species isolated from Petroleum contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A newly isolated strain Pseudomonas fluorescens (Accession number KF 279042.1 have potential in diesel degradation and can be recommended for bioremediation of sites that are contaminated with diesel. This bacterium was characterized on the basis of microbiological, biochemical and molecular analysis. Bacterial growth optimization was studied based on carbon source, nitrogen source, pH and temperature. The strain was selected based on its ability to show growth in medium containing diesel. In addition, optimum temperature and pH for increased growth by the isolate were found to be 37oC and pH 8.0 indicating the maximum utilization of diesel. At the same time, production of protease and urease enzymes during the utilization of diesel was also assayed following the standard procedures.

  14. Influence of compost amendments on the diversity of alkane degrading bacteria in hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MichaelSchloter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alkane degrading microorganisms play an important role for bioremediation of petrogenic contaminated environments. In this study, we investigated the effects of compost addition on the diversity of alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB harboring bacteria in oil-contaminated soil originated from an industrial zone in Celje, Slovenia, to improve our understanding about the bacterial community involved in alkane degradation and the effects of amendments. Soil without any amendments (control soil and soil amended with compost of different maturation stages, i 1 year and ii 2 weeks, were incubated under controlled conditions in a microcosm experiment and sampled after 0, 6, 12 and 36 weeks of incubation. By using quantitative real-time PCR higher number of alkB genes could be detected in soil samples with compost compared to the control soil after 6, 12 and 36 weeks mainly if the less maturated compost was added. To get an insight into the composition of the alkB harboring microbial communities, we performed next generation sequencing of alkB gene fragment amplicons. Richness and diversity of alkB gene harboring prokaryotes was higher in soil mixed with compost compared to control soil after 6, 12 and 36 weeks again with stronger effects of the less maturated compost. Comparison of communities detected in different samples and time points based on principle component analysis revealed that the addition of compost in general stimulated the abundance of alkB harboring Actinobacteria during the experiment independent from the maturation stage of the compost compared to the control soils. In addition alkB harboring proteobacteria like Shewanella or Hydrocarboniphaga as well as proteobacteria of the genus Agrobacterium responded positively to the addition of compost to soil The amendment of the less maturated compost resulted in addition in a large increase of alkB harboring bacteria of the Cytophaga group (Microscilla mainly at the early sampling

  15. Distribution of endophytic bacteria in Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L. from soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anping Peng

    Full Text Available The distributions of endophytic bacteria in Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L. grown in soils contaminated with different levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were investigated with polymerase chain reaction followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technology (PCR-DGGE and cultivation methods. Twelve types of PAHs, at concentrations varying from 0.16 to 180 mg·kg(-1, were observed in the roots and shoots of the two plants. The total PAH concentrations in Alopecurus aequalis Sobol obtained from three different PAH-contaminated stations were 184, 197, and 304 mg·kg(-1, and the total PAH concentrations in Oxalis corniculata L. were 251, 346, and 600 mg·kg(-1, respectively. The PCR-DGGE results showed that the endophytic bacterial communities in the roots and shoots of the two plants were quite different, although most bacteria belonged to Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A total of 68 endophytic bacterial strains were isolated from different tissues of the two plants and classified into three phyla: Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. In both plants, Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were the dominant cultivable populations. With an increase in the PAH pollution level, the diversity and distribution of endophytic bacteria in the two plants changed correspondingly, and the number of cultivable endophytic bacterial strains decreased rapidly. Testing of the isolated endophytic bacteria for tolerance to each type of PAH showed that most isolates could grow well on Luria-Bertani media in the presence of different PAHs, and some isolates were able to grow rapidly on a mineral salt medium with a single PAH as the sole carbon and energy source, indicating that these strains may have the potential to degrade PAHs in plants. This research provides the first insight into the characteristics of endophytic bacterial populations under different PAH pollution levels and provides a

  16. Selection of oxidant doses for in situ chemical oxidation of soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranc, B; Faure, P; Croze, V; Simonnot, M O

    2016-07-15

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a promising alternative to thermal desorption for the remediation of soils contaminated with organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). For field application, one major issue is the selection of the optimal doses of the oxidizing solution, i.e. the oxidant and appropriate catalysts and/or additives. Despite an extensive scientific literature on ISCO, this choice is very difficult because many parameters differ from one study to another. The present review identifies the critical factors that must be taken into account to enable comparison of these various contributions. For example, spiked soils and aged, polluted soils cannot be compared; PAHs freshly spiked into a soil are fully available for degradation unlike a complex mixture of pollutants trapped in a soil for many years. Another notable example is the high diversity of oxidation conditions employed during batch experiments, although these affect the representativeness of the system. Finally, in this review a methodology is also proposed based on a combination of the stoichiometric oxidant demand of the organic pollutants and the design of experiments (DOE) in order to allow a better comparison of the various studies so far reported. PMID:27043880

  17. Contamination of Runoff Water at Gdańsk Airport (Poland by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Namieśnik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Airport runoff can contain high concentrations of various pollutants, in particular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, the environmental levels of which have to be monitored. Airport runoff water samples, collected at the Gdańsk-Rębiechowo Airport from 2008 to 2009, were analysed for PAHs and PCBs by gas chromatography. The aromatic fractions were separated by liquid-liquid extraction and analysed by GC/MS. Total PAH concentrations were 295–6,758 ng/L in 2008 and 180–1,924 ng/L in 2009, while total PCB levels in 2008 ranged from 0.14 to 0.44 µg/L and in 2009 from 0.06 to 0.23 µg/L. The PAH and PCB compositions in airport runoff waters were examined over a range of spatial and temporal scales to determine distributions, trends and possible sources. This pollution is mainly pyrolytic and related to anthropogenic activity. There were significant differences between the samples collected in the two seasons. An understanding of the magnitude of contamination due to airport runoff water is important for the effective management of airport infrastructure.

