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Sample records for chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide

  1. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlburt, Paul K.; Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  2. Cesium and strontium extraction by solutions of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide in diethylene glycol ditetrafluoropropyl ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new solvent (free of nitro groups) is proposed for chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD) - diethylene glycol ditetrafluoropropyl ether (D6DE). The D6DE ensures a high CCD solubility and its complex of physical and chemical properties is of interest as a possible industrial solvent

  3. Synergistic extraction of Eu(III) with N-phosphorylated bis-ureas and chlorinated cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Selucký, P.; Bubeníková, M.; Rais, J.; Grüner, Bohumír; Brusko, V.V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 1 (2013), s. 27-31. ISSN 0033-8230 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0668 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : liquid-liquid extraction * lanthanides * actinides * N-phosphorylated bis-ureas * chlorinated cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ion * high level liquid waste Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.411, year: 2013

  4. Evaluation of a novel and efficient solvent system containing chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for radio-cesium recovery from acidic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandwal, Pankaj; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.

    2014-11-01

    A novel solvent system containing chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD) in a diluent mixture containing 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (NPOE) and n-dodecane was found to be highly efficient for the extraction of radio-cesium from acidic feed conditions. When PEG-400 (polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight of 400) was added to the solvent system, it was found to extract radio-strontium as well similar to that reported with the UNEX (Universal Extractant) solvent. The solvent system was found to be superior as compared to analogous solvent systems reported previously using CCD in either nitrobenzene or PTMS (phenyltrifluoromethyl sulphone, a fluorinated diluent). The present work deals with less toxic solvent formulation which can be used as an alternative to these hazardous/toxic chemicals for simultaneous recovery of Cs(I) and Sr(II) from acidic solutions. Batch co-current extraction data are also presented for the simultaneous recovery of Cs and Sr which indicated near quantitative extraction (>99.5%) of the metal ions in 4 and 3 stages, respectively. The reusability and radiolytic stability studies were also carried out which suggested highly encouraging results.

  5. HLW partitioning by complex solvent on the basis of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid and polyethylene glycol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide to the solvent on the basis of zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid makes possible to extract not only RE and TPE but also to extract cesium from aqueous nitric acid media. At the same time RE and TPE distribution coefficients noticeably increase because of synergetic effect induced by formation of the complex acid of the possible composition H3[Zr(DBP)4(CCD)3]. The proposed solvent extraction system could be used for partitioning of the main radionuclides contained in high and intermediate level wastes. (author)

  6. Treatment of acidic INEEL waste using a countercurrent cobalt dicarbollide-based universal solvent extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tertiary solvent containing chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, diphenylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and polyethylene glycol in different diluents was evaluated for the separation of cesium, strontium, actinides and rare earth elements from acidic liquid radioactive waste in countercurrent solvent extraction processes. This universal solvent extraction process has been demonstrated in 24-stage centrifugal contactor pilot plants, using simulated acidic tank waste, at the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), St. Petersburg, Russia, and at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Demonstration of the universal extraction process with actual tank waste is scheduled at the INEEL in 1998

  7. Preparation and use of tetra-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation and use of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollide for extraction of cesium and strontium into hydrocarbon solvents. Tetra-C-alkyl derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide, Co(C2R2B9H9)2-(CoB2R4-; R=CH3 and C6H13) are demonstrated to be significant cesium and strontium extractants from acidic and alkaline solutions into non-toxic organic solvent systems. Extractions using mesitylene and diethylbenzene are compared to those with nitrobenzene as the organic phase. CoB2-hexyl4- in diethylbenzene shows improved selectivity (104) for Cs over Na in acidic solution. In dilute alkaline solution, CoB2-hexyl4- extracts Cs less efficiently, but more effectively removes Sr from higher base concentrations. A general synthesis of tetra-C-alkyl cobalt dicarbollides is described. 6 figs

  8. Synthesis of a di-alcohol derivative of cobalt dicarbollide for condensation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymers containing the cobalt dicarbollide anion in the main chain are currently of interest as possible cation exchange materials for the selective removal of 137Cs+ and 90Sr2 from nuclear wastes. Suitable monomeric compounds are obtained by derivatizing the carbon sites of the cobalt dicarbollide anion with organic functional groups. Selective deprotonation of [Co(C2B9H11)2] with 2 equivalent of nBuLi in the results in the formation of the dilithio complex, [Co(LiC2B9H10)2]. Reaction of [Co(LiC2B9H10)2] with ethylene oxide followed by protonation of the alcohol group with IIcl (g) gives the dialcohol monomer, [Co13(C2B9H10)2(C2H4OH)2]. The dialcohol monomer has been characterized by FTIR, and 1H and 13C NMR. The characterization as well as the reaction chemistry of the dialcohol monomer with isocyanates will be discussed

  9. Supported cobalt dicarbollide process for F-element separation and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt dicarbollide, an extremely strong anion, was first utilized in a solvent extraction process in 1975 by Kyrs, and developed in Czechoslovakia by Kyrs, Rais, Selucky and co-workers at NRI. The process was further refined and demonstrated in Russia to remove fission products from Purex waste. Until recently, the process did not interest U.S. investigators because it utilized nitrobenzene as a diluent. To overcome the use of a hazardous diluent, a new supported dicarbollide process (SDP) was jointly invented by the authors in 1992. Results from laboratory tests of the SDP for cesium, strontium and f-element removal from aqueous solutions (over a wide pH range) are very encouraging. The SDP operates without significant loss of the extractant and modifier to the aqueous effluent compared to the solvent extraction mode, and it combines the advantages of solvent extraction, such as high selectivity, with the advantages of ion exchange processes, such as large number of theoretical plates. This paper will present results to date of the testing of the process

  10. Cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO groups as selective extraction agents for lanthanide and actinide cations from highly acidic nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new series of boron substituted cobalt bis(dicarbollide)(1-) ion (1) derivatives of the general formula [(8-CMPO-(CH2-CH2O)2-1,2-C2B9H10)(1',2'-C2B9H11)-3,3'-Co]- (CMPO = Ph2P(O)-CH2C(O)NR, R = C4H9 (3b), -C12H25 (4b), -CH2-C6H5 (5b)) was prepared by ring cleavage of the 8-dioxane-cobalt bis(dicarbollide) (2) bi-polar compound by the respective primary amines and by subsequent reaction of the resulting amino derivatives (3a-5a) with the nitrophenyl ester of diphenyl-phosphoryl-acetic acid. The compounds were synthesized with the aim to develop a new class of more efficient extraction agents for liquid/liquid extraction of polyvalent cations, i.e. lanthanides and actinides, from high-level activity nuclear waste. All compounds were characterized by a combination of 11B NMR, 1H high field NMR, Mass Spectrometry with Electro-spray and MALDI TOF ionisation, HPLC and other techniques. The molecular structure of the supramolecular Ln3+ complex of the anion 5b was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystallographic results proved that the Ln(m) atom is bonded to three functionalized cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anions in a charge compensated complex. The cation is tightly coordinated by six oxygen atoms of the CMPO terminal groups (two of each ligand) and by three water molecules completing the metal coordination number to 9. Atoms occupying the primary coordination sphere form a tri-capped trigonal prismatic arrangement. Very high liquid-liquid extraction efficiency of all anionic species was observed. Moreover, less polar toluene can be applied as an auxiliary solvent replacing the less environmentally friendly nitro- and chlorinated solvents used in the current dicarbollide liquid-liquid extraction process. The extraction coefficients are sufficiently high for possible technological applications. (authors)

  11. Recent advances in the development of a cobalt dicarbollide based solvent extraction process for the separation of Cs and Sr from spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), a chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) based solvent extraction process is being developed for the separation of Cs and Sr from leached spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. The separation of Cs and Sr would significantly reduce the short-term heat generation of spent nuclear fuel requiring geological disposal. Recent advances in the development of a CCD/PEG process will be presented. The data presented will include acid dependency data, results of batch contact testing using simulant feeds traced with 137Cs, 90Sr and 241Am as well as results of testing to evaluate extractant composition. The impacts of other separation process in an advanced aqueous separation flow sheet on the effectiveness of the CCD/PEG process will be detailed. (authors)

  12. Synthesis, structure and electrical conductivity of fulvalenium salts of cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion and its derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vladimir Bregadze; Igor Sivaev; Irina Lobanova; Olga Kazheva; Grigorii Alexandrov; Andrey Kravchenko; Vladimir Starodub; Lev Buravov; Lev Titov; Oleg Dyachenko

    2010-01-01

    TTF, TTF-BMDT, TTF-BEDT and TMTSF cation radical salts of cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion [3,3'-Co(1,2-C2B9H11)2]- and its derivatives are prepared and their crystal structures and electrical conductivities are determined. Some regularities in the crystal structures of the TTF-based radical cation salts prepared are also discussed.

  13. Conjugates of boron clusters with derivatives of natural chlorin and bacteriochlorin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conjugates of bacteriochlorin p and chlorin e6 with cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion [3,3'-Co(1,2-C2B9H11)2]- were synthesized using different synthetic approaches. The boronated bacteriochlorin p was prepared by reaction of bacteriochlorin N-amino cycloimide with, bis(dicarbollide)-based carboxylic acid. The boronated chlorin e6 conjugates were obtained by both 'click reaction' of containing alkyne group chlorine with azide derivative of cobaltacarborane and reaction of chorin-based amines with cyclic oxonium derivative of cobalt bis(dicarbollide).

  14. Lanthanide and actinide extractions using functionalized cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ion derivatives substituted with metal ligating functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several extractants based on cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ion of formula [(1,2-C2B9H10)(1',2'- C2B9H11)-3,3'-Co(III)]- with covalently bonded CMPO group of general formulation [(Ph)2P(0)(CH2)C(0)N(H)n=0,1] were prepared and tested for extraction of trivalent radionuclides. The compounds studied differ in mode of attachment of CMPO group to COSAN moiety. Compound 1 with diethylene glycol connector between the COSAN cage and CMPO group provided better extraction properties than compounds with direct attachment (2) and N-bridge connection of COSAN moiety to nitrogen of CMPO group (3a or 3b). The compounds allowed the use of a less-polar solvent mixture of hexyl-methylketone and n-dodecane, which could replace the polar and less environmentally friendly solvent nitrobenzene

  15. Lanthanide and actinide extractions with cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ion derivatives covalently bonded to diglycolyl diamide platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of minor actinides from high-level waste (HLW) remains a difficult problem. A wide series of compounds based on two cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions [(1,2-C2B9H10)(1',2'-C2B9H11)-3,3'-Co(III)]- (COSAN) covalently bonded to a diglycolyl amide platform via diethyleneglycol connectors was prepared by reaction of the diglycolic acid dichloride with various ammonium derivatives of the ion COSAN with the aim to develop new class of extractants for trivalent radionuclides from acidic waste solutions. The extractants of general formulation [{(N,N-(8-CH2-CH2O)2-1,2-C2B9H10) (1',2'-C2B9H11)-3,3'-Co (N,N'-R)NCOCH2}2-O]Na2 differed in substitution on the amidic nitrogen (by e.g. butyl-, hexyl-, octyl-, t-octyl-, dodecyl-, benzyl-groups). Compounds were characterized by combination of 11B, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS, HPLC, and TLC RF. The purity of all species was better than 98%. Most of the compounds proved to be very efficient extraction agents and enabled effective extraction of europium(III) and americium(III) from nitric acid solutions. The recovery of the trivalent radionuclides from the loaded organic phase was possible by using ammonium citrate or even better by using solution of ammonium citrate and ammonium DTPA (diethylenetriamine pentaacetate). (orig.)

  16. Raman spectral investigation of structural peculiarities of cobalt carborane complexes containing dicarbollide and dicarbacanastide ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain cobalt carborane complexes incorporating Cs[(1.2--C2B9H11)2Co], Cs[(8, 9, 12-Br3-C2B9H8)2Co], Cs[8-I-C2B9H10)2Co and multinuclear chain cobalt carborane complexes of general formula Csn[(1.2-C2B9H11)2Con (1.2-C2B8H10)n-1], where n=2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 have been studied by the method of Raman spectroscopy. Characteristic features of the frequency and intensity of lines of ligand-metal-ligand full-symmetry stretching vibration in Raman spectra of the complexes permit their use as analytic characteristic. Refs. 8, figs. 3

  17. Lanthanide and actinide extractions with cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ion derivatives covalently bonded to diglycolyl diamide platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lučaníková, M.; Selucký, P.; Rais, J.; Grüner, Bohumír; Kvíčalová, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2011), s. 89-95. ISSN 2193-2875 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0668; GA MŠk LC523 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Dicarbollides derivatives * TODGA * Liquid-liquid extraction * Lanthanides * Actinides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  18. Solvent Extraction of Calcium into Nitrobenzene by Using an Anionic Ligand Based on Cobalt Bis(Dicarbollide) Anion with Covalently Bonded CMPO Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrlík, Emanuel; Selucký, Pavel; Vaňura, Petr

    2012-06-01

    From extraction experiments and γ-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constantcorresponding to the general equilibrium Ca2+(aq) + 2HL(nb) CaL2(nb) + 2H+(aq) taking place in the two-phase water-nitrobenzene (L- = anionic ligand based on cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion with covalently bonded CMPO function; aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) was evaluated as log Kex (Ca2+, 2HL) = 0.0 ± 0.1. Further, the stability constant of the electroneutral complex species CaL2 in water-saturated nitrobenzene was calculated for a temperature of 25 °C : log βnb (CaL2) = 11.0 ± 0.2. PMID:24061262

  19. Solvent extraction of some divalent metal cations into nitrobenzene by using an anionic ligand based on cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion with covalently bonded CMPO function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From extraction experiments and γ-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium M2+(aq) + CaL2(nb) ↔ ML2(nb) + Ca2+(aq) taking place in the two-phase water-nitrobenzene system (M2+ = Mg2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, UO22+, Co2+, Ni2+, Mn2+; L- = anionic ligand based on cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion with covalently bonded CMPO function; aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the electroneutral complex species ML2 in water-saturated nitrobenzene were calculated; they were found to increase in the following cation order: Sr2+ 2+, Ni2+ 2+ 2+ 2+, Cd2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 22+. (author)

  20. Lanthanide and actinide extractions with anionic ligands based on cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Selucký, P.; Rais, J.; Lučaníková, M.; Grüner, Bohumír; Kvíčalová, Magdalena; Fejfarová, Karla; Císařová, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 96, 4-5 (2008), s. 273-284. ISSN 0033-8230 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/08/0006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : carboranes * metallaboranes * dicarbollides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.084, year: 2008

  1. Lanthanide and actinide extractions with anionic ligands based on cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compounds were synthesized with the aim to develop efficient extraction agents for liquid-liquid extraction of polyvalent cations, i.e. lanthanides and actinides from high-level activity nuclear waste. Compounds of general formulation [(8-CMPO-(CH2-CH2O)2-1,2-C2B9H10)(1',2'-C2B9H11)-3.3'-Co(III)] with different phosphorus and nitrogen substitution (CMPO=2R,3R P(O)-(CH2)nC(O)N1R, 1R = t-octyl, H, Ph, 2R=Ph, n-octyl, 3R=Ph, n 1,2)-(4a to 4e), were prepared and characterized by combination of 11B NMR, 1H high field NMR, ESI-M.S., HPLC and other techniques. Molecular structure of the sodium complex of ligand 4a (1R = t-octyl, 2R = 3R = Ph, n = 1) was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Effect of several modifications in the structure of 4a-4e on the extraction properties was outlined. The study resulted in the definition of ionic ligand with enhanced extraction efficiency for 4a,b (t-octyl and H on the amidic nitrogen atom) and a better solubility of 4a and 4d (1R = t-octyl, 2R = n-Oct, 1R=Ph, n = 1) in less polar solvents. Low polar mixtures of hydrogenated tetrapropylene (TPH) hexyl methyl ketone (HMK) can be applied as an auxiliary solvent for 4a, selected for detailed studies, replacing thus the polar and less environmentally friendly nitro-, fluoro- and chloro- solvents used in the current dicarbollide liquid-liquid extraction process. Results of the fission products separation from the simulated PUREX feed using 4a are presented inclusive procedures for Eu3+ stripping. (orig.)

  2. Chemistry of cobalt bis(1,2-dicarbollide) ion; the synthesis of carbon substituted alkylamino derivatives from hydroxyalkyl derivatives via methylsulfonyl or p-toluenesulfonyl esters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekvinda, Jan; Švehla, Jaroslav; Císařová, I.; Grüner, Bohumír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 798, č. 1 (2015), s. 112-120. ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05677S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Boranes * Carboranes * Metallacarboranes * Dicarbollide * Building blocks Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.173, year: 2014

  3. Separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from simulated high-level waste using cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ion derivate substituted with diphenyl-N-tert.octyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Selucký, P.; Lučaníková, M.; Grüner, Bohumír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 3 (2012), s. 179-183. ISSN 0033-8230 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523; GA ČR GA104/09/0668 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : dicarbollide * CMPO * liquid-liquid extraction * actinides * lanthanides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.373, year: 2012

  4. Halogen protected cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO functions as anionic extractants for trivalent lanthanide/actinide partitioning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Švec, Petr; Selucký, P.; Bubeníková, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2012), s. 103-112. ISSN 0277-5387 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0668 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : carboranes * metallaboranes * dicarbollides * CMPR * liquid-liquid extraction * lanthanides * actinides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.813, year: 2012

  5. Cobalt bis(dicarbollides)(1-) covalently attached to the calix[4]arene platform: The first combination of organic bowl-shaped matrices and inorganic metallaborane cluster anions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Mikulášek, Libor; Báča, Jiří; Císařová, I.; Böhmer, V.; Danila, C.; Reinoso-García, M.M.; Verboom, W.; Reinhoudt, D.N.; Casnati, A.; Ungaro, R.

    -, č. 10 (2005), s. 2022-2039. ISSN 1434-193X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC523; GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Grant ostatní: EEC(XE) F16W-CT-2003-508854 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : calixarenes * carboranes * dicarbollides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.548, year: 2005

  6. Separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from simulated high-level waste using cobalt bis(dicarbollide) (1{sup -}) ion derivate substituted with diphenyl-N-tert.octyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selucky, P.; Lucanikova, M. [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Gruener, B. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rez near Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    A derivative with cobalt bis(dicarbollide)(1{sup -}) ion covalently bonded with diphenyl-N-tert.octyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide with a formula [(8-Ph{sub 2}P(O))-CH{sub 2}C(O)N-t-C{sub 8}H{sub 17}-(CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}O){sub 2}-(1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 10})(1',2'-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 11})-3,3'-Co]{sup -} (CMPO-COSAN) has been evaluated for actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) separation from high level liquid waste (HLLW) from PUREX reprocessing. The procedures for HLLW treatment by CMPO-COSAN dissolved in low polar mixture of hexylmethylketone and hydrogenated tetrapropylene (HMK/TPH, 1:1) or polar mixture of nitrobenzene/bromoform (NB/BF, 9:1) were proposed. The good separation of Am(III)/Ln(III) from bulk of fission products was achieved. The trivalent radionuclides were effectively stripped from the loaded organic phase by using ammonium citrate or mixture of ammonium citrate and ammonium diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA). The co-extraction of some undesirable elements as Zr, Mo, Pd was suppressed using oxalic acid and HEDTA in extraction and a scrub steps. However, co-extraction of Ag has to be solved, yet. (orig.)

  7. Studies on Am(III) separation from simulated high-level waste using cobalt bis(dicarbollide) (1-) ion derivative covalently bound to N,N'-di-n-octyl diglycol diamide as extractant and DTPA as stripping agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of minor actinides from high level liquid waste (HLLW) belongs to the principal challenges in current nuclear treatment. A derivative based on two cobalt bis(dicarbollide) (1-) ions covalently bound to the N,N'-di-n-octyl diglycolyl amide platform via diethyleneglycol chain with the formula ([(N,N'-(8-(OCH2 CH2)2-1,2-C2B9H10)(1',2'-C2B9H11)-3,3'-Co)(N,N'-n-C8H17)NCOCH2]2O)Na2 (TODGA-COSAN), dissolved in low polar mixture of hexyl methyl ketone and n-dodecane, was used as an extractant for efficient Am(III)/Eu(III) separation from PUREX HLLW. Am(III) could be selectively stripped from loaded organic phase by using a stripping agent composed from 0.05 M DTPA and 1 M citric acid as a buffer and 1 M NaNO3 at pH 3.0. Separation factor between europium and americium of 13 was achieved. The europium remaining in the organic phase could be consecutively effectively stripped by using solution of ammonium citrate or ammonium citrate with ammonium DTPA at pH∼7. (author)

  8. Studies on Am(III) separation from simulated high-level waste using cobalt bis(dicarbollide) (1(-)) ion derivative covalently bound to N,N'-di-n-octyl diglycol diamide as extractant and DTPA as stripping agent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeníková, M.; Selucký, P.; Rais, J.; Grüner, Bohumír; Švec, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 293, č. 1 (2012), s. 403-408. ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0668 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Solvent extraction * actinides * high- level liquid waste * dicarbollide derivatives * carboranes * TODGA * DTPA Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.467, year: 2012

  9. Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chlorine gas are inhaled. Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) that may be delayed for a few hours ... health problems such as fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) following the initial exposure. How people can protect ...

  10. The Zwitterion [8,8′-μ-CH2O(CH3)-(1,2-C2B9H10)2-3,3′-Co]0 as a Versatile Building Block To Introduce Cobalt Bis(Dicarbollide) Ion into Organic Molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plešek, Jaromír; Grüner, Bohumír; Šícha, Václav; Böhmer, V.; Císařová, I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 5 (2012), s. 1703-1715. ISSN 0276-7333 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523; GA AV ČR IAAX00320901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : boranes * carboranes * dicarbollides * X-ray diffraction * NMR Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.145, year: 2012

  11. Mechanism of a one-photon two-electron process in photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from ascorbic acid with a cobalt chlorin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Shoko; Mase, Kentaro; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-10-21

    A one-photon two-electron process was made possible in photocatalytic H2 evolution from ascorbic acid with a cobalt(II) chlorin complex [Co(II)(Ch)] via electron transfer from ascorbate to the excited state of [Ru(bpy)3](2+) followed by electron transfer from [Ru(bpy)3](+) to Co(II)(Ch) with proton to give the hydride complex, which reacts with proton to produce H2. [Co(III)(Ch)](+) was reduced by ascorbate to reproduce Co(II)(Ch). PMID:26323791

  12. Supramolecular variations based on cobalt bis(dicarbollide)(1-)ion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Mikulášek, Libor; Báča, Jiří; Císařová, I.; Bőhmer, V.

    Průhonice, 2004, O18. [European Meeting on Boron Chemistry /3./. Průhonice (CZ), 12.09.2004-16.09.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : boranes * carboranes Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  13. Extraction of europium and americium by a mixture of CMPO and dicarbollide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of Eu3+ and Am3+ by a mixture of CMPO and dicarbollide in nitrobenzene has been studied. The synergetic effect of dicarbollide is pronounced at low acidities but still lower than for previously studied DBDECMP. Separation properties towards Am/Eu pair are small. (author) 6 refs.; 2 figs

  14. Synthesis, characterization and some chemistry of c-substituted carboxylic acids of cobalt bis(dicarbollide)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekvinda, Jan; Hnyk, Drahomír; Grüner, Bohumír

    Warsaw : Warsaw University of Technology, 2013. s. 144. ISBN 978-83-60988-16-9. [European Conference on Boron Chemistry /6./. 08.09.2013-13.09.2013, Radzejowice] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00320901 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  15. The Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Polycyclic Derivatives of Cobalt Bis(dicarbollide)(1(-))

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Šícha, Václav; Hnyk, Drahomír; Londesborough, Michael Geoffrey Stephen; Císařová, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 7 (2015), s. 3148-3158. ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00320901; GA ČR GA15-05677S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Organic-molecules * Crystal-structure * boron materials * Metallacarboranes Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.762, year: 2014

  16. Extraction of cesium and barium by dicarbollide and polyethylene glycol in the presence of alkylammonium cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of cesium and barium cations into nitrobenzene and 60 % (vol.%) nitrobenzene + 40 % CCl4 mixture in the presence of dicarbollide (+Slovafol 909), and primary alkylammonium cations has been studied. Extraction constants determined for three methylammonium cations correlate well with their hydration enthalpies. Reverse order of the hydrophobicity of methylammonium cations (competition with bare Cs+ ion) and for their tendency to enter the polyethylene glycol complex (competition with polyethylene glycol complexed Cs+ and Ba2+ ions) is recorded. The possibility of the regeneration of the organic phase after stripping of Cs+ and Ba2+ ions with methylammonium cations has been investigated. (author) 18 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Tetraphenylporphyrin-cobalt(III)bis(1,2-dicarbollide) conjugate: aggregation, protonation of porphyrin ring and photophysical properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubát, Pavel; Cígler, P.; Král, V.; Lang, Kamil; Zelinger, Zdeněk

    Bad Hofgastein : EPA , 2006, s. 72-72. [Central European Conference on Photochemistry. Bad Hohgastein (AT), 05.03.2006-09.03.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : porphyrin Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  18. Synthesis of C-substituted alkylamino derivatives of cobalt bis(1,2-dicarbollide) ion via alkylsulfonyl esters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekvinda, Jan; Švehla, Jaroslav; Císařová, I.; Grüner, Bohumír

    Cambridge : Zing Conferences, 2015. s. 35. [ Medical chemistry of boron compounds conference. 04.10.2015-07.10.2015, Oropesa] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05677S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  19. Synthesis, characterisation and some chemistry of C- and B-substituted carboxylic acids of cobalt bis(dicarbollide)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekvinda, Jan; Šícha, Václav; Hnyk, Drahomír; Grüner, Bohumír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 13 (2014), s. 5106-5120. ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00320901 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : BORON-CLUSTER COMPOUNDS * EFFICIENT EXTRACTANTS * ACTINIDE EXTRACTIONS Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  20. Spin-Controlled Conductivity in a Thiophene-Functionalized Iron-Bis(dicarbollide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Benjamin; Sauriol, Dustin; Derosa, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between spin state and conductivity is studied for a thiophene-functionalized iron(III)-bis(dicarbollide) with one or two thiophenes at each end of the cage. Iron has a high ground state spin that can be adjusted by external electromagnetic fields to produce different magnetic states. The hypothesis explored here is that changes in the spin state of these Fe-containing molecules can lead to significant changes in molecular conductivity. Two examples of the possible application of such spin-dependent conductivity are its use as a molecular switch, the basic building block in digital logic, or as a memory bit. The molecules were first optimized using the Becke-3 Lee-Yang-Parr functional (B3LYP) with the 6-31G(d) basis set. A relaxed molecular geometry at each spin state was then placed between gold electrodes to conduct spin-polarized electron transport calculations with the density functional theory/non-equilibrium Green's functions formalism. The revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhf solids exchange-correlation functional (PBES) with double zeta polarized basis set was used. The result of these calculations show that the conductivity increases with the spin state. The cage structure is shown to exhibit fully delocalized molecular orbitals (MOs) appropriate for high conductivity and thus, in this system, the conductivity depends on the position of the MOs relative to the Fermi level. Minority spins are responsible for the conductivity of the doublet spin state while majority spins dominate for the quartet and sextet spin states as they are found closer to the Fermi level when they are occupied. Energy calculations predict a difference in energy between the more and the less conductive spin states (sextet and doublet respectively) that is 15-20 times greater than the thermal energy, which would imply stability at room temperature; however, the energy difference is sufficiently small that transitions between spin states can be induced.

  1. Chlorination of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained on the Different Metal Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Pełech

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a chlorination method is proposed for simultaneous purification and functionalization of carbon nanotubes, thus increasing their ability to use. Carbon nanotubes were obtained by CVD method through ethylene decomposition on the nanocrystalline iron or cobalt or bimetallic iron-cobalt catalysts. The effects of temperature (50, 250, and 450°C in the case of carbon nanotubes obtained on the Fe-Co catalyst and type of catalyst (Fe, Co, Fe/Co on the effectiveness of the treatment and functionalization were tested. The phase composition of the samples was determined using the X-ray diffraction method. The quantitative analysis of metal impurity content was validated by means of the thermogravimetric analysis. Using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS analysis, and also Mohr titration method, the presence of chlorine species on the surface of chlorinated samples was confirmed.

  2. Technology assessment: Chlorine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine is not just one of many chemical feedstocks which is used in a few definitely harmful products like PVC or CFC but is irrelevant in all other respects. Just the opposite is true: There is hardly any product line of the chemical industry that can do without chlorine, from herbicides and pesticides to dyes, plastics, pharmaceuticals, photographic atricles, and cosmetics. Chlorine is not only a key element of chemical production but also an ubiquitous element of everyday life in civilisation. There are even many who would agree that the volume of chlorine production is an indicator of the competitive strength and national wealth of a modern society. By now, however, it has become evident that the unreflected use of chlorine is no longer ecologically acceptable. The consequences of a chlorine phase-out as compared to the continued chlorine production at the present level were investigated scientifically by a PROGNOS team. They are presented in this book. (orig.)

  3. ORIGIN OF COBALT ANISOTROPY IN RARE EARTH-COBALT INTERMETALLICS

    OpenAIRE

    Ballou, Rafik; Lemaire, R.

    1988-01-01

    The strong cobalt anisotropies in rare earth-cobalt intermetallics are shown to arise from orbitally selective 3d band energy dispersion due to either chain like or layered like cobalt staking rather than from usual crystal field effect.

  4. Water Treatment Technology - Chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on chlorination provides instructional materials for nine competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purpose and process of chlorination, chlorine…

  5. Chlorine solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorine solar neutrino experiment in the Homestake Gold Mine is described and the results obtained with the chlorine detector over the last fourteen years are summarized and discussed. Background processes producing 37Ar and the question of the constancy of the production rate of 37Ar are given special emphasis

  6. Cobalt sensitization and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    : This clinical review article presents clinical and scientific data on cobalt sensitization and dermatitis. It is concluded that cobalt despite being a strong sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen to come up on patch testing should be regarded as a very complex metal to test with. Exposure...

  7. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxi...

  8. Chlorine trifluoride (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monograph on chlorine trifluoride may be considered as a working tool useful in gaseous diffusion research. It consists of data gathered from the literature and includes furthermore a certain amount of original data. This monograph groups together the physical, chemical and physiological properties of chlorine trifluoride, as well as the preparation and analytical methods. It has been thought wise to add some technological information, and the safety regulations governing its use. (authors)

  9. Zirconia concentrate chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination experiments were conducted in order to study the kinetics of gasification of the zirconium oxide present in the zirconia concentrate. The variables studied are temperature (1173 to 1373 K), percentage of reducing agent (12 to 36%) and porosity (22 to 30%). The results indicated a greater influence of temperature and percentage of reducing agent as well as allowed the conclusion that a balance between the levels of these variables is an important factor in the appropriate chlorination conditions. (author)

  10. Hydrophilic copolymers based on poly(2-alkyl oxazoline) as a carriers of cobalt bis(dicarbollide) conjugates designed as HIV protease inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dordovic, V.; Uchman, M.; Pleštil, Josef; Zhigunov, Alexander; Matějíček, P.

    Prague: Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2012. s. 96. ISBN 978-80-85009-72-9. [Prague Meeting on Macromolecules /76./ - Polymers in Medicine. 01.07.2012-05.07.2012, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : poly(2-alkyl oxazoline) * HIV protease Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  11. Cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions with covalently bonded CMPO groups as selective extraction agents for lanthanide and actinide cations from highly acidic nuclear waste solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Plešek, Jaromír; Báča, Jiří; Císařová, I.; Dozol, J. F.; Rouquette, H.; Vinas, C.; Selucký, P.; Rais, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 10 (2002), s. 1519-1527. ISSN 1144-0546 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/99/1096; GA ČR GA104/01/0142; GA ČR GA203/99/M037; GA MŠk LN00A028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATIONS * BORON-CLUSTER COMPOUNDS * CALIXARENES Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.060, year: 2002

  12. Solvent estraction of actinides and lanthanides by CMP(O)-and N-acyl(thio)urea-tetrafunctionalized cavitands: strong synergistic effect of cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinoso-Garcia, Marta M.; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of two carbamoylmethylphosphate (CMP)- and -phosphine oxide (CMPO)-tetrafunctionalized cavitands with a propyl spacer between the cavitand platform and the chelating sites is described. Liquid-liquid extractions with CMP(O)-and N-acyl(thio)urea-tetrafunctionalized cavitands were perfor

  13. Recent progress in design and development of efficient extractans for f-block elements based on cobalt bis(dicarbollide) bulding block

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Kvíčalová, Magdalena; Plešek, Jaromír; Šícha, Václav; Císařová, I.

    Vol. XIII. Platja d´Aro: CSIC, 2008. IL B12 . [IMEBORON /13./. 21.09.2008-25.09.2008, Platja d´Aro] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : boranes Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  14. Electrodeposition of Cobalt Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sungbok; Hong, Kimin [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    We developed an electroplating process of cobalt nanowires of which line-widths were between 70 and 200 nm. The plating electrolyte was made of CoSO{sub 4} and an organic additive, dimethyldithiocarbamic acid ester sodium salt (DAESA). DAESA in plating electrolytes had an accelerating effect and reduced the surface roughness of plated cobalt thin films. We obtained void-free cobalt nanowires when the plating current density was 6.25 mA/cm{sup 2} and DAESA concentration was 1 mL/L.

  15. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Robert H.; Joseph O. Falkinham; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains wer...

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrophobous ions at the liquid-liquid interfaces: case of dicarbollide anions as synergy agents and of ionic liquids as extracting medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we first describe the distribution of dicarbollide salts (CCD-, Mn+) in concentrated monophasic solutions (water, chloroform, octanol, nitrobenzene) and in the corresponding biphasic 'oil' - water solutions. We point to the importance of surface activity of the CCD-s and of their self-aggregation in water, with marked counterions effects, and we explain the synergistic effect of CCD-s in the Eu3+ extraction by BTP ligands. In the second part of the thesis we report exploratory simulations on the extraction of Sr2+ by 18-crown-6 to an hydrophobic ionic liquid ([BMI][PF6]), focusing on the liquid - liquid interface. Analogies and differences with a classical aqueous interface are outlined. (author)

  17. Cobalt/fullerene spinterfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Spintronics is a multidisciplinary research field and it explores phenomena that interlink the spin and charge degrees of freedom. The thesis focuses on spin-polarized electronic transports in cobalt (Co) and fullerene (C60) based vertical spintronic devices. It starts with a review about spin-trans

  18. Recovery of the metals contained in spent catalysts using a thermal treatment followed by a selective chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental procedure for the recovery of the metallic values contained in spent catalysts, such as cobalt, chromium, copper, nickel, molybdenum, titanium, vanadium, tungsten, etc. is described. The procedure is based both on a thermal treatment carried out prior to another one performed at 600 degree centigree and on the selective chlorination of the samples, using different gaseous mixtures, at a temperature between 300 and 600 degree centigree. From the chlorination residues, and as chlorides, it is possible to recover up to 98% nickel, cobalt molybdenum, titanium and tungsten and 80% of the vanadium compounds contained in the condensation products. The oxygen partial pressure in the gaseous mixture seems to be a determining factor in the chlorination selectivity. 12 refs

  19. Chlorination of zirconyte concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination experiments with zirconyte concentrate were carried out in order to study the effects of temperature, percentage of reducing agent and porosity on the gasification of ZrO2 for 10 and 20 minutes of reaction. Factorial analysis was applied and the results indicated that temperature and percentage of reducing agent were the two only variables effecting the ZrO2 gasification. (author)

  20. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the ...

  1. The chlorination of cooling water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After reviewing the means of fighting biological pollution of cooling water circuits in nuclear power stations, the authors describe the chlorination treatment methods used by EDF. This deals with the massive shock chlorination of the cooling towers and the continuous low-level chlorination of coastal nuclear power stations. In both areas, the Research and Development Board of EDF has carried out and encouraged research with the aim of improving circuit protection, while still protecting the aquatic eco-system against damage that might be caused by waste chlorinated water

  2. Chalcogenide Cobalt telluride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Bishnu; Dulal, Rajendra; Pegg, Ian L.; Philip, John

    Cobalt telluride nanotubes are grown using wet chemical and hydrothermal syntheses. Wet chemical synthesized nanotubes display nearly 1: 1 Co to Te ratio. On the other hand, CoTe nanotubes synthesized using hydrothermal method show excess Co content leading to the compound Co58Te42. Both CoTe and Co58Te42 display magnetic properties, but with totally different characteristics. The Curie temperature of CoTe is higher than 400 K. However, the Tc of Co58Te42 is below 50 K. Transport properties of cobalt telluride (CoTe) nanotube devices show that they exhibit p-type semiconducting behavior. The magnetoresistance measured at 10 K show a magnetoresistance of 54%. . National Science Foundation under ECCS-0845501 and NSF-MRI, DMR-0922997.

  3. Blood doping by cobalt. Should we measure cobalt in athletes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidi Gian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood doping is commonplace in competitive athletes who seek to enhance their aerobic performances through illicit techniques. Presentation of the hypothesis Cobalt, a naturally-occurring element with properties similar to those of iron and nickel, induces a marked and stable polycythemic response through a more efficient transcription of the erythropoietin gene. Testing the hypothesis Although little information is available so far on cobalt metabolism, reference value ranges or supplementation in athletes, there is emerging evidence that cobalt is used as a supplement and increased serum concentrations are occasionally observed in athletes. Therefore, given the athlete's connatural inclination to experiment with innovative, unfair and potentially unhealthy doping techniques, cobalt administration might soon become the most suited complement or surrogate for erythropoiesis-stimulating substances. Nevertheless, cobalt administration is not free from unsafe consequences, which involve toxic effects on heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and cancer promotion. Implications of the hypothesis Cobalt is easily purchasable, inexpensive and not currently comprehended within the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Moreover, available techniques for measuring whole blood, serum, plasma or urinary cobalt involve analytic approaches which are currently not practical for antidoping laboratories. Thus more research on cobalt metabolism in athletes is compelling, along with implementation of effective strategies to unmask this potentially deleterious doping practice

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrophobous ions at the liquid-liquid interfaces: case of dicarbollide anions as synergy agents and of ionic liquids as extracting medium; Simulations par dynamique moleculaire d'ions hydrophobes aux interfaces liquide - liquide: le cas des anions dicarbollides comme agents de synergie et celui des liquides ioniques comme milieu extractant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevrot, G

    2008-01-15

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we first describe the distribution of dicarbollide salts (CCD{sup -}, Mn{sup +}) in concentrated monophasic solutions (water, chloroform, octanol, nitrobenzene) and in the corresponding biphasic 'oil' - water solutions. We point to the importance of surface activity of the CCD{sup -}s and of their self-aggregation in water, with marked counterions effects, and we explain the synergistic effect of CCD{sup -}s in the Eu{sup 3+} extraction by BTP ligands. In the second part of the thesis we report exploratory simulations on the extraction of Sr{sup 2+} by 18-crown-6 to an hydrophobic ionic liquid ([BMI][PF6]), focusing on the liquid - liquid interface. Analogies and differences with a classical aqueous interface are outlined. (author)

  5. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli; Møller, Per; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2010-01-01

    . Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results: Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these...

  6. Studies with solid chlorine chemical for chlorination of sea water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination is one of the conventional methods to control biofouling of condenser cooling water systems using either river water, reservoir water or sea water. However, there are many safety concerns associated with handling, storage and application of gaseous chlorine. Studies were carried out with suitable alternative chlorine chemical compounds which do not involve majority of these concerns but meet the functional requirement of gas chlorine. Trichloroisocyanuric Acid (TCCA) is one of the suitable alternatives to Gas chlorine. TCCA is a chlorine stabilized compound, stabilized with Cyanuric acid, thus similar to Gas Chlorine in its functions except that it is available in solid form. Release of chlorine is a gradual process in TCCA unlike Gaseous chlorine. Field studies with TCCA indicated gradual and near uniform release rate of chlorine, for longer duration with the requisite free residual chlorine levels (FRC). Thus, use of TCCA could be considered as a suitable alternative for gas chlorine for regular chlorination requirements. (author)

  7. Structure of cobalt protoporphyrin chloride and its dimer, observation and DFT modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Ha-Thi, Minh-Huong; Chen, Shufeng; Soep, Benoît; Shafizadeh, Niloufar

    2016-06-22

    In this article we present a joint study by time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and density functional theory of cobalt protoporphyrin dimer complexes. The main novelty of the experimental part is to reveal the formation of porphyrin dimers that eventually include a chlorine atom. Density functional theory calculations have been performed to shed light on the structural and electronic properties of monomers and dimers that may be formed experimentally. Various geometries of the monomers are analyzed in the two lowest spin states. The electronic structures are examined by means of population analysis relying on the iterative Hirshfeld scheme and the topological analyses of the electron localization function. It is shown that the cobalt ligand bond is purely ionic in the triplet states but shows a noticeable covalent character in the singlet state. Ionization potential of Co-protoporphyrin and binding energies of the chlorine ligand are also reported. Concerning the dimers, several association patterns are investigated for the chlorinated and non-chlorinated complexes. It is found that the structures of the most stable complexes involve four hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic acid moieties of the protoporphyrins. However other association modes are likely to be possible in the experiments. PMID:27270590

  8. DNA probe modified with 3-iron bis(dicarbollide) for electrochemical determination of DNA sequence of Avian Influenza Virus H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Iwona; Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J; Radecki, Jerzy; Radecka, Hanna

    2014-01-15

    In this work, we report on oligonucleotide probes bearing metallacarborane [3-iron bis(dicarbollide)] redox label, deposited on gold electrode for electrochemical determination of DNA sequence derived from Avian Influenza Virus (AIV), type H5N1. The oligonucleotide probes containing 5'-terminal NH2 group were covalently attached to the electrode, via NHS/EDC coupling to 3-mercaptopropionic acid SAM, previously deposited on the surface of gold. The changes in redox activity of Fe(III) centre of the metallacarborane complex before and after hybridization process was used as analytical signal. The signals generated upon hybridization with targets such as complementary or non-complementary 20-mer ssDNA or various PCR products consisting of 180-190 bp (dsDNA) were recorded by Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV). The developed system was very sensitive towards targets containing sequence complementary to the probe with the detection limit estimated as 0.03 fM (S/N=3.0) and 0.08 fM (S/N=3.0) for 20-mer ssDNA and for dsDNA (PCR product), respectively. The non-complementary targets generated very weak responses. Furthermore, the proposed genosensor was suitable for discrimination of PCR products with different location of the complementarity region. PMID:23958581

  9. Radiochemical analysis of chlorine-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to propose a radiochemical separation method of chlorine-36 from other beta-gamma emitters based on an oxidation technique where chlorine is trapped by NaOH. Chlorine-36 beta emissions are measured by liquid scintillation counting by the dual label technique in order to avoid the contamination produced by carbon-14 which is also trapped by NaOH and it is the main contaminant present in graphite samples. The sensitivity of this radiochemical method is high enough to achieve the needed thresholds for the radiological characterization of the radioactive materials in which this method can be applied

  10. Sorption isotherms of europium captured on supports impregnated with dicarbollide and dibutyldiethyl carbamoylmethylphosphonate from nitric acid media and column experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration dependence was investigated for the sorption of europium (10-6 to 10-2 mol/l) on the XAD-7 support impregnated with 25 wt.% chlorinated dicarbollic acid and 5 wt.% dibutylether carbamoylmethylphosphonate. The sorption proceeded from 0.1 M and 1 M HNO3 in static conditions or from 0.1 M HNO3 in laboratory columns in dynamic conditions. The distribution coefficients were found to decrease substantially at higher Eu concentrations, and their values obtained in dynamic conditions were two-fold lower than in the static conditions. The effective capacity of the sorbent for Eu was concentration-dependent, and no saturation was reached in the experiments performed. The desorption of Eu from columns using 0.15 M EDTA solutions with an initial pH of 7.02 was also examined at 40 ± 5 deg. 2 tabs., 6 figs., 6 refs

  11. Cobalt metabolism in horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The levels of serum vitamin B12 were determined on 16 mature partly warm-blooded, partly Finnish rural-race horses by the radioisotopic competitive inhibition assay method. The mean value from three samplings carried out in dupli- or triplicate was 1.54 plus/minus 0.16ng/p. The utilization of seruminorganic cobalt for cyanocobalaminsynthesis was studied on two geldings, which received a dose of 200 μi 58CoCl2 i.v. A Sephadex G-100 gel filtration was carried out with the serum proteins from serial blood samplings at different time intervals 15min. to 48 hrs. after administration. The gel filtration showed the presence of two labelled proteins in the serum, one of them appearing some tie after adminitration and disappearing almost completely towards the end of the experimental period. The two elution peaks are considered to represent inorganic 58Co and 58Co labelled vitamin B12. The appearance of labelling in seru vitamin B12 indicates the passing of cobalt into the intestine, and reabsorption into blood in the form of vitamin B12. (author)

  12. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  13. Kinetic study of neodymium oxide chlorination with gaseous chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, Marta V., E-mail: marta.bosco@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Fouga, Gaston G. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida Bustillo 9500, CP 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Bohe, Ana E. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Complejo Tecnologico Pilcaniyeu, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida Bustillo 9500, CP 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Centro Regional Universitario Bariloche, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, CP 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze the kinetics of the neodymium oxide chlorination reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For temperatures below 425 Degree-Sign C the system is under chemical control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reaction order of 0.40 with respect to chlorine partial pressure was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An activation energy of 161 {+-} 4 kJ mol{sup -1} was determined. - Abstract: The kinetics of the chlorination of neodymium oxide has been investigated by thermogravimetry between 312 Degree-Sign C and 475 Degree-Sign C, and for partial pressures of chlorine ranging from 10 kPa to 50 kPa. The starting temperature for the reaction of neodymium oxide with chlorine was determined to be about 250 Degree-Sign C, leading to neodymium oxychloride as product. The results showed that, for temperatures below 425 Degree-Sign C, the system is under chemical control and the formation of the oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The influence of chlorine mass transport through the bulk gas phase and through the boundary layer on the overall reaction rate was analyzed. In the absence of these two mass-transfer steps, a reaction order of 0.39 with respect to chlorine partial pressure, and an activation energy of 161 {+-} 4 kJ mol{sup -1} were determined. A complete rate equation has been successfully developed.

