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Sample records for chlorin e6 leads

  1. Intra- and intermembrane distribution of chlorin e6 derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorin, Vladimir P.; Zorina, Tatyana E.; Mikhalovsky, Iosif S.; Khludeyev, Ivan I.

    1995-01-01

    The parameters of chlorin e6 and trimethylester of chlorin e6 incorporation and distribution in suspensions of unilamellar liposomes of DMPC, DPPC, and DSPC, as well as efficiency of the pigment redistribution from liposomes to cellular membranes have been studied. Determination of the fraction of pigments' fluorescence which is accessible to quenching by a watersoluble quencher indicates that for both chlorins the outer monolayer of the liposomal membrane is more populated than the inner one. Gel-liquid crystalline phase transition induces a shift of a part of the pigments' molecules toward the inner monolayer. By means of ultrafiltration technique it is shown that chlorins binding to liposomal membrane occurs as partitioning between water and lipid phases. The partition coefficient is affected strongly by the type of pigment, the phase state of the lipid bilayer. Similar results were obtained when the influence of the physical state of the lipid bilayer on the rate of chlorins redistribution from liposomes to cellular membrane was studied. These findings show that diffusive mobility of the sensitizer in suspensions of cellular and model membranes is a complex process which is dependent on structural features of both the pigment and its biological carriers.

  2. Photodynamic activity of the boronated chlorin e6 amide in artificial and cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Kotova, Elena A; Omarova, Elena O; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Ol'shevskaya, Valentina A; Kalinin, Valery N; Nikitina, Roza G; Osipchuk, Julia S; Kaplan, Mikhail A; Ramonova, Alla A; Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Agapov, Igor I; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic tumor-destroying activity of the boronated chlorin e6 derivative BACE (chlorin e6 13(1)-N-{2-[N-(1-carba-closo-dodecaboran-1-yl)methyl]aminoethyl}amide-15(2), 17(3)-dimethyl ester), previously described in Moisenovich et al. (2010) PLoS ONE 5(9) e12717, was shown here to be enormously higher than that of unsubstituted chlorin e6, being supported by the data on much higher photocytotoxicity of BACE in M-1 sarcoma cell culture. To validate membrane damaging effect as the basis of the enhanced tumoricidal activity, BACE was compared with unsubstituted chlorin e6 in the potency to photosensitize dye leakage from liposomes, transbilayer lipid flip-flop, inactivation of gramicidin A ionic channels in planar lipid membranes and erythrocyte hemolysis. In all the models comprising artificial and cellular membranes, the photodynamic effect of BACE exceeded that of chlorin e6. BACE substantially differed from chlorin e6 in the affinity to liposomes and erythrocytes, as monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, flow cytometry and centrifugation. The results support the key role of membrane binding in the photodynamic effect of the boronated chlorin e6 amide.

  3. Energy transfer in complexes of water-soluble quantum dots and chlorin e6 molecules in different environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, Irina V; Orlova, Anna O; Maslov, Vladimir G; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Artemyev, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    The photoexcitation energy transfer is found and investigated in complexes of CdSe/ZnS cationic quantum dots and chlorin e6 molecules formed by covalent bonding and electrostatic interaction in aqueous solution and in porous track membranes. The quantum dots and chlorin e6 molecules form stable complexes that exhibit Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from quantum dots to chlorin e6 regardless of complex formation conditions. Competitive channels of photoexcitation energy dissipation in the complexes, which hamper the FRET process, were found and discussed.

  4. Assessment of anticancer effect of chlorin e6 dimethyl ether for photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kaplan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of the study for anticancer efficacy of photodynamic therapy with chlorin e6 dimethyl ether for treatment of outbread rats with sarcoma M-1 are represented. The drug was given intravenously or intraperitonealy at a dose of 1.25 mg/kg body weight (light dose – 300 J/cm2 or 2,5 mg/kg body weight (light dose – 150 J/cm2. The spectrometry showed that maximal drug accumulation in tumor was in 2 h after intravenous injection or 3 h after intraperitoneal injection of photosensitizer, thus, sensitized tumors were irradiated according to these time intervals. Intraperitoneal injection of chlorin е6 dimethyl ether at a dose of 1.25 mg/kg body weight with treatment session in 3 h and light dose of 300 J/cm2 was the most effective (the complete response in animals – 86%.

  5. Synthesis and Resonance Energy Transfer in Conjugates of Luminescent Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots and Chlorin e6 Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosyuk, A. A.; Artemyev, M. V.

    2013-05-01

    We synthesized a new type of conjugates of highly luminescent water soluble CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots covalently bound to Chlorin e6 dye molecules. We observed a resonance energy transfer from quantum dots emitting at 660 nm to Chlorine e6 molecules in our conjugates which can be utilized for phototherapy. Contrary to that quantum dots emitting at 588 nm show non-resonance quenching of excitonic luminescence without the energy transfer to dye molecules.

  6. Influence of metronidazole and some electron acceptors on the chlorin e6 photosensitized killing of Ehrlich carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekulayev, V.; Shevchuk, Igor; Mihkelsoo, Virgo T.; Kallikorm, A. P.

    1992-06-01

    A decrease in the effectiveness of photosensitized killing of neoplasm cells was observed in the presence of chlorin-e6 at a reduced concentration of oxygen. But when metronidazole (MZ) was injected in vitro as well as in vivo, a significant increase in the photosensitized killing of Ehrlich carcinoma cells by chlorin-e6 was observed. Moreover, contrary to the hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), MZ increases the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) by using chlorin-e6 not only in the hypoxic but also in the aerobic conditions. The interaction between MZ and the excited photosensitizer may account for an increased phototoxicity of chlorin-e6. The formation of cytotoxic nitroimidazole radicals as a result of photochemical processes of type 1 is discussed. This property of the photosensitizer may be successfully used in working out a method of potentiating PDT in combination not only with nitroimidazoles, but also with other electron acceptor compounds (EACp), e.g., quinone antitumor antibiotics.

  7. Biodistribution of Amine-Amide Chlorin e6 Derivative Conjugate with a Boron Nanoparticle for Boron Neutron-Capture Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    А.B. Volovetsky; N.Y. Shilyagina; V.V. Dudenkova; S.О. Pasynkova; М.А. Grin; А.F. Mironov; А.V. Feofanov; I.V. Balalaeva; А.V. Maslennikova

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study the biodistribution of amino-amide chlorin e6 derivative conjugate with cobalt bis-dicarbollide as a potential boron transporter for the tasks of boron neutron-capture therapy. Materials and Methods. The experiments were carried out on Balb/c mice with induced murine colon carcinoma CT-26. Amino-amide chlorin e6 derivative conjugate with cobalt bis-dicarbollide was administered intravenously, the dose being 5 and 10 mg/kg body mass. The sampling for m...

  8. In vitro studies of chlorin e6-assisted photodynamic inactivation of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C.; Mohrbacher, C.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bauer-Marschall, Ina; Krickhahn, C.; Stachon, A.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP), a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium located in gastric mucosa, plays an im- portant role in gastro carcinogenesis. Due to the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance, photodynamic inactivation of bacteria presents a new approach to treat bacterial infections, like HP. In vitro experiments were performed to determine the irradiation conditions for a complete inactivation of HP with the photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6). The HP strain CCUG 38770 (Culture Collection, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) was routinely cultured under microaerophilic conditions, suspended in sodium chloride, incubated with Ce6 and irradiated briefly with red light of the appropriate wavelength of λ = 660 nm. Series of measurements of different Ce6-concentrations (0.1 μM - 100 μM) were carried out, whereby the incubation time was kept constant at 1 min. The absorbed energy dose has been selected in varying the irradiation time (1 s - 300 s) and the power density (4.5 mW/cm2 - 31 mW/cm2 ). Quantification of inactivation was performed by enumeration of the grown colonies. In addition, the accumulation of Ce6 in HP cells was studied more precisely by uorescence spectroscopy. With a Ce6 concentration of 100 μM and a power density of 9 mW cm2 , a 6-log10 reduction in the survival rate of HP was achieved within 30 seconds of irradiation. In conclusion the most relevant factor for the inactivation of HP is the exposure time of irradiation, followed by the concentration of Ce6 and the light intensity. Further studies with HP strains obtained from patient specimens are under current investigation.

  9. Phycobilisomes Coupled Chlorin e6 Sensitized Solar Cells%藻胆体耦合Chlorin e6染料敏化太阳能电池的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于道永; 张建; 朱国良; 葛保胜; 黄方

    2010-01-01

    采用超声波破碎结合蔗糖密度梯度离心的方法从钝顶螺旋藻中分离出纯度较高的完整藻胆体,探讨了具有超大分子结构的藻胆体作为染料敏化太阳能电池(DSSC)敏化荆的可行性,考察了藻胆体与Chlorin e6在纳米TiO2电极上的耦合敏化作用.研究发现,藻胆体可以组装在纳米TiO2电极上作为DSSC的敏化剂,藻胆体DSSC的开路电压0.55 V,短路电流0.50 mA/cm2,光电转化效率0.19%;藻胆体与Chlorin e6耦合敏化可以增大DSSC的短路电流,提高光电转化效率,且高于藻胆体和Chlorin e6单独敏化的加和,表现出明显的耦合效应,为进一步探讨光合膜蛋白在光电材料中的应用奠定了基础.

  10. Polymer-bound meso-chlorin e6 for PDT (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinick, Nancy L.; Sun, Ying; Joyner, D. A.; Reed, R.; Spikes, John D.; Straight, Richard C.; Kopecek, Jindrich

    1992-06-01

    Two types of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer containing meso- chlorin e6 monoethylene diamine disodium salt (Mce6) were synthesized. The Mce6 was bound via pendant enzymatically degradable oligopeptide side chains (G-F-L-G) in one copolymer and was attached through noncleavable side chains (G) in the other. Preliminary experiments have been undertaken to compare their localization/retention behavior and their tumorcidal activity in vivo (A/J mice; C1300 neuroblastoma). Results of localization/retention experiments indicated that the Mce6 bound to the noncleavable copolymer was retained in the tumor and other tissues for a prolonged time period compared with free Mce6 or the Mce6 bound to the cleavable copolymer. Light activation of the Mce6 from the cleavable copolymer rendered a substantially more potent biological response in vivo than did the permanently bound Mce6. It is hypothesized and indirectly supported by photophysical data that both of the polymer-photosensitizer complexes are aggregated (or conformationally altered) under physiological conditions due to their hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties. In buffer at pH 7.4, the quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation by free Mce6 is three-fold higher than by the Mce6 bound to a noncleavable copolymer; adding detergent (CTAB), increased the quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation to a value consistent with that of the free Mce6. In vivo, if a sufficient time lag is allowed after drug administration for tumor cell lysosomal enzymes to cleave the Mce6 from the polymer containing degradable side chains, the Mce6 would be released in free form and behave with properties akin to the free drug. Due to the difference in cellular uptake mechanisms for free and bound drugs (and the targeting potential of the copolymer), a much higher local concentration in the tumor compared with surrounding tissue can be achieved with the polymer bound drug than the free photosensitizer. Side effects

  11. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Soo Khee; Bhuvaneswari Ramaswamy; Thong Patricia SP; Chin William WL; Heng Paul WS; Olivo Malini

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Methods Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human...

  12. The conjugates of carbon nanodots and chlorin e6 for enhancing cellular internalization and photodynamic therapy of cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiongwei; Wang, Shimiao; Huang, Zheng; Liu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a large heterocyclic aromatic molecule, is a promising photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT). We propose an efficient nano-photosensitizer delivery system based on covalent interactions between Ce6 and polyethylenimine (PEI) coated carbon nanodots (CDots). We observed  >50% Ce6 drug loading content for PEI, due to this compound’s unique ‘proton sponge effect.’ We found that the covalently incorporated Ce6 molecules retained their functional properties for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and PDT. The chemical characteristics of CDot-PEI-Ce6 and Ce6 were evaluated using different analytical methods, including transmission electron microscopy and UV-Visible absorption spectra. Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and fluorescence spectra were used to demonstrate that Ce6 successfully conjugated to the CDots. The high cellular uptake of CDots-PEI-Ce6 was confirmed using flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. According to the MTT assay, the CDots-PEI-Ce6 exhibited low dark toxicity and efficient PDT efficacy to HeLa cancer cells. These results indicate that CDot-PEI-Ce6 conjugates are potential photosensitizer delivery systems for PDT.

  13. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Khee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6 formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Methods Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Results Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Conclusion Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer.

  14. Photodynamic inactivation of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by chlorin e6 and red light (λ=670nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Katrin; Simon, Carole; Finke, Melanie; Bleses, Katharina; Birke, Martina; Szentmáry, Nora; Hüttenberger, Dirk; Eppig, Timo; Stachon, Tanja; Langenbucher, Achim; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Herrmann, Mathias; Seitz, Berthold; Bischoff, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDR-SA) are a frequent cause of antibiotic treatment refractory bacterial corneal infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is being discussed as a putative treatment option to cure this type of bacterial infection. Here we tested the in vitro susceptibility of a set of 12 clinically derived MDR-SA isolates with differing genetic backgrounds and antibiotic resistance profiles against photodynamic inactivation (PDI) by the porphyrin chlorin e6 (Ce6) and red light (λ=670nm). All tested clinical isolates displayed a 5-log10 reduction in viable cells by Ce6 and red light, when cells were preincubated with the photosensitizer at concentrations ≥128μM for 30min in the dark, and a subsequent irradiation with light at λ=670nm (power density: 31mW/cm(2), absorbed dose: 18,6J/cm(2)) was applied. Similarly, cells of the laboratory strain Newman required the same Ce6 pre-incubation and light dose for a 5-log10 reduction in cell viability. Inactivation of crtM in strain Newman, which interferes with pigment production in S. aureus, rendered the mutant more susceptible to this PDT procedure, indicating that the level of resistance of S. aureus to this therapy form is affected by ability of the pathogen to produce the carotenoid pigment staphyloxanthin. Incubation of freshly explanted porcine corneas with a 0.5% Ce6 gel demonstrated that the photosensitizer can diffuse into and accumulate within the stroma of the cornea in concentrations found to be sufficient to yield a 5-log10 reduction of the S. aureus cell pool in vitro. These data suggest that PDI with Ce6 and red light might be a promising new option for the treatment of MDR-SA induced corneal infections.

  15. Bio-photovoltaic conversion device using chlorine-e6 derived from chlorophyll from Spirulina adsorbed on a nanocrystalline TiO2 film electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amao, Yutaka; Komori, Tasuku

    2004-03-15

    A bio-photovoltaic conversion device based on dye-sensitised solar cell (DSSC) using the visible light sensitisation of chlorine-e6 (Chl-e6) derived from chlorophyll from Spirulina adsorbed on a nanocrystalline TiO2 film was developed. Form fluorescence spectrum of Chl-e6 adsorbed on a nanocrystalline TiO2 film, the emission of Chl-e6 was effectively quenched by TiO2 nanocrystalline indicating that the effective electron injection from the excited singlet state of Chl-e6 into the conduction band of TiO2 particles occurred. The short-circuit photocurrent density (Isc). the open-circuit photovoltage (Voc). and the fill factor (FF) of solar cell using Chl-e6 adsorbed on a nanocrystalline TiO2 film electrode were estimated to be 0.305 +/- 0.012 mA cm(-2), 426 +/- 10 mV, and 45.0%, respectively. IPCE values were reached a maximum around the wavelength of absorption maximum (7.40% at 400 nm; 1.44% at 514 nm and 2.91% at 670 nm), indicating that the DSSC using visible light sensitisation of nanocrystalline TiO2 film by Chl-e6 was developed.

  16. Chlorin e6-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy Suppresses P. acnes-Induced Inflammatory Response via NFκB and MAPKs Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yoon-Young; Ryu, A-Reum; Jin, Solee; Jeon, Yu-Mi; Lee, Mi-Young

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), consisting of photosensitizer, light, and oxygen has been used for the treatment of various diseases including cancers, microbial infections and skin disorders. In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effect of chlorin e6-mediated PDT in P. acnes-infected HaCaT cells using photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) and halogen light. The live and heat-killed P. acnes triggered an upregulation of inflammatory molecules such as iNOS, NO, and inflammatory cytokine in HaCaT cells and mouse model. Ce6-mediated PDT notably downregulated the expression of these inflammatory molecules in vitro and in vivo. Similarly, chlorin e6-mediated PDT was capable of regulating inflammatory response in both live and heat killed S. epidermidis exposed HaCaT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK were reduced by Ce6-mediated PDT. Ce6-mediated PDT also reduced the phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IĸBα and NFκB p65 in P. acnes-stimulated HaCaT cells. In addition, the dramatic increase in the nuclear translocation of NFκB p65 observed upon stimulation with P. acnes was markedly impaired by Ce6-based PDT. This is the first suggestion that Ce6-mediated PDT suppresses P. acnes-induced inflammation through modulating NFκB and MAPKs signaling pathways. PMID:28118375

  17. Chlorin e6 Prevents ADP-Induced Platelet Aggregation by Decreasing PI3K-Akt Phosphorylation and Promoting cAMP Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of reagents that prevent thrombosis have been developed but were found to have serious side effects. Therefore, we sought to identify complementary and alternative medicinal materials that are safe and have long-term efficacy. In the present studies, we have assessed the ability of chlorine e6 (CE6 to inhibit ADP-induced aggregation of rat platelets and elucidated the underlying mechanism. CE6 inhibited platelet aggregation induced by 10 µM ADP in a concentration-dependent manner and decreased intracellular calcium mobilization and granule secretion (i.e., ATP and serotonin release. Western blotting revealed that CE6 strongly inhibited the phosphorylations of PI3K, Akt, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and different mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 as well as p38-MAPK. Our study also demonstrated that CE6 significantly elevated intracellular cAMP levels and decreased thromboxane A2 formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we determined that CE6 initiated the activation of PKA, an effector of cAMP. Taken together, our findings indicate that CE6 may inhibit ADP-induced platelet activation by elevating cAMP levels and suppressing PI3K/Akt activity. Finally, these results suggest that CE6 could be developed as therapeutic agent that helps prevent thrombosis and ischemia.

  18. An efficient dual-loaded multifunctional nanocarrier for combined photothermal and photodynamic therapy based on copper sulfide and chlorin e6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoxiao; Pang, Xiaojuan; Lei, Mingzhu; Ma, Man; Guo, Fang; Wang, Jinping; Yu, Meng; Tan, Fengping; Li, Nan

    2016-04-30

    The therapeutic effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) was hampered by the poor water solubility and instability in physiological conditions of the photosensitizers. Here, we designed folate conjugated thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as the nanocarrier to improve the solubility, stability and biocompatibility of photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6). Based on the photothermal effect, we combined copper sulfide (CuS) as the photothermal agent to realize heat-triggered Ce6 release as well as synergistic effect of photothermal and photodynamic therapy. In vitro MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay showed that Ce6-CuS-TSL had low dark toxicity, while performed excellent phototoxicity under the combined 660 and 808 nm laser irradiation compared to any single laser irradiation alone. Moreover, in vivo combination therapy study revealed that Ce6-CuS-TSL inhibited tumor growth to a great extent without evident side effect under the laser irradiation. All detailed evidence demonstrated a considerable potential of Ce6-CuS-TSL for synergistic cancer treatment.

  19. Co-Delivery of Cisplatin Prodrug and Chlorin e6 by Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Chemo-Photodynamic Combination Therapy to Combat Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Jianliang; Su, Hua; Mu, Ge; Sun, Jing-Hua; Tan, Cai-Ping; Liang, Xing-Jie; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-06-01

    Combination therapy shows great promise in circumventing cisplatin resistance. We report herein the development of a novel nanoscale drug delivery system (nDDS) based nanotherapeutic that combines chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT) into one single platform to achieve synergistic anticancer capacity to conquer cisplatin resistance. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSNs) was used as the drug delivery vector to conjugate cisplatin prodrug and to load photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) to afford the dual drug loaded delivery system MSNs/Ce6/Pt. The hybrid nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 100 nm and slightly positive surface charge of about 18.2 mV. The MSNs/Ce6/Pt nanoparticles can be efficiently internalized by cells through endocytosis, thereby achieving much higher cellular Pt uptake than cisplatin in cisplatin-resistant A549R lung cancer cells. After 660 nm light irradiation (10 mW/cm(2)), the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MSNs/Ce6/Pt treated cells was elevated dramatically. As a result of these properties, MSNs/Ce6/Pt exhibited very potent anticancer activity against A549R cells, giving a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for the combination therapy of 0.53 μM, much lower than that of cisplatin (25.1 μM). This study suggests the great potential of nDDS-based nanotherapeutic for combined chemo-photodynamic therapy to circumvent cisplatin resistance.

  20. Bipolar tetraether lipids derived from thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius for membrane stabilization of chlorin e6 based liposomes for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Gihan; Jedelská, Jarmila; Strehlow, Boris; Bakowsky, Udo

    2015-09-01

    The initial burst release of water-soluble photosensitizers is one of the major problems encountered the development of controlled release formulations. In this study, the freely water soluble chlorin e6 (Ce6) was assembled with cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) to improve its loading efficiency in the liposomal bilayer. Tetraether lipids (TELs) derived from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were added to DOTAP:Ce6 assembly in a concentration range of 2.5×10(-4)-1.6×10(-3)M to stabilize the membrane rigidity of the liposomes and to provide controlled release system. From the comparative spectroscopic experiments, it has been shown that the assembled DOTAP:Ce6 along with addition of TELs have improved the loading efficiency of Ce6 in TELs-liposomes and obviously modified the release profile of Ce6. The in vitro cell viability of Ce6 in mouse neuro-blastoma (Neuro-2a) and ovarian cell carcinoma (SK-OV-3) confirmed neglected dark cytotoxicity and presented potential photo-induced cytotoxicity with the effect was being more pronounced in Neuro 2a than in SK-OV-3. In-situ IV-injection of chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) showed hemorrhage and necrosis 30 min post irradiation at 1.8 mol% TELs (19.9J/cm(2)). Higher TELs of 2.2 and 3.7 mol% in particular demonstrated localized vascular destruction within the irradiated area. Our results suggest that TELs favored slower release rates of Ce6. This, in turn, tetraether lipids can be considered as a versatile class of lipids for photodynamic modality for destruction of cancer cells and tumor vasculature while sparing the quiescent ones.

  1. Photoinactivation Using Visible Light Plus Water-Filtered Infrared-A (vis+wIRA) and Chlorine e6 (Ce6) Eradicates Planktonic Periodontal Pathogens and Subgingival Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmad, Ali; Walankiewicz, Aleksander; Hellwig, Elmar; Follo, Marie; Tennert, Christian; Wittmer, Annette; Karygianni, Lamprini

    2016-01-01

    Alternative treatment methods for pathogens and microbial biofilms are required due to the widespread rise in antibiotic resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has recently gained attention as a novel method to eradicate pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of a novel aPDT method using visible light (vis) and water infiltrated infrared A (wIRA) in combination with chlorine e6 (Ce6) against different periodontal pathogens in planktonic form and within in situ subgingival oral biofilms. Eight different periodontal pathogens were exposed to aPDT using vis+wIRA and 100 μg/ml Ce6 in planktonic culture. Additionally, pooled subgingival dental biofilm was also treated by aPDT and the number of viable cells determined as colony forming units (CFU). Live/dead staining was used in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy to visualize and quantify antimicrobial effects within the biofilm samples. Untreated negative controls as well as 0.2% chlorhexidine-treated positive controls were used. All eight tested periodontal pathogens including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Eikenella corrodens, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Slackia exigua, and Atopobium rimae and the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm were eliminated over the ranges of 3.43–8.34 and 3.91–4.28 log10 CFU in the log10 scale, respectively. Thus, aPDT showed bactericidal effects on the representative pathogens as well as on the in situ subgingival biofilm. The live/dead staining also revealed a significant reduction (33.45%) of active cells within the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm. Taking the favorable tissue healing effects of vis+wIRA into consideration, the significant antimicrobial effects revealed in this study highlight the potential of aPDT using this light source in combination with Ce6 as an adjunctive method to treat periodontitis as well as periimplantitis. The

  2. Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but it is also used to make pesticides (insect killers), rubber, and solvents. Chlorine is used in ... the following signs and symptoms may develop: Blurred vision Burning pain, redness, and blisters on the skin ...

  3. Influence of the carbohydrate fragment position in the macrocycle of chlorine e6 trimethyl ester glycosylated derivatives on their in vitro photo- induced activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Yakubovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical and photophysical properties, as well as photo-induced activity, of glycoconjugates based on chlorine е6 trimethyl ether with various positions of carbohydrate fragment in the macrocycle have been studied. The photo-induced activity was investigated in the human (HEp2, A549 and HT29 and animal (LLC cell lines. The tested compounds showed in vitro both high photo-induced activity and high stability in the dark. The photosensitizer with galactose in the A pirrole ring demonstrated the highest activity (the half maximal inhibitory concentration (ИК50 varied from 27±2 nM to 75±5 nM in tests on different cell lines. Dyes with sugar substitutes in the C pirrole ring were 5–10 times less active. 

  4. Chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Following a brief description of the use of chlorine as a chemical warfare agent in World War I, this chapter summarizes physical and chemical data and recent clinical and controlled laboratory studies on the irritant and lethal effects of chlorine. The mechanism of toxicity for both irritation and lethal effects is described. The mathematical relationship between concentration and exposure duration for a set endpoint is given for both an irritancy response and mortality. This information can be used to assist in time-scaling for the set endpoint to other exposure durations. Risk assessment addresses the potential for greater effects in sensitive populations such as asthmatics. A concentration of 0.5 ppm for up to 8 hours is a no-adverse-effect concentration in most sensitive subjects; whereas, a concentration of 1.0 ppm induces some sensory irritation and transient changes in respiratory tract airflow parameters. Treatment and intervention of exposed individuals is dependent upon symptoms

  5. Identification of intermediates leading to chloroform and C-4 diacids in the chlorination of humic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Leer, E.W.B. de; Erkelens, Corrie; Galan, L.

    1985-01-01

    The chlorination of terrestrial humic acid was studied at pH 7. 2 with varying chlorine to carbon ratios. The principal products are chloroform, di- and trichloroacetic acid, and chlorinated C-4 diacids. At a high chlorine dose many new chlorination products were detected, among them chlorinated aro

  6. Minimal E6 unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susič, Vasja

    2016-06-01

    A realistic model in the class of renormalizable supersymmetric E6 Grand Unified Theories is constructed. Its matter sector consists of 3 × 27 representations, while the Higgs sector is 27 +27 ¯+35 1'+35 1' ¯+78 . An analytic solution for a Standard Model vacuum is found and the Yukawa sector analyzed. It is argued that if one considers the increased predictability due to only two symmetric Yukawa matrices in this model, it can be considered a minimal SUSY E6 model with this type of matter sector. This contribution is based on Ref. [1].

  7. Chlorine doping reduces electron-hole recombination in lead iodide perovskites: time-domain ab initio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-11-19

    Rapid development in lead halide perovskites has led to solution-processable thin film solar cells with power conversion efficiencies close to 20%. Nonradiative electron-hole recombination within perovskites has been identified as the main pathway of energy losses, competing with charge transport and limiting the efficiency. Using nonadiabatic (NA) molecular dynamics, combined with time-domain density functional theory, we show that nonradiative recombination happens faster than radiative recombination and long-range charge transfer to an acceptor material. Doping of lead iodide perovskites with chlorine atoms reduces charge recombination. On the one hand, chlorines decrease the NA coupling because they contribute little to the wave functions of the valence and conduction band edges. On the other hand, chlorines shorten coherence time because they are lighter than iodines and introduce high-frequency modes. Both factors favor longer excited-state lifetimes. The simulation shows good agreement with the available experimental data and contributes to the comprehensive understanding of electronic and vibrational dynamics in perovskites. The generated insights into design of higher-efficiency solar cells range from fundamental scientific principles, such as the role of electron-vibrational coupling and quantum coherence, to practical guidelines, such as specific suggestions for chemical doping.

  8. [Effect of chlorine and phosphorus on water soluble and exchangeable lead in a soil contaminated by lead and zinc mining tailings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bi-ling; Xie, Zheng-miao; Li, Jing; Wu, Wei-hong; Jiang, Jun-tao

    2008-06-01

    Effect of chlorine on in situ lead immobilization using phosphorus in a soil contaminated by lead and zinc mining tailings was evaluated. The results showed that water soluble and exchangeable Pb were reduced by 92.0%-95.1% in the soil after P application. It was also suggested that application dosage of phosphorus at the P/Pb molar ratio of 0.6, was enough to remediate Pb toxicity in the soil. Compared to without Cl treatment at the level of molar ratio of 0.6 P/Ph, water soluble and exchangeable Pb in the soil treated with Cl was reduced markedly. It was concluded that the effects chlorine addition on in situ lead (Pb) immobilization using phosphate were improved. Visual MINTEQ model was employed to figure out Pb and P species distribution and saturation indices for minerals in the soils treated by P and Cl. The results showed that Pb activity was controlled by lead phosphate in the soil, especially pyromorphite [Pb5(PO4)3Cl], which would be the reason for Pb bioactivity reduction in the soil after application of Cl and P. The effective Pb bioactivity reduction indicated that addition of Cl was necessary to to improve in situ lead immobilization using phosphorous in the lead-contaminated soil.

  9. Study on the photosensitizing effects and tumor-photobiological activity of chlorin e6 amide derivatives%二氢卟吩e6酰胺衍生物的光敏效应及肿瘤光生物活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章玲; 姚建忠; 刘建飞; 王小燕; 张万年; 周有骏; 朱驹; 吕加国

    2002-01-01

    目的寻找新型的光动力治疗肿瘤新药.方法以蚕沙叶绿素粗提物为原料合成4种二氢卟吩e6酰胺衍生物(Ⅰ1~Ⅰ4),并测定其光敏效应和肿瘤光生物活性.结果Ⅰ1~Ⅰ4表现出较强的光敏效应,且强于参比药物血卟啉衍生物(hematoporphyrin derivative, HPD);Ⅰ1~Ⅰ4对小鼠S180肉瘤有较好的光动力损伤作用,其中Ⅰ3的光动力损伤作用要好于HPD.结论提示二氢卟吩e6酰胺衍生物是一类具有发展前途的光动力抗肿瘤新药.

  10. E6Tensors: A Mathematica Package for E6 Tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Deppisch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We present the Mathematica package E6Tensors, a tool for explicit tensor calculations in E6 gauge theories. In addition to matrix expressions for the group generators of E6, it provides structure constants, various higher rank tensors and expressions for the representations 27, 78, 351 and 351'. This paper comes along with a short manual including physically relevant examples. I further give a complete list of gauge invariant, renormalisable terms for superpotentials and Lagrangians.

  11. E6SSM vs MSSM gluino phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The E6SSM is a promising model based on the group E6, assumed to be broken at the GUT scale, leading to the group SU(3×SU(2×U(1×U(1′ at the TeV scale. It gives a solution to the MSSM μ-problem without introducing massless axions, gauge anomalies or cosmological domain walls. The model contains three families of complete 27s of E6, giving a richer phenomenology than the MSSM. The E6SSM generically predicts gluino cascade decay chains which are about 2 steps longer than the MSSM’s due to the presence of several light neutralino states. This implies less missing (and more visible transverse momentum in collider experiments and kinematical distributions such as Meff are different. Scans of parameter space and MC analysis suggest that current SUSY search strategies and exclusion limits have to be reconsidered.

  12. E6SSM vs MSSM gluino phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Svantesson, Patrik; Hall, Jonathan P; King, Stephen F

    2012-01-01

    The E6SSM is a promising model based on the group E6, assumed to be broken at the GUT scale, leading to the group SU(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)\\times U(1)' at the TeV scale. It gives a solution to the MSSM {\\mu}-problem without introducing massless axions, gauge anomalies or cosmological domain walls. The model contains three families of complete 27s of E6, giving a richer phenomenology than the MSSM. The E6SSM generically predicts gluino cascade decay chains which are about 2 steps longer than the MSSM's due to the presence of several light neutralino states. This implies less missing (and more visible) transverse momentum in collider experiments and kinematical distributions such as M_eff are different. Scans of parameter space and MC analysis suggest that current SUSY search strategies and exclusion limits have to be reconsidered.

  13. Regulation of apoptosis by the papillomavirus E6 oncogene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Li; Li-Na Zhao; Zhi-Guo Liu; Ying Han; Dai-Ming Fan

    2005-01-01

    Infection with human papillomaviruses is strongly associated with the development of multiple cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The HPV E6 gene is essential for the oncogenic potential of HPV.The recgulation of apoptosis by oncogene has been relatel to carcinogenesis closely; therefore, the modulation of E6 on cellular apoptosis has become a hot research topic recently. Inactivation of the pro-apoptotic tumor suppressor p53 by E6 is an important mechanism by which E6promotes cell growth; it is expected that inactivation of p53 by E6 should lead to a reduction in cellular apoptosis,numerous studies showed that E6 could in fact sensitize cells to apoptosis. The molecular basis for apoptosis modulation by E6 is poorly understood. In this article, we will present an overview of observations and current understanding of molecular basis for E6-induced apoptosis.

  14. Low-energy electroweak model from E6×E'6 preons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sutapa

    1988-03-01

    A low-energy electroweak symmetry group is proposed from an E6×E'6 preon model which leads to SU(3)C×SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)YL×U(1)YR where SU(2)R can either be the usual left-right-symmetric model group or an ``inert SU(2)R'' with electromagnetically neutral gauge bosons. Additional discrete symmetries proposed in E6 models are obtained as a transformation of preons and conservation of quantum numbers. Among the results of this model are (i) the existence of two effective scales, metacolor (ΛM~1014 GeV) and hypercolor ΛH (1 TeV), (ii) preon substructures for vector leptons (both right and left handed), (iii) B-L number (1/3 for the g quark, (iv) neutral composite Higgs scalar bosons, and (v) small mixing angles between (E-d,e-),(d,g) states and neutrino mixing.

  15. HPV16 E6 and E6AP differentially cooperate to stimulate or augment Wnt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sominsky, Sophia, E-mail: sophia.tab@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Kuslansky, Yael, E-mail: ykuslansky@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shapiro, Beny, E-mail: benyshap@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Jackman, Anna, E-mail: jackman@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Haupt, Ygal, E-mail: ygal.haupt@petermac.org [Research Division, The Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina, E-mail: arina@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sherman, Levana, E-mail: lsherman@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    The present study investigated the roles of E6 and E6AP in the Wnt pathway. We showed that E6 levels are markedly reduced in cells in which Wnt signaling is activated. Coexpression of wild-type or mutant E6AP (C820A) in Wnt-activated cells stabilized E6 and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin/TCF transcription. Expression of E6AP alone in nonstimulated cells elevated β-catenin level, promoted its nuclear accumulation, and activated β-catenin/TCF transcription. A knockdown of E6AP lowered β-catenin levels. Coexpression with E6 intensified the activities of E6AP. Further experiments proved that E6AP/E6 stabilize β-catenin by protecting it from proteasomal degradation. This function was dependent on the catalytic activity of E6AP, the kinase activity of GSK3β and the susceptibility of β-catenin to GSK3β phosphorylation. Thus, this study identified E6AP as a novel regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway, capable of cooperating with E6 in stimulating or augmenting Wnt/β-catenin signaling, thereby possibly contributing to HPV carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • The roles of E6 and E6AP in the Wnt pathway were investigated. • E6AP stabilizes E6 and enhances E6 activity in augmentation of Wnt signaling. • E6AP cooperates with E6 to stabilize β-catenin and stimulate Wnt/β-catenin signaling. • E6AP and E6 act through different mechanisms to augment or stimulate Wnt signaling.

  16. E6 inspired supersymmetric models with exact custodial symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzorov, Roman

    2013-01-01

    The breakdown of E6 gauge symmetry at high energies may lead to supersymmetric models based on the standard model gauge group together with extra U(1)ψ and U(1)χ gauge symmetries. To ensure anomaly cancellation the particle content of these E6 inspired models involves extra exotic states that generically give rise to nondiagonal flavor transitions and rapid proton decay. We argue that a single discrete Z˜2H symmetry can be used to forbid tree-level flavor changing transitions, as well as the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. We present 5D and 6D orbifold grand unified theory constructions that lead to the E6 inspired supersymmetric models of this type. The breakdown of U(1)ψ and U(1)χ gauge symmetries that preserves E6 matter parity assignment guarantees that ordinary quarks and leptons and their superpartners, as well as the exotic states which originate from 27 representations of E6, survive to low energies. These E6 inspired models contain two dark matter candidates and must also include additional TeV scale vectorlike lepton or vectorlike down-type quark states to render the lightest exotic quark unstable. We examine gauge coupling unification in these models and discuss their implications for collider phenomenology and cosmology.

  17. E6 inspired SUSY models with exact custodial symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Nevzorov, R

    2012-01-01

    The breakdown of E_6 gauge symmetry at high energies may result in supersymmetric (SUSY) models based on the Standard Model (SM) gauge group together with extra U(1)_{\\psi} and U(1)_{\\chi} gauge symmetries. To ensure anomaly cancellation the particle content of these E_6 inspired models involves extra exotic states that can give rise to non--diagonal flavour transitions and rapid proton decay. We argue that a single discrete \\tilde{Z}^{H}_2 symmetry can be used to forbid tree--level flavor-changing transitions and the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. We present 5D and 6D orbifold GUT models that can lead to the E_6 inspired SUSY models of this type. The breakdown of U(1)_{\\psi} and U(1)_{\\chi} gauge symmetries that preserves E_6 matter parity assignment guarantees that the exotic states which originate from 27_i representations of E_6 as well as ordinary quark and lepton states survive to low energies. The considered E_6 inspired models contain at least two dark-matter candidates a...

  18. Analysis of the Cotton E6 Promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Aimin; LIU Jinyuan

    2005-01-01

    An E6 gene from sea island cotton (Gossypium barbadense) was expressed specifically in cotton fiber cells to transfer functions to cultivated species for better transgenic engineering. The regulatory activity of the E6 promoter region was then studied by isolating a 614-bp fragment of the 5'-flanking region from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum CRI-12) to produce a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct for analysis of tissue-specific expression in transgenic tobacco seedlings. Fluorescent analyses indicate that the relatively short E6 promoter is sufficient to direct green fluorescent protein expression specifically in the leaf trichomes (hair cells) of the transgenic tobacco plants. As cotton fibers are also unicellular trichomes that differentiate from epidermal cells of developing cotton ovules, the result suggests that the relatively short E6 promoter can serve as a fiber-specific expression promoter for genetic engineering to improve cotton fiber quality.

  19. Alternative Z ' bosons in E 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Eduardo; Erler, Jens

    2015-10-01

    We classify the quantum numbers of the extra U(1)' symmetries contained in E 6. In particular, we categorize the cases with rational charges and present the full list of models which arise from the chains of the maximal subgroups of E 6. As an application, the classification allows us to determine all embeddings of the Standard Model fermions in all possible decompositions of the fundamental representation of E 6 under its maximal subgroups. From this we find alternative chains of subgroups for Grand Unified Theories. We show how many of the known models including some new ones appear in alternative breaking patterns. We also use low energy constraints coming from parity-violating asymmetry measurements and atomic parity non-conservation to set limits on the E 6 motivated parameter space for a Z ' boson mass of 1.2 TeV. We include projected limits for the present and upcoming QWEAK, MOLLER and SOLID experiments.

  20. Alternative $Z'$ Bosons in $E_6$

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We classify the quantum numbers of the extra $U(1)'$ symmetries contained in $E_6$. In particular, we categorize the cases with rational charges and present the full list of models which arise from the chains of the maximal subgroups of $E_6$. As an application, the classification allows us to determine all embeddings of the Standard Model fermions in all possible decompositions of the fundamental representation of $E_6$ under its maximal subgroups. From this we find alternative chains of subgroups for Grand Unified Theories. We show how many of the known models including some new ones appear in alternative breaking patterns. We also use low energy constraints coming from parity-violating asymmetry measurements and atomic parity non-conservation to set limits on the $E_6$ motivated parameter space for a $Z'$ boson mass of~1.2~TeV. We include projected limits for the present and upcoming QWEAK, MOLLER and SOLID experiments.

  1. Overexpression of ligase defective E6-associated protein, E6-AP, results in mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Tufail, Rozina; Hokayem, Jimmy El; Jorda, Mercy; Zhao, Wei; Reis, Zizi; Nawaz, Zafar

    2012-02-01

    E6-associated protein (E6-AP) is a dual function protein. It acts as an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase enzyme and coactivator of steroid hormone receptors such as estrogen (ERα) and progesterone (PR) receptors. It promotes the degradation of ERα and PR through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it has been shown that the levels of E6-AP are inversely associated with that of ERα in human breast tumors. But the role of wild-type human E6-AP and its ubiquitin-protein ligase activity in mammary tumorigenesis is still unknown. To investigate this role, the authors utilized transgenic mice lines that specifically overexpress either the wild-type human E6-AP (E6-AP(WT)) or the ubiquitin-protein ligase defective E6-AP that contains C833S mutation (E6-AP(C833S)) in the mammary gland. To further substantiate the role of E6-AP in the development of breast tumorigenesis, it was also examined the expression of E6-AP in a large cohort of human breast cancer samples. The transgenic mice that overexpress wild-type E6-AP (E6-AP(WT)) fail to develop mammary tumors. Unlike the E6-AP(WT) mice, the E6-AP(C833S) mice that overexpress ubiquitin-protein ligase defective E6-AP protein develop mammary hyperplasia with a median latency of 18 months. These observations suggest that the inactivation of the ubiquitin-protein ligase function of E6-AP is sufficient to initiate the process of mammary tumor development. Furthermore, the data also suggests that E6-AP exerts its effects on target cells by modulating the protein levels and functions of ERα and PR. In addition, it was found in human breast cancer patients that the level of E6-AP is decreased in invasive breast tumors compared to normal breast tissue. Moreover, the authors also show that the survival patterns for E6-AP negative patients were worse compared to E6-AP positive patients. Taken together, these data suggests that E6-AP may act as a tumor suppressor in breast.

  2. E6 inspired composite Higgs model

    CERN Document Server

    Nevzorov, R

    2015-01-01

    We consider a composite Higgs model embedded into a Grand Unified Theory(GUT) based on the E_6 gauge group. The phenomenological viability of this E_6 inspired composite Higgs model (E6CHM) implies that standard model (SM) elementary fermions with different baryon or lepton number should stem from different 27 representations of E_6. We present a six-dimensional orbifold GUT model in which the E_6 gauge symmetry is broken to the SM gauge group so that the appropriate splitting of the bulk 27-plets takes place. In this model the strongly coupled sector is localised on one of the branes and possesses an SU(6) global symmetry that contains the SU(3)_C\\times SU(2)_W\\times U(1)_Y subgroup. In this case the approximate gauge coupling unification can be attained if the right-handed top quark is a composite state and the elementary sector involves extra exotic matter beyond the SM which ensures anomaly cancellation. The breakdown of the approximate SU(6) symmetry at low energies in this model results in a set of the ...

  3. Study on Chlorination Leaching New Technology for Lead Sulphide Concentrate%硫化铅精矿氯化浸出新工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑梅; 张福生; 丛自范

    2011-01-01

    研究了硫化铅精矿在盐酸-氧气体系中的氯化浸出过程.重点考察了各种参数对硫化铅精矿中铅和银浸出效果和硫在浸出渣中富集率的影响.结果表明,硫化铅精矿在氯化镁溶液中的浸出效果优于氯化钠溶液,在催化剂铜离子浓度为1.45 g/L、盐酸用量为理论量1.5倍、氧气流量40 mL/min、氯化镁浓度5.5 mol/L、浸出温度90℃、浸出时间7h、液固比6∶1的条件下,铅和银的浸出率分别达到99.11%和90.57%,硫富集率为90.12%.%Chlorination leaching process of lead sulphide concentrate in hydrochloric acid-oxygen system was studied. A variety of parameters on the effect of lead and silver leaching rate and enriching rate of sulfur in leaching residue were investigated. The results indicate that the leaching effect of lead sulphide concentrate in magnesium chloride solution is superior to that in sodium chloride solution. Lead and silver leaching rate achieved 99. 11%, 90. 57% respectively, and enriching rate of sulphur is 90. 12% under the optimum parameters that catalyst copper ion concentration is 1. 45 g/L, hydrochloric acid dosage is 1. 5 times to theoretical quantity, oxygen flow is 40 mL/min, magnesium chloride concentration is 5. 5 mol/L, leaching temperature is 90 ℃ , leaching time is 7 hours, ratio of liquid to solid is 6 : 1.

  4. Influence and Resolution of Nitrite-Leaded Chlorine Decay in Reclaimed Water%再生水中亚硝酸盐对余氯衰减的影响及其控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周广宇; 赵新华; 张蕾; 单金林

    2013-01-01

    Based on the water samples collected from a reclaimed water treatment plant (RWTP) in North China, the effect of nitrite and TOC on chlorine decay was investigated and a parallel first-order decay model was used to simu-late the experimental data. The result indicated that the reaction constant between nitrite and chlorine was higher than that between organic matter and chlorine;and nitrite consumed much more chlorine than organic matter after break-point chlorination. In order to stabilize the chlorine concentration in reclaimed water, two methods were proposed to restrain nitrite-leaded chlorine decay:adding ammonia and adjusting water to be alkaline before chlorination, each of which was tested by experiments and simulated with parallel first-order decay models. It is proven that the two meth-ods were both effective in stabilizing residual chlorine concentration. And then the residual-chlorine composition and chemical dosage of the two proposed methods were compared, and the result showed that adjusting water to be alka-lescent (pH=8.3) was better than ammonia addition, and thus the former method was recommended to be applied in the plant.%  根据华北地区某再生水厂的实际水质特点,通过实验比较了加氯消毒后水中 TOC、2 NO −对余氯消耗的影响;使用平行一级反应模型分析实验结果,发现折点氯化后亚硝酸盐耗氯反应的速率常数显著高于有机物耗氯反应,亚硝酸盐成为再生水中重要耗氯物质.为稳定再生水中余氯浓度,提出了2个方案:再生水中加氨或调节 pH值,分别进行了模型拟合和实验效果分析.通过对比加氨和调 pH 值方案的余氯成分和所需药剂投量,得出调节水体至弱碱性(pH 值为8.3)是更好的途径.本研究对再生水厂消毒工艺的设计、运行具有一定的借鉴意义,对保证再生水水质安全具有较高的实用价值.

  5. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found? Who is at risk? What are the health effects of lead? Get educational material about lead Get certified as a Lead Abatement Worker, or other abatement discipline Lead in drinking water Lead air pollution Test your child Check and maintain your home ...

  6. Dark matter in a constrained E 6 inspired SUSY model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athron, P.; Harries, D.; Nevzorov, R.; Williams, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate dark matter in a constrained E 6 inspired supersymmetric model with an exact custodial symmetry and compare with the CMSSM. The breakdown of E 6 leads to an additional U(1) N symmetry and a discrete matter parity. The custodial and matter symmetries imply there are two stable dark matter candidates, though one may be extremely light and contribute negligibly to the relic density. We demonstrate that a predominantly Higgsino, or mixed bino-Higgsino, neutralino can account for all of the relic abundance of dark matter, while fitting a 125 GeV SM-like Higgs and evading LHC limits on new states. However we show that the recent LUX 2016 limit on direct detection places severe constraints on the mixed bino-Higgsino scenarios that explain all of the dark matter. Nonetheless we still reveal interesting scenarios where the gluino, neutralino and chargino are light and discoverable at the LHC, but the full relic abundance is not accounted for. At the same time we also show that there is a huge volume of parameter space, with a predominantly Higgsino dark matter candidate that explains all the relic abundance, that will be discoverable with XENON1T. Finally we demonstrate that for the E 6 inspired model the exotic leptoquarks could still be light and within range of future LHC searches.

  7. Tinkertoys for the $E_6$ Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chacaltana, Oscar; Trimm, Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Compactifying the 6-dimensional (2,0) superconformal field theory, of type ADE, on a Riemann surface, $C$, with codimension-2 defect operators at points on $C$, yields a 4-dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=2$ superconformal field theory. An outstanding problem is to classify the 4D theories one obtains, in this way, and to understand their properties. In this paper, we turn our attention to the $E_6$ (2,0) theory, which (unlike the A- and D-series) has no realization in terms of M5-branes. Classifying the 4D theories amounts to classifying all of the 3-punctured spheres ("fixtures"), and the cylinders that connect them, that can occur in a pants-decomposition of $C$. We find 904 fixtures: 19 corresponding to free hypermultiplets, 825 corresponding to isolated interacting SCFTs (with no known Lagrangian description) and 60 "mixed fixtures", corresponding to a combination of free hypermultiplets and an interacting SCFT. Of the 825 interacting fixtures, we list only the 139 "interesting" ones. As an application, we study...

  8. Dark Matter in a Constrained $E_6$ Inspired SUSY Model

    CERN Document Server

    Athron, P; Nevzorov, R; Williams, A G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate dark matter in a constrained $E_6$ inspired supersymmetric model with an exact custodial symmetry and compare with the CMSSM. The breakdown of $E_6$ leads to an additional $U(1)_N$ symmetry and a discrete matter parity. The custodial and matter symmetries imply there are two stable dark matter candidates, though one may be extremely light and contribute negligibly to the relic density. We demonstrate that a predominantly Higgsino, or mixed bino-Higgsino, neutralino can account for all of the relic abundance of dark matter, while fitting a 125 GeV SM-like Higgs and evading LHC limits on new states. However we show that the recent LUX 2016 limit on direct detection places severe constraints on the mixed bino-Higgsino scenarios that explain all of the dark matter. Nonetheless we still reveal interesting scenarios where the gluino, neutralino and chargino are light and discoverable at the LHC, but the full relic abundance is not accounted for. At the same time we also show that there is a huge volu...