  18. Shifts in microbial community structure during in situ surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingwen; Li, Feng; Zhan, Yu; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to reveal the microbial mechanism of in situ surfactant-enhanced bioremediation (SEBR). Various concentrations of rhamnolipids, Tween 80, and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS) were separately sprayed onto soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for years. Within 90 days, the highest level of degradation (95 %) was observed in the soil treated with rhamnolipids (10 mg/kg), followed by 92 % degradation with Tween 80 (50 mg/kg) and 90 % degradation with SDBS (50 mg/kg). The results of the microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) suggest that bacteria dominated the enhanced PAH biodegradation (94 % of the maximum contribution). The shift of bacterial community structure during the surfactant treatment was analyzed by using the 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing. In the presence of surfactants, the number of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas increased from 2-3 to 15-30 % at the end of the experiment (two to three times of control). Gene prediction with phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt) shows that the PAH-degrading genes, such as 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate dioxygenase and PAH dioxygenase large subunit, significantly increased after the surfactant applications (p < 0.05). The findings of this study provide insights into the surfactant-induced shifts of microbial community, as well as critical factors for efficient bioremediation. PMID:27068902

  19. Combination of biochar amendment and mycoremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons immobilization and biodegradation in creosote-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Alfaro-Barta, Irene; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-03-21

    Soils impregnated with creosote contain high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). To bioremediate these soils and avoid PAH spread, different bioremediation strategies were tested, based on natural attenuation, biochar application, wheat straw biostimulation, Pleurotus ostreatus mycoremediation, and the novel sequential application of biochar for 21 days and P. ostreatus 21 days more. Soil was sampled after 21 and 42 days after the remediation application. The efficiency and effectiveness of each remediation treatment were assessed according to PAH degradation and immobilization, fungal and bacterial development, soil eco-toxicity and legal considerations. Natural attenuation and biochar treatments did not achieve adequate PAH removal and soil eco-toxicity reduction. Biostimulation showed the highest bacterial development but low PAH degradation rate. Mycoremediation achieved the best PAH degradation rate and the lowest bioavailable fraction and soil eco-toxicity. This bioremediation strategy achieved PAH concentrations below Spanish legislation for contaminated soils (RD 9/2005). Sequential application of biochar and P. ostreatus was the second treatment most effective for PAH biodegradation and immobilization. However, the activity of P. ostreatus was increased by previous biochar application and PAH degradation efficiency was increased. Therefore, the combined strategy for PAH degradation have high potential to increase remediation efficiency. PMID:25506817

  20. Biosurfactant production by Serratia rubidaea SNAU02 isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil and its physico-chemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalini, S; Parthasarathi, R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize and optimize the growth media for biosurfactant production from Serratia rubidaea SNAU02 isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil from Cuddalore district, Tamilnadu, India. The biosurfactant produced by S. rubidaea SNAU02, was able to reduce the surface tension to 34.4 mN m(-1) in MSM medium. The biosurfactant was characterized by FT-IR and GC-MS analysis. The GC-MS analysis shows that dirhamnolipid was detected in abundance as predominant congener than monorhamnolipid. The response surface methodology (RSM) -central composite design (CCD) was performed to optimize the media for biosurfactant production. The maximum emulsification index was obtained under the optimal condition of 29.31 g L(-1) mannitol; 2.06 g L(-1) yeast extract, medium pH 6.97 and 5.69 g L(-1) NaCl. The biosurfactant produced by S. rubidaea recovered 92% of used engine oil adsorbed to a sand sample, suggested the potential application in microbial enhanced oil recovery and bioremediation. PMID:23993704

  1. Effects of diurnal temperature variation on microbial community and petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soils from a sub-Arctic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-12-01

    Contaminated soils are subject to diurnal and seasonal temperature variations during on-site ex-situ bioremediation processes. We assessed how diurnal temperature variations similar to that in summer at the site from which petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil was collected affect the soil microbial community and the extent of biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons compared with constant temperature regimes. Microbial community analyses for 16S rRNA and alkB genes by pyrosequencing indicated that the microbial community for soils incubated under diurnal temperature variation from 5°C to 15°C (VART5-15) evolved similarly to that for soils incubated at constant temperature of 15°C (CST15). In contrast, under a constant temperature of 5°C (CST5), the community evolved significantly different. The extent of biodegradation of C10-C16 hydrocarbons in the VART5-15 systems was 48%, comparable with the 41% biodegradation in CST15 systems, but significantly higher than CST5 systems at 11%. The enrichment of Gammaproteobacteria was observed in the alkB gene-harbouring communities in VART5-15 and CST15 but not in CST5 systems. However, the Actinobacteria was abundant at all temperature regimes. The results suggest that changes in microbial community composition as a result of diurnal temperature variations can significantly influence petroleum hydrocarbon bioremediation performance in cold regions. PMID:25808640

  2. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy reveals polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination despite relatively pristine site characteristics: Results of a field study in the Niger Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinaju, Blessing E; Martin, Francis L

    2016-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is an emerging technique to detect biochemical alterations in biological tissues, particularly changes due to sub-lethal exposures to environmental contaminants. We have previously shown the potential of attenuated total reflection FTIR (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to detect real-time exposure to contaminants in sentinel organisms as well as the potential to relate spectral alterations to the presence of specific environmental agents. In this study based in the Niger Delta (Nigeria), changes occurring in fish tissues as a result of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure at contaminated sites are compared to the infrared (IR) spectra of the tissues obtained from a relatively pristine site. Multivariate analysis revealed that PAH contamination could be occurring at the pristine site, based on the IR spectra and significant (P<0.0001) differences between sites. The study provides evidence of the IR spectroscopy techniques' sensitivity and supports their potential application in environmental biomonitoring. PMID:26826366

  3. Influence of Vegetation on the In Situ Bacterial Community and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Degraders in Aged PAH-Contaminated or Thermal-Desorption-Treated Soil▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Faure, Pierre; Norini, Marie-Paule; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Leyval, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination, bacterial community, and PAH-degrading bacteria were monitored in aged PAH-contaminated soil (Neuves-Maisons [NM] soil; with a mean of 1,915 mg of 16 PAHs·kg−1 of soil dry weight) and in the same soil previously treated by thermal desorption (TD soil; with a mean of 106 mg of 16 PAHs·kg−1 of soil dry weight). This study was conducted in situ for 2 years using experimental plots of the two soils. NM soil was colonized by spontaneous vege...