  14. Obtaining and thermodynamic properties of cobalt fluoride tetrahydrate and cobalt hydroxycarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to obtaining and thermodynamic properties of cobalt fluoride tetrahydrate and cobalt hydroxycarbonate. Therefore, the cobalt fluoride tetrahydrate (II) was obtained by the reaction of cobalt hydroxycarbonate(II) with hydrofluoric acid solutions of different concentrations. The enthalpy and adverse reactions was defined by means of calorimetry method. The enthalpy of formation of cobalt fluoride tetrahydrate (II) and cobalt hydroxycarbonate(II) was determined by thermochemical cycles.

  15. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  16. Thermodynamics Features of Cesium and Strontium Extraction by Mixtures of H+CCD- and PEG-400 in FS-13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Washington State University, Chemistry Department, P.O. Box 644630, Pullman, WA 99164-4630 (United States); Zalupski, P. [Washington State University, Chemistry Department, P.O. Box 644630, Pullman, WA 99164-4630 (United States); Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Martin, L.R.; Herbst, R.S. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Derivatives of the cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion, a polyhedral metallo-carborane, have proven to be unique phase transfer reagents for solvent extraction. It has been shown that a variety of cations may be partitioned into dicarbollide-containing polar organic media. The electronic delocalization of the cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion enhances its inert characteristics, shielding its core structure from the main chemical processes that could cause degradation. It is highly resistant to radiation damage, heat, hydrolysis and redox-driven decomposition. The substantial selectivity exhibited by chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide anions in polar organic media for cesium over other members of the alkali metal family is of particular interest for nuclear fuel processing. The attractive properties of this anion have led to significant efforts to implement dicarbollides in strategies for radioactive waste management. For example, a process for the selective removal of cesium, strontium and actinides from a variety of acidic radioactive wastes using mixtures of chlorinated derivative of dicarbollide, CCD-, polyethylene glycol (PEG-400), and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) has been developed as the UNEX process. Mixtures of H+CCD- and PEG-400 also have received attention as a possible component of the UREX+ processes, a framework for advanced aqueous reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel in the U.S. As part of the EUROPART project, a substantial effort focused on the synthesis and evaluation of a variety of dicarbollide derivatives attempting to blend metal-coordinating functionalities with the CCD structure. To gain a deeper understanding of selected thermodynamic features of the CCD-PEG-400 system and thereby improve the prospects for its application, the thermochemistry of cesium and strontium partitioning in liquid-liquid systems containing chlorinated cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion (CCD-) and polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) has been

  17. New gravimetric method for cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, G P; Ray, H N; Biswas, K

    1966-10-01

    A new gravimetric method for the determination of cobalt is described, based on precipitation from acidic solution with a reagent prepared by heating alpha-nitroso-beta-naphthol in a mixture of glacial acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and syrupy phosphoric acid. The cobalt is weighed, after ignition of the precipitate, as Co(3)O(4). Iron(III), copper, chromium(III), vanadium(V), tungsten(VI), aluminium, molybdenum, nickel, titanium, zirconium, uranium(VI) and cerium do not interfere. PMID:18960030

  18. Physical and electrochemical properties of cobalt doped (Ti,Ru)O{sub 2} electrode coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummelgård, Christine [Department of Natural Sciences, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall (Sweden); Karlsson, Rasmus K.B. [Applied Electrochemistry, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Bäckström, Joakim [Department of Natural Sciences, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall (Sweden); Rahman, Seikh M.H. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Cornell, Ann [Applied Electrochemistry, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Sten [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Olin, Håkan, E-mail: hakan.olin@miun.se [Department of Natural Sciences, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall (Sweden)

    2013-12-01

    Highlights: • Cobalt doped oxide displays crystallites half the size compared to undoped oxide. • Crystallites half the size are in agreement with twice as large active area. • The cobalt dopand joined with the (Ti,Ru)O{sub 2} in rutile phase, as no spinel was found. • Doped electrodes showed an increase in activity for hydrogen evolution. • Similar activity was shown for chlorine evolution comparing doped and undoped oxides. -- Abstract: The physical and electrochemical properties of ternary oxides Ti{sub 0.7}Ru{sub 0.3−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 2} (x = 0.093 and x = 0) have been investigated and compared. Samples of three different thicknesses were prepared by spin-coating onto polished titanium to achieve uniform and well-defined coatings. The resulting electrodes were characterized with a variety of methods, including both physical and electrochemical methods. Doping with cobalt led to a larger number of micrometer-sized cracks in the coating, and coating grains half the size compared to the undoped samples (10 instead of 20 nm across). This is in agreement with a voltammetric charge twice as high, as estimated from cyclic voltammetry. There is no evidence of a Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel phase, suggesting that the cobalt is mainly incorporated in the overall rutile structure of the (Ti,Ru)O{sub 2}. The doped electrodes exhibited a higher activity for cathodic hydrogen evolution compared to the undoped electrodes, despite the fact that one third of the active ruthenium was substituted with cobalt. For anodic chlorine evolution, the activity was similar for both electrode types.

  19. COBALT SALTS PRODUCTION BY USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila V. Dyakova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the extracting cobalt salts by using mixtures on the basis of tertiary amine from multicomponent solutions from the process of hydrochloride leaching of cobalt concentrate. The optimal composition for the extraction mixture, the relationship between the cobalt distribution coefficients and modifier’s nature and concentration, and the saltingout agent type have been determined. A hydrochloride extraction technology of cobalt concentrate yielding a purified concentrated cobalt solution for the production of pure cobalt salts has been developed and introduced at Severonikel combine.

  20. Effects of Chlorine on Enterovirus RNA Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary mechanism of disinfection of waterborne pathogens by chlorine has always been believed to be due to the alteration of proteins by free chlorine and subsequent disruption of their biological structure.

  1. Cobalt release from implants and consumer items and characteristics of cobalt sensitized patients with dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menne, Torkil; Liden, Carola;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cobalt allergy is prevalent in dermatitis patients. Very little documentation exists about current sources of cobalt exposure.Objectives. To investigate and discuss putative sources of cobalt exposure and to present selected epidemiological data on cobalt allergy from patch-tested der...

  2. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    OpenAIRE

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N. A.; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactiv...

  3. Reducing chlorination of niobium pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of cylindric briquettes of Nb2O5 and carbon are presented. The effects of chlorine flow, dimension of the briquettes, porosity, percentage of the reducing agent in the mixture and temperature are analysed. The volatilization aspect of Nb2O5 by the briquettes and the structural transformations of the samples are described. (M.A.C.)

  4. Novel chlorinated derivatives of BODIPY

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Moreno, I.; Costela González, Ángel; Chiara, José Luis; Duran-Sampedro, G.; Ortiz, M. J.; Rodríguez Agarrabeitia, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to the use of novel dyes with a BODIPY structure, characterised in that they contain at least one chlorine atom bound to the carbons of the boradiazaindacene system, to the use thereof as laser dyes and fluorescent markers, and to a method for obtaining some of these compounds.

  5. Accumulation of cobalt by cephalopods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulation of cobalt by cephalopod mollusca was investigated by radiotracer experiments and elemental analysis. In the radiotracer experiments, Octopus vulgaris took up cobalt-60 from seawater fairly well and the concentration of the nuclide in whole body attained about 150 times the level of seawater at 25th day at 200C. Among the tissues and organs measured, branchial heart which is the specific organ of cephalopods showed the highest affinity for the nuclide. The organ accumulated about 50% of the radioactivity in whole body in spite of its little mass as 0.2% of total body weight. On the other hand, more than 90% of the radioactivity taken up from food (soft parts of Gomphina melanaegis labelled with cobalt-60 previously in an aquarium) was accumulated in liver at 3rd day after the single administration and then the radioactivity in the liver seemed to be distributed to other organs and tissues. The characteristic elution profiles of cobalt-60 was observed for each of the organs and tissues in Sephadex gel-filtration experiment. It was confirmed by the gel-filtration that most of cobalt-60 in the branchial heart was combined with the constituents of low molecular weights. The average concentration of stable cobalt in muscle of several species of cephalopods was 5.3 +- 3.0 μg/kg wet and it was almost comparable to the fish muscle. On the basis of soft parts, concentration of the nuclide closed association among bivalve, gastropod and cephalopod except squid that gave lower values than the others. (author)

  6. Effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols have many significant effects on the reactivity of oxido-reduction. The effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate were evaluated through different kinetics studies. Since chlorine was an electron withdrawing atom, the substitution of chlorine on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by σ-electron withdrawing conductive effect; at the same time, the substitution of chlorine at ortho or para position on the aromatic ring increased the oxidation rate constant by π-electron donating conjugative effect, and the conjugative effect could counteract the negative impact of the conductive effect to some extent. On the other hand, the substitution of chlorine at ortho position on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by steric hindrance effect. The oxidation rate constants of phenol and chlorinated phenols studied decreased as follow order: 4-chlorophenol>2,4-dichlorophenol>phenol>2,6-dichlorophenol.

  7. The cobalt-60 container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has successfully designed and constructed a container (cargo) scanner, which uses cobalt-60 of 100-300 Ci as radiation source. The following performances of the Cobalt-60 container scanner have been achieved at INET: a) IQI (Image Quality Indicator) - 2.5% behind 100 mm of steel; b) CI (Contrast Indicator) - 0.7% behind 100 mm of steel; c) SP (Steel Penetration) - 240 mm of steel; d) Maximum Dose per Scanning - 0.02mGy; e) Throughput - twenty 40-foot containers per hour. These performances are equal or similar to those of the accelerator scanners. Besides these nice enough inspection properties, the Cobalt-60 scanner possesses many other special features which are better than accelerator scanners: a) cheap price - it will be only or two tenths of the accelerator scanner's; b) low radiation intensity - the radiation protection problem is much easier to solve and a lot of money can be saved on the radiation shielding building; c) much smaller area for installation and operation; d) simple operation and convenient maintenance; e) high reliability and stability. The Cobalt-60 container (or cargo) scanner is satisfied for boundary customs, seaports, airports and railway stations etc. Because of the nice special features said above, it is more suitable to be applied widely. Its high properties and low price will make it have much better application prospects

  8. Cobalt 60 commercial irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantage of using cobalt 60 for ionizing treatment is that it has excellent penetration. Gamma plants are also very efficient, in as much as there is very little mechanical or electrical equipment in a gamma irradiation facility. The average efficiency of a gamma plant is usually around 95% of all available processing time

  9. Water Chlorination for human consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beginning from this issue, an initiative of Federgasacqua (Federal association dealing with the gas and the water) takes place through the activities of the Task Forces Water Quality Control and Materials and Processes, which aim is to offer to the water industry operators and updated information concerning some main subjects, emphasizing in particular the technical and management applied topics. The paper deals with the chlorination processes in drinking water treatment. An overview of the italian situation is presented, concerning disinfection as well as other oxidation processes, together with an historical background on chlorination. Concerning the applications, the chemical technologies and the main processes, the disinfectant effectiveness and the byproducts formation have been described. Further, the regulations in force have been reported and discussed on national and international bases

  10. Metabolic fate of chlorinated paraffins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposition of three [1-14C]-chlorododecanes (MCDD, PCDD I and PCDD II; 17.4%, 55.9%, and 68.5% chlorination) was studied in C57Bl mice. [1-14C]-lauric acid (LA) was studied as reference compound. Fifty-two percent (MCDD), 32% (PCDD I), and 8% (PCDD II) of the radioactive doses were exhaled as 14CO2 during 12 h after i.v. injection. Similar results were obtained after p.o. administration. In addition to a marked labelling of the liver and fat, the distribution patterns observed at 24 h after administration revealed an uptake of radioactivity in tissues with high cell turnover/high metabolic activity, e.g., intestinal mucosa, bone marrow, salivary glands and thymus. The concentration of radioactivity in these sites and the exhalation of 14CO2, which were inverse to the degree of chlorination, indicate that the chloroalkanes are degraded to metabolites which can be utilized in the intermediary metabolism. A similar, although more pronounced, distribution pattern and 14CO2-exhalation (70% of i.v. dose) was observed after LA administration. The long time retention of heptane-soluble radioactivity in liver and fat (indicating unmetabolized substance) increased with degree of chlorination. On the contrary, the administration of LA and the chlorododecanes MCDD and PCDD I, but not of PCDD II, resulted in a selective labelling of the central nervous system 30-60 days after injection. (orig.)

  11. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M.E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent

  12. Fracturing graphene by chlorination: a theoretical viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Ijäs, M.; Havu, P.; Harju, A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent photochlorination experiment [B. Li et al., ACS Nano 5, 5957 (2011)], we study theoretically the interaction of chlorine with graphene. In previous theoretical studies, covalent binding between chlorine and carbon atoms has been elusive upon adsorption to the graphene basal plane. Interestingly, in their recent experiment, Li et al. interpreted their data in terms of chemical bonding of chlorine on top of the graphene plane, associated with a change from sp2 to sp3 in ...

  13. Recovery of Cobalt as Cobalt Oxalate from Cobalt Tailings Using Moderately Thermophilic Bioleaching Technology and Selective Sequential Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobao Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt is a very important metal which is widely applied in various critical areas, however, it is difficult to recover cobalt from minerals since there is a lack of independent cobalt deposits in nature. This work is to provide a complete process to recover cobalt from cobalt tailings using the moderately thermophilic bioleaching technology and selective sequential extraction. It is found that 96.51% Co and 26.32% Cu were extracted after bioleaching for four days at 10% pulp density. The mean compositions of the leach solutions contain 0.98 g·L−1 of Co, 6.52 g·L−1 of Cu, and 24.57 g·L−1 of Fe (III. The copper ion was then recovered by a solvent extraction process and the ferric ions were selectively removed by applying a goethite deironization process. The technological conditions of the above purification procedures were deliberately discussed. Over 98.6% of copper and 99.9% of ferric ions were eliminated from the leaching liquor. Cobalt was finally produced as cobalt oxalate and its overall recovery during the whole process was greater than 95%. The present bioleaching process of cobalt is worth using for reference to deal with low-grade cobalt ores.

  14. The continuous chlorination of plutonium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, M.J.

    1959-08-14

    Previous reports on the chlorination of plutonium dioxide describe numerous small-scale experiments and a few fair-sized batch preparations. The chemistry of chlorination by numerous reagents is covered, but no process had received sufficient study for large-scale preparation of anhydrous plutonium trichloride. The literature search revealed no extensive studies on chlorination rates, exhaust gas filtering, atmospheric requirements, reactor materials, etc. A program was undertaken to select a chlorination process, to develop the necessary information for defining operating conditions and equipment specifications, and then to demonstrate the operation of the process.

  15. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl2–N2 mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated

  16. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated.

  17. The respiratory effects of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugell, D.W.; Morgan, W.K.; Perkins, D.G.; Rubin, A. (Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We studied seven subjects with certain manifestations of cobalt-induced lung disease. All worked with cobalt and were involved in either the production or use of hard metal. The mode of presentation varied from an acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis that cleared completely when exposure ceased to progressive severe interstitial fibrosis of the lungs. In one subject reexposure was followed by a recurrence of the symptoms. All subjects showed restrictive ventilatory impairment and a reduction of their diffusing capacity. The radiologic appearances varied greatly. While two subjects had clear roentgenograms with small lung volumes, others had a micronodular pattern or small blotchy nodular infiltrates, and one had diffuse reticulonodulation as is seen in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. The pathologic appearances varied between desquamative interstitial pneumonia and overt mural fibrosis of the alveoli. Six of the seven patients had multinucleated giant cells in their biopsy specimens or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

  18. The respiratory effects of cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied seven subjects with certain manifestations of cobalt-induced lung disease. All worked with cobalt and were involved in either the production or use of hard metal. The mode of presentation varied from an acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis that cleared completely when exposure ceased to progressive severe interstitial fibrosis of the lungs. In one subject reexposure was followed by a recurrence of the symptoms. All subjects showed restrictive ventilatory impairment and a reduction of their diffusing capacity. The radiologic appearances varied greatly. While two subjects had clear roentgenograms with small lung volumes, others had a micronodular pattern or small blotchy nodular infiltrates, and one had diffuse reticulonodulation as is seen in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. The pathologic appearances varied between desquamative interstitial pneumonia and overt mural fibrosis of the alveoli. Six of the seven patients had multinucleated giant cells in their biopsy specimens or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid

  19. Relative transition probabilities of cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, R. A.; Miller, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results of determinations of neutral-cobalt transition probabilities measured relative to Co I 4150.43 A and Co II 4145.15 A, using a gas-driven shock tube as the spectroscopic light source. Results are presented for 139 Co I lines in the range from 3940 to 6640 A and 11 Co II lines in the range from 3840 to 4730 A, which are estimated to have reliabilities ranging from 8 to 50%.

  20. Cobalt bis(dicarbollide) ions functionalized by CMPO-like groups attached to boron by short bonds; efficient extraction agents for separation of trivalent f-block elements from highly acidic nuclear waste

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Kvíčalová, Magdalena; Plešek, Jaromír; Šícha, Václav; Císařová, I.; Lučaníková, M.; Selucký, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 694, č. 11 (2009), s. 1678-1689. ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523; GA AV ČR IAA400310613 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : carboranes * metallacarbaboranes * liquid-liquid extraction Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.347, year: 2009

  1. FORM FACTOR MEASUREMENT IN FERROMAGNETIC COBALT ORTHOVANADATE

    OpenAIRE

    Fuess, H.; Müller, R.; Schwabe, D.; Tasset, F.

    1982-01-01

    Single crystals of cobalt orthovanadate Co3V2O8 were grown by the Czochralski method. The substance is orthorhombic with two different crystallographic sites for the cobalt ions. Magnetization measurements in fields up to 15 Tesla show pronounced magnetic anisotropy and a ferromagnetic ordering below Tc = 6.3 (3)K. Neutron powder pattern and polarized measurements on a single crystal revealed different magnetic moments for the two cobalt ions. The analysis of the magnetic form factors gave th...

  2. Behavior of chlorine in lake water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water from monsoon fed Sagre lake is being used as a source of raw water for Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS--1 and 2). The raw water from the lake is initially pumped to Sagre water treatment plant (SWTP) operated by Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation (MIDC) from where, the processed water is sent to cater the needs of both the units of TAPS-1 and 2, townships of TAPS and MIDC, and the nearby villages. At the SWTP the raw water is treated with alum to remove the turbidity, filtered and chlorinated using bleaching powder. All these years the raw water is chlorinated in such a way whereby a residual chlorine level of 0.5-1.0 mg/l, is maintained at the outlet of water treatment plant. The adequacy of the current chlorination practice was investigated, at the request of the NPC-500 MWe group during 1990, so that the future requirements of raw water for TAPP-3 and 4, can be met from the expanded SWTP. In this connection experiments on chlorine dose -- residual chlorine relationship and the decay pattern of chlorine with time was carried out in the lake water (with low value of total dissolved solids and total hardness 3 sample at the site. The total bacterial count in the raw water observed to be 107 counts/ml originally came down to 103 counts/ml at the end of one-hour exposure time to chlorine. It was found that the chlorine demand of the water was around 6 mg/l. In addition Jar test to evaluate the aluminum dose was also carried out. Based on these experiments a chlorine dose of 6 mg/l for one hour contact time was arrived at. The experimental findings were in agreement with the current chlorination practices. (author)

  3. Chlorine dioxide and by-products in water distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Francisco Cardoso

    1991-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is used as both a pre-oxidant and/or a post-disinfectant in several water treatment plants in the United States. Chlorine dioxide is associated with its byproducts chlorite and chlorate. Chlorine dioxide, chlorine, chlori te and chlorate were sampled in four distribution systems where chlorine dioxide is used for disinfection purposes: Charleston, WV, Columbus, GA, New Castle, PA, and Skagit, WA. The fate of chlorine dioxide and its by-products in dist...

  4. Inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine.

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, D.; Hoff, J C

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine were studied at 5 degrees C with a purified preparation of single virions and a preparation of cell-associated virions. Inactivation of the virus preparations with chlorine and chlorine dioxide was studied at pH 6 and 10. The monochloramine studies were done at pH 8. With 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter at pH 6, more than 4 logs (99.99%) of the single virions were inactivated in less than 15 s...

  5. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.300 Chlorine...

  6. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  7. Chlorine demand and residual chlorine decay kinetics of Kali river water at Kaiga project area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power plant at Kaiga would use Kali river water for condenser cooling. This necessitated studies on the chemistry of chlorination such as chlorine demand, kinetics of chlorination and other water characteristics aimed at obtaining base line data. The study revealed significant seasonal variation of chlorine demand ranging from 0.5 ppm to 1.7 ppm (3.0 ppm dose, 30 min contact time) and total consumption of 5.0 ppm (10.0 ppm dose, 48 hours contact time). The reaction follows first order kinetics in chlorine. High correlation of chlorine demand with chlorophyll a, suspended matter, turbidity, silica, nitrite, phosphate and sulphate indicated that chlorine demand is greatly influenced by water quality. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  8. Internal chlorination of Ni-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berztiss, D.; Hennesen, K.; Grabke, H.J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In contrast to internal oxidation, sulfidation and carburization, very little information is available regarding internal chlorination, especially diffusion of chlorine in metallic alloys. This paper describes results of experiments on Ni-Cr alloys (<10 wt% Cr) exposed in an atmosphere containing radioactive HCl. The diffusion of chlorine in the alloy can be determined by measurement of residual {beta}-activity from the sample surface. Successively thin layers (0.5-10 {mu}m) of the alloy were removed by lapping and the surface activity was measured to obtain a depth profile. Both single and polycrystalline materials were tested. Through this work it should be determined if there is in fact solubility and diffusion of chlorine in Ni-based alloys as some authors have proposed or if the ingress of chlorine is mainly a grain boundary phenomenon. (orig.)

  9. Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Updates Subscribe Listen Page last reviewed April ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Download page Subscribe to RSS Get email ...

  10. Inhalation cancer risk assessment of cobalt metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mina; Thompson, Chad M; Brorby, Gregory P; Mittal, Liz; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-08-01

    Cobalt compounds (metal, salts, hard metals, oxides, and alloys) are used widely in various industrial, medical and military applications. Chronic inhalation exposure to cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate has caused lung cancer in rats and mice, as well as systemic tumors in rats. Cobalt compounds are listed as probable or possible human carcinogens by some agencies, and there is a need for quantitative cancer toxicity criteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has derived a provisional inhalation unit risk (IUR) of 0.009 per μg/m(3) based on a chronic inhalation study of soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate; however, a recent 2-year cancer bioassay affords the opportunity to derive IURs specifically for cobalt metal. The mechanistic data support that the carcinogenic mode of action (MOA) is likely to involve oxidative stress, and thus, non-linear/threshold mechanisms. However, the lack of a detailed MOA and use of high, toxic exposure concentrations in the bioassay (≥1.25 mg/m(3)) preclude derivation of a reference concentration (RfC) protective of cancer. Several analyses resulted in an IUR of 0.003 per μg/m(3) for cobalt metal, which is ∼3-fold less potent than the provisional IUR. Future research should focus on establishing the exposure-response for key precursor events to improve cobalt metal risk assessment. PMID:27177823

  11. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Eddie L.; Christa Simmers; D. Andrew Knight

    2010-01-01

    Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH3)6]3+ ion.

  12. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie L. Chang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH36]3+ ion.

  13. Cobalt speciation and mobility in glacial sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The migration behaviour of cobalt in a sand-groundwater system has been studied. Batch sorption, column and diffusion experiments all showed that more than one cobalt species were present and that interconversion occurred between them. In a column experiment cobalt complexed with natural (probably fulvic) material contained in the groundwater dissociated with a first order rate constant of 1.8 x 10-4 sec-1. This suggested that in a field tracer test in the Drigg borehole array very little cobalt would reach the first sampling point. Experiments with the Co-EDTA, however, showed that although some dissociation occurred the Co-EDTA complexes were sufficiently stable for field use. Sectioning a column through which a pulse of Co-EDTA had passed produced a complicated distribution of sorbed cobalt which was tentatively interpreted as being due to the movement of two retarded (possibly colloidal) species

  14. Cobalt and possible oxidant-mediated toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemery, B; Lewis, C P; Demedts, M

    1994-06-30

    The occurrence of interstitial lung disease similar to hard metal lung disease in diamond polishers who had been exposed to cobalt (in the absence of tungsten carbide) through the use of polishing disks containing microdiamonds sintered with cobalt, led us to experimentally test the hypothesis that cobalt has pro-oxidant activity in lung tissue. Several experiments were carried out in which we measured indices of oxidant stress, mainly changes in the oxidation state of glutathione and in the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway, upon exposure of hamster pulmonary tissue to CoCl2 in vivo by intratracheal instillation, or in vitro by incubating lung slices. These experiments indicated that cobalt ions are capable of causing thiol oxidation in lung tissue as an early manifestation of oxidant stress, but more studies are needed to establish the relevance of this mechanism in the causation of lung disease in subjects exposed to cobalt-containing dusts. PMID:7939609

  15. Novel Solvent for the Simultaneous recovery of Radioactive Nuclides from Liquid Radioactive Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanovskiy, Valeriy Nicholiavich; Smirnov, Lgor V.; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.

    1999-10-07

    The present invention relates to solvents, and methods, for selectively extracting and recovering radionuclides, especially cesium and strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive wastes. More specifically, the invention relates to extracting agent solvent compositions comprising complex organoboron compounds, substituted polyethylene glycols, and neutral organophosphorus compounds in a diluent. The preferred solvent comprises a chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, diphenyl-dibutylmethylenecarbamoylphosphine oxide, PEG-400, and a diluent of phenylpolyfluoroalkyl sulfone. The invention also provides a method of using the invention extracting agents to recover cesium, strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive waste.

  16. A comparison of the virucidal properties of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, G R; Butler, M

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine were compared with chlorine as virucidal agents. Under optimal conditions all disinfectants were effective at low concentrations, but each disinfectant responded differently to acidity and alkalinity. Disinfection by chlorine was impaired by the presence of ammonia, but the other disinfectants retained much of their potency. Disinfection of poliovirus by iodine resulted in structural changes in the virions as seen by electron micrroscopy, but the ...

  17. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    OpenAIRE

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M. E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent formation of less desirable side-products. For example, mixtures of chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons are still formed as by-products in industrial processes such as the production of vinyl chlor...

  18. Formation of Chloroform and Other Chlorinated Byproducts by the Chlorination of Antibacterial Products

    OpenAIRE

    Fiss, Edward Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Triclosan is a widely used antibacterial agent found in many personal hygiene products. While it has been established that pure triclosan and free chlorine readily react, interactions between triclosan-containing products and free chlorine have not previously been analyzed. Sixteen double-blinded solutions including both triclosan-containing (1.14-3.12 mg triclosan/g product) and triclosan-free products were contacted with free chlorine. Products detected included (chlorophenoxy)phenols, ...

  19. Chlorine demand studies: a need for optimisation of chlorine doses for biofouling control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on chlorine demand, chlorine decay, rate of HOBr formation and speciation of chlorine residuals of cooling water from Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) were carried out. April to September was found to be a high demand period. The rate of reaction is faster and also initial demand is relatively high for this seawater as compared to other sea areas. Decay occurs in two phases, the first being instantaneous and the second being very slow. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  20. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments. The major application is in the health care industry where irradiators are used to sterilize single use medical products. These irradiators are designed and built by MDS Nordion and are used by manufacturers of surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes and other medical products. The irradiator is a large shielded room with a storage pool for the cobalt-60 sources. The medical products are circulated through the shielded room and exposed to the cobalt-60 sources. This treatment sterilizes the medical products which can then be shipped to hospitals for immediate use. Other applications for this irradiation technology include sanitisation of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials and food irradiation. The cobalt-60 sources are manufactured by MDS Nordion in their Cobalt Operations Facility in Kanata. More than 75,000 cobalt-60 sources for use in irradiators have been manufactured by MDS Nordion. The cobalt-60 sources are double encapsulated in stainless steel capsules, seal welded and helium leak tested. Each source may contain up to 14,000 curies. These sources are shipped to over 170 industrial irradiators around the world. This paper will focus on the MDS Nordion proprietary technology used to produce the cobalt-60 isotope in CANDU reactors. Almost 55 years ago MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada developed the process for manufacturing cobalt-60 at the Chalk River Labs, in Ontario, Canada. A cobalt-59 target was introduced into a research reactor where the cobalt-59 atom absorbed one neutron to become cobalt-60. Once the cobalt-60 material was removed from the research reactor it was encapsulated in stainless steel and seal welded using a Tungsten Inert Gas weld. The first cobalt-60 sources manufactured using material from the Chalk River Labs were used in cancer

  1. Cobalt-Mediated Vinylic C-H Functionalization of Alkenes

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Warren Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of cobalt dinitrosyl complexes with alkenes to form cobalt dinitrosoalkane complexes is used to effect the C-H functionalization of alkenes. Deprotonation of cobalt dinitrosoalkane complexes, followed by reaction with neutral electrophiles, yields functionalized cobalt complexes. Thermolysis of such complexes with the parent alkene allows a migration of the cobalt dinitrosyl moiety to the parent alkene, releasing the organic product of C-H functionalization. Progress is presented...

  2. Chlorination of organic material in different soil types

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavsson, Malin

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that formation of chlorinated organic matter occurs naturally and that organic chlorine is as abundant as the chloride ion in organic soils. A large number of organisms are known to convert inorganic chloride (Clin) to organic chlorine (Clorg) (e.g. bacteria, lichen, fungi and algae) and some enzymes associated to these organisms are capable of chlorinating soil organic matter. The aim with the study was to compare organic matter chlorination rates in soils from several dif...

  3. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  4. Scintigraphy of ORL tumours with cobalt bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our experiences with cobalt bleomycin scintigraphy in the treatment planning of ORL tumors are described. 142 scintigrams taken from 127 patients have been examined. As is shown by our investigation, cobalt bleomycin scintigraphy is a good examination method, however, too much expenditure is needed to have the necessary data for therapy planning. To our opinion, the information obtained in oto-rhino-laryngology by an exact clinical examination is as good as that of cobalt bleomycin scintigraphy. Our treatment schemes had only to be revised in some exceptional cases. (orig.)

  5. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology for cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors, designed and developed by MDS Nordion and AECL, has been safely,economically and successfully employed in CANDU reactors with over 195 reactor years of production. Today over forty percent of the world's disposable medical supplies are made safer through sterilization using cobalt-60 sources from MDS Nordion. Over the past 40 years, MDS Nordion with its CANDU reactor owner partners, has safely and reliably shipped more than 500 million curies of cobalt-60 sources to customers around the world

  6. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Radiolytic removal of trihalomethane in chlorinated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling is one of the major operational problems in seawater cooling systems. It is controlled by application of chlorine based biocides in the range of 0.5-2.0 mg L-1. The bromide in seawater reacts with the added chlorine and forms hypobromous acid. The brominated residual biocides react with natural organic matter present in the seawater, resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) such as bromoform (CHBr3), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl) bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2). Though THMs represent a small fraction of the added chlorine, they are relatively more persistent than residual chlorine, and hence pose a potential hazard to marine life because of their reported mutagenicity. There have been few reports on removal of THMs from chlorinated seawater. In this work, the efficacy of gamma irradiation technique for the removal of THMs from chlorine-dosed seawater was investigated. Experiments were carried out using seawater collected from Kalpakkam. Irradiation study was conducted in chlorinated (1, 3, and 5 mg L-1 of Cl2) seawater by applying various dosages (0.4-5.0 kGy) of gamma radiation using a 60Co Gamma Chamber 5000. Bromoform showed a faster rate of degradation as compared to other halocarbons like bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane. This shows the change in total THM concentration with variation in the radiation dose and initial Cl2 dosing. When the percentage degradation of all the three trihalomethane species was compared with applied doses, it was found that the maximum reduction occurred at a dose of 2.5 kGy. The reduction was almost similar for all the three doses (1, 3, 5 ppm of Cl2) used for chlorination. With a further increase in radiation dose to 5.0 kGy, a slight increase in reduction was observed

  8. Photostability of different chlorine photosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report the photodegradation of three different chlorine photosensitizers (Photoditazine®, Radachlorin®, and Foscan®). The photosensitizer degradation was analyzed by changes in the fluorescence spectrum during illumination. The rate of fluorescence variation was normalized to the solution absorption and the photon energy resulting in the determination of the necessary number of photons to be absorbed to induce photosensitizer photodegradation. The parameter for rate of the molecules decay, the photon fluence rate and optical properties of the solution allow us to determine the photosensitizer stability in solution during illumination. The results show that the order of susceptibility for photodegradation rate is: Radachlorin® < Photoditazine® < Foscan®. This difference in the photodegradation rate for Foscan can be explained by the high proportion of aggregates in solution that inhibit the photo-oxidative process that impede the singlet oxygen formation. We hypothesize that there is a correlation between photodegradation rate and photodynamic efficacy witch is governed by the singlet oxygen formation responsible for the most relevant reaction of the cell death photodynamic induction. Then its is important to know the photostability of different types of drugs since the photodegradation rate, the photodegradation as well as the photodynamic efficacy are strong correlated to the oxygen concentration in the tissue

  9. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maas, Z G; Hinkle, K

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H$^{35}$Cl at 3.69851 $\\mu$m. The high resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m telescope. The average [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with --0.72$<$[Fe/H]$<$0.20 is [$^{35}$Cl/Fe]=(--0.10$\\pm$0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16$\\pm$0.15) dex. The [$^{35}$Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of $\\sim$0.35 dex above model predictions suggesting chemical evolution models are under producing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and \\ion{H}{2} regions. In one star where both H$^{35}$Cl a...

  10. Nanocrystalline cobalt oxides for carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2007-09-01

    Thin Films of nanocrystalline cobalt oxide were formed by sol-gel method. Structure, optical properties and surface properties of these films were investigated by numerous characterization techniques. These films were successfully fabricated on glass substrates below 500°C. . Micropatterns of cobalt oxide thin films were also fabricated on glass and silicon substrates by employing a lift-off method. Crystal size of these nanocrystalline cobalt films could be successfully controllable by varying the amount of cobalt precursors and number of layers. These films were used as the seeding layers for carbon nanotube growth in a CVD process By changing the concentration of monomer precursors in the solgel coating solutions, different size nanoclusters hence different size carbon nanotubes could be synthesized in CVD process. This method can be used for controlled growth of carbon nanotubes for many different applications. In this paper, detail of these experimental results will be presented.

  11. An elevator for cobalt-60 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elevator used for cobalt-60 source is a key device in the irradiation industry. It plays an important role in the safety and control of irradiation operation as well as the utilization rate of radiation source. From 1983 to 1986, Beijing Institute of Nuclear Engineering undertook designing of various size irradiation projects for different uses. Since then a kind of cobalt-60 source elevator suited for the irradiator of wet-source-storage has been chosen. It is reliable in the operation and complete in the function. An automatic control circuit brings the systems of cobalt-60 source elevator into an interlock system which ensures the irradiation operation safety. Besides introducing the structural features and performance of this elevator, the conditions of safety interlocking in raising or lowering the cobalt-60 source is also discussed. The discussion is from the safety viewpoint of operating an irradiator and irradiation technology

  12. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection. PMID:23591108

  13. Influencing factors and degradation products of antipyrine chlorination in water with free chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiquan Cai; Liqiu Zhang; Fei Qi; Li Feng

    2013-01-01

    Owing to its low cost,free chlorine is one of the most common disinfectants for wastewater and drinking water treatment.However,the formation of disinfection byproducts has been found to occur after free chlorine disinfection in recent decades.Antipyrine (ANT),an anti-inflammatory analgesic,has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment.In this work.the removal efficiency of ANT by free chlorine oxidation in ultrapure water was investigated with batch experiments.The influencing factors on the removal of ANT were explored at initial concentrations of ANT from 0.04 to 0.64 mg/L,free chlorine dosage from 0.30 to 1.31 mg/L,and pH from 1.5 to 9.0.The main degradation products were identified by solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.The results showed that ANT reacted rapidly with free chlorine in ultrapure water systems and up to 90.6% removal efficiency of ANT was achieved after 25 sec (initial free chlorine 1 mg/L,ANT 0.5 mg/L,pH 7.0).Higher oxidant dosage,lower ANT initial concentration and low pH favor the ANT removal.The main degradation product in ANT chlorination was a monochlorine substitution product (4-chloro-l,2-dihydro1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-one),which can be further chlorinated by free chlorine.In addition,the total organic carbon result indicated that ANT is difficult to be mineralized using chlorine.

  14. 3.6. Chlorination of alumina containing waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination of alumina containing waste products is considered in this article. Based on conducted studies following optimal conditions of chlorination of alumina containing waste products with reducer - coal were found: temperature - 750-850 deg C, chlorination duration -1-1,5 hours, quantity of reducer - 30% and size of particles - 0,1 mm. Based on conducted studies following optimal conditions of chlorination of alumina containing waste products with reducer - natural gas were found: temperature - 650-750 deg C, chlorination duration - 2 hours, chlorine to methane ratio is 4:1 and size of particles - 0,2-0,3 mm.

  15. AN ELECTROPLATING METHOD OF FORMING PLATINGS OF NICKEL, COBALT, NICKEL ALLOYS OR COBALT ALLOYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    An electroplating method of forming platings of nickel, cobalt, nickel alloys or cobalt alloys with reduced stresses in an electrodepositing bath of the type: Watt's bath, chloride bath or a combination thereof, by employing pulse plating with periodic reverse pulse and a sulfonated naphthalene...

  16. Nickel acts as an adjuvant during cobalt sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menne; Nielsen, Morten Milek; Vennegaard, Marie T.;

    2015-01-01

    Metal allergy is the most frequent form of contact allergy with nickel and cobalt being the main culprits. Typically, exposure comes from metal-alloys where nickel and cobalt co-exist. Importantly, very little is known about how co-exposure to nickel and cobalt affects the immune system. We...... in the draining lymph nodes compared to mice sensitized with cobalt alone. In contrast, the presence of cobalt during nickel sensitization only induced an increased CD8(+) T cell proliferation during challenge to nickel. Thus, the presence of nickel during cobalt sensitization potentiated the challenge response...

  17. Phosphate valorization by dry chlorination route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanari N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the extraction of phosphorus chlorinated compounds from phosphate materials using chlorination with gaseous chlorine. An industrial sample of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, after transformation into calcium pyrophosphate (Ca2P2O7, is subjected to reactions with Cl2+CO+N2 and Cl2+C+N2 at temperatures ranging from 625 to 950°C using boat experiments. Gathering results of the thermodynamic predictions and TG/DT analysis with those of SEM and XRD examinations of the chlorinated residues allowed the interpretation of phenomena and reactions mechanism occurring during the calcium pyrophosphate carbochlorination. Reaction rate of Ca2P2O7 by Cl2+CO+N2 at 950°C is slowed down due to the formation of a CaCl2 liquid layer acting as a barrier for the diffusion of the reactive gases and further reaction progress. While, the carbochlorination with Cl2+C+N2 led to almost full chlorination of Ca2P2O7 at 750°C and the process proceeds with an apparent activation energy of about 104 kJ/mol between 625 and 750°C. Carbochlorination technique can be considered as an alternative and selective route for the valorization of low grade phosphates and for the phosphorus extraction from its bearing materials.