  9. Diphoton excess from $E_6$ in F-theory GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Karozas, Athanasios; Leontaris, George K; Meadowcroft, Andrew K

    2016-01-01

    We interpret the 750-760 GeV diphoton resonance as one or more of the spinless components of a singlet superfield arising from the three 27-dimensional representations of $E_6$ in F-theory, which also contain three copies of colour-triplet charge $\\mp 1/3$ vector-like fermions $D_i,\\bar{D}_i$ and inert Higgs doublets to which the singlets may couple. For definiteness we consider (without change) a model that was proposed some time ago which contains such states, as well as bulk exotics, leading to gauge coupling unification. The smoking gun prediction of the model is the existence of other similar spinless resonances, possibly close in mass to 750-760 GeV, decaying into diphotons, as well as the three families of vector-like fermions $D_i,\\bar{D}_i$.

  10. Preliminary treatment of chlorinated streams containing fission products: mechanisms leading to crystalline phases in molten chloride media; Pretraitement pyrochimique de flux charges en produits de fission: mecanismes conduisant a l'obtention de phases cristallines en milieux chlorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudry, D

    2008-10-15

    The world of the nuclear power gets ready for profound modifications so that 'the atom' can aspire in conformance with long-lasting energy: it is what we call the development of generation IV nuclear systems. So, the new pyrochemical separation processes for the spent fuel reprocessing are currently being investigated. Techniques in molten chloride media generate an ultimate flow (with high chlorine content) which cannot be incorporated in conventional glass matrices. This flow is entirely water-soluble and must be conditioned in a chemical form which is compatible with a long-term disposal. This work of thesis consists in studying new ways for the management of the chlorinated streams loaded with fission products (FP). To do it, a strategy of selective FP extraction via the in situ formation of crystalline phases was retained. The possibility of extracting rare earths in the eutectic LiCl-KCl was demonstrated via the development of a new way of synthesis of rare earth phosphates (TRPO{sub 4}). As regards alkaline earths, the conversion of strontium and barium chlorides to the corresponding tungstates or molybdates was studied in different solvents. Mechanisms leading to the crystalline phases in molten chloride media were studied via the coupling of NMR and XRD techniques. First of all, it has been shown that these mechanisms are dependent on the stability of the used precursors. So in the case of the formation of rare earth phosphates the solvent is chemically active. On the other hand, in the case of the formation of alkaline earth tungstates it would seem that the solvent plays the role of structuring agent which can control the ability to react of chlorides. (author)

  11. Chlorinated Iridoid Glucosides from Veronica longifolia and their Antioxidant Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Harput, U. Sebnem;

    2010-01-01

    From Veronica longifolia were isolated three chlorinated iridoid glucosides, namely asystasioside E (6) and its 6-O-esters 6a and 6b, named longifoliosides A and B, respectively. The structures of 6a and 6b were proved by analysis of their spectroscopic data and by conversion to the catalpol este...

  12. Reactions of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons with chlorine and chlorine dioxide in coal tar lined pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, T.; Maier, M.; Sacher, F.; Maier, D. [University of Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany). Engler Bunte Institut

    1997-12-31

    In the presence of disinfectants, PAH are remobilised from the coal tar lining of water distribution mains. Reactions of the PAH with chlorine and chlorine dioxide can lead to chlorinated PAH that might show higher mutagenic effects that the parent PAH. Detection limits in the lower nanogram-per-litre level for the determination of PAH and chlorinated PAH were achieved by using solid phase micro extraction and a gas chromatographic mass spectrometric device. Thus, the reactions of four PAH (anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene and phenanthrene) with chlorine and chlorine dioxide under conditions and at concentrations of common practice in the drinking water distribution system could be investigated. In batch experiments with demineralised and drinking water at pH 7, the concentrations of fluoranthene, fluorene and phenanthrene remained constant, whereas anthracene reacted quantitatively with both disinfectants. The reaction of anthracene followed by pseudo-first order kinetics. In these reactions no chlorinated products could be detected, only monohydroxyanthracene and anthraquinone were identified. The toxic effect of a set of chlorinated and oxidised PAH was also examined.

  13. Water Treatment Technology - Chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on chlorination provides instructional materials for nine competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purpose and process of chlorination, chlorine…

  14. Human papillomavirus 16E6 and NFX1-123 potentiate notch signaling and differentiation without activating cellular arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vliet-Gregg, Portia A.; Hamilton, Jennifer R. [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A., E-mail: rkatzen@uw.edu [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle WA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) oncoproteins bind host cell proteins to dysregulate and uncouple apoptosis, senescence, differentiation, and growth. These pathways are important for both the viral life cycle and cancer development. HR HPV16 E6 (16E6) interacts with the cellular protein NFX1-123, and they collaboratively increase the growth and differentiation master regulator, Notch1. In 16E6 expressing keratinocytes (16E6 HFKs), the Notch canonical pathway genes Hes1 and Hes5 were increased with overexpression of NFX1-123, and their expression was directly linked to the activation or blockade of the Notch1 receptor. Keratinocyte differentiation genes Keratin 1 and Keratin 10 were also increased, but in contrast their upregulation was only indirectly associated with Notch1 receptor stimulation and was fully unlinked to growth arrest, increased p21{sup Waf1/CIP1}, or decreased proliferative factor Ki67. This leads to a model of 16E6, NFX1-123, and Notch1 differently regulating canonical and differentiation pathways and entirely uncoupling cellular arrest from increased differentiation. - Highlights: • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the Notch canonical pathway through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the differentiation pathway indirectly through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased differentiation gene expression without growth arrest. • Increased NFX1-123 with 16E6 may create an ideal cellular phenotype for HPV.

  15. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins as risk factors for tumorigenesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Niladri Ganguly; Suraj P Parihar

    2009-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is small, double-stranded DNA virus that infects mucosal and cutaneous epithelial tissue. HPV is sexually transmitted and the viral DNA replicates extrachromosomally. The virus is non-enveloped and has an icosahedral capsid. There are approximately 118 types of HPV, which are characterized as high-risk or low-risk types. High-risk HPVs cause malignant transformation while the low-risk ones cause benign warts and lesions. The expression of E6 and E7 is normally controlled during the normal viral life cycle when viral DNA replicates extrachromosomally. HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins are overexpressed when the viral genome integrates into the host DNA. Deregulated overexpression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins can cause several changes in cellular pathways and functions leading to malignant transformation of cells and tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on several cellular mechanisms and pathways that are altered in the presence of E6 and E7, the target proteins of E6 and E7 inside the host cell and how they contribute to the development of the transformed phenotype..

  16. Human Papillomavirus 16E6 Oncogene Mutation in Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Xiao-qin Ha; Tong-de Lv; Chuan-ping Xing; Bin Liu; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, after breast cancer. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are considered to be the major causes of cervical cancer. HPV16 is the most common type of HR-HPVs and HPV16 E6 gene is one of the major oncogenes. Specific mutations are considered as dangerous factors causing CC. This study was designed to find mutations of HPV16 E6 and the relationship between the mutations and the happening of CC.Methods: The tissue DNA was extracted from 15 biopsies of CC. Part of HPV16 E6 gene (nucleotide 201-523) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the CC tissue DNA. The PCR fragments were sequenced and analyzed.Results: The result of PCR showed that the positive rate of HPV16 E6 was 93.33% (14/15). After sequencing and analyzing, in the 13 out of 14 PCR fragments, 4 maintained prototype (30.77%), 8 had a same 350G mutation (61.54%), and 1 had a 249G mutation (7.69%).Conclusion: This study suggest that there is a high infection rate of HPV in cervical cancer and most of the HPV16 E6 gene has mutations. Those mutations may have an association with the development of cervical cancer.

  17. 75 FR 51113 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... COMMISSION Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Spain AGENCY: United States International Trade... chlorinated isocyanurates from China and Spain. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice of the scheduling... from China and Spain would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within...

  18. BPS states in the Minahan-Nemeschansky E6 theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hollands, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    We use the method of spectral networks to compute BPS state degeneracies in the Minahan-Nemeschansky $E_6$ theory, on its Coulomb branch, without turning on a mass deformation. The BPS multiplicities come out in representations of the $E_6$ flavor symmetry. For example, along the simplest ray in electromagnetic charge space, we give the first $14$ numerical degeneracies, and the first $7$ degeneracies as representations of $E_6$. We find a complicated spectrum, exhibiting exponential growth of multiplicities as a function of the electromagnetic charge. There is one unexpected outcome: the spectrum is consistent (in a nontrivial way) with the hypothesis of "spin purity," that if a BPS state in this theory has electromagnetic charge equal to $n$ times a primitive charge, then it appears in a spin-$\\frac{n}{2}$ multiplet.

  19. Affine structures and a tableau model for E_6 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Brant

    2009-01-01

    We provide the unique affine crystal structure for type E_6^{(1)} Kirillov-Reshetikhin crystals corresponding to the multiples of fundamental weights s Lambda_1, s Lambda_2, and s Lambda_6 for all s \\geq 1 (in Bourbaki's labeling of the Dynkin nodes, where 2 is the adjoint node). Our methods introduce a generalized tableaux model for classical highest weight crystals of type E and use the order three automorphism of the affine E_6^{(1)} Dynkin diagram. In addition, we provide a conjecture for the affine crystal structure of type E_7^{(1)} Kirillov-Reshetikhin crystals corresponding to the adjoint node.

  20. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxi...

  1. Hepatitis C virus induces E6AP-dependent degradation of the retinoblastoma protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Munakata

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive-strand RNA virus that frequently causes persistent infections and is uniquely associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. While the mechanism(s by which the virus promotes cancer are poorly defined, previous studies indicate that the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B, forms a complex with the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb, targeting it for degradation, activating E2F-responsive promoters, and stimulating cellular proliferation. Here, we describe the mechanism underlying pRb regulation by HCV and its relevance to HCV infection. We show that the abundance of pRb is strongly downregulated, and its normal nuclear localization altered to include a major cytoplasmic component, following infection of cultured hepatoma cells with either genotype 1a or 2a HCV. We further demonstrate that this is due to NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb and its subsequent degradation via the proteasome. The NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb requires the ubiquitin ligase activity of E6-associated protein (E6AP, as pRb abundance was restored by siRNA knockdown of E6AP or overexpression of a dominant-negative E6AP mutant in cells containing HCV RNA replicons. E6AP also forms a complex with pRb in an NS5B-dependent manner. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of pRb in which the HCV NS5B protein traps pRb in the cytoplasm, and subsequently recruits E6AP to this complex in a process that leads to the ubiquitination of pRb. The disruption of pRb/E2F regulatory pathways in cells infected with HCV is likely to promote hepatocellular proliferation and chromosomal instability, factors important for the development of liver cancer.

  2. $E_{6}$ and the bipartite entanglement of three qutrits

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, M J

    2007-01-01

    Recent investigations have established an analogy between the entropy of four-dimensional supersymmetric black holes in string theory and entanglement in quantum information theory. Examples include: (1) N=2 STU black holes and the tripartite entanglement of three qubits (2-state systems), where the common symmetry is [SL(2)]^3 and (2) N=8 black holes and the tripartite entanglement of seven qubits where the common symmetry is E_7 which contains [SL(2)]^7. Here we present another example: N=8 black holes (or black strings) in five dimensions and the bipartite entanglement of three qutrits (3-state systems), where the common symmetry is E_6 which contains [SL(3)]^3. Both the black hole (or black string) entropy and the entanglement measure are provided by the Cartan cubic E_6 invariant. Similar analogies exist for ``magic'' N=2 supergravity black holes in both four and five dimensions.

  3. Z' Bosons from E(6): Collider and Electroweak Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens; Munir, Shoaib; Rojas, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Many models beyond the Standard Electroweak Theory, top-down or bottom-up, contain extensions of the gauge symmetry group by extra U(1)' factors which can be understood or treated as subgroups of E(6). A brief overview of such models is followed by a sketch of a systematic classification. We then describe how the resulting extra massive neutral gauge bosons can be searched for and in case of positive evidence diagnosed using electroweak and collider data.

  4. Chlorination of organophosphorus pesticides in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Juan L; Benítez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; González, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of three organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon) with chlorine were determined in the present study, and the influence of pH and temperature was established. It was found that an increase in the pH provides a negative effect on the pesticides degradation rates. Apparent second-order rate constants at 20 degrees C and pH 7 were determined to be 110.9, 0.004 and 191.6 M(-1) s(-1) for chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon, respectively. A higher reactivity of chlorine with the phosphorothioate group (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) than with the phosphate moiety (chlorfenvinfos) could explain these results. Intrinsic rate constant for the elementary reactions of chlorine species with chlorpyrifos and diazinon were also calculated, leading to the conclusion that the reaction between hypochlorous acid and the pesticide is predominant at neutral pH. The elimination of these pesticides in surface waters was also investigated. A chlorine dose of 2.5 mg L(-1) was enough to oxidize chlorpyrifos and diazinon almost completely, with a formation of trihalomethanes below the EU standard for drinking water. However, the removal of chlorfenvinfos was not appreciable. Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for the removal of organophosphorus pesticides with phosphorothioate group during oxidation and disinfection processes, but not for the elimination of pesticides with phosphate moiety.

  5. Preon Model and Family Replicated E_6 Unification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa V. Laperashvili

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously we suggested a new preon model of composite quark-leptons and bosons with the 'flipped' $E_6imes widetilde{E_6}$ gauge symmetry group. We assumed that preons are dyons having both hyper-electric $g$ and hyper-magnetic $ilde g$ charges, and these preons-dyons are confined by hyper-magnetic strings which are an ${f N}=1$ supersymmetric non-Abelian flux tubes created by the condensation of spreons near the Planck scale. In the present paper we show that the existence of the three types of strings with tensions $T_k=k T_0$ $(k = 1,2,3$ producing three (and only three generations of composite quark-leptons, also provides three generations of composite gauge bosons ('hyper-gluons' and, as a consequence, predicts the family replicated $[E_6]^3$ unification at the scale $sim 10^{17}$ GeV. This group of unification has the possibility of breaking to the group of symmetry: $ [SU(3_C]^3imes [SU(2_L]^3imes [U(1_Y]^3 imes [U(1_{(B-L}]^3$ which undergoes the breakdown to the Standard Model at lower energies. Some predictive advantages of the family replicated gauge groups of symmetry are briefly discussed.

  6. Preon model and family replicated E_6 unification

    CERN Document Server

    Das, C R

    2007-01-01

    Previously we suggested a new preon model of composite quark-leptons and bosons with the 'flipped' E_6\\times \\tilde{E_6} gauge symmetry group. We assumed that preons are dyons having both hyper-electric g and hyper-magnetic \\tilde g charges, and these preons-dyons are confined by hyper-magnetic strings which are an N=1 supersymmetric non-Abelian flux tubes created by the condensation of spreons near the Planck scale. In the present talk we show that the existence of the three types of strings with tensions T_k=k T_0 (k=1,2,3) producing three (and only three) generations of composite quark-leptons, also provides three generations of composite gauge bosons ('hyper-gluons') and, as a consequence, predicts the family replicated [E_6]^3 unification near the Planck scale. This group of unification has the possibility of breaking to the group of symmetry: [SU(3)_C]^3\\times [SU(2)_L]^3\\times [U(1)_Y]^3 \\times [U(1)_{(B-L)}]^3 which undergoes the breakdown to the Standard Model at lower energies. The AntiGUT scenario ...

  7. Preon Model and Family Replicated E_6 Unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Chitta Ranjan; Laperashvili, Larisa V.

    2008-02-01

    Previously we suggested a new preon model of composite quark-leptons and bosons with the 'flipped' E6 × ˜E6 gauge symmetry group. We assumed that preons are dyons having both hyper-electric g and hyper-magnetic ˜g charges, and these preons-dyons are confined by hyper-magnetic strings which are an N = 1 supersymmetric non-Abelian flux tubes created by the condensation of spreons near the Planck scale. In the present paper we show that the existence of the three types of strings with tensions Tk = kT0 (k = 1,2,3) producing three (and only three) generations of composite quark-leptons, also provides three generations of composite gauge bosons ('hyper-gluons') and, as a consequence, predicts the family replicated [E6]3 unification at the scale ~1017 GeV. This group of unification ha! s the possibility of breaking to the group of symmetry: [SU(3)C]3 × [SU(2)L]3 × [U(1)Y]3 × [U(1)(B-L)]3 which undergoes the breakdown to the Standard Model at lower energies. Some predictive advantages of the family replicated gauge groups of symmetry are briefly discussed.

  8. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Robert H; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains wer...

  9. Human papillomavirus type 18 E6*, E6, and E7 protein synthesis in cell-free translation systems and comparison of E6 and E7 in vitro translation products to proteins immunoprecipitated from human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenbuck, B; Larsen, P M; Fey, S J; Bartsch, D; Gissmann, L; Schwarz, E

    1991-09-01

    Expression of the E6 and E7 transforming genes of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) occurs via structurally bicistronic mRNAs in which the downstream open reading frame (ORF) E7 is preceded either by the full-length ORF E6 or by a spliced ORF, E6*. We have used in vitro transcription and translation of HPV18 cDNAs in order to analyze the synthesis of E6*, E6, and E7 proteins and to compare the E6 and E7 in vitro translation products with the authentic proteins immunoprecipitated from cervical cancer cells. In wheat germ extract, in vitro translation resulted in the production of all three proteins, E6*, E6, and E7. In rabbit reticulocyte lysate, however, only the E6 and E7 proteins were produced. The lack of E6* protein was due neither to template RNA degradation nor to an inhibitory influence of the RNA 5' leader sequences, thus indicating the possibility of either inhibition of synthesis or degradation of E6* protein in reticulocyte lysate. The E7 protein was synthesized from both E6*-E7 and E6-E7 RNAs. In vitro-synthesized and authentic HPV18 E7 proteins revealed identical electrophoretic mobilities in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, thus indicating similar modifications. By using a monoclonal antibody against the N terminus of HPV18 E6* and E6, an 18-kDa protein was detected not only in HPV18-positive but also in HPV18-negative epithelial cells. The 18-kDa proteins and the in vitro-synthesized HPV18 E6 protein exhibited comparable electrophoretic characteristics in two-dimensional gels. These results suggest the possible existence of a cellular protein related to HPV18 E6.

  10. Low-Cost Graphite-Based Free Chlorine Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Si; Deen, M Jamal; Ghosh, Raja

    2015-11-01

    Pencil lead was used to fabricate a graphite-based electrode for sensing applications. Its surface was electrochemically modified using ammonium carbamate to make it suitable for sensing free chlorine in water samples. Chlorine is widely used as a disinfectant in the water industry, and the residual free chlorine concentration in water distributed to the consumers must be lower than that stipulated by regulatory bodies. The graphite-based amperometric sensor gave a selective and linear response to free chlorine in the relevant concentration range and no response to commonly interfering ions. It was evaluated further for storage stability, response time, and hysteresis. This sensor is being proposed as a low-cost device for determining free chlorine in water samples. Its ease-of-use, limitations, and feasibility for mass-production and application is discussed.

  11. Structure of the E6/E6AP/p53 complex required for HPV-mediated degradation of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Zapien, Denise; Ruiz, Francesc Xavier; Poirson, Juline; Mitschler, André; Ramirez-Ramos, Juan; Forster, Anne; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Masson, Murielle; Pol, Scott Vande; Podjarny, Alberto; Travé, Gilles; Zanier, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Summary The p53 pro-apoptotic tumor suppressor is mutated or functionally altered in most cancers. In epithelial tumors induced by “high-risk” mucosal Human Papillomaviruses (hrm-HPVs), including human cervical carcinoma and a growing number of head-and-neck cancers 1, p53 is degraded by the viral oncoprotein E6 2. In this process, E6 binds to a short LxxLL consensus sequence within the cellular ubiquitin ligase E6AP 3. Subsequently, the E6/E6AP heterodimer recruits and degrades p53 4. Neither E6 nor E6AP are separately able to recruit p53 3,5, and the precise mode of assembly of E6, E6AP and p53 is unknown. Here, we solved the crystal structure of a ternary complex comprising full-length HPV16 E6, the LxxLL motif of E6AP and the core domain of p53. The LxxLL motif of E6AP renders the conformation of E6 competent for interaction with p53 by structuring a p53-binding cleft on E6. Mutagenesis of critical positions at the E6-p53 interface disrupts p53 degradation. The E6-binding site of p53 is distal from previously described DNA- and protein-binding surfaces of the core domain. This suggests that, in principle, E6 may avoid competition with cellular factors by targeting both free and bound p53 molecules. The E6/E6AP/p53 complex represents a prototype of viral hijacking of both the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway and the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. The present structure provides a framework for the design of inhibitory therapeutic strategies against HPV-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:26789255

  12. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Massimi, Paola [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Lizano, Marcela, E-mail: lizanosoberon@gmail.com [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Banks, Lawrence, E-mail: banks@icgeb.org [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  13. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  14. Chlorine dioxide and hemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.P. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (USA). Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

    1989-05-01

    Because it has little or no tendency to generate carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform, chlorine dioxide is an attractive alternative to chlorine for drinking water disinfection. There are, however, concerns about its acute toxicity, and the toxic effects of its by-products, chlorite and chlorate. The human experience with chlorine dioxide in both controlled, prospective studies and in actual use situations in community water supplies have as yet failed to reveal adverse health effects. The EPA has recommended standards of 0.06 mg/L for chlorine dioxide and standards of 0.007 mg/L for chlorite and chlorate in drinking water. Among groups who may be at special risk from oxychlorines in drinking water are patients who must undergro chronic extracorporeal hemodialysis. Although even units for home hemodialysis are supposed to be equipped with devices which effectively remove oxychlorines, there is a always a possibility of operator error or equipment failure. When the equipment is adequately maintained, it is likely that dialysis patients will have more intensive exposures from drinking water than from dialysis fluids despite the much larger volumes of water that are involved in dialysis. This paper discusses a hemodialysis and the standards and effects of oxychlorines. 90 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. HPV16 E6-induced and E6AP-dependent inhibition of the transcriptional coactivator hADA3 in human cervical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; Ye, Feng; Lu, Weiguo; Hong, Die; Wan, Xiaoyun; Xie, Xing

    2009-03-01

    To determine whether there exists an additional pathway of E6 that is independent of direct P53 degradation and whether hADA3, a transcriptional coactivator, is involved in this process. We investigated the association between E6 and hADA3, as well as E6-associated protein (E6AP) and hADA3, in SiHa cells via RNA interference technique. Our results showed that the expression of hADA3 protein was significantly increased, cellular proliferation was decreased and apoptotic rate was increased in SiHa cells treated by E6 siRNA and E6AP siRNA respectively. Our results suggested that oncoprotein E6 inhibits hADA3 in cervical cancer cells and this process is E6AP-dependent.

  16. HPV 5 and 8 E6 abrogate ATR activity resulting in increased persistence of UVB induced DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Wallace

    Full Text Available The role of the E6 oncoprotein from high-risk members of the α human papillomavirus genus in anogenital cancer has been well established. However, far less is known about the E6 protein from the β human papillomavirus genus (β-HPVs. Some β-HPVs potentially play a role in non-melanoma skin cancer development, although they are not required for tumor maintenance. Instead, they may act as a co-factor that enhances the carcinogenic potential of UV damage. Indeed, the E6 protein from certain β-HPVs (HPV 5 and 8 promotes the degradation of p300, a histone acetyl transferase involved in UV damage repair. Here, we show that the expression of HPV 5 and 8 E6 increases thymine dimer persistence as well as the likelihood of a UVB induced double strand break (DSB. Importantly, we provide a mechanism for the increased DNA damage by showing that both extended thymine dimer persistence as well as elevated DSB levels are dependent on the ability of HPV 8 E6 to promote p300 degradation. We further demonstrate that HPV 5 and 8 E6 expression reduces the mRNA and protein levels of ATR, a PI3 kinase family member that plays a key role in UV damage signaling, but that these levels remain unperturbed in cells expressing a mutated HPV 8 E6 incapable of promoting p300 degradation. We confirm that the degradation of p300 leads to a reduction in ATR protein levels, by showing that ATR levels rebound when a p300 mutant resistant to HPV 8 mediated degradation and HPV 8 E6 are co-transfected. Conversely, we show that ATR protein levels are reduced when p300 is targeted for degradation by siRNA. Moreover, we show the reduced ATR levels in HPV 5 and 8 E6 expressing cells results in delayed ATR activation and an attenuated ability of cells to phosphorylate, and as a result accumulate, p53 in response to UVB exposure, leading to significantly reduced cell cycle arrest. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that β-HPV E6 expression can enhance the carcinogenic potential of

  17. Perturbative unification of gauge couplings in supersymmetric E6 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gi-Chol; Maru, Nobuhito; Yotsutani, Kaho

    2016-07-01

    We study gauge coupling unification in supersymmetric (SUSY) E6 models where an additional U(1)‧ gauge symmetry is broken near the TeV scale and a number of exotic matter fields from the 27 representations have O(TeV) mass. Solving the two-loop renormalization group equations (RGE) of gauge couplings and a kinetic mixing coupling between the U(1)‧ and U(1)Y gauge fields, we find that the gauge couplings fall into the non-perturbative regime below the grand unified theories (GUT) scale. We examine threshold corrections on the running of gauge couplings from both light and heavy ( ˜ GUT scale) particles and show constraints on the size of corrections to achieve the perturbative unification of gauge couplings.

  18. The gas phase chlorination of ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsbye, Unni; Myhrvold, Elisabeth M.; Slagtern, Aase; Dahl, Ivar M. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Oslo (Norway)

    1999-07-01

    Light alkanes are dehydrogenated to their corresponding olefins before further reactions to more valuable chemicals. The conversion of ethane to ethene in a steam cracker requires the addition of a substantial amount of heat (90 kJ/mol). Oxidative processes for ethane dehydrogenation could in principle be carried out adiabatically, however, the oxidation selectivity towards hydrogen is too low in existing systems, which leads to low ethene selectivities. This paper discusses the potential for light alkane derivatization through chlorination.

  19. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the ...

  20. The effect of photochemical dissociation on downwind chlorine dioxide plume concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalowicz, R.; Alp, E. [Bovar Environmental, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The pulp and paper industry handles toxic gases which may present an inherent hazard to the safety of the general public in the surrounding area. One such toxic gas that may pose a hazard is chlorine dioxide. Spills of chlorine dioxide solution result in the gassing off of toxic clouds of chlorine dioxide. Under daytime dry conditions, chlorine dioxide decomposes photolytically to form chlorine and oxygen and intermediates, chlorine trioxide and chlorine hexoxide. Air dispersion modeling of chlorine dioxide releases which does not properly account for its photochemical decomposition will lead to overly conservative hazard zone estimates. Under these conditions, risk control measures and emergency response evacuation zones based on such estimates will be unnecessarily expensive, perhaps prohibitive. This paper investigates the photolytic rate of dissociation of chlorine dioxide under various atmospheric conditions. It was found that modeling based on the decomposition of chlorine dioxide gas, resulted in downwind distances to TLV-Short Term Exposure Limits which are considerably shorter than modeling based on chlorine dioxide dispersion with no decomposition.

  1. Comparative analysis of concentrations of lead, cadmium and mercury in cord blood, maternal blood, and breast milk, as well as persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons in maternal milk samples from Germany and Iran; Vergleichende Untersuchungen ueber die Blei-, Cadmium- und Quecksilberkonzentrationen im Nabelschnurblut, im muetterlichen Blut und in der Frauenmilch sowie ueber einige persistente Organochlorverbindungen in der Milch deutscher und iranischer Muetter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javanmardi, F.

    2001-07-01

    The concentration of the heavy metals lead, cadmium and mercury in cord blood, maternal blood and breast milk has been studied. Lead and cadmium were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury was determined using the flow-injection hydride technique. According to the concentrations of heavy metals and chlorinated hydrocarbons we ascertained for the region of Rendsburg, the toxic risk for infants relative to the consumption of contaminated maternal milk can be viewed as very slight. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war es, die aktuelle Schwermetallbelastung des Nabelschnurblutes, des muetterlichen Blutes und der Muttermilch zu untersuchen. Die Bestimmung von Blei und Cadmium erfolgte mit Hilfe der Atomabsorptionsspektrometrie. Quecksilber wurde mittels der Fliessinjektions-Hydridtechnik bestimmt. Nach den von uns ermittelten Schwermetall- bzw. Chlorkohlenwasserstoffkonzentrationen fuer die Region Rendsburg kann das mit dem Verzehr kontaminierter Muttermilch verbundene toxische Risiko fuer den Saeugling als sehr gering eingeschaetzt werden. (orig.)

  2. $E_6$ Inspired SUSY Benchmarks, Dark Matter Relic Density and a 125 GeV Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Athron, P; Nevzorov, R; Williams, A G

    2015-01-01

    We explore the relic density of dark matter and the particle spectrum within a constrained version of an $E_6$ inspired SUSY model with an extra $U(1)_N$ gauge symmetry. In this model a single exact custodial symmetry forbids tree-level flavor-changing transitions and the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. We present a set of benchmark points showing scenarios that have a SM-like Higgs mass of 125 GeV and sparticle masses above the LHC limits. They lead to striking new physics signatures which may be observed during run II of the LHC and can distinguish this model from the simplest SUSY extensions of the SM. At the same time these benchmark scenarios are consistent with the measured dark matter abundance and necessarily lead to large dark matter direct detection cross sections close to current limits and observable soon at the XENON1T experiment.

  3. E6 inspired SUSY benchmarks, dark matter relic density and a 125 GeV Higgs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athron, Peter; Harries, Dylan; Nevzorov, Roman; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-09-01

    We explore the relic density of dark matter and the particle spectrum within a constrained version of an E6 inspired SUSY model with an extra U(1)N gauge symmetry. In this model a single exact custodial symmetry forbids tree-level flavor-changing transitions and the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. We present a set of benchmark points showing scenarios that have a SM-like Higgs mass of 125 GeV and sparticle masses above the LHC limits. They lead to striking new physics signatures which may be observed during run II of the LHC and can distinguish this model from the simplest SUSY extensions of the SM. At the same time these benchmark scenarios are consistent with the measured dark matter abundance and necessarily lead to large dark matter direct detection cross sections close to current limits and observable soon at the XENON1T experiment.

  4. A comparison of chlorinated organic material produced by chlorine and chlorine dioxide bleaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKaque, A.B.; Reeve, D.W. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide react differently with pulp during bleaching and produce different types of organic by-products. The main differences are the large reduction in the amount of AOX (adsorbable organic halogen) in the effluent and EOX (extractable organic halogen) in the pulp. This talk reviews the differences in the amounts and types of chlorinated organic by-products produced by the two different bleaching agents.

  5. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert H.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains were more resistant to chlorine than were cells of the more rapidly growing strains. Water-grown cells were 10-fold more resistant than medium-grown cells. Disinfectant resistance may be one factor promoting the persistence of M. avium in drinking water. PMID:10742264

  6. HPV16 E6 regulates annexin 1 (ANXA1) protein expression in cervical carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas [Department of Biology, Institute of Bioscience, Language and Exact Science, São Paulo State University, São Jose do Rio Preto (Brazil); Sichero, Laura [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Centre for Translational Research in Oncology, Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo (ICESP), São Paulo (Brazil); Boccardo, Enrique [Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo., São Paulo (Brazil); Villa, Luisa Lina [Department of Radiology and Oncology, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Rahal, Paula, E-mail: rahalp@yahoo.com.br [Department of Biology, Institute of Bioscience, Language and Exact Science, São Paulo State University, São Jose do Rio Preto (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Annexin 1 (ANXA1) is a substrate for E6AP mediated ubiquitylation. It has been hypothesized that HPV 16 E6 protein redirects E6AP away from ANXA1, increasing its stability and possibly contributing to viral pathogenesis. We analyzed ANXA1 expression in HPV-positive and negative cervical carcinoma-derived cells, in cells expressing HPV-16 oncogenes and in cells transduced with shRNA targeting E6AP. We observed that ANXA1 protein expression increased in HPV-16-positive tumor cells, in keratinocytes expressing HPV-16 E6wt (wild-type) or E6/E7 and C33 cells expressing HPV-16 E6wt. ANXA1 protein expression decreased in cells transfected with E6 Dicer-substrate RNAs (DsiRNA) and C33 cells cotransduced with HPV-16 E6wt and E6AP shRNA. Moreover, colony number and proliferation rate decreased in HPV16-positive cells transduced with ANXA1 shRNA. We observed that in cells infected with HPV16, the E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1. We suggest that ANXA1 may play a role in HPV-mediated carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • ANXA1 upregulation requires the presence of E6 and E6AP and is dependent on E6 integrity. • E6 binds to E6AP to degrade p53 and upregulate ANXA1 in cells infected with HPV16. • ANXA1 plays a role in cell proliferation in HPV-positive cervical cells.

  7. Inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by chlorination and sequential UV/chlorination disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju, E-mail: jjgeng@nju.edu.cn; Ren, Hongqiang, E-mail: hqren@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2015-04-15

    This study investigated disinfection methods including chlorination, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and sequential UV/chlorination treatment on the inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). ARGs including sul1, tetX, tetG, intI1, and 16S rRNA genes in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluent were examined. The results indicated a positive correlation between the removal of ARGs and chlorine dosage (p = 0.007–0.014, n = 6),as well as contact time (p = 0.0001, n = 10). Greater free chlorine (FC) dosage leads to higher removal for all the genes and the maximum removal (1.30–1.49 logs) could be achieved at FC dosage of 30 mg L{sup −1}. The transformation kinetic data for ARGs removal (log C{sub 0} / C) followed the second-order reaction kinetic model with FC dosage (R{sup 2} = 0.6829–0.9999) and contact time (R{sup 2} = 0.7353–8634), respectively. Higher ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}–N) concentration was found to lead to lower removal of ARGs at the same chlorine dosage. When the applied Cl{sub 2}:NH{sub 3}–N ratio was over 7.6:1, a significant reduction of ARGs (1.20–1.49 logs) was achieved. By using single UV irradiation, the log removal values of tetX and 16Ss rRNA genes were 0.58 and 0.60, respectively, while other genes were 0.36–0.40 at a fluence of 249.5 mJ cm{sup −2}, which was observed to be less effective than chlorination. With sequential UV/chlorination treatment, 0.006 to 0.31 log synergy values of target genes were observed under different operation parameters. - Highlights: • Chlorine is more effective than UV irradiation in removing ARGs from MWTP effluent. • The chlorination reaction followed the second-order reaction kinetic model. • Higher NH{sub 3}–N contents result in lower ARGs removal in the chlorination process. • FC is more effective than CC on the inactivation of ARGs. • UV irradiation followed by chlorination shows high efficiency in removing ARGs.

  8. E6 inspired composite Higgs model and 750 GeV diphoton excess

    CERN Document Server

    Nevzorov, R

    2016-01-01

    In the E6 inspired composite Higgs model (E6CHM) the strongly interacting sector possesses an SU(6)\\times U(1)_B\\times U(1)_L global symmetry. Near scale f\\gtrsim 10 TeV the SU(6) symmetry is broken down to its SU(5) subgroup, that involves the standard model (SM) gauge group. This breakdown of SU(6) leads to a set of pseudo--Nambu--Goldstone bosons (pNGBs) including a SM--like Higgs and a SM singlet pseudoscalar A. Because of the interactions between A and exotic fermions, which ensure the approximate unification of the SM gauge couplings and anomaly cancellation in this model, the couplings of the pseudoscalar A to gauge bosons get induced. As a result, the SM singlet pNGB state A with mass around 750 GeV may give rise to sufficiently large cross section of pp\\to \\gamma\\gamma that can be identified with the recently observed diphoton excess.

  9. Inactivation of Chironomid Larvae with Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xin-bin; CUI Fu-yi

    2008-01-01

    Chironomid larvae propagate prolifically in eutrophic water body and they cannot be exterminated by conventional disinfection process.The inactivation effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on Chironomid larvae were investigated and some boundary values in practice were determined under conditions of various oxidant dosage,organic precursor concentration and pH value.In addition,removal effect of differmt pre-oxidation combined with coagulation process on Chironomid larvae in law water was evaluated.It was found that chlorine dioxide possessed better inactivation effect than chlorine.Complete inactivation of Chironomid larvae in raw water was resulted by 1.5mg/L of chlorine dioxide with 30min of contact time. Additionally,the ocgallic precursor concentration,pH value had little influence on the inactivation effect.The coagulation jar test showed that Chironomid larvae in the raw water could be completely ronxwed by chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation in combination with the omgulation process at chlorine dioxide dosage of 0.8 mg/L.

  10. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii. PMID:21602398

  11. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Eigl, Rosmarie; Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter; Sterba, Johannes H.; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t1/2 = 37.24 min) - accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the 36Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for 36Cl/Cl analysis.

  12. Gaseous, chlorine-free chlorine dioxide for drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, G. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States); Rosenblatt, A. [CDG Technology Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The benefits of applying chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) for the oxidative treatment of drinking water are well established. Chlorine dioxide treated finished water typically has substantially lower trihalomethane (THM) levels because ClO{sub 2} will not form chlorinated organic species as a by-product of disinfection. The THMs that are formed are probably due to chlorine from the generator or chlorine used to maintain a post-disinfection residual. An emerging regulatory issue concerning the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is causing the water industry to set standards for the generation and delivery of ClO{sub 2}. The Federal Register (11 February 1994) contains language developed to limit the production of the unwanted inorganic by-products chlorite (ClO{sub 2}{sup -}), chlorate (ClO{sub 3}{sup -}), and bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup -}) ions by requiring utilities to maintain high (95%) generation efficiencies and by limiting the amount of excess Cl{sub 2} that can be used during the generation process. The efficiency and excess Cl{sub 2} regulations may be problematic for utilities that over-chlorinate to attain chlorine dioxide high yields. Many utilities will have to decide either to reduce the amount of Cl{sub 2} used to react with sodium chlorite (NaClO{sub 2}), thereby increasing the ClO{sub 2}{sup -} residual in finished water, or over-chlorinate to increase yields and surpass the excess Cl{sub 2} limits.

  13. Improved method generates more chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, R.W.; Kosinski, A.J.; Baker, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    The addition of acid can greatly improve the chlorine-chlorite process and enhance the use of chlorine dioxide as an alternative to chlorine for disinfection. The process is economical for use in taste and odor control, and for manganese, oxidation. The maximum yield is obtained using no excess chlorine, and the amount of unreacted sodium chlorite and chlorine in the product stream is reduced. (1 diagram, 4 graphs, 9 references)

  14. Inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by chlorination and sequential UV/chlorination disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2015-04-15

    This study investigated disinfection methods including chlorination, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and sequential UV/chlorination treatment on the inactivation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). ARGs including sul1, tetX, tetG, intI1, and 16S rRNA genes in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluent were examined. The results indicated a positive correlation between the removal of ARGs and chlorine dosage (p=0.007-0.014, n=6),as well as contact time (p=0.0001, n=10). Greater free chlorine (FC) dosage leads to higher removal for all the genes and the maximum removal (1.30-1.49 logs) could be achieved at FC dosage of 30 mg L(-1). The transformation kinetic data for ARGs removal (log C0/C) followed the second-order reaction kinetic model with FC dosage (R(2)=0.6829-0.9999) and contact time (R(2)=0.7353-8634), respectively. Higher ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration was found to lead to lower removal of ARGs at the same chlorine dosage. When the applied Cl2:NH3-N ratio was over 7.6:1, a significant reduction of ARGs (1.20-1.49 logs) was achieved. By using single UV irradiation, the log removal values of tetX and 16Ss rRNA genes were 0.58 and 0.60, respectively, while other genes were 0.36-0.40 at a fluence of 249.5 mJ cm(-2), which was observed to be less effective than chlorination. With sequential UV/chlorination treatment, 0.006 to 0.31 log synergy values of target genes were observed under different operation parameters.

  15. In silico Structural Prediction of E6 and E7 Proteins of Human Papillomavirus Strains by Comparative Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available More than 200 different types of Human papillomavirus (HPV are identified, 40 transmit extensively through sexual contacts affecting the genital tract. HPV strains have been etiologically linked to vaginal, vulvar, penile, anal, oral and cervical cancer (99.7% as a result of mutations leading to cell transformations due to interference of E6 and E7 oncoproteins with p53 and pRB tumor suppressor genes respectively, besides other cellular proteins. As structures of E6 and E7 proteins are not available, the simultaneous structural analysis of E6 and E7 proteins of 50 different HPV strains was carried out in detail for prediction and validation, using bioinformatics tools. E6 and E7 proteins sequences were retrieved in FASTA format from NCBI and their structures predicted by comparative modeling using modeller9v6 software. Further, most of the HPV strains showed good stereochemistry results in most favored regions when subjected to PROCHECK analysis and subsequently each protein was validated using ProSA-web tool. The work carried out on comparing and exploring the structural variations in these oncogenic proteins might help in genome based drugs and vaccines designing, beyond their limitations.

  16. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  17. Transformation of iopamidol during chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Friedrich M; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Machek, Edward J; Duirk, Stephen E; Plewa, Michael J; Richardson, Susan D; Ternes, Thomas A

    2014-11-01

    The transformation of the iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) iopamidol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol, and diatrizoate was examined in purified water over the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 in the presence of sodium hypochlorite, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide. In the presence of aqueous chlorine, only iopamidol was transformed. All other ICM did not show significant reactivity, regardless of the oxidant used. Chlorination of iopamidol followed a second order reaction, with an observed rate constant of up to 0.87 M(-1) s(-1) (±0.021 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 8.5. The hypochlorite anion was identified to be the reactive chlorine species. Iodine was released during the transformation of iopamidol, and was mainly oxidized to iodate. Only a small percentage (less than 2% after 24 h) was transformed to known organic iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of low molecular weight. Some of the iodine was still present in high-molecular weight DBPs. The chemical structures of these DBPs were elucidated via MSn fragmentation and NMR. Side chain cleavage was observed as well as the exchange of iodine by chlorine. An overall transformation pathway was proposed for the degradation of iopamidol. CHO cell chronic cytotoxicity tests indicate that chlorination of iopamidol generates a toxic mixture of high molecular weight DBPs (LC50 332 ng/μL).

  18. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products.

  19. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  20. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%.

  1. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condit, Richard C., E-mail: condit@mgm.ufl.edu; Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-08-15

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. - Highlights: • Mutation of E6 disrupts association of viral membranes with viral core proteins • Mutation of E6 does not perturb viral membrane biosynthesis • Mutation of E6 does not perturb localization of viral transcription enzymes • Mutation of E6 causes mis-localization and aggregation of viral core proteins • Vaccinia assembly uses three subassemblies: membranes, viroplasm, prenucleocapsid.

  2. Transgenic plants and associated bacteria for phytoremediation of chlorinated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aken, Benoit; Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    2010-01-01

    Phytoremediation is the use of plants for the treatment of environmental pollution, including chlorinated organics. Although conceptually very attractive, removal and biodegradation of chlorinated pollutants by plants is a rather slow and inefficient process resulting in incomplete treatment and potential release of toxic metabolites into the environment. In order to overcome inherent limitations of plant metabolic capabilities, plants have been genetically modified, following a strategy similar to the development of transgenic crops: genes from bacteria, fungi, and mammals involved in the metabolism of organic contaminants, such as cytochrome P-450 and glutathione S-transferase, have been introduced into higher plants, resulting in significant improvement of tolerance, removal, and degradation of pollutants. Recently, plant-associated bacteria have been recognized playing a significant role in phytoremediation, leading to the development of genetically modified rhizospheric and endophytic bacteria with improved biodegradation capabilities. Transgenic plants and associated bacteria constitute a new generation of genetically modified organisms for efficient and environmental-friendly treatment of polluted soil and water. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of transgenic plants and bacteria for the treatment of chlorinated pollutants, including chlorinated solvents, polychlorinated phenols, and chlorinated herbicides.

  3. MECHANISM OF CHLORATE FORMATION IN CHLORINE DIOIXDE DELIGNIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung-Ho Yoon; Li-Jun Wang; Se-Jong Kim

    2004-01-01

    The effect of pH on chlorate formation during chlorine dioxide delignification of oxygen delignified kraft pulp was studied. Chlorate formation was found to increase slightly when pH was increased from 1.8 to 2.5, further increase of pH decreased chlorate formation.The above phenomenon is explained by the combination of two mechanisms, one by the reaction between hypochlorous acid and chlorite, another by the effect of chlorine on the regeneration of chlorine dioxide. The first mechanism suggests that chlorate formation is highly dependent on HCIO concentration which decreases with increasing pH and causes chlorate formation to behave in the same trend. The second mechanism suggests that chlorine favors the regeneration of chlorine dioxide while HCIO favors chlorate formation, thus lowering the pH from about 4 to the acidic end should decreases chlorate formation. The two opposite effects lead to the maximum formation of chlorate at around pH 2.5.

  4. Metals releases and disinfection byproduct formation in domestic wells following shock chlorination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Walker

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Shock chlorination is used for rapid disinfection to control pathogens and nuisance bacteria in domestic wells. A typical shock chlorination procedure involves adding sodium hypochlorite in liquid bleach solutions to achieve concentrations of free chlorine of up to 200 ppm in the standing water of a well. The change in pH and oxidation potential may bring trace metals from aquifer materials into solution and chlorine may react with dissolved organic carbon to form disinfection byproducts. We carried out experiments with four wells to observe and determine the persistence of increased concentrations of metals and disinfection byproducts. Water samples from shock chlorinated wells were analyzed for Pb, Cu, As, radionuclides and disinfection byproducts (haloacetic acids and trihalomethanes, immediately prior to treatment, after sufficient contact time with chlorine had elapsed, and at intervals determined by the number of casing volumes purged, for up to four times the well casing volume.

    Elevated concentrations of lead and copper dissipated in proportion to free chlorine (measured semi-quantitatively during the purging process. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were formed in wells during disinfection. In one of two wells tested, disinfection byproducts dissipated in proportion to free chlorine during purging. However, one well retained disinfection byproducts and free chlorine after four well volumes had been purged. Although metals returned to background concentrations in this well, disinfection byproducts remained elevated, though below the MCL, likely because purging volume was insufficient. Simple chlorine test strips may be a useful method for indicating when purging is adequate to remove metals and disinfection by-products mobilized and formed by shock chlorination.

  5. Metals releases and disinfection byproduct formation in domestic wells following shock chlorination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Walker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock chlorination is used for rapid disinfection to control pathogens and nuisance bacteria in domestic wells. A typical shock chlorination procedure involves adding sodium hypochlorite in liquid bleach solutions to achieve concentrations of free chlorine of up to 200 mg L−1 in the standing water of a well. The change in pH and oxidation potential may bring trace metals from aquifer materials into solution and chlorine may react with dissolved organic carbon to form disinfection byproducts. We carried out experiments with four wells to observe and determine the persistence of increased concentrations of metals and disinfection byproducts. Water samples from shock chlorinated wells were analyzed for Pb, Cu, As, radionuclides and disinfection byproducts (haloacetic acids and trihalomethanes, immediately prior to treatment, after sufficient treatment time with chlorine had elapsed, and at intervals determined by the number of casing volumes purged, for up to four times the well casing volume.

    Elevated concentrations of lead and copper dissipated in proportion to free chlorine (measured semi-quantitatively during the purging process. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were formed in wells during disinfection. In one of two wells tested, disinfection byproducts dissipated in proportion to free chlorine during purging. However, one well retained disinfection byproducts and free chlorine after 4 WV had been purged. Although metals returned to background concentrations in this well, disinfection byproducts remained elevated, though below the MCL. This may have been due to well construction characteristics and interactions with aquifer materials. Simple chlorine test strips may be a useful method for indicating when purging is adequate to remove metals and disinfection by-products mobilized and formed by shock chlorination.

  6. Mutagenic Potential ofBos taurus Papillomavirus Type 1 E6 Recombinant Protein: First Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pinheiro Araldi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine papillomavirus (BPV is considered a useful model to study HPV oncogenic process. BPV interacts with the host chromatin, resulting in DNA damage, which is attributed to E5, E6, and E7 viral oncoproteins activity. However, the oncogenic mechanisms of BPV E6 oncoprotein per se remain unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the mutagenic potential of Bos taurus papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1 E6 recombinant oncoprotein by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMNA and comet assay (CA. Peripheral blood samples of five calves were collected. Samples were subjected to molecular diagnosis, which did not reveal presence of BPV sequences. Samples were treated with 1 μg/mL of BPV-1 E6 oncoprotein and 50 μg/mL of cyclophosphamide (positive control. Negative controls were not submitted to any treatment. The samples were submitted to the CBMNA and CA. The results showed that BPV E6 oncoprotein induces clastogenesis per se, which is indicative of genomic instability. These results allowed better understanding the mechanism of cancer promotion associated with the BPV E6 oncoprotein and revealed that this oncoprotein can induce carcinogenesis per se. E6 recombinant oncoprotein has been suggested as a possible vaccine candidate. Results pointed out that BPV E6 recombinant oncoprotein modifications are required to use it as vaccine.