  4. Monitoring of ground water quality and heavy metals in soil during large scale bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste in India: case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ajoy Kumar Mandal; Atanu Jana; Mr. Abhijit Datta; Sarma, Priyangshu M.; Banwari Lal; Jayati Datta

    2014-01-01

    Bioremediation using microbes has been well accepted as an environmentally friendly and economical treatment method for disposal of hazardous petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated waste (oily waste) and this type of bioremediation has been successfully conducted in laboratory and on a pilot scale in various countries, including India. Presently there are no federal regulatory guidelines available in India for carrying out field-scale bioremediation of oily waste using microbes. The results of th...

  5. Production of Alkaline Protease by Solvent-Tolerant Alkaliphilic Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942 Isolated from Hydrocarbon Contaminated Habitat: Process Parameters Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Ulhas Patil; Ambalal Chaudhari

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, a newly isolated organic solvent-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterial strain was reported from a hydrocarbon (gasoline and diesel) contaminated soil collected from the petrol station, Shirpur (India). The strain was identified as Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942, based on phenotype, biochemical, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The capability of Bacillus circulans to secrete an extracellular, thermostable, alkaline protease and grow in the presence...

  6. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites

  7. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-09-14

    The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites.

  8. Influence of pretreatment on efficiency of bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradation has been selected as a technique to treat a Montreal site which was contaminated by oil pipeline spills. A 2500 m3 volume of soil was excavated and stored in piles. Three large closed cells were then constructed for use in on-site biodegradation of the soil. Before proceeding with the on-site biodegradation, a feasibility study was conducted in the laboratory using 20 kg of soil placed in mini-reactors for 188 d of biodegradation at ambient temperature. Before biodegradation began, the soil in certain of the mini-reactors was pretreated by comminuting gravel pieces larger than 0.5 cm in diameter and by mixing the soil with sawdust and nutrients. At predetermined intervals, the soils were analyzed at various locations in the mini-reactors for such parameters as oil and grease concentrations, organic matter content, Kjeldahl nitrogen, humidity, phosphorus, and metals. Emissions of volatile organic compounds and CO2 were also measured. The mean decrease in oil and grease concentration was found to be 89%. No decrease was noted in those soils that had not been pretreated with sawdust and nutrients. An increase in soil pH was noted up to the 50th day of biodegradation, after which the pH decreased gradually. The feasibility study shows the influence of the addition of sawdust on one of the most important environmental parameters during the course of biodegradation: the pH value. Increase in pH can decrease or stop the activity of soil microorganisms. 11 refs., 6 figs

  9. Combined in-situ and ex-situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils by closed-loop soil vapor extraction and air injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment and restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils at a bulk petroleum above-ground storage tank (AST) site in Michigan is being conducted through in-situ and ex-situ closed-loop soil vapor extraction (SVE), soil vapor treatment, and treated air injection (AI) processes. The soil vapor extraction process applies a vacuum through the petroleum hydrocarbon affected soils in the ex-situ bio-remediation pile (bio-pile) and along the perimeter of excavated area (in-situ area) to remove the volatile or light petroleum hydrocarbons. This process also draws ambient air into the ex-situ bio-pile and in-situ vadose zone soil along the perimeter of excavated area to enhance biodegradation of light and heavy petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil. The extracted soil vapor is treated using a custom-designed air bio-remediation filter (bio-filter) to degrade the petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in the soil vapor extraction air streams. The treated air is then injected into a flush grade soil bed in the backfill area to perform final polishing of the air stream, and to form a closed-loop air flow with the soil vapor extraction perforated pipes along the perimeter of the excavated area

  10. Comparison of earthworm responses to petroleum hydrocarbon exposure in aged field contaminated soil using traditional ecotoxicity endpoints and 1H NMR-based metabolomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1H NMR metabolomics and conventional ecotoxicity endpoints were used to examine the response of earthworms exposed to petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) in soil samples collected from a site that was contaminated with crude oil from a pipeline failure in the mid-1990s. The conventional ecotoxicity tests showed that the soils were not acutely toxic to earthworms (average survival ≥90%), but some soil samples impaired reproduction endpoints by >50% compared to the field control soil. Additionally, metabolomics revealed significant relationships between earthworm metabolic profiles (collected after 2 or 14 days of exposure) and soil properties including soil PHC concentration. Further comparisons by partial least squares regression revealed a significant relationship between the earthworm metabolomic data (collected after only 2 or 14 days) and the reproduction endpoints (measured after 63 days). Therefore, metabolomic responses measured after short exposure periods may be predictive of chronic, ecologically relevant toxicity endpoints for earthworms exposed to soil contaminants. -- Highlights: •Earthworm response to petroleum hydrocarbon exposure in soil is examined. •Metabolomics shows significant changes to metabolic profile after 2 days. •Significant relationships observed between metabolomic and reproduction endpoints. •Metabolomics may have value as a rapid screening tool for chronic toxicity. -- Earthworm metabolomic responses measured after 2 and 14 days are compared to traditional earthworm ecotoxicity endpoints (survival and reproduction) in petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil

  11. Contaminants in Otter, Mink and Marten in British Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Harding L.

    1999-01-01

    As a continuation of studies of mustelids on the Columbia and Fraser River systems in north-western North America, chlorinated hydrocarbon and trace metal contamination of mink, marten and river otter were assessed in relation to physiological and reproductive measures of condition. Mink, marten and river otter were collected during the winters 1994/95 and 1995/96 from commercial trappers. Necropsies included evaluation of the following biological parameters: sex, body mass and length, age, t...