  18. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, W.N. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. They probably entered the water as leachates from chemical waste dumps and as effluents from manufacturing. Hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorobenzene are commonly present in Herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from the Great Lakes, and some of the isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene are occasionally detected at low concentrations. Hexachlorobenzene, which was formerly used as a fungicide, has been the most thoroughly studied chlorinated benzene, and has been detected in many species. Its use as a fungicide in the United States was canceled in 1984. Since about 1975 hexachlorobenzene has been formed mainly in the production of chlorinated solvents. It is highly persistent in the environment and some species are poisoned by hexachlorobenzene at very low chronic dietary exposures. As little as 1 ppm in the diet of mink (Mustela vison) reduced the birth weights of young, and 5 ppm in the diet of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) caused slight liver damage. This paper describes a long-term (26 wk) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to length of exposure and three 8 wk experiments relating concentration to the concentration in soil the soil organic matter content, and the degree of chlorination. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  20. Separation of niobium from ferroniobium by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation of niobium from ferroniobium by chlorine metallurgy were investigated. The chlorination of ferroniobium by chlorine gas was carried out under several thermodynamic conditions and the effective conditions were determined. Preliminary separation of niobium pentachloride from ferric chloride is possible by selective condensation with temperature gradient techniques. Selective reduction of ferric chloride to ferrous chloride by iron powder was done to separate niobium pentachloride by their volatility difference. Separation of niobium pentachloride from ferric chloride using organic solvent was tested. The niobium pentachloride with high purity could be separated effectively from ferroniobium chlorides by selective reduction of ferric chloride and selective dissolution of niobium pentachloride in organic solvent. A new dry process which has the possibility of industrial application is presented. (Author

  1. Investigation of molybdenum pentachloride interaction with chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Raman spectra of molybdenum pentachloride solutions in liquid chlorine lines were recorded in case of 397, 312, 410, 217 and 180 cm-1 vibrations of ν1(A1'), ν2(A1'), ν5(E'), ν6(E') and ν8(E'') monomer (symmetry D3h) molecules of MoCl5. Interaction of molten molybdenum pentachloride with chlorine at increased (up to 6 MPa) pressures of Cl2 was studied. In Raman spectra of its vapour distillation in liquid chlorine alongside with MoCl5 lines appearance of new lines at 363 and 272 cm-1, similar in their frequency to the ones calculated for the vibrations ν1(A1g) and ν2(Eg) of MoCl6 molecules (symmetry Oh), was observed

  2. Simultaneous chlorination and sulphation of calcined limestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukata, M.; Takeda, K.; Miyatain, T.; Ueyama, K. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-06-01

    In order to analyze HCl and SO{sub 2} retention in fluidized bed combustors of coal and wastes, chlorination and sulphation of calcined limestone were investigated at 1023 K and atmospheric pressure using thermogravimetry. The rate of chlorination of calcined limestone slightly depended on its particle size and was kept almost constant against the progress of chlorination. In contrast, the rate of sulphation increased with decreasing particle size and steeply decreased with the progress of sulphation as commonly reported. It was found that the sulphation was markedly accelerated in the presence of HCl. Such acceleration of sulphation was remarkable for larger limestone. The level of conversion of CaO to (CaSO{sub 4} + CaCl{sub 2}) always approached 100% in the simultaneous absorption of HCl and SO{sub 2}. It was observed by SEM that in the chlorination a number of spherical aggregates and large voids were formed on the surface of limestone and that large aggregates with very flat surface and large voids have been formed in the course of the simultaneous chlorination and sulphation. The chlorination behavior and the acceleration of SO{sub 2} absorption in the presence of HCl can be due both to the formation of a mobile Cl{sup -} ion-containing phase and to the formation of voids playing a role of the diffusion paths for HCl and SO{sub 2} toward the interior of a limestone particle. Melting of a eutectic mixture of CaCl{sub 2} and CaSO{sub 4} might largely contribute to the promotion of SO{sub 2} absorption in the case of simultaneous absorption of HCl and SO{sub 2}. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, Maria M; Olsen, Jorn; Villeneuve, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF).......To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF)....

  4. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water

  5. Review of chlorination of zirconium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of chlorination zirconium dioxide is presented.used semi batch process with vertical reactor, horizontal reactor and fluidized reactor. The feed were zircon dioxide from Aldrich, direct zircon sand and briquette of zircon sand. From the study it is obtained that the best reactor is vertical reactor.It needs modification of chlorination reactor and sublimator to obtain the larger conversion. It is come to reality that zirconium tetrachloride preparation by process is significant with zirconium tetrachloride from Aldrich. It needs the sequel research to get the best result of process. (author)

  6. Chlorinated organic compounds produced by Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize, not only reduces grain yield and degrades quality but also produces mycotoxins in the infected grain. Focus has been on mycotoxins because of the human and animal health hazards associated with them. In addition to work done on mycotoxins, chemical profiling of F. graminearum to identify other compounds produced by this fungus remains critical. With chemical profiling of F. graminearum the entire chemistry of this fungus can be understood. The focus of this work was to identify chlorinated compounds produced by F. graminearum. Various chlorinated compounds were detected and their role in F. graminearum is yet to be understood. PMID:27165533

  7. Filter materials for absorbing high temperature cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To remove dissolved cobalts at high temperature and at high pressure without cooling primary coolants in nuclear reactor, thereby decreasing the heat loss. Constitution: In the case of using ion exchange resins for removing cobalts dissolved in reactor water which may cause radiation exposure, a large heat loss is resulted because of the requirement for cooling the reactor water in order to avoid the thermal decomposition of the resins. In view of the above, heat- and corrosion-resistant metals such as stainless steels and zircaloys are formed into granular, fiberous, mesh or porous configurations suitable to column filter materials and oxide film layers are formed to the surface of the metals to prepare adsorbing filter materials. By extracting impurity cobalts from the oxide film layers, the cobalt can be prevented from leaching, to improve the cobalt-removing performance from the treated water. Purification can be applied by chemical purification using extracting liquids such as mineral acids or organic acids and hot water treatment under high temperature and high pressure. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Electronic properties, doping and defects in chlorinated silicon nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    de Carvalho, A.; Öberg, S; Rayson, M. J.; Briddon, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals with diameters between 1 and 3 nm and surfaces passivated by chlorine or a mixture of chlorine and hydrogen were modeled using density functional theory, and their properties compared with those of fully hydrogenated nanocrystals. It is found that fully and partially chlorinated nanocrystals are stable, and have higher electron affinity, higher ionization energy and lower optical absorption energy threshold. As the hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals, chlorinated silicon na...

  9. Attacks of Asthma due to Chlorinized Water: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Eyup Berdan; Ercan Gocgeldi; Sami Ozturk; Ali Kutlu

    2008-01-01

    The presence of a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma-like symptoms in swimmers has been reported. But, attacks of asthma which is related to chlorinized water is rare. Chlorine, a strong oxidizing agent, is an important toxic gas that the swimmer can breath during swimming and a worker can exposed to chlorine while he or she was using water with chlorine at home. We describe a persistent increase in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness following chronic exposure ...

  10. Immunofluorescence and morphology of Giardia lamblia cysts exposed to chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Sauch, J F; Berman, D

    1991-01-01

    Giardia cyst-like objects detected by immunofluorescence in chlorinated water samples often cannot be positively identified by their morphological appearance. To determine the effect of chlorine on cyst immunofluorescence and morphology, Giardia lamblia cysts were exposed to chlorine for 48 h. The majority of cysts exposed to chlorine concentrations of 1 to 11 mg/liter at 5 and 15 degrees C lost their internal morphological characteristics necessary for identification, but most of them were s...

  11. Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones, Robert MD

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:151-156.

  12. Blends of caprolactam/caprolactone copolymers and chlorinated polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberda van Ekenstein, G.O.R.; Deuring, H.; ten Brinke, G.; Ellis, T.S.

    1997-01-01

    The phase behaviour of blends of chlorinated polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and chlorinated PVC with random copolymers of caprolactone and caprolactam has been investigated and the results correlated with a binary interaction model. The known miscibility of polycaprolactone in the chlorinate

  13. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  14. Palladium-cobalt particles as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Huang, Tao

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates to palladium-cobalt particles useful as oxygen-reducing electrocatalysts. The invention also relates to oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells containing these palladium-cobalt particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for the production of electrical energy by using the palladium-cobalt particles of the invention.

  15. Total quality management of cobalt-60 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total Quality Management of Cobalt-60 sources by a supplier requires a life cycle approach to source management. This covers various aspects, including design, manufacturing, installation, field inspection, source surveillance and return of cobalt-60 sources at the end of their useful life. The Total Quality Management approach demonstrates a strong industry commitment to the beneficial use of gamma technology for industrial irradiation applications in both developed nations and in those nations who are developing their infrastructure and techniques for the beneficial use of this technology. MDS Nordion continues to demonstrate its support and commitment to the industry by developing and implementing state-of-the-art standards for the safe use of cobalt-60 sources

  16. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe2O4) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods

  17. Perfluorinated cobalt phthalocyanine effectively catalyzes water electrooxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Morlanes, Natalia Sanchez

    2014-12-08

    Efficient electrocatalysis of water oxidation under mild conditions at neutral pH was achieved by a fluorinated cobalt phthalocyanine immobilized on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) surfaces with an onset potential at 1.7 V vs. RHE. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and inhibition studies indicate that phthalocyanine molecular species are the operational active sites. Neither free cobalt ions nor heterogeneous cobalt oxide particles or films were observed. During long-term controlled-potential electrolysis at 2 V vs. RHE (phosphate buffer, pH 7), electrocatalytic water oxidation was sustained for at least 8 h (TON ≈ 1.0 × 105), producing about 4 μmol O2 h-1 cm-2 with a turnover frequency (TOF) of about 3.6 s-1 and no measurable catalyst degradation.

  18. 46 CFR 151.50-31 - Chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... desired rate of discharge, provided the air or gas is oil-free and thoroughly dried by passing it over activated aluminum oxide, silica gel, or other acceptable drying agent, and provided the supply pressure is...-resistant to chlorine in either the gas or liquid phase. Cast or malleable iron shall not be used....

  19. Chlorinated tyrosine derivatives in insect cuticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    2004-01-01

    , not-yet sclerotized cuticle of adult femur and tibia, the amounts increased rapidly during the first 24 h after ecdysis and more slowly during the next two weeks. Control analyses using stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry have confirmed that the chlorinated tyrosines are not artifacts formed...

  20. Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

  1. Anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of wastewaters from chlorine and total chlorine-free bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidal, G.; Soto, M.; Field, J.; Mendez-Pampin, R.; Lema, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Chlorine bleaching effluents are problematic for anaerobic wastewater treatment due to their high methanogenic toxicity and low biodegradability. Presently, alternative bleaching processes are being introduced, such as elemental chlorine-free (ECF) and total chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching. The methan

  2. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested o...

  3. Reaction products of aquatic humic substances with chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J D; Christman, R F; Norwood, D L; Millington, D S

    1982-01-01

    A major concern of the chlorination of aquatic humic materials is the ubiquitous production of trihalomethanes. A large number of other chlorinated organic compounds, however, have been shown to be formed by chlorine's reaction with humic substances. In this study, humic material was concentrated from a coastal North Carolina lake and chlorinated at a chlorine to carbon mole ratio of 1.5 at pH 12. A high pH was necessary for complete dissolution of the humic material and for production of ade...

  4. Improvement of cobalt-transport in axons by complexing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallyas, F; Lénárd, L; Lázár, G

    1978-09-01

    The use of the cobalt technique is limited by the fact that cobaltous ions travel within axons for a shorter distance than do other intracellular markers. In the present experiments different organic cobaltous complexes were tested in the rat's sciatic nerve. Cobaltous complexes containing ornithine, threonine, lysine or Girard's reagent travelled two or three times further than did the cobaltous ions alone. Using the lysine complex in the frog's visual system, very fine terminals were observed which have never been demonstrated with other techniques. The possible use of other metal complexes as intracellular markers are also discussed. PMID:19605220

  5. Relation between chlorine with the quality of crude water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine as disinfection agent in drinking water was used widely since it was successfully been practiced in drinking water in Jersey City, 1908. Mostly, water treatment plants in Malaysia were using chlorine as disinfection agent to kill pathogen and contaminated materials that can be dangerous to consumer. Because of chlorine was a strongly disinfection agent, it also can react with another chemical components such as manganese, hydrogen, sulfides, ammonia and phenol in water. These reactions happen very fast, and chlorine will not react as disinfection agent unless all the organic and inorganic substitution presented in water reacts with chlorine. These reactions between components will increase demand of chlorine in water. The demand of chlorine in water must be filled before the free radical chlorine occurred. These free radical chlorine will decay into hypochlorous acid and hypochlorite ion that so important in disinfection process to kill pathogens and pollutants in water. Most of water treatment plant to maintain free chlorine up to 0.2 mg/ L in distribution system to consumer. These researches involved determination of parameters that can be trusted to react with the chlorine in nine sampling station along Semenyih River and four stations in water treatment plants. These parameters were determined from ammonia, cyanides, sulfides, phenol, phosphorus, nitrite, manganese, iron and sum of organic carbons. Overall, these researches concluded that ammonia and sum of organic carbons were the most compounds that react with the chlorine to produce tryhalometane and chloramines. Besides that, the concentration of cyanides compounds, sulfide, phenol, phosphorus, nitrite, manganese and iron also decrease after the chlorination process. Results can used to evaluate demanding levels of chlorine in Semenyih River. (author)

  6. Water splitting: Taking cobalt in isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The sustainable production of hydrogen is key to the delivery of clean energy in a hydrogen economy; however, lower-cost alternatives to platinum electrocatalysts are needed. Now, isolated, earth-abundant cobalt atoms dispersed over nitrogen-doped graphene are shown to efficiently electrolyse water to generate hydrogen.

  7. Nano cobalt oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-07-01

    Nano structured metal oxides including TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 have been synthesized and evaluated for their photocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The photocatalytic activity of nano cobalt oxide was then compared with two other nano structured metal oxides namely TiO 2 and Fe 3O 4. The synthesized nano cobalt oxide was characterized thoroughly with respect to EDX and TEM. The yield of hydrogen was observed to be 900, 2000 and 8275 mmol h -1 g -1 of photocatalyst for TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 respectively under visible light. It was observed that the hydrogen yield in case of nano cobalt oxide was more than twice to that of TiO 2 and the hydrogen yield of nano Fe 3O 4 was nearly four times as compared to nano Co 3O 4. The influence of various operating parameters in hydrogen generation by nano cobalt oxide was then studied in detail. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surface magnetism in iron, cobalt, and nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alde´n, M.; Mirbt, S.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt;

    1992-01-01

    We have calculated magnetic moments, work functions, and surface energies for several of the most closely packed surfaces of iron, cobalt, and nickel by means of a spin-polarized Green’s-function technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the tight-binding and atomic sphere...

  9. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth—an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1 nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone

  10. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A. J.; Amamou, W.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Kawakami, R. K.; Hammel, P. C.

    2014-05-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth—an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1 nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

  11. Antiradiation effectiveness of the chlorine C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present ever more attention of the experimenters in the field of search of high-effective antiray means - is directed to development of preparations from bio-active substances of a natural origin. In this connection all greater interest is caused by researches of antiray activity of these compounds, distinguished, as a rule, from known preparations of synthetic manufacture of low toxicity, absence of expressed collateral effects and possibility of course application. It has biological (antiray) activity in dozes 5-10 mg/kg and chlorine C which is derivative of chlorophil A. At present it passes tests in oncology. Porphyrines (synthetic and natural) are recently subjected to wide study as potential medicinal means, due to their ability to be accumulated in bodies of the reticulo-endothelial system and proliferous tissues, as well as their physical-chemical characteristics (fluorescence, photosensitizing action, colouring). All this testifies for the benefit of perspective use of porphyrin for treatment and diagnostics of tumors. According to the above described properties of porphyrines there is that fact, that for some of them radioprotective properties are revealed during the injections as well as before and after radiation treatment. The above said has formed the basis for study of antiray properties of the chlorine C during the experiments on small-sized laboratory animals. Antiradiation effectivity of chlorine C was studied on the mice (CBA x C57 B1) F1. Chlorine C was applied in a wide range of dozes with its' use in 3 variants: before radiation treatment, after radiation treatment, combined (before and after radiation treatment). Radioprotective activity of chlorine C reduces at an increase of a time of the injection before radiation treatment and at other ways of injection (intramuscularly, subcutaneously, per os). Studies of medical activity of chlorine C in experiments on mice have shown, that the compound does not possess medical activity. The death of

  12. Comparative efficacy of chlorine and chlorine dioxide regimes for condenser slime control in seawater cooled heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination has long been used as an effective and economic biocide for biofouling control in seawater cooling systems. However, the efficacy of chlorine is reduced in the presence of organic content of seawater and the inability of chlorine to effectively penetrate biofilms. Chlorine dioxide is being projected as a possible alternative to chlorine. Experiments were carried out with the help of a seawater circulating facility, in which direct comparison of the efficacy of the two biocides was possible using test condenser tube assemblies. The test condenser tubes made of titanium, SS 316L and Cu-Ni 90/10 were dosed with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. Each dose was evaluated for 30 days. Continuous and intermittent additions of chlorine (0.38 - 0.45 mg L-1 TRO) and chlorine dioxide (0.4 - 0.5 mg L-1) were used, along with control. The flow velocity in the tubes was maintained at 1.5 m/s. Results of the study showed that the efficacy of the biocide to control biofilms depended on the biocide and the material. Continuous chlorination resulted in 75% reduction of viable counts on titanium, followed by 24% reduction on CuNi and 6% reduction on SS 316L surfaces, as compared to the control. When compared to continuous chlorination, increase in bacterial density in the tubes was observed at different regimes of intermittent chlorination. On SS 316L and Cu-Ni surfaces, intermittent chlorination for 1h, once every 3 h, appeared to give adequate protection. Continuous addition of chlorine dioxide resulted in 99% reduction of viable counts on titanium surfaces, followed by 28% reduction on SS 316 L surfaces and 52% reduction on Cu-Ni surfaces, as compared to the controls. The data indicate that the efficacy of biocides to control biofilms depend on not only the biocide and its frequency of application but also the material of construction. (author)

  13. Comparative efficacy of chlorine and chlorine dioxide regimes for condenser slime control in seawater cooled heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, P.S.; Veeramani, P.; Ershath, M.; Rajamohan, R.; Harinath, Y.V.; Mohan, T.V.K.; Venugopalan, V.P. [BARC Facilities, Water and Steam Chemistry Div., Kalpakkam, Tamil nadu (India)

    2010-07-01

    Chlorination has long been used as an effective and economic biocide for biofouling control in seawater cooling systems. However, the efficacy of chlorine is reduced in the presence of organic content of seawater and the inability of chlorine to effectively penetrate biofilms. Chlorine dioxide is being projected as a possible alternative to chlorine. Experiments were carried out with the help of a seawater circulating facility, in which direct comparison of the efficacy of the two biocides was possible using test condenser tube assemblies. The test condenser tubes made of titanium, SS 316L and Cu-Ni 90/10 were dosed with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. Each dose was evaluated for 30 days. Continuous and intermittent additions of chlorine (0.38 - 0.45 mg L{sup -1} TRO) and chlorine dioxide (0.4 - 0.5 mg L{sup -1}) were used, along with control. The flow velocity in the tubes was maintained at 1.5 m/s. Results of the study showed that the efficacy of the biocide to control biofilms depended on the biocide and the material. Continuous chlorination resulted in 75% reduction of viable counts on titanium, followed by 24% reduction on CuNi and 6% reduction on SS 316L surfaces, as compared to the control. When compared to continuous chlorination, increase in bacterial density in the tubes was observed at different regimes of intermittent chlorination. On SS 316L and Cu-Ni surfaces, intermittent chlorination for 1h, once every 3 h, appeared to give adequate protection. Continuous addition of chlorine dioxide resulted in 99% reduction of viable counts on titanium surfaces, followed by 28% reduction on SS 316 L surfaces and 52% reduction on Cu-Ni surfaces, as compared to the controls. The data indicate that the efficacy of biocides to control biofilms depend on not only the biocide and its frequency of application but also the material of construction. (author)

  14. Recent Achievements in the Radiation-Catalysed Chlorination of Chlorinated Pentane Derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-catalysed chlorination of the so-called tetrachloro-cyclopentane, the product obtained from cyclopentadiene by addition of chlorine, has already been studied earlier by the authors with success. On maintaining an adequate dosage rate, no ring cleavage occurs, and, mainly for stereochemical reasons, octachloro-cyclopentene forms as an end product - similarly to conventional chlorination carried out at high temperature (400-500oC), but at substantially lower temperature (170oC) and without any resin formation. It is known that besides other end products, octachloro-cyclopentene forms also from perchlorinated pentane, under simultaneous cyclization. In their recent experiments presented here, the authors investigated how and to what extent the yield of octachloro-cyclopentene is affected by additional chlorination of pentane, previously chlorinated under cooling (at 10 to 30oC). The experiments were carried out with a Co60 radiation source of 330 c at a dosage rate of 8 x 103 to 8 x 104r/hr, in a heated reaction mixture, mixed with a chlorine stream for periods not exceeding 30 hr. It was found that also this type of chlorination and cyclization takes place at a temperature substantially lower than the conventional 500-600oC. According to the experiments, in this case it is advisable to raise the initial temperature of 170oC of the reaction gradually to 220oC with the progress of the reaction, in order to promote the cyclization reaction. It was found, namely, that first the paraffin chain was further chlorinated and later the perchlorinated pentane derivatives cyclize partly to octachloro-cyclopentene, under formation of other chlorinated alkane and alkene derivatives. This reaction mechanism was also supported by thermodynamical calculations. The end product contains three main components; its content of octachloro-cyclopentene ranges between 25 and 35%. The data required for the evaluation of the economy of the method will be available only on the

  15. Revisiting the thermochemistry of chlorine fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, H R

    2016-01-01

    In this work, accurate calculations of standard enthalpies of formation of chlorine fluorides (ClF$_n$, n=1--7; Cl$_2$F and Cl$_3$F$_2$) were performed through the isodesmic reactions scheme. It is argued that, for many chlorine fluorides, the gold standard method of quantum chemistry (CCSD(T)) is not capable to predict enthalpy values nearing chemical accuracy if atomization scheme is used. This is underpinned by a thorough analysis of total atomization energy results and the inspection of multireference features of these compounds. Other thermodynamic quantities were also calculated at different temperatures. In order to complement the energetic description, elimination curves were studied through density functional theory as a computationally affordable alternative to highly correlated wave function-based methods.

  16. Chlorine-Free Red-Burning Pyrotechnics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Koch, Ernst-Christian; Poret, Jay C; Moretti, Jared D; Harbol, Seth M

    2015-09-01

    The development of a red, chlorine-free pyrotechnic illuminant of high luminosity and spectral purity was investigated. Red-light emission based solely on transient SrOH(g) has been achieved by using either 5-amino-1H-tetrazole or hexamine to deoxidize the combustion flame of a Mg/Sr(NO3 )2 /Epon-binder composition and reduce the amount of both condensed and gaseous SrO, which emits undesirable orange-red light. The new formulations were found to possess high thermal onset temperatures. Avoiding chlorine in these formulations eliminates the risk of the formation of PCBs, PCDDs, and PCDFs. This finding, hence, will have a great impact on both military pyrotechnics and commercial firework sectors. PMID:26333055

  17. Spectrographic determination of chlorine and fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental conditions have been investigated in order to obtain the highest sensitivity in spectrographic determination of chlorine and fluorine using the Fassel method of excitation in an inert atmosphere. The influence of the nature of the atmosphere, of the discharge conditions and of the matrix material has been investigated. The following results have been established: 1. chlorine determination is definitely possible: a working curve has been drawn between 10 μg and 100 μg, the detection limit being around 5 μg; 2. fluorine determination is not satisfactory: the detection limit is still of the order of 80 μg. The best operating conditions have been defined for both elements. (author)

  18. Bacterial responses to reactive chlorine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research. PMID:23768204

  19. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, V P; Snead, M C; Krusé, C W; Kawata, K

    1986-11-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants--free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide--when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic pipe were added for circulation. The levels of residual disinfectants tested were 0.2 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as available chlorine. In the absence of a disinfectant residual, microorganisms in the sewage contaminant were consistently recovered at high levels. The presence of any disinfectant residual reduced the microorganism level and frequency of occurrence at the consumer's tap. Free chlorine was the most effective residual disinfectant and may serve as a marker or flag in the distribution network. Free chlorine and chlorine dioxide were the least stable in the pipe network. The loss of disinfectant in the pipe network followed first-order kinetics. The half-life determined in static tests for free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and combined chlorine was 140, 93, and 1680 min. PMID:3028767

  20. Scientific Opinion on safety and efficacy of cobalt compounds (E3 as feed additives for all animal species: Cobaltous acetate tetrahydrate, basic cobaltous carbonate monohydrate and cobaltous sulphate heptahydrate, based on a dossier submitted by TREAC EEIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Cobalt(III is a component of cobalamin. Its essentiality as trace element results from the capacity of certain animal species to synthesise cobalamin by the gastrointestinal microbiota. Feeding supplemental cobalt from the additives under application up to the maximum total content in feed set in EU is considered safe for all animal species/categories; margin of safety is around 10. Cobalt is predominantly excreted via faecal route. Absorbed cobalt follows aqueous excretion routes. About 43% of body cobalt is stored in muscle; however, kidney and liver are the edible tissues containing the highest cobalt concentrations and are most susceptible reflecting dietary cobalt concentrations. In animals with capacity to synthesise cobalamin, cobalt is also deposited in tissues as vitamin B12. Cobalt(II cations are genotoxic under in vitro and in vivo conditions, and have carcinogen, mutagen and reproduction toxicant (CMR properties. No data are available on the potential carcinogenicity of cobalt(II following oral exposure. However, oral exposure may potentially entail adverse threshold-related effects in humans. The estimated population intake of cobalt most likely includes the contribution of foodstuffs from animals fed cobalt-supplemented feedingstuffs. An increase in cobalt exposure by the use of cobalt-containing feed additives is therefore not expected. Considering the population exposure to cobalt, about 4–10 times lower than the health-based guidance value, no safety concern for the consumer is expected for threshold effects of oral cobalt. The cobalt(II compounds assessed are considered skin and eye irritants and dermal/inhalatory sensitisers. Their dust is a hazard to persons handling these substances. Exposure by inhalation must be avoided. The use of cobalt from any source at the authorised maximum content in feed does not provide a risk to the environment. The compounds assessed are available for cobalamin

  1. Chlorine diffusion in CdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadaiyandi, K.; Ramachandran, K. (School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj Univ. (India))

    1991-06-01

    The experimental results of chlorine diffusion in CdTe reveal that the dominant mechanism for diffusion is through neutral defect pair such as (V{sub Cd}V{sub Te}){sup *}. Here, theoretical calculations are carried out for all the possible mechanisms such as single vacancy, single interstitial, neutral defect pair, and Frenkel defect pair. The results suggest that the most possible mechanism for Cl diffusion in CdTe is that through neutral defect pair, supporting the experiment. (orig.).

  2. Chlorine requirement for Japanese laying quails

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Guilherme Perazzo Costa; Jalceyr Pessoa Figueiredo Júnior; Denise Fontana Figueiredo Lima; Cláudia de Castro Goulart; José Humberto Vilar da Silva; Matheus Ramalho de Lima; Sarah Gomes Pinheiro; Valéria Pereira Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the chlorine nutritional requirement of Japanese Quails during the laying phase, based on performance and egg quality parameters. A total of 240 Japanese quails were distributed according to a randomized block design, with five treatments and six replicates, with 8 birds each. The experiment lasted 84 days, divided in four cycles of 21 days each. Treatments consisted of a basal diet formulated to meet the nutritional requirements, except for chlori...

  3. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zheng, Tongzhang [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Wise, John Pierce, E-mail: John.Wise@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  4. Radiolytic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolytic degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloroform, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene) in water was carried out. Water solutions of the chlorinated hydrocarbons with different concentrations were irradiated with γ rays. Concentrations of methane, ethane, CO, CO2, H2, and O2 after the irradiation were determined by gas chromatography. Concentration of chloride ion in the irradiated sample was determined by ion chromatography. Experimental results show that radiolytic degradation of the chlorinated hydrocarbon increased with the radiation dose. Methane, ethane, CO2, H2, and Cl- concentrations increased with the radiation dose and the sample concentration. On the other hand, O2 concentration decreased with the radiation dose and the sample concentration. When sample concentration was high, dissolved oxygen might be not enough for converting most of the C atoms in the sample into CO2. This resulted in a low decomposition ratio. Addition of H2O2 as an oxygen resource could increase the decomposition ratio greatly. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was applied to identify some intermediates of the radiolytic dehalogenation. Radiolytic degradation mechanisms are also discussed. (author)

  5. Radioimmunoassay for chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides a double-antibody radioimmunoassay method for the determination of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, particularly, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, in environmental samples including animal tissues such as monkey liver and adipose tissues. The limit of detection is approximately 25 picograms for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin. Assuming an appropriate cleanup procedure is used, chlorinated dibenzofurans are the only likely interferences, and these can be distinguished through the use of two antisers of different dibenzo-furan/dibenzodioxin selectivities. The invention includes the preparation of a reproducible antigen, an appropriate radiolabeled hapten, and effective sample extracts. A feature of the assay method is the use of a nonionic detergent (e.g., ''cutscum'' or ''triton x-305'') to solubilize the extremely hydrophobic dibenzo-p-dioxins in a manner permitting their binding by antibodies. The immunoassay is applicable to screening samples in order to minimize the demand for mass spectrometric screening, and to routine monitoring for exposure to known chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins in potentially contaminated environments

  6. Chlorination and Carbochlorination of Cerium Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorination and carbochlorination of cerium oxide were studied by thermogravimetry under controlled atmosphere (TG) in the 7000C 9500C temperature range.Both reactants and products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (RX), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Thermodynamic calculations were performed by computer assisted software.The chlorination starts at a temperature close to 8000C.This reaction involves the simultaneous formation and evaporation of CeCl3.Both processes control the reaction rate and their kinetic may not be easily separated.The apparent chlorination activation energy in the 8500C-9500C temperature range is 172 to 5 kJ/ mole.Carbon transforms the CeO2-Cl2 into a more reactive system: CeO2-C-Cl2, where the effects of the carbon content, total flow rate and temperature were analyzed.The carbochlorination starting temperature is 7000C.This reaction is completed in one step controlled by mass transfer with an apparent activation energy of 56 to 5 kJ/mole in the 8500C-9500C temperature range

  7. Reducing the cobalt inventory in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reducing the cobalt content of materials used in nuclear power plants is one approach to controlling the radiation fields responsible for occupational radiation exposure; corrosion of steam generator tubing is the primary source in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Wear of the cobalt-base alloys used to hardface valves (especially feedwater regulator valves) and as pins and rollers in control blades are the primary boiling water reactor (BWR) sources. Routine valve maintenance can also be a significant source of cobalt. Wear, mechanical property, and corrosion measurements led to the selection of Nitronic-60/CFA and PH 13-8 Mo/Inconel X-750 as low-cobalt alloys for use as pin/roller combinations. These alloys are currently being tested in two commercial BWRs. Measurements show that Type 440C stainless steel wears less than the cobalt-base alloys in BWR feedwater regulator valves. Sliding wear tests performed at room temperature in simulated PWR water showed that Colmonoy 74 and 84, Deloro 40, and Vertx 4776 are attractive low-cobalt hardfacing alloys if the applied loads are less than or equal to103 MPa. The cobalt-base alloys performed best at high loads (207 MPa). Ongoing laboratory studies address the development and evaluation of cobalt-free iron-base hardfacing alloys and seek to improve the wear resistance of cobalt-base alloys by using lasers. Reducing cobalt impurity levels in core components that are periodically discharged should also help reduce radiation fields and disposal costs

  8. Attacks of Asthma due to Chlorinized Water: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Eyup Berdan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma-like symptoms in swimmers has been reported. But, attacks of asthma which is related to chlorinized water is rare. Chlorine, a strong oxidizing agent, is an important toxic gas that the swimmer can breath during swimming and a worker can exposed to chlorine while he or she was using water with chlorine at home. We describe a persistent increase in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness following chronic exposure to strong respiratory irritant with chlorinized water in two subjects with no past history of asthma or atopy. We conclude that airway hyperresponsiveness can develop or increase after chronic inhalation of high concentrations of irritants such as chlorinized water an indoor irritant factor and that these changes may be prolonged. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(1: 87-90

  9. Attacks of Asthma due to Chlorinized Water: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Eyup Berdan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a high prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma-like symptoms in swimmers has been reported. But, attacks of asthma which is related to chlorinized water is rare. Chlorine, a strong oxidizing agent, is an important toxic gas that the swimmer can breath during swimming and a worker can exposed to chlorine while he or she was using water with chlorine at home. We describe a persistent increase in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness following chronic exposure to strong respiratory irritant with chlorinized water in two subjects with no past history of asthma or atopy. We conclude that airway hyperresponsiveness can develop or increase after chronic inhalation of high concentrations of irritants such as chlorinized water an indoor irritant factor and that these changes may be prolonged. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000: 87-90

  10. Electric plasma discharge combustion synthesis of chlorine dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the production of chlorine dioxide comprises feeding an inert gas to a reaction zone and applying an electrical discharge to the inert gas to produce a high temperature plasma. Chlorine gas and oxygen gas are supplied simultaneously to the reaction zone and reacted in the plasma to produce a gaseous mixture comprised of chlorine dioxide, chlorine, oxygen and inert gas, the molar ratio of oxygen to chlorine in the reaction zone being at least about 2.5;1. The gaseous mixture is recovered from the reaction zone. Chlorine dioxide, which may be recovered as a gas or reacted to produce an alkali metal chlorite, is employed as a bleaching agent and a water treatment agent

  11. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xianxia; Hu, Xin-Xin; Ding, Xin-Long; Kong, Hai-Chuan; Sha, Hao-Dong; Lin, He; Wen, Wen; Shen, Guangxia; Guo, Zhi; Ma, Zi-Feng; Yang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too. PMID:24229351

  12. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: influence of cobalt dispersion and titanium oxides promotion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azib, H.

    1996-04-10

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of Sol-Gel preparation parameters which occur in silica supported cobalt catalysts synthesis. These catalysts are particularly used for the waxes production in natural gas processing. The solids have been characterized by several techniques: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), programmed temperature reduction (TPR), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), Magnetism, thermodesorption of H{sub 2} (TPD). The results indicate that the control of the cobalt dispersion and oxide phases nature is possible by modifying Sol-Gel parameters. The catalytic tests in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were conducted on a pilot unit under pressure (20 atm) and suggested that turnover rates were independent of Co crystallite size, Co phases in the solids (Co deg., cobalt silicate) and titanium oxide promotion. On the other methane, the C{sub 3}{sup +} hydrocarbon selectivity is increased with increasing crystallite size. Inversely, the methane production is favoured by very small crystallites, cobalt silicate increase and titanium addition. However, the latter, used as a cobalt promoter, has a benefic effect on the active phase stability during the synthesis. (author). 149 refs., 102 figs., 71 tabs.

  13. Treatment of algae-induced tastes and odors by chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate

    OpenAIRE

    Buffin, Lisa Webster

    1992-01-01

    Chlorine (C12(sq»' chlorine dioxide (Cl02 ) and potassium permanganate (KMn04) were evaluated as oxidants for the removal of grassy and cucumber odors associated with the pure compounds, cis-3-hexenol and trans-2, cis-6-nonadienal, respectively, and for the removal of fishy odors associated with a culture of an alga, Synura petersenii. The effects of the oxidants on the pure compounds were assessed both by Flavor Profile Analysis (FPA) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The ef...

  14. Some kinetics aspects of chlorine-solids reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kanari, N.; Mishra, D.; Mochón, J.; Verdeja, L. F.; Diot, F.; Allain, E.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes detailed kinetics investigations on some selected chlorine-solid reactions through thermogravimetric measurements. The solids studied in this article include chemical pure oxides and sulfides as well as their natural bearing materials. The chlorinating agents employed are gaseous mixtures of Cl2+N2 (chlorination), Cl2+O2 (oxychlorination), and Cl2+CO (...

  15. The removal of phenols from oily wastewater by chlorine dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Chung-Jung

    1988-01-01

    Treatability studies were performed on oily wastewaters produced by petroleum and canning industries. Chlorine dioxide was used for the removal of phenolic compounds from these oily wastewaters. Most of phenolic compounds can be destroyed by chlorine dioxide within 15 minutes if CI02-to-phenol ratios of higher than 5.0 are provided. Factors such as pH, temperature, and COD have little effect on phenol removal. The effectiveness of chlorine dioxide treatment depends critic...

  16. Palau’chlor: A Practical and Reactive Chlorinating Reagent

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Rodrigo A.; Pan, Chung-Mao; Yabe, Yuki; Kawamata, Yu; Eastgate, Martin D.; Baran, Phil S.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike its other halogen atom siblings, the utility of chlorinated arenes and (hetero)arenes are twofold: they are useful in tuning electronic structure as well as acting as points for diversification via cross-coupling. Herein we report the invention of a new guanidine-based chlorinating reagent, CBMG or “Palau’chlor”, inspired by a key chlorospirocyclization en route to pyrrole imidazole alkaloids. This direct, mild, operationally simple, and safe chlorinating method is compatible with a ra...

  17. Blends of caprolactam/caprolactone copolymers and chlorinated polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Alberda van Ekenstein, G.O.R.; Deuring, H.; ten Brinke, G.; Ellis, T. S.

    1997-01-01

    The phase behaviour of blends of chlorinated polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and chlorinated PVC with random copolymers of caprolactone and caprolactam has been investigated and the results correlated with a binary interaction model. The known miscibility of polycaprolactone in the chlorinated polymers is not compromised until a relatively high lactam content in the copolymer is attained. The incorporation of segmental interaction parameters, derived from separate studies involving pol...

  18. Cobalt 60 as a marking agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt 60 is a particularly attractive candidate for marking explosives because not only does it have a useful half-life of 5.3 years, but it produces two highly penetrating gamma rays, at 1.173 and 1.332 MeV, in coincidence. The fact that two strong, monoenergetic gamma rays are produced simultaneously makes it possible to detect a much smaller amount of this element in the presence of terrestrial background radiation than is possible for other radioactive elements that produce only one gamma ray. The authors have built a test-bed system comprising six large plastic scintillators and their associated hardware to investigate the performance of this technique. Experiments have shown that reliable detection can be done with a sufficiently small amount of cobalt 60 so as not to raise safety concerns

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of melting behaviours of supported cobalt cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular dynamics simulation combined with the simulated annealing method are used to study the melting behaviors of free cobalt clusters and two kinds of supported cobalt clusters with cluster size ranging from 400 to 2000 atoms. Gupta potential is used for the cobalt - cobalt interactions in Co clusters. Influences on the melting properties are discussed with two kinds of supported potentials: the Lennard-Jones potential and the Morse potential. Our results reveal that with the same number of cobalt atoms and the same cobalt-substrate interation stength, the melting points and pre-melting intervals of the two kinds of supported Co clusters are all in reasonable agreement with each other. With increasing the depth of supported potential, the melting points increase for the supported cluster. Similar to the case of free clusters, the linear relation between the melting point and the inverse of cluster's size cube root is also found for the two kinds of supported clusters. (authors)

  20. Radiation and thermal effects on cobalt retention by Mexican aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and radiation effects on the leaching of cobalt from two cobalt exchanged zeolites and one clay were determined. The cobalt exchanged aluminosilicates were heated at different temperatures (500, 700, 900 and 1100 deg. C), and the materials were then treated with NaCl (1 and 5 M) and HNO3 (0.001 and 1 M) solutions to determine the leaching behavior of cobalt from the materials. Cobalt showed greater stability when the materials were heated at the highest temperature. The unheated samples and those heated at 1100 deg. C were gamma irradiated, and it was found that cobalt leaching from gamma irradiated aluminosilicates was higher than that for non-irradiated materials

  1. Enhanced magnetocrystalline anisotropy in deposited cobalt clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic properties of nanomaterials made by embedding cobalt nanocrystals in a copper matrix have been studied using a SQUID magnetometer. The remanent magnetization at temperatures down to 1.8 K and the RT (room temperature) field-dependent magnetization of 1000- and 8000-atom (average-size) cobalt cluster samples have been measured. In all cases it has been possible to relate the morphology of the material to the magnetic properties. However, it is found that the deposited cluster samples contain a majority of sintered clusters even at cobalt concentrations as low as 5% by volume. The remanent magnetization of the 8000-atom samples was found to be bimodal, consisting of one contribution from spherical particles and one from touching (sintered) clusters. Using a Monte Carlo calculation to simulate the sintering it has been possible to calculate a size distribution which fits the RT superparamagnetic behaviour of the 1000-atom samples. The remanent magnetization for this average size of clusters could then be fitted to a simple model assuming that all the nanoparticles are spherical and have a size distribution which fits the superparamagnetic behaviour. This gives a value for the potential energy barrier height (for reversing the spin direction) of 2.0 μeV/atom which is almost four times the accepted value for face-centred-cubic bulk cobalt. The remanent magnetization for the spherical component of the large-cluster sample could not be fitted with a single barrier height and it is conjectured that this is because the barriers change as a function of cluster size. The average value is 1.5 μeV/atom but presumably this value tends toward the bulk value (0.5 μeV/atom) for the largest clusters in this sample. (author)

  2. Sputtering yield measurements on single crystal cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of cobalt have been bombarded with 80 keV A+ ions in the direction of the h.c.p. structure and in the direction of the f.c.c. structure. The sputtering yields, measured by the weight loss method, depend on the crystal structure, and damage, introduced by the ion bombardment, is shown to play a significant role in the explanation of the measured sputtering yields. (Auth.)

  3. Photoionization of cobalt impuritiesin zinc oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ivanov, V.; Godlewski, M.; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 9 (2015), s. 1988-1992. ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GAP108/12/1941 Grant ostatní: SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : absorption band * cobalt * photoionization * electron spin resonance * pulsed mode * ZnO Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.489, year: 2014

  4. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Patrick L. [Yale University

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  5. Mechanisms of inactivation of poliovirus by chlorine dioxide and iodine.

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, M E; O'Brien, R T

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide and iodine inactivated poliovirus more efficiently at pH 10.0 than at pH 6.0. Sedimentation analyses of viruses inactivated by chlorine dioxide and iodine at pH 10.9 showed that viral RNA separated from the capsids, resulting in the conversion of virions from 156S structures to 80S particles. The RNAs release from both chlorine dioxide- and iodine-inactivated viruses cosedimented with intact 35S viral RNA. Both chlorine dioxide and iodine reacted with the capsid proteins of p...

  6. Water splitting processes of the iron-chlorine family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-step processes for thermal water splitting comprise individual chemical reactions which, as far as the iron-chlorine family is concerned, may be generalized: hydrolysis, chlorination, dechlorination, reduction, regeneration of chlorinating agent. These categories comprise series of chemical equations which can be combined to water splitting cycles in different configurations. A systematic estimation of the chemical equations of the five categories is given instead of treating several hundred water-splitting processes of the iron-chlorine family. The individual chemical equations are estimated from published data, by laboratory experiments, and by operating conditions of technical processes. (author)

  7. Cobalt metabolism and toxicology-A brief update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole, E-mail: LOSimonsen@dadlnet.dk; Harbak, Henrik; Bennekou, Poul

    2012-08-15

    Cobalt metabolism and toxicology are summarized. The biological functions of cobalt are updated in the light of recent understanding of cobalt interference with the sensing in almost all animal cells of oxygen deficiency (hypoxia). Cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) stabilizes the transcriptional activator hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and thus mimics hypoxia and stimulates erythropoietin (Epo) production, but probably also by the same mechanism induces a coordinated up-regulation of a number of adaptive responses to hypoxia, many with potential carcinogenic effects. This means on the other hand that cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) also may have beneficial effects under conditions of tissue hypoxia, and possibly can represent an alternative to hypoxic preconditioning. Cobalt is acutely toxic in larger doses, and in mammalian in vitro test systems cobalt ions and cobalt metal are cytotoxic and induce apoptosis and at higher concentrations necrosis with inflammatory response. Cobalt metal and salts are also genotoxic, mainly caused by oxidative DNA damage by reactive oxygen species, perhaps combined with inhibition of DNA repair. Of note, the evidence for carcinogenicity of cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate is considered sufficient in experimental animals, but is as yet considered inadequate in humans. Interestingly, some of the toxic effects of cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) have recently been proposed to be due to putative inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} entry and Ca{sup 2+}-signaling and competition with Ca{sup 2+} for intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins. The tissue partitioning of cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) and its time-dependence after administration of a single dose have been studied in man, but mainly in laboratory animals. Cobalt is accumulated primarily in liver, kidney, pancreas, and heart, with the relative content in skeleton and skeletal muscle increasing with time after cobalt administration. In man the renal excretion is initially rapid but decreasing over the first days, followed by a second, slow

  8. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon-Cobalt Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Tembre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of carbon-cobalt thin films using infrared spectroscopy has shown existence of carbon-cobalt stretching mode and great porosity. The Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy have been used in order to investigate the microstructure of the films. These films exhibit complex Raman spectra suggesting the presence of amorphous and crystallized phases. The different fractions of phases and the correlation between the atomic bond structures and the Raman features depend on the cobalt content.