  7. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Travé, Gilles [UMR 7242 CNRS-Université de Strasbourg, Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie, Boulevard Sébastien Brant, Illkirch 67412 (France); Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J., E-mail: n.j.stonehouse@leeds.ac.uk [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-24

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future.

  8. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1E6OL-1MCEA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1E6OL-1MCEA 1E6O 1MCE L A EIVLTQSPAITAASLGQKVTITCSAS----SSVSYMHWY...DINVKWKIDGSERQNGVLNSWTDQDS-KDSTYSMSSTLTLTKDEYERHNSYTCEATHKTSTSPIVKSFNRN--- PSALTQ-PPSASGSLGQSVT...82 1MCE A 1MCEA...in> 1MCE A 1MCEA...2 1MCE A 1MCEA

  9. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara A. Belyaeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4 which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of the selective chlorination of electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, C A

    2009-07-30

    The remelting of automobile scrap in an electric arc furnace (EAF) results in the production of a dust, which contains high concentrations of the oxides of zinc, iron, calcium and other metals. Typically, the lead and zinc are of commercial value, while the other metals are not worth recovering. At the present time, EAF dusts are treated in high temperature Waelz rotary kiln-type processes, where the lead and zinc oxides are selectively reduced and simultaneously reoxidized and a crude zinc oxide is produced. Another alternative processing route is selective chlorination, in which the non-ferrous metals are preferentially chlorinated to their gaseous chlorides and in this manner separated from the iron. In the present research, a detailed thermodynamic analysis of this chlorination process has been performed and the following factors were investigated; temperature, amount of chlorine, lime content, silica content, presence of an inert gas and the oxygen potential. High lead and zinc recoveries as gaseous chlorides could be achieved but some of the iron oxide was also chlorinated. Additionally, the calcium oxide in the dust consumes chlorine, but this can be minimized by adding silica, which results in the formation of stable calcium silicates. The optimum conditions were determined for a typical dust composition. The selectivities achieved with chlorination were lower than those for reduction, as reported in the literature, but there are other advantages such as the potential recovery of copper.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of the selective chlorination of electric arc furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickles, C.A., E-mail: pickles-c@mine.queensu.ca [Department of Mining Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2009-07-30

    The remelting of automobile scrap in an electric arc furnace (EAF) results in the production of a dust, which contains high concentrations of the oxides of zinc, iron, calcium and other metals. Typically, the lead and zinc are of commercial value, while the other metals are not worth recovering. At the present time, EAF dusts are treated in high temperature Waelz rotary kiln-type processes, where the lead and zinc oxides are selectively reduced and simultaneously reoxidized and a crude zinc oxide is produced. Another alternative processing route is selective chlorination, in which the non-ferrous metals are preferentially chlorinated to their gaseous chlorides and in this manner separated from the iron. In the present research, a detailed thermodynamic analysis of this chlorination process has been performed and the following factors were investigated; temperature, amount of chlorine, lime content, silica content, presence of an inert gas and the oxygen potential. High lead and zinc recoveries as gaseous chlorides could be achieved but some of the iron oxide was also chlorinated. Additionally, the calcium oxide in the dust consumes chlorine, but this can be minimized by adding silica, which results in the formation of stable calcium silicates. The optimum conditions were determined for a typical dust composition. The selectivities achieved with chlorination were lower than those for reduction, as reported in the literature, but there are other advantages such as the potential recovery of copper.

  12. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Mahmoud El-Tawil

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers.

  13. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 variants in France and risk of viral persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornet Iris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only a small portion of HPV 16 infections persist and can lead to cervical intraepithelial lesions and cancer. Factors that favour HPV persistence versus clearance are still poorly understood, but several studies have suggested that HPV intra-type variants may influence persistence and clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association between HPV 16 variants and the risk for viral persistence in the general population of France. Methods One hundred and forty two women infected with HPV 16 with normal cytology, without previous treatment for cervical lesions, and with a valid second follow-up visit 4 to 16 months later, were selected from patients participating in routine cervical cancer screening in the Reims HPV Primary Screening Cohort Study. HPV intra-type variants were determined by sequencing the HPV 16 E6 open reading frame, and were compared for viral persistence at the second visit using odds ratios (OR to estimate relative risk. Results Although no statistically significant differences in risk for persistence were observed by the HPV 16 variant lineage, European variants containing the polymorphism 350 T (EUR-350 T appeared to persist more often than those containing 350 G (EUR-350 G (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.8-3.4. Conclusions No strong differences were observed in the risk of viral persistence for the HPV 16 variants that predominate in France.

  14. Sonoporation of Cervical Carcinoma Cells Affected with E6-Oncoprotein for the Treatment of Uterine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, Laura; Lee, Kyle; Pichardo, Samuel; Zehbe, Ingeborg

    2010-03-01

    Cervical cancer has been identified as the third leading cause of average years of life lost per person dying of cancer. Since essentially all cervical cancers contain copies of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA, we propose a treatment that targets HPV-infected cells using strategies that re-introduce normal functions into the infected cells while sparing healthy cells. We propose the use of focused ultrasound in combination with microbubbles as means to deliver antibodies against the E6 protein present only in HPV positive cells. We conducted in vitro studies with cell cultures of SiHa cervical carcinoma cells seeded into Opticell™ chambers. An in-house ultrasound excitation apparatus was used to control and explore the optimal acoustic parameters in order to maximize delivery. We first validated the possibility of delivering the EX-EGFP-M02 vector (Genecopoeia) into the cells; 1.2 μL of activated microbubbles (Definity®) and 50 μg of the vector were mixed in media and then injected into the Opticell™ chamber. We used 32 μs pulses at a central frequency of 930 KHz with a repetition frequency of 1.5 kHz and total exposure duration of 30 s; six pressure values were tested (0 to 1 MPa). Fluorescence imaging was used to determine the levels of intracellular proteins and assess delivery. The delivery of an anti-α-Tubulin antibody was next tested and confirmed that the delivery into HPV16 positive cells was successful.

  15. In situ aerobic cometabolism of chlorinated solvents: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascari, Dario; Zanaroli, Giulio; Danko, Anthony S

    2015-01-01

    The possible approaches for in situ aerobic cometabolism of aquifers and vadose zones contaminated by chlorinated solvents are critically evaluated. Bioaugmentation of resting-cells previously grown in a fermenter and in-well addition of oxygen and growth substrate appear to be the most promising approaches for aquifer bioremediation. Other solutions involving the sparging of air lead to satisfactory pollutant removals, but must be integrated by the extraction and subsequent treatment of vapors to avoid the dispersion of volatile chlorinated solvents in the atmosphere. Cometabolic bioventing is the only possible approach for the aerobic cometabolic bioremediation of the vadose zone. The examined studies indicate that in situ aerobic cometabolism leads to the biodegradation of a wide range of chlorinated solvents within remediation times that vary between 1 and 17 months. Numerous studies include a simulation of the experimental field data. The modeling of the process attained a high reliability, and represents a crucial tool for the elaboration of field data obtained in pilot tests and for the design of the full-scale systems. Further research is needed to attain higher concentrations of chlorinated solvent degrading microbes and more reliable cost estimates. Lastly, a procedure for the design of full-scale in situ aerobic cometabolic bioremediation processes is proposed.

  16. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    OpenAIRE

    Korich, D. G.; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactiv...

  17. Disinfectants: Chlorine and chlorine dioxide. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the antimicrobial properties of chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The use of chlorine for the inactivation of viruses, bacteria, and fungi in wastewater treatment plants is discussed, including the mode of action and factors influencing inactivation. The use of chlorine dioxide as an alternative to chlorine disinfection in swimming pools and water supplies, and possible adverse effects are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 157 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Disruption of human papillomavirus 16 E6 gene by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas system in human cervical cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lan Yu, Xiaoli Wang, Da Zhu, Wencheng Ding, Liming Wang, Changlin Zhang, Xiaohui Jiang, Hui Shen, Shujie Liao, Ding Ma, Zheng Hu, Hui Wang Cancer Biology Research Center, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China Abstract: High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV, especially HPV16, is considered a main causative agent of cervical cancer. Upon HPV infection, the viral oncoprotein E6 disrupts the host tumor-suppressor protein p53, thus promoting malignant transformation of normal cervical cells. Here, we used the newly developed programmable ribonucleic acid-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas system to disrupt the HPV16 E6 gene. We showed that HPV16 E6 deoxyribonucleic acid was cleaved at specific sites, leading to apoptosis and growth inhibition of HPV16-positive SiHa and CaSki cells, but not HPV-negative C33A or human embryonic kidney 293 cells. We also observed downregulation of the E6 protein and restoration of the p53 protein. These data proved that the HPV16 E6 ribonucleic acid-guided CRISPR/Cas system might be an effective therapeutic agent in treating HPV infection-related cervical malignancy. Keywords: CRISPR/Cas system, E6, p53, SiHa, CaSki, cervical cancer

  19. Human Papillomavirus 16 E6 Antibodies in Individuals Without Diagnosed Cancer: A Pooled Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Anantharaman, Devasena; Waterboer, Tim; Johansson, Mattias; Brennan, Paul; Michel, Angelika; Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Martina; Purdue, Mark P.; Holcátová, Ivana; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Lagiou, Pagona; Polesel, Jerry; Simonato, Lorenzo; Merletti, Franco; Healy, Claire M.; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Conway, David I.; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Thomson, Peter; Castellsagué, Xavier; Znaor, Ariana; Black, Amanda; Huang, Wen-Yi; Krogh, Vittorio; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B(as).; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ekström, Johanna; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Sánchez, María-José; Travis, Ruth C.; Hildesheim, Allan; Pawlita, Michael; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The increasing incidence of oropharyngeal cancer in many developed countries has been attributed to human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infections. Recently, HPV16 E6 serology has been identified as a promising early marker for oropharyngeal cancer. Therefore, characterization of HPV16 E6 seropositivity among individuals without cancer is warranted. Methods 4,666 controls were pooled from several studies of cancer and HPV seropositivity, all tested within the same laboratory. HPV16 E6 seropositive controls were classified as having i) moderate (mean fluorescent intensity [MFI]≥484 & <1000) or ii) high seroreactivity (MFI≥1000). Associations of moderate and high HPV16 E6 seroreactivity with i) demographic risk factors; and seropositivity for ii) other HPV16 proteins (E1, E2, E4, E7 and L1) and iii) E6 proteins from non-HPV16 types (HPV6, 11, 18, 31, 33, 45 and 52) were evaluated. Results Thirty-two (0.7%) HPV16 E6 seropositive controls were identified; 17 (0.4%) with moderate and 15 (0.3%) with high seroreactivity. High HPV16 E6 seroreactivity was associated with former smoking (odds ratio [OR] 5.5 [95% confidence interval [CI]:1.2-51.8]), and seropositivity against HPV16 L1 (OR 4.8, 95%CI:1.3-15.4); E2 (OR 7.7, 95%CI:1.4-29.1); multiple HPV16 proteins (OR 25.3, 95%CI:2.6-119.6 for 3 HPV16 proteins beside E6) and HPV33 E6 (OR 17.7, 95%CI:1.9-81.8). No associations were observed with moderate HPV16 E6 seroreactivity. Conclusions High HPV16 E6 seroreactivity is rare among individuals without diagnosed cancer and was not explained by demographic factors. Impact Some HPV16 E6 seropositive individuals without diagnosed HPV-driven cancer, especially those with seropositivity against other HPV16 proteins, may harbor a biologically relevant HPV16 infection. PMID:25623733

  20. Environmental factors regulating soil organic matter chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Teresia; Montelius, Malin; Reyier, Henrik; Rietz, Karolina; Karlsson, Susanne; Lindberg, Cecilia; Andersson, Malin; Danielsson, Åsa; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Natural chlorination of organic matter is common in soils. Despite the widespread abundance of soil chlorinated soil organic matter (SOM), frequently exceeding soil chloride abundance in surface soils, and a common ability of microorganisms to produce chlorinated SOM, we lack fundamental knowledge about dominating processes and organisms responsible for the chlorination. To take one step towards resolving the terrestrial chlorine (Cl) puzzle, this study aims to analyse how environmental factors influence chlorination of SOM. Four factors were chosen for this study: soil moisture (W), nitrogen (N), chloride (Cl) and organic matter quality (C). These factors are all known to be important for soil processes. Laboratory incubations with 36Cl as a Cl tracer were performed in a two soil incubation experiments. It was found that addition of chloride and nitrogen seem to hamper the chlorination. For the C treatment, on the other hand, the results show that chlorination is enhanced by increased availability of labile organic matter (glucose and maltose). Even higher chlorination was observed when nitrogen and water were added in combination with labile organic matter. The effect that more labile organic matter strongly stimulated the chlorination rates was confirmed by the second separate experiment. These results indicate that chlorination was not primarily a way to cut refractory organic matter into digestible molecules, representing one previous hypothesis, but is related with microbial metabolism in other ways that will be further discussed in our presentation.

  1. The Human Papillomavirus E6 PDZ Binding Motif: From Life Cycle to Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketaki Ganti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-causing HPV E6 oncoproteins are characterized by the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM at their extreme carboxy terminus. It was long thought that this region of E6 had a sole function to confer interaction with a defined set of cellular substrates. However, more recent studies have shown that the E6 PBM has a complex pattern of regulation, whereby phosphorylation within the PBM can regulate interaction with two classes of cellular proteins: those containing PDZ domains and the members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins. In this review, we explore the roles that the PBM and its ligands play in the virus life cycle, and subsequently how these can inadvertently contribute towards the development of malignancy. We also explore how subtle alterations in cellular signal transduction pathways might result in aberrant E6 phosphorylation, which in turn might contribute towards disease progression.

  2. Effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols have many significant effects on the reactivity of oxido-reduction. The effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate were evaluated through different kinetics studies. Since chlorine was an electron withdrawing atom, the substitution of chlorine on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by σ-electron withdrawing conductive effect; at the same time, the substitution of chlorine at ortho or para position on the aromatic ring increased the oxidation rate constant by π-electron donating conjugative effect, and the conjugative effect could counteract the negative impact of the conductive effect to some extent. On the other hand, the substitution of chlorine at ortho position on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by steric hindrance effect. The oxidation rate constants of phenol and chlorinated phenols studied decreased as follow order: 4-chlorophenol>2,4-dichlorophenol>phenol>2,6-dichlorophenol.

  3. HPV16 E6/E7 Negatively Affect Radiosensitivity of Lung Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Lu; Qinghui Meng; Ming Cui; Xiaofei Chu; Shuyi Zhao; Huiwen Xiao; Jiali Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lung cancer cells associated with radioresistance are likely to give rise to local recurrence and distant metastatic relapse,but little is known about its underlying mechanisms.In the present paper,the effects of the HPV16 E6 and HPV16 E7 oncoprotein on the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cell lines were investigated.Methods The HPV16 E6 or HPV16 E7 oncoprotein was expressed by a transient transfection with pcDNA3-HPV16 E6 or pcDNA3-HPV16 E7 expression vector.Human lung cancer H2179 cells and mouse lung cancer Lewis cells were exposed to a γ-ray radiation source,cellular survival was evaluated by using a colony formation assay.The expression of HPV16 oncoproteins E6/E7,extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2(ERK1/2) and AKT signaling was determined by Western blot assay.VEGF secretion was determined by ELISA.Results Both HPV16 oncoproteins E6 and E7 significantly decreased radiosensitivity of H2179 cells,associated with a promotion of the ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation.A decrease of reactive oxygen species(ROS) and an increase of VEGF levels were observed in the cells expressing the HPV16 oncoproteins E6 and E7.Furthermore,a similar reduction of radiosensitivity mediated by the HPV16 oncoproteins E6 and E7 was also observed in a mouse lung cancer Lewis cells.Conclusion The findings indicate that the HPV16 oncoproteins E6 and E7 negatively affects susceptibility of lung cancer cells to radiotherapy via regulation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathway and VEGF expression.

  4. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems.

  5. Structural and optical properties of chlorinated plasma polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turri, Rafael [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Avenida Tres de Marco 511, Alto de Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Davanzo, Celso U. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Schreiner, Wido [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Parana, PR (Brazil); Dias da Silva, Jose Humberto [Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Bauru, SP (Brazil); Appolinario, Marcelo Borgatto [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Avenida Tres de Marco 511, Alto de Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Durrant, Steven F., E-mail: steve@sorocaba.unesp.br [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Avenida Tres de Marco 511, Alto de Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2011-12-30

    Amorphous hydrogenated chlorinated carbon (a-C:H:Cl) films were produced by the plasma polymerization of chloroform-acetylene-argon mixtures in a radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The main parameter of interest was the proportion of chloroform in the feed, R{sub C}, which was varied from 0 to 80%. Deposition rates of 80 nm min{sup -1} were typical for the chlorinated films. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy revealed the presence of C-Cl groups in all the films produced with chloroform in the feed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed this finding, and revealed a saturation of the chlorine content at {approx} 47 at.% for R{sub C} {>=} 40%. The refractive index and optical gap, E{sub 04}, of the films were roughly in the 1.6 to 1.7, and the 2.8 to 3.7 eV range. These values were calculated from transmission ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra. Chlorination leads to an increase in the water surface contact angle from {approx} 40 Degree-Sign to {approx} 77 Degree-Sign .

  6. Stable Chlorine Isotopes and Elemental Chlorine by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography; Martian Meteorites, Carbonaceous Chondrites and Standard Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    Recently significantly large mass fractionation of stable chlorine isotopes has been reported for terrestrial and lunar samples [1,2]. In addition, in view of possible early solar system processes [3] and also potential perchlorate-related fluid/microbial activities on the Martian surface [4,5], a large chlorine isotopic fractionation might be expected for some types of planetary materials. Due to analytical difficulties of isotopic and elemental analyses, however, current chlorine analyses for planetary materials are controversial among different laboratories, particularly between IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1,6,7] for isotopic analyses, as well as between those doing pyrohydrolysis and other groups [i.e. 6,8]. Additional careful investigations of Cl isotope and elemental abundances are required to confirm real chlorine isotope and elemental variations for planetary materials. We have developed a TIMS technique combined with HF-leaching/ion chromatography at NASA JSC that is applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We present here results for several standard rocks and meteorites, including Martian meteorites.

  7. The influence of chlorine on the gasification of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, C. von; Struis, R.; Stucki, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Chlorides of the heavy metals copper, lead and zinc inhibit the CO{sub 2}-gasification reaction of charcoal. This is observed either by impregnation the wood with the salts before pyrolysis or by mechanically mixing the salts with the charcoal before gasification. Charcoal impregnated or mixed with ammonium chloride reacts more slowly than untreated charcoal. Treating the charcoal with HCl also influences negatively the gasification reactivity, indicating that chlorine plays an important role in the gasification. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs.

  8. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method.

  9. Ultrasensitive quantitation of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncogene sequences by nested real time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Revilla Rubén

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed an ultrasensitive method based on conventional PCR preamplification followed by nested amplification through real time PCR (qPCR in the presence of the DNA intercalating agent EvaGreen. Results Amplification mixtures calibrated with a known number of pHV101 copies carrying a 645 base pair (bp-long insert of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 E6 oncogene were used to generate the E6-1 amplicon of 645 bp by conventional PCR and then the E6-2 amplicon of 237 bp by nested qPCR. Direct and nested qPCR mixtures for E6-2 amplification corresponding to 2.5 × 102-2.5 × 106 initial pHV101 copies had threshold cycle (Ct values in the ranges of 18.7-29.0 and 10.0-25.0, respectively. The Ct of qPCR mixtures prepared with 1/50 volumes of preamplified mixtures containing 50 ng of DNA of the SiHa cell line (derived from an invasive cervical cancer with one HPV16 genome per cell was 19.9. Thermal fluorescence extinction profiles of E6-2 amplicons generated from pHV101 and SiHa DNA were identical, with a peak at 85.5°C. Conclusions Our method based on conventional preamplification for 15 cycles increased 10,750 times the sensitivity of nested qPCR for the quantitation of the E6 viral oncogene and confirmed that the SiHa cell line contains one E6-HPV16 copy per cell.

  10. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukayama, M.Y.; Tan, H.; Wheeler, W.B.; Wei, C.

    1986-11-01

    This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (CL/sub 2/(g)), aqueous chlorine, and ClO/sub 2/ with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO/sub 2/. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO/sub 2/ with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully.

  11. The effect of chlorine and combined chlorine/UV treatment on coliphages in drinking water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyara, Alyaa M; Torvinen, Eila; Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine disinfection is a globally used method to ensure the safety of drinking water. However, it has not always been successful against viruses and, therefore, it is important to find new methods to disinfect water. Seventeen different coliphages were isolated from the treated municipal wastewater. These coliphages and MS2 were treated with different dosages of chlorine in drinking water, and a combined chlorine/ultraviolet irradiation treatment for the chlorine-resistant coliphages. Chlorine disinfection with 0.3-0.5 mg/L total chlorine (free Cl-dosage 0.12-0.21 mg/L) for 10 min achieved 2.5-5.7 Log10-reductions for 11 sensitive coliphages. The six most resistant coliphages showed no reduction with these chlorine concentrations. MS2 was intermediate in chlorine resistance, and thus it is not a good indicator for viruses in chlorine disinfection. In the combined treatment total chlorine of 0.05-0.25 mg/L (free Cl-dosage 0.02-0.08 mg/L) and ultraviolet irradiation (14-22 mWs/cm(2)) were more effective than chlorine alone, and 3-5 Log10-reductions were achieved for the chlorine-resistant strains. The chlorination efficiency could be increased by higher dosages and longer contact times, but this could increase the formation of disinfection by-products. Therefore, the combination treatment is a recommended disinfection method.

  12. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M.E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent

  13. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated.

  14. The chlorination of cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maatman, Hendrik

    1980-01-01

    In this thesis the results of an investigation of the chlorination of cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone in the solvent carbontetrachloride and catalyzed by hydrogen chloride are described. ... Zie: Summary

  15. New World hantaviruses activate IFNlambda production in type I IFN-deficient vero E6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Prescott

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses indigenous to the New World are the etiologic agents of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS. These viruses induce a strong interferon-stimulated gene (ISG response in human endothelial cells. African green monkey-derived Vero E6 cells are used to propagate hantaviruses as well as many other viruses. The utility of the Vero E6 cell line for virus production is thought to owe to their lack of genes encoding type I interferons (IFN, rendering them unable to mount an efficient innate immune response to virus infection. Interferon lambda, a more recently characterized type III IFN, is transcriptionally controlled much like the type I IFNs, and activates the innate immune system in a similar manner.We show that Vero E6 cells respond to hantavirus infection by secreting abundant IFNlambda. Three New World hantaviruses were similarly able to induce IFNlambda expression in this cell line. The IFNlambda contained within virus preparations generated with Vero E6 cells independently activates ISGs when used to infect several non-endothelial cell lines, whereas innate immune responses by endothelial cells are specifically due to viral infection. We show further that Sin Nombre virus replicates to high titer in human hepatoma cells (Huh7 without inducing ISGs.Herein we report that Vero E6 cells respond to viral infection with a highly active antiviral response, including secretion of abundant IFNlambda. This cytokine is biologically active, and when contained within viral preparations and presented to human epithelioid cell lines, results in the robust activation of innate immune responses. We also show that both Huh7 and A549 cell lines do not respond to hantavirus infection, confirming that the cytoplasmic RNA helicase pathways possessed by these cells are not involved in hantavirus recognition. We demonstrate that Vero E6 actively respond to virus infection and inhibiting IFNlambda production in these cells might increase their utility

  16. High resolution spectrophotometry for identification of chlorine dioxide in concentrated chlorine solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauw, R D; Emmert, G L; Bubnis, B; Gordon, G

    1999-12-06

    Electrolyzed salt brine generators hold great promise for water disinfection in small communities and remote locations. Electrolysis cell liquors have been reported to contain chlorine, chlorine dioxide and ozone. High resolution spectrophotometry was used to observe the presence (or absence) of a unique spectral absorbance pattern present in solutions containing 1-2 mg/l chlorine dioxide.

  17. Involvement of Novel Multifunction Steroid Hormone Receptor Coactivator, E6-Associated Protein, in Prostate Gland Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    synthesized RhoA G14V protein in NETN buffer (100 mM NaCl, 1 mM EDTA, 20 mM Tris (pH 8.0), and 0.5% Nonidet P - 40 ) for 2–3 hours at room...to test the effects of loss E6- AP on the normal development of the prostate gland ( 40 , 41). We have also generated E6-AP transgenic mouse line that...expression of p -Akt in all the lobes compared to the wild- type, there was no significant differences between the extents of p -Akt over expression between

  18. First direct limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with electric charge less than $e/6$

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, H; Nelson, R H; Ogburn, R W; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    While the Standard Model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically-produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than $e$/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers found no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between $e$/6 and $e$/200.

  19. Impact of chlorine dioxide and ozone on the oxidation of NTA during drinking water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrubec, J.; ' t Hart, M.J.; Marsman, P.; Luijten, J.A.

    1984-11-01

    The use, as it is proposed, of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) for phosphate replacement in detergents will lead to its discharge in surface water at relatively high concentrations. Questions have been raised about potential health hazards related to the uptake and treatment of the NTA containing riverwater for drinking water supply. Degradation of NTA by biological oxidation in waste water treatment systems, soil and surface water under aerobic conditions has been demonstrated many times. However reports on degradation of NTA by chemical oxidation applied in water treatment processes are scarce. The aim of the present investigation was to determine removal of nitrilotriacetic acid upon chlorine, chlorine dioxide and ozone treatment under conditions characteristic for drinking water treatment practice; possible formation of mutagenic substances from the reaction of NTA with these oxidants; and formation of halogenated reaction products of NTA with chlorine and chlorine dioxide.

  20. β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 disrupt homology dependent double strand break repair by attenuating BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression and foci formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Wallace

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has explored a putative role for the E6 protein from some β-human papillomavirus genus (β-HPVs in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers, specifically β-HPV 5 and 8 E6. Because these viruses are not required for tumor maintenance, they are hypothesized to act as co-factors that enhance the mutagenic capacity of UV-exposure by disrupting the repair of the resulting DNA damage. Supporting this proposal, we have previously demonstrated that UV damage signaling is hindered by β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 resulting in an increase in both thymine dimers and UV-induced double strand breaks (DSBs. Here we show that β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 further disrupt the repair of these DSBs and provide a mechanism for this attenuation. By binding and destabilizing a histone acetyltransferase, p300, β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 reduce the enrichment of the transcription factor at the promoter of two genes critical to the homology dependent repair of DSBs (BRCA1 and BRCA2. The resulting diminished BRCA1/2 transcription not only leads to lower protein levels but also curtails the ability of these proteins to form repair foci at DSBs. Using a GFP-based reporter, we confirm that this reduced foci formation leads to significantly diminished homology dependent repair of DSBs. By deleting the p300 binding domain of β-HPV 8 E6, we demonstrate that the loss of robust repair is dependent on viral-mediated degradation of p300 and confirm this observation using a combination of p300 mutants that are β-HPV 8 E6 destabilization resistant and p300 knock-out cells. In conclusion, this work establishes an expanded ability of β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 to attenuate UV damage repair, thus adding further support to the hypothesis that β-HPV infections play a role in skin cancer development by increasing the oncogenic potential of UV exposure.

  1. MECHANISM OF CHLORATE FORMATION IN CHLORINE DIOIXDE DELIGNIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung-HoYoon; Li-JunWangI; Se-JongKim

    2004-01-01

    The effect of pH on chlorate formation duringchlorine dioxide delignification of oxygen delignifiedkraft pulp was studied. Chlorate formation was foundto increase slightly when pH was increased from 1.8to 2.5, further increase of pH decreased chlorateformation.The above phenomenon is explained by thecombination of two mechanisms, one by the reactionbetween hypochlorous acid and chlorite, another bythe effect of chlorine on the regeneration of chlorinedioxide. The first mechanism suggests that chlorateformation is highly dependent on HC10concentration which decreases with increasing pHand causes chlorate formation to behave in the sametrend. The second mechanism suggests that chlorinefavors the regeneration of chlorine dioxide whileHCIO favors chlorate formation, thus lowering thepH from about 4 to the acidic end should decreaseschlorate formation. Thethe maximum formation2.5.two opposite effects lead toof chlorate at around pH

  2. Phytoscreening of BTEX and chlorinated solvents by tree coring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Broholm, Mette Martina; Trapp, Stefan

    Background/Objectives. Site characterization is often time consuming and a financial burden for the site owners, which raises a demand for rapid and inexpensive screening methods. Tree coring is a phytoscreening method useful for detection of contamination with organic compounds. The method takes......(s). The measured concentrations are also compared to concentrations detected in soil and/or groundwater. Furthermore, the two screening technologies Tree coring and Soil air sampling have been compared to evaluate the feasibility of the tree coring method. Results/Lessons Learned. The method of tree coring can...... detect contamination with BTEX and chlorinated solvents in the shallow subsurface. The uptake of BTEX into trees varies to a greater extent with the site conditions and tree species than chlorinated solvents, which lead to greater uncertainty. Tree coring is semi-quantitative, low...

  3. Inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine.

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, D; Hoff, J C

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine were studied at 5 degrees C with a purified preparation of single virions and a preparation of cell-associated virions. Inactivation of the virus preparations with chlorine and chlorine dioxide was studied at pH 6 and 10. The monochloramine studies were done at pH 8. With 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter at pH 6, more than 4 logs (99.99%) of the single virions were inactivated in less than 15 s...

  4. Molecular detection of HPV 16/18 E6 genes from cervical cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Kabuga Auwal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiological, clinical and molecular studies have established the link between genital infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HPV and cervical cancer but there is great challenge in establishing early infection by both clinicians and the laboratories. The virus cannot be grown in conventional cell cultures and serology cannot different between active and past infection. Molecular studies remain the goal standard as it detects viral nucleic acid or cellular antigens indicative of oncogenic potential in cytology or biopsy specimen. The study was aimed to molecularly determine the presence of HPV 16/18 and expression of E6 gene in squamous intraepithelial lesions. Methods: Cervical cells were collected from 18 women with positive cytology test results and 32 controls in gynaecology clinic of Murtala Muhammad Specialist Hospital, Kano Nigeria and HPV 16/18 were detected with E6 gene specific PCR primers. Results: Overall, HPV E6 gene was found in 76% of the women, 88.3% of positive cytology specimens and 71.2% controls. Conclusions: There is very high prevalence of HPV infection. The presence of HPV 16/18 E6 genes in cervical intraepithelial lesions may serve as a useful predictor of diagnosis and possible clinical outcome of the disease. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(9.000: 2232-2236

  5. Detection of E6/E7 HPV oncogene transcripts as biomarker of cervical intaepithelial displasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carcheri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that only persistent infection with high risk types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV HR is a significant risk factor for the development of an invasive squamous cervical cancer. The overexpression of viral oncogenes E6/E7 of HPV is considered a necessary process for incurring in a malignant phenotype.A HPV infection can be identified by detection of HPV DNA in biological samples, but the DNAbased tests cannot delineate between transient or persistent and potentially transforming infection. Instead there is many evidence to suggest that detection of HPV gene expression may constitute a more specific approach to highlight a clinically significant infection. Especially seems that the detection of E6/E7 transcripts can be usefully used for identify the women with a persistent HPV infection that will can induce a future cervical cancer. The aim of our study is to investigate if the detection of oncogenic viral gene activity by detecting transcripts of the E6 and E7 genes can be most usefull of HPV-DNA test in the triage of ASCUS or low grade cervical lesions. Our results confirm that HPV E6/E7 mRNA test can be considered a promising method to stratify HPV positive women for risk of future high-grade cervical lesions or cervical intaepithelial neoplasia.

  6. Tumor prevention in HPV8 transgenic mice by HPV8-E6 DNA vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Awerkiew, Sabine; Hufbauer, Martin; Schädlich, Lysann; Gissmann, Lutz; Eming, Sabine; Pfister, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    The genus beta human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in individuals with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Immunosuppressed transplant recipients are prone to harbor particularly high betapapillomavirus DNA loads, which may contribute to their highly increased risk of SCC. Tumor induction in HPV8 transgenic mice correlates with increased expression of viral oncogenes E6 and E2. In an attempt to prevent skin tumor development, we evaluated an HPV8-E6-DNA vaccine, which was able to stimulate a detectable HPV8-E6-specific cell-mediated immune response in 8/15 immunized mice. When skin of HPV8 transgenic mice was grafted onto non-transgenic littermates, the grafted HPV8 transgenic tissue was not rejected and papillomas started to grow within 14 days all over the transplant of 9/9 non-vaccinated and 7/15 not successfully vaccinated mice. In contrast, no papillomas developed in 6/8 successfully vaccinated mice. In the other two of these eight mice, a large ulcerative lesion developed within the initial papilloma growth or papilloma development was highly delayed. As the vaccine completely or partially prevented papilloma development without rejecting the transplanted HPV8 positive skin, the immune system appears to attack only keratinocytes with increased levels of E6 protein, which would give rise to papillomas.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 DNase-seq Blood Jurkat (Clo...ne E6-1) http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 Histone Blood Jurkat (Clone... E6-1) SRX024361,SRX024357,SRX216366 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 Histone Blood Jurkat (Clone... E6-1) SRX024361,SRX024357,SRX216366 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 DNase-seq Blood Jurkat (Clo...ne E6-1) http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  19. The photoreactivity of chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaida, V. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Simon, J.D. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1995-06-09

    Determining the detailed photoreactivity of radicals that are of importance in atmospheric processes requires information from both laboratory and field measurements and theoretical calculations. Laboratory experiments and quantum calculations have been used to develop a comprehensive understanding of the photoreactivity of chlorine dioxide (OClO). The photoreactivity is strongly dependent on the medium (gas phase, liquid solution, or cryogenic matrix). These data reveal details of the complex chemistry of OClO. The potential role of this radical in stratospheric ozone depletion is discussed in accord with these laboratory measurements. 53 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Rare human papillomavirus 16 E6 variants reveal significant oncogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommasino Massimo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether low prevalence human papillomavirus (HPV 16 E6 variants differ from high prevalence types in their functional abilities. We evaluated functions relevant to carcinogenesis for the rarely-detected European variants R8Q, R10G and R48W as compared to the commonly detected L83V. Human immortalized keratinocytes (NIKS stably transduced with the E6 variants were used in most functional assays. Low and high prevalence E6 variants displayed similar abilities in abrogation of growth arrest and inhibition of p53 elevation induced by actinomycin D. Differences were detected in the abilities to dysregulate stratification and differentiation of NIKS in organotypic raft cultures, modulate detachment induced apoptosis (anoikis and hyperactivate Wnt signaling. No distinctive phenotype could be assigned to include all rare variants. Like L83V, raft cultures derived from variants R10G and R48W similarly induced hyperplasia and aberrantly expressed keratin 5 in the suprabasal compartment with significantly lower expression of keratin 10. Unlike L83V, both variants, and particularly R48W, induced increased levels of anoikis upon suspension in semisolid medium. R8Q induced a unique phenotype characterized by thin organotypic raft cultures, low expression of keratin 10, and high expression of keratins 5 and 14 throughout all raft layers. Interestingly, in a reporter based assay R8Q exhibited a higher ability to augment TCF/β-catenin transcription. The data suggests that differences in E6 variant prevalence in cervical carcinoma may not be related to the carcinogenic potential of the E6 protein.

  1. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  2. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  3. Mutagenic compounds from chlorination of humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmbom, Bjarne

    Chlorination of natural humic substances, as well as of lignin, produces a myriad of non-chlorinated and chlorinated compounds. The identification of an important class of strongly mutagenic compounds is reviewed. The most important Ames mutagen in chlorinated drinking waters of various origin is the compound 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone ("MX"). This compound occurs at neutral pH in the acyclic form, i.e. in the form of Z-2-chloro-3-(dichloromethyl)-4-oxobutenoic acid. Its E-isomer (E-MX) is present in chlorinated drinking waters at a similar concentration, but is less mutagenic in Ames test. Both oxidised and reduced forms of MX and E-MX are also present in chlorinated waters. The present knowledge of the chemistry and toxicology of these mutagens is examined. The formation and possible elimination of the chlorination mutagens is discussed. The need of understanding the mechanisms of formation of these mutagens from humic substances during drinking water chlorination is emphasized.

  4. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  5. Internal chlorination of Ni-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berztiss, D.; Hennesen, K.; Grabke, H.J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In contrast to internal oxidation, sulfidation and carburization, very little information is available regarding internal chlorination, especially diffusion of chlorine in metallic alloys. This paper describes results of experiments on Ni-Cr alloys (<10 wt% Cr) exposed in an atmosphere containing radioactive HCl. The diffusion of chlorine in the alloy can be determined by measurement of residual {beta}-activity from the sample surface. Successively thin layers (0.5-10 {mu}m) of the alloy were removed by lapping and the surface activity was measured to obtain a depth profile. Both single and polycrystalline materials were tested. Through this work it should be determined if there is in fact solubility and diffusion of chlorine in Ni-based alloys as some authors have proposed or if the ingress of chlorine is mainly a grain boundary phenomenon. (orig.)

  6. Chlorine isotope behavior during prograde metamorphism of sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selverstone, Jane; Sharp, Zachary D.

    2015-05-01

    Chlorine stable isotope compositions of two sedimentary sequences and their metamorphic equivalents were measured in order to study fractionation effects during prograde metamorphism and devolatilization. Protoliths (n = 25) were collected from a 50 m section of Triassic fluvial and playa-lake strata and Jurassic (Liassic) marine black shales in a well-characterized quarry. Low greenschist to middle amphibolite facies equivalents (n > 80) were collected from the Glarus Alps, Urseren Zone, and Lucomagno region. Bulk δ37Cl values are constant within individual sedimentary layers, but vary from -2.0 to + 2.4 ‰ in Triassic rocks and from -3.0 to 0‰ in the black shales. Dolomitic and gypsiferous samples have positive δ37Cl values, but marls and shales are isotopically negative. Bulk Cl contents show only small declines during the earliest stages of metamorphism. Metamorphic equivalents of the Triassic and Liassic protoliths record the same overall ranges in δ37Cl as their protoliths. Samples with highly correlated bulk compositions but different metamorphic grade show no statistically significant difference in δ37Cl. These data lead to the following conclusions: (1) Terrestrial and marine sedimentary rocks display large primary heterogeneities in chlorine isotope composition. As a result, an unambiguous "sedimentary signature" does not exist in the chlorine stable isotope system. (2) No isotopic fractionation is discernable during metamorphic devolatilization, even at low temperatures. Alpine-style metamorphism thus has little to no effect on bulk chlorine isotopic compositions, despite significant devolatilization. (3) Cl is largely retained in the rocks during devolatilization, contrary to the normally assumed hydrophilic behavior of chlorine. Continuous release of mixed-volatile C-O-H fluids likely affected Cl partitioning between fluid and minerals and allowed chlorine to remain in the rocks. (4) There is no evidence for fluid communication across (meta

  7. Development and trends in chlorine dioxide bleaching with integrated chlorate electrolysis for the cellulose industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintzer, P.

    1980-05-01

    Rising demand for cellulose and paper and the environmental measures necessary in this branch of industry compel the companies involved to invest large sums. In particular, waste water from bleaching operations causes difficulties in biological waste water purification owing to high chlorolignin content. The sequence of chlorination steps have been optimized for each quality of wood, and the increasing use of chlorine dioxide leads to an expansion of chlorate electrolysis and chlorine dioxide plant at the expense of chlorine. The consumption of chemicals for the various cellulose qualities is considered. During the past 30 years, the Muenchner process for production of ClO/sub 2/ has proved environmentally sound and is being continuously improved. Only hydrochloric acid and water are needed as raw materials. The chlorine formed in this process is converted into hydrochloric acid, hypochlorite, and chlorine water. All steps of the processes require only liquids and gases permitting a favourable, closed mode of operation without by-products or waste salts. New chlorate cells built since 1969 are equipped exclusively with coated titanium anodes (load between 6 and 100 kA) with DC efficiencies of 92 to 95%. Annual world production of sodium chlorate exceeds 1 million tonnes. The rate of increase has long remained steady at 5%.

  8. Kinetics of the oxidation of cylindrospermopsin and anatoxin-a with chlorine, monochloramine and permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Eva; Sordo, Ana; Metcalf, James S; Acero, Juan L

    2007-05-01

    Cyanobacteria produce toxins that may contaminate drinking water sources. Among others, the presence of the alkaloid toxins cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and anatoxin-a (ANTX) constitutes a considerable threat to human health due to the acute and chronic toxicity of these compounds. In the present study, not previously reported second-order rate constants for the reactions of CYN and ANTX with chlorine and monochloramine and of CYN with potassium permanganate were determined and the influence of pH and temperature was established for the most reactive cases. It was found that the reactivity of CYN with chlorine presents a maximum at pH 7 (rate constant of 1265 M(-1)s(-1)). However, the oxidation of CYN with chloramine and permanganate are rather slow processes, with rate constants <1 M(-1)s(-1). The first chlorination product of CYN was found to be 5-chloro-CYN (5-Cl-CYN), which reacts with chlorine 10-20 times slower than the parent compound. The reactivity of ANTX with chlorine and chloramines is also very low (k<1M(-1)s(-1)). The elimination of CYN and ANTX in surface water was also investigated. A chlorine dose of 1.5 mg l(-1) was enough to oxidize CYN almost completely. However, 3 mg l(-1) of chlorine was able to remove only 8% of ANTX, leading to a total formation of trihalomethanes (TTHM) at a concentration of 150 microg l(-1). Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for CYN degradation during oxidation and disinfection processes but not for ANTX removal. The permanganate dose required for CYN oxidation is very high and not applicable in waterworks.

  9. DESENVOLVIMENTO FONOLÓGICO EM CRIANÇAS DOS 3 ANOS E 6 MESES AOS 4 ANOS E 6 MESES DE IDADE NASCIDAS COM MUITO BAIXO PESO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Machado NOGUEIRA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho tem o objectivo central de avaliar o desenvolvimento fonológico de crianças nascidas com muito baixo peso, contribuindo com evidência empírica para a reflexão sobre o papel das variáveis fonológicas na avaliação do desenvolvimento linguístico infantil. Foi implementado um estudo com 30 crianças na faixa etária dos 3 anos e 6 meses aos 4 anos e 6 meses, sendo que 15 pertenciam à população de crianças nascidas com muito baixo peso e as restantes à de crianças nascidas com peso adequado, emparelhadas por género e idade. Observou-se o desempenho segmental das crianças nos dois grupos em estudo, avaliando-se a relação entre a produção das consoantes do inventário segmental do Português Europeu e a sua distribuição em função das variáveis fonológicas posição na palavra, posição na sílaba e acento de palavra. O objectivo central foi o de testar a eficácia das variáveis fonológicas acima referidas na identificação de diferenças de desenvolvimento fonológico entre os dois grupos de crianças. Através do teste de QuiQuadrado e da comparação frequencial, verificou-se que as crianças nascidas com muito baixo peso apresentavam um desempenho verbal inferior ao das crianças com peso adequado, no que diz respeito às variáveis fonológicas testadas.

  10. LHC signatures and cosmological implications of the E6 inspired SUSY models

    CERN Document Server

    Nevzorov, R

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenological implications of the E6 inspired supersymmetric models based on the Standard Model gauge group together with extra U(1)_N gauge symmetry under which right-handed neutrinos have zero charge are examined. In these models single discrete symmetry forbids the tree-level flavour changing processes and the most dangerous operators that violate baryon and lepton numbers. The two-loop renormalisation group flow of the gauge and Yukawa couplings is explored and the qualitative pattern of the Higgs spectrum in the case of the quasi-fixed point scenario is discussed. These E6 inspired models contain two dark-matter candidates. The presence of exotic states in these models gives rise to the nonstandard decays of the lightest Higgs boson which are also considered.

  11. E6, a dominant gene conditioning early flowering and maturity in soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emídio Rizzo Bonato

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Inheritance was studied in natural variants of the soybean cultivar Paraná, developed under photoperiodic conditions ranging from 13 h 31 min day light, at sowing, to 14 h 23 min, 59 days afterwards. Results indicated that early flowering and maturity are controlled by a single dominant gene. Natural mutations that originated cultivars Paranagoiana and SS-1 occurred at the same locus of cultivar Paraná. It was not possible to determine if the recessive alleles of these mutant cultivars are different. The designation E6 was proposed for the alleles determining earliness in cultivar Paraná, and e6 for the gene determining late flowering and maturity in cultivars Paranagoiana and SS-1, until the individuality of the alleles of Paranagoiana and SS-1 is confirmed.A herança foi estudada em variantes naturais de soja do cultivar Paraná, cultivados sob condições fotoperiódicas que variaram de 13 h 31 min, na data de semeadura, até 14 h 23 min, 59 dias após. Os resultados indicaram que o florescimento e a maturidade precoces são controlados por um gene dominante. As mutações naturais que originaram os cultivares Paranagoiana e SS-1 ocorreram no mesmo loco do cultivar Paraná. Não foi possível determinar se os alelos recessivos desses cultivares mutantes são separados. Foi proposta a designação E6 para os alelos que determinam o florescimento e a maturação precoces no cultivar Paraná, e e6 para os alelos que determinam florescimento e maturação tardios nos cultivares Paranagoiana e SS-1, até que a individualidade dos alelos de Paranagoiana e SS-1 seja confirmada.

  12. $E_6$ and a 750 GeV Di-photon Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, Aniket

    2016-01-01

    The grand unified group $E_6$ is a predictive scheme for physics beyond the standard model (SM). It offers the possibility of extra $Z$ bosons, new vector-like fermions, sterile neutrinos, and neutral scalars in addition to the SM Higgs boson. Some previous discussions of these features are updated and extended. Their relevance to a 750 GeV diphoton enhancement, recently observed by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, is noted.

  13. O-linked GlcNAcylation elevated by HPV E6 mediates viral oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qinghua; Zhao, Rui-Xun; Chen, Jianfeng; Li, Yining; Li, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Quan, Cheng-Shi; Wang, Yi-Shu; Zhai, Ying-Xian; Wang, Jian-Wei; Youssef, Mariam; Cui, Rutao; Liang, Jiyong; Genovese, Nicholas; Chow, Louise T; Li, Yu-Lin; Xu, Zhi-Xiang

    2016-08-16

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causative agents of anogenital cancers and a fraction of head and neck cancers. The mechanisms involved in the progression of HPV neoplasias to cancers remain largely unknown. Here, we report that O-linked GlcNAcylation (O-GlcNAc) and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) were markedly increased in HPV-caused cervical neoplasms relative to normal cervix, whereas O-GlcNAcase (OGA) levels were not altered. Transduction of HPV16 oncogene E6 or E6/E7 into mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) up-regulated OGT mRNA and protein, elevated the level of O-GlcNAc, and promoted cell proliferation while reducing cellular senescence. Conversely, in HPV-18-transformed HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, inhibition of O-GlcNAc with a low concentration of a chemical inhibitor impaired the transformed phenotypes in vitro. We showed that E6 elevated c-MYC via increased protein stability attributable to O-GlcNAcylation on Thr58. Reduction of HPV-mediated cell viability by a high concentration of O-GlcNAc inhibitor was partially rescued by elevated c-MYC. Finally, knockdown of OGT or O-GlcNAc inhibition in HeLa cells or in TC-1 cells, a mouse cell line transformed by HPV16 E6/E7 and activated K-RAS, reduced c-MYC and suppressed tumorigenesis and metastasis. Thus, we have uncovered a mechanism for HPV oncoprotein-mediated transformation. These findings may eventually aid in the development of effective therapeutics for HPV-associated malignancies by targeting aberrant O-GlcNAc.

  14. Gauge Kinetic Mixing and Leptophobic Z' in $E_6$ and SO(10)

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, T G

    1999-01-01

    We examine the influence of gauge kinetic mixing on the couplings of a TeV scale Z' in both E_6 and SO(10) models. The strength of such mixing, which arises due to the existence of incomplete matter representations at low scale, can be described by a single parameter, $\\delta$. The value of this parameter can significantly influence the ability of both hadron and lepton colliders to detect a Z' using conventional search techniques. In addition, $\\delta \

  15. Tula hantavirus triggers pro-apoptotic signals of ER stress in Vero E6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Lankinen, Hilkka; Putkuri, Niina; Vapalahti, Olli; Vaheri, Antti

    2005-03-01

    Tula virus is a member of the Hantavirus genus of the family Bunyaviridae. Viruses of this family have an unusual pattern of intracellular maturation at the ER-Golgi compartment. We recently found that Tula virus, similar to several other hantaviruses, is able to induce apoptosis in cultured cells [Li, X.D., Kukkonen, S., Vapalahti, O., Plyusnin, A., Lankinen, H., Vaheri, A., 2004. Tula hantavirus infection of Vero E6 cells induces apoptosis involving caspase 8 activation. J. Gen. Virol. 85, 3261-3268.]. However, the cellular mechanisms remain to be clarified. In this study, we demonstrate that the progressive replication of Tula virus in Vero E6 cells initiates several death programs that are intimately associated with ER stress: (1) early activation of ER-resident caspase-12; (2) phosphorylation of Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and its downstream target transcriptional factor, c-jun; (3) induction of the pro-apoptotic transcriptional factor, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153, or C/EBP homologous protein (Gadd153/chop); and (4) changes in the ER-membrane protein BAP31 implying cross-talk with the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, we confirmed that a sustained ER stress was induced marked by an increased expression of an ER chaperone Grp78/BiP. Taken together, we have identified involvement of ER stress-mediated death program in Tula virus-infected Vero E6 cells which provides a new approach to understand the mechanisms in hantavirus-induced apoptosis.