  12. Distribution of chlorinated hydrocarbons in overlying water, sediment, polychaete, and hornyhead turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis) in the coastal ocean, Southern California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Eddy Y; Tran, Kim

    2002-08-01

    1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) and its primary metabolites (DDTs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a major source of concern in the Southern California Bight (SCB), USA. The fate of DDTs and PCBs is a key element in assessing the effects imposed by these potential carcinogens on the marine ecosystem. We found that DDTs and PCBs remained widely distributed in the overlying water, sediment, polychaetes, and liver and muscle tissues of the hornyhead turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis) collected from three nearshore locations of the SCB with different levels of contamination. Student's t tests indicated that the measured partition coefficients between the nonaqueous phases (sediment, polychaete, and fish) and overlying water at a heavily contaminated location were significantly greater than those predicted by the equilibrium partitioning theory (EPT). Measured partition coefficients between the nonaqueous phases and overlying water for a few DDT components at two other stations (moderate and low contamination) were also generally greater than the EPT predictions. On the other hand, DDTs and PCBs in polychaetes and fish tissues may be taken up from sediments via equilibrium partitioning or from food sources. These findings are suggestive of the possibility that contaminated sediments may have become an important source of contamination. PMID:12152759

  13. Contaminant risks from biosolids land application Contemporary organic contaminant levels in digested sewage sludge from five treatment plants in Greater Vancouver, British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risks of organic contaminants in sewage sludges are evaluated. - This study examines the potential for environmental risks due to organic contaminants at sewage sludge application sites, and documents metals and various potential organic contaminants (volatile organics, chlorinated pesticides, PCBs, dioxins/furans, extractable petroleum hydrocarbons, PAHs, phenols, and others) in current production biosolids from five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) within the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD). There has been greater focus in Europe, North America and elsewhere on metals accumulation in biosolids-amended soil than on organic substances, with the exception of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans. Another objective, therefore, was to evaluate the extent to which management of biosolids re-use based on metal/metalloid levels coincidentally minimizes environmental risks from organic contaminants. Historical-use contaminants such as chlorophenols, PCBs, and chlorinated pesticides were not detected at environmentally relevant concentrations in any of the 36 fresh biosolids samples, and appear to have virtually eliminated from sanitary collection system inputs. The few organic contaminants found in freshly produced biosolids samples that exhibited high concentrations relative to British Columbia and Canadian soil quality benchmarks included p-cresol, phenol, phenanthrene, pyrene, naphthalene, and heavy extractable petroleum hydrocarbons (HEPHs-nCl9-C34 effective carbon chain length). It was concluded that, with the exception of these petroleum hydrocarbon constituents or their microbial metabolites, the mixing of biosolids with uncontaminated soils during land application and based on the known metal concentrations in biosolids from the Greater Vancouver WWTPs investigated provides adequate protection against the environmental risks associated with organic substances such as dioxins and furans, phthalate esters, or volatile

  14. Monitoring the bio-stimulation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by measurements of soil electrical properties, and CO2 content and its 13C/12C isotopic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, C.; Gourry, J.; Ignatiadis, I.; Colombano, S.; Dictor, M.; Guimbaud, C.; Chartier, M.; Dumestre, A.; Dehez, S.; Naudet, V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminated soils represent an environmental issue as it impacts on ecosystems and aquifers. Where significant subsurface heterogeneity exists, conventional intrusive investigations and groundwater sampling can be insufficient to obtain a robust monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants, as the information they provide is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations, with no information between sampling points. In order to obtain wider information in space volume on subsurface modifications, complementary methods can be used like geophysics. Among geophysical methods, geoelectrical techniques such as electrical resistivity (ER) and induced polarization (IP) seem the more promising, especially to study the effects of biodegradation processes. Laboratory and field geoelectrical experiments to characterize soils contaminated by oil products have shown that mature hydrocarbon-contaminated soils are characterized by enhanced electrical conductivity although hydrocarbons are electrically resistive. This high bulk conductivity is due to bacterial impacts on geological media, resulting in changes in the chemical and physical properties and thus, to the geophysical properties of the ground. Moreover, microbial activity induced CO2 production and isotopic deviation of carbon. Indeed, produced CO2 will reflect the pollutant isotopic signature. Thus, the ratio δ13C(CO2) will come closer to δ13C(hydrocarbon). BIOPHY, project supported by the French National Research Agency (ANR), proposes to use electrical methods and gas analyses to develop an operational and non-destructive method for monitoring in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons in order to optimize soil treatment. Demonstration field is located in the South of Paris (France), where liquid fuels (gasoline and diesel) leaked from some tanks in 1997. In order to stimulate biodegradation, a trench has been dug to supply oxygen to the water table and thus stimulate aerobic metabolic bioprocesses. ER and

  15. Chlorine isotope investigation of natural attenuation of trichloroethene in an aerobic aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural attenuation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) can be an important mechanism for groundwater remediation. It is difficult to determine the effectiveness of natural CAH attenuation from chemical analyses of groundwater samples because mixing, dispersion, and secondary reactions can mask the chemical evidence of attenuation. In this paper, the authors explore the application of stable chlorine isotope ratio measurements as a new tool for evaluating natural attenuation of CAHs. They report stable isotope ratios of chlorine in both trichloroethene (TCE) and inorganic chloride in groundwater from an aerobic aquifer beneath an extensively contaminated industrial site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. Variations in the concentrations and chlorine isotope ratios of TCE and chloride in the groundwater are consistent with those expected from natural attenuation. These data support a model in which partial TCE degradation occurred in relatively impermeable, clay-rich sediments above the aquifer, and little or no further degradation of TCE occurred within the aquifer. A record of changing conditions within the TCE source area can be inferred from the spatial variation of chlorine isotope ratios for TCE and chloride within the plume

  16. Parameters describing nonequilibrium transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through contaminated soil columns: estimability analysis, correlation, and optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Viet V; Michel, Julien; Gujisaite, Valérie; Latifi, Abderrazak; Simonnot, Marie-Odile