  9. Uptake of radionuclides caesium and cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of chemical treatment ammonium, potassium, sodium and H-form of zeolite were prepared. The chemical modifications of zeolite were carried out with: 2M solution of NaNO3, NH4NO3, KNO3; 0,1M solution of HCl; NaOH solution of different concentration. The method of model radioactive solution was used to find the sorption ability for cesium and cobalt every modified zeolite. The model solution were 0.05M solution of cobalt labelled by 60Co or cesium labelled by 137Cs. The highest sorption ability was observed for zeolite modified by NaOH. The influence of pH on uptake of cesium and cobalt by modified zeolite was searched as well. The experimental data (leaching tests, compressive strength measurement and porosity) were measured for the case the Cs and Cs from model water solution and radioactive waste water were up taken on chemically modified zeolite and were subsequently incorporated into cement casts on blast furnace cement slags basis. The leachability was tested in water, in basis solution and in acid solution. The leachability in water and basic solution was negligible, in acid solution it was less than 4% which is inside of value of applied measure method. The compressive strength, porosity and leaching experiment are hopefully and show good mechanical stability and good retention of observed radionuclides in samples exposed in leaching solutions. (J.K.)

  10. The cobalt radioactive isotopes in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the year 1993 the total activity released in cobalt is 69 GBq for the whole of nuclear power plants. The part of activity in cobalt for La Hague in 1993 is 8 GBq of 58Co and 2 GBq of 60Co. The radioactive isotopes released by nuclear power plants or the reprocessing plant of La Hague under liquid effluents are shared by half between 58Co and 60Co. The exposure to sealed sources is the most important risk for the cobalt. The risk of acute exposure can associate a local irradiation of several decades of grays inducing a radiological burns, deep burn to treat in surgery by resection or graft even amputation. A global irradiation of organism for several grays induces an acute irradiation syndrome, often serious. At long term the stochastic effects are represented by leukemia and radio-induced cancers. The increase of probability of their occurrence is 1% by sievert. We must remind that the natural spontaneous probability is 25%. (N.C.)

  11. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream

  12. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J.; De Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutageni...

  13. Compact magnetooptical isolator with cobalt ferrite on silicon photonic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaga, Megumi; Shoji, Yuya; Takamura, Yota; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    In the telecom wavelength range, the magnetooptical effect of cobalt ferrites is approximately 10 times larger than that of conventional magnetooptical materials such as yttrium iron garnets. In this study, we focus on an application of cobalt ferrite to a magnetooptical isolator that is to be miniaturized and made suitable for integration. First, we prepare polycrystalline cobalt ferrite films deposited on a silicon substrate using a MgO buffer layer. Next, we fabricate a waveguide optical isolator of silicon waveguides by the partial deposition of the cobalt ferrite films. An optical isolation ratio of 5.5 dB is demonstrated.

  14. Cobalt metabolism and toxicology—A brief update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt metabolism and toxicology are summarized. The biological functions of cobalt are updated in the light of recent understanding of cobalt interference with the sensing in almost all animal cells of oxygen deficiency (hypoxia). Cobalt (Co2+) stabilizes the transcriptional activator hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and thus mimics hypoxia and stimulates erythropoietin (Epo) production, but probably also by the same mechanism induces a coordinated up-regulation of a number of adaptive responses to hypoxia, many with potential carcinogenic effects. This means on the other hand that cobalt (Co2+) also may have beneficial effects under conditions of tissue hypoxia, and possibly can represent an alternative to hypoxic preconditioning. Cobalt is acutely toxic in larger doses, and in mammalian in vitro test systems cobalt ions and cobalt metal are cytotoxic and induce apoptosis and at higher concentrations necrosis with inflammatory response. Cobalt metal and salts are also genotoxic, mainly caused by oxidative DNA damage by reactive oxygen species, perhaps combined with inhibition of DNA repair. Of note, the evidence for carcinogenicity of cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate is considered sufficient in experimental animals, but is as yet considered inadequate in humans. Interestingly, some of the toxic effects of cobalt (Co2+) have recently been proposed to be due to putative inhibition of Ca2+ entry and Ca2+-signaling and competition with Ca2+ for intracellular Ca2+-binding proteins. The tissue partitioning of cobalt (Co2+) and its time-dependence after administration of a single dose have been studied in man, but mainly in laboratory animals. Cobalt is accumulated primarily in liver, kidney, pancreas, and heart, with the relative content in skeleton and skeletal muscle increasing with time after cobalt administration. In man the renal excretion is initially rapid but decreasing over the first days, followed by a second, slow phase lasting several weeks, and with a

  15. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  16. Some kinetics aspects of chlorine-solids reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanari, N.; Mishra, D.; Mochon, J.; Verdeja, L. F.; Diot, F.; Allain, E.

    2010-07-01

    The present paper describes detailed kinetics investigations on some selected chlorine-solid reactions through thermogravimetric measurements. The solids studied in this article include chemical pure oxides and sulfides as well as their natural bearing materials. The chlorinating agents employed are gaseous mixtures of Cl{sub 2}+N{sub 2} (chlorination), Cl{sub 2}+O{sub 2} (oxy chlorination), and Cl{sub 2}+CO (carbochlorination). Results are presented as effects of various parameters on the reaction rate of these solids with these chlorinating agents. It was observed that the reactivity of these solids towards different chlorinating agents varied widely. Sulfides could be chlorinated at room temperature, while carbochlorination of chromium (III) oxide was possible only above 500 degree centigrade. The variation of the chlorination rate of these complex materials with respect to gas velocity, composition and temperature enabled us to focus some light on the plausible reaction mechanisms and stoichiometries. The obtained results were used for selective removal of iron from chromite concentrates, extraction of valuable metals from sulfide materials, purification of MgO samples, etc.. (Author) 12 refs.

  17. Chlorine-heavy metals interaction on toxicity and metal accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objectives of this study with rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were: to determine whether acute toxic interaction of chlorine, nickel, and temperature is additive, synergistic, antagonistic, or if no interaction occurs; to provide a biological explanation of the mechanisms of the toxic interactions; and to develop a mortality model of the toxic interaction. Twenty chlorine-nickel toxicity tests and a bioaccumulation study, both with and without chlorine, were conducted to accomplish these objectives. Studies using 63Ni were conducted to monitor the effects of chlorine on nickel accumulation in the tissues of trout under conditions similar to those of multiple toxicant studies. The presence of 0.018 ppM TRC (total residual chlorine) increased nickel accumulation in tissues from fish exposed to chlorine and 63Ni. This may be due to an increase in the permeability of the gill to nickel during chlorine exposure. Chlorine and nickel had a synergistic toxic interaction. Mortality in these groups was significantly higher. Temperature did not influence toxicity as strongly

  18. Chlorine Dioxide Induced Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: MMPI Validity Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This paper discusses Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data obtained from individuals exposed to chlorine dioxide in the workplace who developed Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The paper explores current research on chlorine dioxide exposed persons who were misdiagnosed on the basis of MMPI interpretations. Difficulties…

  19. UASB reactor effluent disinfection by ozone and chlorine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro da Silvia, G.H.; Bruning, H.; Gerrity, D.; Daniel, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    This research studied the sequential ozone and chlorine process with respect to, the inactivation of indicator bacteria and the formation of ozone disinfection byproducts in sanitary wastewater effluent. The applied ozone doses were 5, 8 and 10 mg.O3.L-1, followed by chlorine doses of 10, 20 and 30

  20. Chlorine-containing natural compounds in higher plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    More than 130 chlorine-containing compounds have been isolated from higher plants and ferns; about half are polyacetylenes, thiophenes and sesquiterpene lactones from the Asteraceae. A chlorinated chlorophyll may be an important part of photosystem 1. High biological activity is found in 4...

  1. 78 FR 66767 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of September 10, 2013 (78 FR 55293). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Japan of chlorinated isocyanurates, provided for...

  2. Biodegradability of Chlorinated Anilines in Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO WANG; GUAN-GHUA LU; YAN-JIE ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To identify the bacteria tolerating chlorinated anilines and to study the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline and its coexistent compounds. Methods Microbial community of complex bacteria was identified by plate culture observation techniques and Gram stain method. Bacterial growth inhibition test was used to determine the tolerance of complex bacteria to toxicant. Biodegradability of chlorinated anilines was determined using domesticated complex bacteria as an inoculum by shaking-flask test. Results The complex bacteria were identified, consisting of Xanthomonas, Bacillus alcaligenes,Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Actinomycetaceae nocardia. The obtained complex bacteria were more tolerant to o-chloroaniline than mixture bacteria in natural river waters. The effects of exposure concentration and inoculum size on the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline were analyzed, and the biodegradation characteristics of single o-chloroaniline and 2,4-dichloroaniline were compared with the coexistent compounds. Conclusion The biodegradation rates can be improved by decreasing concentration of compounds and increasing inoculum size of complex bacteria. When o-chloroaniline coexists with aniline, the latter is biodegraded prior to the former, and as a consequence the metabolic efficiency of o-chloroaniline is improved with the increase of aniline concentration. Meanwhile, when o-chloroaniline coexists with 2,4-dichloroaniline, the metabolic efficiency of 2,4-dichloroaniline is markedly improved.

  3. New infrared spectroscopic database for chlorine nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of chlorine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 500-1330 cm-1 at 0.002-0.008 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 23 spectra covering the temperature range from 190 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 150 hPa. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 190 and 296 K. The sample was synthesized from N2O5 and Cl2O. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample. Quality assurance included measurements with different sample pressures, spectroscopic purity check of the sample, comparison of integrated absorption cross sections over entire band systems, and assessment of residuals from remote-sensing retrievals. Multiplicative and additive errors were considered giving an overall uncertainty of +2.5/-3.5%. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The worst-case error for the interpolated data is +4.5/-5.5%. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric chlorine nitrate error budget substantially

  4. Cobalt(I) and Cobalt(III) Cyclopentadienyl Complexes with New Silicon-branched Fluorous Tags

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strašák, Tomáš; Čermák, Jan; Červenková Šťastná, Lucie; Sýkora, Jan; Fajgar, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 159, MAR 2014 (2014), s. 15-20. ISSN 0022-1139 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/1372 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fluorous tag * cobalt complex * cyclopentadienyl complex Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.948, year: 2014

  5. Dosing of anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors with cobalt: Impact of cobalt retention on methanogenic activity

    KAUST Repository

    Fermoso, Fernando G.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of dosing a metal limited anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with a metal pulse on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge has thus far not been successfully modeled. The prediction of this effect is crucial in order to optimize the strategy for metal dosage and to prevent unnecessary losses of resources. This paper describes the relation between the initial immobilization of cobalt in anaerobic granular sludge cobalt dosage into the reactor and the evolution of methanogenic activity during the subsequent weeks. An operationally defined parameter (A0· B0) was found to combine the amount of cobalt immobilized instantaneously upon the pulse (B0) and the amount of cobalt immobilized within the subsequent 24. h (A0). In contrast with the individual parameters A0 and B0, the parameter A0· B0 correlated significantly with the methanogenic activity of the sludge during the subsequent 16 or 35. days. This correlation between metal retention and activity evolution is a useful tool to implement trace metal dosing strategies for biofilm-based biotechnological processes. © 2010.

  6. Hydrogen trapping: Synergetic effects of inorganic additives with cobalt sulfide absorbers and reactivity of cobalt polysulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biphasic product CoS2 + Co(OH)2 obtained by oxidation of cobalt sulfide is known to trap hydrogen at room temperature and low pressure according to a balanced reduction equation. Adding various inorganic compounds to this original absorber induces their reduction by hydrogen in the same conditions at a significant rate: (i) excess cobalt hydroxide is reduced to metallic cobalt; (ii) nitrate ions are reduced to ammonia; (iii) sulfur and sodium thiosulfate are reduced to H2S or NaHS and Na2S, respectively. Without a hydrogen absorber these inorganic compounds are not reduced by H2, suggesting synergetic effects involving H2 and the hydrogen absorber. Amorphous cobalt polysulfide, CoS5, is also reduced by hydrogen at room temperature and releases H2S gas. In the presence of a base to neutralize H2S gas, the reaction rate is initially slower than with the CoS2 + Co(OH)2 mixture due to the higher stability of polysulfide chains but the H2 trapping yield is improved, making CoS5 a good candidate for H2 trapping. (authors)

  7. Release of chlorine from biomass at gasification conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the project was to investigate the influence of different gasifying atmospheres on the release of chlorine from biomass during gasification conditions. Furthermore, the purpose was also to try and identify the formed chloro compounds. The results showed that O2, H2O and CO2 had negligible effect on the chlorine release at temperatures under 700 deg C. At temperatures above 800 deg C the reactivity towards CO2 increased and could be seen as higher chlorine release and less solid residue. No chloro organic compounds (aliphatic one to six carbons or aromatic one to two rings) could be detected in the tar or the fuel gas produced during pyrolysis/gasifying. On the other hand, comparable amounts of chlorinated benzenes were found in the cooling section during combustion of lucerne and of synthetic waste, indicating that oxygen is essential for chlorination reactions. 11 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  8. Advanced polymer chemistry of organometallic anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlin, R.M.; Abney, K.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Balaich, G.J.; Fino, S.A. [Air Force Academy, CO (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to prepare and characterize new polymers incorporating cobalt dicarbollide. Specific goals were to prepare polymerizable cobalt dicarbollide monomers using the nucleophilic substitution route discovered in laboratories and to establish the reaction conditions required to form polymers from these complexes. This one-year project resulted in two publications (in press), and provided the foundation for further investigations into polymer synthesis and characterization using cobalt dicarbollide and other metallocarboranes. Interest in synthesizing organometallic polymers containing the cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anion is motivated by their possible application as cation exchange materials for the remediation of cesium-137 and strontium-90 from nuclear wastes.

  9. Synthesis of conjugates of polyhedral boron compounds with tumor-seeking molecules for neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregadze, V., E-mail: bre@ineos.ac.ru [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str. 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Semioshkin, A.; Sivaev, I. [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str. 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    Recent achievements in design and synthesis of boronated acids, amino acids, glycerols as well as conjugates of polyhedral boron hydrides (ortho-carborane, closo-dodecaborate and cobalt bis(dicarbollide)) with natural porphyrins, carbohydrates and nucleosides are described.

  10. Acetic acid assisted cobalt methanesulfonate catalysed chemoselective diacetylation of aldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Zhi Guo Song; Hong Gong; Heng Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Cobalt methanesulfonate in combination with acetic acid catalysed the chemoselective diacetylation of aldehyde with acetic anhydride at room temperature under solvent free conditions. After reaction, cobalt methanesulfonate can be easily recovered and mused many times. The reaction was mild and efficient with good to high yields.

  11. [The cobalt lung in diamond cutters: a new disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demedts, M; Gyselen, A

    1989-01-01

    Although for forty years already broncho-pulmonary pathology has been described in workers exposed to hard-metal (i.e. alloys of tungsten carbide and cobalt) and although cobalt is considered the offending agent of this hazard, these abnormalities have almost not been found after exposure to cobalt alone except in animal experiments. Recently we detected clearcut broncho-pulmonary pathology in 48 diamond polishers (i.e. nearly 1% of those exposed) attributable to the ultrafine cobalt dust from the cutting surface of polishing disks, in which it was used as a cementing matrix for microdiamonds without any tungsten carbide. Nineteen of these patients presented with a fibrosing alveolitis documented in 6 by lung biopsy and in 12 by broncho-alveolar lavage, both of which revealed characteristic multinucleated giant cells. Thirteen suffered from asthma of occupational origin, in 9 proven by cobalt-inhalation tests, and in 5 by peak flow measurements at the workplace. Sixteen had mixed bronchial and alveolar pathology or were incompletely documented. A cross-sectional study in about 200 diamond polishers showed a significant correlation between exposure to cobalt and decrease in lung function. The strikingly harmful effects of cobalt can be explained by the chronic exposure to very small particles with markedly increased solubility. The pathogenesis of the broncho-pulmonary pathology may be attributed to the cytotoxic as well as to the sensitising (i.e. allergic and/or idiosyncratic) actions of cobalt. PMID:2561412

  12. Anisotropie d'agrégats de cobalt

    OpenAIRE

    Morel, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Ce mémoire présente une revue sur la croissance d'agrégats de cobalt par condensation en phase gazeuse. Suit une revue des différent mécanismes physiques à l'origine de l'anisotropie magnétique du cobalt, et de leurs manifestations dans des particules nanométriques.

  13. Microwave Mapping Demonstration Using the Thermochromic Cobalt Chloride Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu D.; Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    An update to the thermochromic cobalt(II) chloride equilibrium demonstration is described. Filter paper that has been saturated with aqueous cobalt(II) chloride is heated for seconds in a microwave oven, producing a color change. The resulting pink and blue map is used to colorfully demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle and to illuminate the…

  14. Effect of cobalt on the Anaerobic Thermophilic Conversion of Methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Jiang, B.; Cysneiros, D.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of cobalt on the anaerobic conversion of methanol under thermophilic conditions was studied in three parallel lab-scale UASB-reactors and in cobalt-limited enriched cultures. Reactors R1, R2, and R3 were fed with methanol in a bicarbonate-buffered medium, supplied with iron and macron

  15. Effects of chlorine or chlorine dioxide during immersion chilling on recovery of bacteria from broiler carcasses and chiller water

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to determine the microbiological impact of immersion chilling broiler carcasses with chlorine or chlorine dioxide. Eviscerated, pre-chill commercial broiler carcasses were cut into left and right halves along the keel bone, and each half was rinsed (HCR) in 100 mL of 0.1% pept...

  16. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 x 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications

  17. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 {times} 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications.

  18. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B0 = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe2O4 (B0 = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B0 = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible

  19. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V. [Instituto de Tecnologías y Ciencias de la Ingeniería, “Ing. H. Fernández Long,” Av. Paseo Colón 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Institut Universitari de Ciència dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Agouram, S. [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  20. Synergetic Inactivation of Microorganisms in Drinking Water by Short-term Free Chlorination and Subsequent Monochloramination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To introduce synergetic inactivation of microorganisms in drinking water by short-term free chlorination for less than 15 minutes followed by monochloramination. Methods Indicator microorganisms such as Escherichia coli,Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and spores of Bacillus subtilis were used to assess the efficiency of sequential chlorination and free chlorination. Results The sequential chlorination was more efficient in inactivating these microorganisms than free chlorination, indicating that synergy was provided by free chlorine and monochloramine. Ammonia addition time, temperature and pH had influences on this synergy. Conclusion The possible mechanism of this synergy might involve three aspects: free chlorine causing sublethal injury to microorganisms and monochloramine further inactivating them; different ability of free chlorine and monochloramine to penetrate and inactivate microorganism congeries; and higher concentration of residual chlorine in sequential chlorination than in free chlorination.

  1. Consumer leather exposure: an unrecognized cause of cobalt sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J.P.; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A patient who had suffered from persistent generalized dermatitis for 7 years was diagnosed with cobalt sensitization, and his leather couch was suspected as the culprit, owing to the clinical presentation mimicking allergic chromium dermatitis resulting from leather furniture exposure....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cobalt spot test, X-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy were used to determine cobalt content and release from the leather couch that caused the dermatitis and from 14 randomly collected samples of furniture leather....... RESULTS: The sample from the patient's leather couch, but none of the 14 random leather samples, released cobalt in high concentrations. Dermatitis cleared when the patient stopped using his couch. CONCLUSIONS: Cobalt is used in the so-called pre-metallized dyeing of leather products. Repeated studies...

  2. Association between cobalt allergy and dermatitis caused by leather articles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen. Recent studies have recognized exposure to leather articles as a potential cause of cobalt allergy. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between contact allergy to cobalt and a history of dermatitis resulting from...... exposure to leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed: the case group consisted of 183 dermatitis patients with a positive patch test reaction to cobalt chloride and a negative patch test reaction to potassium dichromate; the control group consisted of 621 dermatitis patients who...... did not react to either cobalt or chromium in patch testing. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test, Fisher's exact, and the Mann-Whitney test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations while taking confounding factors into consideration. RESULTS: Leather was observed as...

  3. Unconventional magnetisation texture in graphene/cobalt hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, A. D.; Coraux, J.; Chen, G.; N’Diaye, A. T.; Schmid, A. K.; Rougemaille, N.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic domain structure and spin-dependent reflectivity measurements on cobalt thin films intercalated at the graphene/Ir(111) interface are investigated using spin-polarised low-energy electron microscopy. We find that graphene-covered cobalt films have surprising magnetic properties. Vectorial imaging of magnetic domains reveals an unusually gradual thickness-dependent spin reorientation transition, in which magnetisation rotates from out-of-the-film plane to the in-plane direction by less than 10° per cobalt monolayer. During this transition, cobalt films have a meandering spin texture, characterised by a complex, three-dimensional, wavy magnetisation pattern. In addition, spectroscopy measurements suggest that the electronic band structure of the unoccupied states is essentially spin-independent already a few electron-Volts above the vacuum level. These properties strikingly differ from those of pristine cobalt films and could open new prospects in surface magnetism. PMID:27114039

  4. EVALUATION OF A C CONDUCTIVITY & DIELECTRIC BEHAVIOR OF COBALT FERRITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.BHAVIKATTI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 is a spinel ferrimagnetic oxide with high saturation magnetization, large magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Highly crystalline cobalt ferrite particles have been prepared using a newsynthesis method i.e. microwave route. This microwave assisted route is one of the simplest and easy methods for synthesis. Here, cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 is prepared by microwave route using thermal decomposition of cobalt oxalate precursor. Urea is used as a fuel for the solid-state combustion reaction. In this article, we reportthe investigation of ac conductivity and dielectric behavior of cobalt ferrite in the frequency range of 1 KHz to 1MHz and in the temperature range of 00 to 7000 C. The obtained ac conductivity is found to be very low. The experimental results indicate an abnormal behavior in case of dielectric properties.

  5. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  6. Heat Transport of Electron-Doped Cobaltates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; LIANG Ying; FENG Shi-Ping; CHEN Wei-Yeu

    2006-01-01

    Within the t-J model, the heat transport of electron-doped cobaltates is studied based on the fermionspin theory. It is shown that the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is characterized by the low-temperature peak located at a finite temperature. The thermal conductivity increases monotonously with increasing temperature at low-temperatures T < 0.1 J, and then decreases with increasing temperature for higher temperatures T > 0.1 J, in qualitative agreement with experimental result observed from NaxCoO2.

  7. Appraisal of chlorine contact tank modelling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauen, William B; Angeloudis, Athanasios; Falconer, Roger A

    2012-11-15

    With new water directives imposing strict regulations to reduce the footprint of treatment operations and contaminant levels, a performance review of water treatment facilities, including Chlorine Contact Tanks (CCTs) is required. This paper includes a critical appraisal of the international literature on CCT modelling practices to date, aiming to assist the identification of areas requiring further development, in particular, relating to the computational modelling capability and availability of tools to assist hydraulic design and optimisation studies of CCTs. It notes that the hydraulic optimisation practice of poorly designed tanks commenced with experimental studies undertaken in the 1960s and 1970s, which involved mainly two types of studies, namely in situ tracer tests and laboratory physical modelling. The former has traditionally been conducted to diagnose the hydraulic performance of existing CCTs, typically based on results such as Residence Time Distribution (RTD) curves and values of the Hydraulic Efficiency Indicators (HEIs). The latter has been useful in trial and error testing of the impact of certain design modifications on those results, with suggestions for later improvements of the field scale unit. In the 1980s mathematical and numerical modelling studies started to be used to assist CCT investigations, offering a greater level of detail in a more cost-effective manner than equivalent experimentally based investigations. With the growth of computing power and the popularisation of computational models, the 1990s saw the development and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools to simulate the hydraulic performance of CCTs, sometimes independently of experimentation, other than by using available data to calibrate and validate modelling predictions. This has led to the current scenario of CFD models being invaluable assistive tools in optimisation studies of CCTs, with the experimentation practice continuing to allow for specific

  8. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  9. Chlorination of calcium tungstate by mixture of chlorine and sulfur dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of thermodynamic calculations and experimental investigations of interaction of calcium tungstate with Cl2+SO2 mixture at 400-850 deg C are presented. It is shown that the processes passes through several sequential and parallel stages with formation of tungsten (6) oxide and calcium chloride as intermediate products. Peculiarities of the process are determined by the ratio of rates of WO3 formation and chlorination stages

  10. Anaerobic Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Groundwater Aquifers or "Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation"

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, R. Brent; Jay D Keasling

    1997-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE), is a major concern throughout the United States. A developing strategy for the remediation of PCE and TCE contaminated aquifers is anaerobic biodegradation. From a TCE contaminated groundwater site, microorganisms were enriched with the ability to anaerobically convert PCE and TCE completely to ethene. Kinetic studies performed with this culture showed that degradation of PCE, TCE...

  11. Spin-dependent transport in cobalt nanocontacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarau, G.

    2007-04-16

    The magnetoresistance response of cobalt nanocontacts with varying geometries formed between two extended electrodes has been experimentally investigated and linked to micromagnetic simulations. The contribution of the nanoconstriction to the measured magnetoresistance signal has been separated from that of the electrode bulk. The different nanocontact geometries exhibit different shape anisotropies resulting in a characteristic behavior of the magnetization at each nanocontact. The magnetization reversal processes are explained on the basis of the anisotropic magnetoresistance and domain wall scattering effects. The domain wall resistance takes positive values, which is in agreement with models based on the spin mistracking inside the domain wall. The 4 K MR measurements are found to be influenced by the exchange bias effect between the ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes and the antiferromagnetic oxidized Co surface. When cooling down in an applied magnetic field, the uniform biased Co layer behaves as if it possesses a unidirectional anisotropy axis along the field cooling direction. In the zero field cooling case, the exchange bias varies locally throughout the sample giving rise to non-reproducible successive MR traces. (orig.)

  12. Surface tension of undercooled liquid cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides the results on experimentally measured and numerically predicted surface tensions of undercooled liquid cobalt. The experiments were performed by using the oscillation drop technique combined with electromagnetic levitation. The simulations are carried out with the Monte Carlo (MC) method, where the surface tension is predicted through calculations of the work of cohesion, and the interatomic interaction is described with an embedded-atom method. The maximum undercooling of the liquid cobalt is reached at 231 K (0.13Tm) in the experiment and 268 K (0.17Tm) in the simulation. The surface tension and its relationship with temperature obtained in the experiment and simulation are σexp=1.93-0.000 33 (T-Tm) N m-1 and σcal=2.26-0.000 32 (T-Tm) N m-1 respectively. The temperature dependence of the surface tension calculated from the MC simulation is in reasonable agreement with that measured in the experiment. (author)

  13. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl2Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H3BO3 and acidified by dilute H2SO4 to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications

  14. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irshad, M. I., E-mail: imrancssp@gmail.com; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia); Ahmad, F., E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Abdullah, M. Z., E-mail: zaki-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl{sub 2}Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidified by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  15. Cataractogenesis after Cobalt-60 eye plaque radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to estimate the actuarial incidence of typical postirradiation cataracts and to identify prognostic factors related to their development in melanoma-containing eyes treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. A special interest was the impact of calculated radiation dose and dose-rate to the lens. The authors evaluated the actuarial occurrence of post-irradiation cataract in 365 patients with primary posterior uveal melanoma treated by Cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy between 1976 and 1986. Only 22% (S.E. = 4.6%) of the patients who received a total dose of 6 to 20 Gy at the center of the lens developed a visually significant cataract attributable to the radiation within 5 years after treatment. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, the authors identified thickness of the tumor, location of the tumor's anterior margin relative to the equatorward and the ora serrata, and diameter of the eye plaque used as the best combination of covariables for predicting length of time until development of cataract. Surprisingly, the dose of radiation delivered to the lens, which was strongly correlated to all of these covariables, was not a significant predictive factor in multivariate analysis. The results suggest that success of efforts to decrease the occurrence rate of post-irradiation cataracts by better treatment planning might be limited in patients with posterior uveal melanoma. 21 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Novel drug form of chlorin e6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumova, O. Y.; Baum, Rudolf P.; Ermakova, Natalia Y.; Gradyushko, A. T.; Guseva-Donskaya, T. N.; Karmenyan, Artashes V.; Koraboyev, U. M.; Laptev, V. P.; Mechkov, V. M.; Mikhailova, L. M.; Panferova, N. G.; Rebeko, Aleksei G.; Reshetnickov, Andrei V.; Ryabov, M. V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Tsvetkova, Tatyana A.; Zhukova, O. S.

    1999-12-01

    A novel stable water-soluble form of well known photosensitizer chlorin e6 named `Photodithazine' has been obtained from Spirulina Platensis cyanobacteria as a noncovalent complex with N-methyl-D-glucosamine, and its biological characteristics evaluate, which proved to be as follows: in vitro photocytotoxicity was 1 (mu) M (EC50) as determined by the extent of DNA synthesis inhibition in CaOv cells after irradiation with 650 - 900 nm light, and 5 (mu) M (EC65) as determined using MTT test on PC12 cells after irradiation with 670 nm laser light at the doses of 15 and 20 J/cm2, respectively, with Al-sulfophthalocyanine `Photosense' (Russia; oligomerized hematoporphyrin-IX mixture `Photogen', Russia) being used as permitted reference drugs.

  17. Emission of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons from combustion of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission of simple chlorinated compounds has been analyzed at five different cases at the district heating plant in Tranaas. The aim of this project has been to investigate the possibilities of finding a method for continuous monitoring of the emissions of chlorinated organic compounds from combustion. Samples were taken only after flue gas condensation. Three easily detectable chlorinated compounds could be quantified in spite of extremely low chlorine content in the fuel: * trichloroethylene, * tetrachloroethylene, * mono chlorinated benzene. Total amount of these compounds were > 0.2 mg/nm3. It is hard to find correlations between the emissions of chlorinated hydrocarbons and combustion conditions. One reason can be the sampling method which did not come up to our expectations. The high volatility of the solvent caused ice in the sampling train and most probably there has been great losses of the most volatile compounds. In spite of the fact that the combustion parameters in several samples were very good with low values of CO (0.2 mg/nm3 of monochlorinated benzene could be detected in the flue gas. Due to the unsatisfactory sampling method the real concentrations of the detected compounds are probably higher than the reported values. The amounts of chlorinated compounds detected are, in this plant, too low for continuous measurements. ( 6 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.)

  18. Thermal and under irradiation diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work concerns the study of the thermal and radiation enhanced diffusion of 36Cl in uranium dioxide. We simulated the presence of 36Cl by implanting a quantity of 37Cl comparable to the impurity content of chlorine in UO2. In order to evaluate the diffusion properties of chlorine in the fuel and in particular to assess the influence of the irradiation defects, we performed two kinds of experiments: - the influence of the temperature was studied by carrying out thermal annealings in the temperature range 900 - 1300 C; we showed that implanted chlorine was mobile from temperatures as low as 1000 C and determined a thermal diffusion coefficient D1000 C around 10-16 cm2s-1 - the influence of the irradiation by fission products were studied by irradiating the samples with 127I (energy of 63.5 MeV). We could determine that the diffusion of the implanted chlorine under irradiation and in the range of temperature 30 - 250 C was not purely athermal. We calculated a diffusion coefficient under irradiation D250 C of about 0-14 cm2.s-1. We showed the importance of the implantation and irradiation defects as preferential paths for a fast chlorine transport. We carried out ab initio calculations showing that chlorine is preferentially located in a substitutional site. This is in favour of a Frank-Turnbull diffusion mechanism or a vacancy/chlorine. (author)

  19. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  20. Does chlorination of seawater reverse osmosis membranes control biofouling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Hong, Pei-Ying; Nada, Nabil; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full-scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations. PMID:25917390

  1. Removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti and mutagenicity with chlorine dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Jin-long; CUI Fu-yi; QU Bo; ZHU Gui-bing

    2006-01-01

    Mesocyclops leukarti of zooplankton propagates excessively in eutrophic water body and it cannot be effectively inactivated by the conventional drinking water treatment process. In order to tackle this problem, a study of removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti with chlorine dioxide in a waterworks was performed. The results showed that Mesocyclops leukarti could be effectively removed from water by 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide preoxidation combined with the conventional drinking water treatment process.Higher oxidizability and molecular state of chlorine dioxide in water is the key to the inactivation of Mesocyclops leukarti. The chlorite, disinfection by-products (DBPs) of chlorine dioxide, was stable at 0.45 mg/L, which is lower than that critical value of the USEPA. GC-MS examination showed that the quantity of organic substance in the water treated by chlorine dioxide obviously decreased. Ames test further revealed that the mutagenicity was reduced by chlorine dioxide with respect to prechlorine. The propagation ofMesocyclops leukarti can be inactivated effectively and safely by chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation.

  2. Corrosion of copper by chlorine trifluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research described called for a considerable amount of preliminary development of the test methods and equipment in order that the various measurements and observations could be carried out without contaminating either the samples or this highly reactive gas. The chlorine trifluoride was highly purified before use, its purity being checked by gas-phase chromatography, micro-sublimation and infrared spectrography. The tests were carried out on copper samples of various purities, in particular a 99.999 per cent copper in the form of mono-crystals. They involved kinetic measurements and the characterization of corrosion products under different temperature and pressure conditions. The kinetics showed reactions of the same order of magnitude as those obtained with elementary fluorine. At atmospheric pressure there occurs formation of cupric fluoride and cuprous chloride. The presence of this latter product shows that it is not possible to consider ClF3 simply as a fluorinating agent. At low pressures an unknown product has been characterized. There are strong grounds for believing that it is the unstable cuprous fluoride which it has not yet been possible to isolate. A germination phenomenon has been shown to exist indicating an analogy between the initial phases of fluorination and those of oxidation. Important effects resulting from the dissociation of the copper fluorides and the solubility of chlorine in this metal have been demonstrated. Finally, tests have shown the considerable influence of the purity of the gas phase and of the nature of the reaction vessel walls on the rates of corrosion which can in certain cases be increased by a factor of several powers of ten. (author)

  3. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27295623

  4. Chlorination of niobium oxide in the presence of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorination kinetics of niobium pentoxide in the presence of carbon monoxide between 500-8000C of temperature is studied. The following variable that influences on the reaction rate are analysed: gas flow, geometry and volume of the Nb2O5 samples, reaction temperature and composition of the chlorinated mixture. At the same time, two other materials were studied: the CaO.Nb2O5 (synthetized in laboratory) and pyrochlorine concentrates. The three materials are compared for the chlorination method used. (M.A.C.)

  5. Effect of sulfur dioxide on indium (3) oxide chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of thermodynamic calculations and kinetic investigations, it is established that in the temperature range from 550 to 800 deg C in the In2O3-Cl2-SO2 system coupled reactions of InCl3 and In2(SO4)3 formation accompanying by further In2(SO4)3 chlorination with gaseous chlorine are main processes, SO2 accelerates considerably In2O3 chlorination at a temperature below 800 deg C, its influence on the process of chloride sublimation at a temperature higher than 800 deg C is not so noticeable

  6. Chlorine Dioxide Gas Treatment of Cantaloupe and Residue Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Simran

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a selective oxidant and powerful antimicrobial agent. Previous work has shown that treatment of cantaloupe with chlorine dioxide gas at 5 mg/L for 10 minutes results in a 4.6 and 4.3 log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes respectively. A significant reduction (p Current analytical methods for chlorine dioxide and chloroxyanions are only applicable to aqueous samples. Some of these methods have been used to determine surface residues in treated products by...

  7. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Olivieri, V P; Snead, M C; Krusé, C W; Kawata, K.

    1986-01-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants--free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide--when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic p...

  8. Effect of Chlorine on Giardia lamblia Cyst Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Jarroll, Edward L.; Bingham, Alan K.; Meyer, Ernest A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of chlorine concentration on Giardia lamblia cyst viability was tested under a variety of conditions. The ability of Giardia cysts to undergo excystation was used as the criterion of viability. The experimental variables employed included temperature (25, 15, and 5°C), pH (6, 7, and 8), chlorine-cyst contact time (10, 30, and 60 min), and chlorine concentration (1 to 8 mg/liter). In the pH range studied, cyst survival generally was observed to increase as buffer pH increased. Water...

  9. INFRARED VIBRATIONAL SPECTRA OF CHLORINATED AND HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Kalem, S; Chevallier, J.; Al Dallal, S.; Bourneix, J.

    1981-01-01

    The infrared spectra of chlorinated and hydrogenated amorphous silicon have been measured. In addition to the hydrogen induced bands at 2110, 1990, 885, 840 and 640 cm-1, we observe two new modes at 545 cm-1 (Si-Cl stretching) and 500 cm-1 ( Si TO modes induced by chlorine). Observation of the 545 cm-1 band proves that chlorine acts as a dangling bond terminator. Upon annealing, some of the Si-Cl groups transform into SiCl4 molecules (SiCl4 stretching at 615 cm-1). A good agreement is found b...

  10. Concentration of radioactive cobalt by seaweeds in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the pathway of radioactive substances in marine environments, seaweeds play an important role because of their higher concentration factors for many radionuclides and because they constitute a link of food chain in the sea. In the present work, uptake, distribution and excretion of radioactive cobalt were studied on several kinds of seaweeds by radioisotope tracer experiments under laboratory conditions and concentration factors were calculated. The concentration factors were also estimated from the results of stable cobalt determination by activation analysis or atomic absorption spectrometry on seaweeds and seawater, and compared with the results of tracer expts. The seaweeds showed the species specificity for the concentration of stable and radioactive cobalt with diverse values of concentration factors and biological half-lives. The transfer of radioactive cobalt in the food chain from contaminated seaweeds to mollusca was examined by feeding abalones, Haliotis discus, with four kinds of seaweed labelled with 60Co and observing retention. Absorption rate for radioactive cobalt by abalones calculated at two days after feeding showed diverse values depending upon the species of seaweed, as follows: 47% through Laminaria japonica and Ulva pertusa, 31% through Undaria pinnatifida and 26 through Eisenia bicyclis, respectively. From the results, it was assumed that the accumulation of radioactive cobalt by mollusca is affected by the species of seaweeds as food. A very high concentration of ingested radioactive cobalt in the midgut gland was seen on the autoradiograph of abalone samples. (auth.)

  11. Concentration of radioactive cobalt by seaweeds in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the pathway of radioactive substances in marine environments, seaweeds play an important role because of their higher concentration factors for many radionuclides and because they constitute a link in the food chain. In the present work, uptake, distribution and excretion of radioactive cobalt were studied on several kinds of seaweeds by radioisotope tracer experiments under laboratory conditions and concentration factors were calculated. The concentration factors were also estimated from the results of stable cobalt determination by activation analysis or atomic absorption spectrometry on seaweeds and seawater, and compared with the results of tracer experiments. The seaweeds showed the species specificity for the concentration of stable and radioactive cobalt with diverse values of concentration factors and biological half-lives. The transfer of radioactive cobalt in the food chain from contaminated seaweeds to mollusca was examined by feeding abalones, Haliotis discus, with four kinds of seaweed labelled with 60Co and observing retention. Absorption rate for radioactive cobalt by abalones calculated at two days after feeding showed diverse values depending upon the species of seaweed, as follows: 47% through Laminaria japonica and Ulva pertusa, 31% through Undaria pinnatifida and 26% through Eisenia bicyclis, respectively. From the results, it was assumed that the accumulation of radioactive cobalt by mollusca is affected by the species of seaweeds as food. A very high concentration of ingested radioactive cobalt in the midgut gland was seen on the autoradiograph of abalone samples. (author)

  12. RESEARCH ON MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF RESIDUAL CHLORINE DECAY AND OPTIMIZATION OF CHLORINATION ALLOCATION OF URBAN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yi-mei; CHI Hai-yan; LI Hong; SHAN Jin-lin; ZHAI Chun-nian

    2005-01-01

    The concentration of Residual Chlorine (RC) frequently violates the standard in situations of urban water distribution system with large water supply area and long time of distribution.If chlorine dosage increases within water treatment plant, although RC in distribution system could meet water quality standard, Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) such as hydrocarbon halide rises.In the paper, a mathematical model of chlorine allocation optimization was presented based on reaction kinetics mechanism and optimization theory to solve the problem.The model includes the objective function of minimizing annual operation cost and constraints of RC standard and rational chlorination station distribution, and solving by 0-1 Integer Programming (IP).The model had been applied to a real water distribution system.The simulation results of the model showed that adding chlorine in water distribution system remarkably improved water quality and reduced the operation cost by 49.3% per year less than chlorine dosed only in water treatment plant to meet RC standard.The results prove adding chlorine in water distribution system based on the model can bring both technological and economic advancement.

  13. Effect of the temperature and the chlorine pressure, over the aluminium chlorides obtained by direct chlorination of the 6061 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aluminium chloride is synthesized by direct chlorination of aluminium, in agreement with the following reaction: Al(s) + 3/2 Cl2 AlCl3 (s,g).The present work focuses on the preparation of aluminium chlorides by two methods: (a) Chlorination of 6061 aluminium alloy with gaseous chlorine in sealed containers, filled with different pressures of gas, from 0.8 to 74 Kpa and in the range of temperature between 2000 and 5000C.(b) Chlorination of the same alloy in chlorine flow between 1500 and 4000C.In the sealed systems, the hexahydrated aluminium trichloride predominated over the anhydrous form. For pressures lower than 14 Kpa and temperatures under 2500C, the chloride didn't appear.The residues were rich in aluminium, chlorine and magnesium.In the other systems, the anhydrous chloride was found in the areas of the reactor of temperatures above 1000C, for all the thermal treatments. The waste was composed by CrCl3 and AlCl3.6H2O.The influence of the chlorine pressures and the heating temperature over the characteristics of the product, was studied.The characterization techniques were x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy, and the evolution of the structure was followed by scanning electron microscopy

  14. Preparation and characterization of black cobalt solar selective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black cobalt (cobalt oxide) solar selective coatings were prepared on copper substrates by using an electroplating technique. The changes in the physical properties of the cobalt coating due to thermal degradation were characterized by using Auger electron spectroscopy, glow discharge spectrometry, ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrophotometer and atom force microscopy. The optimum black cobalt solar selective coating was prepared on a copper substrate by using a synthesized electrolyte with CoCl2 and KSCN at a current density of about 0.5 A/dm2 for 45 s ∼ 60 s. Its optical properties were a solar absorptance of the order of 0.80 ∼ 0.84 and a thermal emittance of 0.01. From the depth profile analysis, the concentration of cobalt particles near the film-substrate interface was higher than that at the surface, but the oxygen concentration at the surface was higher than that at the interface. These results suggest that the selective absorption was dominated by this chemical composition variation in the cobalt coating. The surface morphology of this film, as observed by using atomic force microscopy, showed that the surface was composed of a nearly uniform coating with a small rough surface and pores. We also found that the thermal degradation of the black cobalt coating annealed for 43 hours at temperatures of 250 ∼ 350 .deg. C occurred primarily due to diffusion of copper substrate materials into the cobalt film. The results of the thermal stability test showed that the black cobalt selective coatings on copper substrates were stable during use at temperatures under 250 .deg. C.