  16. Chlorination of Wastewater, Manual of Practice No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water Pollution Control Federation, Washington, DC.

    This manual reviews chlorination practices in the treatment and disposal of wastes from the earliest known applications. The application of chlorination for various purposes is described but no attempt has been made to compare chlorination with other methods. Included are chapters on the development and practice of wastewater chlorination,…

  17. Electron affinity of chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, L.M.; Pentecost, T.; Koppenol, W.H. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

    1989-12-14

    The flowing afterglow technique was used to determine the electron affinity of chlorine dioxide. A value of 2.37 {plus minus} 0.10 eV was found by bracketing between the electron affinities of HS* and SF{sub 4} as a lower limit and that of NO{sub 2} as an upper limit. This value is in excellent agreement with 2.32 eV predicted from a simple thermodynamic cycle involving the reduction potential of the ClO{sub 2}/ClO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} couple and a Gibbs hydration energy identical with that of SO{sub 2}{sup {sm bullet}{minus}}.

  18. Phosphate valorization by dry chlorination route

    OpenAIRE

    Kanari N.; Menad N.; Diot F.; Allain E.; Yvon J.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This work deals with the extraction of phosphorus chlorinated compounds from phosphate materials using chlorination with gaseous chlorine. An industrial sample of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, after transformation into calcium pyrophosphate (Ca 2 P 2 O 7), is subjected to reactions with Cl 2 +CO+N 2 and Cl 2 +C+N 2 at temperatures ranging from 625 to 950 °C using boat experiments. Gathering results of the thermodynamic predictions and TG/DT analysis with those of SEM ...

  19. Effect of phytic acid ketone on expression of HPV16/18 E6/E7 mRNA and protein in human cervical cancer cell line%植酸酮对宫颈癌细胞株中 HPV16/18 E6/E7 mRNA 及蛋白表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王侃; 高晓丽; 田文艳; 岳天孚

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of phytic acid ketone on expression of HPV 16/18 E6/E7 mRNA and protein in human cervical cancer cells.Methods The Caski cells ( containing HPV16 ) and Hela cells ( containing HPV18) were cultivated in vitro and then divided into the experimental groups 1, 2, 3, 4 and the control group ( each group contained Caski cell line and Hela cell line).The experimental groups 1, 2, 3, 4 were respectively treated with dif-ferent concentrations of phytic acid ketone (58.6 mg/L, 117 mg/L, 586 mg/L, 5 860 mg/L) for 72 h.The levels of HPV16/18 E6/E7 mRNA were determined with real-time PCR.Western blotting was used to measure the expression levels of E6 and E7 proteins.Results E6/E7 mRNA and protein expression in the same type of cells of the experimental groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 was lower than that of the control group, and the E6/E7 mRNA and protein expression showed a decreasing tendency in the experimental groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 (all P<0.05).In each experimental group, E6/E7 mRNA expression in Caski cells was lower than that in Hela cells (all P<0.05).In the same type of cells of the experiential groups, the E6 mRNA expression was lower than that of E7 mRNA (all P<0.05).Conclusions Phytic acid ketone could down-regulate the expression of E6/E7 mRNA and protein in human cervical cancer lines, which was in a dose-dependent manner.The inhibitory effect of phytic acid ketone on HPV16 E6/E7 mRNA was stronger than that on HPV18 E6/E7 mRNA and the suppression of E6 probably played a leading role.%目的:观察植酸酮对宫颈癌细胞株中HPV16/18 E6/E7 mRNA及蛋白表达的影响。方法体外培养Caski细胞株(含HPV16)与Hela细胞株(含HPV18),将所有细胞分成实验1、2、3、4组和对照组,每组均包含Caski细胞和Hela细胞。实验1、2、3、4组分别加入含58.6、117、586、5860 mg/L植酸酮的培养液,对照组加入不含植酸酮的培养液。各组培养72 h后,采用real-time PCR

  20. A comparison of the virucidal properties of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, G. R.; Butler, M.

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine were compared with chlorine as virucidal agents. Under optimal conditions all disinfectants were effective at low concentrations, but each disinfectant responded differently to acidity and alkalinity. Disinfection by chlorine was impaired by the presence of ammonia, but the other disinfectants retained much of their potency. Disinfection of poliovirus by iodine resulted in structural changes in the virions as seen by electron micrroscopy, but the ...

  1. Behavior of chlorine during coal pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, D.; Hutchinson, E.J.; Cao, H.; Pan, W.-P.; Chou, C.-L.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of chlorine in Illinois coals during pyrolysis was evaluated by combined thermo-gravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-ion chromatography (TG-FTIR-IC) techniques. It was found that more than 90% of chlorine in Illinois coals (IBC-103, 105, 106, and 109) was liberated as HCl gas during pyrolysis from 300 to 600??C, with the rate reaching a maximum at 440 ??C. Similarity of the HCl and NH3 release profiles during pyrolysis of IBC-109 supports the hypothesis that the chlorine in coal may be associated with nitrogen and the chlorine is probably bonded to the basic nitrogen sites on the inner walls of coal micropores. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  2. Chlorine Salts at the Phoenix Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, J.; Horgan, B.

    2016-09-01

    Although chlorine salts (perchlorates, chlorides) are known to exist at the Phoenix landing site, their distribution and type have not been positively identified yet. We look for these salts through a novel NIR remote sensing technique.

  3. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Modeling Trihalomethane Formation Potential from Wastewater Chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    chemically with each other, and with living organisms, particularly bacteria ( Manahan , 1991:435). To ensure effective disinfection, to meet the CWA...halogens are strong oxidants and are highly reactive ( Manahan , 1991:504). Chlorine is never found uncombined in nature, it exists only as the...HOCI) according to the following reaction: Cl2 (gas) + H20 =• HOC1 + H+ + Cl The hydrogen is oxidized and the chlorine gas is reduced ( Manahan , 1991

  5. Chlorinated drinking water for lightweight laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Schneider

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The study aimed to evaluate the effect of different levels of chlorine in drinking water of laying hens on zootechnical performance, eggs shell quality, hemogasometry levels and calcium content in tibia. 144 Hy-Line laying hens, 61 weeks old, were used distributed in 24 metabolism cages. They were subjected to water diets, for a period of 28 days, using sodium hypochlorite as a chlorine source in order to obtain the following concentrations: 5ppm (control, 20ppm, 50ppm, and 100ppm. Their performance was evaluated through water consumption, feed intake, egg production and weight, egg mass, feed conversion. Shell quality was measured by specific gravity. At the end of the experiment, arterial blood was collected for blood gas level assessment and a poultry of each replicate was sacrificed to obtain tibia and calcium content measurement. There was a water consumption reduction from 20ppm of chlorine and feed intake reduction in poultry receiving water with 100ppm of chlorine. The regression analysis showed that the higher the level of chlorine in water, the higher the reduction in consumption. There were no differences in egg production and weight, egg mass, feed conversion, specific gravity, tibia calcium content, and hemogasometry levels (hydrogenionic potential, carbon dioxide partial pressure, oxygen partial pressure, sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, carbon dioxide total concentration, anion gap and oxygen saturation. The use of levels above 5ppm of chlorine is not recommended in the water of lightweight laying hens.

  6. Environmentally acceptable incineration of chlorinated chemical waste: review of theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Zeeuw, M.A.; Lemkowitz, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons in the form of chemical waste, represent a threat to the environment and public health of the world. Their proper handling, removal and destruction is critical to long term safety. Increasingly strict government legislation is leading to an increase in the quantity of chlori

  7. Kinetics and mechanisms of formation of bromophenols during drinking water chlorination: assessment of taste and odor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Juan L; Piriou, Philippe; von Gunten, Urs

    2005-08-01

    Halophenols are often reported as off-flavor causing compounds responsible for medicinal taste and odor episodes in drinking water. To better understand and minimize the formation of 2-bromophenol and 2,6-dibromophenol which have low odor threshold concentrations (OTCs, 30 and 0.5 ng/L, respectively) a kinetic data base for the chlorination and bromination of phenols was established by combination of kinetic measurements and data from literature. Second-order rate constants for the reactions of chloro- and bromophenols with chlorine and bromine were determined over a wide pH range. The second-order rate constants for bromination of phenols are about three orders of magnitude higher than for chlorination. A quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) showed a good comparability of second-order rate constants from this study with those published previously for different phenol derivatives. The quantification of product distribution of the formed halophenols demonstrated that chlorine or bromine attack in ortho position is favored with respect to the para position. A kinetic model was formulated allowing us to investigate the influence of chlorine dose and some water quality parameters such as the concentration of phenol, ammonia, bromide and the pH on the product distribution of halophenols. The kinetic model can be applied to optimize drinking water chlorination with respect to phenol-born taste and odor problems. In general, high chlorine doses lead to low concentrations of intermediate odorous chlorophenols and bromophenols. An increase in the ammonia or phenol concentration leads to a higher consumption of HOCl and therefore greater final concentration of intermediate bromophenols. The presence of higher bromide than phenol concentration also facilitates the rapid bromination pathway which leads to further bromination of 2,6-dibromophenol to higher brominated phenols. Laboratory-scale experiments on taste and odor formation due to the chlorination of

  8. A new kind of Molotov? Gasoline-pool chlorinator mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutches, Katherine; Lord, James

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the reaction between pool chlorinators and gasoline. In particular, the propensity for self-ignition and the resulting chemical products were studied. An organic pool chlorinator was combined with gasoline in varying proportions in an attempt to form a hypergolic mixture. None of the combinations resulted in self-ignition, but larger quantities of chlorinator produced vigorous light-colored smoke and a solid mass containing isocyanuric acid and copper chloride. Additionally, the chlorinating abilities of different commercially available pool chlorinators were explored. When Ca(ClO)(2) and sodium dichloro-s-triazinetrione-based chlorinators were used, the presence of gasoline was still visible after 10 days, despite limited chlorination. The trichloro-s-triazinetrione-based chlorinator, however, caused efficient chlorination of the C(2)- and C(3)-alkylbenzenes, making gasoline no longer identifiable.

  9. Maxillofacial prostheses of chlorinated polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, P D

    1978-05-01

    There is clearly a need for maxillofacial prosthetic materials with improved properties. The chlorinated polyethylenes are thermoplastic elastomers which have particularly promising properties, and were used by us to prepare improved maxillofacial prostheses. Suitable CPE resins were compounded with other polymers and with pigments on a heated rubber mill to form thin sheets in a variety of shades. These were heated at 190 degrees C for 10 min and placed between heated linotype mold halves. The prosthesis was formed in a hand press. Sometimes heating and pressing were repeated. After cooling in water, the prosthesis was removed and hand-shaded with oil-soluble dyes. Physical properties were evaluated using standard techniques; skin irritation studies were conducted by 14-day insult patch tests on rabbits. Clinical evaluations were conducted on human volunteers. Parallel evaluations were conducted on commerically available materials for comparison. The CPE was superior to all of the three commerical materials in most properties, and comparable to the better of the three in the remaining properties. On balance, CPE was significantly superior. Early results indicate that the materials and techniques required are easily handled in the dental lab and that the final prosthesis has excellent aesthetic and patient acceptability.

  10. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maas, Z G; Hinkle, K

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H$^{35}$Cl at 3.69851 $\\mu$m. The high resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m telescope. The average [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with --0.72$<$[Fe/H]$<$0.20 is [$^{35}$Cl/Fe]=(--0.10$\\pm$0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16$\\pm$0.15) dex. The [$^{35}$Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of $\\sim$0.35 dex above model predictions suggesting chemical evolution models are under producing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and \\ion{H}{2} regions. In one star where both H$^{35}$Cl a...

  11. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 TFs and others Blood Jurkat...28777,SRX128782,SRX128784,SRX107307 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Bromate ion formation in dark chlorination and ultraviolet/chlorination processes for bromide-containing water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Bormate (BrO3-) is a carcinogenic chemical produced in ozonation or chlorination of bromide-containing water. Although its formation in seawater with or without sunlight has been previously investigated, the formation of bromate in dilute solutions,particularly raw water for water treatment plant, is unknown. In this article, the results of bench scale tests to measure the formation rates of bromate formation in dilute solutions, including de-ionized water and raw water from Yangtze River, were presented in dark chlorination and ultraviolet (UV)/chlorination processes. And the effects of initial pH, initial concentration of NaOCl, and UV light intensity on bromate formation in UV/chlorination of the diluted solutions were investigated. Detectable bromate was formed in dark chlorination of the two water samples with a relatively slow production rate. Under routine disinfecting conditions, the amount of formed bromate is not likely to exceed the national standards (10 μg/L). UV irradiation enhanced the decay of free chlorine, and,simultaneously, 6.6%-32% of Br- was oxidized to BrO3-. And the formation of bromate exhibited three stages: rapid stage, slow stage and plateau. Under the experimental conditions (pH = 4.41-11.07, CCl2= 1.23-4.50 mg/L), low pH and high chlorine concentration favored the generation of bromate. High light intensity promoted the production rate of bromate, but decreased its total generation amount due to acceleration of chlorine decomposition.

  19. HPV16E6-Dependent c-Fos Expression Contributes to AP-1 Complex Formation in SiHa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixin Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the major role of HPV16E6 in cancer has been considered to be its ability to inhibit the p53 tumor-suppressor protein, thereby thwarting p53-mediated cytotoxic responses to cellular stress signals. Here, we show that HPV16E6-dependent c-fos oncogenic protein expression contributes to AP-1 complex formation under oxidative stress in SiHa cells (HPV16-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. In addition, we examined the role of HPV16E6 in TGF-α-induced c-fos expression and found that the c-fos protein expression induced by TGF-α is HPV16E6 dependent. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that HPV16E6 contributes to AP-1 complex formation after both ligand-dependent and independent EGFR activation, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of HPV-associated tumors.

  20. Interaction of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoprotein with Sorting Nexin 27 Modulates Endocytic Cargo Transport Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketaki Ganti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A subset of high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs are the causative agents of a large number of human cancers, of which cervical is the most common. Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, contribute directly towards the development and maintenance of malignancy. A characteristic feature of the E6 oncoproteins from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM at its C-terminus, which confers interaction with cellular proteins harbouring PDZ domains. Here we show that this motif allows E6 interaction with Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27, an essential component of endosomal recycling pathways. This interaction is highly conserved across E6 proteins from multiple high-risk HPV types and is mediated by a classical PBM-PDZ interaction but unlike many E6 targets, SNX27 is not targeted for degradation by E6. Rather, in HPV-18 positive cell lines the association of SNX27 with components of the retromer complex and the endocytic transport machinery is altered in an E6 PBM-dependent manner. Analysis of a SNX27 cargo, the glucose transporter GLUT1, reveals an E6-dependent maintenance of GLUT1 expression and alteration in its association with components of the endocytic transport machinery. Furthermore, knockdown of E6 in HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells phenocopies the loss of SNX27, both in terms of GLUT1 expression levels and its vesicular localization, with a concomitant marked reduction in glucose uptake, whilst loss of SNX27 results in slower cell proliferation in low nutrient conditions. These results demonstrate that E6 interaction with SNX27 can alter the recycling of cargo molecules, one consequence of which is modulation of nutrient availability in HPV transformed tumour cells.

  1. Chlorine dioxide treatment for zebra mussel control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybarik, D. [Dairyland Power Cooperative, La Crosse, WI (United States); Byron, J. [Nalco Chemical Company, Naperville, IL (United States); Germer, M. [Rio Linda Chemical Company, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Chlorine is recognized and commonly used biocide for power plant cooling water and service water treatment programs, including the control of zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide has recently become a popular method of zebra mussel control because of its economy, safety, environmental acceptability, and effectiveness when compared to other mussel control methods. This control technique was recently demonstrated at Dairyland Power Cooperative`s Alma Generating Station on the east bank of the upper Mississippi River in Alma, Wisconsin. The project was assisted with EPRI Tailored Collaboration Program funds. The Dairyland Power Alam Generating Station consists of five generating units that utilize raw, untreated Mississippi River water for condenser, circulating, and service water supplies. The first units were built in 1947, with the final and largest unit being completed in 1960. Total station generating capacity is 200 MW. Because of recent increases in the zebra mussel density at the station intake, Dairyland Power selected the team of Nalco and Rio Linda to perform a chlorine dioxide treatment of the station`s new water systems to eradicate and control the mussels before their presence created operational difficulties. This paper will present the results of the treatment including treatment theory, design and construction of the treatment system, the method of chlorine dioxide generation, treatment concentration, analytical methods o monitoring chlorine dioxide generation, residuals and trihalomethane (THM) concentrations, protocol for monitoring treatment mortality, and the effects of chlorine dioxide and detoxification on other water chemistry parameters and equipment materials. The goal of this paper is to inform and assist users with establishing consistent and uniform practices for safely utilizing and monitoring chlorine dioxide in the eradication and control of zebra mussels.

  2. Chlorinated Phospholipids and Fatty Acids: (Patho)physiological Relevance, Potential Toxicity, and Analysis of Lipid Chlorohydrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Chlorinated phospholipids are formed by the reaction of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), generated by the enzyme myeloperoxidase under inflammatory conditions, and the unsaturated fatty acyl residues or the head group. In the first case the generated chlorohydrins are both proinflammatory and cytotoxic, thus having a significant impact on the structures of biomembranes. The latter case leads to chloramines, the properties of which are by far less well understood. Since HOCl is also widely used as a disinfecting and antibacterial agent in medicinal, industrial, and domestic applications, it may represent an additional source of danger in the case of abuse or mishandling. This review discusses the reaction behavior of in vivo generated HOCl and biomolecules like DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates but will focus on phospholipids. Not only the beneficial and pathological (toxic) effects of chlorinated lipids but also the importance of these chlorinated species is discussed. Some selected cleavage products of (chlorinated) phospholipids and plasmalogens such as lysophospholipids, (chlorinated) free fatty acids and α-chloro fatty aldehydes, which are all well known to massively contribute to inflammatory diseases associated with oxidative stress, will be also discussed. Finally, common analytical methods to study these compounds will be reviewed with focus on mass spectrometric techniques. PMID:28090245

  3. Chlorinated Phospholipids and Fatty Acids: (Pathophysiological Relevance, Potential Toxicity, and Analysis of Lipid Chlorohydrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Schröter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated phospholipids are formed by the reaction of hypochlorous acid (HOCl, generated by the enzyme myeloperoxidase under inflammatory conditions, and the unsaturated fatty acyl residues or the head group. In the first case the generated chlorohydrins are both proinflammatory and cytotoxic, thus having a significant impact on the structures of biomembranes. The latter case leads to chloramines, the properties of which are by far less well understood. Since HOCl is also widely used as a disinfecting and antibacterial agent in medicinal, industrial, and domestic applications, it may represent an additional source of danger in the case of abuse or mishandling. This review discusses the reaction behavior of in vivo generated HOCl and biomolecules like DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates but will focus on phospholipids. Not only the beneficial and pathological (toxic effects of chlorinated lipids but also the importance of these chlorinated species is discussed. Some selected cleavage products of (chlorinated phospholipids and plasmalogens such as lysophospholipids, (chlorinated free fatty acids and α-chloro fatty aldehydes, which are all well known to massively contribute to inflammatory diseases associated with oxidative stress, will be also discussed. Finally, common analytical methods to study these compounds will be reviewed with focus on mass spectrometric techniques.

  4. Influencing factors and degradation products of antipyrine chlorination in water with free chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiquan Cai; Liqiu Zhang; Fei Qi; Li Feng

    2013-01-01

    Owing to its low cost,free chlorine is one of the most common disinfectants for wastewater and drinking water treatment.However,the formation of disinfection byproducts has been found to occur after free chlorine disinfection in recent decades.Antipyrine (ANT),an anti-inflammatory analgesic,has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment.In this work.the removal efficiency of ANT by free chlorine oxidation in ultrapure water was investigated with batch experiments.The influencing factors on the removal of ANT were explored at initial concentrations of ANT from 0.04 to 0.64 mg/L,free chlorine dosage from 0.30 to 1.31 mg/L,and pH from 1.5 to 9.0.The main degradation products were identified by solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.The results showed that ANT reacted rapidly with free chlorine in ultrapure water systems and up to 90.6% removal efficiency of ANT was achieved after 25 sec (initial free chlorine 1 mg/L,ANT 0.5 mg/L,pH 7.0).Higher oxidant dosage,lower ANT initial concentration and low pH favor the ANT removal.The main degradation product in ANT chlorination was a monochlorine substitution product (4-chloro-l,2-dihydro1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-one),which can be further chlorinated by free chlorine.In addition,the total organic carbon result indicated that ANT is difficult to be mineralized using chlorine.

  5. Influencing factors and degradation products of antipyrine chlorination in water with free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Meiquan; Zhang, Liqiu; Qi, Fei; Feng, Li

    2013-01-01

    Owing to its low cost, free chlorine is one of the most common disinfectants for wastewater and drinking water treatment. However, the formation of disinfection byproducts has been found to occur after free chlorine disinfection in recent decades. Antipyrine (ANT), an anti-inflammatory analgesic, has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In this work, the removal efficiency of ANT by free chlorine oxidation in ultrapure water was investigated with batch experiments. The influencing factors on the removal of ANT were explored at initial concentrations of ANT from 0.04 to 0.64 mg/L, free chlorine dosage from 0.30 to 1.31 mg/L, and pH from 1.5 to 9.0. The main degradation products were identified by solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that ANT reacted rapidly with free chlorine in ultrapure water systems and up to 90.6% removal efficiency of ANT was achieved after 25 sec (initial free chlorine 1 mg/L, ANT 0.5 mg/L, pH 7.0). Higher oxidant dosage, lower ANT initial concentration and low pH favor the ANT removal. The main degradation product in ANT chlorination was a monochlorine substitution product (4-chloro-1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-one), which can be further chlorinated by free chlorine. In addition, the total organic carbon result indicated that ANT is difficult to be mineralized using chlorine.

  6. Disposition of PUREX facility tanks D5 and E6 uranium and plutonium solutions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, D.P.

    1993-12-01

    Approximately 9 kilograms of plutonium and 5 metric tons of uranium in a 1 molar nitric acid solution are being stored in two PUREX facility vessels, tanks D5 and E6. The plutonium was accumulated during cleanup activities of the plutonium product area of the PUREX facility. Personnel at PUREX recently completed a formal presentation to the Surplus Materials Peer Panel (SMPP) regarding disposition of the material currently in these tanks. The peer panel is a group of complex-wide experts who have been chartered by EM-64 (Office of Site and Facility Transfer) to provide a third party independent review of disposition decisions. The information presented to the peer panel is provided in the first section of this report. The panel was generally receptive to the information provided at that time and the recommendations which were identified.

  7. Design of a highly effective therapeutic HPV16 E6/E7-specific DNA vaccine: optimization by different ways of sequence rearrangements (shuffling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad N Almajhdi

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with the high-risk Human Papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16 is the causative event for the development of cervical cancer and other malignant tumors of the anogenital tract and of the head and neck. Despite many attempts to develop therapeutic vaccines no candidate has entered late clinical trials. An interesting approach is a DNA based vaccine encompassing the nucleotide sequence of the E6 and E7 viral oncoproteins. Because both proteins are consistently expressed in HPV infected cells they represent excellent targets for immune therapy. Here we report the development of 8 DNA vaccine candidates consisting of differently rearranged HPV-16 E6 and E7 sequences within one molecule providing all naturally occurring epitopes but supposedly lacking transforming activity. The HPV sequences were fused to the J-domain and the SV40 enhancer in order to increase immune responses. We demonstrate that one out of the 8 vaccine candidates induces very strong cellular E6- and E7- specific cellular immune responses in mice and, as shown in regression experiments, efficiently controls growth of HPV 16 positive syngeneic tumors. This data demonstrates the potential of this vaccine candidate to control persistent HPV 16 infection that may lead to malignant disease. It also suggests that different sequence rearrangements influence the immunogenecity by an as yet unknown mechanism.

  8. On site sodium hypochlorite generation using electro chlorination. Disinfection of potable waste in small communities; Produccion in situ de NaClO, mediante electrocloracion. Aplicaciona la desinfeccion de agua de consumo en pequenas comunidades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valero, F.; Todra, F.; Gomez, J. L.

    2008-07-01

    This works deals with the experience of ATLL in the re chlorination of its distribution system.Besides security problems that present the disinfection using chlorine in local tanks near the houses, in some cases, the irregular consumption leads to new problems related with maintenance and management of the system. To improve the process, ATLL has installed some on site electro chlorination systems to generate sodium hypochlorite (0,8%) from salt, at request. (Author) 8 refs.

  9. Effect of chlorination on the development of marine biofilms dominated by diatoms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Jagadeesan, V.

    , and Thalassionema did not increase in density after chlorine treatment. It was also demonstrated that diatoms can colonize, grow and photosynthesize on chlorine-treated surfaces. Under pulse chlorination (treatment every 6 h), irrespective of chlorine concentration...

  10. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF A NOVEL HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE 16 L1/E6-E7 CHIMERIC RECOMBINANT DNA VACCINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑瑾; 马军; 张福萍; 杨筱凤; 董小平; 司履生; 王一理

    2004-01-01

    Objective Preparations of HPV16 L1/E6 and L1/E7 prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines. Methods The nucleotides within HPV16 E6 and E7 genes, which are responsible for viral transforming activity, were mutated by mage primer site-directed mutagenesis method. The correctly mutated E6 and E7 fragments were separately cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1, together with HPV16 L1 gene, generating chimeric recombinants plasmids 1MpVAX1-L1E6, 2MpVAX1-L1E6, 1MpVAX1-L1E7, 2MpVAX1-L1E7 and 3MpVAX1-L1E7. CHO cells were transiently transfected with the individual DNA vaccines by calcium phosphate method. Target protein expressions in the extracts of the transfected cell lines were measured by ELISA and immunohistochemistry, with HPV16 L1 and E6 specific monoclonal antibodies. Results ELISA assays showed the P/N ratios in the cell extracts transfected with L1E6 and L1E7 plasmids were more than 2.1. Immunohistochemistry revealed brownish precipitant signal in cytoplasm and nuclei of the transfected cells. Conclusion Successful constructions of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccine plasmids lay solid foundation for future animal experiment and clinical trial.

  11. Development of anti-E6 pegylated lipoplexes for mucosal application in the context of cervical preneoplastic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechanteur, Anna; Furst, Tania; Evrard, Brigitte; Delvenne, Philippe; Hubert, Pascale; Piel, Géraldine

    2015-04-10

    Cervical cancer induced by human papillomavirus (HPV) is the fourth highest mortality causing cancer in women despite the use of prophylactic vaccines. E6 targeting represents an attractive strategy to treat this cancer. Indeed, oncoprotein E6 is produced by keratinocytes infected by HPV and is partially responsible for carcinogenesis. E6 interferes with the apoptosis process in stressed cells by degradation of p53 tumor suppressor gene. Our strategy consists in using E6 siRNA complexed with pegylated lipoplexes. The addition of hydrophilic polymer around the nanoparticles is crucial to use them by vaginal application on account of cervicovaginal mucus. Physicochemical characteristics were evaluated and in vitro assays were performed to evaluate transfection potential, E6 mRNA extinction and p53 re-expression. Cationic liposomes DOTAP/Cholesterol/DOPE 1/0.75/0.5 (N/P 2.5) with or without 50% DSPE-PEG2000 and associated with siE6 have demonstrated good physicochemical characteristics in terms of complexation, size, surface charge and stability. Both lipoplexes have been tested on CaSki cell line (HPV 16+) with 50 nM and 100 nM of siE6. Lipoplexes formulations induce 30-40% of E6 mRNA extinction and induce the re-expression of p53. In conclusion, pegylated anti-E6 lipoplexes have demonstrated their efficiency to cross the cellular membrane and to release siRNA into the cytoplasm confirmed by final p53 protein production.

  12. Natural Chlorophyll-Related Porphyrins and Chlorins for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Feng Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural-chlorophyll-related porphyrins, including (2H, Zn, Cu-protoporphyrin IX (Por-1 and Zn-mesoporphyrin IX (Por-2, and chlorins, including chlorin e6 (Chl-1, chlorin e4 (Chl-2, and rhodin G7 (Chl-3, have been used in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. For porphyrin sensitizers that have vinyl groups at the β-positions, zinc coordinated Por-1 gives the highest solar-energy-to-electricity conversion efficiency (h of up to 2.9%. Replacing the vinyl groups of ZnPor-1 with ethyl groups increases the open-circuit voltage (Voc from 0.61 V to 0.66 V, but decreases the short-circuit current (Jsc from 7.0 mA·cm−2 to 6.1 mA·cm−2 and the value of h to 2.8%. Density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT calculations suggest that the higher Jsc values of Zn-based porphyrin sensitizers result from the favorable electron injection from the LUMO at higher energy levels. In the case of the chlorin sensitizers, the number of carboxyl protons has a large effect on the photovoltaic performance. Chl-2 with two carboxyl protons gives much higher values of Jsc, Voc, and h than does Chl-1 with three carboxyl protons. Replacing the protons of Chl-1 with sodium ions can substantially improve the photovoltaic performance of Chl-1-based solar cells. Furthermore, the sodium salt of Chl-3 with an aldehyde group at the C7 position shows poorer photovoltaic performance than does the sodium salt of Chl-1 with methyl groups at the C7 position. This is due to the low light-harvesting capability of Chl-3.

  13. Suppression of chlorine activation on aviation-produced volatile particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Meilinger

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effect of nm-sized aircraft-induced aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4/H2O particles on atmospheric ozone as a function of temperature. Our calculations are based on a previously derived parameterization for the regional-scale perturbations of the sulfate surface area density due to air traffic in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC and a chemical box model. We confirm large scale model results that at temperatures T > 210 K additional ozone loss -- mainly caused by hydrolysis of BrONO2 and N2O5 -- scales in proportion with the aviation-produced increase of the background aerosol surface area. However, at lower temperatures (< 210 K we isolate two effects which efficiently reduce the aircraft-induced perturbation: (1 background particles growth due to H2O and HNO3 uptake enhance scavenging losses of aviation-produced liquid particles and (2 the Kelvin effect efficiently limits chlorine activation on the small aircraft-induced droplets by reducing the solubility of chemically reacting species. These two effects lead to a substantial reduction of heterogeneous chemistry on aircraft-induced volatile aerosols under cold conditions. In contrast we find contrail ice particles to be potentially important for heterogeneous chlorine activation and ozone depletion. These features have not been taken into consideration in previous global studies of the atmospheric impact of aviation. Therefore, to parameterize them in global chemistry and transport models, we propose the following parameterisation: scale the hydrolysis reactions by the aircraft-induced surface area increase, and neglect heterogeneous chlorine reactions on liquid plume particles but not on ice contrails and aircraft induced ice clouds.

  14. Suppression of chlorine activation on aviation-produced volatile particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Meilinger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effect of nanometer-sized aircraft-induced aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4/H2O particles on atmospheric ozone as a function of temperature. Our calculations are based on a previously derived parameterization for the regional-scale perturbations of the sulfate surface area density due to air traffic in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC and a chemical box model. We confirm large scale model results that at temperatures T>210 K additional ozone loss -- mainly caused by hydrolysis of BrONO2 and N2O5 -- scales in proportion with the aviation-produced increase of the background aerosol surface area. However, at lower temperatures (2O and HNO3 uptake enhance scavenging losses of aviation-produced liquid particles and (2 the Kelvin effect efficiently limits chlorine activation on the small aircraft-induced droplets by reducing the solubility of chemically reacting species. These two effects lead to a substantial reduction of heterogeneous chemistry on aircraft-induced volatile aerosols under cold conditions. In contrast we find contrail ice particles to be potentially important for heterogeneous chlorine activation and reductions in ozone levels. These features have not been taken into consideration in previous global studies of the atmospheric impact of aviation. Therefore, to parameterize them in global chemistry and transport models, we propose the following parameterisation: scale the hydrolysis reactions by the aircraft-induced surface area increase, and neglect heterogeneous chlorine reactions on liquid plume particles but not on ice contrails and aircraft induced ice clouds.

  15. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, W.E. Jr. [Alabama Power Co./GSC No. 8, Birmingham, AL (United States); Laylor, M.M. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water.

  16. Microbiological aspects of the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons from air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolfing, Jan; Wijngaard, Arjan J. van den; Janssen, Dick B.

    1993-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons are widely used synthetic chemicals that are frequently present in industrial emissions. Bacterial degradation has been demonstrated for several components of this class of compounds. Structural features that affect the degradability include the number of chlorine atoms and

  17. Occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, Maria M; Olsen, Jørn; Villeneuve, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF).......To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF)....

  18. Atomic basis for the species-specific inhibition of αV integrins by monoclonal antibody 17E6 is revealed by the crystal structure of αVβ3 ectodomain-17E6 Fab complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Bhuvaneshwari; Van Agthoven, Johannes F; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Alonso, José Luis; Adair, Brian D; Rui, Xianliang; Anand, Saurabh; Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K; Burger, Christa; Goodman, Simon L; Arnaout, M Amin

    2014-05-16

    The function-blocking, non-RGD-containing, and primate-specific mouse monoclonal antibody 17E6 binds the αV subfamily of integrins. 17E6 is currently in phase II clinical trials for treating cancer. To elucidate the structural basis of recognition and the molecular mechanism of inhibition, we crystallized αVβ3 ectodomain in complex with the Fab fragment of 17E6. Protein crystals grew in presence of the activating cation Mn(2+). The integrin in the complex and in solution assumed the genuflected conformation. 17E6 Fab bound exclusively to the Propeller domain of the αV subunit. At the core of αV-Fab interface were interactions involving Propeller residues Lys-203 and Gln-145, with the latter accounting for primate specificity. The Propeller residue Asp-150, which normally coordinates Arg of the ligand Arg-Gly-Asp motif, formed contacts with Arg-54 of the Fab that were expected to reduce soluble FN10 binding to cellular αVβ3 complexed with 17E6. This was confirmed in direct binding studies, suggesting that 17E6 is an allosteric inhibitor of αV integrins.

  19. Diurnal variation of stratospheric chlorine monoxide - A critical test of chlorine chemistry in the ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, P. M.; De Zafra, R.; Parrish, A.; Barrett, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ground-based observations of a mm-wave spectral line at 278 GHz have yielded stratospheric chlorine monoxide column density diurnal variation records which indicate that the mixing ratio and column density of this compound above 30 km are about 20 percent lower than model predictions based on 2.1 parts/billion of total stratospheric chlorine. The observed day-to-night variation is, however, in good agreement with recent model predictions, both confirming the existence of a nighttime reservoir for chlorine and verifying the predicted general rate of its storage and retrieval.

  20. Chlorine: Undergraduate Research on an Element of Controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hasok

    2009-04-01

    If chemical elements were people, chlorine would be a celebrity. Although intrinsically no more or less important than any other element, chlorine has had a knack of making headlines. The genre of "object biography" has been quite successful in popular science recently. We took this opportunity to write a "biographical" study of chlorine. Chlorine's wide range of interesting controversies is well suited for attracting and maintaining the enthusiasm of the diverse range of students we teach in our department.

  1. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  2. Hantavirus infection induces apoptosis in Vero E6cells via mitochondria pathway%汉坦病毒通过线粒体途径诱导Vero E6细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱鹏飞; 于建武; 刘伟; 颜炳柱; 孙丽杰; 康鹏; 赵勇华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the apoptosis of Vero E6 cells infected with hantavirus. Methods N protein of hantavirus was detected in the lysates of Vero E6 cells infected with hantavirus by Western blot. The apoptosis of Vero E6 cells induced by hantavirus was detected by flow cytometry and DNA-ladder assays. The expression levels of Bcl-2, Cyt-c and activated Caspase-3 were assessed by Western blot. Results Hantavirus N protein was found in cell ly sates following hantavirus infection of Vero E6 cells by western blot. DNA electrophoresis showed typical DNA laddering and apoptosis peak was detected by flow cytometry. The expres sion levels of Cyt-c and activated Caspase-3 were increased while Bcl-2 decreased as the infec tion sustained. Conclusion Hantavirus infection induces apoptosis in Vero E6 cells via mito chondria pathway.%目的 探讨汉坦病毒诱导非洲绿猴肾细胞Vero E6凋亡的机制.方法 汉坦病毒感染VeroE6细胞后应用Western blot检测胞浆内汉坦病毒核心蛋白(N蛋白)的表达情况,应用DNA-ladder和流式细胞术检测汉坦病毒感染Veto E6细胞诱导凋亡的发生,用Western blot方法检测凋亡相关蛋白Bcl -2、Cyt-c及Caspase-3的表达情况.结果 汉坦病毒感染Vero E6细胞后,在胞浆内检测出汉坦病毒N蛋白.流式细胞仪检测到凋亡峰,DNA电泳可见典型的DNA梯带.Western blot显示随着感染时间的延长,Cyt-c蛋白及Caspase-3酶原活化片段表达增加,Bcl-2蛋白表达减少.结论 汉坦病毒通过线粒体途径诱导Vero E6细胞凋亡.

  3. A new proposal for diphoton resonance from $E_6$ motivated extra $U(1)$

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Kasinath; Nandi, S; Rai, Santosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We propose that the diphoton resonance signal indicated by the recent LHC data might also arise from the pair productions of vector-like heavy down-type quarks with mass around $750$ GeV and above. The vector-like quark decays into an ordinary light quark and a Standard Model singlet scalar. The subsequent decay of scalar singlet produces the diphoton excess. Both the vector-like quark and singlet scalars appear naturally in the $E_6$, and their masses can be in the TeV scale with a suitable choice of symmetry breaking pattern. The prediction of such a proposal would be to see an accompanying dijet signal at the same mass with similar cross section in the $2\\gamma + 2j$ final state and two dijet resonances at the same mass for a $4j$ final state with a cross section, about 100 times larger. Both predictions can be tested easily as the luminosity accumulates in the upcoming runs of the LHC.

  4. Masses of Third Family Vector-like Quarks and Leptons in Yukawa-Unified $E_6$

    CERN Document Server

    Hebbar, Aditya; Shafi, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    In supersymmetric $E_6$ the masses of the third family quarks and charged lepton, $t-b-\\tau$, as well as the masses of the vector-like quarks and leptons, $D-\\bar{D}$ and $ L-\\bar{L}$, may arise from the coupling $27_3$ x $27_3$ x $27_H$, where $27_3$ and $27_H$ denote the third family matter and Higgs multiplets respectively. We assume that the SO(10) singlet component in $27_H$ acquires a TeV scale VEV which spontaneously breaks U(1)$_\\psi$ and provides masses to the vector-like particles in $27_3$, while the MSSM doublets in $27_H$ provide masses to $ t, b$ and $\\tau$. Imposing Yukawa coupling unification $h_t=h_b=h_{\\tau}=h_D=h_L$ at $M_{GUT}$ and employing the ATLAS and CMS constraints on the $Z'_\\psi$ boson mass, we estimate the lower bounds on the third family vector-like particles $D-\\bar{D}$ and $L-\\bar{L}$ masses to be around 5.85 TeV and 2.9 TeV respectively. These bounds apply in the supersymmetric limit.

  5. Quasi-fixed point scenarios and the Higgs mass in the E6 inspired SUSY models

    CERN Document Server

    Nevzorov, R

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the renormalization group (RG) flow of the gauge and Yukawa couplings within the E6 inspired supersymmetric (SUSY) models with extra U(1)_{N} gauge symmetry under which right-handed neutrinos have zero charge. In these models single discrete \\tilde{Z}^{H}_2 symmetry forbids the tree-level flavor-changing transitions and the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. We argue that the measured values of the SU(2)_W and U(1)_Y gauge couplings lie near the quasi-fixed points of the RG equations in these models. The solutions for the Yukawa couplings also approach the quasi-fixed points with increasing their values at the Grand Unification scale. We calculate the two-loop upper bounds on the lightest Higgs boson mass in the vicinity of these quasi-fixed points and compare the results of our analysis with the corresponding ones in the NMSSM. In all these cases the theoretical restrictions on the SM-like Higgs boson mass are rather close to 125 GeV.

  6. Quasifixed point scenarios and the Higgs mass in the E6 inspired supersymmetric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzorov, R.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze the two-loop renormalization group (RG) flow of the gauge and Yukawa couplings within the E6 inspired supersymmetric models with extra U(1)N gauge symmetry under which right-handed neutrinos have zero charge. In these models, single discrete Z stretchy="false">˜2H symmetry forbids the tree-level flavor-changing transitions and the most dangerous baryon and lepton number violating operators. We consider two different scenarios A and B that involve extra matter beyond the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model contained in three and four 5+5¯ representations of SU(5), respectively, plus three SU(5) singlets which carry U(1)N charges. In scenario A, the measured values of the SU(2)W and U(1)Y gauge couplings lie near the fixed points of the RG equations. In scenario B, the contribution of two-loop corrections spoils the unification of gauge couplings, resulting in the appearance of the Landau pole below the grand unification scale MX. The solutions for the Yukawa couplings also approach the quasifixed points with increasing their values at the scale MX. We calculate the two-loop upper bounds on the lightest Higgs boson mass in the vicinity of these quasifixed points and compare the results of our analysis with the corresponding ones in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. In all these cases, the theoretical restrictions on the Standard-Model-like Higgs boson mass are rather close to 125 GeV.

  7. Explaining the CMS excesses, baryogenesis and neutrino masses in $E_{6}$ motivated $U(1)_{N}$ model

    CERN Document Server

    Dhuria, Mansi; Sarkar, Utpal

    2016-01-01

    We study the superstring inspired $E_{6}$ model motivated $U(1)_{N}$ extension of the supersymmetric standard model to explore the possibility of explaining the recent excess CMS events and the baryon asymmetry of the universe in eight possible variants of the model. In light of the hints from short-baseline neutrino experiments at the existence of one or more light sterile neutrinos, we also study the neutrino mass matrices dictated by the field assignments and the discrete symmetries in these variants. We find that all the variants can explain the excess CMS events via the exotic slepton decay, while for a standard choice of the discrete symmetry four of the variants have the feature of allowing high scale baryogenesis (leptogenesis). For one other variant three body decay induced soft baryogenesis mechanism is possible which can induce baryon number violating neutron-antineutron oscillation. We also point out a new discrete symmetry which has the feature of ensuring proton stability and forbidding tree lev...

  8. Iron-carbon composites for the remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Bhanu Kiran

    This research is focused on engineering submicron spherical carbon particles as effective carriers/supports for nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles to address the in situ remediation of soil and groundwater chlorinated contaminants. Chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) form a class of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) toxic contaminants in soil and groundwater. The in situ injection of NZVI particles to reduce DNAPLs is a potentially simple, cost-effective, and environmentally benign technology that has become a preferred method in the remediation of these compounds. However, unsupported NZVI particles exhibit ferromagnetism leading to particle aggregation and loss in mobility through the subsurface. This work demonstrates two approaches to prepare carbon supported NZVI (iron-carbon composites) particles. The objective is to establish these iron-carbon composites as extremely useful materials for the environmental remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and suitable materials for the in situ injection technology. This research also demonstrates that it is possible to vary the placement of iron nanoparticles either on the external surface or within the interior of carbon microspheres using a one-step aerosol-based process. The simple process of modifying iron placement has significant potential applications in heterogeneous catalysis as both the iron and carbon are widely used catalysts and catalyst supports. Furthermore, the aerosol-based process is applied to prepare new class of supported catalytic materials such as carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles for ex situ remediation of contaminated water. The iron-carbon composites developed in this research have multiple functionalities (a) they are reactive and function effectively in reductive dehalogenation (b) they are highly adsorptive thereby bringing the chlorinated compound to the proximity of the reactive sites and also serving as adsorption

  9. DETECTION OF E6, E7 AND CELL-TYPE SPECIFIC ENHANCER OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE 16 IN BREAST CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qian; CHU Yong-lie; JIA Xiao-li; ZHANG Shu-qun; LIU Wen-kang

    2008-01-01

    Objective To detect HPV16 E6, E7 genes and cell-type specific enhancer (CTSE) of long control region (LCR) in breast carcinoma (BC).Methods HPV16 E6,E7 genes and CTSE were detected in 40 BCs and 20 normal breast tissue (NBT) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results The positive rates of HPV16 E6, E7genes and CTSE were 60% (24/40),55% (22/40) and 67.5%(27/40)respectively in BCs, whereas only 5% (1/20), 5%(1/20) and 15% (3/20) in NBTs (P<0.05). There exited significant correlation between E6 gene and CTSE in BCs (P<0.05), as well as E7 gene and CTSE. The infection of HPV16 E6, E7 and CTSE had no statistic relationship with pathological features.Conclusion There were HPV16 E6, E7 genes and CTSE together in BCs and CTSE may play an important role in pathogenesis of BC.

  10. Characterization of unknown iodinated disinfection byproducts during chlorination/chloramination using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Yahe; Shi, Quan; Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2016-06-01

    Iodinated disinfection byproducts (I-DBPs), formed from the reaction of disinfectant(s) with organic matter in the presence of iodide in raw water, have recently been focused because of their more cytotoxic and genotoxic properties than their chlorinated or brominated analogues. To date, only a few I-DBPs in drinking water have been identified. In this study, C18 solid phase extraction coupled with electrospray ionization ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize unknown I-DBPs in chloraminated/chlorinated water spiked with iodide and humic substances. In total, 178 formulas for one-iodine-containing products, 13 formulas for two-iodine-containing products, and 15 formulas for one-chlorine and one-iodine-containing products were detected in the chloraminated water sample, while only 9 formulas for one-iodine-containing products and 6 formulas for one-chlorine and one-iodine-containing products were found in the chlorinated water sample. Most I-DBPs have corresponding chlorine-containing analogues with identical CHO compositions. As indicated by the modified aromaticity index (AImod), in the C18 extracts, more than 68% of the I-DBPs have aromatic structures or polycyclic aromatic structures. This result demonstrates that the use of chloramination as an alternative disinfection method may lead to the formation of abundant species of I-DBPs in the presence of iodide. Thus, the suitability of adopting chloramination as an alternative disinfection method should be reevaluated, particularly when iodide is present in raw water.

  11. Chlorine doped graphene quantum dots: Preparation, properties, and photovoltaic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jianhong; Xiang, Jinzhong, E-mail: jzhxiang@ynu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Tang, Libin, E-mail: scitang@163.com; Ji, Rongbin, E-mail: jirongbin@gmail.com; Yuan, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Ruiyun; Tai, Yunjian; Song, Liyuan [Kunming Institute of Physics, Kunming 650223 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are becoming one of the hottest advanced functional materials because of the opening of the bandgap due to quantum confinement effect, which shows unique optical and electrical properties. The chlorine doped GQDs (Cl-GQDs) have been fabricated by chemical exfoliation of HCl treated carbon fibers (CFs), which were prepared from degreasing cotton through an annealing process at 1000 °C for 30 min. Raman study shows that both G and 2D peaks of GQDs may be redshifted (softened) by chlorine doping, leading to an n-type doping. The first vertical (Cl)-GQDs based photovoltaic detectors have been demonstrated, both the light absorbing and electron-accepting roles for (Cl)-GQDs in photodetection have been found, resulting in an exceptionally big ratio of photocurrent to dark current as high as ∼10{sup 5} at room temperature using a 405 nm laser irradiation under the reverse bias voltage. The study expands the application of (Cl)-GQDs to the important optoelectronic detection devices.

  12. Chlorination of nickel ore by gaseous chlorine in the presence of active additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Ilija B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions occurring during chlorination with and without additives for both nickel oxides and nickel ferrites, which are component parts of nickel ore. The experimental research investigated the influence of temperature in the range from 600 up to 1000 °C and time (up to 3 h on the chlorination degree of nickel ores with and without additives. It was found that the introduction of additives such as C, S, BaS and NaCl intensified the chlorination of nickel ore. The results can be applied and may help determine the optimal conditions for the chlorination of low-grade ferrous nickel ores.

  13. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested o...

  14. Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

  15. Method and apparatus for producing chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santillie, P.W.; Ramras, D.M.

    1984-05-29

    A continuous method and apparatus are described for the efficient production of gaseous chlorine dioxide by the reaction between gaseous sulfur dioxide and an aqueous solution of a metallic chlorate. The chlorate solution and a highly concentrated sulfur dioxide gas are introduced into a packed columnar chamber at closely adjacent locations at the bottom of the chamber so as to flood the chamber and maximize both the contact area and contact time of the two reactants. Throughout the reaction the chamber is subjected to high vacuum imposed by an eductor which exhausts the chlorine dioxide gas and spent reactants. For use of the chlorine dioxide to produce potable water or treat foodstuffs, the chlorine dioxide and spent reactants are exhausted from the chamber separately by respective eductors substantially balanced with respect to each other to impose comparable vacuums upon the chamber. Because of the high efficency of the reaction, substantial heat is generated therefrom which is absorbed by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. The flow rate of the coolant and flow rate of the reactants into the chamber are porportional due to the dependency of the reactant flow rate on the coolant flow rate.