    2014-03-01

    The soil and groundwater at former industrial sites polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produce a very challenging environmental issue. The description of PAH transport by means of mathematical models is therefore needed for risk assessment and remediation strategies at these sites. Due to the complexity of release kinetics and transport behavior of the PAHs in the aged contaminated soils, their transport is usually evaluated at the laboratory scale. Transport parameters are then estimated from the experimental data via the inverse method. To better assess the uncertainty of optimized parameters, an estimability method was applied to firstly investigate the information content of experimental data and the possible correlations among parameters in the two-site sorption model. These works were based on the concentrations of three PAHs, Acenaphthene (ACE), Fluoranthene (FLA) and Pyrene (PYR), in the leaching solutions of the experiments under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions. The estimability results showed that the experiment under unsaturated flow conditions contained more information content for estimating four transport parameters than under the saturated one. In addition, whatever the experimental conditions for all three PAHs the fraction of sites with instantaneous sorption, f, was highly correlated with the adsorption distribution coefficient, Kd. The very strong correlation between the two parameters f and Kd suggests that they should not be simultaneously calibrated. Transport parameters were optimized using HYDRUS-1D software with different scenarios based on the estimability analysis results. The optimization results were not always reliable, especially in the case of the experiment under saturated flow conditions because of its low information content. In addition, the estimation of transport parameters became very uncertain if two parameters f and Kd were optimized simultaneously. The findings of the current work can suggest some

  17. Succession of Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Metabolic Community Characteristics during In Vitro Bioslurry Treatment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelberg, David B.; Talley, Jeffrey W.; Perkins, Edward J.; Tucker, Samuel G.; Luthy, Richard G.; Bouwer, Edward J.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.

    2001-01-01

    Dredged harbor sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was removed from the Milwaukee Confined Disposal Facility and examined for in situ biodegradative capacity. Molecular techniques were used to determine the successional characteristics of the indigenous microbiota during a 4-month bioslurry evaluation. Ester-linked phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), multiplex PCR of targeted genes, and radiorespirometry techniques were used to define in situ microbial phenotypic, genotypic, and metabolic responses, respectively. Soxhlet extractions revealed a loss in total PAH concentrations of 52%. Individual PAHs showed reductions as great as 75% (i.e., acenapthene and fluorene). Rates of 14C-PAH mineralization (percent/day) were greatest for phenanthrene, followed by pyrene and then chrysene. There was no mineralization capacity for benzo[a]pyrene. Ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid analysis revealed a threefold increase in total microbial biomass and a dynamic microbial community composition that showed a strong correlation with observed changes in the PAH chemistry (canonical r2 of 0.999). Nucleic acid analyses showed copies of genes encoding PAH-degrading enzymes (extradiol dioxygenases, hydroxylases, and meta-cleavage enzymes) to increase by as much as 4 orders of magnitude. Shifts in gene copy numbers showed strong correlations with shifts in specific subsets of the extant microbial community. Specifically, declines in the concentrations of three-ring PAH moieties (i.e., phenanthrene) correlated with PLFA indicative of certain gram-negative bacteria (i.e., Rhodococcus spp. and/or actinomycetes) and genes encoding for naphthalene-, biphenyl-, and catechol-2,3-dioxygenase degradative enzymes. The results of this study suggest that the intrinsic biodegradative potential of an environmental site can be derived from the polyphasic characterization of the in situ microbial community. PMID:11282603

  18. Analyzing tree cores to detect petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater at a former landfill site in the community of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, eastern Canadian subarctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonkwe, Merline L D; Trapp, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    This research examines the feasibility of analyzing tree cores to detect benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m, p, o-xylene (BTEX) compounds and methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in groundwater in eastern Canada subarctic environments, using a former landfill site in the remote community of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at the landfill site is the result of environmentally unsound pre-1990s disposal of households and industrial solid wastes. Tree cores were taken from trembling aspen, black spruce, and white birch and analyzed by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. BTEX compounds were detected in tree cores, corroborating known groundwater contamination. A zone of anomalously high concentrations of total BTEX constituents was identified and recommended for monitoring by groundwater wells. Tree cores collected outside the landfill site at a local control area suggest the migration of contaminants off-site. Tree species exhibit different concentrations of BTEX constituents, indicating selective uptake and accumulation. Toluene in wood exhibited the highest concentrations, which may also be due to endogenous production. Meanwhile, MTBE was not found in the tree cores and is considered to be absent in the groundwater. The results demonstrate that tree-core analysis can be useful for detecting anomalous concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons, such as BTEX compounds, in subarctic sites with shallow unconfined aquifers and permeable soils. This method can therefore aid in the proper management of contamination during landfill operations and after site closures. PMID:27151238

  19. Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, W.J.; Penrose, W.R.; Stetter, J.R. [Transducer Research, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Transducer Research, Inc. (TRI) has been working with the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center to develop a new chemical monitor based on a unique sensor which responds selectively to vapors of chlorinated solvents. We are also developing field applications for the monitor in actual DOE cleanup operations. During the initial phase, prototype instruments were built and field tested. Because of the high degree of selectivity that is obtained, no response was observed with common hydrocarbon organic compounds such as BTX (benzene, toluene, xylene) or POLs (petroleum, oil, lubricants), and in fact, no non-halogen-containing chemical has been identified which induces a measurable response. By the end of the Phase I effort, a finished instrument system was developed and test marketed. This instrument, called the RCL MONITOR, was designed to analyze individual samples or monitor an area with automated repetitive analyses. Vapor levels between 0 and 500 ppm can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ppm using the handportable instrument. In addition to the development of the RCL MONITOR, advanced sampler systems are being developed to: (1) extend the dynamic range of the instrument through autodilution of the vapor and (2) allow chemical analyses to be performed on aqueous samples. When interfaced to the samplers, the RCL MONITOR is capable of measuring chlorinated solvent contamination in the vapor phase up to 5000 ppm and in water and other condensed media from 10 to over 10,000 ppb(wt)--without hydrocarbon and other organic interferences.