  15. Incentives and opportunities for reducing the cobalt content in reactor core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt in core components contributes to radiation field buildup on out-of-core surfaces. Core components containing cobalt-base alloys and cobalt as an impurity are identified. The use of cobalt-free wear-resistant alloys and construction materials with lower impurity levels of cobalt is disused. It is argued that such measures are cost effective. Lower radiation fields and disposal costs will offset higher raw material costs. Component performance will not be affected. (author)

  16. Electrochemical performance of cobalt hydroxide nanosheets formed by the delamination of layered cobalt hydroxide in water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneiderová, Barbora; Demel, Jan; Pleštil, Josef; Tarábková, Hana; Bohuslav, Jan; Lang, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 27 (2014), s. 10484-10491. ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-09462P Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : Ray-absorption spectroscopy * Alpha-cobalt * Solvothermal decomposition * Nickel * Nanocomposites Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  17. The structural evolution and diffusion during the chemical transformation from cobalt to cobalt phosphide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural evolution and the diffusion processes which occur during the phase transformation of nanoparticles (NPs), ε-Co to Co 2P to CoP, from a reaction with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations were used to elucidate the changes in the local structure of cobalt atoms which occur as the chemical transformation progresses. The lack of long-range order, spread in interatomic distances, and overall increase in mean-square disorder compared with bulk structure reveal the decrease in the NP\\'s structural order compared with bulk structure, which contributes to their deviation from bulk-like behavior. Results from EXAFS show both the Co2P and CoP phases contain excess Co. Results from EXAFS, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the inward diffusion of phosphorus is more favorable at the beginning of the transformation from ε-Co to Co2P by forming an amorphous Co-P shell, while retaining a crystalline cobalt core. When the major phase of the sample turns to Co 2P, the diffusion processes reverse and cobalt atom out-diffusion is favored, leaving a hollow void, characteristic of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. For the transformation from Co2P to CoP theory predicts an outward diffusion of cobalt while the anion lattice remains intact. In real samples, however, the Co-rich nanoparticles continue Kirkendall hollowing. Knowledge about the transformation method and structural properties provides a means to tailor the synthesis and composition of the NPs to facilitate their use in applications. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Dysprosium Modification of Cobalt Ferrite Ionic Magnetic Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Rong-li; LIU Yong-chao; GENG Quan-rong; ZHAO Wen-tao

    2005-01-01

    Dysprosium composite cobalt ferrite ionic magnetic fluids were prepared by precipitation in the presence of Tri-sodium citrate. Influence of dysprosium modification on magnetic property is studied. The result shows that magnetic response toward exterior magnetic field can be improved by adding Dy3+. Studies also show that the increase of reaction temperature may improve the modification effect of dysprosium. By adding dysprosium ions, the average diameter of the magnetic nanoparticles will be decreased evidently. It is clear that the particles appear as balls, Cobalt ferrite with sizes of 12-15 nm, rare earth composite cobalt ferrite with sizes of 6-8 nm.

  19. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Larrude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs synthesized by spray pyrolysis were decorated with cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a simple synthesis route. This wet chemistry method yielded nanoparticles randomly anchored to the surface of the nanotubes by decomposition of cobalt nitrate hexahydrate diluted in acetone. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that dispersed particles were formed on the MWCNTs walls. The average size increased with the increasing concentration of cobalt nitrate in acetone in the precursor mixture. TEM images indicated that nanoparticles were strongly attached to the tube walls. The Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the MWCNT structure was slightly damaged after the nanoparticle growth.

  20. The cobalt radioactive isotopes in environment; Les isotopes radioactifs du cobalt dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    For the year 1993 the total activity released in cobalt is 69 GBq for the whole of nuclear power plants. The part of activity in cobalt for La Hague in 1993 is 8 GBq of {sup 58}Co and 2 GBq of {sup 60}Co. The radioactive isotopes released by nuclear power plants or the reprocessing plant of La Hague under liquid effluents are shared by half between {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co. The exposure to sealed sources is the most important risk for the cobalt. The risk of acute exposure can associate a local irradiation of several decades of grays inducing a radiological burns, deep burn to treat in surgery by resection or graft even amputation. A global irradiation of organism for several grays induces an acute irradiation syndrome, often serious. At long term the stochastic effects are represented by leukemia and radio-induced cancers. The increase of probability of their occurrence is 1% by sievert. We must remind that the natural spontaneous probability is 25%. (N.C.)

  1. Assessing the Impact of Chlorinated-Solvent Sites on Metropolitan Groundwater Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Narter, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated-solvent compounds are among the most common groundwater contaminants in the U.S.A. The majority of the many sites contaminated by chlorinated-solvent compounds are located in metropolitan areas, and most such areas have one or more chlorinated-solvent contaminated sites. Thus, contamination of groundwater by chlorinated-solvent compounds may pose a potential risk to the sustainability of potable water supplies for many metropolitan areas. The impact of chlorinated-solvent sites on...

  2. TOXICITY OF RESIDUAL CHLORINE COMPOUNDS TO AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory studies on the acute and chronic toxicity of chlorine and inorganic chloramines to trout, salmon, minnows, bullhead, largemouth bass, and bluegill were conducted. Acute toxicity under continuous and intermittent patterns of exposure as well as behavioral, reproduction,...

  3. Complete Non-Radioactive Operability Tests for Cladding Hull Chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Jared A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylton, Tom D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brunson, Ronald Ray [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunt, Rodney Dale [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bradley, Eric Craig [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Non-radioactive operability tests were made to test the metal chlorination reactor and condenser and their accessories using batch chlorinations of non-radioactive cladding samples and to identify optimum operating practices and components that need further modifications prior to installation of the equipment into the hot cell for tests on actual used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding. The operability tests included (1) modifications to provide the desired heating and reactor temperature profile; and (2) three batch chlorination tests using, respectively, 100, 250, and 500 g of cladding. During the batch chlorinations, metal corrosion of the equipment was assessed, pressurization of the gas inlet was examined and the best method for maintaining solid salt product transfer through the condenser was determined. Also, additional accessing equipment for collection of residual ash and positioning of the unit within the hot cell were identified, designed, and are being fabricated.

  4. MICROEMULSION OF MIXED CHLORINATED SOLVENTS USING FOOD GRADE (EDIBLE) SURFACTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground water contamination frequently consists of mixed chlorinated solvents [e.g., tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and trans-1,2- dichloroethylene (DCE)]. In this research, mixtures of the food grade (edible) surfactants bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinat...

  5. The chlorination kinetics of zirconium dioxide mixed with carbon black

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, the effects of chlorine gas at different chlorine partial pressures and carbon concentrations on the carbochlorination of zirconia were studied. It was found that in briquettes containing 18.7 %wt carbon, in a chlorine partial pressure range of 0.25-0.75 atm and for a reacted fraction of less than 0.7, the chemical reaction model was dominant for the carbochlorination process of zirconia. The order of reaction into chlorine gas (n) in this situation was 0.57. Moreover, the best weight ratio of carbon to zirconia was 40/60. In this case, the activation energy of the reaction was 209.9 kJ mol-1 in a temperature range of 1023-1223 K, and the dominant model was the chemical reaction model.

  6. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeability, solubility and diffusion coefficients of chlorine dioxide for high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), nylon, and multilayer of ethylene viny...

  7. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells

  8. Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, Z.

    2015-01-01

      Subjects: bioremediation; biodegradation; environmental biotechnology, subsurface and groundwater contamination; biological processes; geochemistry; microbiology The combination of enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and aquife

  9. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  10. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  11. Determination of chlorine in graphite by combustion-ion chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Lianzhong [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy; Watanabe, Kazuo; Itoh, Mitsuo

    1995-09-01

    A combustion/ion chromatographic method has been studied for the sensitive determination of chlorine in graphite. A graphite sample was burnt at 900degC in a silica reaction tube at an oxygen flow rate of 200 ml/min. Chlorine evolved was absorbed in 20 ml of a 0.1 mM sodium carbonate solution. The solution was evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved with a small volume of water. Chlorine in the solution was determined using ion chromatography. The method was applied to JAERI graphite certified reference materials and practical graphite materials. The detection limit was about 0.8 {mu}gCl/g for a 2.0 g sample. The precision was about 2.5% (relative standard deviation) for samples with chlorine content of 70 {mu}g/g level. The method is also usable for coal samples. (author).

  12. Determination of chlorine in graphite by combustion-ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combustion/ion chromatographic method has been studied for the sensitive determination of chlorine in graphite. A graphite sample was burnt at 900degC in a silica reaction tube at an oxygen flow rate of 200 ml/min. Chlorine evolved was absorbed in 20 ml of a 0.1 mM sodium carbonate solution. The solution was evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved with a small volume of water. Chlorine in the solution was determined using ion chromatography. The method was applied to JAERI graphite certified reference materials and practical graphite materials. The detection limit was about 0.8 μgCl/g for a 2.0 g sample. The precision was about 2.5% (relative standard deviation) for samples with chlorine content of 70 μg/g level. The method is also usable for coal samples. (author)

  13. Kinetics of Chlorine Decay in Water Distribution Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建华; 薛罡; 赵洪宾; 汪永辉; 郭美芳

    2004-01-01

    A combined first and second-order model, which includes bulk decay and wall decay, was developed to describe chlorine decay in water distribution systems. In the model the bulk decay has complex relationships with total organic carbon (TOC), the initial chlorine concentration and the temperature. Except for the initial stages they can be simplified into a linear increase with TOC, a linear decrease with initial chlorine concentration and an exponential relationship with the temperature. The model also explains why chlorine decays rapidly in the initial stages. The parameters of model are determined by deriving the best fitness with experimental data. And the accuracy of model has been verified by using the experimental data and the monitoring data in a distribution system.

  14. Characters of chlorine isotopic composition in ocean water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Xiao, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, W.G.; Hong, A.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Y.; Wei, H.; Shirodkar, P.V.

    The chlorine isotopic composition of ocean water was determined using thermal ionization mass spectrometry based on the measurement of Cs sub(2) Cl sup(+) ion. The results show that the sup(37) Cl/ sup(35) Cl ratios are basically homogeneous...

  15. Modeling of residual chlorine in water distribution system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Water quality within water distribution system may vary with both location and time. Water quality models are used to predict the spatial and temporal variation of water quality throughout water system. A model of residual chlorine decay in water pipe has been developed,given the consumption of chlorine in reactions with chemicals in bulk water, bio-films on pipe wall, in corrosion process, and the mass transport of chlorine from bulk water to pipe wall. Analytical methods of the flow path from water sources to the observed point and the water age of every observed node were proposed. Model is used to predict the decay of residual chlorine in an actual distribution system. Good agreement between calculated and measured values was obtained.

  16. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  17. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfectant byproducts (DNPS) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low-resolu...

  18. SCENARIOS EVALUATION TOOL FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENT MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell

    2006-08-16

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  19. Oxygen Evolution Electrocatalysis on Cobalt Oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajdich, Michal; Norskov, Jens K.; García-Mota, Monica; Bell, Alexis T.

    2012-02-01

    The oxidation of water for hydrogen production using sunlight is of high importance to photo-fuel cell research. The electrochemical approach via heterogeneous catalysis to water splitting is a very promising route. The key challenge of this method lies in reduction of the loses, i.e., over-potential, for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on the anode. In this work, we investigate the dependence of theoretical over-potential of OER on type of anode by applying standard density functional theory (DFT). We attempt to explain recent experimental observation of enhanced activity on gold supported Cobalt Oxide surfaces [1]. We explore variety of possible CoO structures and associated surfaces which could emerge under operating conditions of catalyst. Finally, we also explore the influence of environment and admixtures of CoO with other elements. [4pt] [1] B.S. Yeo, A.T. Bell, AT, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 5587-5593 (2011).

  20. Chlorine dioxide as an oxidant for organoboron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Practicability of using chlorine dioxide aqueous solution as an oxidant for terpene organoboron compounds prepared by hydroborating (+)α-pinene (1) and (-)β-pinene (2) is studied. By the methods of IR spectroscopy and 13C NMR it is shown that products of 1 and 2 oxidation are (-)-isopinocampheol and (-)-cis-myrtanol, which are formed with a high yield. In terms of its efficiency chlorine dioxide is no worse than hydrogen peroxide in reactions of organoboric compounds oxidation

  1. Oxidation of manganese(II) during chlorination: role of bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, S; Fouche, L; Dick, J; Heitz, A; von Gunten, U

    2013-08-01

    The oxidation of dissolved manganese(II) (Mn(II)) during chlorination is a relatively slow process which may lead to residual Mn(II) in treated drinking waters. Chemical Mn(II) oxidation is autocatalytic and consists of a homogeneous and a heterogeneous process; the oxidation of Mn(II) is mainly driven by the latter process. This study demonstrates that Mn(II) oxidation during chlorination is enhanced in bromide-containing waters by the formation of reactive bromine species (e.g., HOBr, BrCl, Br2O) from the oxidation of bromide by chlorine. During oxidation of Mn(II) by chlorine in bromide-containing waters, bromide is recycled and acts as a catalyst. For a chlorine dose of 1 mg/L and a bromide level as low as 10 μg/L, the oxidation of Mn(II) by reactive bromine species becomes the main pathway. It was demonstrated that the kinetics of the reaction are dominated by the adsorbed Mn(OH)2 species for both chlorine and bromine at circumneutral pH. Reactive bromine species such as Br2O and BrCl significantly influence the rate of manganese oxidation and may even outweigh the reactivity of HOBr. Reaction orders in [HOBr]tot were found to be 1.33 (±0.15) at pH 7.8 and increased to 1.97 (±0.17) at pH 8.2 consistent with an important contribution of Br2O which is second order in [HOBr]tot. These findings highlight the need to take bromide, and the subsequent reactive bromine species formed upon chlorination, into account to assess Mn(II) removal during water treatment with chlorine. PMID:23859083

  2. Challenges in subsurface in situ remediation of chlorinated solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Broholm, Mette Martina; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Christiansen, Camilla Maymann; Hønning, J.; B. H. Hansen; Nedergaard, L. W.; Kern, Kristina; Uthuppu, Basil; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Ottesen, L.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorinated solvent source zones in the subsurface pose a continuous threat to groundwater quality at many sites worldwide. In situ remediation of these sites is particularly challenging in heterogeneous fractured media and where the solvents are present as DNAPL. In situ remediation by chemical as well as biological degradation of chlorinated solvents is a contact sport and requires direct contact between the contaminant and the reactants and/or degrading microorganisms. In fractured geologi...

  3. Bromoform production in tropical open-ocean waters: OTEC chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, E.O.; Valentine, R.

    1981-09-01

    The bromoform, and other volatile organics produced while chlorinating both the evaporator and condenser seawater during operation of the one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC-1 test facility are reported. Although many halogenated compounds might be produced as a result of chlorination, the quantitative analyses in this study focused on volatile EPA priority pollutants. Bromoform is the compound specifically recognized as a potential pollutant. Its concentration may be indicative of other halogenated species.

  4. Bio-remediation of aquifers polluted by chlorinated solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous cases of contamination of aquifers by chlorinated aliphatic solvents, largely utilized during the last decades, constitute a public health problem, because of the toxic effect of such compounds. Different types of aerobic or anaerobic bacteria are able to degrade these molecules. Processes of bio remediation are now experimented in order to restore polluted aquifers. We present here the microorganisms and the enzymatic reactions involved in the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents, and different examples of in situ bio remediation operations are described. (author)

  5. Assessment of the risk of transporting liquid chlorine by rail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, W.B.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the risk of shipping liquid chlorine by rail. While chlorine is not an energy material, there are several benefits to studying chlorine transportation risks. First, chlorine, like energy materials, is widely used as a feedstock to industry. Second, it is the major purification agent in municipal water treatment systems and therefore, provides direct benefits to the public. Finally, other risk assessments have been completed for liquid chlorine shipments in the US and Europe, which provide a basis for comparison with this study. None of the previous PNL energy material risk assessments have had other studies for comparison. For these reasons, it was felt that a risk assessment of chlorine transportation by rail could provide information on chlorine risk levels, identify ways to reduce these risks and use previous studies on chlorine risks to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the PNL risk assessment methodology. The risk assessment methodology used in this study is summarized. The methodology is presented in the form of a risk assessment model which is constructed for ease of periodic updating of the data base so that the risk may be reevaluated as additional data become available. The report is sectioned to correspond to specific analysis steps identified in the model. The transport system and accident environment are described. The response of the transport system to accident environments is described. Release sequences are postulated and evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a direct comparison with other reports in this series.

  6. Structural Insights into Regioselectivity in the Enzymatic Chlorination of Tryptophan

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; De Laurentis, Walter; Leang, Khim; Herrmann, Julia; Ihlefeld, Katja; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2009-01-01

    The regioselectively controlled introduction of chlorine into organic molecules is an important biological and chemical process. This importance derives from the observation that many pharmaceutically active natural products contain a chlorine atom. Flavin-dependent halogenases are one of the principal enzyme families responsible for regioselective halogenation of natural products. Structural studies of two flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases (PrnA and RebH) have generated important ins...

  7. Chlorine-containing natural compounds in higher plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    More than 130 chlorine-containing compounds have been isolated from higher plants and ferns; about half are polyacetylenes, thiophenes and sesquiterpene lactones from the Asteraceae. A chlorinated chlorophyll may be an important part of photosystem 1. High biological activity is found in 4-chloro......-chloroindoleacetic acid from pea and in the cancerostatic maytansinoids. Many compounds are chlorohydrins isolated along with the related epoxides. Some compounds, like gibberellin A6 hydrochloride from bean, are perhaps artefacts....

  8. Spatial and temporal variability of inorganic chlorine in Northwestern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommariva, R.; Hollis, L. D. J.; Baker, A. R.; Ball, S. M.; Bell, T. G.; Cordell, R. L.; Fleming, Z.; Gaget, M.; Yang, M. X.; Monks, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine is well known to be a strong oxidant in the atmosphere;chlorine reactivity impacts the formation of tropospheric ozone, theoxidation of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons, and the cycling ofnitrogen, sulphur and mercury. An accurate assessment of the roleplayed by chlorine in tropospheric chemical processes is complicatedby the scarce knowledge of its sources, sinks and distribution.We report observations of inorganic chlorine species (Cl2, ClNO2,particulate chloride) taken over the period 2014-2015 at threedifferent locations in Britain: an urban site a hundred kilometersfrom the ocean (Leicester), a coastal site mostly affected by shiptraffic (Penlee Point, Cornwall) and a coastal site experiencingeither clean air from the North Sea or polluted air from inland(Weybourne, Norfolk).This dataset provides a first look into the geographical distributionand seasonal variability of chlorine in Northwestern Europe: theresults suggest that, during the night, ClNO2 is ubiquitous withconcentrations in the range of hundreds to thousands of pptV at alllocations, whereas Cl2 can be observed only at coastal sites, withconcentrations of a few tens of pptV. The implications of thewidespread presence of these forms of inorganic chlorine for ozoneproduction and, in general, for the oxidative processes in the loweratmosphere are discussed with the help of a wide range of supportingmeasurements.

  9. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O Omarova

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane, applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters.

  10. Site-selective photofragmentation of chlorinated polymeric films observed around the chlorine K-edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arantes, C., E-mail: csilva@inmetro.gov.br [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Xerém 25250-020, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Mendes, L.A.V. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Ondina, 40210-340 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pinho, R.R. [Departamento de Física-ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Campus Universitário, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Ferreira, M. [PEMM/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, G.G.B. de; Rocha, A.B.; Rocco, M.L.M. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► PVC and PVDC were studied by PSID and NEXAFS techniques at the Chlorine 1s-edge. ► PVC film presented isotope ratio of 3:1 in the PSID spectrum. ► Cl{sup +} ion yield curves reproduce the photoabsorption spectrum for both polymers. ► Site-selectivity of C–Cl bond breaking due to an efficient spectator Auger decay. - Abstract: Photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID) and Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) studies have been performed on poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and poly(vinyl dichloride) (PVDC) around the chlorine 1s-edge. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron source operating in the single-bunch mode and a time-of-flight mass spectrometry for ion analysis. Cl{sup +} ion yields, as a function of the photon energy, reproduce the photoabsorption spectrum, showing significant increase at the 1s-resonance. Edge-jump ratios, defined as the ratio between edge-jumps (intensity ratio of the yields between above and below the absorption edge) of two different transitions, for Cl{sup +} ion yields were much higher than the equivalent electron yields, indicating site-selectivity in C–Cl bond breaking for both polymers, as a result of efficient spectator Auger decay. The expected isotope ratio of 3:1 for chlorine was measured for PVC. The interpretation of the NEXAFS spectrum was assisted by quantum mechanical calculations at a multireference perturbation theory level.

  11. Cathodic electrodeposition of cobalt oxide films using polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite films consisting of cobalt hydroxide and polyelectrolytes, such as poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and polyethylenimine (PEI), were obtained by electrodeposition. In the proposed method, electrophoretic deposition of PDDA macromolecules or PEI-Co2+ complexes has been combined with cathodic electrosynthesis of cobalt hydroxide. By varying the concentration of the polyelectrolytes in solutions, the deposition time and the current density, the amount of deposited material and its composition can be varied. The composite deposits have been studied by scanning, transmission and atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The obtained results have been compared with the results of investigation of pure cobalt hydroxide films. Heat treatment of the deposits resulted in decomposition of the hydroxide precursor and burning out of polymer to form cobalt oxide films. This method enables the formation of thick nanostructured oxide films

  12. Battery related cobalt and REE flows in WEEE treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, P; Rotter, V S; Ueberschaar, M

    2015-11-01

    In batteries associated with waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), battery systems can be found with a higher content of valuable and critical raw materials like cobalt and rare earth elements (REE) relative to the general mix of portable batteries. Based on a material flow model, this study estimates the flows of REE and cobalt associated to WEEE and the fate of these metals in the end-of-life systems. In 2011, approximately 40 Mg REE and 325 Mg cobalt were disposed of with WEEE-batteries. The end-of-life recycling rate for cobalt was 14%, for REE 0%. The volume of waste batteries can be expected to grow, but variation in the battery composition makes it difficult to forecast the future secondary raw material potential. Nevertheless, product specific treatment strategies ought to be implemented throughout the stages of the value chain. PMID:26054962

  13. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Highlights: ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials for nanomedicine. ► They have high coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized easily. ► They are a good candidate for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Alumina Template-Dependant Growth of Cobalt Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Malferrari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Different electrochemical regimes and porous alumina were applied for template synthesis of cobalt nanowire (nw arrays, revealing several peculiar cases. In contrast to quite uniform filling of sulfuric acid alumina templates by alternating current deposition, nonuniform growth of the Co nw tufts and mushrooms was obtained for the case of oxalic acid templates. We showed herein for the first time that such configurations arise from the spontaneous growth of cobalt nw groups evolving from the cobalt balls at the Al/alumina interface. Nevertheless, the uniform growth of densely packed cobalt nw arrays, up to tens of micrometers in length, was obtained via long-term direct current galvanostatic deposition at low current density using oxalic acid templates one-side coated by conducting layer. The unique point of this regime is the formation of hexagonal lattice Co nws with a preferred (100 growth direction.

  15. Ion exchange of Cobalt and Cadmium in Zeolite X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing development in the industry has an important contribution to the environmental damage, where the natural effluents are each day more contaminated by toxic elements, such as: mercury, chromium, lead and cadmium. So as to separate such elements it has sorbent must have enough stability, and have a sharp capacity of sorption. In this work it was studied the sorption behavior of cobalt and on the other hand, cadmium in aqueous solutions, which along with sodic form of the Zeolite X, undergoes a phenomenon of ionic interchange. Such interchange was verify to different concentration of cadmium, cobalt and hydronium ion. The content of cobalt and sodium in the interchanged samples was detected through the neutronic activation analysis. The results disclose a higher selectivity for cadmium than cobalt. (Author)

  16. The synergistic effect of Escherichia coli inactivation by sequential disinfection with low level chlorine dioxide followed by free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Dong; Zhu, Sui-Yi; Chen, Bo-Yan; Huo, Ming-Xin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there was little information available on pathogen removal using low level disinfectant followed by free chlorine in sequential disinfection (SD). This study investigated Escherichia coli inactivation by four types of disinfection: single step disinfection (SSD), SD, traditional sequential disinfection (TSD) and mixed disinfectant disinfection (MDD). Results indicated that SD had higher ability to inactivate E. coli than the others, indicating there was a positive synergistic effect on chlorine disinfection by prior dosing with a low level of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). The ONPG assay suggested that the permeability of cell wall rather than the viability of E. coli were changed under 0.02 mg/l ClO(2) treatment. The coexistence of residual ClO(2) and free chlorine also plays an active synergistic effect. Additionally, temperature had a positive effect on E. coli inactivation in SD, while inactivation was reduced in alkaline compared to neutral and acidic conditions. PMID:23165713

  17. Inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by chlorination and sequential UV/chlorination disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated disinfection methods including chlorination, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and sequential UV/chlorination treatment on the inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). ARGs including sul1, tetX, tetG, intI1, and 16S rRNA genes in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluent were examined. The results indicated a positive correlation between the removal of ARGs and chlorine dosage (p = 0.007–0.014, n = 6),as well as contact time (p = 0.0001, n = 10). Greater free chlorine (FC) dosage leads to higher removal for all the genes and the maximum removal (1.30–1.49 logs) could be achieved at FC dosage of 30 mg L−1. The transformation kinetic data for ARGs removal (log C0 / C) followed the second-order reaction kinetic model with FC dosage (R2 = 0.6829–0.9999) and contact time (R2 = 0.7353–8634), respectively. Higher ammonia nitrogen (NH3–N) concentration was found to lead to lower removal of ARGs at the same chlorine dosage. When the applied Cl2:NH3–N ratio was over 7.6:1, a significant reduction of ARGs (1.20–1.49 logs) was achieved. By using single UV irradiation, the log removal values of tetX and 16Ss rRNA genes were 0.58 and 0.60, respectively, while other genes were 0.36–0.40 at a fluence of 249.5 mJ cm−2, which was observed to be less effective than chlorination. With sequential UV/chlorination treatment, 0.006 to 0.31 log synergy values of target genes were observed under different operation parameters. - Highlights: • Chlorine is more effective than UV irradiation in removing ARGs from MWTP effluent. • The chlorination reaction followed the second-order reaction kinetic model. • Higher NH3–N contents result in lower ARGs removal in the chlorination process. • FC is more effective than CC on the inactivation of ARGs. • UV irradiation followed by chlorination shows high efficiency in removing ARGs

  18. Inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by chlorination and sequential UV/chlorination disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju, E-mail: jjgeng@nju.edu.cn; Ren, Hongqiang, E-mail: hqren@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2015-04-15

    This study investigated disinfection methods including chlorination, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and sequential UV/chlorination treatment on the inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). ARGs including sul1, tetX, tetG, intI1, and 16S rRNA genes in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluent were examined. The results indicated a positive correlation between the removal of ARGs and chlorine dosage (p = 0.007–0.014, n = 6),as well as contact time (p = 0.0001, n = 10). Greater free chlorine (FC) dosage leads to higher removal for all the genes and the maximum removal (1.30–1.49 logs) could be achieved at FC dosage of 30 mg L{sup −1}. The transformation kinetic data for ARGs removal (log C{sub 0} / C) followed the second-order reaction kinetic model with FC dosage (R{sup 2} = 0.6829–0.9999) and contact time (R{sup 2} = 0.7353–8634), respectively. Higher ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}–N) concentration was found to lead to lower removal of ARGs at the same chlorine dosage. When the applied Cl{sub 2}:NH{sub 3}–N ratio was over 7.6:1, a significant reduction of ARGs (1.20–1.49 logs) was achieved. By using single UV irradiation, the log removal values of tetX and 16Ss rRNA genes were 0.58 and 0.60, respectively, while other genes were 0.36–0.40 at a fluence of 249.5 mJ cm{sup −2}, which was observed to be less effective than chlorination. With sequential UV/chlorination treatment, 0.006 to 0.31 log synergy values of target genes were observed under different operation parameters. - Highlights: • Chlorine is more effective than UV irradiation in removing ARGs from MWTP effluent. • The chlorination reaction followed the second-order reaction kinetic model. • Higher NH{sub 3}–N contents result in lower ARGs removal in the chlorination process. • FC is more effective than CC on the inactivation of ARGs. • UV irradiation followed by chlorination shows high efficiency in removing ARGs.

  19. Synergistic effect between UV and chlorine (UV/chlorine) on the degradation of carbamazepine: Influence factors and radical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Huang, Nan; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2016-07-01

    For successful wastewater reclamation, advanced oxidation processes have attracted attention for elimination of emerging contaminants. In this study, the synergistic treatment with UV irradiation and chlorine (UV/chlorine) was used to degrade carbamazepine (CBZ). Neither UV irradiation alone nor chlorination alone could efficiently degraded CBZ. UV/chlorine oxidation showed a significant synergistic effect on CBZ degradation through generation of radical species (OH and Cl), and this process could be well depicted by pseudo first order kinetic. The degradation rate constants (kobs,CBZ) of CBZ increased linearly with increasing UV irradiance and chlorine dosage. The degradation of CBZ by UV/chlorine in acidic solutions was more efficient than that in basic solutions mainly due to the effect of pH on the dissociation of HOCl and OCl(-) and then on the quantum yields and radical species quenching of UV/chlorine. When pH was increased from 5.5 to 9.5, the rate constants of degradation of CBZ by OH decreased from 0.65 to 0.14 min(-1) and that by Cl decreased from 0.40 to 0.11 min(-1). The rate constant for the reaction between Cl and CBZ was 5.6 ± 1.6 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). Anions of HCO3(-) (1-50 mM) showed moderate inhibition of CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine, while Cl(-) did not. UV/chlorine could efficiently degrade CBZ in wastewater treatment plant effluent, although the degradation was inhibited by about 30% compared with that in ultrapure water with chlorine dosage of 0.14-0.56 mM. Nine main oxidation products of the CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine were identified using the HPLC-QToF MS/MS. Initial oxidation products arose from hydroxylation, carboxylation and hydrogen atom abstraction of CBZ by OH and Cl, and were then further oxidized to generate acylamino cleavage and decarboxylation products of acridine and acridione. PMID:27105033

  20. Modelling of the natural chlorine cycling in a coniferous stand: implications for chlorine-36 behaviour in a contaminated forest environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considered as one of the most available radionuclide in soil–plant system, 36Cl is of potential concern for long-term management of radioactive wastes, due to its high mobility and its long half-life. To evaluate the risk of dispersion and accumulation of 36Cl in the biosphere as a consequence of a potential contamination, there is a need for an appropriate understanding of the chlorine cycling dynamics in the ecosystems. To date, a small number of studies have investigated the chlorine transfer in the ecosystem including the transformation of chloride to organic chlorine but, to our knowledge, none have modelled this cycle. In this study, a model involving inorganic as well as organic pools in soils has been developed and parameterised to describe the biogeochemical fate of chlorine in a pine forest. The model has been evaluated for stable chlorine by performing a range of sensitivity analyses and by comparing the simulated to the observed values. Finally a range of contamination scenarios, which differ in terms of external supply, exposure time and source, has been simulated to estimate the possible accumulation of 36Cl within the different compartments of the coniferous stand. The sensitivity study supports the relevancy of the model and its compartments, and has highlighted the chlorine transfers affecting the most the residence time of chlorine in the stand. Compared to observations, the model simulates realistic values for the chlorine content within the different forest compartments. For both atmospheric and underground contamination scenarios most of the chlorine can be found in its organic form in the soil. However, in case of an underground source, about two times less chlorine accumulates in the system and proportionally more chlorine leaves the system through drainage than through volatilisation. - Highlights: ► 36Cl is of potential concern for long-term management of radioactive wastes. ► There is a need for an appropriate understanding of the Cl

  1. Efficacy of chlorine, acidic electrolyzed water and aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions to decontaminate Escherichia coli O157:H7 from lettuce leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared the efficacy of chlorine (20 – 200 ppm), acidic electrolyzed water (50 ppm chlorine, pH 2.6), acidified sodium chlorite (20 – 200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, Sanova), and aqueous chlorine dioxide (20 – 200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, TriNova) washes in reducing population...

  2. Chlorine Stabilizer T-128 enhances efficacy of chlorine against cross contamination by E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in fresh-cut lettuce processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    During fresh produce processing, organic materials released from cut tissues can rapidly react with free chlorine in the wash solution, leading to the potential survival of foodborne bacterial pathogens and cross-contamination when the free chlorine is depleted. A reported chlorine stabilizer, T128...

  3. Leaching refuse after sphalerite mineral for extraction zinc and cobalt

    OpenAIRE

    S. Brožová; J. Drápala; Kursa, M.; Pustějovská, P.; S. Jursová

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with a possibility of zinc and cobalt extraction from refuse after sphalerite mineral leaching. It contains theoretic analysis of hydrometallurgical processes. Practical part describes samples and their leaching in 10 % and 20 % sulphuric acid. In the end of the paper it is evaluated under which conditions the highest yield of zinc and cobalt from refuse after sulphide ore leaching is reached. Web of Science 55 3 499 497

  4. Leaching refuse after sphalerite mineral for extraction zinc and cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brožová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a possibility of zinc and cobalt extraction from refuse after sphalerite mineral leaching. It contains theoretic analysis of hydrometallurgical processes. Practical part describes samples and their leaching in 10 % and 20 % sulphuric acid. In the end of the paper it is evaluated under which conditions the highest yield of zinc and cobalt from refuse after sulphide ore leaching is reached.

  5. Mechanizm of propylene oxidation on modified cobalt-molybdenum catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect is studied of additions of iron, copper, nickel, and vanadium oxides, introduced into cobalt, molybdate, on oxidation reactions of propylene to acrolein and acrylicacid. The principal parameters determining the activity and selectivity of oxidation of propylene and acrolein on modified cobalt molibdate are the structure, the type of Mo-O bond, and the nature of the electron transitions in the solid under the effect of adsorption of the reaction components

  6. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on alumina supported cobalt catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechara, R.; Balloy, D.; Vanhove, D.

    1997-11-01

    Physico-chemical properties of Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-gamma were investigated by XRD, XPS, thermogravimetry and catalytic measurements. Interactions between the metal and its support were found for catalysts prepared from alumina with the greater specific area. For the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the products distribution appeared not to be sensitive to the cobalt particle size, but seems to depend on the degree of cobalt reduction.

  7. Black nickel-cobalt selective coatings for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, K.N.; Selvam, M.; Shenoi, B.A.; Shanmugam, N.V.; John, S.; Annamalai, M.; Iyer, M.V.; Nirmala, K.A.; Venkatesh, P.; Prasad, C.R.; Subramani, C.

    1982-01-01

    The development of black nickel-cobalt selective coating for solar energy conversion is reported. This coating has been produced by plating nickel-cobalt alloy from suitable electrolyte and then immersion blackening in weak sulphuric acid. The effect of plating time, current density and immersion time, in acid with respect to absorptance and emittance were studied. Thermal cycling test and stagnation temperature measurement was also carried out.

  8. Identification of Different Cobalt Nucleation on Glassy Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min GU; Fang Zu YANG; Ling HUANG; Shi Bing YAO; Shao Min ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    The nucleation mechanisms of cobalt from sulfate solutions were studied by utilizing the electrochemical technique, chronoamperometry.It was found that the recorded current-time transients introduced from 1.0 mol/L CoSO4 solution were complexes with unusual shapes.All characteristic features were identified as separate process.The instantaneous or progressive nucleation with 2D or 3D growth exists during the cobalt deposition, depending on the applied potentials.

  9. Efficacy of Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of Poliovirus in Water Disinfected by Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, Ozone, and UV Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Norman J.; Margolin, Aaron B.

    1994-01-01

    MilliQ water was inoculated with poliovirus type 1 strain LSc-1 and was treated with disinfectants, including chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and UV light. No relationship between probes and plaque assays were seen, demonstrating that viral nucleic acids were not destroyed. These findings suggest that nucleic acid probes cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses and cannot be used in the evaluation of treated waters.

  10. Hydrogen-chlorine fuel cell for production of hydrochloric acid and electric power : chlorine kinetics and cell design

    OpenAIRE

    Thomassen, Magnus Skinlo

    2005-01-01

    This thesis work is the continuation and final part of a joint project between the Department of Materials Technology, NTNU and Norsk Hydro Research Center in Porsgrunn, looking at the possibility of using fuel cells for production of hydrogen chloride and electric power. The experimental work encompass an evaluation of three hydrogen - chlorine fuel cell design concepts, development and implementation of a mathematical fuel cell model and a kinetic study of the chlorine reduction reaction. T...

  11. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of landfills as an in situ biological treatment system represents an alternative for source area remediation with a significant cost saving. The specific objective of this research is to investigate the intrinsic bioattenuation capacity of the landfill ecosystem for chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The research was conducted in two complementary systems: simulated landfill bioreactors and batch degradation experiment in serum bottles. Refuse samples excavated from a landfill were tested in laboratory bioreactors designed and operated to facilitate refuse decomposition under landfilling conditions. Each bioreactor was operated with leachate recirculation and gas collection. Target CAHs, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), were added to selected reactors and maintained at 20 μM each in leachate to simulate the effect of long-term exposure of refuse microorganisms to CAHs on the degradation potential of these chemicals in landfills. At two different stages of refuse decomposition, active refuse decomposition representing young landfills and maturation phase representing aged landfills, anaerobic microbial cultures were derived from selected bioreactors and tested in serum bottles for their abilities to biodegrade target CAHs. Results of this study suggest that landfills have an intrinsic reductive dechlorination capacity for PCE and TCE. The decomposition of refuse, a source of complex organics, enhances reductive dechlorination by the refuse cultures tested in this study. In addition, the test results suggest that it may be possible to develop engineering strategies to promote both CAHs degradation and refuse decomposition in landfills. (author)

  12. Electrochemical Membrane Reactors for Sustainable Chlorine Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Kunz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymer electrolyte membranes have found broad application in a number of processes, being fuel cells, due to energy concerns, the main focus of the scientific community worldwide. Relatively little attention has been paid to the use of these materials in electrochemical production and separation processes. In this review, we put emphasis upon the application of Nafion membranes in electrochemical membrane reactors for chlorine recycling. The performance of such electrochemical reactors can be influenced by a number of factors including the properties of the membrane, which play an important role in reactor optimization. This review discusses the role of Nafion as a membrane, as well as its importance in the catalyst layer for the formation of the so-called three-phase boundary. The influence of an equilibrated medium on the Nafion proton conductivity and Cl crossover, as well as the influence of the catalyst ink dispersion medium on the Nafion/catalyst self-assembly and its importance for the formation of an ionic conducting network in the catalyst layer are summarized.

  13. Characteristics of cobalt removal by crab shell particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of cobalt removal by raw crab shell particles was investigated. The removal efficiency of cobalt was dependent on contact time, solution pH, crab shell dose and ionic strength. Approximately 99% of the cobalt was removed within 6 hour after contact with crab shell particles. The removal efficiency was slightly affected by initial solution pH over 5.0 and the final solution pH changed to 10 spontaneously. In addition, optimum [H range of cobalt removal was broaden by the effect of crab shell addition. Maximum uptake of cobalt was 510 mg Co/g crab shell at initial pH 5.0. The removal efficiency was affected slightly by ionic strength up to 2.0 M of NaCl. From the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), the removal of cobalt by crab shell was mainly through the dissolution of CaCO3 followed by precipitation of Co(OH)2 and CoCO3 and then the precipitates were adsorbed to the chitin on the surface of crab shell particles. Compared to the results with activated carbon column, the addition of crab shell to activated carbon column increased the removal efficiency dramatically.(author)

  14. Cobalt Blues The Story of Leonard Grimmett, the Man Behind the First Cobalt-60 Unit in the United States

    CERN Document Server

    Almond, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    For the latter half of the 20th century, cobalt-60 units were the mainstay of radiation treatments for cancer. Cobalt Blues describes the development of the first cobalt-60 unit in the United States and the man behind it, Leonard Grimmett. Conceptually conceived before World War II, it only became possible because of the development of nuclear reactors during the war. Although Grimmett conceived of and published his ideas first, the Canadians built the first units because of the capability of their reactor to produce more suitable cobalt-60 sources. This book tells the story of how Grimmett and others came together at the time that the U S Atomic Energy Agency was pushing the use of radioactivity in medicine. Due to his sudden death, very little information about Grimmett was known until recently, when various documents have come to light, allowing the full story to be told.

  15. Analysis of residual chlorine in simple drinking water distribution system with intermittent water supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Roopali V.; Patel, H. M.

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of residual chlorine concentration at various locations in drinking water distribution system is essential final check to the quality of water supplied to the consumers. This paper presents a methodology to find out the residual chlorine concentration at various locations in simple branch network by integrating the hydraulic and water quality model using first-order chlorine decay equation with booster chlorination nodes for intermittent water supply. The explicit equations are developed to compute the residual chlorine in network with a long distribution pipe line at critical nodes. These equations are applicable to Indian conditions where intermittent water supply is the most common system of water supply. It is observed that in intermittent water supply, the residual chlorine at farthest node is sensitive to water supply hours and travelling time of chlorine. Thus, the travelling time of chlorine can be considered to justify the requirement of booster chlorination for intermittent water supply.

  16. Chlorinated and Non chlorinated-Volatile Organic Compounds (Vocs) in Drinking Water of Peninsular Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey undertaken in Peninsular Malaysia has shown that volatile organic compounds (VOCs), both chlorinated and non-chlorinated, are present in selected drinking water samples. In this study, analyses of VOCs were performed by means of solid phase micro extraction (SPME) with a 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fibre followed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry detector (GC-MSD). Samples from different points of the distribution system networks were taken and analysed for 54 VOCs of different chemical families. The results of the study indicated that chloroform constituted the major portion of the VOCs in all samples analysed. In addition to trihalo methanes (THMs), other abundant compounds detected were cis and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,2-dibromoethane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. However, the measured concentrations did not exceed the National Guideline for Drinking Water Quality 2000 in any case. No clear relationship between the status of development of a state in Malaysia to the levels and types of VOCs detected in its drinking water was noted. Nevertheless, the finding of anthropogenic chemicals, even at low concentrations, gave credibility to the viewpoint that improper development and disposal practices threatened the purity of the drinking water. (author)

  17. Development of a Site-Specific Kinetic Model for Chlorine Decay and the Formation of Chlorination By-Products in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhur Saeed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine is used commonly to prevent biofouling in cooling water systems. The addition of chlorine poses environmental risks in natural systems due to its tendency to form chlorination by-products (CBPs when exposed to naturally-occurring organic matter (NOM. Some of these CBPs can pose toxic risks to aquatic and benthic species in the receiving waters. It is, therefore, important to study the fate of residual chlorine and CBPs to fully understand the potential impacts of chlorination to the environment. The goal of this study was to develop improved predictions of how chlorine and CBP concentrations in seawater vary with time, chlorine dose and temperature. In the present study, chlorination of once-through cooling water at Ras Laffan Industrial City (RLIC, Qatar, was studied by collecting unchlorinated seawater from the RLIC cooling water system intake, treating it with chlorine and measuring time series of chlorine and CBP concentrations. Multiple-rate exponential curves were used to represent fast and slow chlorine decay and CBP formation, and site-specific chlorine kinetic relationships were developed. Through extensive analysis of laboratory measurements, it was found that only some of the control parameters identified in the literature were important for predicting residual chlorine and CBP concentrations for this specific location. The new kinetic relationships were able to significantly improve the predictability and validity of Generalized Environmental Modeling System for Surfacewaters (GEMSS-chlorine kinetics module (CKM, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and chlorine kinetics and transport model when applied for RLIC outfall studies using actual field measurements.