  16. Photoabsorption and photoionization of chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flesch, R.; Ruehl, E.; Hottmann, K.; Baumgaertel, H. (Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany))

    1993-01-28

    Photoprocesses of chlorine dioxide in the near-UV have become highly important for stratospheric photoprocesses at high latitudes, especially in Antarctica. Chlorine dioxide has been identified among other absorbers because of its specific absorption cross section in the near-UV. Possible contributions of chlorine dioxide photochemistry to polar ozone depletion have been discussed recently. The high-resolution He I photoelectron spectrum and the absolute (vacuum-UV) absorption cross section (6-25 eV) as well as the ionic fragmentation of chlorine dioxide (OCIO) are reported. The photoelectron spectrum is interpreted in terms of exchange splitting effects of the various singlet and triplet cation states as well as by comparison to chemically related molecules. The vacuum-UV absorption spectrum shows different Rydberg series converging to the cation states. These Rydberg series and their vibrational progressions are assigned by term value arguments, dipole selection rules, and comparison with the photoelectron spectrum. Photoionization mass spectrometry is used for measurements of the ionization and fragmentation threshold of OCIO. The major fragment is ClO[sup +] which occurs above 13.4 eV. Thermomechanical data such as heats of formation and bond dissociation energies are derived. No evidence for isomerization of OClO[sup +] is found, as observed for the electronically excited neutral molecule. 54 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Inhibitor treatment program for chlorine dioxide corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, J.G.; Holder, E.P.

    1991-11-12

    This patent describes a method of inhibiting corrosion by chlorine dioxide in oil field waterflood systems by adding a sufficient amount of a corrosion inhibiting composition. It comprises a phosphonate, a copolymer consisting of repeating units of acrylic acid/allyl hydroxy propyl sulfonate ether, and a permangante.

  18. Gene expression profile of cervical and skin tissues from human papillomavirus type 16 E6 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert PF

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although K14E6 transgenic mice develop spontaneous tumors of the skin epithelium, no spontaneous reproductive tract malignancies arise, unless the transgenic mice were treated chronically with 17β-estradiol. These findings suggest that E6 performs critical functions in normal adult cervix and skin, highlighting the need to define E6-controlled transcriptional programs in these tissues. Methods We evaluated the expression profile of 14,000 genes in skin or cervix from young K14E6 transgenic mice compared with nontransgenic. To identify differentially expressed genes a linear model was implemented using R and the LIMMA package. Two criteria were used to select the set of relevant genes. First a set of genes with a Log-odds ≥ 3 were selected. Then, a hierarchical search of genes was based on Log Fold Changes. Results Microarray analysis identified a total of 676 and 1154 genes that were significantly up and down-regulated, respectively, in skin from K14E6 transgenic mice. On the other hand, in the cervix from K14E6 transgenic mice we found that only 97 and 252 genes were significantly up and down-regulated, respectively. One of the most affected processes in the skin from K14E6 transgenic mice was the cell cycle. We also found that skin from transgenic mice showed down-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes and genes related to the immune response. In the cervix of K14E6 transgenic mice, we could not find affected any gene related to the cell cycle and apoptosis pathways but did observe alterations in the expression of immune response genes. Pathways such as angiogenesis, cell junction and epidermis development, also were altered in their gene expression profiles in both tissues. Conclusion Expression of the HPV16 E6 oncoprotein in our model alters expression of genes that fell into several functional groups providing insights into pathways by which E6 deregulate cell cycle progression, apoptosis, the host resistance to infection

  19. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  20. Post-translational control of IL-1β via the human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncoprotein: a novel mechanism of innate immune escape mediated by the E3-ubiquitin ligase E6-AP and p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Niebler

    Full Text Available Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs are causally involved in the development of anogenital cancer. HPVs apparently evade the innate immune response of their host cells by dysregulating immunomodulatory factors such as cytokines and chemokines, thereby creating a microenvironment that favors malignancy. One central key player in the immune surveillance interactome is interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β which not only mediates inflammation, but also links innate and adaptive immunity. Because of its pleiotropic physiological effects, IL-1β production is tightly controlled on transcriptional, post-translational and secretory levels. Here, we describe a novel mechanism how the high-risk HPV16 E6 oncoprotein abrogates IL-1β processing and secretion in a NALP3 inflammasome-independent manner. We analyzed IL-1β regulation in immortalized keratinocytes that harbor the HPV16 E6 and/or E7 oncogenes as well as HPV-positive cervical tumor cells. While in primary and in E7-immortalized human keratinocytes the secretion of IL-1β was highly inducible upon inflammasome activation, E6-positive cells did not respond. Western blot analyses revealed a strong reduction of basal intracellular levels of pro-IL-1β that was independent of dysregulation of the NALP3 inflammasome, autophagy or lysosomal activity. Instead, we demonstrate that pro-IL-1β is degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner in E6-positive cells which is mediated via the ubiquitin ligase E6-AP and p53. Conversely, in E6- and E6/E7-immortalized cells pro-IL-1β levels were restored by siRNA knock-down of E6-AP and simultaneous recovery of functional p53. In the context of HPV-induced carcinogenesis, these data suggest a novel post-translational mechanism of pro-IL-1β regulation which ultimately inhibits the secretion of IL-1β in virus-infected keratinocytes. The clinical relevance of our results was further confirmed in HPV-positive tissue samples, where a gradual decrease of IL-1

  1. Halogenase-Inspired Oxidative Chlorination Using Flavin Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Thea; Mühldorf, Bernd; Wolf, Robert; König, Burkhard

    2016-04-18

    Chlorine gas or electropositive chlorine reagents are used to prepare chlorinated aromatic compounds, which are found in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and polymers, and serve as synthetic precursors for metal-catalyzed cross-couplings. Nature chlorinates with chloride anions, FAD-dependent halogenases, and O2 as the oxidant. A photocatalytic oxidative chlorination is described based on the organic dye riboflavin tetraacetate mimicking the enzymatic process. The chemical process allows within the suitable arene redox potential window a broader substrate scope compared to the specific activation in the enzymatic binding pocket.

  2. Kinetic models and pathways of ronidazole degradation by chlorination, UV irradiation and UV/chlorine processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lang; Lin, Yi-Li; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Zhu, Wen-Qian; Huang, He; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2014-11-15

    Degradation kinetics and pathways of ronidazole (RNZ) by chlorination (Cl2), UV irradiation and combined UV/chlorine processes were investigated in this paper. The degradation kinetics of RNZ chlorination followed a second-order behavior with the rate constants calculated as (2.13 ± 0.15) × 10(2) M(-2) s(-1), (0.82 ± 0.52) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) and (2.06 ± 0.09) × 10(-1) M(-1) s(-1) for the acid-catalyzed reaction, as well as the reactions of RNZ with HOCl and OCl(-), respectively. Although UV irradiation degraded RNZ more effectively than chlorination did, very low quantum yield of RNZ at 254 nm was obtained as 1.02 × 10(-3) mol E(-1). RNZ could be efficiently degraded and mineralized in the UV/chlorine process due to the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The second-order rate constant between RNZ and hydroxyl radical was determined as (2.92 ± 0.05) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The degradation intermediates of RNZ during the three processes were identified with Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography - Electrospray Ionization - mass spectrometry and the degradation pathways were then proposed. Moreover, the variation of chloropicrin (TCNM) and chloroform (CF) formation after the three processes were further evaluated. Enhanced formation of CF and TCNM precursors during UV/chlorine process deserves extensive attention in drinking water treatment.

  3. Turbidity and chlorine demand reduction using alum and moringa flocculation before household chlorination in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Kelsey; Lantagne, Daniele; Kotlarz, Nadine; Jellison, Kristen

    2010-03-01

    Over 1.1 billion people in the world lack access to improved drinking water. Diarrhoeal and other waterborne diseases cause an estimated 1.87 million deaths per year. The Safe Water System (SWS) is a household water treatment intervention that reduces diarrhoeal disease incidence among users in developing countries. Turbid waters pose a particular challenge to implementation of SWS programmes; although research shows that a 3.75 mg l(-1) sodium hypochlorite dose effectively treats turbid waters, users sometimes object to the strong chlorine taste and prefer to drink water that is more aesthetically pleasing. This study investigated the efficacy of two locally available chemical water treatments-alum and Moringa oleifera flocculation-to reduce turbidity and chlorine demand at turbidities of 10, 30, 70, 100 and 300 NTU. Both treatments effectively reduced turbidity (alum flocculation 23.0-91.4%; moringa flocculation 14.2-96.2%). Alum flocculation effectively reduced chlorine demand compared with controls at 30, 70, 100 and 300 NTU (p=0.01-0.06). Moringa flocculation increased chlorine demand to the point where adequate free chlorine residual was not maintained for 24 hours after treatment. Alum pretreatment is recommended in waters>or=30 NTU for optimum water disinfection. Moringa flocculation is not recommended before chlorination.

  4. Bioaugmentation with endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii enhances metal rhizoaccumulation in host Sedum plumbizincicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eMa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of hyperaccumulator–endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn and Pb. Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn ˃ Cd ˃ Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants.

  5. Bioaugmentation with Endophytic Bacterium E6S Homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii Enhances Metal Rhizoaccumulation in Host Sedum plumbizincicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Zhang, Chang; Oliveira, Rui S.; Freitas, Helena; Luo, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Application of hyperaccumulator-endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil, and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn, and Pb). Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn, and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn > Cd >Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn, and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants. PMID:26870079

  6. E6-Associated Protein Dependent Estrogen Receptor Regulation of Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit R2A Expression in Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Jean-Pierre; Zeidan, Youssef H; Zafar, Nawal; El Hokayem, Jimmy

    2017-02-18

    E6ap is a known transcriptional coregulator for estrogen receptor alpha (Er, Erα) in the presence of estrogen. Protein kinase A (PKA) contains two regulatory subunits derived from four genes. Recent evidence demonstrates that PKA regulates E6ap activity. Data generated in our lab indicated estrogen dependent regulation of Pkar2a levels. Our project sets to investigate a possible feedback mechanism constituting of Erα and E6ap transcriptional regulation of Pkar2a expression. Western blot evaluated protein regulation correlations with E2 in mouse neuroblastoma lines. Bioinformatics detected estrogen response element (ERE) sequences. quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) validated the western blot results. ERE oligonucleotides were synthesized. Reporter gene transcriptional activity was evaluated via Luciferase assay output. Electromobility shift assay (EMSA) assessed direct binding between Erα relevant sequences. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and Re-ChIP were conducted in quantifying protein complex recruitment levels. Pkar2a protein expression directly correlated with E2, and four putative ERE sequences were identified. Pkar2a mRNA expression reverted to baseline with either E2 or E6ap absent. In the presence of E2, ERE-1 and ERE-4 possessed Luciferase reporter gene transcriptional capabilities. ERE-1 portrayed band shifts, representing direct binding to Erα with E2 supplementation. With E2, ERE-1 significantly enhanced Erα and E6ap recruitment levels to the Pkar2a promoter. Pkar2a is directly regulated by Erα and E6ap in the presence of estrogen stimulus. This work indicates a feedback mechanism in the interplay between PKA and E6ap, which may prove crucial for the role of both proteins in cancers and neurogenetic diseases like Angelman syndrome.

  7. 金雀异黄素诱导人白血病Jurkat E6-1细胞凋亡作用%Induction of apoptosis by genistein in human leukemia cell line Jurkat E6-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘素芳; 何坚; 杨静静; 李万里

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and its mechanism of genistein (Gen) on human leukemia cell line Jurkat E6-1. Methods Jurkat E6-1 cells were treated with different concentrations of Gen. Inhibitive effect of Gen on cell growth was determined with methy thiazoly tetazolium(MTT) test. DNA-ladder was used to measure the effect of Gen on apoptosis of Jurkat E6-1 cells. Alternative of bcl-2 and bax genes were detected with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Results At a concentration of higher than 0. 5 μmol / L,Gen could inhibit the growth of Jurkat E6-1 cells. After 24 hours, the inhibition ratio was 5.9% compared with that of the control group, with a significant difference (P < 0.01 ) in a time-does-dependent manner( P < 0. 01 ). After 72 hours, the inhibition ratio was 24.9%, with a significant difference compared to that of at 24 hours(P <0. 01 ). The expression rate of bcl-2 decreased after the treatment with the increasing concentration of Gen. However, the expression rate of bax increased after the treatment with the decreased concentrations of Gen. Conclusion Gen can significantly inhibit the growth of human leukemia line Jurkat E6-1. Its mechanism is up-regulation of the bax expression and down-regulation of the bcl-2 expression.%目的 探讨金雀异黄素(genistein,Gen)诱导人白血病Jurkat E6-1细胞凋亡机制.方法 以不同浓度Gem作用于Jurkat E6-1细胞,采用四甲基偶氮噻唑蓝(MTT)法检测Gen对Jurkat E6-1细胞增殖抑制作用;采用DNA-ladder检测Gen对细胞凋亡影响;采用实时定量PCR(RT-PCR)检测凋亡相关基因bax、bcl-2表达水平.结果与对照组比较,P>0.5 μmol/L浓度的Gen明显抑制Jurkat E6-1细胞增殖,培养24 h,10 μmoL/L Gen组抑制率为5.9%,与对照组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),随Gen浓度增加和培养时间延长,抑制作用逐渐增强,72 h后,10μmol/L Gen组抑制率为24.9%;Gen使Jurkat E6-1细胞Bax表达上调,Bcl-2表达下调,

  8. Lead Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including some imported jewelry. What are the health effects of lead? • More commonly, lower levels of lead in children over time may lead to reduced IQ, slow learning, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), or behavioral issues. • Lead also affects other ...

  9. Suppression of HPV E6 and E7 expression by BAF53 depletion in cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kiwon; Lee, Ah-Young [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Yunhee Kim [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science and Department of Biology, Kyunghee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyockman, E-mail: hmkwon@hufs.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Integration of HPV into host genome critical for activation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. {yields} BAF53 is essential for higher-order chromatin structure. {yields} BAF53 knockdown suppresses E6 and E7 from HPV integrants, but not from episomal HPVs. {yields} BAF53 knockdown decreases H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18. {yields} BAF53 knockdown restores the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. -- Abstract: Deregulation of the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 plays a pivotal role in cervical carcinogenesis because the E6 and E7 proteins neutralize p53 and Rb tumor suppressor pathways, respectively. In approximately 90% of all cervical carcinomas, HPVs are found to be integrated into the host genome. Following integration, the core-enhancer element and P105 promoter that control expression of E6 and E7 adopt a chromatin structure that is different from that of episomal HPV, and this has been proposed to contribute to activation of E6 and E7 expression. However, the molecular basis underlying this chromatin structural change remains unknown. Previously, BAF53 has been shown to be essential for the integrity of higher-order chromatin structure and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we examined whether BAF53 is required for activated expression of E6 and E7 genes. We found that BAF53 knockdown led to suppression of expression of E6 and E7 genes from HPV integrants in cervical carcinoma cell lines HeLa and SiHa. Conversely, expression of transiently transfected HPV18-LCR-Luciferase was not suppressed by BAF53 knockdown. The level of the active histone marks H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on the P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18 was decreased in BAF53 knockdown cells. BAF53 knockdown restored the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. These results suggest that activated expression of the E6 and E7 genes of integrated HPV is dependent on BAF53-dependent higher-order chromatin

  10. Specific Magnetic Isolation of E6 HPV16 Modified Magnetizable Particles Coupled with PCR and Electrochemical Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Jimenez Jimenez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The majority of carcinomas that were developed due to the infection with human papillomavirus (HPV are caused by high-risk HPV types, HPV16 and HPV18. These HPV types contain the E6 and E7 oncogenes, so the fast detection of these oncogenes is an important point to avoid the development of cancer. Many different HPV tests are available to detect the presence of HPV in biological samples. The aim of this study was to design a fast and low cost method for HPV identification employing magnetic isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR and electrochemical detection. These assays were developed to detect the interactions between E6-HPV16 oncogene and magnetizable particles (MPs using commercial Dynabeads M-280 Streptavidin particles and laboratory-synthesized “homemade” particles called MANs (MAN-37, MAN-127 and MAN-164. The yields of PCR amplification of E6-HPV16 oncogene bound on the particles and after the elution from the particles were compared. A highest yield of E6-HPV16 DNA isolation was obtained with both MPs particles commercial M-280 Streptavidin and MAN-37 due to reducing of the interferents compared with the standard PCR method. A biosensor employing the isolation of E6-HPV16 oncogene with MPs particles followed by its electrochemical detection can be a very effective technique for HPV identification, providing simple, sensitive and cost-effective analysis.

  11. Specific Magnetic Isolation of E6 HPV16 Modified Magnetizable Particles Coupled with PCR and Electrochemical Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Jimenez, Ana Maria; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Dostalova, Simona; Krejcova, Ludmila; Michalek, Petr; Richtera, Lukas; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-05-05

    The majority of carcinomas that were developed due to the infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) are caused by high-risk HPV types, HPV16 and HPV18. These HPV types contain the E6 and E7 oncogenes, so the fast detection of these oncogenes is an important point to avoid the development of cancer. Many different HPV tests are available to detect the presence of HPV in biological samples. The aim of this study was to design a fast and low cost method for HPV identification employing magnetic isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electrochemical detection. These assays were developed to detect the interactions between E6-HPV16 oncogene and magnetizable particles (MPs) using commercial Dynabeads M-280 Streptavidin particles and laboratory-synthesized "homemade" particles called MANs (MAN-37, MAN-127 and MAN-164). The yields of PCR amplification of E6-HPV16 oncogene bound on the particles and after the elution from the particles were compared. A highest yield of E6-HPV16 DNA isolation was obtained with both MPs particles commercial M-280 Streptavidin and MAN-37 due to reducing of the interferents compared with the standard PCR method. A biosensor employing the isolation of E6-HPV16 oncogene with MPs particles followed by its electrochemical detection can be a very effective technique for HPV identification, providing simple, sensitive and cost-effective analysis.

  12. Human papilloma virus early proteins E6 (HPV16/18-E6) and the cell cycle marker P16 (INK4a) are useful prognostic markers in uterine cervical carcinomas in Qassim Region--Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, O M; AlSheeha, M

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a common and an important public health problem for adult women in developing countries. In contrast, cervical cancer incidence is low in Saudi Arabia. High-risk types of human papilloma viruses (HPV16 and HPV18) are the most significant risk factors for cervical cancer. HPV16/18-E6 oncoprotein is associated with HPV etiology, viral persistence and epithelial transformation. Cell cycle protein p16 INK4a (p16) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cervical carcinomas. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of HPV16/18-E6 and p16 in uterine cervical carcinomas in Qassim Region--Saudi Arabia, and to relate the results to the established clinicopathological prognostic parameters (age of the patient, educational level, birth control methods, number of pregnancy, smoking status, degree of histological differentiation, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis) The study included 40 specimens of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinomas diagnosed and confirmed by biopsy. Histopathological classification of cervical tumors cases was performed according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). Immunohistochemical analysis for HPV16/18-E6 and p16 were carried out on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of cervical tissues using avidin-biotin peroxidase method. There was a significant statistical correlation between HPV16/18-E6 expression in cervical carcinoma and nationality, smoking status and size of the tumor. HPV16/18-E6 oncoprotein expression in normal lymphocytes and endothelial cells in the tumor tissues and the adjacent normal cervical tissues suggest the possibility that HPV infection might spread to other organs through blood circulation. P16 expression has been correlated with high grade, stage of cervical SCC and HPV16/18-E6 expression. The current study supports the critical function of p16 and HPV16/18-E6 as specific markers for cervical carcinoma. However the potential for usage

  13. Oxidative elimination of cyanotoxins: comparison of ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Eva; Onstad, Gretchen D; Kull, Tomas P J; Metcalf, James S; Acero, Juan L; von Gunten, Urs

    2007-08-01

    As the World Health Organization (WHO) progresses with provisional Drinking Water Guidelines of 1 microg/L for microcystin-LR and a proposed Guideline of 1 microg/L for cylindrospermopsin, efficient treatment strategies are needed to prevent cyanotoxins such as these from reaching consumers. A kinetic database has been compiled for the oxidative treatment of three cyanotoxins: microcystin-LR (MC-LR), cylindrospermopsin (CYN), and anatoxin-a (ANTX) with ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate. This kinetic database contains rate constants not previously reported and determined in the present work (e.g. for permanganate oxidation of ANTX and chlorine dioxide oxidation of CYN and ANTX), together with previously published rate constants for the remaining oxidation processes. Second-order rate constants measured in pure aqueous solutions of these toxins could be used in a kinetic model to predict the toxin oxidation efficiency of ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate when applied to natural waters. Oxidants were applied to water from a eutrophic Swiss lake (Lake Greifensee) in static-dose testing and dynamic time-resolved experiments to confirm predictions from the kinetic database, and to investigate the effects of a natural matrix on toxin oxidation and by-product formation. Overall, permanganate can effectively oxidize ANTX and MC-LR, while chlorine will oxidize CYN and MC-LR and ozone is capable of oxidizing all three toxins with the highest rate. The formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the treated water may be a restriction to the application of sufficiently high-chlorine doses.

  14. Repair of tracheal epithelium by basal cells after chlorine-induced injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musah Sadiatu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorine is a widely used toxic compound that is considered a chemical threat agent. Chlorine inhalation injures airway epithelial cells, leading to pulmonary abnormalities. Efficient repair of injured epithelium is necessary to restore normal lung structure and function. The objective of the current study was to characterize repair of the tracheal epithelium after acute chlorine injury. Methods C57BL/6 mice were exposed to chlorine and injected with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU to label proliferating cells prior to sacrifice and collection of tracheas on days 2, 4, 7, and 10 after exposure. Airway repair and restoration of a differentiated epithelium were examined by co-localization of EdU labeling with markers for the three major tracheal epithelial cell types [keratin 5 (K5 and keratin 14 (K14 for basal cells, Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP for Clara cells, and acetylated tubulin (AcTub for ciliated cells]. Morphometric analysis was used to measure proliferation and restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium. Results Epithelial repair was fastest and most extensive in proximal trachea compared with middle and distal trachea. In unexposed mice, cell proliferation was minimal, all basal cells expressed K5, and K14-expressing basal cells were absent from most sections. Chlorine exposure resulted in the sloughing of Clara and ciliated cells from the tracheal epithelium. Two to four days after chlorine exposure, cell proliferation occurred in K5- and K14-expressing basal cells, and the number of K14 cells was dramatically increased. In the period of peak cell proliferation, few if any ciliated or Clara cells were detected in repairing trachea. Expression of ciliated and Clara cell markers was detected at later times (days 7–10, but cell proliferation was not detected in areas in which these differentiated markers were re-expressed. Fibrotic lesions were observed at days 7–10 primarily in distal trachea. Conclusion

  15. Genotoxicity of quinolone antibiotics in chlorination disinfection treatment: formation and QSAR simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wei, Dongbin; Du, Yuguo

    2016-10-01

    Lots of unexpected disinfection by-products were formed during the chlorination disinfection of contaminated water bodies, leading to a potential threat to human health and ecological safety. In this study, SOS/umu assay was used to trace the genotoxicity variation of 20 quinolone compounds during the chlorination disinfection. Furthermore, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship models were developed based on the electronic and hydrophobic properties of the quinolones, which were used to quantify the impact of the different structural features of the compounds on their genotoxicity variation. The results revealed that quinolones bearing hydrophilic substituents with less H-bond donors and negative charge at the 1-position of the quinolone ring exhibited a positive correlation with genotoxicity elevation. More notably, the chlorination of quinolones in both ultrapure water and secondary effluent matrices provided comparable levels of genotoxicity, indicating that our research could potentially be used to evaluate the environmental risk of quinolone antibiotics in chlorination disinfection treatment.

  16. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  17. Comparative efficacy of chlorine and chlorine dioxide regimes for condenser slime control in seawater cooled heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, P.S.; Veeramani, P.; Ershath, M.; Rajamohan, R.; Harinath, Y.V.; Mohan, T.V.K.; Venugopalan, V.P. [BARC Facilities, Water and Steam Chemistry Div., Kalpakkam, Tamil nadu (India)

    2010-07-01

    Chlorination has long been used as an effective and economic biocide for biofouling control in seawater cooling systems. However, the efficacy of chlorine is reduced in the presence of organic content of seawater and the inability of chlorine to effectively penetrate biofilms. Chlorine dioxide is being projected as a possible alternative to chlorine. Experiments were carried out with the help of a seawater circulating facility, in which direct comparison of the efficacy of the two biocides was possible using test condenser tube assemblies. The test condenser tubes made of titanium, SS 316L and Cu-Ni 90/10 were dosed with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. Each dose was evaluated for 30 days. Continuous and intermittent additions of chlorine (0.38 - 0.45 mg L{sup -1} TRO) and chlorine dioxide (0.4 - 0.5 mg L{sup -1}) were used, along with control. The flow velocity in the tubes was maintained at 1.5 m/s. Results of the study showed that the efficacy of the biocide to control biofilms depended on the biocide and the material. Continuous chlorination resulted in 75% reduction of viable counts on titanium, followed by 24% reduction on CuNi and 6% reduction on SS 316L surfaces, as compared to the control. When compared to continuous chlorination, increase in bacterial density in the tubes was observed at different regimes of intermittent chlorination. On SS 316L and Cu-Ni surfaces, intermittent chlorination for 1h, once every 3 h, appeared to give adequate protection. Continuous addition of chlorine dioxide resulted in 99% reduction of viable counts on titanium surfaces, followed by 28% reduction on SS 316 L surfaces and 52% reduction on Cu-Ni surfaces, as compared to the controls. The data indicate that the efficacy of biocides to control biofilms depend on not only the biocide and its frequency of application but also the material of construction. (author)

  18. HPV16 E6 seropositivity among cancer-free men with oral, anal or genital HPV16 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachler, Daniel C; Waterboer, Tim; Campbell, Christine M Pierce; Ingles, Donna J; Kuhs, Krystle A Lang; Nyitray, Alan G; Hildesheim, Allan; Pawlita, Michael; Kreimer, Aimée R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-12-01

    Antibodies against the Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 oncoprotein appear years prior to clinical diagnosis of anal and oropharyngeal cancer, but whether they develop around the time of HPV infection is unclear. Serum samples from 173 cancer-free men from the Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men (HIM) Study were tested for HPV antibodies and DNA. HPV16 E6 seropositivity was low among men with oral HPV16-infection (1/28; 3.6%, 95%CI=0.0%-18.4%), anal HPV16-infection (1/61; 1.6%, 95%CI=0.0%-8.8%), and 24-month persistent genital HPV16-infection (1/84; 1.2%, 0.0-6.5%). This suggests E6 seroconversion may not occur around the time of oral, anal, or genital HPV16 acquisition.

  19. Characterization of a cluster of oncogenic mutations in E6 of a human papillomavirus 83 variant isolated from a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavo, Isabelle; Benchetrit, Maxime; Loubatier, Céline; Michel, Gregory; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2011-10-01

    We previously isolated human papillomavirus 83 (HPV83m) from a cervical smear. Sequence analysis of E6 and E7 proteins highlighted five mutations located in the second putative zinc-finger region of E6 (E6m), an important domain for protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Here, we show that E6m of HPV83m can trigger human primary cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth properties, similarly to E6 of HPV16, a high-risk HPV (HR-HPV). Interestingly, we demonstrate that, in contrast to E6 of HPV16, E6m corrupts neither p53 stability nor telomerase activity, but acts as a specific modulator of the transcriptional machinery. By studying E6m reversion mutants, we confirmed the importance of the second zinc-finger domain in triggering the observed upregulation of cell growth and of the transcriptional machinery. Reversion of these mutations in E6m (to yield strain E6r) fully abolished the oncogenic potential of E6m, transforming the phenotype of E6 from a high-risk to a low-risk phenotype. Importantly, our data define the importance of a cluster of mutations in the second zinc finger of E6m in increasing the oncogenic potential of HPV83.

  20. 8e6科技2007年最新上网行为管理产品

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    8e6科技近期在北京国际网络安全技术与应用展览会上宣布推出全新的上网行为管理产品组合,包括8e6 Mobile Client移动设备上网行为管理系统,Enterprise Reporter 4.0上网行为审计系统、Threat Analysis1.0实时威胁分析系统和E-Police上网内容审计系统。

  1. Molecular interactions of ‘high risk’ human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 oncoproteins: implications for tumour progression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Oishee Chakrabarti; Sudhir Krishna

    2003-04-01

    The aetiology of cervical cancer has been primarily attributed to human papillomaviruses (HPVs). These are characterized by the persistent expression of the two oncogenes, E6 and E7. Experimental studies show that E6 and E7 genes of the high risk HPVs deregulate key cell cycle controls. Recent work has uncovered new cellular partners for these proteins that throw light on many of the pathways and processes in which these viral proteins intervene. This review focuses on the regulation of host proteins by the viral oncoproteins and consequence of such interactions on cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis.

  2. THE HUMORAL AND CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES INDUCED BY HPV18L1-E6/E7 DNA VACCINES IN MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most commoncancer in woman,particularly in developing coun-tries.In the past t wo decades,epidemiologic andvirological data have identified a clear and consistentassociation of human papilomavirus(HPV)infec-tion withthe development of cervical cancer[1].Theexpression of the E6and E7genes from high-riskHPV16and HPV18is crucial for development,i m-mortalization and maintenance of the malignantphenotype of cervical carcinoma.Therefore,E6andE7genes are i mportant targets for the de...

  3. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Secondary to Inhalation of Chlorine Gas in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    throughout the duration of the protocol. Maintenance intravenous (IV) fluids ( lactated Ringers solution, 0.9% sodium chloride, 5% dextrose) were given...27 and that in lower doses leads to reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS).28 To date, systemic10,26,29 and inhaled steroids,26,30,31 nebulized ...budesonide reduces chlorine gas-induced acute lung injury. J Trauma. 2004;56:850–862. 32. Bosse GM. Nebulized sodium bicarbonate in the treatment of

  4. Revisiting the thermochemistry of chlorine fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, H R

    2016-01-01

    In this work, accurate calculations of standard enthalpies of formation of chlorine fluorides (ClF$_n$, n=1--7; Cl$_2$F and Cl$_3$F$_2$) were performed through the isodesmic reactions scheme. It is argued that, for many chlorine fluorides, the gold standard method of quantum chemistry (CCSD(T)) is not capable to predict enthalpy values nearing chemical accuracy if atomization scheme is used. This is underpinned by a thorough analysis of total atomization energy results and the inspection of multireference features of these compounds. Other thermodynamic quantities were also calculated at different temperatures. In order to complement the energetic description, elimination curves were studied through density functional theory as a computationally affordable alternative to highly correlated wave function-based methods.

  5. Behavioral toxicology, risk assessment, and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista de Duffard, A.M.; Duffard, R. [Laboratorio de Toxicologia Experimental, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    1996-04-01

    Behavioral end points are being used with greater frequency in neurotoxicology to detect and characterize the adverse effects of chemicals on the nervous system. Behavioral measures are particularly important for neurotoxicity risk assessment since many known neurotoxicants do not result in neuropathology. The chlorinated hydrocarbon class consists of a wide variety of chemicals including polychlorinated biphenyls, clioquinol, trichloroethylene, hexachlorophene, organochlorine insecticides (DDT, dicofol, chlordecone, dieldrin, and lindane), and phenoxyherbicides. Each of these chemicals has effects on motor, sensory, or cognitive function that are detectable using functional measures such as behavior. Furthermore, there is evidence that if exposure occurs during critical periods of development, many of the chlorinated hydrocarbons are developmental neurotoxicants. Developmental neurotoxicity is frequently expressed as alterations in motor function or cognitive abilities or charges in the ontogeny of sensorimotor reflexes. Neurotoxicity risk assessment should include assessments of the full range of possible neurotoxicological effects, including both structural and functional indicators of neurotoxicity. 121 refs., 1 tab.

  6. A comparison of iodinated trihalomethane formation from chlorine, chlorine dioxide and potassium permanganate oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Yi-Li; Lin, Lin; Ye, Tao; Tian, Fu-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) from iodide-containing raw waters oxidized by chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) and potassium permanganate (KMnO₄) at different oxidant concentrations, reaction times, pHs, initial iodide concentrations and bromide to iodide mass ratios. Among the six investigated I-THMs, iodoform was the major species formed during the oxidation using chlorine, ClO₂ and KMnO₄. When oxidant concentration increased from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, the formation of I-THMs increased and then decreased for chlorine and ClO₂, but kept increasing for KMnO₄. As the reaction time went by, I-THM concentration increased to a plateau within 10 h (ClO₂ within only 1 h, especially) for all the three oxidants. I-THM formation gradually increased from pH 3.0 to 9.0 and remained stable at pH values higher than 7.5 for chlorine; however, for ClO₂ and KMnO₄ the highest I-THM formation showed at pH 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. As initial iodide concentration increased from 20 to 800 μg/L, the total amount and species of I-THMs increased for the three oxidants. Iodide contributed to I-THM formation much more significantly than bromide.

  7. Oncoprotein expression of E6 and E7 does not prevent 5-fluorouracil (5FU) mediated G1/S arrest and apoptosis in 5FU resistant carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, C; Mirjolet, J-F; Barberi-Heyob, M; Ramacci, C; Teiten, M-H; Merlin, J L

    2003-07-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5FU) exposure can lead to both G1/S arrest and apoptosis induction which are dependent of P53 induction. The human papilloma virus oncoproteins (HPV), E6 and E7, inactivate respectively P53 and Rb. P53 degradation by E6 protein, leads to lack of G1/S arrest after genotoxic stress. Overexpression of E7 protein prevents P53-induced G1/S arrest following DNA damage. However, few studies have described 5FU effect and efficacy on cancer cell lines presenting HPV 18 positive status. KB cell line and KB3 subline presented wild-type P53 status and difference in 5FU sensitivity. During 5FU exposure, P53 gene and protein expression was increased in both cell lines. E6 and E7 mRNA and protein expression was decreased in KB and KB3. P53 and E6 protein expressions were inversely correlated. 5FU exposure, induced a G1/S arrest which can be maintained or intensified by P53 via P21 induction expression. 5FU exposure has led to apoptosis induction related to P53 induction. In the present study, 5FU exposure was shown to induce G1/S arrest and apoptosis by P53-dependent molecular pathway, in HPV 18 positive cells.

  8. Mutations in the E6/E7 genes of human papillomavirus type 16 from cervical cancer tissue%宫颈癌组织中HPV16型E6/E7序列突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志珊; 庄建良; 李爱禄; 蒋燕成

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析泉州地区宫颈癌患者HPV16型E6/E7序列突变情况,探讨其与宫颈癌发生的相关性.方法 取35例HPV16阳性的宫颈癌组织标本,采用PCR法扩增E6、E7全长基因.PCR产物直接测序,并与野生型序列进行比对.分析E6、E7基因的变异情况.结果 E6、E7基因的突变率分别为91.4%和89.2%.E6基因中有10个位点为错义突变,2个位点为无义突变.氨基酸突变频率最高的是D25E(77.1%).E7基因中共发现5个突变位点,有2个位点为错义突变,3个位点为无义突变,突变频率最高是N29S和无义突变T846C(均为75.0%).结论 HPV16 E6、E7基因中最常见突变位点D25E、N29S和T846C可能与宫颈癌的发生密切相关,可为研究针对中国人群的HPV疫苗提供一定的线索.%To investigate mutations in E6/E7 genes of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) in patients with cervical cancer in Quanzhou area and explore the potential association between the mutations and cervical cancer, 35 cervical cancer tissue with HPV 16 positive were collected in this study. DNA samples were amplified by polymerase chain reation (PCR), then the products were directly sequenced and the results were compared with the prototype sequence. It was found that the prevalences of HPV 16 E6 and E7 variants were 91. 4% and 89. 2% respectively. Ten mis-sense variantions and 2 silent variantions were identified in E6. The hot spot of E6 nucleotide mutation was D25E, with a frequency of 77. 1%. A total of 5 mutation spots was found in E7, including 2 mis-sense and 3 silent variations. Both N29S and T846C were the most common mutations, with the same ratio of 75. 0%. It is suggested that the mutation of D25E, N29S and T846C are likely to be associated with ontogenesis of cervical cancer. This founding might provide valuable information for HPV vaccine development in China.

  9. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Gavarini, S. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), Villeurbanne (France); Martin, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Centre de Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Saint-Paul lez Durance (France); Raimbault, L. [Centre d' Informatique Geologique (CIG), Ecole des Mines, Fontainebleau (France); Scheidegger, A.M. [Lab. for Waste Management, Nuclear Energy and Safety Dept. (NES), Paul Scherrer Inst. Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    In a nuclear reactor, isotopes such as {sup 35}Cl present as impurities in the nuclear fuel are activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of nuclear fuel, the activation products such as {sup 36}Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute to the ''instant release fraction'' as they are likely to migrate in defects and grain boundaries. In order to differentiate diffusion mechanisms due to ''athermal'' processes during irradiation from thermally activated diffusion, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This work concerns the measurement of the thermal diffusion coefficient of chlorine in UO{sub 2}. {sup 37}Cl was implanted at a 10{sup 13} at/cm{sup 2} fluence in depleted UO{sub 2} samples which were then annealed in the 900-1200 C temperature range and finally analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to obtain {sup 37}Cl depth profiles. The migration process appears to be rather complex, involving mechanisms such as atomic, grain boundary, directed diffusion along preferential patterns as well as trapping into sinks before successive effusion. However, using a diffusion model based on general equation of transport, apparent diffusion coefficients could be calculated for 1000 and 1100 C and a mean activation energy of 4.3 eV is proposed. This value is one of the lowest values compared to those found in literature for other radionuclides pointing out a great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO{sub 2} at relatively low temperatures. In order to unequivocally determine the diffusion behaviour of both implanted and pristine chlorine before and after thermal annealing, the structural environment of chlorine in UO{sub 2} was examined using micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (micro-XAS). (orig.)

  10. 产细菌素屎肠球菌E6的特性分析及发酵条件优化%Characteristics and optimization of fermentative condition for bacteriocin producing Enterococcus Faecium E6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶瑜; 常伟; 唐洁; 李明元

    2013-01-01

    研究了屎肠球菌E6抑菌活性的生物学特性,并通过响应面法优化其发酵条件.结果表明,屎肠球菌E6产蛋白质类细菌素,能够抑制单增李斯特氏菌、大肠杆菌、金黄色葡萄球菌和枯草芽孢杆菌生长,在pH3.0~7.0条件下有明显抑菌活性,60~121℃热处理20min后仍具有抑菌活性.通过Box-Behnken实验设计优化屎肠球菌E6发酵条件为培养时间36.0h,培养温度31.0℃,培养基pH5.1.在此条件下,发酵上清液抑菌圈直径可达20.17mm,较优化前提高了27.2%.%The characteristics of antimicrobial activity and the fermentative condition of Enterococcus Faecium E6 were discussed.Proteinic bacteriocin produced by E6 showed inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. It showed obviously activity under pH3.0 ~ 7.0 condition.lt was also active when heated at 60~121℃ for 20min. The fermentative condition, optimized by Box-Behnken design,was cultured at pH 5.1,temperature of 31.0℃ for 36.0h.Under this condition,the diameter of inhibition zone reached up to 20.17mm,which increased by 27.2% than optimization before.

  11. Hydraulic fracturing with chlorine dioxide cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.A.; Newlove, J.C.; Horton, R.L.

    1990-10-23

    This patent describes a method for fracturing a subterranean formation penetrated by a wellbore. It comprises: injecting a fracturing fluid into the formation to form a vertical fracture therein, the fracturing fluid being gelled with a polymer selected from guar, guar derivatives, acrylamide, acrylamide derivatives, cellulose, cellulose derivatives, and mixtures thereof and crosslinked with an organometallic crosslinking compound and having temperature stability above about 175{degrees} F.; packing the fracture with particulate propping agent; backflowing fluids from the formation through the propped fracture to remove a portion of the polymer; injecting at matrix rates sufficient aqueous solution of chlorine dioxide down the wellbore and into the propped fracture to penetrate at least 60 feet of the propped fracture length and contact polymer in the fracturing fluid and polymer residue in the propped fracture and on the fracture walls, the amount of the chlorine dioxide in the aqueous medium being sufficient to degrade polymer in the fracturing fluid and polymer residue; permitting the chlorine dioxide to remain in contact with the polymer in the fracturing fluid and with the polymer residue on the fracture walls and in the fracture for sufficient time to degrade the polymer thereby reducing the fracturing fluid viscosity and dissolving portions of the polymer residue; and flowing formation fluid from the formation through the propped fracture and into the wellbore to remove substantial portions of the polymer and degraded polymer from the fracture.

  12. Chlorine Monoxide in the Antarctic Spring Stratosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Ayerbe, Mauricio

    1988-06-01

    A series of observations of stratospheric chlorine monoxide (ClO) were carried out during the austral springs of 1986 and 1987 in McMurdo Station, Antarctica, as part of two experimental campaigns sent to investigate the seasonal decrease in ozone over the antarctic continent (the ozone "hole"). Measurements of the vertical distribution of ClO were obtained by high resolution ground-based emission spectroscopy at 278 GHz, using the Stony Brook mm-wave receiver. They show the presence of an anomalous layer of lower stratospheric ClO which is not observed at other latitudes. This anomalous layer is centered at ~20 km altitude and exhibits a pronounced diurnal variation, reaching a maximum at midday and disappearing at night. During the period of Sep. 20-24, 1987, the lower-stratospheric ClO had a maximum volume mixing ratio of 1.8_sp{+0cdot5}{ -0cdot9} ppbv. A normal ClO layer centered at ~36 km was also observed, with concentrations and diurnal behavior similar to those seen in tropical latitudes. These findings are evidence of anomalous chlorine chemistry taking place in the lower stratosphere during the antarctic spring, and indicate that increasing anthropogenic chlorine is a prime causative agent in the formation of the ozone hole.

  13. 78 FR 42530 - Prospective Grant of an Exclusive License: Human Papillomavirus 16 E2 and E6 Peptides for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... Papillomavirus 16 E2 and E6 Peptides for Cervical Cancer Vaccine Development AGENCY: National Institutes of... contemplated exclusive license may be in a field of use directed to cervical cancer vaccines. DATES: Only... potentially prophylactic or therapeutic for cervical cancer, other genital cancers, head and neck cancers,...

  14. File list: NoD.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 No description Blood Jurkat... (Clone E6-1) http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 Input control Blood Jurkat ...(Clone E6-1) SRX015828,SRX024358,SRX128786,SRX128785 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 Input control Blood Jurkat ...(Clone E6-1) SRX024358,SRX128786,SRX015828,SRX128785 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  17. File list: NoD.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 No description Blood Jurkat... (Clone E6-1) http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Bld.10.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  18. File list: NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 No description Blood Jurkat... (Clone E6-1) http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 Input control Blood Jurkat ...(Clone E6-1) SRX015828,SRX128786,SRX024358,SRX128785 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  20. File list: NoD.Bld.05.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Bld.05.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 No description Blood Jurkat... (Clone E6-1) http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Bld.05.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  1. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR hg19 Input control Blood Jurkat ...(Clone E6-1) SRX015828,SRX128786,SRX024358 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Jurkat_BRACKETLClone_E6-1BRACKETR.bed ...

  2. Electric plasma discharge combustion synthesis of chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotson, R. L.; Geren, G. W.

    1984-09-18

    A process for the production of chlorine dioxide comprises feeding an inert gas to a reaction zone and applying an electrical discharge to the inert gas to produce a high temperature plasma. Chlorine gas and oxygen gas are supplied simultaneously to the reaction zone and reacted in the plasma to produce a gaseous mixture comprised of chlorine dioxide, chlorine, oxygen and inert gas, the molar ratio of oxygen to chlorine in the reaction zone being at least about 2.5;1. The gaseous mixture is recovered from the reaction zone. Chlorine dioxide, which may be recovered as a gas or reacted to produce an alkali metal chlorite, is employed as a bleaching agent and a water treatment agent.

  3. A DFT study of the interaction between large PAHs and atomic chlorine or hydrogen chloride molecule: Toward a modelling of the influence of chlorinated species on the trapping of water by soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Fernandez, C.; Radola, B.; Martin-Gondre, L.; Picaud, S.; Rayez, M. T.; Rayez, J. C.; Ouf, F. X.; Rubayo-Soneira, J.

    2017-02-01

    First-principle calculations have been performed to characterize the interaction of chlorinated species (HCl and Cl) with large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules and radicals. Whereas the characterization of the interaction process on the face of the PAH molecules requires taking into account long-range dispersion interactions in the calculations, trapping at the edge of PAH radicals involves stronger interactions that lead to the dissociation of the HCl molecule. Then, the first steps of water adsorption on the corresponding chlorinated species has been characterized, showing that chlorine may act as an efficient nucleation center for water molecules on such aromatic systems mimicking part of the carbonaceous surfaces that are likely present in soot. These results represent a first but necessary step for a better understanding of soot behavior in industrial or domestic fire situations.

  4. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF HPV16 L1, E6 AND E7 SEROPOSITIVITY AND ORAL HPV16 INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachler, Daniel C.; Viscidi, Raphael; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Minkoff, Howard; Strickler, Howard D.; Cranston, Ross D.; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Weber, Kathleen M.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Reddy, Susheel; Gillison, Maura L.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with HPV infections can develop IgG antibodies to HPV proteins including the L1 capsid and E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Evidence on whether L1 antibodies reduce the risk of cervical HPV infection is mixed, but this has not been explored for oral HPV infections. Antibodies to HPV16’s E6 oncoprotein have been detected in some oropharyngeal cancer cases years prior to cancer diagnosis, but it is unknown if these antibodies are associated with oral HPV16 DNA. Methods Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays tested for serum antibodies to HPV16’s L1 capsid in 463 HIV-infected and 293 HIV-uninfected adults, and for antibodies to recombinantly expressed E6 and E7 oncoproteins to HPV16 in 195 HIV-infected and 69 HIV-uninfected cancer-free participants at baseline. Oral rinse samples were collected semi-annually for up to three years and tested for HPV DNA using PGMY 09/11 primers. Adjusted Poisson, logistic, and Wei-Lin-Weissfeld regression models were utilized. Results HPV16 L1 seroreactivity did not reduce the subsequent risk of incident oral HPV16 infection in unadjusted (HR=1.4, 95%CI=0.59–3.3) or adjusted (aHR=1.1, 95%CI=0.41–3.0) analysis. Antibodies to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins were detected in 7.6% and 3.4% of participants respectively, but they were not associated with baseline oral HPV16 DNA prevalence or oral HPV16 persistence (each p-value>0.40). Conclusions Naturally acquired HPV16 L1 antibodies did not reduce the risk of subsequent oral HPV16 infection. HPV16 E6 and E7 seropositivity was not a marker for oral HPV16 infection in this population without HPV-related cancer. PMID:25585068

  5. Validation study for crediting chlorine in criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobes, Vladimir [ORNL; Scaglione, John M [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL; Dunn, Michael E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management practices in the United States rely on dry storage systems that include both canister- and cask-based systems. The United States Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign is examining the feasibility of direct disposal of dual-purpose (storage and transportation) canisters (DPCs) in a geological repository. One of the major technical challenges for direct disposal is the ability to demonstrate the subcriticality of the DPCs loaded with SNF for the repository performance period (e.g., 10,000 years or more) as the DPCs may undergo degradation over time. Specifically, groundwater ingress into the DPC (i.e., flooding) could allow the system to achieve criticality in scenarios where the neutron absorber plates in the DPC basket have degraded. However, as was shown by Banerjee et al., some aqueous species in the groundwater provide noticeable reactivity reduction for these systems. For certain amounts of particular aqueous species (e.g., chlorine, lithium) in the groundwater, subcriticality can be demonstrated even for DPCs with complete degradation of the neutron absorber plates or a degraded fuel basket configuration. It has been demonstrated that chlorine is the leading impurity, as indicated by significant neutron absorption in the water that is available in reasonable quantities for the deep geological repository media under consideration. This paper presents the results of an investigation of the available integral experiments worldwide that could be used to validate DPC disposal criticality evaluations, including credit for chlorine. Due to the small number of applicable critical configurations, validation through traditional trending analysis was not possible. The bias in the eigenvalue of the application systems due only to the chlorine was calculated using TSURFER analysis and found to be on the order of 100 percent mille (1 pcm = 10-5 keff). This study investigated the design of a series of

  6. Validation Study for Crediting Chlorine in Criticality Analyses for US Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobes, Vladimir [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, John C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dunn, Michael E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management practices in the United States rely on dry storage systems that include both canister- and cask-based systems. The United States Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign is examining the feasibility of direct disposal of dual-purpose (storage and transportation) canisters (DPCs) in a geological repository. One of the major technical challenges for direct disposal is the ability to demonstrate the subcriticality of the DPCs loaded with SNF for the repository performance period (e.g., 10,000 years or more) as the DPCs may undergo degradation over time. Specifically, groundwater ingress into the DPC (i.e., flooding) could allow the system to achieve criticality in scenarios where the neutron absorber plates in the DPC basket have degraded. However, as was shown by Banerjee et al., some aqueous species in the groundwater provide noticeable reactivity reduction for these systems. For certain amounts of particular aqueous species (e.g., chlorine, lithium) in the groundwater, subcriticality can be demonstrated even for DPCs with complete degradation of the neutron absorber plates or a degraded fuel basket configuration. It has been demonstrated that chlorine is the leading impurity, as indicated by significant neutron absorption in the water that is available in reasonable quantities for the deep geological repository media under consideration. This paper presents the results of an investigation of the available integral experiments worldwide that could be used to validate DPC disposal criticality evaluations, including credit for chlorine. Due to the small number of applicable critical configurations, validation through traditional trending analysis was not possible. The bias in the eigenvalue of the application systems due only to the chlorine was calculated using TSURFER analysis and found to be on the order of 100 percent mille (1 pcm = 10-5 keff). This study investigated the design of a series of

  7. Method of improving formation permeability using chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, L.A.; Williams, D.A.