  20. Biodegradation of an oil-hydrocarbon contaminated soil, enhanced by surfactants: Effect of the type and dose of surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of different parameters, such as surfactant type an dose, soil initial hydrocarbons concentration, and soil granulometry, over the total petroleum hydrocarbons TPH degradation, as well as over the microbial count (as colony formation units CFU/g soil) along the process. (Author)

  1. Biodegradation of an oil-hydrocarbon contaminated soil, enhanced by surfactants: Effect of the type and dose of surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, L. G.; Galindo, C.; Rojas, N.; Iturbe, R.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of different parameters, such as surfactant type an dose, soil initial hydrocarbons concentration, and soil granulometry, over the total petroleum hydrocarbons TPH degradation, as well as over the microbial count (as colony formation units CFU/g soil) along the process. (Author)

  2. Bioremediation of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum, pesticides, chlorophenols and heavy metals by composting: Applications, microbes and future research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Piao; Zeng, Guangming; Yang, Chunping; Huang, Danlian; Zhang, Jiachao

    2015-11-01

    Increasing soil pollution problems have caused world-wide concerns. Large numbers of contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), petroleum and related products, pesticides, chlorophenols and heavy metals enter the soil, posing a huge threat to human health and natural ecosystem. Chemical and physical technologies for soil remediation are either incompetent or too costly. Composting or compost addition can simultaneously increase soil organic matter content and soil fertility besides bioremediation, and thus is believed to be one of the most cost-effective methods for soil remediation. This paper reviews the application of composting/compost for soil bioremediation, and further provides a critical view on the effects of this technology on microbial aspects in contaminated soils. This review also discusses the future research needs for contaminated soils. PMID:26008965

  3. Assessment of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination in the surficial sediments and ground water at three former underground storage tank locations, Fort Jackson, South Carolina, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water and sediment contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons resulting from leaks and overfills was detected during tank removal activities at three former underground storage tank locations at Fort Jackson, near Columbia, South Carolina. Investigations were initiated to assess the effect of contamination to the surficial aquifer at Sites 1062, 2438, and 2444. These investigations involved the installation of permanent monitoring wells and the collection and analysis of sediment and ground-water samples at the three sites. Water-level data were collected at all sites to determine hydraulic gradients and the direction of ground-water flow. In addition, aquifer tests were made at Site 1062 to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the surficial aquifer at that site. Sediment borings were made at the three sites to collect subsurface-sediment samples for lithologic description and laboratory analyses, and for the installation of ground-water monitoring wells. Laboratory analyses of sediment samples collected from boreholes at Site 1062 indicated elevated concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons at three locations. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons - Diesel Range Organics were detected at one borehole at a concentration of 388,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene concentrations in sediment from the site ranged from less than 350 to over 100,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total lead was detected at concentrations ranging from 2,900 to 5,900 micrograms per kilogram. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected at Site 2438 in one borehole at a trace concentration of 112 micrograms per kilogram of para- and meta-xylenes. No concentrations exceeding the detection limits were reported for petroleum hydrocarbons in sediment samples collected from Site 2444; however, total lead was detected in sediment samples from two boreholes, each at concentrations of 600 micrograms per kilogram. Ground-water samples were collected from each site for

  4. Isolation and characterization of a novel hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Achromobacter sp. HZ01 from the crude oil-contaminated seawater at the Daya Bay, southern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Morphological properties of the colonies and cells of strain HZ01. (A) Colonies of strain HZ01 on the LB solid plate; (B) Gram-negative bacterium of strain HZ01 (20 × 100); (C) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photograph of strain HZ01 (×15,000); and (D) Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) photograph of strain HZ01 (×5000). - Highlights: • A novel petroleum degrading bacterium HZ01 was obtained from the crude oil-contaminated seawater. • Strain HZ01 had been identified as Achromobacter sp. • Strain HZ01 could degrade the evaporated diesel oil with the degradability of 96.6%. • Strain HZ01 could effectively degrade anthracene, phenanthrene and pyrence. • Strain HZ01 may be employed to remove hydrocarbon contaminants. - Abstract: Microorganisms play an important role in the biodegradation of petroleum contaminants, which have attracted great concern due to their persistent toxicity and difficult biodegradation. In this paper, a novel hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium HZ01 was isolated from the crude oil-contaminated seawater at the Daya Bay, South China Sea, and identified as Achromobacter sp. Under the conditions of pH 7.0, NaCl 3% (w/v), temperature 28 °C and rotary speed 150 rpm, its degradability of the total n-alkanes reached up to 96.6% after 10 days of incubation for the evaporated diesel oil. Furthermore, Achromobacter sp. HZ01 could effectively utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as its sole carbon source, and could remove anthracene, phenanthrene and pyrence about 29.8%, 50.6% and 38.4% respectively after 30 days of incubation. Therefore, Achromobacter sp. HZ01 may employed as an excellent degrader to develop one cost-effective and eco-friendly method for the bioremediation of marine environments polluted by crude oil

  5. Trichoderma longibrachiatum Evx1 is a fungal biocatalyst suitable for the remediation of soils contaminated with diesel fuel and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreolli, Marco; Lampis, Silvia; Brignoli, Pierlorenzo; Vallini, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    Trichoderma sp. strain Evx1 was isolated from a semi-deciduous forest soil in Southern Italy. It decolorizes polynuclear organic dyes and tolerates high concentrations of phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. The ability of this ascomycete fungus to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was verified in vitro and confirmed by its strong phenoloxidase activity in the presence of gallic acid. Phylogenetic characterization of Trichoderma sp. Evx1 positioned this strain within the species Trichoderma longibrachiatum. The potential use of this species for the bioremediation of contaminated environmental matrices was tested by inoculating diesel-spiked soil with a dense mycelial suspension. The biodegradation percentage of the C12-40 hydrocarbon fraction in the inoculated soil rose to 54.2 ± 1.6 %, much higher than that in non-inoculated soil or soil managed solely by a combination of watering and aeration. The survival and persistence of T. longibrachiatum Evx1 throughout the bioremediation trial was monitored by PCR-DGGE analysis. The fungal strain was still present in the soil 30 days after bioaugmentation. These findings indicate that T. longibrachiatum Evx1 may be a suitable inoculum in bioremediation protocols for the reclamation of soils contaminated by complex mixtures of hydrocarbons. PMID:26832871