  18. Can chlorination co-select antibiotic-resistance genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Selective pressures, such as chemical or heavy metal pollution, may co-select for bacterial antibiotic resistance in the environment. However, whether chlorination in water treatment can co-select antibiotic-resistant bacteria is controversial. In this study, high capacity quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis was applied to target almost all known antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) (282 types) and 13 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in bacteria detected in secondary effluents from a municipal wastewater treatment plant after chlorination. The results revealed that 125 unique ARGs were detected in non-chlorinated samples, and the number decreased (79-91 types) as the chlorine concentration was increased. Moreover, 7.49 × 10(4)-3.92 × 10(7) copies/100 ml water reduction of ARGs occurred with 4 mg Cl2/l. Considering the relative abundance of ARGs (i.e., ARG copies normalized to 16S rRNA gene copies), 119 ARGs decreased in response to chlorination, whereas only six ARGs, such as dfrA1, tetPB-03, tetPA, ampC-04, tetA-02, and erm(36), were potentially enriched by 10.90-, 10.06-, 8.63-, 6.86-, 3.77-, and 1.09-fold, respectively. Furthermore, the relative abundance of 12 detected MGEs was lower after chlorination. Therefore, chlorination was effective in reducing ARGs and MGEs rather than co-selecting them. PMID:27192478

  19. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  20. Study on metal corrosion caused by chlorine dioxide of various purities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔崇威; 黄君礼; 许晶

    2004-01-01

    Weight lost method was used to comparatively study the corrosion behavior of four different metals under the dosage of chlorine dioxide, chlorine and their mixture respectively. The experimental results indicated that chlorine causes the most serious corrosion of carbon steel, and the higher the concentration of chlorine, the more serious the corrosion. On the contras, metals corrosion is the least serious in the case of chlorine dioxide.The results further revealed that chlorine dioxide is the most effective water treatment reagent, making it the best choice to use extensively in circulated cooling water disinfection and corrosion control.

  1. Chlorine solubility in evolved alkaline magmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Carroll

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies of Cl solubility in trachytic to phonolitic melts provide insights into the capacity of alkaline magmas to transport Cl from depth to the earth?s surface and atmosphere, and information on Cl solubility variations with pressure, temperature and melt or fluid composition is crucial for understanding the reasons for variations in Cl emissions at active volcanoes. This paper provides a brief review of Cl solubility experiments conducted on a range of trachytic to phonolitic melt compositions. Depending on the experimental conditions the melts studied were in equilibrium with either a Cl-bearing aqueous fluid or a subcritical assemblage of low- Cl aqueous fluid + Cl-rich brine. The nature of the fluid phase(s was identified by examination of fluid inclusions present in run product glasses and the fluid bulk composition was calculated by mass balance. Chlorine concentrations in the glass increase with increasing Cl molality in the fluid phase until a plateau in Cl concentration is reached when melt coexists with aqueous fluid + brine. With fluids of similar Cl molality, higher Cl concentrations are observed in peralkaline phonolitic melts compared with peraluminous phonolitic melts; overall the Cl concentrations observed in phonolitic and trachytic melts are approximately twice those found in calcalkaline rhyolitic melts under similar conditions. The observed negative pressure dependence of Cl solubility implies that Cl contents of melts may actually increase during magma decompression if the magma coexists with aqueous fluid and Cl-rich brine (assuming melt-vapor equilibrium is maintained. The high Cl contents (approaching 1 wt% Cl observed in some melts/glasses from the Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei areas suggest saturation with a Cl-rich brine prior to eruption.

  2. Two-phase ozonation of chlorinated organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years the amount of research being conducted in the field of single-phase ozonation has grown extensively. However, traditional aqueous-phase ozonation systems are limited by a lack of selective oxidation potential, low ozone solubility in water, and slow intermediate decomposition rates. Furthermore, ozone may decompose before it can be utilized for pollutant destruction since ozone can be highly unstable in aqueous solutions. Naturally occurring compounds such as NaHCO3 also affect ozone reactions by inhibiting the formation of OH-free radicals. To compensate for these factors, excess ozone is typically supplied to a reactor. Since ozone generation requires considerable electric power consumption (16 - 24 kWh/kg of O3), attempts to enhance the ozone utilization rate and stability should lead to more efficient application of this process to hazardous waste treatment. To improve the process, ozonation may be more efficiently carried out in a two-phase system consisting of an inert solvent (saturated with O3) contacted with an aqueous phase containing pollutants. The non-aqueous phase must meet the following criteria: (1) non-toxic, (2) very low vapor pressure, (3) high density (for ease of separation), (4) complete insolubility in water, (5) reusability, (6) selective pollutant extractability, (7) high oxidant solubility, and (8) extended O3 stability. Previously published studies (1) have indicated that a number of fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds fit these criteria. For this project, FC40 (a product of 3M Co.) was chosen due to its low vapor pressure (3 mm Hg) and high specific gravity (1.9). The primary advantages of the FC40 solvent are that it is non-toxic, reusable, has an ozone solubility 10 times that of water, and that 85 % of the ozone remains in the solvent even after 2 hours. This novel two-phase process has been utilized to study the rapid destruction of organic chlorine compounds and organic mixtures

  3. Rapid Determination of HAAs Formation Potential of the Reaction of Humic Acid with Chlorine or Chlorine Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhi-liang; GE Yuan-xin; ZHANG Rong-hua; MA Hong-mei; HAO Jian-fu

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of gas chromatography(GC) coupled with a short capillary column and an electron capture detector(ECD), a simple and rapid method for the determination of five haloacetic acids(HAAs) in drinking water was developed by the optimization of derivation conditions and the modification of gas chromatographic program. HAAs formation potential(HAAFP) of the reaction of humic acid with chlorine was determined via this method. The major advantages of the method are the simplicity of chromatographic temperature program and the short run time of GC. Dichloroacetic acid(DCAA) and Trichloroacetic acid(TCAA), which were detected in the determination of HAAFP, were rapidly formed in the first 72 h of the reaction of humic acid with chlorine. HAAFP of the reaction of humic acid with chlorine increased with the increase in the concentrations of humic acid and chlorine. The average HAAFP of the reaction of humic acid with chlorine was 39.9 μg/mg TOC under the experimental conditions. When the concentration of humic acid was 4 mg/L, the concentration of HAAs, which were produced in the reaction of humic acid with chorine, may exceed MCL of 60 μg/L HAAs as the water quality standards for urban water supply of China and the first stage of US EPA disinfection/disinfection by-products(D/DBP) rule; when the concentration of humic acid was 2 mg/L, the concentration of HAAs may exceed MCL of 30 μg/L HAAs for the second stage of US EPA D/DBP rule. When humic acid was reacted with chlorine dioxide, only DCAA was detected with a maximum concentration of 3.3 μg/L at a humic acid content of 6 mg/L. It was demonstrated that the substitution of chlorine dioxide for chorine may entirely or partly control the formation of HAAs and effectively reduce the health risk associated with disinfected drinking water.

  4. Bacterial repopulation of drinking water pipe walls after chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Laurence; Francius, Grégory; El Zein, Racha; Angel, Edith; Block, Jean-Claude

    2016-09-01

    The short-term kinetics of bacterial repopulation were evaluated after chlorination of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) colonized with drinking water biofilms and compared with bare HDPE surfaces. The effect of chlorination was partial as a residual biofilm persisted and was time-limited as repopulation occurred immediately after water resupply. The total number of bacteria reached the same levels on both the bare and chlorinated biofilm-fouled HDPE after a seven-day exposure to drinking water. Due to the presence of a residual biofilm, the hydrophobicity of chlorinated biofilm-fouled surface exhibited much lower adhesion forces (2.1 nN) compared to bare surfaces (8.9 nN). This could explain the rapid repopulation after chlorination, with a twofold faster bacterial accumulation rate on the bare HDPE surface. γ-Proteobacteria dominated the early stages of repopulation of both surfaces and a shift in the dominance occurred over the colonization time. Such observations define a timescale for cleaning frequency in industrial environments and guidelines for a rinsing procedure using drinking water. PMID:27483985

  5. Immobilization of chlorine dioxide modified cells for uranium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been a trend towards the use of microorganisms to recover metals from industrial wastewater, for which various methods have been reported to be used to improve microorganism adsorption characteristics such as absorption capacity, tolerance and reusability. In present study, chlorine dioxide(ClO2), a high-efficiency, low toxicity and environment-benign disinfectant, was first reported to be used for microorganism surface modification. The chlorine dioxide modified cells demonstrated a 10.1% higher uranium adsorption capacity than control ones. FTIR analysis indicated that several cell surface groups are involved in the uranium adsorption and cell surface modification. The modified cells were further immobilized on a carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) matrix to improve their reusability. The cell-immobilized adsorbent could be employed either in a high concentration system to move vast UO22+ ions or in a low concentration system to purify UO22+ contaminated water thoroughly, and could be repeatedly used in multiple adsorption-desorption cycles with about 90% adsorption capacity maintained after seven cycles. - Highlights: • Chlorine dioxide was first reported to be used for microorganism surface modification. • The chlorine dioxide modified cells demonstrated a 10.1% higher uranium adsorption capacity than control ones. • The chlorine dioxide modified cells were further immobilized by carboxymethylcellulose to improve their reusability

  6. Coagulation properties of anelectrochemically prepared polyaluminum chloride containing active chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chengzhi; LIU Huijuan; QU Jiuhui

    2006-01-01

    With high content of the Al13 species and the active chloride, an electrochemically prepared polyaluminum chloride (E-PACl) presents integrated efficiency of coagulation and oxidation. The coagulation properties of E-PACl were systemically investigated through jar tests in the various water quality conditions. The active chlorine in E-PACl can significantly influence the coagulation behavior due to the active chlorine preoxidation, which can change the surface charge characteristic of organic matter (OM) in water. The active chlorine preoxidation could improve the E-PACl coagulation efficiency if the water possessed the characteristics of relatively low OM content (2 mg/L) and high hardness (278 mg CaCO3/L). In the water with medium content of OM (5 mg/L), dosage would be a crucial factor to decide whether the active chlorine in E-PACl aided coagulation process or not. Comparing with alkaline condition, active chlorine would show a more significant influence on the coagulation process in acidic region.

  7. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl2–N2 flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al2O3 (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl2 atmosphere of the MgO–Al2O3 mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C

  8. Chlorinated organic pesticides in marketed food: Barcelona, 2001-06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontcuberta, M. [Agencia de Salut Publica de Barcelona, ASPB, Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Av Drassanes 13, 08001 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: mfontcub@aspb.es; Arques, J.F.; Villalbi, J.R.; Martinez, M.; Centrich, F.; Serrahima, E.; Pineda, L.; Duran, J.; Casas, C. [Agencia de Salut Publica de Barcelona, ASPB, Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Av Drassanes 13, 08001 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    This paper reports concentration levels of 22 chlorinated organic compounds (both primary compounds and metabolites) in food marketed in the city of Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) in 2001-06. Samples included meat products, fish and seafood, eggs, milk and dairy, vegetal oils, cereal products and derivates, vegetables, fresh fruits, dry fruits, spices, formula and baby food, tea and wine. Levels of chlorinated organic compounds were determined by gas chromatography with selective detectors: electron capture (ECD), flame photometric (FPD) and confirmation with mass-spectrometry. Chlorinated organic pesticides were detected in 7 of the 1,484 samples analyzed in the 2001-06 period (0.5%): 1 dairy product, 1 fruit, 1 olive oil and 4 vegetables. Specific pesticides detected are lindane and endosulfan {alpha}, {beta} or sulphate. A decrease in both the proportion of samples with detectable residues and in the variety of chlorinated pesticides found is visible when comparing these results with those of the previous 1989-2000 period. These results suggest the gradual disappearance of regulated chlorinated organic pesticides as a consequence of the growing worldwide implementation of current regulatory agreements.

  9. Biofilm formation by Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica and its removal by chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Periasamy; Nancharaiah, Y Venkata; Venugopalan, Vayalam P; Rao, T Subba; Jayachandran, Seetharaman

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of a recently described marine bacterium, SBT 033 GenBank Accession No. AY723742), Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica, at the seawater intake point, outfall and mixing point of an atomic power plant is described, and its ability to form biofilm was investigated. The effectiveness of the antifouling biocide chlorine in the inactivation of planktonic as well as biofilm cells of P. ruthenica was studied in the laboratory. The results show that the planktonic cells were more readily inactivated than the cells enclosed in a biofilm matrix. Viable counting showed that P. ruthenica cells in biofilms were up to 10 times more resistant to chlorine than those in liquid suspension. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy it was shown that significant detachment of P. ruthenica biofilm developed on a glass substratum could be accomplished by treatment with a dose of 1 mg l-1 chlorine. Chlorine-induced detachment led to a significant reduction in biofilm thickness (up to 69%) and substratum coverage (up to 61%), after 5-min contact time. The results show that P. ruthenica has a remarkable ability to form biofilms but chlorine, a common biocide, can be used to effectively kill and detach these biofilms. PMID:17178570

  10. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Barbosa, Lucía [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Básicas (ICB), Universidad Nacional de Cuyo Parque General San Martín, Mendoza (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl{sub 2} atmosphere of the MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C.

  11. Chlorinated organic pesticides in marketed food: Barcelona, 2001-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports concentration levels of 22 chlorinated organic compounds (both primary compounds and metabolites) in food marketed in the city of Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) in 2001-06. Samples included meat products, fish and seafood, eggs, milk and dairy, vegetal oils, cereal products and derivates, vegetables, fresh fruits, dry fruits, spices, formula and baby food, tea and wine. Levels of chlorinated organic compounds were determined by gas chromatography with selective detectors: electron capture (ECD), flame photometric (FPD) and confirmation with mass-spectrometry. Chlorinated organic pesticides were detected in 7 of the 1,484 samples analyzed in the 2001-06 period (0.5%): 1 dairy product, 1 fruit, 1 olive oil and 4 vegetables. Specific pesticides detected are lindane and endosulfan α, β or sulphate. A decrease in both the proportion of samples with detectable residues and in the variety of chlorinated pesticides found is visible when comparing these results with those of the previous 1989-2000 period. These results suggest the gradual disappearance of regulated chlorinated organic pesticides as a consequence of the growing worldwide implementation of current regulatory agreements

  12. MECHANISM OF CHLORATE FORMATION IN CHLORINE DIOIXDE DELIGNIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung-Ho Yoon; Li-Jun Wang; Se-Jong Kim

    2004-01-01

    The effect of pH on chlorate formation during chlorine dioxide delignification of oxygen delignified kraft pulp was studied. Chlorate formation was found to increase slightly when pH was increased from 1.8 to 2.5, further increase of pH decreased chlorate formation.The above phenomenon is explained by the combination of two mechanisms, one by the reaction between hypochlorous acid and chlorite, another by the effect of chlorine on the regeneration of chlorine dioxide. The first mechanism suggests that chlorate formation is highly dependent on HCIO concentration which decreases with increasing pH and causes chlorate formation to behave in the same trend. The second mechanism suggests that chlorine favors the regeneration of chlorine dioxide while HCIO favors chlorate formation, thus lowering the pH from about 4 to the acidic end should decreases chlorate formation. The two opposite effects lead to the maximum formation of chlorate at around pH 2.5.

  13. Tuning of magnetic parameters in cobalt-polystyrene nanocomposites by reduction cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Swapna S., E-mail: swapna.s.nair@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica and I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Sunny, Vijutha; Anantharaman, M.R. [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682 022, Kerala (India)

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores. A porous polymer network (polystyrene) was chosen as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The concentration of cobalt can be tuned in this technique by repeating the cycling process. Highlights: {yields} Elementary cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized inside polystyrene by a novel process. {yields} The self protection is achieved by the auto-shelling with the metal oxide. {yields} The magnetisation and coercivity could be tuned by repeating the cycles. {yields} Tuning of magnetic properties (both coercivity and magnetisation) could be achieved by the repetition of reduction cycles. {yields} Synthesized nanocomposite can act as a catalyst for carbon nanotube synthesis. -- Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores using CoSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O and NaBH{sub 4}. A porous polymer network (sulphonated polystyrene) was chosen, as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The

  14. Cobalt 60 cation exchange with mexican clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mexican clays can be used to remove radioactive elements from contaminated aqueous solutions. Cation exchange experiments were performed with 60 Co radioactive solution. In the present work the effect of contact time on the sorption of Co 2+ was studied. The contact time in hydrated montmorillonite was from 5 to 120 minutes and in dehydrated montmorillonite 5 to 1400 minutes. The Co 2+ uptake value was, in hydrated montmorillonite, between 0.3 to 0.85 m eq/g and in dehydrated montmorillonite, between 0.6 to 1.40 m eq/g. The experiments were done in a pH 5.1 to 5.7 and normal conditions. XRD patterns were used to characterize the samples. The crystallinity was determined by X-ray Diffraction and it was maintained before and after the cation exchange. DTA thermo grams showed the temperatures of the lost humidity and crystallization water. Finally, was observed that dehydrated montmorillonite adsorb more cobalt than hydrated montmorillonite. (Author)

  15. Cobalt electrodeposition using urea and choline chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical behavior of Co(II) in urea-choline chloride-CoCl2 melt was investigated by cyclic voltammetry at 373 K. The results show that the reaction of Co(II) to Co is irreversible and it proceeds via a one-step two electrons transfer process. The diffusion coefficient of Co(II) was estimated to be 1.7 × 10−6 cm2 s−1 at 373 K. Electrodeposition of cobalt was studied at different cathodic potentials (-0.80 to -0.95 V) and at different temperatures (353 to 383 K) in eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea (1:2 molar ratio). The deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM images show that uniform, dense, and compact deposits were obtained at -0.80 V within a temperature range of 353 K to 373 K. EDS and XRD analysis confirm that high-purity metallic Co deposits were obtained

  16. Cesium transport across flat sheet supported liquid membrane containing CCD in NPOE-dodecane mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    137Cs is an important fission product of concern for separation scientists working in the area of radioactive waste management. Removal of this long lived heat and gamma ray emitting radionuclides (t1/2 = 30.2 y) from radioactive waste would drastically bring down the MANREM problem. In addition to this, the recovered cesium can find applications in irradiators for sterilization of foods, medical accessories, sewage sludge treatment, etc. Chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD) in nitrobenzene and xylene mixture as the diluent has been used for the extraction of radio-cesium from acidic wastes. Other studies have used phenyl trifluoromethylsulfone (FS-13) as the diluent and have been used for supported liquid membrane (SLM) based separation methods which not only have the advantage of simultaneous extraction and stripping, but also drastically cut down the VOC inventory which is welcome from environmental concern point of view

  17. Using 15-crown-5, 18-crown-6 and dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 for Am, Ce, Eu and Cm extraction from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction from nitric acid of Am, Eu, Ce, Cm(III) tracers by 15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6), dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) as well as mixtures of crown ethers and chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (ChCoD) in nitrobenzene solutions has been investigated. It was revealed that 18C6 is selective for Ce, Am and Cm compared with Eu. The addition of 18C6 to a solution of ChCoD allows Am and Cm to be separated from lanthanides by using this extractant more efficiently. The separation factors of Ce, Am, Cm and Eu are increased as a function of the ionic strength of the aqueous phase for extraction by mixtures of 18C6 and ChCoD and of DCH18C6 and ChCoD

  18. Inactivation of Aspergillus flavus in drinking water after treatment with UV irradiation followed by chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Mohammad [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Sciences, and Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Coast and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zheng, Tianling [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Sciences, and Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Coast and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Yu, Xin, E-mail: xyu@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The disinfection process for inactivating microorganisms at drinking water treatment plants is aimed for safety of drinking water for humans from a microorganism, such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi by using chlorination, ozonation, UV irradiation, etc. In the present study, a combination of two disinfectants, UV irradiation followed by chlorination, was evaluated for inactivating Aspergillus flavus under low contact time and low dosage of UV irradiation. The results indicated an inverse correlation between the inactivation of A. flavus by using UV irradiation only or chlorination alone. By using UV radiation, the 2 log{sub 10} control of A. flavus was achieved after 30 s of irradiation, while chlorination was observed to be more effective than UV, where the 2 log was achieved at chlorine concentration of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/l, in contact time of 60, 5, 1 and 1 min, respectively. However, combined use (UV irradiation followed by chlorination) was more effective than using either UV or chlorination alone; 5 s UV irradiation followed by chlorination produced 4 log{sub 10} reduction of A. flavus at chlorine concentrations of 2 and 3 mg/l under a contact time of 15 min. The results indicated that efficiency of UV irradiation improves when followed by chlorination at low concentrations. - Highlights: • As a disinfectant, chlorine is more effective than UV in inactivating Aspergillus flavus. • As a combined method, UV irradiation followed by chlorination shows high efficiency. • UV irradiation can improve effectiveness of chlorination in reducing Aspergillus flavus.

  19. Inactivation of Aspergillus flavus in drinking water after treatment with UV irradiation followed by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disinfection process for inactivating microorganisms at drinking water treatment plants is aimed for safety of drinking water for humans from a microorganism, such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi by using chlorination, ozonation, UV irradiation, etc. In the present study, a combination of two disinfectants, UV irradiation followed by chlorination, was evaluated for inactivating Aspergillus flavus under low contact time and low dosage of UV irradiation. The results indicated an inverse correlation between the inactivation of A. flavus by using UV irradiation only or chlorination alone. By using UV radiation, the 2 log10 control of A. flavus was achieved after 30 s of irradiation, while chlorination was observed to be more effective than UV, where the 2 log was achieved at chlorine concentration of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/l, in contact time of 60, 5, 1 and 1 min, respectively. However, combined use (UV irradiation followed by chlorination) was more effective than using either UV or chlorination alone; 5 s UV irradiation followed by chlorination produced 4 log10 reduction of A. flavus at chlorine concentrations of 2 and 3 mg/l under a contact time of 15 min. The results indicated that efficiency of UV irradiation improves when followed by chlorination at low concentrations. - Highlights: • As a disinfectant, chlorine is more effective than UV in inactivating Aspergillus flavus. • As a combined method, UV irradiation followed by chlorination shows high efficiency. • UV irradiation can improve effectiveness of chlorination in reducing Aspergillus flavus

  20. Cobalt chloride attenuates hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage in rat brain: Molecular mechanisms of action of cobalt chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the efficacy of cobalt preconditioning in preventing hypobaric hypoxia induced vascular leakage (an indicator of cerebral edema) using male Sprague-Dawley rats as model system. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in vascular leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. There was a marked increase in Nuclear Factor κB (NFκB) DNA binding activity and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), Interleukin-1 (IL-1), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) and cell adhesion molecules such as Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and P-selectin. Chemical preconditioning by cobalt for 7 days (12.5 mg Co/kg b.w., oral) significantly attenuated cerebral vascular leakage and the expression of inflammatory mediators induced by hypoxia. Administration of NFκB inhibitor, curcumin (50 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) appreciably inhibited hypoxia induced vascular leakage indicating the involvement of NFκB in causing vascular leakage. Interestingly, cobalt when administered at 12.5 mg Co/kg b.w. (i.p.), 1 h before hypoxia could not prevent the vascular leakage indicating that cobalt per se did not have an effect on NFκB. The lower levels of NFκB observed in the brains of cobalt administered animals might be due to higher levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins (hemeoxygenase-1 and metallothionein). To conclude cobalt preconditioning inhibited hypobaric hypoxia induced cerebral vascular leakage by lowering NFκB DNA binding activity and its regulated pro-inflammatory mediators. This is contemplated to be mediated by cobalt induced reduction in ROS/NO and increase in HO-1 and MT

  1. Chlorination and oxidation of sulfonamides by free chlorine: Identification and behaviour of reaction products by UPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Vanessa de Jesus; Cardoso, Vitor Vale; Benoliel, Maria João; Almeida, Cristina M M

    2016-01-15

    Sulfonamides (SAs) are one class of the most widely used antibiotics around the world and have been frequently detected in municipal wastewater and surface water in recent years. Their transformation in waste water treatment plants (WWTP) and in water treatment plants (WTP), as well as, their fate and transport in the aquatic environment are of concern. The reaction of six sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole, sulfapyridine, sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine, sulfathiazole and sulfadiazine) with free chlorine was investigated at a laboratory scale in order to identify the main chlorination by-products. A previously validated method, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, was used to analyse SAs and their chlorination by-products. At room temperature, pH 6-7, reaction times of up to 2 h and an initial concentration of 2 mg/L of free chlorine, the majority of SAs suffered degradation of around 65%, with the exception of sulfamethoxazole and sulfathiazole (20%). The main reaction of SAs with free chlorine occurred in the first minute. PMID:26560639

  2. Electronic diffraction study of the chlorination of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been made of the chlorination of the (100), (110) and (111) crystal faces of nickel using high energy electron diffraction and electron microscopy. Two methods have been used: bombardment with chlorine ions having an energy of between 10 and 30 keV, and direct chlorination in a diffractor at pressures of about 10-4 torr. It has thus been possible to show the very special properties of nickel chloride (CdBr2 type, space group R 3-bar m) which is always formed along the (0001) plane, whatever the orientation of the substrate. It has also been possible to attain the metal-halide interface and to show the existence of two-dimensional chemisorbed films which are ordered or disordered according to the crystal orientation. (author)

  3. Radiation enhanced thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work concerns the study of the thermal and radiation enhanced diffusion of 36Cl in uranium dioxide. It is a contribution to PRECCI programme (research programme on the long-term behaviour of the spent nuclear fuel). 36Cl is a long lived volatile activation product (T = 300 000 years) able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction in geological disposal conditions. We simulated the presence of 36Cl by implanting a quantity of 37Cl comparable to the impurity content of chlorine in UO2. In order to evaluate the diffusion properties of chlorine in the fuel and in particular to assess the influence of the irradiation defects, we performed two kinds of experiments: - the influence of the temperature was studied by carrying out thermal annealings in the temperature range 900 - 1300 deg. C; we showed that implanted chlorine was mobile from temperatures as low as 1000 deg. C and determined a thermal diffusion coefficient D1000deg.C around 10-16 cm2s-1 and deduced an activation energy of 4.3 eV. This value is one of lowest compared to that of volatile fission products such as iodine or the xenon. These parameters reflect the very mobile behaviour of chlorine; - the irradiation effects induced by fission products were studied by irradiating the samples with 127I (energy of 63.5 MeV). We showed that the implanted chlorine diffusion in the temperature range 30 - 250 deg. C is not purely athermal. In these conditions, the diffusion coefficient D250deg.C for the implanted chlorine is around 10-14 cm2s-1 and the activation energy is calculated to be 0.1 eV. Moreover, at 250 deg. C, we observed an important transport of the pristine chlorine from the bulk towards the surface. This chlorine comes from a zone where the defects are mainly produced by the nuclear energy loss process at the end of iodine range. We showed the importance of the implantation and irradiation defects as preferential paths for a fast chlorine transport. We carried out ab initio

  4. Solvent extractions applications to hydrometallurgy. Pt.III: Nickel, cobalt, manganese and ocean nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main applications of solvent extraction to the hydrometallurgy of nickel, cobalt, manganese and manganese rich ocean nodules, which also contain nickel, cooper and cobalt, are exposed. A short description of the processes with commercial applications is made. (author)

  5. Monsoon induced cobalt enrichment in Porites (coral) from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.A.S.; Nath, B.N.

    Cobalt concentrations in growth bands of a reef building coral (Porites sp.) collected from Kalpeni Atoll of the Lakshadweep group of islands (Arabian Sea), rvealed that cobalt concentrations and Co/Ca ratios exhibit similar trend. Study indicates...

  6. Graphene/cobalt nanocarrier for hyperthermia therapy and MRI diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamie, Shadie; Ahadian, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghiass, Mohammad Adel; Iraji Zad, Azam; Saber, Reza; Parseh, Benyamin; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are promising materials for theranostic nanomedicine applications, which are defined as the ability to diagnose, provide targeted therapy and monitor the response to the therapy. In this study, the composites were synthesized via chemical method, using graphene oxide as the source material and assembling cobalt nanoparticles of 15nm over the surface of graphene sheets. Various characterization techniques were then employed to reveal the morphology, size and structure of the nanocomposites, such as X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. Using ion-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, cobalt concentration in the nanocomposites was found to be 80%. In addition, cytotoxicity of graphene/cobalt nanocomposites were evaluated using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide or MTT assay. MTT viability assay exhibited biocompatibility to L929 mouse fibroblasts cells, under a high dose of 100μg/mL over 24h. Hyperthermia results showed the superior conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat at 350kHz frequency for 0.01 and 0.005g/L of the nanocomposites solution. The measured heat generation and energy transfer results were anticipated by the finite element analysis, conducted for the 3D structure. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics also showed that negatively charge graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are suitable for T1-weighted imaging. PMID:27351138

  7. Synthesis, magnetic resonance and microwave absorption properties of cobalt nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using a simple and low-cost liquid reduction method, we have synthesized cobalt nanospheres on a large scale. The materials were characterized, and the result showed that as-prepared products were cobalt nanospheres, assembled by nanosheets in parallel, with a size of around 100 nm. The electromagnetic behaviors of the cobalt nanospheres, including permittivity (εr=ε′−jε″) and permeability (μr=μ′−jμ″), were also investigated as a function of frequency in the microwave frequency range of 2–18 GHz. The permittivity presented multiple dielectric resonance peaks whilst the permeability displayed dual obvious magnetic resonance peaks, manifestly different from other cobalt particles in comparison. The calculated reflection loss (RL) indicated there were two strong microwave absorption peaks over the microwave frequency range of 2–18 GHz, which was in accord with the magnetic resonance peaks. The result revealed that the magnetic loss contributed even more than dielectric loss to the microwave absorption for the cobalt nanospheres. (paper)

  8. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm−3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe2O4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples. - Highlights: • Substitution by a large number of rare earth elements was investigated. • First reported results on magnetostriction measurements of RE doped cobalt ferrite. • The doped samples presented an increased porosity and a decreased grain size. • Increased magnetostrctive response was observed for several doped samples

  9. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in arctic marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norstrom, R J; Muir, D C

    1994-09-16

    By 1976, the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) had been demonstrated in fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), ringed seal (Phoca hispida), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), walrus (Obdobenus rosmarus divergens), beluga (Delphinapterus leucas), porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in various parts of the Arctic. In spite of this early interest, very little subsequent research on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals was undertaken until the mid-1980s. Since that time, there has been an explosion of interest, resulting in a much expanded data base on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals. Except in the Russian Arctic, data have now been obtained on the temporospatial distribution of PCBs and other contaminants in ringed seal, beluga and polar bear. Contaminants in narwhal (Monodon monoceros) have also now been measured. On a fat weight basis, the sum of DDT-related compounds (S-DDT) and PCB levels are lowest in walrus (< 0.1 microgram/g), followed by ringed seal, (0.1-1 microgram/g range). Levels are an order of magnitude higher in beluga and narwhal (1-10 micrograms/g range). It appears that metabolism and excretion of S-DDT and PCBs may be less efficient in cetaceans, leading to greater biomagnification. Polar bears have similar levels of PCBs as cetaceans (1-10 micrograms/g), but with a much simpler congener pattern. DDE levels are lowest in polar bear, indicating rapid metabolism. Effects of age and sex on residue levels are found for all species where this was measured. Among cetaceans and ringed seal, sexually mature females have lower levels than males due to lactation. Although PCB levels in adult male polar bears are about twice as high as females, there is only a trivial age effect in either sex apart from an initial decrease from birth to sexual maturity (age 0-5). Comparison of levels of S-DDT and PCBs in Arctic beluga and ringed seal with those in beluga in the Gulf of St

  10. Experimental cancer studies of chlorinated by-products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorinated drinking water contains a number of different by-products formed during the chlorination process from organic matter. The carcinogenicity of only a fraction of them have been evaluated in experimental animals. The focus has been on compounds and groups of compounds that are most abundant in chlorinated drinking water or the in vitro toxicity data have suggested genotoxic potential. From trihalomethanes, chloroform causes liver tumors in mice and female rats and renal tumors in male mice and rats. Tumor formation by chloroform is strongly associated with cytotoxicity and regenerative cell proliferation in tissues and that has been considered to be one determinant of its carcinogenicity. From halogenic acetic acids, dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and trichlotoacetic acid (TCA) are hepatocarcinogenic in mice and DCA in male rats. Their genotoxicity is equivocal and nongenotoxic mechanisms, such as peroxisome proliferation and hypomethylation of DNA in the liver, likely contribute to tumor development. From chlorinated furanones (CHFs), 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) is a multisite carcinogen in rats (e.g. in thyroid glands and liver) and it has caused DNA damage in vivo. MX may be a complete carcinogen because it also has promoter properties in vitro. Chlorinated drinking water may also contain brominated by-products providing the raw water contains bromide. At least some of them (bromodichloromethane, bromoform) have been shown to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Altogether, although several by-products have been shown to have carcinogenic potential in laboratory animals, it not yet possible to state which compounds or groups of by-products cause the cancer risk in chlorinated drinking water. The cellular mechanisms of their effects and these effects at low concentrations are still poorly understood. The few studies with mixtures of these by-products suggest that the mixture effects may be complex and unpredictable (inhibitory

  11. Oxidation of synthetic phenolic antioxidants during water chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2012-01-15

    The degradation of seven phenolic antioxidants and metabolites during chlorination was investigated. Under strong chlorination conditions (10 mg L(-1) chlorine, 24h), five of the target compounds were significantly degraded, while only BHT-Q (2,6-di-tert-butylcyclohexa-2,5-diene-1,4-dione) and BHT-CHO (3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde) were stable. The effect of the presence of bromide to the sample was only significant for BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) resulting in increased disappearance rate as it is increased. Moreover, the disappearance kinetics were investigated at different concentrations of chlorine and pH of sample using a factorial experimental design. It was observed that the pH of the sample was a significant factor for BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) and BHA, and chlorine concentration was significant for BHT, resulting in increased disappearance kinetics as they are increased. The degradation of these compounds has revealed two main processes: hydroxylation and oxidation of the aromatic system. The hydroxylated derivatives in some cases (e.g. from BHT-OH (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(hydroxymethyl)phenol) and BHT-COOH (3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzoic acid)) are formed via the chlorinated and/or brominated intermediate. Moreover, the oxidation of the aromatic system leads to the quinone derivatives. The investigation of these by-products in real samples by solid-phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-GC-MS) showed that derivatives of BHT, BHT-OH and/or BHT-COOH occurred in wastewater and drinking water samples analysed. PMID:22093692

  12. Transformation of phenazone-type drugs during chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2012-05-01

    Chlorination is one of the most popular disinfection steps for water treatment in Europe. However, chlorine can react with pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants leading to either their elimination or by-products being formed. These by-products are frequently not identified and therefore the consequences of chlorination can be underestimated. In this work, the degradation of two analgesics and antipyretics, phenazone (antipyrine) and propyphenazone, during chlorination was investigated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). A quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q-TOF) system was used to follow the time course of the pharmaceuticals, and also used in the identification of the by-products. The degradation kinetics was investigated at different concentrations of chlorine (1-10 mg/L), bromide (0-100 μg/L) and sample pH (5.7-8.3) by means of a Box-Behnken experimental design. Depending on these factors, half-lives were in the ranges: 0.9-295 s for phenazone and 0.4-173 s for propyphenazone. Also, it was observed that chlorine concentration was a significant factor for propyphenazone, resulting in increased degradation rate as it is increased. The transformation path of these drugs consisted mainly of halogenations, hydroxylations and dealkylations. After several days of reaction two derivatives remained stable for phenazone: chloro-hydroxy-phenazone and N-demethyl-chloro-hydroxy-phenazone and two for propyphenazone: N-demethyl-hydroxy-propyphenazone and N-demethyl-chloro-hydroxy-propyphenazone. Moreover, experiments conducted with real water matrices, tap and surface water, showed that reaction, and formation of by-products, can take place both at the emission source point (household) and during drinking water production. PMID:22381982

  13. The Health Effects of Chlorine Dioxide as a Disinfectant in Potable Water: A Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant in water is being considered by the EPA. This article presents a summary of the known published reports concerning health effects of chlorine dioxide on animal and human populations. (Author/MA)

  14. Project Summary. IN-SITU AQUIFER RESTORATION OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATICS BY METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated the potential of an innovative approach to aquifer restoration: enhanced in-situ biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic solvents by a bacterial community grown on methane under aerobic conditions. The target chlorinated compounds were trichloroethene (...

  15. Chlorine isotopic geochemistry of salt lakes in the Qaidam Basin, China

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Liu, W.G.; Xiao, Y.K.; Wang, Q.Z.; Qi, H.P.; Wang, Y.H.; Zhou, Y.M.; Shirodkar, P.V.

    The isotopic compositions of chlorine in salt lake brine coexisting with halite, oil-field water and river water from the Qaidam Basin (Qinghai, China) have been examined using high-precision measurement of chlorine isotopes based on thermal...

  16. Chlorine release from biomass. Part 6; Kloravgaang fraan biobraenslen. Del 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zintl, Frank; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    Chlorine release from model compounds and different biomass fuels has been studied during thermal treatment in an electric oven in inert atmosphere (N{sub 2}) and with addition of 10% O{sub 2}. The amount of chlorine in all investigated materials has been kept to 2% with addition of KCl solution in methanol. The amount of chlorine was analysed before and after treatment in the decided atmosphere and to the temperature chosen. The influence from different functional groups on the chlorine release at low temperatures has been studied in pyrolysis experiments of simple model compounds with different structures. A good correlation between the chlorine release and the functional groups in the model substances was achieved. Results from the experiments shows that the early chlorine release, is most likely to occur in all biofuels, since all biomass fuels contains biological material with significant amounts of functional groups which can interact with fuel chlorine ( inorganic chlorine)

  17. Supplying sodium and chlorine is effective on patients with congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Changcong Cui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the relationship of severity of heart failure and the concentration of serum sodium(Na + ) and chlorine(Cl- ) and to explore the effect of supplying sodium and chlorine on patients with Congestive heart failure. Methods: 80 patients with congestive heart failure were divided into two groups, namely supplying and control group. Serum sodium and chlorine were measured in all these patients. All treatments but supplying sodium and chlorine were same between the supplying and control groups. Results:According to NYHA, patients who were in class Ⅳ had lower level of serum sodium and chlorine than those in class Ⅱ ( P < 0.05). The heart function was improved after the level of serum sodium and chlorine were raised. Conclusions: The concentration of serum sodium and chlorine relates to the severity of heart failure. The therapy of supplying sodium and chlorine is an effective way to decrease death rate.

  18. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Paul F. Bazylewski; Luan Nguyen; Robert P.C. Bauer; Hunt, Adrian H.; Eamon J. G. McDermott; Leedahl, Brett D.; Andrey I. Kukharenko; Cholakh, Seif O.; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.; Peter Blaha; Alexander Moewes; Young Hee Lee; Gap Soo Chang

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this trea...

  19. Hard hardfacing by welding in the manufacture of valves; Problem Cobalt, alternatives, advantages, disadvantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloys of recharge usually used in the field of the valves are base alloys cobalt (stellite), but in the field of nuclear power plants, due to radioactive activation of the cobalt, there is a growing trend to replace these alloys with other calls cobalt free . In this paper we will explore the most frequent and will be deducted the relevant advantages and disadvantages of these, in comparison with base alloys cobalt. (Author)

  20. COBALT SEGREGATION IN CARBIDE GRAIN BOUNDARIES IN WC-Co COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Vicens, J.; Dubon, A.; Laval, J; Benjdir, M.; Nouet, G.

    1990-01-01

    The cobalt concentration at WC-WC grain boundaries in WC-Co composites was determined via X-ray energy dispersive analysis in STEM. Cobalt profiles were performed-across coincidence grain boundaries Σ2 and Σ5 with a (10(-1)0) prismatic plane. A small cobalt segregation has been detected when dislocations were imaged in the grain boundaries. The cobalt segregation value is compared to the segregation ratio obtained in low angle and general grain boundaries.

  1. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y.S.(China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275 (10), Beijing 102413, PR China); Vaughn, J M

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4 degrees C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10(5)-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa a...

  2. Chlorination of commercial molybdenite concentrate in a fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K. U.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Bose, D. K.; Sundaresan, M.; Gupta, C. K.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on recovery of molybdenum from commercial grade molybdenite using the technique of fluidized bed chlorination in the presence of oxygen are presented. Molybdenum recovery above 99 pct at a chlorine utilization efficiency of 84 pct has been achieved for a fluidizing gas flow-rate of 3 L/min of the gases Cl2, O2, and N2 mixed in the proportion of 2∶5∶23, respectively, at 300 °C. The investigations on kinetics showed that the overall oxychlorination reaction is controlled by chemical reaction and is of first order with respect to particle surface area.

  3. Enhanced reductive dechlorination in clay till contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most frequently found contaminants in groundwater. In fractured media, chlorinated ethenes and ethanes are transported downwards through preferential pathways with subsequent diffusion into the sediment matrix. Due to slow back diffusion it can serve as a long...... the potential for development of degradation throughout the entire clay matrix. When ERD is applied in a low permeability settings one of the major constraints is to obtain the necessary contact between electron donor, bacteria and contaminants to achieve reasonable remediation timeframes. Two injection methods...

  4. The chlorine isotope fingerprint of the lunar magma ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, Jeremy W.; Treiman, Allan H.; Guan, Yunbin; Ma, Chi; Eiler, John M.; Gross, Juliane; Greenwood, James P.; Stolper, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    The Moon contains chlorine that is isotopically unlike that of any other body yet studied in the Solar System, an observation that has been interpreted to support traditional models of the formation of a nominally hydrogen-free (“dry”) Moon. We have analyzed abundances and isotopic compositions of Cl and H in lunar mare basalts, and find little evidence that anhydrous lava outgassing was important in generating chlorine isotope anomalies, because ^(37)Cl/^(35)Cl ratios are not related to Cl a...

  5. Sonochemical Treatment of Water Polluted by Chlorinated Organocompounds. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Louisnard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As one of several types of pollutants in water, chlorinated compounds have been routinely subjected to sonochemical analysis to check the environmental applications of this technology. In this review, an extensive study of the influence of the initial concentration, ultrasonic intensity and frequency on the kinetics, degradation efficiency and mechanism has been analyzed. The sonochemical degradation follows a radical mechanism which yields a very wide range of chlorinated compounds in very low concentrations. Special attention has been paid to the mass balance comparing the results from several analytical techniques. As a conclusion, sonochemical degradation alone is not an efficient treatment to reduce the organic pollutant level in waste water.

  6. Chlorine international thermodynamic tables of the fluid state

    CERN Document Server

    Angus, S; de Reuck, K M

    1985-01-01

    Chlorine: International Thermodynamic Tables of the Fluid State-8 is a four-chapter book that covers available and estimated data on chlorine; estimation of the element's properties; the correlating equations for the element; and how the tabulated properties are calculated from chosen equation. The tables in this book give the volume, entropy, enthalpy, isobaric heat capacity, compression factor, fugacity/pressure ratio, Joule-Thomson coefficient, ratio of the heat capacities, and speed of sound as a function of pressure and temperature. Given in the tables as well are the pressure, entropy, i

  7. Total oxidation of chlorinated VOCs on supported oxide catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Bertinchamps, Fabrice

    2005-01-01

    Biomass-fed cogeneration units and waste incinerators have the advantages of producing efficiently heat and power and of reducing the amount of CO2 emitted per produced energy. However, they produce toxic polychlorinated VOCs (dioxins), CO and NOx. This thesis aims at developing a catalytic system for the total oxidation of chlorinated VOCs that: i) convert efficiently chlorinated VOCs below 250 °C and ii) resist to the exhaust co-pollutants (H2O, CO, NOx). Moreover, this thesis aims at havin...