    1991-07-16

    This patent describes a method of treating a sandstone formation containing clays or silicates. It comprises injection a treating liquid into the formation comprising an aqueous solution of: from 50 to 4,200 ppm chlorine dioxide and from 1 to 85 volume percent of carbon dioxide; permitting the chlorine dioxide to react with material in the formation; and thereafter injecting into the formation an acid solution capable of dissolving the reaction products of chlorine dioxide and the clays and silicates.

  8. Treatment of algae-induced tastes and odors by chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate

    OpenAIRE

    Buffin, Lisa Webster

    1992-01-01

    Chlorine (C12(sq»' chlorine dioxide (Cl02 ) and potassium permanganate (KMn04) were evaluated as oxidants for the removal of grassy and cucumber odors associated with the pure compounds, cis-3-hexenol and trans-2, cis-6-nonadienal, respectively, and for the removal of fishy odors associated with a culture of an alga, Synura petersenii. The effects of the oxidants on the pure compounds were assessed both by Flavor Profile Analysis (FPA) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The ef...

  9. Cyclopalladated Ferrocenylimine Catalyzed Chlorination of 2-Arylbenzoxazoles%Cyclopalladated Ferrocenylimine Catalyzed Chlorination of 2-Arylbenzoxazoles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷瑜婷; 杨帆; 吴养洁; 李克

    2011-01-01

    An efficient and facile protocol for palladacycle-catalyzed chlorination of 2-arylbenzoxazoles was developed. The results represent the first examples involving the palladacycle as the catalyst for such chlorination. This chlori- nation was not a ligand-directed ortho-C--H activation, but an electrophilic substitution process at the para-position of the nitrogen atom in the benzo ring of benzoxazole moiety, the regiochemistry of which had been confirmed by HMBC spectral analysis. The catalytic system could tolerate various halogen atoms, such as F, Cl and Br, affording the corresponding products in moderate to excellent yields.

  10. Synthesis, Photophysical Properties, and Biological Evaluation of trans-Bisthioglycosylated Tetrakis(fluorophenyl)chlorin for Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirohara, Shiho; Oka, Chio; Totani, Masayasu; Obata, Makoto; Yuasa, Junpei; Ito, Hiromu; Tamura, Masato; Matsui, Hirofumi; Kakiuchi, Kiyomi; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Kawaichi, Masashi; Tanihara, Masao

    2015-11-12

    trans-Bisthioglycosylated tetrakis(fluorophenyl)chlorin (7) was designed as a powerful photodynamic therapy (PDT) photosensitizer based on the findings of our systematic studies. We show here that the trans-bisthioglycosylated structure of 7 enhanced its uptake by HeLa cells and that the chlorin ring of 7 increased the efficiency of reactive oxygen species generation under the standard condition of our photocytotoxicity test. The versatility of 7 in PDT treatment was established using weakly metastatic B16F1 melanoma cells, metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cells, the RGK-1 gastric carcinoma mucosal cell line, and three human glioblastoma cell lines (U87, U251, and T98G). The pharmacokinetics of 7 in mice bearing 4T1 breast cancer cells showed a high tumor-to-skin concentration ratio (approximately 60) at 24 h after intraperitoneal injection. The PDT efficacy of 7 in vivo was approximately 250-times higher than that of mono-l-aspartyl chlorin e6 (9) in mice bearing 4T1 breast cancer cells.

  11. E6D25E, HPV16 Asian variant shows specific proteomic pattern correlating in cells transformation and suppressive innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopjitt, Peechanika; Pientong, Chamsai; Sunthamala, Nuchsupha; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Haonon, Ornuma; Boonmars, Thidarut; Kikawa, Satomi; Nakahara, Tomomi; Kiyono, Tohru; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2016-09-09

    HPV16 Asian variant (HPV16As) containing E6D25E oncogene, is commonly associated with cervical cancers of Asian populations. To explore a mechanism of E6D25E oncoprotein in carcinogenesis, we compared protein profiles in human keratinocytes expressing E6D25E with E6 of HPV16 prototype (E6Pro). A human cervical keratinocyte cell line, HCK1T, was transduced with retroviruses containing E6D25E or E6Pro genes. Biological properties of E6D25E or E6Pro transduced HCK1T cells were characterized. Protein profiles of the transduced HCK1T cells were analyzed using 2D-PAGE and characterized by mass spectrometry and western blotting. Reactomes of modulated proteins were analyzed by using the Reactome Knowledgebase. The E6D25E and E6Pro oncoproteins were comparable for their abilities to degrade p53 and suppress the induction of p21, and induce cell proliferation. Interestingly, the protein profiles of the HCK1T cells transduced with E6D25E showed specific proteomic patterns different from those with E6Pro. Among altered proteins, more than 1.5-fold up- or down- regulation was observed in E6D25E-expressing cells for gp96 and keratin7 which involved in activation of TLR signaling and transformation of squamocolumnar junction cells, respectively. This report describes new cellular proteins specifically targeted by E6D25E oncoprotein that may contribute to impair immune response against viral infection and cell transformation associated with oncogenic property of HPV16As variant.

  12. Correlation between high risk type human papillomavirus E6/E7 mRNA and cervical cancer%高危型HPV E6/E7 mRNA与宫颈癌相关性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小红; 钱艺美; 缪铃; 乐瑶; 杜娟

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between the positive rate of high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) mRNA E6/E7 and cervical cancer,and provide evidence for the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer.Methods A total of 100 cervical cancer cases and 100 healthy controls were selected in our hospital from January 2015 to December 2015.The fluorescence quantitative PCR and pathological examination on HPV E6/E7 mRNA were carried out.The correlation between HPV E6/E7 mRNA and cervical squamous epithelial lesions were analyzed.Results In case group,the positive rate ofHPV E6/E7 mRNA was 76.0% (76/100).In control group,the positive rate was 13.0% (13/100).The positive rate in case group was significantly higher than that in control group,and the difference was statistically significant (x2=24.522,P<0.001).The positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the two groups were compared,and the difference was not significant (P>0.05).The positive rate of HPV E6/E7 mRNA was significantly higher than high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) rate (26.1%),low-grade SIL rate (17.6%) and atypical squamous cell hyperplasia rate (6.7%),the difference was statistically significant (x2=7.615,P=0.001;x2=9.114,P=0.001;x2=18.241,P<0.001).Conclusions The detection rate ofHPV E6/E7 mRNA in cervical cancer patients was high.And with the increased severity of cervical squamous epithelial lesions,the positive rate of HPV E6/E7 mRNA increased.%目的 探讨高危型HPV E6/E7 mRNA检出率与宫颈癌的相关性,为临床防治宫颈癌提供依据.方法 选择2015年收治的100例宫颈癌患者为A组,同期100例健康体检者为B组,采用荧光定量PCR检测入组患者高危型HPV E6/E7 mRNA和病理学检查,比较两组患者HPV E6/E7感染率和荧光定量PCR检查效率,分析HPV E6/E7感染与宫颈鳞状上皮病变的相关性.结果 A组阳性76例,阳性率为76.0%;B组阳性13例,阳性率为13.0%;A组阳性率高于B

  13. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... months, and at 3, 4, 5, and 6 years of age. A blood lead level test should be done only if the risk ... recommended if the person is symptomatic at any level below 70 mcg/dL. Because lead will pass through the blood to an unborn child, pregnant ...

  14. Chlorinated and nitrogenous disinfection by-product formation from ozonation and post-chlorination of natural organic matter surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tom; Templeton, Michael R; Rifai, Omar; Ali, Hussain; Graham, Nigel J D

    2014-09-01

    Ozonation before chlorination is associated with enhanced formation of chloropicrin, a halonitromethane disinfection by-product (DBP), during drinking water treatment. In order to elucidate reasons for this, five natural organic matter (NOM) surrogates were treated using both chlorination and ozonation-chlorination under controlled laboratory conditions. Selected surrogates comprised two phenolic compounds, two free amino acids and one dipeptide; these were resorcinol, 3-aminophenol, L-aspartic acid, β-alanine and ala-ala, respectively. Quantified DBPs included chloropicrin, chloroform, dichloroacetonitrile and trichloroacetonitrile. Relative to chlorination alone, increases in the formation of chloropicrin from ozonation-chlorination varied from 138% for 3-aminophenol to 3740% for ala-ala for the four amine surrogates. This indicates that ozone is more effective than chlorine in mediating a rate-limiting oxidation step in chloropicrin formation, most plausibly involving conversion of an amine group to a nitro group. While both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surrogates acted as chloropicrin precursors, ala-ala was the most reactive precursor following ozonation-chlorination. Since peptides are far commoner in drinking water sources than free amino acids, further research into chemical oxidation of these species by ozone and chlorine is recommended. In contrast, oxidation with ozone prior to chlorination reduced chloroform formation moderately for the two phenolic compounds.

  15. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on mutagenic activity of Lake Kinnereth water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttman-Bass, N.; Bairey-Albuquerque, M.; Ulitzur, S.; Chartrand, A.; Rav-Acha, C.

    1987-03-01

    Water from Lake Kinnereth (Israel) was tested for the presence of mutagenic activity, with and without disinfection by chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The samples were assayed for activity with two Ames Salmonella typhimurium tester strains, TA 104 and TA 100, and by a luminescent genotoxic assay with a dark mutant strain of Photobacterium fischeri. The water concentrates were mutagenic in strain TA 104 and in the luminescent assay, reaching positive mutagenic activities in the equivalent of 20 mL of water. Chlorination did not greatly affect the net mutagenic activity, although ClO/sub 2/ apparently reduced it. Humic acids were isolated from lake sediment and were assayed with and without disinfection in distilled water and in lake water from which the organic components were removed. The humic acids were mutagenic in both test systems, and treatment with Cl/sub 2/ generally decreased the net activity. ClO/sub 2/ also tended to decrease the mutagenic activity, and cytotoxic effects were observed in some of the samples. Conversely, commercial humic acid was mutagenic only after chlorination on strain TA 100. 54 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  16. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  17. Assessment of Damage to Nucleic Acids and Repair Machinery in Salmonella typhimurium Exposed to Chlorine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Phe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Water disinfection is usually evaluated using mandatory methods based on cell culturability. However, such methods do not consider the potential of cells to recover, which should also be kept as low as possible. In this paper, we hypothesized that a successful disinfection is achieved only when the applied chlorine leads to both intracellular nucleic acid damage and strong alterations of the DNA repair machinery. Monitoring the SOS system responsiveness with a umuC'-‘lacZ reporter fusion, we found that the expression of this important cellular machinery was altered after the beginning of membrane permeabilization but prior to the total decline of both the cell culturability and the nucleic acid integrity as revealed by Sybr-II staining. Rapid measurement of such nucleic acid alterations by fluorochrome-based staining could be used as an alternative method for assessing the effectiveness of disinfection with chlorine.

  18. Expression and In Silico Analysis of the Recombinant Bovine Papillomavirus E6 Protein as a Model for Viral Oncoproteins Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mazzuchelli-de-Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins.

  19. Explaining the CMS $eejj$ and $e \\slashed {p}_T jj$ Excess and Leptogenesis in Superstring Inspired $E_6$ Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dhuria, Mansi; Rangarajan, Raghavan; Sarkar, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    We show that superstring inspired $E_6$ models can explain both the recently detected excess $eejj$ and $e \\slashed p_T jj$ signals at CMS, and also allow for leptogenesis. Working in a R-parity conserving low energy supersymmetric effective model, we show that the excess CMS events can be produced via the decay of exotic sleptons in alternative left-right symmetric models of $E_6$, which can also accommodate leptogenesis at a high scale. On the other hand, either the $eejj$ excess or the $e \\slashed p_T jj$ excess can be produced via the decays of right handed gauge bosons, but some of these scenarios may not accommodate letptogenesis as there will be strong $B-L$ violation at low energy, which, along with the anomalous fast electroweak $B+L$ violation, will wash out all baryon asymmetry. Baryogenesis below the electroweak scale may then need to be implemented in these models.

  20. Advantages and disadvantages of chemical oxidation and disinfection by ozone and chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiessinger, F.; Richard, Y.; Montiel, A.; Musquere, P.

    1981-04-01

    Ozone and chlorine dioxide present definite advantages and disadvantages over chlorination. Chlorination, particularly for the removal of ammonia and the maintenance of a disinfectant residual in the distribution system has decisive advantages and will be difficult to replace. Ozone and chlorine dioxide seem to produce fewer carcinogenic by-products but the risk for acute toxicity, especially from the chlorites which follow chlorine dioxide, is higher than with chlorine. Chlorine dioxide and more particularly ozone should be considered as useful complements to chlorination, but no strong oxidative treatment should be applied before most of the organic matter has been removed.

  1. Human papillomavirus (HPV 16 E6 variants in tonsillar cancer in comparison to those in cervical cancer in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV, especially HPV16, is associated with the development of both cervical and tonsillar cancer and intratype variants in the amino acid sequence of the HPV16 E6 oncoprotein have been demonstrated to be associated with viral persistence and cancer lesions. For this reason the presence of HPV16 E6 variants in tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC in cervical cancer (CC, as well as in cervical samples (CS, were explored. METHODS: HPV16 E6 was sequenced in 108 TSCC and 52 CC samples from patients diagnosed 2000-2008 in the County of Stockholm, and in 51 CS from young women attending a youth health center in Stockholm. RESULTS: The rare E6 variant R10G was relatively frequent (19% in TSCC, absent in CC and infrequent (4% in CS, while the well-known L83V variant was common in TSCC (40%, CC (31%, and CS (29%. The difference for R10G was significant between TSCC and CC (p = 0.0003, as well as between TSCC and CS (p = 0.009. The HPV16 European phylogenetic lineage and its derivatives dominated in all samples (>90%. CONCLUSION: The relatively high frequency of the R10G variant in TSCC, as compared to what has been found in CC both in the present study as well as in several other studies in different countries, may indicate a difference between TSCC and CC with regard to tumor induction and development. Alternatively, there could be differences with regard to the oral and cervical prevalence of this variant that need to be explored further.

  2. Induction of focal epithelial hyperplasia in tongue of young bk6-E6/E7 HPV16 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Marroquin-Chavira, Alberto; Hernandez-Mote, Ruth; Valencia, Concepción; Manjarrez-Zavala, M Eugenia; Covarrubias, Luis; Gariglio, Patricio

    2009-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is one of the most common neoplasms in the world. During the past 2 decades, the role of high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) has been studied and the data supporting HPV as a one of the causative agents in the development and progression of a sub-set of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) has accumulated. In order to investigate the role of HR-HPV oncogene expression in early epithelial alterations in vivo, we produced transgenic mice expressing HPV16 early region genes from the promoter of the bovine keratin 6 gene (Tg[bK6-E6/E7]). In this article, we demonstrate that E6/E7 transgene was abundantly expressed and cellular proliferation was increased in the middle tongue epithelia of transgenic mice, and that in the same region young (27 weeks old) Tg[bK6-E6/E7] mice spontaneously developed histological alterations, mainly focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH).

  3. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie van de Wall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV targeting human papillomavirus (HPV. Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7 via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus.

  4. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Almstead, Laura L. [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States); Bellone, Stefania [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208063, New Haven, CT 06520-8063 (United States); Prevatt, Edward G. [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States); Santin, Alessandro D. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208063, New Haven, CT 06520-8063 (United States); Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, P.O. Box 208028, New Haven, CT 06520-8028 (United States); DiMaio, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.dimaio@yale.edu [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208040, New Haven, CT 06520-8040 (United States); Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208024 (United States); Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, P.O. Box 208028, New Haven, CT 06520-8028 (United States)

    2012-01-05

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  5. Sonoporation delivery of monoclonal antibodies against human papillomavirus 16 E6 restores p53 expression in transformed cervical keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Togtema

    Full Text Available High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV, such as HPV16, have been found in nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Therapies targeted at blocking the HPV16 E6 protein and its deleterious effects on the tumour suppressor pathways of the cell can reverse the malignant phenotype of affected keratinocytes while sparing uninfected cells. Through a strong interdisciplinary collaboration between engineering and biology, a novel, non-invasive intracellular delivery method for the HPV16 E6 antibody, F127-6G6, was developed. The method employs high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU in combination with microbubbles, in a process known as sonoporation. In this proof of principle study, it was first demonstrated that sonoporation antibody delivery into the HPV16 positive cervical carcinoma derived cell lines CaSki and SiHa was possible, using chemical transfection as a baseline for comparison. Delivery of the E6 antibody using sonoporation significantly restored p53 expression in these cells, indicating the antibody is able to enter the cells and remains active. This delivery method is targeted, non-cytotoxic, and non-invasive, making it more easily translatable for in vivo experiments than other transfection methods.

  6. Modelling the impact of chlorine and bromine emissions from large Plinian eruptions on ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenna, Hans; Krüger, Kirstin; Kutterolf, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Large Plinian volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of atmosphere-relevant gases (e.g. S, Cl, Br) and materials into the stratosphere. If the eruption occurs in the tropics, it can have a global impact due to the dispersal through the large scale meridional overturning circulation. Most climate model studies concentrate on the sulfate aerosol effects on climate. In contrast, ozone-depletion initiated by volcanic halogens from tropical eruptions was believed to play an insignificant role for the global atmosphere, based on observations from the recent El Chichon and Pinatubo eruptions. New results regarding the halogen release by Plinian eruptions, as well as recent volcanic plume observations and model simulations facilitate now our investigation into what effect the combined chlorine and bromine emissions from large tropical eruptions have on ozone and the atmosphere in general. A complete halogen data set for the last 200 ka (Kutterolf et al., 2015), derived by the petrological method from paleo-eruptions of the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA), are used to force simulations with the advanced chemistry climate model WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model). The goal is to quantify the impact of volcanic halogens on the preindustrial atmosphere when the background chlorine levels were low compared to the present day with the main focus on stratospheric ozone. We carried out 5 model simulations assuming that 10% of the Cl and Br (9.51e+6 kg Br and 2.93e+9 kg Cl) emitted from the average CAVA eruption is injected into the tropical stratosphere during January. The model response reveals a global impact on the ozone layer affecting via radiation also atmospheric dynamics for more than 5 years. Given the current decline in anthropogenic chlorine, the results will become relevant for future halogen-rich explosive eruptions in the tropics. References: Kutterolf, S., T. Hansteen, A. Freundt, H. Wehrmann, K. Appel, K. Krüger, and W. Pérez (2015), Bromine

  7. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... menopause.) Once the lead is released from the mother's bones, it re-enters the blood stream and ... drinks. Avoid eating off any colorfully painted ceramic plates, and avoid drinking from any ceramic mugs unless ...

  8. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games ... OTHERS: Lead has recently been found in some plastic mini-blinds and vertical blinds which were made ...

  9. 78 FR 66767 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of September 10, 2013 (78 FR 55293). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Japan Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Japan of chlorinated isocyanurates, provided for...

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Atmosphereic Inorganic Chlorine Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randall R.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last five years substantial progress has been made in defining the realm of new chlorine chemistry in the polar stratosphere. Application of existing experimental techniques to potentially important chlorine-containing compounds has yielded quantitative kinetic and spectroscopic data as well as qualitative mechanistic insights into the relevant reactions.

  11. Chlorine Dioxide Induced Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: MMPI Validity Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This paper discusses Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data obtained from individuals exposed to chlorine dioxide in the workplace who developed Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The paper explores current research on chlorine dioxide exposed persons who were misdiagnosed on the basis of MMPI interpretations. Difficulties…

  12. 75 FR 23303 - Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... COMMISSION Chlorinated Isocyanurates From China and Spain AGENCY: United States International Trade... isocyanurates from China and Spain. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it has instituted reviews... revocation of the antidumping duty orders on chlorinated isocyanurates from China and Spain would be...

  13. Chlorine-containing natural compounds in higher plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    More than 130 chlorine-containing compounds have been isolated from higher plants and ferns; about half are polyacetylenes, thiophenes and sesquiterpene lactones from the Asteraceae. A chlorinated chlorophyll may be an important part of photosystem 1. High biological activity is found in 4...

  14. THE HUMORAL AND CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES INDUCED BY HPV18L1-E6/E7 DNA VACCINES IN MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jin; Li Xu; Li Ang; Wang Yili; Si Lüsheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective To construct eukaryotic expression vector of HPV18 L1- E6, E7 chimeric gene and examine the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by this DNA vaccines in mice. Methods The C-terminal of major capsid protein L1 gene and mutant zinc finger domains of early E6/7 oncogenes in HPV18 were integrated and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to generate vaccines pVAX1-L1E6Mxx, E7Mxx. CHO cells were transiently transfected with the individual construct. Target protein expressions in the lysate of the transfected cells were measured by ELISA and immunocytochemistry. After BALB/c mice were vaccinated with various recombinant plasmids(pVAX1-L1-E6M3 or pVAX1-L1-E7M3) and immunie adjuvants (pLXHDmB7-2 or LTB) through different administration routes (intramuscular or intranasal) , the great cellular immune responses were produced as revealed by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and lymphocyte proliferation, and the expression of IL-4 and IFN- γ cells in CD4+ and CD8+subpopulations. Results The highly efficient expression of pVAX1-L1E6Mxx, E7Mxx vector in host eukaryotic cells were demonstrated both by ELISA and immunocytochemistry. The level of specific serum IgG against HPV in experiment groups mice was much higher than that of control group, and intranuscular immunization group had the highest antibody level. Intramuscular immunization groups were superior to intranasal immunization groups in DTH response, splenocyte proliferation and CD8+ IFN-γ + cells number, but CD4+ IL4+ cell number was higher in intranasal immunization groups. The immunization groups using pLXHDmB7-2 as adjuvant were superior to other groups in immunoresponse. Conclusion These DNA vaccines produce remarkable cellular and humoral immuneresponses in the mouse and may provide as prophylatic and therapeutic candidates for HPV induced cancer treatment.

  15. Effects of short-chain chlorinated paraffins on soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezchlebová, Jitka; Cernohlávková, Jitka; Kobeticová, Klára; Lána, Jan; Sochová, Ivana; Hofman, Jakub

    2007-06-01

    Despite the fact that chlorinated paraffins have been produced in relatively large amounts, and high concentrations have been found in sewage sludge applied to soils, there is little information on their concentrations in soils and the effect on soil organisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of chlorinated paraffins in soils. The effects of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (64% chlorine content) on invertebrates (Eisenia fetida, Folsomia candida, Enchytraeus albidus, Enchytraeus crypticus, Caenorhabditis elegans) and substrate-induced respiration of indigenous microorganisms were studied. Differences were found in the sensitivity of the tested organisms to short-chain chlorinated paraffins. F. candida was identified as the most sensitive organism with LC(50) and EC(50) values of 5733 and 1230 mg/kg, respectively. Toxicity results were compared with available studies and the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) of 5.28 mg/kg was estimated for the soil environment, based on our data.

  16. Biodegradability of Chlorinated Anilines in Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO WANG; GUAN-GHUA LU; YAN-JIE ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To identify the bacteria tolerating chlorinated anilines and to study the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline and its coexistent compounds. Methods Microbial community of complex bacteria was identified by plate culture observation techniques and Gram stain method. Bacterial growth inhibition test was used to determine the tolerance of complex bacteria to toxicant. Biodegradability of chlorinated anilines was determined using domesticated complex bacteria as an inoculum by shaking-flask test. Results The complex bacteria were identified, consisting of Xanthomonas, Bacillus alcaligenes,Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Actinomycetaceae nocardia. The obtained complex bacteria were more tolerant to o-chloroaniline than mixture bacteria in natural river waters. The effects of exposure concentration and inoculum size on the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline were analyzed, and the biodegradation characteristics of single o-chloroaniline and 2,4-dichloroaniline were compared with the coexistent compounds. Conclusion The biodegradation rates can be improved by decreasing concentration of compounds and increasing inoculum size of complex bacteria. When o-chloroaniline coexists with aniline, the latter is biodegraded prior to the former, and as a consequence the metabolic efficiency of o-chloroaniline is improved with the increase of aniline concentration. Meanwhile, when o-chloroaniline coexists with 2,4-dichloroaniline, the metabolic efficiency of 2,4-dichloroaniline is markedly improved.

  17. HPV E6/p53 mediated down-regulation of miR-34a inhibits Warburg effect through targeting LDHA in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Su, Jing; Xue, Song-Lin; Yang, Hui; Ju, Li-Li; Ji, Ying; Wu, Kai-Hua; Zhang, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Ye-Xin; Hu, Jian-Fang; Yu, Min-Min

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play crucial roles in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and developmental timing. Aberrantly expressed miRNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of metabolism. However, little is known about its role in tumor metabolism of cervical cancer. In this study, we determined the oncogenic effects of miRNAs on Warburg effect, a metabolic phenotype that allows cancer cells to utilize glucose even under aerobic conditions. A gain-of-function study was performed in 12 down-regulated miRNAs that frequently reported in cervical cancer. We found that miR-34a plays a suppressive role in Warburg effect as evidenced by decreased lactate production and glucose consumption. Knockdown of oncoprotein E6 expression of human papillomavirus in SiHa and HeLa cells by siRNAs lead to an increased protein level of p53, decreased level of miR-34a, as well as reduced Warburg effect. Subsequently, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), which catalyzes the last key step in glycolysis, was identified as a direct target of miR-34a. Silencing of LDHA or introduction of miR-34a significantly attenuated colony formation ability and invasive capacity of SiHa and HeLa cells, and these effects were fully compromised by reintroduction of LDHA. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that deregulated miR-34a/LDHA axis induced by HPV E6/p53 signaling facilitates tumor growth and invasion through regulating Warburg effect in cervical cancer, and provided new insights into the mechanism by which miR-34a contributes to the development and progression of cervical cancer.

  18. Synergetic Inactivation of Microorganisms in Drinking Water by Short-term Free Chlorination and Subsequent Monochloramination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To introduce synergetic inactivation of microorganisms in drinking water by short-term free chlorination for less than 15 minutes followed by monochloramination. Methods Indicator microorganisms such as Escherichia coli,Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and spores of Bacillus subtilis were used to assess the efficiency of sequential chlorination and free chlorination. Results The sequential chlorination was more efficient in inactivating these microorganisms than free chlorination, indicating that synergy was provided by free chlorine and monochloramine. Ammonia addition time, temperature and pH had influences on this synergy. Conclusion The possible mechanism of this synergy might involve three aspects: free chlorine causing sublethal injury to microorganisms and monochloramine further inactivating them; different ability of free chlorine and monochloramine to penetrate and inactivate microorganism congeries; and higher concentration of residual chlorine in sequential chlorination than in free chlorination.

  19. Chlorine inactivation of Tubifex tubifex in drinking water and the synergistic effect of sequential inactivation with UV irradiation and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiao-Bao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Long, Yuan-Nan; He, Pan-Pan; Xu, Chao

    2017-06-01

    The inactivation of Tubifex tubifex is important to prevent contamination of drinking water. Chlorine is a widely-used disinfectant and the key factor in the inactivation of T. tubifex. This study investigated the inactivation kinetics of chlorine on T. tubifex and the synergistic effect of the sequential use of chlorine and UV irradiation. The experimental results indicated that the Ct (concentration × timereaction) concept could be used to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex with chlorine, thus allowing for the use of a simpler Ct approach for the assessment of T. tubifex chlorine inactivation requirements. The inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be well-fitted to a delayed pseudo first-order Chick-Watson expression. Sequential experiments revealed that UV irradiation and chlorine worked synergistically to effectively inactivate T. tubifex as a result of the decreased activation energy, Ea, induced by primary UV irradiation. Furthermore, the inactivation effectiveness of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be affected by several drinking water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand with potassium permanganate (CODMn) concentration. High pH exhibited pronounced inactivation effectiveness and the decrease in turbidity and CODMn concentrations contributed to the inactivation of T. tubifex.

  20. Change in genotoxicity of wastewater during chlorine dioxide and chlorine disinfections and the influence of ammonia nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lisha; HU Hongying; WANG Chao; Koichi Fujie

    2007-01-01

    The effects of chlorine dioxide and chlorine disinfections on the genotoxicity of different biologically treated sewage wastewater samples were studied by umu-test.The experiment results showed that when chlorine dioxide dosage was increased from 0 to 30 mg/L,the genotoxicity of wastewater first decreased rapidly and then tended to be stable,while when the chlorine dosage was increased from 0 to 30 mg/L,the genotoxicity of wastewater changed diversely for different samples.It was then found that ammonia nitrogen did not affect the change of genotoxicity during chlorine dioxide disinfection of wastewater,while it greatly affected the change of genotoxicity during chlorine disinfection of wastewater.When the concentration of ammonia nitrogen was low(<10-20mg/L),the genotoxicity of wastewater decreased after chlorine disinfection,and when the concentration of ammonia nitrogen was high(>10-20 mg/L),the genotoxicity of wastewater increased after chlorine disinfection.

  1. 宫颈癌及癌前病变中HPV16E6/E7的检测及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘小清; 费秀英; 吴汝红

    2004-01-01

    To leam whether HPV16 E6/E7 genes correlate with cervical carcinoma and precancerous lesions. Methods Amplification and cloning of HPV16 E6/E7 genes were performed by PCR and molecular biological techniques for their sequences. Cervical cancer, CIN Ⅱ - Ⅲ and cervicitis were confirmed by pathologic detections. Results Detection rates of HPV16 E6/E7 in biopsies of cervical carcinoma, CIN Ⅱ - Ⅲ and cervicitis were individually 70%, 75% and 65%. Statistic results show that there is no difference among them in HPV16 E7 detection. Also ther is no difference between cervical cancer and CIN Ⅱ - Ⅲ in HPV16 E6 detection, however, both were higher detections than in cervicitis statistically. Conclusion HPV16 E6/E7 genes correlate with cervical carcinoma and precancerous lesions. E6 gene might especially function on occurrence of cervical carcinoma from precancerous lesions.

  2. Human Papillomavirus 16 E6,E7 siRNAs Inhibit Proliferation and Induce Apoptosis of SiHa Cervical Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Chun-lian; GAO Guo-lan; HAN Jie; LI Hua; CHEN He-ping; HE Ming

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effects of HPVl6 E6/E7 siRNAs on cervical cancer SiHa cells. Methods:The expressions of the E6,E7,p53 and Rb genes were assayed by RT-PCR and Western-bloting respectively.The proliferation and apoptosis of the cells were evaluated by MTT and flow cytometry. Results:HPV 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes were selectivly downregulated by HPV 16 E6 and E7 siRNAs,which sustained at least 96 h by single dose siRNA.Furthermore,reduction of E6 and E7 oncogenes expression upregulated the expressions of P53 and RB protein and induced apoptosis in SiHa cells. Conclusion:Introduction of HPV16 E6/E7 siRNA might be a potentially potent and specific approach to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of SiHa cervical cancer cells.

  3. Evaluation of the Most Current and Effective Methods in the Analysis of Chlorinated Dioxins in Ground Beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebere C. Anyanwu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorinated dioxins are the group of environmental pollutants consisting of 210 chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. They are highly toxic and persistent. They are lipophilic and can easily biomagnify in the food chain, hence posing a serious threat to human health. The daily consumption of low-level contaminated food, mainly of animal origin, leads to the accumulation of dioxins in the human body. The exposures of the general human population to dioxins and the specific issues of a risk assessment of dioxin pose serious concerns in public environmental and nutritional health. This paper reviews the analysis of chlorinated dioxins in ground beef. The sources of contamination of chlorinated dioxins in ground beef are first reviewed to form a basis for a clear understanding of the health implications of chlorinated dioxins in the human food chain and why it is necessary to monitor the level of dioxins in animal food products, especially ground beef. The methods of collection, sampling, and processing of ground beef, and the methods of sample clean up prior to the analysis, are reviewed. Emphasis is laid on the new techniques that are available and that might be effective in the analysis of chlorinated dioxins in ground beef. Among these new methods and techniques are: the synergistic combination of ELISA/GC/MS, direct sample introduction to /GC/MS-MS, automated clean-up method, and the supercritical fluid extraction methods. The possible treatments of results from each method and technique are discussed and their respective efficiencies are compared. Finally, quality control and quality assurance parameters are evaluated for levels of accuracy, reproducibility, and precision.

  4. Myeloperoxidase-Related Chlorination Activity Is Positively Associated with Circulating Ceruloplasmin in Chronic Heart Failure Patients: Relationship with Neurohormonal, Inflammatory, and Nutritional Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassi, Aderville; Binno, Simone Maurizio; Tedeschi, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Galizia, Cinzia; Bianconcini, Michele; Coghi, Pietro; Fellini, Federica; Ruffini, Livia; Govoni, Paolo; Piepoli, Massimo; Perlini, Stefano; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by the development of an imbalance between oxygen- and nitric oxide-derived free radical production leading to protein nitration. Both chlorinating and peroxidase cycle of Myeloperoxidase (MPO) contribute to oxidative and nitrosative stress and are involved in tyrosine nitration of protein. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) has antioxidant function through its ferroxidase I (FeOxI) activity and has recently been proposed as a physiological defense mechanism against MPO inappropriate actions. Objective. We investigated the relationship between plasma MPO-related chlorinating activity, Cp and FeOxI, and nitrosative stress, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nutritional biomarkers in HF patients. Methods and Results. In chronic HF patients (n = 81, 76 ± 9 years, NYHA Class II (26); Class III (29); Class IV (26)) and age-matched controls (n = 17, 75 ± 11 years, CTR), plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, FeOxI, nitrated protein, free Malondialdehyde, BNP, norepinephrine, hsCRP, albumin, and prealbumin were measured. Plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, BNP, norepinephrine, and hsCRP were increased in HF versus CTR. FeOxI, albumin, and prealbumin were decreased in HF. MPO-related chlorinating activity was positively related to Cp (r = 0.363, P < 0.001), nitrated protein, hsCRP, and BNP and inversely to albumin. Conclusions. Plasma MPO chlorinated activity is increased in elderly chronic HF patients and positively associated with Cp, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nitrosative parameters suggesting a role in HF progression. PMID:26539521

  5. Myeloperoxidase-Related Chlorination Activity Is Positively Associated with Circulating Ceruloplasmin in Chronic Heart Failure Patients: Relationship with Neurohormonal, Inflammatory, and Nutritional Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderville Cabassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Heart failure (HF is accompanied by the development of an imbalance between oxygen- and nitric oxide-derived free radical production leading to protein nitration. Both chlorinating and peroxidase cycle of Myeloperoxidase (MPO contribute to oxidative and nitrosative stress and are involved in tyrosine nitration of protein. Ceruloplasmin (Cp has antioxidant function through its ferroxidase I (FeOxI activity and has recently been proposed as a physiological defense mechanism against MPO inappropriate actions. Objective. We investigated the relationship between plasma MPO-related chlorinating activity, Cp and FeOxI, and nitrosative stress, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nutritional biomarkers in HF patients. Methods and Results. In chronic HF patients (n=81, 76 ± 9 years, NYHA Class II (26; Class III (29; Class IV (26 and age-matched controls (n=17, 75 ± 11 years, CTR, plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, FeOxI, nitrated protein, free Malondialdehyde, BNP, norepinephrine, hsCRP, albumin, and prealbumin were measured. Plasma MPO chlorinating activity, Cp, BNP, norepinephrine, and hsCRP were increased in HF versus CTR. FeOxI, albumin, and prealbumin were decreased in HF. MPO-related chlorinating activity was positively related to Cp (r= 0.363, P<0.001, nitrated protein, hsCRP, and BNP and inversely to albumin. Conclusions. Plasma MPO chlorinated activity is increased in elderly chronic HF patients and positively associated with Cp, inflammatory, neurohormonal, and nitrosative parameters suggesting a role in HF progression.

  6. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  7. Partitioning and budget of inorganic and organic chlorine species observed by MIPAS-B and TELIS in the Arctic in March 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wetzel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic winter 2010/11 was characterized by a persisting vortex with extremely cold temperatures in the lower stratosphere above northern Scandinavia leading to a strong activation of chlorine compounds (ClOx like Cl, Cl2, ClO, ClOOCl, OClO, and HOCl which rapidly destroyed ozone when sunlight returned after winter solstice. MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding and TELIS (Terahertz and submillimeter Limb Sounder balloon measurements obtained in northern Sweden on 31 March 2011 inside the polar vortex have provided vertical profiles of inorganic and organic chlorine species as well as diurnal variations of ClO around sunrise over the whole altitude range in which chlorine is undergoing activation and deactivation. This flight was performed at the end of the winter during the last phase of ClOx deactivation. The complete inorganic and organic chlorine partitioning and budget in the stratosphere has been derived by combining MIPAS-B and TELIS simultaneously observed molecules. A total chlorine amount of 3.41 ± 0.30 ppbv is inferred from the measurements. This value is in line with previously carried out stratospheric observations confirming the slightly decreasing chlorine trend in the stratosphere. Observations are compared and discussed with the output of a multi-year simulation performed with the Chemistry Climate Model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry. The simulated stratospheric total chlorine amount is in accordance with the MIPAS-B/TELIS observation taking into account the fact that some chlorine source gases and very short lived species are not included in the model.

  8. Tangles of type $E_n$ and a reducibility criterion for the Cohen-Wales representation of the Artin group of type $E_6$

    CERN Document Server

    Levaillant, Claire I

    2011-01-01

    We introduce tangles of type $E_n$ and construct a representation of the Birman-Murakami-Wenzl algebra (BMW algebra) of type $E_6$. As a representation of the Artin group of type $E_6$, this representation is equivalent to the faithful Cohen-Wales representation of type $E_6$ that was used to show the linearity of the Artin group of type $E_6$. We find a reducibility criterion for this representation and complex values of the parameters for which the algebra is not semisimple.

  9. Lead grids

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    One of the 150 lead grids used in the multiwire proportional chamber g-ray detector. The 0.75 mm diameter holes are spaced 1 mm centre to centre. The grids were made by chemical cutting techniques in the Godet Workshop of the SB Physics.

  10. Leading men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Nielsen, Tønnes

    2016-01-01

    Through a systematic comparison of c. 50 careers leading to the koinarchate or high priesthood of Asia, Bithynia, Galatia, Lycia, Macedonia and coastal Pontus, as described in funeral or honorary inscriptions of individual koinarchs, it is possible to identify common denominators but also...

  11. Ultrafast measurements of chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludowise, P.D.

    1997-08-01

    Time-resolved mass spectrometry and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy are used to study the ultrafast photodissociation dynamics of chlorine dioxide, an important constituent in stratospheric ozone depletion. Chapter 1 introduces these pump/probe techniques, in which a femtosecond pump pulse excites a molecule to a dissociative state. At a later time, a second femtosecond probe pulse ionizes the molecule. The resulting mass and photoelectron spectra are acquired as a function of the delay between the pump and probe pulses, which follows the evolution of the molecule on the excited state. A comparison to other techniques used to study reaction dynamics is discussed. Chapter 2 includes a detailed description of the design and construction of the experimental apparatus, which consists of a femtosecond laser system, a molecular beam time-of-flight spectrometer, and a data acquisition system. The time-of-flight spectrometer is specifically designed to have a short flight distance to maximize the photoelectron collection efficiency without degrading the resolution, which is limited by the bandwidth of the femtosecond laser system. Typical performance of the apparatus is demonstrated in a study of the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitric oxide. The results of the time-resolved mass spectrometry experiments of chlorine dioxide are presented in Chapter 3. Upon excitation to the A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state near 3.2 eV, the molecule dissociates through an indirect two-step mechanism. The direct dissociation channel has been predicted to be open, but is not observed. A quantum beat is observed in the OClO{sup +} species, which is described as a vibrational coherence of the optically prepared A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state. Chapter 4 presents the results of the time-resolved photoelectron experiments of chlorine dioxide. At short delay time, the quantum beat of the OClO{sup +} species is observed in the X {sup 1}A{sub 1} state of the ion. At infinite delay, the signal

  12. Cisplatin sensitivity and mechanisms of anti-HPV16 E6-ribozyme on cervical carcinoma CaSKi cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiguo Rao; Jianfei Gao; Bicheng Zhang; Bo Yang; Jiren Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to study the cisplatin sensitizing effect and mechanism of anti-HPV16 E6- ribozyme on cervical carcinoma cell line.Methods: The anti-HPV16E6-ribozyme and empty eucaryotic expressing plasmids were transfected into CaSKi cell, which named as CaSKi-R, CaSKi-P respectively.E6 mRNA, the sensitivity to cisplatin, apoptosis rates, expression of p53, Bcl-2, Bax and C-myc proteins and mRNA were examined by Northern blot, MTT colorimetric assay, PI/Annexin V stained methods, flow cytometry anslysis and RT-PCR, respectively.Results: E6 mRNA was less in CaSKi-R than in CaSKi.The sensitivity of CaSKi-R cells to cisplatin was 2.28 and 2.21 times than that of CaSKi and CaSKi-P cells.The apoptotic rates in CaSKi, CaSKi-P and CaSKi-R cells was (18.9 ± 3.5)%, (19.7 ± 4.8)% and (40.4 ± 4.5)%.The apoptotic rates was increased in CaSKi-R than that of CaSKi cells treated with cisplatin (P = 0.003).Comapred with CaSKi cell, the expression of p53 (P = 0.000), Bax protein (P = 0.002) was significantly higher and the expression of Bcl-2 protein (P = 0.005), C-myc protein (P = 0.005) was significantly lower in CaSKi-R than that of CaSKi cell treated with cisplatin.Comapred with CaSKi cell, the expression of p53, Bax mRNA in CaSKi-R cell treated with cisplatin increased, while Bcl-2, C-myc mRNA decreased.Conclusion: CaSKi-R cells transfected by anti-HPVE6-ribozyme increased the sensitivity to cisplatin.The increase of sensitivity to cisplatin in CaSKi-R cells may be associated with increasing expression of p53, Bax protein, and decreasing expression of C-myc, Bcl-2 proteins.

  13. Suppression of Innate Immune Response by Primary Human Keratinocytes Expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    CCR5 , which is commonly used by HIV to gain entry into cells. Thus, HHV-8 inhibits the ability of HIV to infect cells already infected by HHV-8...can be recruited by cytokines and chemokines secreted by keratinocytes during inflammation. Macrophage inflammatory protein 3a (MIP-3a) functions as a...common 74 feature of E6 and E7 proteins from high- and low-risk HPV types 4.2.3 Transcription of MIP-3a requires NF-r.B signaling 76 4.3 Discussion

  14. Synthesis of 1,7-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)hepta-4E,6E-dien-3-one

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU,Guang-Bing; LI,Shao-Bai

    2004-01-01

    @@ Diarylheptanoids, most of which appearing in the areas of anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, super-oxide scavenging and anti-hepatotoxic effects, constitute a distinct group of metabolites of natural plants characterized by two aromatic rings linked by a linear seven aliphatic chain. We have investigated this kind of compounds and made some progress.[1]1,7-Bis(4-hydroxy-phenyl)hepta-4E,6E-dien-3-one (1) was firstly isolated from the seeds of Alpinia blepharocalyx.[2] So far the synthesis of the compound has not been reported yet. Herein, we report the synthesis of compound 1. The synthetic route is outlined in Scheme 1.

  15. Degradation of DEET and Caffeine under UV/Chlorine and Simulated Sunlight/Chlorine Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peizhe; Lee, Wan-Ning; Zhang, Ruochun; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2016-12-20

    Photoactivation of aqueous chlorine could promote degradation of chlorine-resistant and photochemically stable chemicals accumulated in swimming pools. This study investigated the degradation of two such chemicals, N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) and caffeine, by low pressure ultraviolet (UV) light and simulated sunlight (SS) activated free chlorine (FC) in different water matrices. Both DEET and caffeine were rapidly degraded by UV/FC and SS/FC but exhibited different kinetic behaviors. The degradation of DEET followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, whereas the degradation of caffeine accelerated with reaction. Mechanistic study revealed that, under UV/FC, ·OH and Cl· were responsible for degradation of DEET, whereas ClO· related reactive species (ClOrrs), generated by the reaction between FC and ·OH/Cl·, played a major role in addition to ·OH and Cl· in degrading caffeine. Reaction rate constants of DEET and caffeine with the respective radical species were estimated. The imidazole moiety of caffeine was critical for the special reactivity with ClOrrs. Water matrix such as pH had a stronger impact on the UV/FC process than the SS/FC process. In saltwater matrix under UV/FC and SS/FC, the degradation of DEET was significantly inhibited, but the degradation of caffeine was much faster than that in nonsalty solutions. The interaction between Br(-) and Cl(-) may play an important role in the degradation of caffeine by UV/FC in saltwater. Reaction product analysis showed similar product patterns by UV/FC and SS/FC and minimal formation of chlorinated intermediates and disinfection byproducts.

  16. Does Chlorination of Seawater Reverse Osmosis Membranes Control Biofouling?

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq

    2015-04-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full–scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  17. Chlorine diffusion in uranium dioxide under heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipon, Y. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1/Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4, rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France) and Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1, Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT A), 94, boulevard Niels Bohr, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)]. E-mail: pipon@ipnl.in2p3.fr; Bererd, N. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1/Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4, rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1, Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT A), 94, boulevard Niels Bohr, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1/Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4, rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Peaucelle, C. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1/Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4, rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1/Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4, rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), DEN/Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Jaffrezic, H. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1/Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4, rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Raimbault, L. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre de Geosciences, 35 rue Saint Honore, F-77305 Fontainebleau cedex (France); Sainsot, P. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon (INSA), UMR 5514, F-69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Carlot, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Centre de Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, 13108 Saint-Paul lez Durance (France)

    2007-04-15

    The radiation enhanced diffusion of chlorine in UO{sub 2} during heavy ion irradiation is studied. In order to simulate the behaviour of {sup 36}Cl, present as an impurity in UO{sub 2}, {sup 37}Cl has been implanted into the samples (projected range 200 nm). The samples were then irradiated with 63.5 MeV {sup 127}I at two fluxes and two temperatures and the chlorine distribution was analyzed by SIMS. The results show that, during irradiation, the diffusion of the implanted chlorine is enhanced and slightly athermal with respect to pure thermal diffusion. A chlorine gain of 10% accumulating near the surface has been observed at 510 K. This corresponds to the displacement of pristine chlorine from a region of maximum defect concentration. This behaviour and the mean value of the apparent diffusion coefficient found for the implanted chlorine, around 2.5 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, reflect the high mobility of chlorine in UO{sub 2} during irradiation with fission products.

  18. Chlorine diffusion in uranium dioxide under heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Peaucelle, C.; Toulhoat, N.; Jaffrézic, H.; Raimbault, L.; Sainsot, P.; Carlot, G.

    2007-04-01

    The radiation enhanced diffusion of chlorine in UO2 during heavy ion irradiation is studied. In order to simulate the behaviour of 36Cl, present as an impurity in UO2, 37Cl has been implanted into the samples (projected range 200 nm). The samples were then irradiated with 63.5 MeV 127I at two fluxes and two temperatures and the chlorine distribution was analyzed by SIMS. The results show that, during irradiation, the diffusion of the implanted chlorine is enhanced and slightly athermal with respect to pure thermal diffusion. A chlorine gain of 10% accumulating near the surface has been observed at 510 K. This corresponds to the displacement of pristine chlorine from a region of maximum defect concentration. This behaviour and the mean value of the apparent diffusion coefficient found for the implanted chlorine, around 2.5 × 10-14 cm2 s-1, reflect the high mobility of chlorine in UO2 during irradiation with fission products.

  19. Does chlorination of seawater reverse osmosis membranes control biofouling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Hong, Pei-Ying; Nada, Nabil; Croue, Jean Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Biofouling is the major problem of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes used for desalting seawater (SW). The use of chlorine is a conventional and common practice to control/prevent biofouling. Unlike polyamide RO membranes, cellulose triacetate (CTA) RO membranes display a high chlorine tolerance. Due to this characteristic, CTA membranes are used in most of the RO plants located in the Middle East region where the elevated seawater temperature and water quality promote the risk of membrane biofouling. However, there is no detailed study on the investigation/characterization of CTA-RO membrane fouling. In this investigation, the fouling profile of a full-scale SWRO desalination plant operating with not only continuous chlorination of raw seawater but also intermittent chlorination of CTA-RO membranes was studied. Detailed water quality and membrane fouling analyses were conducted. Profiles of microbiological, inorganic, and organic constituents of analysed fouling layers were extensively discussed. Our results clearly identified biofilm development on these membranes. The incapability of chlorination on preventing biofilm formation on SWRO membranes could be assigned to its failure in effectively reaching throughout the different regions of the permeators. This failure could have occurred due to three main factors: plugging of membrane fibers, chlorine consumption by organics accumulated on the front side fibers, or chlorine adaptation of certain bacterial populations.

  20. Removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti and mutagenicity with chlorine dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Jin-long; CUI Fu-yi; QU Bo; ZHU Gui-bing

    2006-01-01

    Mesocyclops leukarti of zooplankton propagates excessively in eutrophic water body and it cannot be effectively inactivated by the conventional drinking water treatment process. In order to tackle this problem, a study of removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti with chlorine dioxide in a waterworks was performed. The results showed that Mesocyclops leukarti could be effectively removed from water by 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide preoxidation combined with the conventional drinking water treatment process.Higher oxidizability and molecular state of chlorine dioxide in water is the key to the inactivation of Mesocyclops leukarti. The chlorite, disinfection by-products (DBPs) of chlorine dioxide, was stable at 0.45 mg/L, which is lower than that critical value of the USEPA. GC-MS examination showed that the quantity of organic substance in the water treated by chlorine dioxide obviously decreased. Ames test further revealed that the mutagenicity was reduced by chlorine dioxide with respect to prechlorine. The propagation ofMesocyclops leukarti can be inactivated effectively and safely by chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation.