  6. Hydrocarbon studies in Pugent Sound and off the Washington Coast. Progress report, March 1976--February 1977. [Natural distribution in marine organisms and sediments and contamination by petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, R.; Fairhall, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    Seasonal samplings of phytoplankton, zooplankton, and neuston are being made in a number of areas within Puget Sound and off the west coast of Washington State north of the Columbia River. The samples are being subjected to solvent extraction to remove the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, which are then being characterized by gas chromatography, UV fluorescence spectroscopy, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Selected samples are being analyzed by combined gas chromatography--mass spectrometry and/or by having /sup 14/C and /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios determined. The purpose of these measurements is to establish the natural distribution of hydrocarbons in local marine organisms and sediments and to determine the extent to which they may be already contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. Some of the regions being sampled are in comparatively remote areas which are unlikely to have received significant oil pollution while other samples come from areas near petroleum refineries or along tanker routes where spills are more likely. In addition to the organisms, cores of sediment are being collected and analyzed in a similar manner. Sediment accumulation rates are being determined in these cores over the last 100 years with the /sup 210/Pb technique. Profiles of changes in hydrocarbon types and amounts during the last 100 years will be determined.

  7. Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Cundill, A.; J. Bacon; Dale, P; Fordyce, F.M.; Fowler, D; Hedmark, A.; Hern, A.; Skiba, U.

    2011-01-01

    Soil contamination occurs when substances are added to soil, resulting in increases in concentrations above background or reference levels. Pollution may follow from contamination when contaminants are present in amounts that are detrimental to soil quality and become harmful to the environment or human health. Contamination can occur via a range of pathways including direct application to land and indirect application from atmospheric deposition. Contamination was identified b...

  8. Analyzing tree cores to detect petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater at a former landfill site in the community of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, eastern Canadian subarctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonkwe, Merline L D; Trapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the feasibility of analyzing tree cores to detect benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m, p, o-xylene (BTEX) compounds and methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in groundwater in eastern Canada subarctic environments, using a former landfill site in the remote community of Happ...... Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at the landfill site is the result of environmentally unsound pre-1990s disposal of households and industrial solid wastes. Tree cores were taken from trembling aspen, black spruce, and white birch and analyzed by headspace...... not found in the tree cores and is considered to be absent in the groundwater. The results demonstrate that tree-core analysis can be useful for detecting anomalous concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons, such as BTEX compounds, in subarctic sites with shallow unconfined aquifers and permeable soils...

  9. Comparative bioremediation of heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons co-contaminated soil by natural attenuation, phytoremediation, bioaugmentation and bioaugmentation-assisted phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, A C; Bagard, M; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G; Huguenot, D

    2016-09-01

    Biological remediation technologies are an environmentally friendly approach for the treatment of polluted soils. This study evaluated through a pot experiment four bioremediation strategies: a) natural attenuation, b) phytoremediation with alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), c) bioaugmentation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and d) bioaugmentation-assisted phytoremediation, for the treatment of a co-contaminated soil presenting moderate levels of heavy metals (Cu, Pb and Zn at 87, 100 and 110mgkg(-1) DW, respectively) and petroleum hydrocarbons (3800mgkg(-1) DW). As demonstrated by plant biomass and selected physiological parameters alfalfa plants were able to tolerate and grow in the co-contaminated soil, especially when soil was inoculated with P. aeruginosa, which promoted plant growth (56% and 105% increase for shoots and roots, respectively) and appeared to alleviate plant stress. The content of heavy metals in alfalfa plants was limited and followed the order: Zn>Cu>Pb. Heavy metals were mainly concentrated in plant roots and were poorly translocated, favouring their stabilization in the root zone. Bioaugmentation of planted soil with P. aeruginosa generally led to a decrease of plant metal concentration and translocation. The highest degree of total petroleum hydrocarbon removal was obtained for bioaugmentation-assisted phytoremediation treatment (68%), followed by bioaugmentation (59%), phytoremediation (47%) and natural attenuation (37%). The results of this study demonstrated that the combined use of plant and bacteria was the most advantageous option for the treatment of the present co-contaminated soil, as compared to natural attenuation, bioaugmentation or phytoremediation applied alone. PMID:26524994

  10. Studies concerning thermodynamics and kinetics of the absorption of halogenated hydrocarbons relevant to environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the research project the scrubbing of air contaminated by peculiar volatile organic compounds was investigated using the absorption technique by means of high boiling organics as washing liquids. Eight chlorinated hydrocarbons well known from technical processes were chosen to be representative for the volatile organic compounds. Eleven absorption media were selected on the basis of their physical properties. For the determination of the solubility data of the absorption media due to chlorinated hydrocarbons, nitrogen as well as a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen were used as carrier gas. The influence of the dipole moment of the absorption media on the amount of solubility - expressed as enrichment factor - was studied, too. Concerning the technical application, the thermostability and the stability against diluted inorganic acids were studied as well. (orig.). 56 figs., 8 tabs., 63 refs

  11. Effect of ozonated water and chlorine water wash on the quality and microbial de-contamination of fresh-cut carrot shreds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information exists regarding how wash operations affect water quality and the efficacy of sanitizers on quality and microbial reduction of fresh-cut carrot shreds. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of chlorine and ozone on reducing microbial loads and maintaining quality of ca...