  8. Zirconium tetrachloride production using the fluidized bed chlorination technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the results of a study of the process for production nuclear grade zirconium tetrachloride by fluidized bed chlorination technique are presented. A reactor with a gas distributor has been developed and this permitted to establish a procedure of zirconium tetrachloride production with adequate purity, satisfactories efficiency of reaction and reproducible results. Some relevant parameters of the kinetics of chlorination process such as: time and temperature of reaction, size and minimum fluidizing velocity of microspheres and percentage of the reducing agent have been studied. (author). 15 refs., 5 figs

  9. Chlorine Dioxide Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts and Bacterial Spore Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Chauret, Christian P.; Radziminski, Chris Z.; Lepuil, Michael; Creason, Robin; Andrews, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum, which is resistant to chlorine concentrations typically used in water treatment, is recognized as a significant waterborne pathogen. Recent studies have demonstrated that chlorine dioxide is a more efficient disinfectant than free chlorine against Cryptosporidium oocysts. It is not known, however, if oocysts from different suppliers are equally sensitive to chlorine dioxide. This study used both a most-probable-number–cell culture infectivity assay and in vitro excysta...

  10. Study on encapsulation of chlorine dioxide in gelatin microsphere for reducing release rate

    OpenAIRE

    Ci, Ying; Wang, Lin; Guo, YanChuan; Sun, Ruixue; Wang, Xijie; Li, Jinyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the effects of encapsulation of chlorine dioxide in a hydrophilic biodegradable polymer gelatin to reduce its release rate. Methods: An emulsification-coacervation method was adopted. The characterizations of chlorine dioxide-gelatin microspheres were described. Using UV-vis spectrophotometer the λmax of chlorine dioxide was observed at 358 nm. The particle size and distribution of chlorine oxide-gelatin microspheres was measured by a dynamic light scatte...

  11. Combustion Characteristics of Chlorine-Free Solid Fuel Produced from Municipal Solid Waste by Hydrothermal Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Kunio Yoshikawa; Pandji Prawisudha; Bayu Indrawan

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study on converting municipal solid waste (MSW) into chlorine-free solid fuel using a combination of hydrothermal processing and water-washing has been performed. After the product was extracted from the reactor, water-washing experiments were then conducted to obtain chlorine-free products with less than 3000 ppm total chlorine content. A series of combustion experiments were then performed for the products before and after the washing process to determine the chlorine conten...

  12. Metals releases and disinfection byproduct formation in domestic wells following shock chlorination

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, M.; Newman, J.

    2010-01-01

    Shock chlorination is used for rapid disinfection to control pathogens and nuisance bacteria in domestic wells. A typical shock chlorination procedure involves adding sodium hypochlorite in liquid bleach solutions to achieve concentrations of free chlorine of up to 200 ppm in the standing water of a well. The change in pH and oxidation potential may bring trace metals from aquifer materials into solution and chlorine may react with dissolved organic carbon to form disinfection byproducts. We ...

  13. Removal of iodide from water by chlorination and subsequent adsorption on powdered activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Ikari, Mariya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine oxidation followed by treatment with activated carbon was studied as a possible method for removing radioactive iodine from water. Chlorination time, chlorine dose, the presence of natural organic matter (NOM), the presence of bromide ion (Br-), and carbon particle size strongly affected iodine removal. Treatment with superfine powdered activated carbon (SPAC) after 10-min oxidation with chlorine (1 mg-Cl-2/L) removed 90% of the iodine in NOM-containing water (dissolved organic carbo...

  14. Thermal transport in cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggold, K.

    2006-09-15

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the thermal transport properties of three classes of transition-metal oxides: Cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites. The layered cuprates R{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} with R=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd show an anomalous thermal conductivity {kappa}. Two maxima of {kappa} are observed as a function of temperature for a heat current within the CuO{sub 2} planes, whereas for a heat current perpendicular to the CuO{sub 2} planes only a conventional phononic low-temperature maximum of {kappa} is present. Evidence is provided that the high-temperature maximum is caused by heat-carrying excitations on the CuO{sub 2} square lattice. Moreover, it is shown that the complex low-temperature and magnetic-field behavior of {kappa} in Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} is most likely caused by additional phonon scattering rather than by heat-carrying Nd magnons, as it was proposed in the literature. In the cobaltates RCoO{sub 3} with R=La, Pr, Nd, and Eu, a temperature-induced spin-state transition of the Co{sup 3+} ions occurs. It is shown that the additional lattice disorder caused by the random distribution of populated higher spin states causes a large suppression of the thermal conductivity of LaCoO{sub 3} for T>25 K. The effect is much weaker in PrCoO{sub 3} and NdCoO{sub 3} due to the increased spin gap. A quantitative analysis of the responsible mechanisms based on EuCoO{sub 3} as a reference compound is provided. A main result is that the static disorder is sufficient to explain the suppression of {kappa}. No dynamical Jahn-Teller distortion, as proposed in the literature, is necessary to enhance the scattering strength. Below 25 K, k is mainly determined by resonant phonon scattering on paramagnetic impurity levels, e.g. caused by oxygen non-stoichiometry. Such a suppression of the thermal conductivity by resonant scattering processes is e.g. known from Holmium ethylsulfate. This effect is most pronounced in LaCoO{sub 3}, presumably due to

  15. Thermal transport in cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the thermal transport properties of three classes of transition-metal oxides: Cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites. The layered cuprates R2CuO4 with R=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd show an anomalous thermal conductivity κ. Two maxima of κ are observed as a function of temperature for a heat current within the CuO2 planes, whereas for a heat current perpendicular to the CuO2 planes only a conventional phononic low-temperature maximum of κ is present. Evidence is provided that the high-temperature maximum is caused by heat-carrying excitations on the CuO2 square lattice. Moreover, it is shown that the complex low-temperature and magnetic-field behavior of κ in Nd2CuO4 is most likely caused by additional phonon scattering rather than by heat-carrying Nd magnons, as it was proposed in the literature. In the cobaltates RCoO3 with R=La, Pr, Nd, and Eu, a temperature-induced spin-state transition of the Co3+ ions occurs. It is shown that the additional lattice disorder caused by the random distribution of populated higher spin states causes a large suppression of the thermal conductivity of LaCoO3 for T>25 K. The effect is much weaker in PrCoO3 and NdCoO3 due to the increased spin gap. A quantitative analysis of the responsible mechanisms based on EuCoO3 as a reference compound is provided. A main result is that the static disorder is sufficient to explain the suppression of κ. No dynamical Jahn-Teller distortion, as proposed in the literature, is necessary to enhance the scattering strength. Below 25 K, k is mainly determined by resonant phonon scattering on paramagnetic impurity levels, e.g. caused by oxygen non-stoichiometry. Such a suppression of the thermal conductivity by resonant scattering processes is e.g. known from Holmium ethylsulfate. This effect is most pronounced in LaCoO3, presumably due to magnetic polaron formation. In the doped compounds La1-xSrxCoO3 with 0≤x≤0.25, a large thermopower, a low

  16. The effect of cobalt content in U-700 type alloys on degradation of aluminide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of cobalt content in U-700 type alloys on the behavior of aluminide coatings is studied in burner rig cyclic oxidation tests at 1100C. It is determined that aluminide coatings on alloys with higher cobalt offer better oxidation protection than the same coatings on alloys containing less cobalt.

  17. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  18. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on digestion and cobalamin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptonat...

  19. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on fiber digestion and cobalamin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B*12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptona...

  20. Anionic tert-butyl-calix[4]arenes substituted at the narrow and wide rim by cobalt bis(dicarbollide)(1-) ions and CMPO-groups. Effect of stereochemistry and ratios of the functional groups on the platform on the extraction efficiency for Ln(III)/An(III)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grüner, Bohumír; Böhmer, V.; Dordea, C.; Selucký, P.; Bubeníková, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 747, december (2013), s. 155-166. ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0668 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Actinides * Calixarenes * Carboranes * Lanthanides * Liquid-liquid extraction Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.302, year: 2013

  1. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  2. Temperature and fluence effects in lead implanted cobalt single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The channeled sputtering yields of the hcp and fcc phases of cobalt depend on the crystal structure and the radiation induced damage. Earlier irradiations of cobalt with argon ions channeled in the hcp direction give sputtering yields higher than expected in the temperature range 100-350deg C. This effect was attributed to a combination of radiation induced damage and a possible implantation induced hcp --> fcc phase transition. Sputtering yields for cobalt single crystals irradiated with 150 keV Pb+ ions along the direction of the hcp phase and the direction of the fcc phase have been measured using the weightloss method. The radiation damage and the amount of lead retained in the implanted surface has been investigated by 'in situ' RBS/channeling analysis. Measured partial sputtering yields of lead ≅ 1 atom/ion indicate preferential sputtering of lead atoms. (orig.)

  3. The question of cobalt content in structural steels for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the high cost of very low cobalt steels, studies were made, first, of the effect of cobalt in the steel, and then of the other elements activated in a neutron flux from a reactir core, such as 59Fe and 54Mn. It is shown that these short-lived isotopes soon fall to a level below that of the cobalt but even then persist so long that it would hardly be economical to shut down for the periods necessary for them to become negligible and so the little Co present hardly matters. It might be better to use ordinary boiler steel and to shield it to some extent from the neutron flux. (author)

  4. Electrodeposition of Compositionally Modulated Zinc-cobalt Alloy Multilayer Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费敬银; 梁国正; 辛文利

    2005-01-01

    The effects of pulse parameters on the cobalt content, surface morphologies and grain size of Zn-Co alloy deposits were studied using a pulse plating technique with a square-wave current containing reverse pulse. Average current density and reverse anodic current density amongst the variables investigated have very strong effects on the cobalt content in the Zn-Co alloy deposits. Grain size, surface appearance and internal stress in the deposit were improved significantly by introducing the reverse current. Varieties of Zn-Co alloy compositionally modulated multilayer (CMM) coatings with large differences in cobalt contents for different sublayers were electrodeposited by designing corresponding waveforms using a computer-aided pulse plater and characterized in terms of surface morphologies. Cross-sectional morphologies of the Zn-Co alloy CMM coatings, examined using field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM), confirmed the layered structure.

  5. Magnetic properties of cobalt microwires measured by piezoresistive cantilever magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosolini G.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the magnetic characterization of cobalt wires grown by focused electron beam-induced deposition (FEBID and studied using static piezoresistive cantilever magnetometry. We have used previously developed high force sensitive submicron-thick silicon piezoresistive cantilevers. High quality polycrystalline cobalt microwires have been grown by FEBID onto the free end of the cantilevers using dual beam equipment. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the magnetic cobalt wires become magnetized, which leads to the magnetic field dependent static deflection of the cantilevers. We show that the piezoresistive signal from the cantilevers, corresponding to a maximum force of about 1 nN, can be measured as a function of the applied magnetic field with a good signal to noise ratio at room temperature. The results highlight the flexibility of the FEBID technique for the growth of magnetic structures on specific substrates, in this case piezoresistive cantilevers.

  6. Activation of cobalt by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been completed of cobalt activation in samples from two new locations in Hiroshima. The samples consisted of a piece of steel from a bridge located at a distance of about 1300 m from the hypocenter and pieces of both steel and concrete from a building located at approximately 700 m. The concrete was analyzed to obtain information needed to calculate the cobalt activation in the two steel samples. Close agreement was found between calculated and measured values for cobalt activation of the steel sample from the building at 700 m. It was found, however, that the measured values for the bridge sample at 1300 m were approximately twice the calculated values. Thus, the new results confirm the existence of a systematic error in the transport calculations for neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. 52 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs

  7. Synthesis and Thermal Behavior of Metallic Cobalt Micro and Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marlene Gonzalez Montiel; P Santiago-Jacinto; J A I Daz Gongora; E Reguera; Geonel Rodrguez-Gattorno

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution, a comparative study of metallic cobalt micro and nanoparticles obtained in solution by four different chemical routes is reported. Classic routes such as borohydride reduction in aqueous media and the so-called polyol methodology were used to obtain the cobalt nanostructures to be studied. Using CTAB as surfactant, cobalt hollow nanostructures were obtained. The use of strong reducing agents, like sodium borohydride, favors the formation of quasi-monodispersed nanoparticles of about 2 nm size but accompanied with impurities; for hydrazine (a mild reducer), nanoparticles of larger size are obtained which organize in spherical microagglomerates. Valuable information on the particles thermal stability and on nature of the species anchored at their surface was obtained from thermogravimetric curves. The samples to be studied were characterized from UV-vis, IR, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy images (scanning and transmission).

  8. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Cobalt Films Prepared by Thermal Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuttanun PANSONG

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt films on silicon substrates were prepared by thermal evaporation. By evaporating 0.05 g of cobalt for 80-240 s, a thickness from 21.1 to 67.7 nm was obtained with a deposition rate about 0.26-0.32 nm per second. The 29 nm-thick cobalt film exhibited magnetoresistance (MR ranging from -0.0793% (field perpendicular to the current to +0.0134% (field parallel to the current with saturation in a 220 mT magnetic field. This MR was attributed to anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR since changing the angle between the field and the current (θ gave rise to a change in the electrical resistance (Rθ. The results agreed with the theory since the plot between Rθ and cos2θ could be linearly fitted. AMR was not observed in non-ferromagnetic gold films whose resistance was insensitive to the angle between the current and magnetic field.

  9. Giant Magnetoimpedance in Electrodeposited Cobalt on Silver Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsakorn JANTARATANA

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt of thickness from 1 to 25 mm was coated onto 120 mm-diameter silver wires by electrodeposition. Giant magneto-impedance (GMI of electrodeposited cobalt on silver wires was measured with ac current from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. Their impedance decreased with a longitudinal magnetic field and saturated under 1.5 kOe. With increasing cobalt thickness, the critical frequency decreased but the GMI ratio increased. A maximum GMI ratio of over 200 % and sensitivity of about 0.5 %/Oe were observed in a 25 mm-thick sample at the frequency of about 500 kHz. The results can be explained by the dependence of the circumferential permeability on the magnetic field and frequency of ac current.

  10. Coal and coke - Analysis and testing - Coal and coke - Chlorine - High-temperature combustion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-29

    This Standard sets out a method for the liberation of the chlorine from coal and coke by high-temperature combustion, and its subsequent determination by titrimetry. The presence of residual halogen-bearing organic float-and-sink liquids in coal samples will affect the determination of chlorine. This Standard is applicable to coal and coke containing less than 0.3% chlorine.

  11. Innovative leaching of cobalt and lithium from spent lithium-ion batteries and simultaneous dechlorination of polyvinyl chloride in subcritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2016-10-01

    In this work, an effective and environmentally friendly process for the recovery of cobalt (Co) and lithium (Li) from spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and simultaneously detoxification of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) in subcritical water was developed. Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) power from spent LIBs and PVC were co-treated by subcritical water oxidation, in which PVC served as a hydrochloric acid source to promote metal leaching. The dechlorination of PVC and metal leaching was achieved simultaneously under subcritical water oxidation. More than 95% Co and nearly 98% Li were recovered under the optimum conditions: temperature 350°C, PVC/LiCoO2 ratio 3:1, time 30min, and a solid/liquid ratio 16:1 (g/L), respectively. Moreover, PVC was completely dechlorinated at temperatures above 350°C without any release of toxic chlorinated organic compounds. Assessment on economical and environmental impacts revealed that the PVC and LiCoO2 subcritical co-treatment process had significant technical, economic and environmental benefits over the traditional hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy processes. This innovative co-treatment process is efficient, environmentally friendly and adequate for Co and Li recovery from spent LIBs and simultaneous dechlorination of PVC in subcritical water. PMID:27209515

  12. A new type of high performance cobalt free permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since late l970's, the investigators for permanent magnetic materials have made an effort to find cobalt free and samarium free permanent magnets. In 1983, a sintered Fe/sub 77/Nd/sub 15/B/sub 8/ bulk permanent magnet with energy product up to 36 MGOe was found. In the present investigation the authors report a new type of high-performance cobalt free and samarium free permanent magnets prepared from Pr-Fe-B. The magnetic energy product of these magnets can exceed 37 MGOe

  13. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 μm in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 μm in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process

  14. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Orozco, E [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Bucio-Galindo, L [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Mendoza Leon, H [FM-UPALM, IPN, Apartado Postal 75-395 CP 07300, DF (Mexico); Castillo-Ocampo, P [UAM-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-334 CP 09340, DF (Mexico); Montoya, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 {mu}m in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process.

  15. Inclusion of a cobalt tetraazamacrocycle into layered molybdenum disulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the intercalation of meso-5, 5, 7, 12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,8-diacetate complexed with Co (III) into layered molybdenum disulfide. This is achieved by using the exfoliation and re-stacking properties of LiMoS2. The cobalt complex dissolves readily in a water/acetone solvent mixture. Addition of this solution to an aqueous suspension of single MoS2 layers results in the entrapment of the cobalt macrocycle between the sheets of MoS2. The resulting intercalate was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis.

  16. Chlorine-36 and the initial value problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Stanley N.; Cecil, DeWayne; Zreda, Marek; Sharma, Pankaj

    Chlorine-36 is a radionuclide with a half-life of 3.01×105a. Most 36Cl in the hydrosphere originates from cosmic radiation interacting with atmospheric gases. Large amounts were also produced by testing thermonuclear devices during 1952-58. Because the monovalent anion, chloride, is the most common form of chlorine found in the hydrosphere and because it is extremely mobile in aqueous systems, analyses of both total Cl- as well as 36Cl have been important in numerous hydrologic studies. In almost all applications of 36Cl, a knowledge of the initial, or pre-anthropogenic, levels of 36Cl is useful, as well as essential in some cases. Standard approaches to the determination of initial values have been to: (a) calculate the theoretical cosmogenic production and fallout, which varies according to latitude; (b) measure 36Cl in present-day precipitation and assume that anthropogenic components can be neglected; (c) assume that shallow groundwater retains a record of the initial concentration; (d) extract 36Cl from vertical depth profiles in desert soils; (e) recover 36Cl from cores of glacial ice; and (f) calculate subsurface production of 36Cl for water that has been isolated from the atmosphere for more than one million years. The initial value from soil profiles and ice cores is taken as the value that occurs directly below the depth of the easily defined bomb peak. All six methods have serious weaknesses. Complicating factors include 36Cl concentrations not related to cosmogenic sources, changes in cosmogenic production with time, mixed sources of chloride in groundwater, melting and refreezing of water in glaciers, and seasonal groundwater recharge that does not contain average year-long concentrations of 36Cl. Résumé Le chlore-36 est un radionucléide de période 3.01×105a. Pour l'essentiel, le 36Cl dans l'hydrosphère provient des effets du rayonnement cosmique sur les gaz atmosphériques. De grandes quantités de 36Cl ont aussi été produites au cours des

  17. Copper and cobalt in aquatic mosses and stream sediments from the Idaho Cobalt Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, J.A.; Modreski, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of stream sediments and aquatic mosses were collected from nine sites across several mineralized zones at the southeasternmost extension of the Idaho Cobalt Belt. Because the steepness of the terrain and the attendant high flow rate of the streams made it difficult to obtain adequate sediment samples, mosses were considered as an alternative sampling medium. The results not only showed that the Cu and Co content of the mosses correlated almost perfectly with that of the sediments, but that the contrast between samples taken from mineralized and background areas was greater in mosses, especially for Co. Maximum concentrations of 35,000 ??g/g Cu and 2000 ??g/g Co were observed in the ash of mosses, compared to maximum concentrations of 1700 ??g/g and 320 ??g/g, respectively, in the associated sediments. Species identification was considered unimportant, which should dispel some reluctance to use mosses in mineral exploration. ?? 1984.

  18. A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Thornton, Kathleen R.; Northrup, Paul A.; Dunigan, Marisa R.; Ness, Katherine J.; Gellis, Austin B.

    2015-08-01

    Chloride--the most abundant ion in sea water--affects ocean salinity, and thereby seawater density and ocean circulation. Its lack of reactivity gives it an extremely long residence time. Other halogens are known to be incorporated into marine organic matter. However, evidence of similar transformations of seawater chloride is lacking, aside from emissions of volatile organochlorine by marine algae. Here we report high organochlorine concentrations from 180 to 700 mg kg-1 in natural particulate organic matter that settled into sediment traps at depths between 800 and 3,200 m in the Arabian Sea, taken between 1994 and 1995. X-ray spectromicroscopic imaging of chlorine bonding reveals that this organochlorine exists primarily in concentrated aliphatic forms consistent with lipid chlorination, along with a more diffuse aromatic fraction. High aliphatic organochlorine in particulate material from cultured phytoplankton suggests that primary production is a source of chlorinated organic matter. We also found that particulate algal detritus can act as an organic substrate for abiotic reactions involving Fe2+, H2O2 or light that incorporate chlorine into organic matter at levels up to several grams per kilogram. We conclude that transformations of marine chloride to non-volatile organochlorine through biological and abiotic pathways represent an oceanic sink for this relatively unreactive element.

  19. Effect of sulfur dioxide on indium(3) sulfate chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of thermodynamic calculations and kinetic investigations of In2(SO4)3 interaction with gaseous Cl2 and equimolar Cl2 and SO2 mixture at 127-800 deg C are presented. It is found that acceleration of chlorination rate takes place in the presence of SO2, while the temperature of its beginning and activation energy decrease

  20. Processing of molybdenite concentrates by low-temprature chlorination roasting

    OpenAIRE

    Александров, Павло Володимирович

    2012-01-01

    Prospects of low-temperature chlorination roasting with chlorides of alkaline metals application for processing of molybdenite concentrate are shown. General benefits of it are reduction of evolving of dioxide of sulfur in the atmosphere, reduction of roasting temperature to 450 ºС and formation of water-soluble compounds of molybdenum during roasting

  1. Electrochemical chlorine evolution at rutile oxide (110) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heine Anton; Man, Isabela Costinela; Studt, Felix;

    2010-01-01

    function of the oxygen binding energy, giving rise to a Sabatier volcano. By combining the surface phase diagram and the volcano describing the catalytic activity, we find that the reaction mechanism differs depending on catalyst material. The flexibility in reaction path means that the chlorine evolution...

  2. The chlorine isotope fingerprint of the lunar magma ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Jeremy W; Treiman, Allan H; Guan, Yunbin; Ma, Chi; Eiler, John M; Gross, Juliane; Greenwood, James P; Stolper, Edward M

    2015-09-01

    The Moon contains chlorine that is isotopically unlike that of any other body yet studied in the Solar System, an observation that has been interpreted to support traditional models of the formation of a nominally hydrogen-free ("dry") Moon. We have analyzed abundances and isotopic compositions of Cl and H in lunar mare basalts, and find little evidence that anhydrous lava outgassing was important in generating chlorine isotope anomalies, because (37)Cl/(35)Cl ratios are not related to Cl abundance, H abundance, or D/H ratios in a manner consistent with the lava-outgassing hypothesis. Instead, (37)Cl/(35)Cl correlates positively with Cl abundance in apatite, as well as with whole-rock Th abundances and La/Lu ratios, suggesting that the high (37)Cl/(35)Cl in lunar basalts is inherited from urKREEP, the last dregs of the lunar magma ocean. These new data suggest that the high chlorine isotope ratios of lunar basalts result not from the degassing of their lavas but from degassing of the lunar magma ocean early in the Moon's history. Chlorine isotope variability is therefore an indicator of planetary magma ocean degassing, an important stage in the formation of terrestrial planets. PMID:26601265

  3. Release of Chlorine and Sulfur during Biomass Torrefaction and Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, Suriyati Binti; Flensborg, Julie Pauline; Shoulaifar, Tooran Khazraie;

    2014-01-01

    The release of chlorine (Cl) and sulfur (S) during biomass torrefaction and pyrolysis has been investigated via experiments in two laboratory-scale reactors: a rotating reactor and a fixed bed reactor. Six biomasses with different chemical compositions covering a wide range of ash content and ash...

  4. Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in aquifer thermal energy storage

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Z

    2015-01-01

      Subjects: bioremediation; biodegradation; environmental biotechnology, subsurface and groundwater contamination; biological processes; geochemistry; microbiology The combination of enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) appears attractive because such integration provides a promising solution for redevelopment of urban areas in terms of improving the local environmental quality as well as achieving ...

  5. Chlorinated Iridoid Glucosides from Veronica longifolia and their Antioxidant Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Harput, U. Sebnem;

    2010-01-01

    From Veronica longifolia were isolated three chlorinated iridoid glucosides, namely asystasioside E (6) and its 6-O-esters 6a and 6b, named longifoliosides A and B, respectively. The structures of 6a and 6b were proved by analysis of their spectroscopic data and by conversion to the catalpol este......), superoxide (SO), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals....

  6. Chlorine decay under steady and unsteady-state hydraulic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoianov, Ivan; Aisopou, Angeliki

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a simulation framework for the scale-adaptive hydraulic and chlorine decay modelling under steady and unsteady-state flows. Bulk flow and pipe wall reaction coefficients are replaced with steady and unsteady-state reaction coefficients. An unsteady decay coefficient is defined...

  7. EFFECTS OF CONTINUOUS CHLORINATION ON ENTRAINED ESTUARINE PLANKTON

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of continuous chlorination on entrained plankton are investigated in tests using running sea water and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as an indicator of biomass. Effects were measured by bioluminescence with the use of luciferin-luciferase reagents from firefly lanterns...

  8. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Vaughn, J.M. (Univ. of New England College of Medicine, Biddeford, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  9. The role of natural chlorinated hydroquinone metabolites in ligninolytic fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, P.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Ligninolytic Basidiomycetes have been reported to produce a wide variety of chloroaromatic compounds as secondary metabolites, which are structurally similar to environmental pollutants. Among these are chlorinated hydroquinone metabolites (CHM), such as 2-chloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (2Cl-14DMB), 2,

  10. Chlorine in the Forest Ecosystem (a Radiotracer Study)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matucha, Miroslav

    New York: Nova Science Pub Inc, 2007 - (Lyman, E.), s. 317-331 ISBN 978-1-60021-903-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : radiotracer * chlorine * forest ecosystem Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science

  11. Stratospheric chlorine injection by volcanic eruptions - HCl scavenging and implications for ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Turco, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Because the output of volatile chlorine during a major volcanic event can greatly exceed the annual anthropogenic emissions of chlorine to the atmosphere, the fate of volcanic chlorine must be known. Although numerous observations have shown that volcanoes do not significantly contribute to the stratospheric chlorine burden, no quantitative explanation has been published. Hydrogen chloride (HCl) scavenging processes during the early phases of a volcanic eruption are discussed. A plume dynamics and thermodynamics model is used to show that HCl removal in condensed supercooled water can reduce HCl vapor concentrations by up to four orders of magnitude, preventing substantial stratospheric chlorine injection.

  12. Macrokinetic relationships between anodic processes in chlorine electrolysis on ruthenium-titanium oxide anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of porosity on kinetics of the main (chlorine evolution) and side (oxygen evolution and anodic dissolution of ruthenium dioxide) reactions for chlorine electrolysis conditions has been analyzed. Making allowance for chlorine hydrolysis secondary reaction, the distribution of chlorine concentration, solution pH and current densities of the main and side processes over the porous anode depth, have been found. It is shown that solution acidification in the anode pores due to chlorine hydrolysis can bring about replacement of oxygen evolution and ruthenium dioxide dissolution side reactions toward the porous anode external sides thus affecting its selectivity and corrosion resistance

  13. The Chlorine Isotopic Composition Of Lunar UrKREEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. J.; Tartese, R.; Anand, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; Neal, C. R.; Franchi, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the long standing paradigm of an anhydrous Moon was challenged there has been a renewed focus on investigating volatiles in a variety of lunar samples. Numerous studies have examined the abundances and isotopic compositions of volatiles in lunar apatite, Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH). In particular, apatite has been used as a tool for assessing the sources of H2O in the lunar interior. However, current models for the Moon's formation have yet to fully account for its thermal evolution in the presence of H2O and other volatiles. For ex-ample, in the context of the lunar magma ocean (LMO) model, it is anticipated that chlorine (and other volatiles) should have been concentrated in the late-stage LMO residual melts (i.e., the dregs enriched in incompatible elements such as K, REEs (Rare Earth Elements), and P, collectively called KREEP, and in its primitive form - urKREEP, given its incompatibility in mafic minerals like olivine and pyroxene, which were the dominant phases that crystallized early in the cumulate pile of the LMO. When compared to chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks, lunar samples have exotic chlorine isotope compositions, which are difficult to explain in light of the abundance and isotopic composition of other volatile species, especially H, and the current estimates for chlorine and H2O in the bulk silicate Moon (BSM). In order to better understand the processes involved in giving rise to the heavy chlorine isotope compositions of lunar samples, we have performed a comprehensive in situ high precision study of chlorine isotopes in lunar apatite from a suite of Apollo samples covering a range of geochemical characteristics and petrologic types.

  14. Bulk chlorine uptake by polyamide active layers of thin-film composite membranes upon exposure to free chlorine-kinetics, mechanisms, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    We studied the volume-averaged chlorine (Cl) uptake into the bulk region of the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine. Volume-averaged measurements were obtained using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with samples prepared at a range of free chlorine concentrations, exposure times, and mixing, rinsing, and pH conditions. Our volume-averaged measurements complement previous studies that have quantified Cl uptake at the active layer surface (top ≈ 7 nm) and advance the mechanistic understanding of Cl uptake by aromatic polyamide active layers. Our results show that surface Cl uptake is representative of and underestimates volume-averaged Cl uptake under acidic conditions and alkaline conditions, respectively. Our results also support that (i) under acidic conditions, N-chlorination followed by Orton rearrangement is the dominant Cl uptake mechanism with N-chlorination as the rate-limiting step; (ii) under alkaline conditions, N-chlorination and dechlorination of N-chlorinated amide links by hydroxyl ion are the two dominant processes; and (iii) under neutral pH conditions, the rates of N-chlorination and Orton rearrangement are comparable. We propose a kinetic model that satisfactorily describes Cl uptake under acidic and alkaline conditions, with the largest discrepancies between model and experiment occurring under alkaline conditions at relatively high chlorine exposures. PMID:24506252

  15. Session 6: The catalytic oxidation of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oszczudlowski, J. [Institute of Chemistry, Swietokrzyska Academy, Kielce (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The catalytic oxidation of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons was investigated in the presence of natural zeolites modified with 3M HCl and chromium and lanthanum from aqueous solutions. Natural zeolites of the structure of clinoptilolite or mordenite possess unique physical and chemical properties such as high sorptive capacity and ion-exchange selectivity, relatively high heat and mechanical resistance. The activation of samples of natural zeolites was carried out in a 3M aqueous solution of HCl using a Soxhlet apparatus, whereas the ion exchange from aqueous solutions of chromium (III) and lanthanum (III) nitrates. Samples of activated zeolites were calcinated at 500 C with a programmable temperature increase within 4 hours The amounts of Cr and La on zeolite were 3,0 % wt and 4,5 % wt, respectively. Catalytic tests were conducted in a micro-reactor coupled with a gas chromatograph. The conditions of reaction were as follows: temperature range: 473-723 K, substrate composition: chlorinated hydrocarbon (1000-10000 ppm), steam (0-10000 ppm) and air. Under standard conditions volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons were introduced into a gas flux as vapours, whereas low-volatile ones in a mixture with n-hexane or cyclohexane. The quantity of the deposits on the surface of a catalyst was analysed by the thermogravimetric and GC-MS methods. The composition of oxidation products of chlorinated hydrocarbons was chromatographically analysed indirectly with the techniques SPME-GC-ECD and SPME-GCFID. The total quantity of the products was stored in gas containers-Tedlars and the quantitative and qualitative composition was analysed by the method SPME-HS-GC-ECD (solid phase micro-extraction-headspace-gas chromatography-electron capture detector). The total oxidation of CCl{sub 4} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6} in the presence of the Cr/zeolite catalyst occurs at 400 C. The conversion of the catalytic oxidation of chloro-olefins in the presence of the La/zeolite catalyst increases within

  16. Development of hierarchically porous cobalt oxide for enhanced photo-oxidation of indoor pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous cobalt oxide was successfully prepared by precipitation of cobalt hydroxide followed by low temperature thermal decomposition. The morphologies of the resultant oxides remained as the corresponding hydroxides, although the morphology of cobalt hydroxides was greatly influenced by the precursor salts. The cobalt oxides with average crystal size less than 20 nm were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, BET surface area, and XPS analysis. The photocatalytic activities of the various cobalt oxides morphologies were investigated by comparing the photo-degradation of acetaldehyde under simulated solar illumination. Relative to their low order structures and reference titania samples, the hierarchical nanostructures of cobalt oxide showed excellent abilities to rapidly degrade acetaldehyde, a model air pollutant. This was attributed to the unique nature of these hierarchical cobalt oxide nanoassemblies, which contained many catalytically active reaction sites and open pores

  17. Characterization and Catalytic Activity of Montmorillonite K10-Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montmorillonite K10-supported cobalt catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation method. The samples were analyzed by XRD, TPR, FTTR and BET characterization techniques. [Three phases of cobalt species were identified namely, cobalt oxide (Co3O4), cobalt silicate (Co2S1O4) and cobalt aluminate (CoAl2O4). These species were most probably existing within the inter lamellar spaces of the meso porous montmorillonite K10 support]. The two bands observed at 1385 and 760 cm1 were characteristic of metal species rather than the support, being mostly of Co - O bond vibration. The hysteresis loop, pore size distribution, pore volume and BET surface area were greatly affected by cobalt loading. The catalyst containing 18 wt% cobalt was the most selective sample for ethylene production from ethanol dehydration.

  18. Simultaneous Control of Microorganisms and Disinfection By-products by Sequential Chlorination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO CHEN; XIAO-JIAN ZHANG; WEN-JIE HE; HONG-DA HAN

    2007-01-01

    Objective To introduce a new sequential chlorination disinfection process in which short-term free chlorine and chloramine are sequentially added. Methods Pilot tests of this sequential chlorination were carried out in a drinking water plant. Results The sequential chlorination disinfection process had the same or better efficiency on microbe (including virus)inactivation compared with the free chlorine disinfection process. There seemed to be some synergetic disinfection effect between free chlorine and monochloramine because they attacked different targets. The sequential chlorination disinfection process resulted in 35.7%-77.0% TTHM formation and 36.6%-54.8% THAA5 formation less than the free chlorination process.The poorer the water quality was, the more advantage the sequential chlorination disinfection had over the free chlorination.Conclusion This process takes advantages of free chlorine's quick inactivation of microorganisms and chloramine's low disinfection by-product (DBP) yield and long-term residual effect, allowing simultaneous control of microbes and DBPs in an effective and economic way.

  19. Reversed flow injection spectrophotometric determination of low residuals of chlorine dioxide in water using chlorophenol red

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel,simple,rapid,sensitive and highly selective flow injection procedure for the spectrophotometrie determination of chlorine dioxide in the presence of other chlorine species,viz,free chlorine,chlorite,chlorate and hypoehlorite,is developed.The method is based on the discoloration reaction between chlorine dioxide and chlorophenol red and can overcome the shortcomings existed in direct speetrophotometrie determination for chlorine dioxide owing to the serious interference of free and combined chlorine.The procedure gave a linear calibration graph over the range 0-0.71 mg/L of chlorine dioxide.With a detection limit of 0.024 mg/L and a sample throughput of 60 samples/h.

  20. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  1. Removal of C.I. Reactive Red 2 by low pressure UV/chlorine advanced oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Yue; Wang, Wenlong; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hongying

    2016-03-01

    Azo dyes are commonly found as pollutants in wastewater from the textile industry, and can cause environmental problems because of their color and toxicity. The removal of a typical azo dye named C.I. Reactive Red 2 (RR2) during low pressure ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine oxidation was investigated in this study. UV irradiation at 254nm and addition of free chlorine provided much higher removal rates of RR2 and color than UV irradiation or chlorination alone. Increasing the free chlorine dose enhanced the removal efficiency of RR2 and color by UV/chlorine oxidation. Experiments performed with nitrobenzene (NB) or benzoic acid (BA) as scavengers showed that radicals (especially OH) formed during UV/chlorine oxidation are important in the RR2 removal. Addition of HCO3(-) and Cl(-) to the RR2 solution did not inhibit the removal of RR2 during UV/chlorine oxidation. PMID:26969069

  2. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26478356

  3. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr2+ system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and magneticproperties of cobalt chromite nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zákutná, Dominika; Repko, A.; Matulková, I.; Nižňanský, Daniel; Ardu, A.; Cannas, C.; Mantlíková, Alice; Vejpravová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2014), 1-14. ISSN 1388-0764 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/1250 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : cobalt chromite * hydrothermal method * nanoparticles * size effect * multiferroic materials Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.184, year: 2014

  5. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density

  6. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, A. Estrada de la; Garza-Navarro, M. A., E-mail: marco.garzanr@uanl.edu.mx; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  7. Reaction of ethanol on oxidized and metallic cobalt surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Matthew P.; Vohs, John M.

    2011-02-01

    The reaction of ethanol on metallic and oxidized cobalt surfaces was studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to determine the dependence of the reaction pathways on the cobalt oxidation state. The primary reaction for ethoxide species on metallic cobalt surfaces was decarbonylation producing CO, H 2 and carbon. This reaction was facile and occurred below 400 K. In contrast, CoO x surfaces which predominantly contained Co 2+ were selective for the dehydrogenation of ethoxide groups to produce acetaldehyde at 400 K. A fraction of the acetaldehyde molecules produced by this pathway were further oxidized to acetate which decomposed to produce CO 2 at 495 K. More highly oxidized Co surfaces that contained both CO 2+ and Co 3+ were active for the complete oxidation of ethanol producing CO, CO 2, and H 2O as the primary products. The insights that these results provide for understanding the mechanism of the steam reforming of ethanol on cobalt catalysts is discussed.

  8. Geometrical product specifications heat-resistant cobalt cast alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubimov V.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Geometrical product specification MAR-M509 cast cobalt alloy depend beginning temperature of multilayer ceramic shell moulds (MCS. It has found that go down temperature of MCS from 1000°C to 200°C, the increase surface roughness and its amplitude parameters: Sa, Sz, St, Sq, Sp and Sv.

  9. Geometrical product specifications heat-resistant cobalt cast alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Lyubimov V.; Opiekun Z.; Bonk C.

    2007-01-01

    Geometrical product specification MAR-M509 cast cobalt alloy depend beginning temperature of multilayer ceramic shell moulds (MCS). It has found that go down temperature of MCS from 1000°C to 200°C, the increase surface roughness and its amplitude parameters: Sa, Sz, St, Sq, Sp and Sv.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt-manganese oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt doped/un-doped manganese oxides materials were synthesized at various doping rates by soft chemical reactions, oxidation-reduction method, which allows generating a metal-mixed oxide. The synthesized materials were characterized using several techniques including chemical analysis, X-rays diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The chemical analysis confirmed the presence of cobalt in the samples. XRD patterns reveal mainly a spinel-like structure and SEM micrographs exhibited morphology with fine aggregate of particles. TGA profiles showed weight loss due to loss of water in a first step, followed by a loss of oxygen from the lattice associated with partial reduction of Mn4+ to Mn3+. VSM was used to measure the magnetization as a function of the applied magnetic field at temperatures T=50 and 300 K. Different magnetic behaviors were observed when cobalt percentage changed in the samples. These behaviors are considered to be related to the size of the particles and composition of the materials. Higher coercive field and lesser magnetization were observed for the sample with higher cobalt content.

  11. Study of DNA interaction with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, A G; Sazonov, A E; Novikov, D V; Knyazev, A S; Izaak, T I; Itin, V I; Naiden, E P; Magaeva, A A; Terechova, O G

    2011-03-01

    Interaction of cobalt ferrite nanopowder and nucleic acid was investigated. Superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (6-12 nm) were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. Structure of the nanopowder was characterized using X-ray diffraction. It was shown that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were associated with ssDNA and dsDNA in Tris-buffer resulting in bionanocomposite formation with mass weight relation nanoparticles: DNA 1:(0.083 +/- 0.003) and 1:(0.075 +/- 0.003) respectively. The mechanism of interaction between a DNA and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was considered basing on the whole set of obtained data: FTIR-spectroscopy, analyzing desorption of DNA from the surface of the particles while changing the chemical content of the medium, and on the modeling interaction of specific biomolecule fragments with surface of a inorganic material. It was supposed that the linkage was based on coordination interaction of the phosphate groups and oxygen atoms heterocyclic bases of DNA with metal ions on the particle surface. These data can be used to design specific magnetic DNA-nanoparticles hybrid structures. PMID:21449452

  12. Intercalated brucite-type layered cobalt(II hydroxysulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunlawee Yotnoi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to synthesize new cobalt(II sulfate framework structures using 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane as a template, crystals of poly[0.35-[hexaaquacobalt(II] [tri-μ-hydroxido-μ-sulfato-dicobalt(II

  13. Intercalated brucite-type layered cobalt(II) hydroxysulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Bunlawee Yotnoi; Sanchai Luachan; Timothy J. Prior; Apinpus Rujiwatra

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to synthesize new cobalt(II) sulfate framework structures using 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane as a template, crystals of poly[0.35-[hexaaquacobalt(II)] [tri-μ-hydroxido-μ-sulfato-dicobalt(II)

  14. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt-manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, J. [Laboratorio de Magnetismo y Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455-0153 (United States); Arias, N.P. [Laboratorio de Materiales Nanoestructurados y Funcionales, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Electronica y Computacion, Facultad de Ingenieria y Arquitectura, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Giraldo, O. [Laboratorio de Materiales Nanoestructurados y Funcionales, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Rosales-Rivera, A., E-mail: arosalesr@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Magnetismo y Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia)

    2012-08-15

    Cobalt doped/un-doped manganese oxides materials were synthesized at various doping rates by soft chemical reactions, oxidation-reduction method, which allows generating a metal-mixed oxide. The synthesized materials were characterized using several techniques including chemical analysis, X-rays diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The chemical analysis confirmed the presence of cobalt in the samples. XRD patterns reveal mainly a spinel-like structure and SEM micrographs exhibited morphology with fine aggregate of particles. TGA profiles showed weight loss due to loss of water in a first step, followed by a loss of oxygen from the lattice associated with partial reduction of Mn{sup 4+} to Mn{sup 3+}. VSM was used to measure the magnetization as a function of the applied magnetic field at temperatures T=50 and 300 K. Different magnetic behaviors were observed when cobalt percentage changed in the samples. These behaviors are considered to be related to the size of the particles and composition of the materials. Higher coercive field and lesser magnetization were observed for the sample with higher cobalt content.

  15. Nanosized Cobalt Oxides over Aluminum Monoliths for VOC Oxidation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.; Klempa, Jan; Balabánová, Jana

    Poznań: Poznan Science and Technology Park, 2016, P61. ISBN N. [Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts: Faraday Discussion. London (GB), 04.04.2016-06.04.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : cobalt oxides * Al monoliths * catalyst layer Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  16. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreici, Emiliana-Laura, E-mail: andreicilaura@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, West University of Timisoara, Bd. V. Parvan 4,300223 Timisoara (Romania); Petkova, Petya [Shumen University “Konstantin Preslavsky”, 115 Universitetska street, 9712 Shumen (Bulgaria); Avram, Nicolae M. [Department of Physics, West University of Timisoara, Bd. V. Parvan 4,300223 Timisoara (Romania); Academy of Romanian Scientists, Independentei 54, 050094-Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-12-07

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr{sup 2+} system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system.