  1. Roles of reactive chlorine species in trimethoprim degradation in the UV/chlorine process: Kinetics and transformation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zihao; Fang, Jingyun; Xiang, Yingying; Shang, Chii; Li, Xuchun; Meng, Fangang; Yang, Xin

    2016-11-01

    The UV/chlorine process, which forms several reactive species including hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) to degrade contaminants, is being considered to be an advanced oxidation process. This study investigated the kinetics and mechanism of the degradation of trimethoprim (TMP) by the UV/chlorine process. The degradation of TMP was much faster by UV/chlorine compared to UV/H2O2. The degradation followed pseudo first-order kinetics, and the rate constant (k') increased linearly as the chlorine dosage increased from 20 μM to 200 μM and decreased as pH rose from 6.1 to 8.8. k' was not affected by chloride and bicarbonate but decreased by 50% in the presence of 1-mg/L NOM. The contribution of RCS, including Cl, Cl2(-) and ClO, to the degradation removal rate was much higher than that of HO and increased from 67% to 87% with increasing pH from 6.1 to 8.8 under the experimental condition. The increasing contribution of RCS to the degradation with increasing pH was attributable to the increase in the ClO concentration. Kinetic modeling and radical scavenging tests verified that ClO mainly attacked the trimethoxybenzyl moiety of TMP. RCS reacted with TMP much faster than HOCl/OCl(-) to form chlorinated products (i.e., m/z 325) and chlorinated disinfection byproducts such as chloroform, chloral hydrate, dichloroacetonitrile and trichloronitromethane. The hydroxylation and demethylation of m/z 325 driven by HO generated m/z 327 and m/z 341. Meanwhile, reactions of m/z 325 with HO and RCS/HOCl/OCl(-) generated dichlorinated and hydroxylated products (i.e., m/z 377). All the chlorinated products could be further depleted to produce products with less degree of halogenation in the UV/chlorine process, compared to dark chlorination. The acute toxicity to Vibrio fischeri by UV/chlorine was lower than chlorination at the same removal rate of TMP. This study demonstrated the importance of RCS, in particular, ClO, in the degradation of micropollutants

  2. Simulating stable carbon and chlorine isotope ratios in dissolved chlorinated groundwater pollutants with BIOCHLOR-ISO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    BIOCHLOR is a well-known simple tool for evaluating the transport of dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater, ideal for rapid screening and teaching. This work extends the BIOCHLOR model for the calculation of stable isotope ratios of carbon and chlorine isotopes in chloroethenes. An exact solution for the three-dimensional reactive transport of a chain of degrading compounds including sorption is provided in a spreadsheet and applied for modeling the transport of individual isotopes 12C, 13C, 35Cl, 37Cl from a constant source. The model can consider secondary isotope effects that can occur in the breaking of Csbnd Cl bonds. The model is correctly reproducing results for δ13C and δ37Cl modeled by a previously published 1-D numerical model without secondary isotope effects, and is also reproducing results from a microcosm experiment with secondary chlorine isotope effects. Two applications of the model using field data from literature are further given and discussed. The new BIOCHLOR-ISO model is distributed as a spreadsheet (MS EXCEL) along with this publication.

  3. Characterization of Chlorinated Ethene Degradation in a Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    pathway for chlorinated volatiles in phytoremediation applications. Although transpiration of chlorinated solvents has been confirmed in studies ... case study publications and conference presentations providing support for the use of constructed wetlands for the treatment of chlorinated solvent...groundwater. This study characterized and evaluated the concentration of chlorinated ethenes within a vertical flow constructed wetland, fed with PCE

  4. Safety of water treatment by chlorine dioxide oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons commonly found in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taymaz, K.; Williams, D.T.; Benoit, F.M.

    1979-01-01

    The safety of water treatment by chlorine dioxide oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons commonly found in water and industrial wastewaters in the US was studied by observing the reactions of naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes in essentially chlorine-free, aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions. Naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes yielded chlorinated derivatives and oxidation products. Further research is recommended.

  5. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems.

  6. Aqueous reactions of chlorine dioxide with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rav-Acha, C.; Choshen, E.

    1987-11-01

    In contrast to mechanisms proposed earlier in the literature, according to which chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) reacts with various hydrocarbons in aqueous media by abstracting allylic or benzylic hydrogens, it is shown that ClO/sub 2/ reacts with olefins through initial electron transfer. Hydrocarbons that can undergo facile oxidation, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some olefins, react with ClO/sub 2/ quite rapidly, while saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, some aromatic hydrocarbons, and olefins substituted with electron-withdrawing groups remain unreactive. This was substantiated by comparing the reactivities toward ClO/sub 2/ of a variety of hydrocarbons, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, saturated and unsaturated acids, PAH, or cyclic and acyclic olefins. The results were supported by a detailed kinetic and product study of the reaction between ClO/sub 2/ and some model compounds.

  7. Effects of continuous chlorination on entrained estuarine plankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, S.J.; Foulk, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    Technical report: The effects of continuous chlorination in running sea water on entrained plankton were examined. The concentration of ATP was used as an indicator of biomass because: it is present in all living cells; the concentration is proportional to the living biomass; and dead cells lose ATP rapidly. Effects were measured by bioluminescence; luciferin-luciferase reagents from firefly lanterns were used to analyze ATP concentration. Results indicate that ATP measurement is an accurate, effective means of evaluating damage done to planktonic organisms by continuous chlorination. Further studies of the effects of low-concentration, continuous chlorination are recommended. (13 references, 1 table)

  8. Chlorine Dioxide Gas Treatment of Cantaloupe and Residue Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Simran

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a selective oxidant and powerful antimicrobial agent. Previous work has shown that treatment of cantaloupe with chlorine dioxide gas at 5 mg/L for 10 minutes results in a 4.6 and 4.3 log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes respectively. A significant reduction (p Current analytical methods for chlorine dioxide and chloroxyanions are only applicable to aqueous samples. Some of these methods have been used to determine surface residues in treated products by...

  9. Optimization of supercoiled HPV-16 E6/E7 plasmid DNA purification with arginine monolith using design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, A M; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F; Sousa, A

    2015-01-26

    The progress of DNA vaccines is dependent on the development of suitable chromatographic procedures to successfully purify genetic vectors, such as plasmid DNA. Human Papillomavirus is associated with the development of tumours due to the oncogenic power of E6 and E7 proteins, produced by this virus. The supercoiled HPV-16 E6/E7 plasmid-based vaccine was recently purified with the arginine monolith, with 100% of purity, but only 39% of recovery was achieved. Therefore, the present study describes the application of experimental design tools, a newly explored methodology in preparative chromatography, in order to improve the supercoiled plasmid DNA recovery with the arginine monolith, maintaining the high purity degree. In addition, the importance and influence of pH in the pDNA retention to the arginine ligand was also demonstrated. The Composite Central Face design was validated and the recovery of the target molecule was successfully improved from 39% to 83.5%, with an outstanding increase of more than double, while maintaining 100% of purity.

  10. Diphoton Excess at 750 GeV in leptophobic U(1)$^\\prime$ model inspired by $E_6$ GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, P; Yu, Chaehyun

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the 750 GeV diphoton excess at the LHC@13TeV in the framework of leptophobic U(1)$^\\prime$ model inspired by the $E_6$ grand unified theory (GUT). In this model, the Standard Model (SM) chiral fermions carry charges under extra U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge symmetry which is spontaneously broken by a U(1)$^\\prime$-charged singlet scalar ($\\Phi$). In addition, extra quarks and leptons are introduced to achieve the anomaly-free conditions, which is a natural consequence of the assumed $E_6$ GUT. These new fermions are vectorlike under the SM gauge group but chiral under new U(1)$^\\prime$, and their masses come entirely from the nonzero vacuum expectation value of $\\Phi$ through the Yukawa interactions. Then, the CP-even scalar $h_\\Phi$ from $\\Phi$ can be produced at the LHC by the gluon fusion and decay to the diphoton via the one-loop diagram involving the extra quarks and leptons, and can be identified as the origin of diphoton excess at 750 GeV. In this model, $h_\\Phi$ can decay into a pair of dark matter p...

  11. Higgs and Dark Matter Physics in the Type-II Two-Higgs-Doublet Model inspired by E_6 GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, P; Yu, Chaehyun

    2015-01-01

    We study Higgs and dark matter physics in the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) with an extra U(1)_H gauge symmetry, inspired by the E_6 grand unified theory (GUT). From the viewpoint of the bottom-up approach, the additional U(1)_H gauge symmetry plays a crucial role in avoiding the tree-level flavor changing neutral currents mediated by neutral Higgs bosons in general 2HDMs. In the model with U(1)_H gauge symmetry, which has Type-II Yukawa couplings, we have to introduce additional chiral fermions that are charged under the U(1)_H gauge symmetry as well as under the Standard-Model (SM) gauge symmetry in order to cancel chiral gauge anomalies. For the U(1)_H charge assignment and the extra matters, we adopt the ones inspired by the E_6 GUT: the extra quark-like and lepton-like fermions with the non-trivial U(1)_H charges. We discuss their contributions to the physical observables, such as the measurements of Higgs physics and electro-weak interactions, and investigate the consistency with the experiment...

  12. Identification of human papillomavirus-16 E6 variation in cervical cancer and their impact on T and B cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop; Hussain, Showket; Yadav, Inderjit Singh; Gissmann, Lutz; Natarajan, K; Das, Bhudev C; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2015-06-15

    The infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is the most important risk factor for development of cervical cancer. The intra-type variations of HPV have different biological and pathological consequences with respect to disease progression. In the present study, six major Indian variants were experimentally identified in E6 gene of HPV-16 and showed their impact on immunogenicity by in silico methods. Four different phylogenetic lineages were observed in sequences including European (E) prototype, European variant, Asian and American Asian variant classes and complete absence of African phylogenetic lineages. On the prediction of B- and T-cell epitopes, 18 and 23 potent epitopes for MHC-II alleles, 10 potent MHC-I and 15 B-cell epitopes in each reference and variant sequence were identified. Interestingly, the presence of variation H78Y and L83V result in creation of four new epitopes for the HLA-DQA1*0101/DQB1*0501. Out of 15 B-cell predicted epitopes, three most potent epitopes were identified in both reference and variant sequence. Notably the amino acid stretch from amino acid 16-60 and 76-94 are very important for the immunological properties of E6 protein because these regions contain majority of the predicted epitopes. In future, this could control the cervical cancer by targeting these amino acid stretches for the development of HPV-16 vaccine.

  13. Diphoton signature of neutral pseudo-Goldstone boson in the E6CHM at the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nevzorov, R

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of the SU(6) global symmetry to its SU(5) subgroup, that contains the standard model (SM) gauge group, in the $E_6$ inspired composite Higgs model (E$_6$CHM) results in a set of pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons (pNGBs). This set, in particular, involves the SM--like Higgs doublet and a SM singlet boson. In the limit when CP is conserved the SM singlet scalar A is a CP-odd state that does not mix with the SM-like Higgs. The interactions of A with exotic matter beyond the SM, which ensures anomaly cancellation and approximate gauge coupling unification, can induce couplings of this pseudoscalar to the SM gauge bosons. As a consequence, we argue that the SM singlet pNGB state can be identified with the 750 GeV diphoton resonance recently reported by the LHC experiments. Such an interpretation requires that either all or some of the exotic states have masses below 1 TeV. We specify the interactions of the SM singlet pNGB state with the exotic vector-like fermions, top quark and SM gauge bosons as well ...

  14. Regulation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway by Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7 Oncoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Omar Muñoz Bello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell signaling pathways are the mechanisms by which cells transduce external stimuli, which control the transcription of genes, to regulate diverse biological effects. In cancer, distinct signaling pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, have been implicated in the deregulation of critical molecular processes that affect cell proliferation and differentiation. For example, changes in β-catenin localization have been identified in Human Papillomavirus (HPV-related cancers as the lesion progresses. Specifically, β-catenin relocates from the membrane/cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggesting that this transcription regulator participates in cervical carcinogenesis. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins are responsible for the transforming activity of HPV, and some studies have implicated these viral oncoproteins in the regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Nevertheless, new interactions of HPV oncoproteins with cellular proteins are emerging, and the study of the biological effects of such interactions will help to understand HPV-related carcinogenesis. Viruses 2015, 7 4735 This review addresses the accumulated evidence of the involvement of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  15. Impact of vegetation and ecosystems on chlorine(-36) cycling and its modeling: from simplified approaches towards more complex biogeochemical tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Yves; Redon, Paul-Olivier; Gustafsson, Malin; Marang, Laura; Bastviken, David

    2013-04-01

    Chlorine is very soluble at a global scale with chloride (Cl-), the dominating form. Because of its high mobility, chlorine is usually perceived as a good conservative tracer in hydrological studies and by analogy as little reactive in biosphere. Since 36Cl can be considered to have the same behaviour than stable Cl, a good knowledge of chlorine distribution between compartments of terrestrial ecosystems is sufficient to calibrate a specific activity model which supposes rapid dilution of 36Cl within the large pool of stable Cl and isotopic equilibrium between compartments. By assuming 36Cl redistribution similar to that of stable Cl at steady-state, specific activity models are simplified interesting tools for regulatory purposes in environmental safety assessment, especially in case of potential long term chronic contamination of agricultural food chain (IAEA, 2010). In many other more complex scenarios (accidental acute release, intermediate time frame, and contrasted natural ecosystems), new information and tools are necessary for improving (radio-)ecological realism, which entails a non-conservative behavior of chlorine. Indeed observed dynamics of chlorine in terrestrial ecosystems is far from a simple equilibrium notably because of natural processes of organic matter (SOM) chlorination mainly occurring in surface soils (Öberg, 1998) and mediated by microbial activities on a large extent (Bastviken et al. 2007). Our recent studies have strengthened the view that an organic cycle for chlorine should now be recognized, in addition to its inorganic cycle. Major results showed that: organochlorine (Clorg) formation occurs in all type of soils and ecosystems (culture, pasture, forest), leading to an average fraction of the total Cl pool in soil of about 80 % (Redon et al., 2012), chlorination in more organic soils over time leads to a larger Clorg pool and in turn to a possible high internal supply of inorganic chlorine (Clin) upon dechlorination. (Gustafsson et

  16. Chlorine-36 and chlorine concentrations within several compartments of a deciduous forest ecosystem in Meuse/Haute-Marne (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupier, Julie; Benedetti, Lucilla; Bourles, Didier; Leclerc, Elisabeth; Thiry, Yves

    2013-04-01

    Chlorine-36 is a cosmogenic nuclide mainly produced in the atmosphere by interactions between energetic particles originating from the cosmic radiations and 40Ar. Because of its long half-life (T1-2 = 3.01 105 yr) and its high mobility, chlorine-36 is a critical radionuclide concerning radioactive waste repository sites. Moreover, it has been shown that inorganic chlorine could be enriched along the trophic chain due to its high solubility and bioavailability (Ashworth and Shaw, 2006). Additionally, many studies during the last decades have established that due to chlorination process, organic chlorine may account for a large proportion of the total soil chlorine pool (more than 80 % in surface soils of temperate ecosystems. Redon et al., 2012). The aim of this study is thus to measure chlorine-36 in all the compartments of the biogeochemical cycle, to better understand its recycling in the biosphere. The study site is the experimental beech forest site of the Andra long-term monitoring and testing system (OPE*). It is located at Montiers-sur-Saulx, North-East of France and is associated to the future radioactive waste repository site of Bure. Since March 2012, rainwater above (rainfall collected from a 45 m high tower built on purpose) and below (throughfall and stemflow) the canopy, has been collected monthly, as well as soil solutions (gravitational and bound waters) at four depths (0, 10, 30, 60 cm deep). Chlorine-36 and chlorine have been measured in the rainfall samples between March and July 2012 and in water solutions collected from all compartments of the biosphere using isotope dilution mass spectrometry at the french AMS national facility ASTER located at CEREGE. The results yielded from the rainfall samples allow to study the temporal fluctuations of chlorine-36 in the atmosphere, which represents the main inflow of chlorine-36 in its biogeochemical cycle. The first results indicate a flow increase during the late spring-early summer. Santos et al

  17. Core-level excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, R.; Plenge, J.; Rühl, E.

    2006-03-01

    Inner-shell excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide (OClO) in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-excitation regime is reported. The electronic structure of the element-selectively excited radical is studied by X-ray absorption and total cation yields. A comparison of both approaches allows us to estimate the absolute photoionization cross-section and the ionization yield near the Cl 2p- and O 1s-absorption edges. The latter quantity is characteristically enhanced in core-ionization continua. We observe below both core-absorption edges intense core-to-valence-transitions. These are assigned in comparison with related work on core-excited sulfur dioxide. These results give clear evidence that the highest molecular orbital of OClO is half-filled. High-resolution spectra recorded in the Cl 2p-regime show evidence for Rydberg transitions. The extrapolation of the term values of the low-lying Rydberg states allows us to derive the Cl 2p-ionization energy of OClO. Fragmentation of core-excited OClO is reported. Photoelectron-photoion-coincidence (PEPICO) spectra are recorded, indicating that singly and doubly charged fragments are formed. Fission of the doubly and multiply charged OClO leads to singly charged fragments. These are measured by photoion-photoion-coincidence (PIPICO) spectra, where characteristic changes in intensity of the fission channels in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-continuum are observed.

  18. Selective determination of chlorine dioxide using gas diffusion flow injection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollowell, D.A.; Pacey, G.E.; Gordon, G.

    1985-12-01

    An automated absorbance technique for the determination of aqueous chlorine dioxide has been developed by utilizing gas diffusion flow injection analysis. A gas diffusion membrane is used to separate the donor (sampling) stream from the acceptor (detecting) stream. The absorbance of chlorine dioxide is monitored at 359 nm. The first method uses distilled water as the acceptor stream and gives a detection limit of 0.25 mg/L chlorine dioxide. This system is over 550 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than chlorine. To further minimize chlorine interference, oxalic acid is used in the acceptor stream. The detection limit for this system is 0.45 mg/L chlorine dioxide. This second system is over 5400 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than chlorine. Both methods show excellent selectivity for chlorine dioxide over iron and manganese compounds, as well as other oxychlorinated compounds such as chlorite and perchlorate ions. 18 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  19. RESEARCH ON MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF RESIDUAL CHLORINE DECAY AND OPTIMIZATION OF CHLORINATION ALLOCATION OF URBAN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yi-mei; CHI Hai-yan; LI Hong; SHAN Jin-lin; ZHAI Chun-nian

    2005-01-01

    The concentration of Residual Chlorine (RC) frequently violates the standard in situations of urban water distribution system with large water supply area and long time of distribution.If chlorine dosage increases within water treatment plant, although RC in distribution system could meet water quality standard, Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) such as hydrocarbon halide rises.In the paper, a mathematical model of chlorine allocation optimization was presented based on reaction kinetics mechanism and optimization theory to solve the problem.The model includes the objective function of minimizing annual operation cost and constraints of RC standard and rational chlorination station distribution, and solving by 0-1 Integer Programming (IP).The model had been applied to a real water distribution system.The simulation results of the model showed that adding chlorine in water distribution system remarkably improved water quality and reduced the operation cost by 49.3% per year less than chlorine dosed only in water treatment plant to meet RC standard.The results prove adding chlorine in water distribution system based on the model can bring both technological and economic advancement.

  20. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels; Kloorattujen orgaanisten yhdisteiden muodostuminen kierraetyspolttoaineiden leijukerrospoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  1. Human Papillomavirus E6/E7-Specific siRNA Potentiates the Effect of Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hun Soon; Rajasekaran, Nirmal; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Young Deug; Hong, Sungyoul; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Young Seok; Choi, Jong-Sun; Choi, Yoon-La; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-05-29

    The functional inactivation of TP53 and Rb tumor suppressor proteins by the HPV-derived E6 and E7 oncoproteins is likely an important step in cervical carcinogenesis. We have previously shown siRNA technology to selectively silence both E6/E7 oncogenes and demonstrated that the synthetic siRNAs could specifically block its expression in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. Herein, we investigated the potentiality of E6/E7 siRNA candidates as radiosensitizers of radiotherapy for the human cervical carcinomas. HeLa and SiHa cells were transfected with HPV E6/E7 siRNA; the combined cytotoxic effect of E6/E7 siRNA and radiation was assessed by using the cell viability assay, flow cytometric analysis and the senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) assay. In addition, we also investigated the effect of combined therapy with irradiation and E6/E7 siRNA intravenous injection in an in vivo xenograft model. Combination therapy with siRNA and irradiation efficiently retarded tumor growth in established tumors of human cervical cancer cell xenografted mice. In addition, the chemically-modified HPV16 and 18 E6/E7 pooled siRNA in combination with irradiation strongly inhibited the growth of cervical cancer cells. Our results indicated that simultaneous inhibition of HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression with radiotherapy can promote potent antitumor activity and radiosensitizing activity in human cervical carcinomas.

  2. Genetic immunization against cervical carcinoma : induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity with a recombinant alphavirus vector expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; Pries, F; Bungener, L; Kraak, M; Regts, J; Wilschut, J

    2000-01-01

    infection of genital epithelial cells with human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 is closely associated with the development of cervical carcinoma. The transforming potential of these high-risk HPVs depends on the expression of the E6 and E7 early viral gene products. Since the expression of E6

  3. The HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein is expressed mainly from the unspliced E6/E7 transcript in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; López-Urrutia, Eduardo; Bonilla-Moreno, Raúl; Martínez-Salazar, Martha; Arechaga-Ocampo, Elena; Berumen, Jaime; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás

    2010-12-01

    The HPV-16 E6/E7 early transcripts are first produced as bicistronic or polycistronic mRNAs, and about 90% of the original pre-mRNA is spliced to produce three new alternative mRNAs. HPV-16 spliced transcripts are expressed heterogeneously in tumors and cell lines. Our results suggest that suboptimal splicing acceptor sites in E6/E7 intron 1 and the differential expression of splicing factors are involved in the production of the heterogeneous splicing profile in cell lines. The unspliced pre-mRNA and the alternative spliced transcripts contribute differentially to the production of E7 in stably transfected C33-A cells. The highest level of E7 was produced from the least prevalent transcript, the unspliced E6/E7(pre-mRNA). The order of relative expression of E7 was unspliced E6/E7(pre-mRNA) > E6*I/E7 > E6*II/E7. Our findings suggest that E6/E7 alternative splicing may be a mechanism for differential expression of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which also affects the expression of their targets, the proteins p53 and pRb.

  4. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to escape from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Juri; Shim, Joo Hee; Tiwari, Indira; Jang, Kyung Lib

    2016-09-28

    The E6-associated protein (E6AP) is a ubiquitin ligase that mediates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Given the role of HCV core protein as a major component of the viral nucleocapsid, as well as a multifunctional protein involved in viral pathogenesis and hepatocarcinogenesis, HCV has likely evolved a strategy to counteract the host anti-viral defense mechanism of E6AP and maximize its potential to produce infectious virus particles. In the present study, we found that HCV core protein derived from either ectopic expression or HCV infection inhibits E6AP expression via promoter hypermethylation in human hepatocytes. As a result, the potential of E6AP to ubiquitinate and degrade HCV core protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome system was severely impaired, which in turn led to stimulation of virus propagation. The effects of HCV core protein were almost completely abolished when the E6AP level was restored by ectopic expression of E6AP, treatment with a universal DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, 5-Aza-2'dC, or knock-down of DNMT1. In conclusion, HCV core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to protect itself from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulate virus propagation, providing a potential target for the development of anti-viral drugs against HCV.

  5. A Nanoarchitecture Based on Silver and Copper Oxide with an Exceptional Response in the Chlorine-Promoted Epoxidation of Ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Adrian; Hueso, Jose L; Suarez, Hugo; Mallada, Reyes; Ibarra, Alfonso; Irusta, Silvia; Santamaria, Jesus

    2016-09-05

    The selective oxidation of ethylene to ethylene epoxide is highly challenging as a result of competing reaction pathways leading to the deep oxidation of both ethylene and ethylene oxide. Herein we present a novel catalyst based on silver and copper oxide with an excellent response in the selective oxidation pathway towards ethylene epoxide. The catalyst is composed of different silver nanostructures dispersed on a tubular copper oxide matrix. This type of hybrid nanoarchitecture seems to facilitate the accommodation of chlorine promoters, leading to high yields at low reaction temperatures. The stability after the addition of chlorine promoters implies a substantial improvement over the industrial practice: a single pretreatment step at ambient pressure suffices in contrast with the common practice of continuously feeding organochlorinated precursors during the reaction.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis and predicted functional effect of protein mutations of E6 and E7 HPV16 strains isolated in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Wulandari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: E6 and E7 are oncoproteins of HPV16. Natural amino acid variation in HPV16 E6 can alter its carcinogenic potential. The aim of this study was to analyze phylogenetically E6 and E7 genes and proteins of HPV16 from Indonesia and predict the effects of single amino acid substitution on protein function. This analysis could be used to reduce time, effort, and research cost as initial screening in selection of protein or isolates to be tested in vitro or in vivo.Methods: In this study, E6 and E7 gene sequences were obtained from 12 samples of  Indonesian isolates, which  were compared with HPV16R (prototype and 6 standard isolates in the category of European (E, Asian (As, Asian-American (AA, African-1 (Af-1, African-2 (Af-2, and North American (NA branch from Genbank. Bioedit v.7.0.0 was used to analyze the composition and substitution of single amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of E6 and E7 genes and proteins was performed using Clustal X (1.81 and NJPLOT softwares. Effects of single amino acid substitutions on protein function of E6 and E7 were analysed by SNAP.Results: Java variants and isolate ui66* belonged to European branch, while the others belonged to Asian and African branches. Twelve changes of amino acids were found in E6 and one in E7 proteins. SNAP analysis showed two non neutral mutations, i.e. R10I and C63G in E6 proteins. R10I mutations were found in Af-2 genotype (AF472509 and Indonesian isolates (Af2*, while C63G mutation was found only in Af2*.Conclusion: E6 proteins of HPV16 variants were more variable than E7. SNAP analysis showed that only E6 protein of African-2 branch had functional differences compared to HPV16R.

  7. Complete Non-Radioactive Operability Tests for Cladding Hull Chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Jared A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylton, Tom D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brunson, Ronald Ray [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunt, Rodney Dale [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bradley, Eric Craig [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Non-radioactive operability tests were made to test the metal chlorination reactor and condenser and their accessories using batch chlorinations of non-radioactive cladding samples and to identify optimum operating practices and components that need further modifications prior to installation of the equipment into the hot cell for tests on actual used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding. The operability tests included (1) modifications to provide the desired heating and reactor temperature profile; and (2) three batch chlorination tests using, respectively, 100, 250, and 500 g of cladding. During the batch chlorinations, metal corrosion of the equipment was assessed, pressurization of the gas inlet was examined and the best method for maintaining solid salt product transfer through the condenser was determined. Also, additional accessing equipment for collection of residual ash and positioning of the unit within the hot cell were identified, designed, and are being fabricated.

  8. Modeling of residual chlorine in water distribution system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Water quality within water distribution system may vary with both location and time. Water quality models are used to predict the spatial and temporal variation of water quality throughout water system. A model of residual chlorine decay in water pipe has been developed,given the consumption of chlorine in reactions with chemicals in bulk water, bio-films on pipe wall, in corrosion process, and the mass transport of chlorine from bulk water to pipe wall. Analytical methods of the flow path from water sources to the observed point and the water age of every observed node were proposed. Model is used to predict the decay of residual chlorine in an actual distribution system. Good agreement between calculated and measured values was obtained.

  9. Characters of chlorine isotopic composition in ocean water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Xiao, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, W.G.; Hong, A.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Y.; Wei, H.; Shirodkar, P.V.

    The chlorine isotopic composition of ocean water was determined using thermal ionization mass spectrometry based on the measurement of Cs sub(2) Cl sup(+) ion. The results show that the sup(37) Cl/ sup(35) Cl ratios are basically homogeneous...

  10. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  11. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfectant byproducts (DNPS) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low-resolu...

  12. Kinetics of Chlorine Decay in Water Distribution Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建华; 薛罡; 赵洪宾; 汪永辉; 郭美芳

    2004-01-01

    A combined first and second-order model, which includes bulk decay and wall decay, was developed to describe chlorine decay in water distribution systems. In the model the bulk decay has complex relationships with total organic carbon (TOC), the initial chlorine concentration and the temperature. Except for the initial stages they can be simplified into a linear increase with TOC, a linear decrease with initial chlorine concentration and an exponential relationship with the temperature. The model also explains why chlorine decays rapidly in the initial stages. The parameters of model are determined by deriving the best fitness with experimental data. And the accuracy of model has been verified by using the experimental data and the monitoring data in a distribution system.

  13. Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, Z.

    2015-01-01

      Subjects: bioremediation; biodegradation; environmental biotechnology, subsurface and groundwater contamination; biological processes; geochemistry; microbiology The combination of enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and aquife

  14. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  15. Breathing spiral waves in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenstein, Igal; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.; Yang, Lingfa; Dolnik, Milos; Zhabotinsky, Anatol M.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2008-08-01

    Breathing spiral waves are observed in the oscillatory chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system. The breathing develops within established patterns of multiple spiral waves after the concentration of polyvinyl alcohol in the feeding chamber of a continuously fed, unstirred reactor is increased. The breathing period is determined by the period of bulk oscillations in the feeding chamber. Similar behavior is obtained in the Lengyel-Epstein model of this system, where small amplitude parametric forcing of spiral waves near the spiral wave frequency leads to the formation of breathing spiral waves in which the period of breathing is equal to the period of forcing.

  16. Fate of free chlorine in drinking water during distribution in premise plumbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Muzi; He, Chunguang; He, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Free chlorine is a potent oxidizing agent and has been used extensively as a disinfectant in processes including water treatment. The presence of free chlorine residual is essential for the prevention of microbial regrowth in water distribution systems. However, excessive levels of free chlorine can cause adverse health effects. It is a major challenge to maintain appropriate levels of free chlorine residual in premise plumbing. As the first effort to assessing the fate of chlorine in premise plumbing using actual premise plumbing pipe sections, three piping materials frequently used in premise plumbing, i.e. copper, galvanized iron, and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), were investigated for their performance in maintaining free chlorine residual. Free chlorine decay was shown to follow first-order kinetics for all three pipe materials tested. The most rapid chlorine decay was observed in copper pipes, suggesting the need for higher chlorine dosage to maintain appropriate levels of free chlorine residual if copper piping is used. PVC pipes exhibited the least reactivity with free chlorine, indicative of the advantage of PVC as a premise plumbing material for maintaining free chlorine residual. The reactivity of copper piping with free chlorine was significantly hindered by the accumulation of pipe deposits. In contrast, the impact on chlorine decay by pipe deposits was not significant in galvanized iron and PVC pipes. Findings in this study are of great importance for the development of effective strategies for the control of free chlorine residual and prevention of microbiological contamination in premise plumbing.

  17. Silver-Catalyzed C(sp(3))-H Chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Jun; Kanai, Motomu

    2017-03-17

    A silver-catalyzed chlorination of benzylic, tertiary, and secondary C(sp(3))-H bonds was developed. The reaction proceeded with as low as 0.2 mol % catalyst loading at room temperature under air atmosphere with synthetically useful functional group compatibility. The regioselectivity and reactivity tendencies suggest that the chlorination proceeded through a radical pathway, but an intermediate alkylsilver species cannot be ruled out.

  18. Bromoform production in tropical open-ocean waters: OTEC chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, E.O.; Valentine, R.

    1981-09-01

    The bromoform, and other volatile organics produced while chlorinating both the evaporator and condenser seawater during operation of the one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC-1 test facility are reported. Although many halogenated compounds might be produced as a result of chlorination, the quantitative analyses in this study focused on volatile EPA priority pollutants. Bromoform is the compound specifically recognized as a potential pollutant. Its concentration may be indicative of other halogenated species.

  19. Assessment of the risk of transporting liquid chlorine by rail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, W.B.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the risk of shipping liquid chlorine by rail. While chlorine is not an energy material, there are several benefits to studying chlorine transportation risks. First, chlorine, like energy materials, is widely used as a feedstock to industry. Second, it is the major purification agent in municipal water treatment systems and therefore, provides direct benefits to the public. Finally, other risk assessments have been completed for liquid chlorine shipments in the US and Europe, which provide a basis for comparison with this study. None of the previous PNL energy material risk assessments have had other studies for comparison. For these reasons, it was felt that a risk assessment of chlorine transportation by rail could provide information on chlorine risk levels, identify ways to reduce these risks and use previous studies on chlorine risks to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the PNL risk assessment methodology. The risk assessment methodology used in this study is summarized. The methodology is presented in the form of a risk assessment model which is constructed for ease of periodic updating of the data base so that the risk may be reevaluated as additional data become available. The report is sectioned to correspond to specific analysis steps identified in the model. The transport system and accident environment are described. The response of the transport system to accident environments is described. Release sequences are postulated and evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a direct comparison with other reports in this series.

  20. Reconciling BICEP2 and Planck results with right-handed Dirac neutrinos in the fundamental representation of grand unified E6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Vlcek, Brian J.

    2014-06-01

    The tensor-to-scalar ratio (r = 0.20+0.07-0.05) inferred from the excess B-mode power observed by the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP2) experiment is almost twice as large as the 95% CL upper limits derived from temperature measurements of the WMAP (r grand unification scale, in this paper we investigate whether we can accommodate the required Neff with three right-handed (partners of the left-handed standard model) neutrinos living in the fundamental representation of a grand unified exceptional E6 group. We show that the superweak interactions of these Dirac states (through their coupling to a TeV-scale Z' gauge boson) lead to decoupling of right-handed neutrino just above the QCD cross over transition: 175 MeVlesssimTνRdeclesssim250 MeV. For decoupling in this transition region, the contribution of the three right-handed neutrinos to Neff is suppressed by heating of the left-handed neutrinos (and photons). Consistency (within 1σ) with the favored Neff is achieved for 4.5 TeV < MZ' < 7.5 TeV. The model is fully predictive and can be confronted with future data from LHC14.

  1. Synthesis, spectral, thermal, optical and theoretical studies of (2E,6E)-2-benzylidene-6-(4-methoxybenzylidene)cyclohexanone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenatchi, V; Muthu, K; Rajasekar, M; Meenakshisundaram, Sp

    2014-01-01

    Single crystals of (2E,6E)-2-benzylidine-6-(4-methoxybenzylidine)cyclohexanone are grown by slow evaporation of ethanolic solution at room temperature. The characteristic functional groups present in the molecule are confirmed by Fourier transform infrared and Fourier transform Raman analyses. The scanning electron microscopy study reveals the surface morphology of the material. Thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis study reveals the purity of the material and the crystal is transparent in the visible region having a lower optical cut-off at ∼487nm. The second harmonic generation efficiency of as-grown material is estimated by Kurtz and Perry technique. Optimized geometry has been derived using Hartree-Fock calculations performed at the level 6-31G (d,p) and the first-order molecular hyperpolarizability (β) is estimated. The specimen is further characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  2. Design of a Circularly Polarized Galileo E6-Band Textile Antenna by Dedicated Multiobjective Constrained Pareto Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaut Dierck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing textile antennas for real-life applications requires a design strategy that is able to produce antennas that are optimized over a wide bandwidth for often conflicting characteristics, such as impedance matching, axial ratio, efficiency, and gain, and, moreover, that is able to account for the variations that apply for the characteristics of the unconventional materials used in smart textile systems. In this paper, such a strategy, incorporating a multiobjective constrained Pareto optimization, is presented and applied to the design of a Galileo E6-band antenna with optimal return loss and wide-band axial ratio characteristics. Subsequently, different prototypes of the optimized antenna are fabricated and measured to validate the proposed design strategy.

  3. SCENARIOS EVALUATION TOOL FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENT MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell

    2006-08-16

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  4. Shock-tube pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons - Formation of soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, M.; Hsu, J. P.; Miller, D. L.; Matula, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Soot formation in pyrolysis of chlorinated methanes, their mixtures with methane, and chlorinated ethylenes were studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of an He-Ne laser beam. An additional single-pulse shock-tube study was conducted for the pyrolysis of methane, methyl chloride, and dichloromethane. The experiments were performed at temperatures 1300-3000 K, pressures of 0.4-3.6 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations of 1-5 x 10 to the 17th atoms cu cm. The amounts of soot produced in the pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons are larger than that of their nonchlorinated counterparts. The sooting behavior and product distribution can be generally explained in terms of chlorine-catalyzed chemical reaction mechanisms. The pathway to soot from chlorinated methanes and ethylenes with high H:Cl ratio proceeds via the formation of C2H, C2H2, and C2H3 species. For chlorinated hydrocarbons with low H:Cl ratio, the formation of C2 and its contribution to soot formation at high temperatures becomes significant. There is evidence for the importance of CHCl radical and its reactions in the pyrolysis of dichloromethane.

  5. Prompt gamma analysis of chlorine in concrete for corrosion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-02-15

    Measurement of chlorine in concrete is very important for studying of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is primarily ascribed to the penetration of chloride ions to the steel surface. Preventive measures for avoiding concrete structure reinforcement corrosion requires monitoring the chloride ion concentration in concrete so that its concentration does not exceed a threshold limit to initiate reinforcement concrete corrosion. An accelerator based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed for non-destructive analysis of elemental composition of concrete samples. The setup has been used to measure chlorine concentration in concrete samples over a 1-3 wt% concentration range. Although a strong interference has been observed between the chlorine {gamma}-rays and calcium {gamma}-rays from concrete, the chlorine concentration in concrete samples has been successfully measured using the 1.164 and 7.643 MeV chlorine {gamma}-rays. The experimental data were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations. The study has demonstrated the successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of chlorine in concrete samples.

  6. Prompt gamma analysis of chlorine in concrete for corrosion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2006-02-01

    Measurement of chlorine in concrete is very important for studying of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is primarily ascribed to the penetration of chloride ions to the steel surface. Preventive measures for avoiding concrete structure reinforcement corrosion requires monitoring the chloride ion concentration in concrete so that its concentration does not exceed a threshold limit to initiate reinforcement concrete corrosion. An accelerator based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed for non-destructive analysis of elemental composition of concrete samples. The setup has been used to measure chlorine concentration in concrete samples over a 1-3 wt% concentration range. Although a strong interference has been observed between the chlorine gamma-rays and calcium gamma-rays from concrete, the chlorine concentration in concrete samples has been successfully measured using the 1.164 and 7.643 MeV chlorine gamma-rays. The experimental data were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations. The study has demonstrated the successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of chlorine in concrete samples.

  7. Chlorine dioxide project allows Stora to clean up, use hardwoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butters, G.

    1988-10-01

    Effluent fouling into the Strait of Canso between Nova Scotia mainland and Cape Breton Island has caused Stora Forest Industries Ltd. to develop a $5.6 million solution to its chlorine and acid problems. In 1987, Stora produced about 160,000 tonnes of market pulp where their resource base increasingly consisted of hardwood. The company uses hardwood chips for a growing percentage of its annual pulp production and for its hog fuel boiler, but became faced with having to use more local hardwoods which contributes to the resin problem. Their solution was to construct a 12-tpd chlorine dioxide generator, a process using dry sodium chlorate added to concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, The products are chlorine dioxide and highly concentrated sulphuric acid resulting from the elimination of water at the starting point. This will eliminate the acid effluent from the generator and the sulphuric acid will be recycled to the top of the chlorine dioxide generation process. In the new process, ClCO/sub 2/ replaces 70% of the chlorine in the first stage, with 100% substitution a goal. In addition to eliminating the chlorine, other benefits include an increase in pulp production, a nominal increase in pulp strength, lower production costs, and an economic incentive to harvest the area's mixed-wood stands.

  8. Zebra mussel control using periodic chlorine dioxide treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsou, J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Coyle, J. [Central Illinois Public Service, Merdosia, IL (United States); Crone, D. [Illinois Power Company, Alton, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    This paper summarizes the EPRI report (TR-105202) on the same topic as well as presents changes in current thinking on the suitability (applicability) of chlorine dioxide for fouling control. Chlorine dioxide was tested as a zebra mussel biocide at two steam electric generating stations in Illinois and one in Indiana. The purpose of these studies was to determine the efficacy of chlorine dioxide in killing zebra mussels and to develop site specific treatment programs for the three utilities. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Zebra Mussel Consortium sponsored the testing of this recent use of chlorine dioxide. The raw water system at Central Illinois Public Service`s Meredosia Station, on the Illinois River, received applications of chlorine dioxide in April, July, and September 1994. The raw water system at Illinois Power Company`s Wood River Station, on the Mississippi River, received applications in July 1993, January, April, May, July, and September 1994. The Gallagher Station, on the Ohio River, was treated in July and October 1994. Chlorine dioxide was generated on-site and injected into the water intake structure. Both cooling and service water systems were treated at the facilities. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Chlorobenzene outputs from combustion of chlorinated organic and inorganic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, A.E.S.; Vitali, J.A.; Miller, T.L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors consider the gas phase formation of chlorinated benzenes and phenols as precursors of chlorinated dioxins and furans from the combustion of solid fuels containing organically bound chlorine. The model investigated is intended to apply to the combustion of medical waste, municipal waste and coals containing chlorine. Assuming a temperature-time profile drawn from incinerator experiments, the authors use kinetic modeling with known reaction rates to further investigate four models of chlorinated benzene formation. Since reaction rates for most chlorination processes are now known, the authors choose simple systems of reaction rates that yield outputs that can be made approximately compatible with results of the Pittsfield-Vicon incinerator and Clean Combustion Technology Laboratory experiments. The authors also consider recent measurements of HCI emissions from crematoria and the implication of this work with respect to the benefits of material substitution in medical and municipal waste incineration. These benefits should also accompany the dechlorination of coals. The authors note the disparity between the prevailing USA position and the emerging position of Germany on the issue of halogenated plastics. The authors also note that Europe and Asia are beginning to address solid fuel issues as a consolidated discipline. This pattern should be helpful in broadening the understanding of solid fuels combustion processes and in ferreting out erroneous data and conclusions. This is important in view of the recent concern about the role of low dioxin exposure levels on fetal development and the immune system.

  10. Disinfection of swine wastewater using chlorine, ultraviolet light and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, John J; Qiang, Zhimin; Adams, Craig D; Surampalli, Rao; Mormile, Melanie R

    2006-06-01

    Veterinary antibiotics are widely used at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) to prevent disease and promote growth of livestock. However, the majority of antibiotics are excreted from animals in urine, feces, and manure. Consequently, the lagoons used to store these wastes can act as reservoirs of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. There is currently no regulation or control of these systems to prevent the spread of these bacteria and their genes for antibiotic resistance into other environments. This study was conducted to determine the disinfection potential of chlorine, ultraviolet light and ozone against swine lagoon bacteria. Results indicate that a chlorine dose of 30 mg/L could achieve a 2.2-3.4 log bacteria reduction in lagoon samples. However, increasing the dose of chlorine did not significantly enhance the disinfection activity due to the presence of chlorine-resistant bacteria. The chlorine resistant bacteria were identified to be closely related to Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis. A significant percentage of lagoon bacteria were not susceptible to the four selected antibiotics: chlortetracycline, lincomycin, sulfamethazine and tetracycline (TET). However, the presence of both chlorine and TET could inactivate all bacteria in one lagoon sample. The disinfection potential of UV irradiation and ozone was also examined. Ultraviolet light was an effective bacterial disinfectant, but was unlikely to be economically viable due to its high energy requirements. At an ozone dose of 100 mg/L, the bacteria inactivation efficiency could reach 3.3-3.9 log.

  11. Purification of highly chlorinated dioxins degrading enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K.; Furuichi, T.; Koike, K.; Kuboshima, M. [Hokkaido Univ. (Japan). Division of Environment Resource Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering

    2004-09-15

    Soil contamination caused by dioxins in and around sites of incinerators for municipal solid waste (MSW) is a concern in Japan. For example, scattering wastewater from a wet gas scrubber at an MSW incinerator facility in Nose, Osaka caused soil and surface water contamination. The concentration of dioxins in the soil was about 8,000 pg-TEQ/g. Other contamination sites include soils on which fly ash has been placed directly or improperly stored and landfill sites that have received bottom and fly ash over a long period. Some countermeasures are required immediately at these dioxins-contaminated sites. We have previously developed bioreactor systems for dioxin-contaminated water and soil. We have shown that a fungus, Pseudallescheria boydii (P. boydii), isolated from activated sludge treating wastewater that contained dioxins, has the ability to degrade highly chlorinated dioxins. A reaction product of octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) was identified as heptachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin. Therefore, one of the pathways for degradation of OCDD by this fungus was predicted to be as follows: OCDD is transformed by dechlorination and then one of the remaining aromatic rings is oxidized. To apply P. boydii to on-site technologies (e.g., bioreactor systems), as well as in situ technologies, enzyme treatment using a dioxin-degrading enzyme from P. boydii needs to be developed because P. boydii is a weak pathogenic fungus, known to cause opportunistic infection. As a result, we have studied enzyme purification of nonchlorinated dioxin, namely, dibenzo-pdioxin (DD). However, we did not try to identify enzymes capable of degrading highly chlorinated dioxins. This study has elucidated a method of enzyme assay for measuring OCDD-degrading activity, and has attempted to purify OCDD-degrading enzymes from P. boydii using enzyme assay. In addition, as first step toward purifying 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD), 2,3,7,8-TCDD degradation tests were carried out

  12. Synergistic effect between UV and chlorine (UV/chlorine) on the degradation of carbamazepine: Influence factors and radical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Huang, Nan; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2016-07-01

    For successful wastewater reclamation, advanced oxidation processes have attracted attention for elimination of emerging contaminants. In this study, the synergistic treatment with UV irradiation and chlorine (UV/chlorine) was used to degrade carbamazepine (CBZ). Neither UV irradiation alone nor chlorination alone could efficiently degraded CBZ. UV/chlorine oxidation showed a significant synergistic effect on CBZ degradation through generation of radical species (OH and Cl), and this process could be well depicted by pseudo first order kinetic. The degradation rate constants (kobs,CBZ) of CBZ increased linearly with increasing UV irradiance and chlorine dosage. The degradation of CBZ by UV/chlorine in acidic solutions was more efficient than that in basic solutions mainly due to the effect of pH on the dissociation of HOCl and OCl(-) and then on the quantum yields and radical species quenching of UV/chlorine. When pH was increased from 5.5 to 9.5, the rate constants of degradation of CBZ by OH decreased from 0.65 to 0.14 min(-1) and that by Cl decreased from 0.40 to 0.11 min(-1). The rate constant for the reaction between Cl and CBZ was 5.6 ± 1.6 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). Anions of HCO3(-) (1-50 mM) showed moderate inhibition of CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine, while Cl(-) did not. UV/chlorine could efficiently degrade CBZ in wastewater treatment plant effluent, although the degradation was inhibited by about 30% compared with that in ultrapure water with chlorine dosage of 0.14-0.56 mM. Nine main oxidation products of the CBZ degradation by UV/chlorine were identified using the HPLC-QToF MS/MS. Initial oxidation products arose from hydroxylation, carboxylation and hydrogen atom abstraction of CBZ by OH and Cl, and were then further oxidized to generate acylamino cleavage and decarboxylation products of acridine and acridione.

  13. Site-selective photofragmentation of chlorinated polymeric films observed around the chlorine K-edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arantes, C., E-mail: csilva@inmetro.gov.br [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Xerém 25250-020, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Mendes, L.A.V. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Ondina, 40210-340 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pinho, R.R. [Departamento de Física-ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Campus Universitário, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Ferreira, M. [PEMM/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, G.G.B. de; Rocha, A.B.; Rocco, M.L.M. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► PVC and PVDC were studied by PSID and NEXAFS techniques at the Chlorine 1s-edge. ► PVC film presented isotope ratio of 3:1 in the PSID spectrum. ► Cl{sup +} ion yield curves reproduce the photoabsorption spectrum for both polymers. ► Site-selectivity of C–Cl bond breaking due to an efficient spectator Auger decay. - Abstract: Photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID) and Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) studies have been performed on poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and poly(vinyl dichloride) (PVDC) around the chlorine 1s-edge. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron source operating in the single-bunch mode and a time-of-flight mass spectrometry for ion analysis. Cl{sup +} ion yields, as a function of the photon energy, reproduce the photoabsorption spectrum, showing significant increase at the 1s-resonance. Edge-jump ratios, defined as the ratio between edge-jumps (intensity ratio of the yields between above and below the absorption edge) of two different transitions, for Cl{sup +} ion yields were much higher than the equivalent electron yields, indicating site-selectivity in C–Cl bond breaking for both polymers, as a result of efficient spectator Auger decay. The expected isotope ratio of 3:1 for chlorine was measured for PVC. The interpretation of the NEXAFS spectrum was assisted by quantum mechanical calculations at a multireference perturbation theory level.