  12. Using a Bayesian approach to improve and calibrate a dynamic model of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in an industrial contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimo, Khaled; Garnier, Patricia; Sun, Siao; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc; Cébron, Aurélie; Ouvrard, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    A novel kinetics model that describes the dynamics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soils is presented. The model includes two typical biodegradation pathways: the co-metabolic pathway using pseudo first order kinetics and the specific biodegradation pathway modeled using Monod kinetics. The sorption of PAHs to the solid soil occurs through bi-phasic fist order kinetics, and two types of non-extractible bounded residues are considered: the biogenic and the physically sequestrated into soil matrix. The PAH model was developed in Matlab, parameterized and tested successfully on batch experimental data using a Bayesian approach (DREAM). Preliminary results led to significant model simplifications. They also highlighted that the specific biodegradation pathway was the most efficient at explaining experimental data, as would be expected for an old industrial contaminated soil. Global analysis of sensitivity showed that the amount of PAHs ultimately degraded was mostly governed by physicochemical interactions rather than by biological activity. PMID:27176762

  13. A review of ethyl carbamate and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination risk in cachaça and other Brazilian sugarcane spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachi, L G; Santos, A; Moreira, R F A; De Maria, C A B

    2014-04-15

    Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been identified in Brazilian sugarcane spirits. Contamination sources are: sugarcane burn before harvest and petroleum derivatives. PAHs concentration in spirits produced from burned cane was about 2-3 times higher than those from unburned cane. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is present at less than 1%, and therefore is not a representative marker of cachaça contamination by PAHs. Ethyl carbamate (EC) is produced during both fermentation and distillation. During distillation, cupric ions may catalyse the conversion of cyanide to EC. In discontinuous distillation, the use of the heart fraction for bottling cachaça considerably decreases its concentration. In the continuous process, in which there is no separation of distillate, it is highly recommended to couple cooling devices and reflux systems to the distillation column. Consumers are at a greater risk of EC exposure from cachaça than from any other spirit. PMID:24295690

  14. A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) media sequence for the remediation of heavy metal and hydrocarbon contaminated water: A field assessment at Casey Station, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statham, Tom M; Stark, Scott C; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2016-03-01

    A field trial was conducted at Casey Station, Antarctica to assess the suitability of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) media sequence for the remediation of sites containing both hydrocarbon and heavy metal contamination. An existing PRB was modified to assess a sequence consisting of three sections: (i) Nutrient release/hydrocarbon sorption using ZeoPro™ and granular activated carbon; (ii) Phosphorus and heavy metal capture by granular iron and sand; (iii) Nutrient and excess iron capture by zeolite. The media sequence achieved a greater phosphorus removal capacity than previous Antarctic PRB configurations installed on site. Phosphorus concentrations were reduced during flow through the iron/sand section and iron concentrations were reduced within the zeolite section. However, non-ideal flow was detected during a tracer test and supported by analysis of media and liquid samples from the second summer of operation. Results indicate that the PRB media sequence trialled might be appropriate for other locations, especially less environmentally challenging contaminated sites. PMID:26774301

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain 10-1B, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degrader in Contaminated Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Bello-Akinosho, Maryam; Adeleke, Rasheed; Swanevelder, Dirk; Thantsha, Mapitsi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain 10-1B was isolated from artificially polluted soil after selective enrichment. Its draft genome consists of several predicted genes that are involved in the hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, which is the rate-limiting step in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  16. Spatial distributions of sulphur species and sulphate-reducing bacteria provide insights into sulphur redox cycling and biodegradation hot-spots in a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsiedl, Florian; Pilloni, Giovanni; Ruth-Anneser, Bettina; Lueders, Tillman; Griebler, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction (DSR) has been proven to be one of the most relevant redox reactions in the biodegradation of contaminants in groundwater. However, the possible role of sulphur species of intermediate oxidation state, as well as the role of potential re-oxidative sulphur cycling in biodegradation particularly at the groundwater table are still poorly understood. Here we used a combination of stable isotope measurements of SO42-, H2S, and S0 as well as geochemical profiling of sulphur intermediates with special emphasis on SO32-, S2O32-, and S0 to unravel possible sulphur cycling in the biodegradation of aromatics in a hydrocarbon-contaminated porous aquifer. By linking these results to the quantification of total bacterial rRNA genes and respiratory genes of sulphate reducers, as well as pyrotag sequencing of bacterial communities over depth, light is shed on possible key-organisms involved. Our results substantiate the role of DSR in biodegradation of hydrocarbons (mainly toluene) in the highly active plume fringes above and beneath the plume core. In both zones the concentration of sulphur intermediates (S0, SO32- and S2O32-) was almost twice that of other sampling-depths, indicating intense sulphur redox cycling. The dual isotopic fingerprint of oxygen and sulphur in dissolved sulphate suggested a re-oxidation of reduced sulphur compounds to sulphate especially at the upper fringe zone. An isotopic shift in δ34S of S0 of nearly +4‰ compared to the δ34S values of H2S from the same depth linked to a high abundance (∼10%) of sequence reads related to Sulphuricurvum spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria) in the same depth were indicative of intensive oxidation of S0 to sulphate in this zone. At the lower plume fringe S0 constituted the main inorganic sulphur species, possibly formed by abiotic re-oxidation of H2S with Fe(III)oxides subsequent to sulphate reduction. These results provide first insights into intense sulphur redox cycling in a hydrocarbon

  17. Development, optimization, validation and application of faster gas chromatography - flame ionization detector method for the analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Abdulrazaq; Pappoe, Michael; James, Lesley A; Hawboldt, Kelly

    2015-12-18

    This paper presents an important new approach to improving the timeliness of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) analysis in the soil by Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) using the CCME Canada-Wide Standard reference method. The Canada-Wide Standard (CWS) method is used for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon compounds across Canada. However, inter-laboratory application of this method for the analysis of TPH in the soil has often shown considerable variability in the results. This could be due, in part, to the different gas chromatography (GC) conditions, other steps involved in the method, as well as the soil properties. In addition, there are differences in the interpretation of the GC results, which impacts the determination of the effect