  17. Anomalous Hysteresis Behavior in a Cobalt Ferrite Ferrofluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The magnetization of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid has been studied at low temperatures in the presence of the carrier fluid. A prominent difference between slow and fast cooled samples was observed. In particular the slow cooled samples display an anomalous increase in magnetization on field reversal. The data is analyzed in terms of the possibilities of both coherent and incoherent spin rotations.

  18. Cobalt (III) complexes as novel matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have synthesized a series of novel MMP-9 inhibitors containing cobalt(III) complexes. The synthesized cobalt(III) complexes are effective as enzyme inhibitors and the attachment of a biphenyl group enhanced the efficiency of enzyme inhibition up to 6-fold. When compared to the reported non-hydroxamate MMP inhibitors, the synthesized complexes showed comparable in vitro potency. The enzyme assay showed that the cobalt(III) complex can disrupt the zinc binding active site of MMP-9 and is proposed to work via a ligand exchange mechanism. Since histidine residues are essential for the catalytic activity of a large percentage of enzymes and zinc finger proteins, these cobalt(III) complexes can serve as a prototype inhibitor towards various zinc containing enzymes and proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc binding endopeptidases that play crucial roles in various physiological processes and diseases such as embryogenic growth, angiogenesis, arthritis, skin ulceration, liver fibrosis and tumor metastasis. Because of their implications in a wide range of diseases, MMPs are considered as intriguing drug targets. The majority of MMP inhibitors are organic small molecules containing a hydroxamate functionality for the zinc binding group. This hydroxamate group binds to a zinc(II) center in a bidentate fashion and creates a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry

  19. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels were prepared by soft citrate gel method. The synthesized material was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. All the samples showed a single-phase cubic structure. Lattice constant varies from 8.389 to 8.323 A. Transmission electron microscopic study indicated the nanostructure of the catalysts while homogenous grain distribution was presented by scanning electron microscopic studies. The catalytic activity of the samples was investigated towards acetylation of phenols. The presence of active centers on the surface of the material was confirmed through pyridine adsorption studies. The surface acidity of the catalyst is responsible for better catalytic performance. The material was found to serve as a promising catalyst for acylation and benzoylation of phenols under solvent free condition. These catalysts are ∼100% selective towards o-acylation of phenols, a promising reaction for perfumery intermediates. The catalysts were seen to be reusable without any further treatment. Catalytic activities of cobalt, chromium and iron oxides were also investigated for comparison. The cobalt ferrospinel was found to have better catalytic activity as compared to the Cr-substituted ferrospinels and the pure oxides. Cobalt ferrite catalyst offers high yields in a short reaction time under solvent-free conditions.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankare, P.P., E-mail: p_hankarep@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Sankpal, U.B., E-mail: sankpalumesh@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Patil, R.P. [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Lokhande, P.D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, Maharashtra, 411 007 (India); Sasikala, R. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels were prepared by soft citrate gel method. The synthesized material was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. All the samples showed a single-phase cubic structure. Lattice constant varies from 8.389 to 8.323 A. Transmission electron microscopic study indicated the nanostructure of the catalysts while homogenous grain distribution was presented by scanning electron microscopic studies. The catalytic activity of the samples was investigated towards acetylation of phenols. The presence of active centers on the surface of the material was confirmed through pyridine adsorption studies. The surface acidity of the catalyst is responsible for better catalytic performance. The material was found to serve as a promising catalyst for acylation and benzoylation of phenols under solvent free condition. These catalysts are {approx}100% selective towards o-acylation of phenols, a promising reaction for perfumery intermediates. The catalysts were seen to be reusable without any further treatment. Catalytic activities of cobalt, chromium and iron oxides were also investigated for comparison. The cobalt ferrospinel was found to have better catalytic activity as compared to the Cr-substituted ferrospinels and the pure oxides. Cobalt ferrite catalyst offers high yields in a short reaction time under solvent-free conditions.

  1. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O. F.

    2015-09-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm-3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe2O4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples.

  2. Cobalt (III) complexes as novel matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiyoun [Sungshin Women' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    We have synthesized a series of novel MMP-9 inhibitors containing cobalt(III) complexes. The synthesized cobalt(III) complexes are effective as enzyme inhibitors and the attachment of a biphenyl group enhanced the efficiency of enzyme inhibition up to 6-fold. When compared to the reported non-hydroxamate MMP inhibitors, the synthesized complexes showed comparable in vitro potency. The enzyme assay showed that the cobalt(III) complex can disrupt the zinc binding active site of MMP-9 and is proposed to work via a ligand exchange mechanism. Since histidine residues are essential for the catalytic activity of a large percentage of enzymes and zinc finger proteins, these cobalt(III) complexes can serve as a prototype inhibitor towards various zinc containing enzymes and proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc binding endopeptidases that play crucial roles in various physiological processes and diseases such as embryogenic growth, angiogenesis, arthritis, skin ulceration, liver fibrosis and tumor metastasis. Because of their implications in a wide range of diseases, MMPs are considered as intriguing drug targets. The majority of MMP inhibitors are organic small molecules containing a hydroxamate functionality for the zinc binding group. This hydroxamate group binds to a zinc(II) center in a bidentate fashion and creates a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry.

  3. Occurence of chlorinated aromatic compounds in filter deposits of an incinerator plant for radioactive waste. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic chlorination of chrysene, pyrene and fluoranthene yields complex mixtures of partly isomeric chlorine substituted PAHs. Their distribution resembles that of chlorine compounds previously found in filter deposits of an incineration plant for radioactive waste. In the micro fluctuation test these chlorinated products are strong mutagens to Salmonella typhimurium even without enzymatic activation. Frameshift mutations as well as basepair alterations take place. (Author)

  4. Human metabolism of orally administered radioactive cobalt chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the human gastrointestinal uptake (f1) and subsequent whole-body retention of orally administered inorganic radioactive cobalt. Of eight adult volunteers aged between 24 and 68 years, seven were given solutions of 57Co (T1/2 = 272 d) containing a stable cobalt carrier, and six were given carrier-free 58Co (T1/2 = 71 d). The administered activities ranged between 25 and 103 kBq. The observed mean f1, based on 6 days accumulated urinary excretion sampling and whole-body counting, was 0.028 ± 0.0048 for carrier-free 58Co, and 0.016 ± 0.0021 for carrier-associated 57Co. These values were in reasonable agreement with values reported from previous studies involving a single intake of inorganic cobalt. The time pattern of the total retention (including residual cobalt in the GI tract) included a short-term component with a biological half-time of 0.71 ± 0.03 d (average ± 1 standard error of the mean for the two nuclides), an intermediate component with a mean half-time of 32 ± 8.5 d, and a long-term component (observed in two volunteers) with half-times ranging from 80 to 720 d for the two isotopes. From the present data we conclude that for the short-lived 57Co and 58Co, more than 95% of the internal absorbed dose was delivered within 7 days following oral intake, with a high individual variation influenced by the transit time of the unabsorbed cobalt through the gastro-intestinal tract. - Highlights: • Gastrointestinal (GI) uptake, f1, of inorganic radioactive cobalt varies between 0.007 and 0.043 among humans. • Mean f1 among human volunteers was found to be 0.022 ± 0.003. • More than 95% of the estimated internal absorbed dose occurs within 7 d for the short-lived radionuclides 57Co and 58Co. • More than 60% of the time integrated absorbed dose from ingestion of 60Co occurs within 7 d. • Residence time of cobalt in the human GI-tract strongly influences the time integrated internal absorbed dose

  5. Formation of disinfection byproducts upon chlorine dioxide preoxidation followed by chlorination or chloramination of natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Guo, Wanhong; Lee, Wontae

    2013-06-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is often used as an oxidant to remove taste, odor and color during water treatment. Due to the concerns of the chlorite formation, chlorination or chloramination is often applied after ClO2 preoxidation. We investigated the formation of regulated and emerging disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in sequential ClO2-chlorination and ClO2-chloramination processes. To clarify the relationship between the formation of DBPs and the characteristics of natural organic matter (NOM), changes in the properties of NOM before and after ClO2 oxidation were characterized by fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and size and resin fractionation techniques. ClO2 preoxidation destroyed the aromatic and conjugated structures of NOM and transformed large aromatic and long aliphatic chain organics to small and hydrophilic organics. Treatment with ClO2 alone did not produce significant amount of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), but produced chlorite. ClO2 preoxidation reduced THMs, HAAs, haloacetonitriles (HANs) and chloral hydrate (CH) during subsequent chlorination, but no reduction of THMs was observed during chloramination. Increasing ClO2 doses enhanced the reduction of most DBPs except halonitromethanes (HNMs) and haloketones (HKs). The presence of bromide increased the formation of total amount of DBPs and also shifted DBPs to more brominated ones. Bromine incorporation was higher in ClO2 treated samples. The results indicated that ClO2 preoxidation prior to chlorination is applicable for control of THM, HAA and HAN in both pristine and polluted waters, but chlorite formation is a concern and HNMs and HKs are not effectively controlled by ClO2 preoxidation. PMID:23312737

  6. Durability of Selected Membrane Materials when Exposed to Chlorine Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikeland, Marianne Soerflaten

    2001-03-01

    This thesis is focusing on the durability of selected membrane materials when exposed to chlorine gas in the temperature range 30-100{sup o}C. Studies of the changes of membrane separation properties and the mechanisms promoting these changes have been studied. The selected membrane materials were poly(dimethylsioxane) (PDMS), Fluorel, fluorosilicone, and blends of PDMS and Fluorel. The thesis is organised in seven chapters. The first chapter gives an introduction to the background of the work. The second chapter presents the theory for gas separation using dense rubbery membranes. The properties of the selected membrane materials are presented in chapter three. The fourth chapter describes degradation mechanisms for polymeric materials in general and for the selected membrane materials in particular. Presentation of the experimental work is given in chapter five, while the results with discussions are presented in chapter six. The conclusions and recommendations for further studies are given in chapter seven. Five appendixes are attached: Appendix A describes the calculations of permeability and solubility coefficients and the accuracy of the experimental measurements. Appendix B summarises the measured values in tables and Appendix C describes the analytical methods. Appendix D gives the properties of the gases used in the experiments. Appendix E is the article ''Durability of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) when Exposed to Chlorine Gas'', submitted to the Journal of Applied Polymer Science. Highly crosslinked PDMS was found to have an initial high permeability for chlorine gas and a high Cl{sub 2}/O{sub 2} selectivity. However when exposed to chlorine gas the permeability decreased significantly. Crosslinking of the PDMS polymer chain and chlorination of the polymer gave a denser polymer structure and thus lower permeability. Fluorel showed very low permeabilities and selectivities for the gases in question and was thus not interesting for this

  7. Distribution of cobalt in soil from Kavadarci and the environs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the study of spatial distribution of cobalt in surface soil and subsoil over of the Kavadarci region, Republic of Macedonia, are reported. From the investigated region (360 km2) in total 344 soil samples from 172 locations were collected. At each sampling point soil samples were collected at two depths, topsoil (0-5 cm) and subsoil soil (20-30 cm). Inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied for the determination of cobalt. Data analysis and construction of the map were performed using the Paradox (ver. 9), Statistica (ver. 6.1), AutoDesk Map (ver. 2008) and Surfer (ver. 8.09) software. It was found that for both topsoil and subsoil the median and average values are 15 mg/kg, ranges between 6.7 and 58 mg/kg. The highest content of cobalt is present in the soil from the area of Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks (Pz-Mz) on the western part of the investigated area and Flysch (E) - Eocene upper flysch zone (on the northern part) and the lowest in the soils from the Holocene alluvium of the rivers Crna Reka and Vardar. There are no significant differences between the surface and subsoil in terms of its average quantities. It was found that the critically high contents are related primarily to high contents of cobalt in the sampling points from the western part of the investigated region. The contents of cobalt are higher in subsoil than in topsoil from which it can be concluded that the occurrence is natural.

  8. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulai, G., E-mail: georgiana.bulai@uaic.ro [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Bd. Carol I, nr. 11, 700506 Iasi (Romania); Diamandescu, L. [National Institute of Material Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 07125 Bucharest (Romania); Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Bd. Carol I, nr. 11, 700506 Iasi (Romania); Feder, M. [National Institute of Material Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 07125 Bucharest (Romania); Caltun, O.F. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Bd. Carol I, nr. 11, 700506 Iasi (Romania)

    2015-09-15

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm{sup −3} decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples. - Highlights: • Substitution by a large number of rare earth elements was investigated. • First reported results on magnetostriction measurements of RE doped cobalt ferrite. • The doped samples presented an increased porosity and a decreased grain size. • Increased magnetostrctive response was observed for several doped samples.

  9. The Cobalt-60 Research Facility at Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation facility which is now under construction at Seibersdorf was designed especially for research on the International Fruit Juice Programme. The plant consists of two irradiation chambers, with a capacity of 30 kCi and 10 kCi, respectively. The first is proposed to irradiate quantities of fruit juice for feeding tests and for investigations in source technology. The other was especially designed for research purposes in microbiology and chemistry and has an optimal versatility in source configuration and position according to the experiment conditions. The biological shield, ordinary concrete with a density of about 2.4 ton/m3, gives an outside dose- rate of 0.2 mR/h maximum; The rest position of both sources is a lead cylinder let.into the shielding concrete. Twelve stainless-steel tubes (six tubes for the small chamber), in which the cobalt rods are fitted, pass in a spheric gangway into the irradiation chamber. The 60Co rods of the 30 kCi facility, each with an outside length of 300 mm, consist of two linked parts. They may be arranged individually or in any combination within five seconds by an air pressure system. Different tubes with the respective curvature allow practically every arrangement of source geometry. The chamber, measuring 3 x 3 X 3 m inside, may be closed by a concrete door; a binocular periscope enables the scientist to observe the experiment during irradiation. The other facility, measuring 3.5 x 3 x 3 m inside, can be entered through a labyrinth and has a source activity of 10 kCi. Six rods,- with an outside length of 250 mm, may be moved individually by Teleflex cable. They can be stopped in any position desired, measured from the entrance into the chamber. For observing experiments, a monocular periscope system is installed. The room is controlled at a temperature of between -18°C and +35°C, with an accuracy of ±1°C. Several tubes, up to a diameter of 300 mm, pass the concrete shield to enable the installation of cables and

  10. Highly chlorinated unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutants generated during the methanol-based production of chlorinated methanes: A case study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifei; Yang, Wenlong; Zhang, Linli; Li, Xiaoxiu

    2015-08-01

    The formation of unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may occur during various chlorination processes. In this study, emissions of unintentionally produced POPs during the methanol-based production of chlorinated methanes were investigated. High concentrations of highly chlorinated compounds such as decachlorobiphenyl, octachloronaphthalene, octachlorostyrene, hexachlorobutadiene, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, hexachlorobenzene, and pentachlorobenzene were found in the carbon tetrachloride byproduct of the methanol-based production of chlorinated methanes. The total emission amounts of hexachlorocyclopentadiene, hexachlorobutadiene, polychlorinated benzenes, polychlorinated naphthalenes, octachlorostyrene, and polychlorinated biphenyls released during the production of chlorinated methanes in China in 2010 were estimated to be 10080, 7350, 5210, 427, 212, and 167 kg, respectively. Moreover, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) were formed unintentionally during chlorinated methanes production, the emission factor for PCDDs/DFs was 364 μg toxic equivalency quotient (TEQ) t(-1) product for residues, which should be added into the UNEP toolkit for updating. It was worth noting that a high overall toxic equivalency quotient from polychlorinated naphthalenes and PCDDs/DFs was generated from the chlorinated methanes production in China in 2010. The values reached 563 and 32.8 g TEQ, respectively. The results of the study indicate that more research and improved management systems are needed to ensure that the methanol-based production of chlorinated methanes can be achieved safely. PMID:25777670

  11. Separation of cobalt from synthetic intermediate and decontamination radioactive wastes using polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have been carried out on the removal of radioactive cobalt (60Co) from synthetic intermediate level waste (ILW) and decontamination waste using neat polyurethane (PU) foam as well as n-tributyl phosphate-polyurethane (TBP-PU) foam. The radioactive cobalt has been extracted on the PU foam as cobalt thiocyanate from the ILW. Maximum removal of cobalt has been observed when the concentration of thiocyanate in the solution is about 0.4 M. Cobalt can be separated from decontamination waste containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and iron(II). The extent of extraction of cobalt is slow and the separation of iron and cobalt is better with the neat PU foam compared to the TBP-PU foam. The presence of iron in the decontamination waste facilitates the extraction of cobalt thiocyanate on the PU foam. Column studies have been carried out in order to extend these studies to the plant scale. The capacities of the PU foams for cobalt have been determined. The effect of density and the surface area of PU foam have been investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral studies have been conducted to find out the interaction between PU foam and cobalt thiocyanate species

  12. Cobalt toxicity: Chemical and radiological combined effects on HaCaT keratinocyte cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandre, C.; Moulin, C.; Bresson, C. [CEA Saclay, DEN, SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides and Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Gault, N. [CEA Fontenay Roses, DSV IRCM SCSR LRTS, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France); Poncy, J. L. [CEA Bruyeres Le Chatel, DSV IRCM SREIT LRT, F-91680 Bruyeres Le Chatel (France); Lefaix, J. L. [CEA Caen, DSV IRCM SRO LARIA, F-14070 Caen (France)

    2010-07-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential trace element well known as a constituent of vitamin B{sub 12}, but different compounds of Co are also described as highly toxic and/or radio-toxic for individuals or the environment. In nuclear power plants, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co are radioactive isotopes of cobalt present as activation products of stable Co and Ni used in alloys. Skin exposure is a current occupational risk in the hard metal and nuclear industries. As biochemical and molecular cobalt-induced toxicological mechanisms are not fully identified, we investigated cobalt toxicity in a model human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. In this study, we propose a model to determine the in vitro chemical impact on cell viability of a soluble form of cobalt (CoCl{sub 2}) with or without gamma-ray doses to mimic contamination by {sup 60}Co, to elucidate the mechanisms of cobalt intracellular chemical and radiological toxicity. Intracellular cobalt concentration was determined after HaCaT cell contamination and chemical toxicity was evaluated in terms of cellular viability and clonogenic survival. We investigated damage to DNA in HaCaT cells by combined treatment with chemical cobalt and a moderate gamma-ray dose. Additive effects of cobalt and irradiation were demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of cobalt toxicity is not clearly established, but our results seem to indicate that the toxicity of Co(II) and of irradiation arises from production of reactive oxygen species. (authors)

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt-Carbon Core-Shell Microspheres in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-song Yang; Qian-wang Chen

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of cobalt-carbon core-shell microspheres in supercritical carbon dioxide system was investigated. Cobalt-carbon core-shell microspheres with diameter of about 1μm were prepared at 350℃ for 12 h in a closed vessel containing an appropriate amount of bis(cyclopentadienyl)cobalt powder and dry ice.Characterization by a variety of techniques,including X-ray powder diffraction,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,Transmission electron microscope,Fourier transform infrared spectrum and Raman spectroscopy analysis reveals that each cobalt-carbon core-shell microsphere is made up of an amorphous cobalt core with diameter less than 1 μm and an amorphous carbon shell with thickness of about 200 nm.The possible growth mechanism of cobalt-carbon core-shell microspheres is discussed,based on the pyrolysis of bis(cyclopentadienyl)cobalt in supercritical carbon dioxide and the deposition of carbon or carbon clusters with odd electrons on the surface of magnetic cobalt cores due to magnetic attraction.Magnetic measurements show 141.41 emu/g of saturation magnetization of a typical sample,which is lower than the 168 emu/g of the corresponding metal cobalt bulk material.This is attributed to the considerable mass of the carbon shell and amorphous nature of the magnetic core.Control of magnetism in the cobalt-carbon core-shell microspheres was achieved by annealing treatments.

  14. Synthesis and properties of new chlorin and bacteriochlorin photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Andrei F.

    1996-01-01

    A series of novel sensitizers, which absorb in the range of 660 - 820 nm, derived from natural occurring chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll was synthesized. Biomass of blue-green algae Spirulina platensis was used to prepare chlorophyll a derivatives, and biomass of purple bacteria Rhodobacter capsulatus was applied for preparation of bacteriochlorophyll a. The influence of different substituents on spectral characteristics and the amphipility of the sensitizer was investigated. The route for the synthesis of porphyrin macrocycle with the spacer that bears the isothiocyanate group capable for binding with proteins was proposed. Photophysical properties of chlorin p6, purpurin 18 and their esters in different solvents are investigated. Accumulation of two chlorins in the model Erlich tumor was studied.

  15. Second-generation photosensitizers based on natural chlorines and bacteriochlorines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Andrei F.

    1996-01-01

    New sensitizers for photodynamic therapy were synthesized on the base of biologically generated chlorins and bacteriochlorins. Derivatives of chlorophyll a and bacteriochlorophyll were prepared from the biomass of blue-green algae Spirulina Platensis and purple bacteria Rhodobacter Capsulatus, generated using specially designed photobioreactor. The strategy for chemical transformation of natural chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophyll has been discussed. Purpurin 18 and its dihydroanalogue bacteriopurpurin were chosen as the key intermediates. Modifications of peripheral substituents, such as introducing the new functional groups, hydrogenation of the B-pyrrolic ring, and insertion of amino acid residues gave the series of novel sensitizers, including water soluble chlorin p6 analogues, and derivatives with graded amphiphility for the studies of tumor accumulation in the malignant tissues.

  16. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most widespread groundwater contaminants in the country, contamination which is also among the most difficult and expensive for remediation. These solvents are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen, but this biodegradation requires both a food source for the organisms (electron donor) and the presence of chlorinated solvent biodegrading organisms. These two requirements are present naturally at some contamination sites, leading to natural attenuation of the solvents. If one or both requirements are absent, then engineered bioremediation either through addition of an external electron donor or through bioaugmentation with appropriate microorganisms, or both, may be used for site remediation. The most difficult case for cleanup is when a large residual of undissolved chlorinated solvents are present, residing as dense -non-aqueous-phase- liquid ( DNAPL). A major focus of this study was on the potential for biodegradation of the solvents when pre sent as DNAPL where concentrations are very high and potential for toxicity to microorganisms exist. Another focus was on a better understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in chlorinated solvent biodegradation . These studies were directed towards the chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). The potential for biodegradation of TCE and PCE DNAPL was clearly demonstrated in this research. From column soil studies and batch studies we found there to be a clear advantage in focusing efforts at bioremediation near the DNAPL. Here, chlorinated solvent concentrations are the highest, both because of more favorable reaction kinetics and because such high solvent concentrations are toxic to microorganisms, such as methanogens, which compete with dehalogenators for the electron donor. Additionally, biodegradation near a PCE DNAPL results in an enhanced dissolution rate for the chlorinated solvent, by factors of

  17. Environmental Behavior, Sources, and Effects of Chlorinated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohura

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental sources and behaviors of chlorinated 2- to 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs. ClPAHs are ubiquitous contaminants found in urban air, vehicle exhaust gas, snow, tap water, and sediments. The concentrations of ClPAHs in each of these environments are generally higher than those of dioxins but markedly lower than the concentrations of the parent compounds, PAHs. Environmental data and emission sources analysis for ClPAHs reveal that the dominant process of generation is by reaction of PAHs with chlorine in pyrosynthesis. This secondary reaction process also occurs in aquatic environments. Certain ClPAHs show greater toxicity, such as mutagenicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity, than their corresponding parent PAHs. Investigation of the sources and environmental behavior of ClPAHs is of great importance in the assessment of human health risks.

  18. Effect of odd hydrogen on ozone depletion by chlorine reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, T. M.; Cicerone, R. J.; Liu, S. C.; Chameides, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    The present paper discusses how the shape of the ozone layer changes under the influence of injected ClX for several choices of two key HOx reaction rates. The two HOx reactions are: OH + HO2 yields H2O + O2 and O + HO2 yields OH + O2. Results of calculations are presented which show that the two reaction rates determine the stratospheric concentrations of OH and HO2, and that these concentrations regulate the amount by which the stratospheric ozone column can be reduced due to injections of odd chlorine. It is concluded that the amount of ozone reduction by a given mixing ratio of ClX will remain very uncertain until the significance of several possible feedback effects involving HOx in a chlorine-polluted atmosphere are determined and measurements of the reaction rates and HOx concentrations are made at the relevant temperatures.

  19. Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, a chemical sensor was developed which showed almost perfect selectivity to vapors of chlorinated solvents. When interfaced to an instrument, a chemical analyzer will be produced that has near- absolute selectivity to vapors of volatile chlorinated organic compounds. TRI has just completed the second of a 2-phase program to develop this new instrument system, which is called the RCL MONITOR. In Phase II, this instrument was deployed in 5 EM40 operations. Phase II applications covered clean-up process monitoring, environmental modeling, routine monitoring, health and safety, and technology validation. Vapor levels between 0 and 100 ppM can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.5 ppM using the hand-portable instrument. Based on the favorable performance of the RCL MONITOR, the commercial instrument was released for commercial sales on Sept. 20, 1996

  20. Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons at cold temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study of the viability of intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons at cold temperatures, at a former landfill site, some 300 km northeast of Edmonton. The landfill was also used for disposing of various hydrocarbon-based products of environmental concern.The project was conducted in four phases, i. e. site investigation, analysis of contaminant concentration, microbial study in the laboratory, and computer fate and transport modeling, with the primary focus being on the effect of cold temperatures on the rate of reductive dechlorination. Preliminary analysis of the results shows considerable evidence for the biodegradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and confirms intrinsic bioremediation as a viable option for cold temperature sites. 20 refs., 7 figs

  1. Chlorine trifluoride (1963); Le trifluorure de chlore (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, L.M.; Gillardeau, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    This monograph on chlorine trifluoride may be considered as a working tool useful in gaseous diffusion research. It consists of data gathered from the literature and includes furthermore a certain amount of original data. This monograph groups together the physical, chemical and physiological properties of chlorine trifluoride, as well as the preparation and analytical methods. It has been thought wise to add some technological information, and the safety regulations governing its use. (authors) [French] Cette monographie sur le trifluorure de chlore doit etre consideree comme un instrument de travail dans le cadre des recherches sur la diffusion gazeuse. Il etait necessaire de grouper les donnees eparses dans la litterature. Elle comprend en outre un certain nombre de donnees originales. Cette monographie groupe les proprietes physiques, chimiques et physiologiques du trifluorure de chlore, ainsi que ses methodes de preparation et d'analyse. On a juge utile de joindre des indications technologiques et les consignes de securite concernant son emploi. (auteurs)

  2. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, P. L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig, S.

    2003-12-11

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most widespread groundwater contaminants in the country, contamination which is also among the most difficult and expensive for remediation. These solvents are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen, but this biodegradation requires both a food source for the organisms (electron donor) and the presence of chlorinated solvent biodegrading organisms. These two requirements are present naturally at some contamination sites, leading to natural attenuation of the solvents. If one or both requirements are absent, then engineered bioremediation either through addition of an external electron donor or through bioaugmentation with appropriate microorganisms, or both, may be used for site remediation. The most difficult case for cleanup is when a large residual of undissolved chlorinated solvents are present, residing as dense -non-aqueous-phase- liquid ( DNAPL). A major focus of this study was on the potential for biodegradation of the solvents when pre sent as DNAPL where concentrations are very high and potential for toxicity to microorganisms exist. Another focus was on a better understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in chlorinated solvent biodegradation . These studies were directed towards the chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). The potential for biodegradation of TCE and PCE DNAPL was clearly demonstrated in this research. From column soil studies and batch studies we found there to be a clear advantage in focusing efforts at bioremediation near the DNAPL. Here, chlorinated solvent concentrations are the highest, both because of more favorable reaction kinetics and because such high solvent concentrations are toxic to microorganisms, such as methanogens, which compete with dehalogenators for the electron donor. Additionally, biodegradation near a PCE DNAPL results in an enhanced dissolution rate for the chlorinated solvent, by factors of

  3. Gas Phase Sulfur, Chlorine and Potassium Chemistry in Biomass Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løj, Lusi Hindiyarti

    2007-01-01

    Gas Phase Sulfur, Chlorine and Alkali Metal Chemistry in Biomass Combustion Concern about aerosols formation, deposits, corrosion, and gaseous emissions during biomass combustion, especially straw, continues to be a driving force for investigation on S, Cl, K-containing species under combustions...... uncertainties. In the present work, the detailed kinetic model for gas phase sulfur, chlorine, alkali metal, and their interaction has been updated. The K/O/H/Cl chemistry, S chemistry, and their interaction can reasonably predict a range of experimental data. In general, understanding of the interaction...... sulfur chemistry important for the SO2/SO3 ratio under combustion conditions has been updated. The uncertainties of the important rate constants have been minimized. Modeling predictions with a revised reaction mechanism for SO2/SO3 chemistry are in a good agreement with a range of experimental data from...

  4. MECHANISM OF CHLORATE FORMATION IN CHLORINE DIOIXDE DELIGNIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung-HoYoon; Li-JunWangI; Se-JongKim

    2004-01-01

    The effect of pH on chlorate formation duringchlorine dioxide delignification of oxygen delignifiedkraft pulp was studied. Chlorate formation was foundto increase slightly when pH was increased from 1.8to 2.5, further increase of pH decreased chlorateformation.The above phenomenon is explained by thecombination of two mechanisms, one by the reactionbetween hypochlorous acid and chlorite, another bythe effect of chlorine on the regeneration of chlorinedioxide. The first mechanism suggests that chlorateformation is highly dependent on HC10concentration which decreases with increasing pHand causes chlorate formation to behave in the sametrend. The second mechanism suggests that chlorinefavors the regeneration of chlorine dioxide whileHCIO favors chlorate formation, thus lowering thepH from about 4 to the acidic end should decreaseschlorate formation. Thethe maximum formation2.5.two opposite effects lead toof chlorate at around pH

  5. First Derivative UV Spectra of Surface Water as a Monitor of Chlorination in Drinking Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zitko

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries require the presence of free chlorine at about 0.1 mg/l in their drinking water supplies. For various reasons, such as cast-iron pipes or long residence times in the distribution system, free chlorine may decrease below detection limits. In such cases it is important to know whether or not the water was chlorinated or if nonchlorinated water entered the system by accident. Changes in UV spectra of natural organic matter in lakewater were used to assess qualitatively the degree of chlorination in the treatment to produce drinking water. The changes were more obvious in the first derivative spectra. In lakewater, the derivative spectra have a maximum at about 280 nm. This maximum shifts to longer wavelengths by up to 10 nm, decreases, and eventually disappears with an increasing dose of chlorine. The water treatment system was monitored by this technique for over 1 year and changes in the UV spectra of water samples were compared with experimental samples treated with known amounts of chlorine. The changes of the UV spectra with the concentration of added chlorine are presented. On several occasions, water, which received very little or no chlorination, may have entered the drinking water system. The results show that first derivative spectra are potentially a tool to determine, in the absence of residual chlorine, whether or not surface water was chlorinated during the treatment to produce potable water.

  6. Synthesis and spectral properties of novel chlorinated pH fluorescent probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xianglong [Key Laboratory For Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Tai Bai Bei Lu 229, Xi' an 710069, Shaanxi (China); Jin Xilang; Wang Yunxia [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Tai Bai Bei Lu 229, Xi' an 710069, Shaanxi (China); Mei Qibing [Key Laboratory For Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Li Jianli, E-mail: lijianli@nwu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Tai Bai Bei Lu 229, Xi' an 710069, Shaanxi (China); Shi Zhen, E-mail: gahpyudx@163.co [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Tai Bai Bei Lu 229, Xi' an 710069, Shaanxi (China)

    2011-04-15

    Eight chlorinated fluoresceins have been synthesized by the reaction of chlorinated resorcinols with 4, 5, 6, 7-tetrachlorophthalic anhydride or 3, 6-dichloro-4-carboxyphthalic anhydride in the presence of methanesulfonic acid. The spectral properties of the chlorinated fluoresceins were studied. It was found that they have absorption and emission maxima at long wavelengths and high fluorescence quantum yields. Emission spectra of chlorinated fluoresceins shifted towards long wavelength with increase in chlorine. pH-dependent properties of chlorinated fluoresceins were studied in detail. These compounds showed a strongly pH-sensitive range of 3.0-7.0. These chlorinated fluoresceins will be used as pH probes for pH measurement of the cell because of the high quantum yield and strong pH-sensitivity. - Research highlights: Eight chlorinated fluoresceins have been synthesized in the presence of methanesulfonic acid. Emission spectra of these compounds shifted towards long wavelength with increase in chlorine. Eight chlorinated fluoresceins showed a strongly pH-sensitive range of 3.0-7.0. They have emission maxima at long wavelengths and high fluorescence quantum yields.

  7. Effects of combined UV and chlorine treatment on chloroform formation from triclosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Weiwei; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The co-exposure to UV irradiation and free chlorine may occur in certain drinking water and wastewater treatment systems. This study investigated the effects of simultaneous low pressure ultraviolet (LPUV) irradiation and free chlorination on the formation of chloroform from triclosan which is a commonly used antibacterial agent. Different treatment systems (i.e., combined UV/chlorine, UV alone, and chlorine alone) were applied to examine the degradation of triclosan and formation of chloroform. The fate of representative intermediates, including chlorinated triclosan, dechlorinated triclosan intermediates and 2,4-dichlorophenol, were tracked to deduce the effect of combined UV/chlorine on the transformation of chloroform formation precursors. The relation between intermediates degradation and chloroform formation was investigated in depth by conducting stepwise experiments with UV and chlorine in different sequences. Results indicate that the combined UV/chlorine notably enhanced the chloroform formation from triclosan. From the reaction mechanism perspective the combined UV/chlorine, where the direct photolysis may play an important role, could accelerate the decay of intermediates and facilitate the generation of productive chloroform precursors. The radicals had modest influence on the degradation of triclosan and intermediates and partly hindered the formation of chloroform. These results emphasize the necessity of considering disinfection by-products formation in the application of combined UV/chlorine technology during water treatment. PMID:26746417

  8. Heat inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice exposed to chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, J P; Frank, J F

    2000-08-01

    Exposure of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to chlorine before heat treatment results in increased production of heat shock proteins. Current heating regimens for pasteurizing apple cider do not account for chlorine exposure in the wash water. This research determined the effect of sublethal chlorine treatment on thermal inactivation of E. coli O157:H7. D58-values were calculated for stationary-phase cells exposed to 0.6 mg/liter of total available chlorine and unchlorinated cells in commercial shelf-stable apple juice (pH 3.6). D58-values for unchlorinated and chlorine-exposed cells in buffer were 5.45 and 1.65 min, respectively (P D58-values calculated from these populations are 0.77 min for unexposed cells and 1.19 min for chlorine-exposed cells (P = 0.05). This indicates that a subpopulation of chorine-treated cells is possibly more resistant to heat because of chlorine treatment. The effect of chlorine treatment, however, is insignificant when compared with the effect of losing the shoulder. This is illustrated by the time required to kill the initial 90% of the cell population. This is observed to be 3.14 min for unchlorinated versus 0.3 min for chlorine-exposed cells (P < 0.001). These observations indicate that current heat treatments need not be adjusted for the effect of chlorine treatment. PMID:10945574

  9. Pandora's Poison: Chlorine, Health, and a New Environmental Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    THORNTON, J.

    2002-01-01

    This book focuses on a group of chemicals, organochlorines, that tops the list of all global and environmental contaminants. The author analyzes the cause and effects of problems associated with producing chlorine-based substances. The book examines organochlorines by looking at major sources, the health impacts on humans and wildlife, and its relation to cancer. The author concludes by suggesting policies and alternatives that can reduce the negative impact of organochlorines.

  10. Chlorine dioxide against bacteria and yeasts from the alcoholic fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Meneghin, Silvana Perissatto; Reis, Fabricia Cristina; de Almeida, Paulo Garcia; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2008-01-01

    The ethanol production in Brazil is carried out by fed-batch or continuous process with cell recycle, in such way that bacterial contaminants are also recycled and may be troublesome due to the substrate competition. Addition of sulphuric acid when inoculum cells are washed can control the bacterial growth or alternatively biocides are used. This work aimed to verify the effect of chlorine dioxide, a well-known biocide for bacterial decontamination of water and equipments, against contaminant...

  11. Flash photolysis of chlorine dioxide in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary process when aqueous solutions of chlorine dioxide are flash photo-lysed by light with a wave length greater than 270 nm is: OClO →hν ClO (2Π) + O (3P). The photochemical decomposition is characterized by the formation of small quantities of O (3P) atoms and of equal amounts of chlorine atoms and molecular oxygen, the latter originating in the reaction: ClOO → Cl + O2. The isomer ClOO is formed by the germinate recombination of ClO and O, a process which is twice as important as diffusion of the fragments into the mass of the solution and one which represents 30 per cent of the decomposition of the chlorine dioxide. Under our experimental conditions, the lifetime of the ClOO is less than one microsecond. Chlorine atoms are precursors of Cl2O2, whose UV absorption spectrum has been determined, and which is formed by the reactions: Cl + OClO → Cl2O2; Cl + Cl- → Cl2-; Cl2- + OClO → Cl2O2 + Cl- k = (1,0 ±0,1) 109 M-1s-1. Cl2O2 disappears by a first-order process which leads to the formation of the ions Cl- and ClO3-. Competition between the reactions: O (3P) + O2 → O3; O (3P) + OClO → ClO3. (kOClO + O)/(kO2 + O) = 1.85±0.25 has been studied and the molar extinction coefficient of ClO3 determined at its absorption maximum (255 nm): ε255nm = (920 ± 90) M-1 cm-1. (author)

  12. [Action modes of chlorine dioxide--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingken; Lai, Jieling; Zhan, Ping

    2012-04-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a highly effective disinfectant for food and potable water treatment. Till now, the action mode of ClO2 is still unclear. ClO2, can denature proteins by oxidizing tyrosine, tryptophan, and cysteine. We reviewed the pathways by which ClO02 reacts with important bio-molecules, as well as the primary target sites at individual cellular level of ClO2-induced biocidal effects. PMID:22799207

  13. Comparative Analytical Methods for the Measurment of Chlorine Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Unmesh Jeetendra

    2002-01-01

    Four commercially available methods used for the analysis of low-level Chlorine Dioxide (ClO2) concentrations in drinking water were evaluated for accuracy and precision and ranked according to cost, efficiency and ease of the methods under several conditions that might be encountered at water treatment plants. The different analytical methods included: 1.The DPD (N, N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine) method 2.Lissamine Green B (LGB) wet-chemical method 3.Palintest® kit LGB 4.A...

  14. Plasma chemical etching of gallium arsenide in chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most promising methods, used for the examination of the kinetics and determination of the moments of the start and completion of the processes of plasma chemical etching of a wide range of inorganic materials is optical emission spectroscopy. Therefore, the aim of this work was to examine the kinetic relationships of etching of gallium arsenide in chlorine plasma and determine the possibilities of the optical emission spectroscopy for examination and control of the process

  15. Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sterilization under Square-Wave Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Jeng, David K.; Woodworth, Archie G.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to study chlorine dioxide (CD) gas sterilization under square-wave conditions. By using controlled humidity, gas concentration, and temperature at atmospheric pressure, standard biological indicators (BIs) and spore disks of environmental isolates were exposed to CD gas. The sporicidal activity of CD gas was found to be concentration dependent. Prehumidification enhanced the CD activity. The D values (time required for 90% inactivation) of Bacillus subtilis subsp. ni...

  16. The influence of chlorine on the gasification of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, C. von; Struis, R.; Stucki, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Chlorides of the heavy metals copper, lead and zinc inhibit the CO{sub 2}-gasification reaction of charcoal. This is observed either by impregnation the wood with the salts before pyrolysis or by mechanically mixing the salts with the charcoal before gasification. Charcoal impregnated or mixed with ammonium chloride reacts more slowly than untreated charcoal. Treating the charcoal with HCl also influences negatively the gasification reactivity, indicating that chlorine plays an important role in the gasification. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs.

  17. The pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, A

    2012-01-31

    Swimming pool sanitation has largely been concerned with the microbiological quality of pool water, which is normally treated using a number of chlorine products. Recent studies have pointed to the potential hazards of chlorine by-products to the respiratory epithelium, particularly in indoor, poorly ventilated, pools. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether chronic exposure to indoor chlorinated swimming pools was associated with an increased likelihood of the development of asthma in boys. METHODS: The subjects were boys aged between 6 and 12 years. Data was collected by means of parental responses to a standardized asthma questionnaire (ISAAC: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood), supplemented with additional questions regarding frequency of attendance, number of years attendance, whether the child is a swimming team member. The questionnaire return rate was 71\\/% (n = 121). 23 boys were excluded on the basis that they had asthma before they started swimming (n = 97). There was a significant association between number of years a boy had been swimming and the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months (p = 0.009; OR = 1.351; 95% CI = 1.077-1.693) and diagnosed asthma (p = 0.046; OR = 1.299; 95% CI = 1.004-1.506). The greater the number the number of years a boy had been attending an indoor, chlorinated pool, the greater the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months or "had asthma". Age, parental smoking habits and being a swimming team member had no association with any of the asthma variables examined. Swimming pool attendance may be a risk factor in asthma in boys.

  18. The role of natural chlorinated hydroquinone metabolites in ligninolytic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Teunissen, P.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Ligninolytic Basidiomycetes have been reported to produce a wide variety of chloroaromatic compounds as secondary metabolites, which are structurally similar to environmental pollutants. Among these are chlorinated hydroquinone metabolites (CHM), such as 2-chloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (2Cl-14DMB), 2,6-dichloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (26DCl-14DMB), tetrachloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene and tetrachloro-4-methoxyphenol, which are synthesized by 11 genera of Basidiomycetes.The biosynthesis of these chlor...

  19. Solubility of chlorine in aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Mahir; Oktay, Münir; Kocakerim, M Muhtar; Copur, Mehmet

    2005-03-17

    The solubility of chlorine in aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions was studied. The effects of HCl concentration and temperature on the solubility were evaluated, and the thermodynamic parameters of the dissolution were calculated. It was found that the solubility isotherms had a minimum at about 0.5M HCl concentration at all the temperatures studied and that solubility decreased with the increase of temperature at all the HCl concentration range investigated. PMID:15752843

  20. Long term lung retention after inhalation of cobalt-oxide and cobalt-nitrate aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a single inhalation of the aerosol the long-term lung retention has been measured up to four years. The retained material is determined by its 57Co radioactivity using a gamma camera. Additionally the major lung clearance pathways are estimated by excretion analysis. The dogs have inhaled either monodisperse or bimodal distributed cobaltoxide aerosols in nine experiments with two dogs each. In another experiment dogs have inhaled a cobaltnitrate aerosol. The retention varies with the different aerosols but the agreement of the retention data of dogs inhaling the same aerosol is very good. The retention can be described by a sum of three exponential terms. For all experiments (even with cobalt-nitrate) which are running more than two years the long-term retention is best described with a biological half-life time (BHLT) of 400 days. The long-term fraction of the initial lung burden is about 10 percent. The short term is due to the mucociliary clearance of the tracheobronchial tree. Its fraction and BHLT correspond to the ICRP data. The intermediate phase depends on the solubility of the particles in the lung. The solubility of cobaltoxide particles in the lung depends on their size and chemical structure