  14. Ficusmicrochlorin A-C, two new methoxy lactone chlorins and an anhydride chlorin from the leaves of Ficus microcarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huan-You; Chiu, Hsi-Lin; Lu, Te-Ling; Tzeng, Chih-Ying; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Lee, Ching-Kuo; Shao, Yi-Yuan; Chen, Chiy-Rong; Chang, Chi-I; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    Two new methoxy lactone chlorins ficusmicrochlorin A (1) and ficusmicrochlorin B (2), and one new anhydride chlorin ficusmicrochlorin C (3), along with eight known pheophytins were isolated from the leaves of Ficus microcarpa. Their structures were determined by the extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques. New pheophytin compound was rarely obtained from natural sources. In the past ten years, only three new natural pheophytins were characterized.

  15. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira, E-mail: zak_ana@yahoo.com.mx [Laboratorio de Biomedicina Molecular, Unidad Académica de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Chilpancingo, Gro., México (Mexico); Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar, E-mail: odelmoralh@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Biomedicina Molecular, Unidad Académica de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Chilpancingo, Gro., México (Mexico); Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás, E-mail: nvillega@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Biomedicina Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo, E-mail: ahidalgo@inmegen.gob.mx [Laboratorio de Genómica del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena, E-mail: sromero_cordoba@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Genómica del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  16. The High Arctic Magnetic High - The Geophysical Manifestation of a Large (1.36 x 10e6 km2) and Voluminous (5-10 x 10e6 km3) Igneous Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltus, Richard; Oakey, Gordon; Miller, Elizabeth; Jackson, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    The High Arctic Magnetic High (HAMH) dominates the magnetic anomaly field of the Earth north of about 75°N; this magnetic domain consists of very high amplitude magnetic highs and lows with variable orientations. The HAMH is visible on satellite magnetic compilations (e.g., MF6) with anomaly amplitudes greater than 200 nT indicating it is a globally significant feature. The magnetic potential of this magnetic feature is a single large intensity high indicative of a large volume of magnetic material in the crust. The map area of this magnetic domain is roughly 1.36 x 10e6 km2. Geographically the HAMH lies within the Amerasian Basin adjacent to the Lomonosov Ridge, encompasses the region of the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges, and extends beneath the northern portions of the Canada Basin. Ocean floor geomorphology, limited seismic and sonobouy data, sparse dredge samples, and dated samples from the perimeter of the Arctic Ocean are consistent with the interpretation of the HAMH as the geophysical manifestation of a Large Igneous Province. The designation "High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP)" has been applied to portions of the Arctic perimeter based on geologic mapping and sampling. The designation "Alpha/Mendeleev Large Igneous Province (AMLIP)" has been applied to the offshore Alpha/Mendeleev region (e.g., Grantz et al., 2009) with boundaries defined, in large part, by magnetic anomaly patterns. We have constructed 2D and 3D models of the HAMH to investigate the structure and geometry of this significant crustal feature. We estimate the overall volume of magnetic material as between 5-10 x 10e6 km3. The area and volume of this feature are comparable with estimates for the Deccan Traps and the North Atlantic Igneous Province, but are significantly smaller than the Kerguellen or Ontong Java Plateaus (based on tables in Coffin and Eldholm, 1994). In detail we find significant correlation between shorter wavelength portions of this magnetic feature and the

  17. Genetic stability of a recombinant adenovirus vaccine vector seed library expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    WU, JIE; CHEN, KE-DA; GAO, MENG; CHEN, GANG; JIN, SU-FENG; ZHUANG, FANG-CHENG; WU, XIAO-HONG; JIANG, YUN-SHUI; LI, JIAN-BO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to understand the genetic stability of a master seed bank (MSB) and a working seed bank (WSB) of an adenovirus vector vaccine expressing the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E6 and E7 fusion proteins (Ad-HPV16E6E7). Microscopic examination and viral infectious efficacy were used to measure the infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB. Polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the stability of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target gene insertion, while western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to assess the expression levels of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target protein. A C57BL/6 mouse TC-1 tumor cell growth inhibition model was used to evaluate the biological effect of Ad-HPV16E6E7 administration. The infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 6.31×109 IU/ml and 3.0×109 IU/ml, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of the inserted target genes and target proteins were found to be stable. In the mouse TC-1 tumor inhibition analysis, when the virus titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 109 IU/ml, the tumor inhibition rate was 100%, which was significantly different when compared with the control group (χ2MSB=20.00 and χ2WSB=20.00; P<0.01). Therefore, the Ad-HPV16E6E7 vaccine seed bank is genetically stable and meets the requirements for vaccine development. PMID:25780403

  18. Transformation of cefazolin during chlorination process: products, mechanism and genotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liping; Wei, Dongbin; Wei, Guohua; Du, Yuguo

    2013-11-15

    Large quantities of cephalosporins have entered into aquatic environment in recent years, posing potential adverse effect to human health and ecological safety. In this study, cefazolin, one of widely used cephalosporins, was targeted to explore its transformation behaviors in chlorination disinfection process. With the help of ultra high performance liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectroscopy, one chlorinated product and four oxidation products were detected in cefazolin chlorination system. The corresponding transformation pathways of cefazolin were proposed. Two kinds of reactions occurred in chlorination system, one was oxidation of thioether-sulfur to sulfoxide and di-sulfoxide, and the other was base-catalyzed electrophilic substitution of alpha-H of amide by chlorine atom. The pH value determined the occurrence of reaction types, and increasing chlorine dose promoted transformation of cefazolin. More importantly, genotoxicity in SOS/umu assay had an elevation after chlorination, which might be attributed to the formation of chlorinated product and sulfoxide during chlorination process.

  19. Electrochemical Membrane Reactors for Sustainable Chlorine Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidakovic-Koch, Tanja; Martinez, Isai Gonzalez; Kuwertz, Rafael; Kunz, Ulrich; Turek, Thomas; Sundmacher, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes have found broad application in a number of processes, being fuel cells, due to energy concerns, the main focus of the scientific community worldwide. Relatively little attention has been paid to the use of these materials in electrochemical production and separation processes. In this review, we put emphasis upon the application of Nafion membranes in electrochemical membrane reactors for chlorine recycling. The performance of such electrochemical reactors can be influenced by a number of factors including the properties of the membrane, which play an important role in reactor optimization. This review discusses the role of Nafion as a membrane, as well as its importance in the catalyst layer for the formation of the so-called three-phase boundary. The influence of an equilibrated medium on the Nafion proton conductivity and Cl− crossover, as well as the influence of the catalyst ink dispersion medium on the Nafion/catalyst self-assembly and its importance for the formation of an ionic conducting network in the catalyst layer are summarized. PMID:24958294

  20. Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants in arctic marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norstrom, R J; Muir, D C

    1994-09-16

    By 1976, the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants (CHCs) had been demonstrated in fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), ringed seal (Phoca hispida), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), walrus (Obdobenus rosmarus divergens), beluga (Delphinapterus leucas), porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in various parts of the Arctic. In spite of this early interest, very little subsequent research on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals was undertaken until the mid-1980s. Since that time, there has been an explosion of interest, resulting in a much expanded data base on contaminants in Arctic marine mammals. Except in the Russian Arctic, data have now been obtained on the temporospatial distribution of PCBs and other contaminants in ringed seal, beluga and polar bear. Contaminants in narwhal (Monodon monoceros) have also now been measured. On a fat weight basis, the sum of DDT-related compounds (S-DDT) and PCB levels are lowest in walrus (St. Lawrence and ringed seal in the Baltic Sea, indicate that overall contamination of the Arctic marine ecosystem is 10-50 times less than the most highly contaminated areas in the northern hemisphere temperate latitude marine environment. Geographic distribution of residue levels in polar bears indicates a gradual increase from Alaska east to Svalbard, except PCB levels are significantly higher in eastern Greenland and Svalbard. Information on temporal trends is somewhat contradictory.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  1. Electrochemical Membrane Reactors for Sustainable Chlorine Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Kunz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymer electrolyte membranes have found broad application in a number of processes, being fuel cells, due to energy concerns, the main focus of the scientific community worldwide. Relatively little attention has been paid to the use of these materials in electrochemical production and separation processes. In this review, we put emphasis upon the application of Nafion membranes in electrochemical membrane reactors for chlorine recycling. The performance of such electrochemical reactors can be influenced by a number of factors including the properties of the membrane, which play an important role in reactor optimization. This review discusses the role of Nafion as a membrane, as well as its importance in the catalyst layer for the formation of the so-called three-phase boundary. The influence of an equilibrated medium on the Nafion proton conductivity and Cl crossover, as well as the influence of the catalyst ink dispersion medium on the Nafion/catalyst self-assembly and its importance for the formation of an ionic conducting network in the catalyst layer are summarized.

  2. Ultraviolet absorptions of non-stoichiometric lead chloride PbCl2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, K.J. de; Santen, J.H. van

    1964-01-01

    Tempering evaporated lead chloride films in a nitrogen atmosphere without or with excess lead or chlorine results in extra absorption bands between 268 and 360 mμ and at about 253 mμ, and in a change of the existing absorption at 265.5 mμ (measured at liquid nitrogen temperature). These absorption a

  3. Combustion of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using bimetallic chromium-copper supported on modified H-ZSM-5 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Bakar, Mohamad Zailani Abu; Bhatia, Subhash

    2006-02-28

    The paper reports on the performance of chromium or/and copper supported on H-ZSM-5(Si/Al = 240) modified with silicon tetrachloride (Cr1.5/SiCl4-Z, Cu1.5/SiCl4-Z and Cr1.0Cu0.5/SiCl4-Z) as catalysts in the combustion of chlorinated VOCs (Cl-VOCs). A reactor operated at a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 32,000 h(-1), a temperature between 100 and 500 degrees C with 2500 ppm of dichloromethane (DCM), trichloromethane (TCM) and trichloroethylene (TCE) is used for activity studies. The deactivation study is conducted at a GHSV of 3800 h(-1), at 400 degrees C for up to 12 h with a feed concentration of 35,000 ppm. Treatment with silicon tetrachloride improves the chemical resistance of H-ZSM-5 against hydrogen chloride. TCM is more reactive compared to DCM but it produces more by-products due to its high chlorine content. The stabilization of TCE is attributed to resonance effects. Water vapor increases the carbon dioxide yield through its role as hydrolysis agent forming reactive carbocations and acting as hydrogen-supplying agent to suppress chlorine-transfer reactions. The deactivation of Cr1.0Cu0.5/SiCl4-Z is mainly due to the chlorination of its metal species, especially with higher Cl/H feed. Coking is limited, particularly with DCM and TCM. In accordance with the Mars-van Krevelen model, the weakening of overall metal reducibility due to chlorination leads to a loss of catalytic activity.

  4. Development of a Site-Specific Kinetic Model for Chlorine Decay and the Formation of Chlorination By-Products in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhur Saeed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine is used commonly to prevent biofouling in cooling water systems. The addition of chlorine poses environmental risks in natural systems due to its tendency to form chlorination by-products (CBPs when exposed to naturally-occurring organic matter (NOM. Some of these CBPs can pose toxic risks to aquatic and benthic species in the receiving waters. It is, therefore, important to study the fate of residual chlorine and CBPs to fully understand the potential impacts of chlorination to the environment. The goal of this study was to develop improved predictions of how chlorine and CBP concentrations in seawater vary with time, chlorine dose and temperature. In the present study, chlorination of once-through cooling water at Ras Laffan Industrial City (RLIC, Qatar, was studied by collecting unchlorinated seawater from the RLIC cooling water system intake, treating it with chlorine and measuring time series of chlorine and CBP concentrations. Multiple-rate exponential curves were used to represent fast and slow chlorine decay and CBP formation, and site-specific chlorine kinetic relationships were developed. Through extensive analysis of laboratory measurements, it was found that only some of the control parameters identified in the literature were important for predicting residual chlorine and CBP concentrations for this specific location. The new kinetic relationships were able to significantly improve the predictability and validity of Generalized Environmental Modeling System for Surfacewaters (GEMSS-chlorine kinetics module (CKM, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and chlorine kinetics and transport model when applied for RLIC outfall studies using actual field measurements.

  5. Comparison of chlorine and chlorine dioxide toxicity of fathead minnows and bluegill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.; Soracco, R.J.; Mayack, L.A.; Shealy, R.L.; Broadwell, T.L.; Steffen, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    The comparative toxicity of total residual chlorine (TRC) and chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) was evaluated by conducting 96 h flow-through bioassays with three types of fish. The fish were subjected to an intermittent exposure regime in which biocide residuals were present for approximately 2-h periods beginning at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h into the tests. These conditions simulated the antifouling procedure (1 h day/sup -1/ biocide addition) used to control biofouling of nuclear reactor heat exchangers at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. LC/sub 50/ values showed that ClO/sub 2/ was approximately 2 to 4 times more toxic than TRC to: (1) juvenile and 1-year-old fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas); and (2) young-of-the-year bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). The TRC mean 96-h LC/sub 50/ values were: 0.08 mg l/sup -1/ for juvenile fathead minnows, 0.35 mg l/sup -1/ for adult fathead minnows and 0.44 mg l/sup -1/ for young-of-the-year bluegills. The ClO/sub 2/ mean LC/sub 50/ values were: 0.02 mg l/sup -1/ for juvenile fathead minnows, 0.17 mg l/sup -1/ for adult fathead minnows and 0.15 mg l/sup -1/ for young-of-the-year bluegills. 31 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  6. CHLORINATION OF AMINO ACIDS: REACTION PATHWAYS AND REACTION RATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Zuo Tong; Linge, Kathryn; Busetti, Francesco; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-03-15

    Chlorination of amino acids can result in the formation of organic monochloramines or organic dichloramines, depending on the chlorine to amino acid ratio (Cl:AA). After formation, organic chloramines degrade into aldehydes, nitriles and N-chloraldimines. In this paper, the formation of organic chloramines from chlorination of lysine, tyrosine and valine were investigated. Chlorination of tyrosine and lysine demonstrated that the presence of a reactive secondary group can increase the Cl:AA ratio required for the formation of N,N-dichloramines, and potentially alter the reaction pathways between chlorine and amino acids, resulting in the formation of unexpected by-products. In a detailed investigation, we report rate constants for all reactions in the chlorination of valine, for the first time, using experimental results and modelling. At Cl:AA = 2.8, the chlorine was found to first react quickly with valine (5.4x104 M-1 s-1) to form N-monochlorovaline, with a slower subsequent reaction with N-monochlorovaline to form N,N-dichlorovaline (4.9x102 M-1 s-1), although some N-monochlorovaline degraded into isobutyraldehyde (1.0x10-4 s-1). The N,N-dichlorovaline then competitively degraded into isobutyronitrile (1.3x10-4 s-1) and N-chloroisobutyraldimine (1.2x10-4 s-1). In conventional drinking water disinfection, N-chloroisobutyraldimine can potentially be formed in concentrations higher than its odour threshold concentration, resulting in aesthetic challenges and an unknown health risk.

  7. Electrochemical reduction characteristics and the mechanism of chlorinated hydrocarbons at the copper electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wenying; GAO Tingyao; ZHOU Rongfeng; MA Lumin

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction characteristies of chlorinated hyrdrocarbons were investigated by cyclic voltammetry technique.The reduction mechanism and activity of the chlorinated hydrocarbons at the copper electrode were explored.The relationship between the structure of chlorinated hydrocarbons and their reductive activity were discussed.The experimental results showed that chlorinated alkanes and a portion of chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons could be reduced directly at the copper electrode.However,chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons were not easy to reduce at the copper electrode.The results provided a theoretical basis for the catalyzed iron inner electrolysis method.

  8. Study on metal corrosion caused by chlorine dioxide of various purities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔崇威; 黄君礼; 许晶

    2004-01-01

    Weight lost method was used to comparatively study the corrosion behavior of four different metals under the dosage of chlorine dioxide, chlorine and their mixture respectively. The experimental results indicated that chlorine causes the most serious corrosion of carbon steel, and the higher the concentration of chlorine, the more serious the corrosion. On the contras, metals corrosion is the least serious in the case of chlorine dioxide.The results further revealed that chlorine dioxide is the most effective water treatment reagent, making it the best choice to use extensively in circulated cooling water disinfection and corrosion control.

  9. Human Papillomavirus E6/E7-Specific siRNA Potentiates the Effect of Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Soon Jung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The functional inactivation of TP53 and Rb tumor suppressor proteins by the HPV-derived E6 and E7 oncoproteins is likely an important step in cervical carcinogenesis. We have previously shown siRNA technology to selectively silence both E6/E7 oncogenes and demonstrated that the synthetic siRNAs could specifically block its expression in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. Herein, we investigated the potentiality of E6/E7 siRNA candidates as radiosensitizers of radiotherapy for the human cervical carcinomas. HeLa and SiHa cells were transfected with HPV E6/E7 siRNA; the combined cytotoxic effect of E6/E7 siRNA and radiation was assessed by using the cell viability assay, flow cytometric analysis and the senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal assay. In addition, we also investigated the effect of combined therapy with irradiation and E6/E7 siRNA intravenous injection in an in vivo xenograft model. Combination therapy with siRNA and irradiation efficiently retarded tumor growth in established tumors of human cervical cancer cell xenografted mice. In addition, the chemically-modified HPV16 and 18 E6/E7 pooled siRNA in combination with irradiation strongly inhibited the growth of cervical cancer cells. Our results indicated that simultaneous inhibition of HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression with radiotherapy can promote potent antitumor activity and radiosensitizing activity in human cervical carcinomas.

  10. Prediction of promiscuous epitopes in the e6 protein of three high risk human papilloma viruses: a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Nirmala; Chinnappan, Sudandiradoss

    2013-01-01

    A najor current challenge and constraint in cervical cancer research is the development of vaccines against human papilloma virus (HPV) epitopes. Although many studies are done on epitope identification on HPVs, no computational work has been carried out for high risk forms which are considered to cause cervical cancer. Of all the high risk HPVs, HPV 16, HPV 18 and HPV 45 are responsible for 94% of cervical cancers in women worldwide. In this work, we computationally predicted the promiscuous epitopes among the E6 proteins of high risk HPVs. We identified the conserved residues, HLA class I, HLA class II and B-cell epitopes along with their corresponding secondary structure conformations. We used extremely precise bioinformatics tools like ClustalW2, MAPPP, NetMHC, EpiJen, EpiTop 1.0, ABCpred, BCpred and PSIPred for achieving this task. Our study identified specific regions 'FAFR(K)DL' followed by 'KLPD(Q)LCTEL' fragments which proved to be promiscuous epitopes present in both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, class II molecules and B cells as well. These fragments also follow every suitable character to be considered as promiscuous epitopes with supporting evidences of previously reported experimental results. Thus, we conclude that these regions should be considered as the important for design of specific therapeutic vaccines for cervical cancer.

  11. WAF1 induction and infection by HPV E6 as a determinants of radiosensitivity in human cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harima, Yoko; Oka, Atsutoshi; Harima, Keizo; Tanaka, Yoshimasa [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    To establish a new predictor of outcome for human cervical carcinoma treatment, the relationship between WAF1 mRNA levels during treatment, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor radiosensitivity were investigated. Forty patients with uterine cervical carcinoma were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Only those patients who beard wild-type p53 were included into present clinical trial. p53 status was investigated using SSCP analysis. HPV E6 was determined by PCR, WAF1 mRNA was estimated by RT-PCR. Twenty-one patients achieved complete response (CR), 11 patients achieved partial response (PR), and 8 patients had no change (NC). The increase in WAF1 mRNA after irradiation at 10.8 Gy positively correlated both with better treatment response and improved survival. Although the infection by HPV did not directly influence on the survival rate, it decreased the inducibility of WAF1. p53-dependent activation of WAF1 gene expression during treatment may be a strong determinant of the efficacy of cervical cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Explaining the CMS excesses, baryogenesis, and neutrino masses in a E6 motivated U (1 )N model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuria, Mansi; Hati, Chandan; Sarkar, Utpal

    2016-01-01

    We study the superstring inspired E6 model motivated U (1 )N extension of the supersymmetric standard model to explore the possibility of explaining the recent excess CMS events and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe in eight possible variants of the model. In light of the hints from short-baseline neutrino experiments at the existence of one or more light sterile neutrinos, we also study the neutrino mass matrices dictated by the field assignments and the discrete symmetries in these variants. We find that all the variants can explain the excess CMS events via the exotic slepton decay, while for a standard choice of the discrete symmetry four of the variants have the feature of allowing high scale baryogenesis (leptogenesis). For one other variant three body decay induced soft baryogenesis mechanism is possible which can induce baryon number violating neutron-antineutron oscillation. We also point out a new discrete symmetry which has the feature of ensuring proton stability and forbidding tree level flavor changing neutral current processes while allowing for the possibility of high scale leptogenesis for two of the variants. On the other hand, neutrino mass matrix of the U (1 )N model variants naturally accommodates three active and two sterile neutrinos which acquire masses through their mixing with extra neutral fermions giving rise to interesting textures for neutrino masses.

  13. Chlorine solubility in evolved alkaline magmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Carroll

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies of Cl solubility in trachytic to phonolitic melts provide insights into the capacity of alkaline magmas to transport Cl from depth to the earth?s surface and atmosphere, and information on Cl solubility variations with pressure, temperature and melt or fluid composition is crucial for understanding the reasons for variations in Cl emissions at active volcanoes. This paper provides a brief review of Cl solubility experiments conducted on a range of trachytic to phonolitic melt compositions. Depending on the experimental conditions the melts studied were in equilibrium with either a Cl-bearing aqueous fluid or a subcritical assemblage of low- Cl aqueous fluid + Cl-rich brine. The nature of the fluid phase(s was identified by examination of fluid inclusions present in run product glasses and the fluid bulk composition was calculated by mass balance. Chlorine concentrations in the glass increase with increasing Cl molality in the fluid phase until a plateau in Cl concentration is reached when melt coexists with aqueous fluid + brine. With fluids of similar Cl molality, higher Cl concentrations are observed in peralkaline phonolitic melts compared with peraluminous phonolitic melts; overall the Cl concentrations observed in phonolitic and trachytic melts are approximately twice those found in calcalkaline rhyolitic melts under similar conditions. The observed negative pressure dependence of Cl solubility implies that Cl contents of melts may actually increase during magma decompression if the magma coexists with aqueous fluid and Cl-rich brine (assuming melt-vapor equilibrium is maintained. The high Cl contents (approaching 1 wt% Cl observed in some melts/glasses from the Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei areas suggest saturation with a Cl-rich brine prior to eruption.

  14. Recommendations of technical specifications for ethanol and its blends (E6) and the infrastructure for their management in Mexico; Recomendaciones de especificaciones tecnicas para el etanol y sus mezclas (E6) y la infraestructura para su manejo en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes the importance and benefits of using ethanol-gasoline blend as a substitute for pure gasoline. It presents data of global ethanol market, as well as major producers, processes involved for different raw materials and productivity indicators. It discusses the main properties to be monitored in ethanol and the importance of each one. It also examines the impact of the addition of ethanol in automotive gasoline and the influence of each property in the operation of the cars and the environment. It presents an assessment of the international specifications anhydrous ethanol used in the United States, Brazil and the European Union as well as suggestions for limits harmonization of the main parameters and methodologies, from recently published studies (White Paper-Bioetahnol Guidelines Task Force and to Ethanol from Worldwide Fuel Charter Committee). It includes the specification of Brazilian gasoline, added with 25% of ethanol (E25). It suggests an anhydrous ethanol specification and a specification for gasoline mixtures / ethanol E6 for implementation in Mexico. It presents a prioritization of laboratory testing methods for ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline in three categories, indicating the most appropriate test to be used at different points in the distribution chain of products. It discusses the impact of ethanol on the distribution facilities for fuels, actions to control potential problems, selection of materials and equipment, safety procedures and presents the mixing gasoline / ethanol. It also describes the Brazilian system of production / distribution of fuels and the experience of this country to control fuel quality from the legislation. It includes a table with the top teams, their costs, Brazilian suppliers and a list of Brazilian standards for fuel storage and transport. Finally, we present some suggestions that may be important to ensure the evolution of specifications of ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline in the course of the

  15. pH Control for Effective Anaerobic Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C.; Barry, D.; Gerhard, J. I.; Kouznetsova, I.

    2007-12-01

    SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) is a 4-year collaborative project that aims to evaluate the performance of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The project focuses on a pilot scale demonstration at a trichloroethene (TCE) DNAPL field site, and includes complementary laboratory and modelling studies. Organic acids and hydrogen ions (HCl) typically build up in the treatment zone during anaerobic bioremediation. In aquifer systems with relatively low buffering capacity the generation of these products can cause significant groundwater acidification thereby inhibiting dehalogenating activity. Where the soil buffering capacity is exceeded, addition of buffer may be needed for the effective continuation of TCE degradation. As an aid to the design of remediation schemes, a geochemical model was designed to predict the amount of buffer required to maintain the source zone pH at a suitable level for dechlorinating bacteria (i.e. > 6.5). The model accounts for the amount of TCE to be degraded, site water chemistry, type of organic amendment and soil mineralogy. It assumes complete dechlorination of TCE, and further considers mineral dissolution and precipitation kinetics. The model is applicable to a wide range of sites. For illustration we present results pertinent to the SABRE field site. Model results indicate that, for the extensive dechlorination expected in proximity to the SABRE DNAPL source zone, significant buffer addition may be necessary. Additional simulations are performed to identify buffer requirements over a wider range of field conditions.

  16. Rapid Determination of HAAs Formation Potential of the Reaction of Humic Acid with Chlorine or Chlorine Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhi-liang; GE Yuan-xin; ZHANG Rong-hua; MA Hong-mei; HAO Jian-fu

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of gas chromatography(GC) coupled with a short capillary column and an electron capture detector(ECD), a simple and rapid method for the determination of five haloacetic acids(HAAs) in drinking water was developed by the optimization of derivation conditions and the modification of gas chromatographic program. HAAs formation potential(HAAFP) of the reaction of humic acid with chlorine was determined via this method. The major advantages of the method are the simplicity of chromatographic temperature program and the short run time of GC. Dichloroacetic acid(DCAA) and Trichloroacetic acid(TCAA), which were detected in the determination of HAAFP, were rapidly formed in the first 72 h of the reaction of humic acid with chlorine. HAAFP of the reaction of humic acid with chlorine increased with the increase in the concentrations of humic acid and chlorine. The average HAAFP of the reaction of humic acid with chlorine was 39.9 μg/mg TOC under the experimental conditions. When the concentration of humic acid was 4 mg/L, the concentration of HAAs, which were produced in the reaction of humic acid with chorine, may exceed MCL of 60 μg/L HAAs as the water quality standards for urban water supply of China and the first stage of US EPA disinfection/disinfection by-products(D/DBP) rule; when the concentration of humic acid was 2 mg/L, the concentration of HAAs may exceed MCL of 30 μg/L HAAs for the second stage of US EPA D/DBP rule. When humic acid was reacted with chlorine dioxide, only DCAA was detected with a maximum concentration of 3.3 μg/L at a humic acid content of 6 mg/L. It was demonstrated that the substitution of chlorine dioxide for chorine may entirely or partly control the formation of HAAs and effectively reduce the health risk associated with disinfected drinking water.

  17. Screening for Novel Binding Proteins Interacting with Human Papillomavirus Type 18 E6 Oncogene in the Hela cDNA Library by Yeast Two-Hybrid System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang LI; Ping LIU; Ling XI; Xuefeng JIANG; Jianfeng ZHOU; Shixuan WANG; Li MENG; Yunping LU; Ding Ma

    2008-01-01

    To screen for novel binding proteins interacting with high-risk HPV 18 E6 oncogene, the strain AH109 was transformed with pGBKT7-HPV18 E6 plasmid, and subsequent transference was utilized to screen for interacting proteins with HPV 18 E6 in human Hela cDNA library. HPVl8 E6 mRNA was expressed in yeast and there was no self-activation and toxicity in AH109. Seven proteins that interacted with HPV18 E6, including transmembrane protein 87B, phosphonoformate im- muno-associated protein 5, vimentin, KM-HN-1 protein, dedicator of cytokinesis 7, vaccinia related kinase 2 and a hypothetical protein, were identified. It was suggested that yeast two-hybrid system is an efficient for screening interacting proteins. The high-risk HPV 18 E6 oncogene may interact with the proteins, which may be associated with signal transduction and transeriptional control, epithelial cell invasion and migration, as well as humoral and cellular immune etc. This investigation provides functional clues for further exploration of potential oncogenesis targets for cancer biotherapy.

  18. Modeling Groundwater-Surface Water Interaction and Contaminant Transport of Chlorinated Solvent Contaminated Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimer Ebrahim, Girma; Jonoski, Andreja; van Griensven, Ann; Dujardin, Juliette; Baetelaan, Okke; Bronders, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Chlorinated-solvent form one of the largest groups of environmental chemicals. Their use and misuse in industry have lead to a large entry of these chemicals into the environment, resulting in widespread dissemination and oftentimes environmental contamination. Chlorinated solvent contamination of groundwater resources has been widely reported. For instance, there has been much interest in the assessment of these contaminant levels and their evolutions with time in the groundwater body below the Vilvoorde-Machelen industrial area (Belgium). The long industrial history of the area has lead to complex patterns of pollution from multiple sources and the site has been polluted to the extent that individual plumes are not definable any more. Understanding of groundwater/surface water interaction is a critical component for determining the fate of contaminant both in streams and ground water due to the fact that groundwater and surface water are in continuous dynamic interaction in the hydrologic cycle. The interaction has practical consequences in the quantity and quality of water in either system in the sense that depletion and/or contamination of one of the system will eventually affect the other one. The transition zone between a stream and its adjacent aquifer referred to as the hyporheic zone plays a critical role in governing contaminant exchange and transformation during water exchange between the two water bodies. The hyporheic zone of Zenne River ( the main receptor ) is further complicated due to the fact that the river banks are artificially trained with sheet piles along its reach extending some 12 m below the surface. This study demonstrates the use of MODFLOW, a widely used modular three-dimensional block-centred finite difference, saturated flow model for simulating the flow and direction of movement of groundwater through aquifer and stream-aquifer interaction and the use of transport model RT3D, a three-dimensional multi-species reactive transport model

  19. Chlorinated organic pesticides in marketed food: Barcelona, 2001-06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontcuberta, M. [Agencia de Salut Publica de Barcelona, ASPB, Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Av Drassanes 13, 08001 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: mfontcub@aspb.es; Arques, J.F.; Villalbi, J.R.; Martinez, M.; Centrich, F.; Serrahima, E.; Pineda, L.; Duran, J.; Casas, C. [Agencia de Salut Publica de Barcelona, ASPB, Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Av Drassanes 13, 08001 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    This paper reports concentration levels of 22 chlorinated organic compounds (both primary compounds and metabolites) in food marketed in the city of Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) in 2001-06. Samples included meat products, fish and seafood, eggs, milk and dairy, vegetal oils, cereal products and derivates, vegetables, fresh fruits, dry fruits, spices, formula and baby food, tea and wine. Levels of chlorinated organic compounds were determined by gas chromatography with selective detectors: electron capture (ECD), flame photometric (FPD) and confirmation with mass-spectrometry. Chlorinated organic pesticides were detected in 7 of the 1,484 samples analyzed in the 2001-06 period (0.5%): 1 dairy product, 1 fruit, 1 olive oil and 4 vegetables. Specific pesticides detected are lindane and endosulfan {alpha}, {beta} or sulphate. A decrease in both the proportion of samples with detectable residues and in the variety of chlorinated pesticides found is visible when comparing these results with those of the previous 1989-2000 period. These results suggest the gradual disappearance of regulated chlorinated organic pesticides as a consequence of the growing worldwide implementation of current regulatory agreements.

  20. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Barbosa, Lucía [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Básicas (ICB), Universidad Nacional de Cuyo Parque General San Martín, Mendoza (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl{sub 2} atmosphere of the MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C.

  1. Coagulation properties of anelectrochemically prepared polyaluminum chloride containing active chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chengzhi; LIU Huijuan; QU Jiuhui

    2006-01-01

    With high content of the Al13 species and the active chloride, an electrochemically prepared polyaluminum chloride (E-PACl) presents integrated efficiency of coagulation and oxidation. The coagulation properties of E-PACl were systemically investigated through jar tests in the various water quality conditions. The active chlorine in E-PACl can significantly influence the coagulation behavior due to the active chlorine preoxidation, which can change the surface charge characteristic of organic matter (OM) in water. The active chlorine preoxidation could improve the E-PACl coagulation efficiency if the water possessed the characteristics of relatively low OM content (2 mg/L) and high hardness (278 mg CaCO3/L). In the water with medium content of OM (5 mg/L), dosage would be a crucial factor to decide whether the active chlorine in E-PACl aided coagulation process or not. Comparing with alkaline condition, active chlorine would show a more significant influence on the coagulation process in acidic region.

  2. Application of chlorine dioxide as an oilfield facilities treatment fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaine, J.; Strawser, T.G.; Knippers, M.L.

    1995-11-01

    Both mechanical and chemical treatments are used to clean water flood injection distribution systems whose efficiency has been reduced as a result of plugging material such as iron sulfide sludge. Most mechanical treatments rely on uniform line diameter to be effective, while chemical treatments require good contact with the plugging material for efficient removal. This paper describes the design and operation of a new innovative application using chlorine dioxide for the removal of iron sulfide sludge from water flood injection distribution systems. This technology has evolved from the use of chlorine dioxide in well stimulation applications. The use of chlorine dioxide for continuous treatment of injection brines will also be discussed. Exxon USA`s Hartzog Draw facility in Gillette, Wyoming was the site for the application described. 4,500 barrels of chlorine dioxide was pumped in three phases to clean sixty-six miles of the water flood distribution system. Results indicate that chlorine dioxide was effective in cleaning the well guard screens, the injection lines, frac tanks used to collect the treatment fluids and the injection wells.

  3. Biofouling control: Bacterial quorum quenching versus chlorination in membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekara, Nuwan A; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Chung-Hak

    2016-10-15

    Biofilm formation (biofouling) induced via cell-to-cell communication (quorum sensing) causes problems in membrane filtration processes. Chorine is one of the most common chemicals used to interfere with biofouling; however, biofouling control is challenging because it is a natural process. This study demonstrates biofouling control for submerged hollow fiber membranes in membrane bioreactors by means of bacterial quorum quenching (QQ) using Rhodococcus sp. BH4 with chemically enhanced backwashing. This is the first trial to bring QQ alongside chlorine injection into practice. A high chlorine dose (100 mg/L as Cl2) to the system is insufficient for preventing biofouling, but addition of the QQ bacterium is effective for disrupting biofouling that cannot be achieved by chlorination alone. QQ reduces the biologically induced metal precipitate and extracellular biopolymer levels in the biofilm, and biofouling is significantly delayed when QQ is applied in addition to chlorine dosing. QQ with chlorine injection gives synergistic effects on reducing physically and chemically reversible fouling resistances while saving substantial filtration energy. Manipulating microbial community functions with chemical treatment is an attractive tool for biofilm dispersal in membrane bioreactors.

  4. Chlorination byproducts, their toxicodynamics and removal from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Krishna; Tripathy, Sushree Swarupa; Bersillon, Jean Luc; Dubey, Shashi Prabha

    2007-02-01

    No doubt that chlorination has been successfully used for the control of water borne infections diseases for more than a century. However identification of chlorination byproducts (CBPs) and incidences of potential health hazards created a major issue on the balancing of the toxicodynamics of the chemical species and risk from pathogenic microbes in the supply of drinking water. There have been epidemiological evidences of close relationship between its exposure and adverse outcomes particularly the cancers of vital organs in human beings. Halogenated trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) are two major classes of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) commonly found in waters disinfected with chlorine. The total concentration of trihalomethanes and the formation of individual THM species in chlorinated water strongly depend on the composition of the raw water, on operational parameters and on the occurrence of residual chlorine in the distribution system. Attempts have been made to develop predictive models to establish the production and kinetics of THM formations. These models may be useful for operational purposes during water treatment and water quality management. It is also suggested to explore some biomarkers for determination of DBP production. Various methods have been suggested which include adsorption on activated carbons, coagulation with polymer, alum, lime or iron, sulfates, ion exchange and membrane process for the removal of DBPs. Thus in order to reduce the public health risk from these toxic compounds regulation must be inforced for the implementation of guideline values to lower the allowable concentrations or exposure.

  5. Inactivation of Aspergillus flavus in drinking water after treatment with UV irradiation followed by chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Mohammad [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Sciences, and Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Coast and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zheng, Tianling [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Sciences, and Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Coast and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Yu, Xin, E-mail: xyu@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The disinfection process for inactivating microorganisms at drinking water treatment plants is aimed for safety of drinking water for humans from a microorganism, such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi by using chlorination, ozonation, UV irradiation, etc. In the present study, a combination of two disinfectants, UV irradiation followed by chlorination, was evaluated for inactivating Aspergillus flavus under low contact time and low dosage of UV irradiation. The results indicated an inverse correlation between the inactivation of A. flavus by using UV irradiation only or chlorination alone. By using UV radiation, the 2 log{sub 10} control of A. flavus was achieved after 30 s of irradiation, while chlorination was observed to be more effective than UV, where the 2 log was achieved at chlorine concentration of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/l, in contact time of 60, 5, 1 and 1 min, respectively. However, combined use (UV irradiation followed by chlorination) was more effective than using either UV or chlorination alone; 5 s UV irradiation followed by chlorination produced 4 log{sub 10} reduction of A. flavus at chlorine concentrations of 2 and 3 mg/l under a contact time of 15 min. The results indicated that efficiency of UV irradiation improves when followed by chlorination at low concentrations. - Highlights: • As a disinfectant, chlorine is more effective than UV in inactivating Aspergillus flavus. • As a combined method, UV irradiation followed by chlorination shows high efficiency. • UV irradiation can improve effectiveness of chlorination in reducing Aspergillus flavus.

  6. Transformation of cefazolin during chlorination process: Products, mechanism and genotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liping, E-mail: lisaleercees807@yahoo.cn; Wei, Dongbin, E-mail: weidb@rcees.ac.cn; Wei, Guohua, E-mail: wgh@rcees.ac.cn; Du, Yuguo, E-mail: duyuguo@rcees.ac.cn

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Base-catalyzed electrophilic substitution occurred in cefazolin chlorination. • Oxidation of thioether in cefazolin was found in chlorination process. • The pH conditions impacted on the occurrence of reaction types. • Genotoxicity had an elevation after chlorination of cefazolin. • Reaction pathways of cefazolin chlorination were replayed in surface water matrix. -- Abstract: Large quantities of cephalosporins have entered into aquatic environment in recent years, posing potential adverse effect to human health and ecological safety. In this study, cefazolin, one of widely used cephalosporins, was targeted to explore its transformation behaviors in chlorination disinfection process. With the help of ultra high performance liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectroscopy, one chlorinated product and four oxidation products were detected in cefazolin chlorination system. The corresponding transformation pathways of cefazolin were proposed. Two kinds of reactions occurred in chlorination system, one was oxidation of thioether-sulfur to sulfoxide and di-sulfoxide, and the other was base-catalyzed electrophilic substitution of alpha-H of amide by chlorine atom. The pH value determined the occurrence of reaction types, and increasing chlorine dose promoted transformation of cefazolin. More importantly, genotoxicity in SOS/umu assay had an elevation after chlorination, which might be attributed to the formation of chlorinated product and sulfoxide during chlorination process.

  7. The E6-Ap ubiquitin-protein ligase (UBE3A) gene is localized within a narrowed Angelman syndrome critical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, J S; Jiang, Y H; Galijaard, R J; Matsuura, T; Fang, P; Kubota, T; Christian, S L; Bressler, J; Cattanach, B; Ledbetter, D H; Beaudet, A L

    1997-04-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are distinct clinical phenotypes resulting from maternal and paternal deficiencies, respectively, in human chromosome 15qll-q13. Although several imprinted, paternally expressed transcripts have been identified within the PWS candidate region, no maternally expressed gene has yet been identified within the AS candidate region. We have developed an integrated physical map spanning the PWS and AS candidate regions and localized two breakpoints, including a cryptic t(14;15) translocation associated with AS and a non-AS 15q deletion, which substantially narrow the AS candidate region to approximately 250 kb. Mapping data indicate that the entire transcriptional unit of the E6-AP ubiquitin-protein ligase (UBE3A) gene lies within the AS region. The UBE3A locus expresses a transcript of approximately 5 kb at low to moderate levels in all tissues tested. The mouse homolog of UBE3A was cloned and sequenced revealing a high degree of conservation at nucleotide and protein levels. Northern and RT-PCR analysis of Ube3a expression in mouse tissues from animals with segmental, paternal uniparental disomy failed to detect substantially reduced or absent expression compared to control animals, failing to provide any evidence for maternal-specific expression from this locus. Recent identification of de novo truncating mutations in UBE3A taken with these observations indicates that mutations in UBE3A can lead to AS and suggests that this locus may encode both imprinted and biallelically expressed products.

  8. Emerging nitrogenous disinfection byproducts: Transformation of the antidiabetic drug metformin during chlorine disinfection of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Dominic; Happel, Oliver; Scheurer, Marco; Harms, Klaus; Schmidt, Torsten C; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    As an environmental contaminant of anthropogenic origin metformin is present in the high ng/L- up to the low μg/L-range in most surface waters. Residues of metformin may lead to the formation of disinfection by-products during chlorine disinfection, when these waters are used for drinking water production. Investigations on the underlying chemical processes occurring during treatment of metformin with sodium hypochlorite in aqueous medium led to the discovery of two hitherto unknown transformation products. Both substances were isolated and characterized by HPLC-DAD, GC-MS, HPLC-ESI-TOF, (1)H-NMR and single-crystal X-ray structure determination. The immediate major chlorination product is a cyclic dehydro-1,2,4-triazole-derivate of intense yellow color (Y; C4H6ClN5). It is a solid chlorimine of limited stability. Rapid formation was observed between 10 °C and 30 °C, as well as between pH 3 and pH 11, in both ultrapure and tap water, even at trace quantities of reactants (ng/L-range for metformin, mg/L-range for free chlorine). While Y is degraded within a few hours to days in the presence of light, elevated temperature, organic solvents and matrix constituents within tap water, a secondary degradation product was discovered, which is stable and colorless (C; C4H6ClN3). This chloroorganic nitrile has a low photolysis rate in ambient day light, while being resistant to heat and not readily degraded in the presence of organic solvents or in the tap water matrix. In addition, the formation of ammonia, dimethylamine and N,N-dimethylguanidine was verified by cation exchange chromatography.

  9. Enhanced reductive dechlorination in clay till contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most frequently found contaminants in groundwater. In fractured media, chlorinated ethenes and ethanes are transported downwards through preferential pathways with subsequent diffusion into the sediment matrix. Due to slow back diffusion it can serve as a long...... term secondary source that can leach to the underlying aquifer. As some of the chlorinated solvents and their degradation products are toxic and carcinogenic, remediation technologies applicable in low permeability settings are needed. Enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) has been proven efficient...... and ethanes in clay till (Vadsbyvej) revealed a very complex system where diffusion, biotic and abiotic degradation processes occurred simultaneously. High resolution sub sampling with combined use of chemical analysis, molecular microbial tools and CSIA was necessary to identify both biotic and abiotic...

  10. The geochemistry of stable chlorine and bromine isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggenkamp, Hans [Onderzock and Beleving, Bussum (Netherlands)

    2014-11-01

    First book solely dedicated to the geochemistry of chlorine and bromine isotopes. Detailed description of analytical techniques, including their advantages and disadvantages. Indication of research fields where measurement of these isotopes is especially useful. This book provides detailed information on the history, analysis and applications of chlorine and bromine isotope geochemistry. Chlorine and bromine are geochemically unique as they prefer to exist as single charged negative ions. For this reason isotope fractionation reflects mostly processes that are not related to changes in the redox state and this fractionation is generally modest. The book will describe the processes that are most easily detected using these isotopes. Also isotope variations, and processes that cause them, measured in oxidised species such as perchlorates and in organic molecules will be described in this book.

  11. Survey of potential chlorine production processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    This report is part of the ongoing study of industrial electrochemical processes for the purpose of identifying methods of improving energy efficiencies. A computerized literature search of past and current chlorine generation methods was performed to identify basic chlorine production processes. Over 200 pertinent references are cited involving 20 separate and distinct chlorine processes. Each basic process is evaluated for its engineering and economic viability and energy efficiency. A flow diagram is provided for each basic process. Four criteria are used to determine the most promising processes: raw material availability, type and amount of energy required, by-product demand/disposal and status of development. The most promising processes are determined to be the membrane process (with and without catalytic electrodes), Kel-Chlor, Mobay (direct electrolysis of hydrogen chloride), the Shell process (catalytic oxidation of hydrogen chloride) and oxidation of ammonium chloride. Each of these processes is further studied to determine what activities may be pursued.

  12. Chlorination of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained on the Different Metal Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Pełech

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a chlorination method is proposed for simultaneous purification and functionalization of carbon nanotubes, thus increasing their ability to use. Carbon nanotubes were obtained by CVD method through ethylene decomposition on the nanocrystalline iron or cobalt or bimetallic iron-cobalt catalysts. The effects of temperature (50, 250, and 450°C in the case of carbon nanotubes obtained on the Fe-Co catalyst and type of catalyst (Fe, Co, Fe/Co on the effectiveness of the treatment and functionalization were tested. The phase composition of the samples was determined using the X-ray diffraction method. The quantitative analysis of metal impurity content was validated by means of the thermogravimetric analysis. Using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS analysis, and also Mohr titration method, the presence of chlorine species on the surface of chlorinated samples was confirmed.

  13. Supplying sodium and chlorine is effective on patients with congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Changcong Cui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the relationship of severity of heart failure and the concentration of serum sodium(Na + ) and chlorine(Cl- ) and to explore the effect of supplying sodium and chlorine on patients with Congestive heart failure. Methods: 80 patients with congestive heart failure were divided into two groups, namely supplying and control group. Serum sodium and chlorine were measured in all these patients. All treatments but supplying sodium and chlorine were same between the supplying and control groups. Results:According to NYHA, patients who were in class Ⅳ had lower level of serum sodium and chlorine than those in class Ⅱ ( P < 0.05). The heart function was improved after the level of serum sodium and chlorine were raised. Conclusions: The concentration of serum sodium and chlorine relates to the severity of heart failure. The therapy of supplying sodium and chlorine is an effective way to decrease death rate.

  14. 76 FR 62149 - American Chemistry Council, The Chlorine Institute, Inc., the Fertilizer Institute, and PPG...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board American Chemistry Council, The Chlorine Institute, Inc., the Fertilizer... American Chemistry Council, The Chlorine Institute, Inc., The Fertilizer Institute (TFI), and...

  15. Toxicity of chlorine dioxide to early life stages of marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hose, J.E.; Di Fiore, D.; Parker, H.S.; Sciarrotta, T.

    1989-03-01

    With increasing interest in minimizing exposure to chlorine, many electric generating and water treatment plants are exploring the use of alternative biocides such as chlorine dioxide. Unlike chlorine, chlorine dioxide does not react with ambient organic compounds to form potentially carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform. However, the toxicity of chlorine dioxide to aquatic organisms has received little study. No information exists on chlorine toxicity to marine organisms. Furthermore, West Coast electric power stations usually discharge chlorine intermittently once or twice daily and substantial mixing of receiving water occurs between treatments. Therefore, this study sought to obtain information on chlorine dioxide toxicity using an exposure schedule typical of generating stations which discharge into the marine environment. Early life history stages of a plant, invertebrate and fish were tested since these stages are generally acknowledged to be most sensitive to toxicants and are the stages that are most likely to be exposed to the effluent.

  16. Chlorine release from biomass. Part 6; Kloravgaang fraan biobraenslen. Del 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zintl, Frank; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    Chlorine release from model compounds and different biomass fuels has been studied during thermal treatment in an electric oven in inert atmosphere (N{sub 2}) and with addition of 10% O{sub 2}. The amount of chlorine in all investigated materials has been kept to 2% with addition of KCl solution in methanol. The amount of chlorine was analysed before and after treatment in the decided atmosphere and to the temperature chosen. The influence from different functional groups on the chlorine release at low temperatures has been studied in pyrolysis experiments of simple model compounds with different structures. A good correlation between the chlorine release and the functional groups in the model substances was achieved. Results from the experiments shows that the early chlorine release, is most likely to occur in all biofuels, since all biomass fuels contains biological material with significant amounts of functional groups which can interact with fuel chlorine ( inorganic chlorine)

  17. The spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is cleaved in virus infected Vero-E6 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Spike protein is one of the major structural proteins of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus. It is essential for the interaction of the virons with host cell receptors and subsequent fusion of the viral envelop with host cell membrane to allow infection. Some spike proteins of coronavirus, such as MHV, HCoV-OC43, AIBV and BcoV, are proteolytically cleaved into two subunits, S1 and S2. In contrast, TGV, FIPV and HCoV-229E are not. Many studies have shown that the cleavage of spike protein seriously affects its function. In order to investigate the maturation and proteolytic processing of the S protein of SARS CoV, we generated S1 and S2 subunit specific antibodies (Abs) as well as N, E and 3CL protein-specific Abs. Our results showed that the antibodies could efficiently and specifically bind to their corresponding proteins from E. coli expressed or lysate of SARS-CoV infected Vero-E6 cells by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the anti-S 1 and S2 Abs were proved to be capable of binding to SARS CoV under electron microscope observation. When S2 Ab was used to perform immune precipitation with lysate of SARS-CoV infected cells, a cleaved S2 fragment was detected with S2-specific mAb by Western blot analysis. The data demonstrated that the cleavage of S protein was observed in the lysate, indicating that proteolytic processing of S protein is present in host cells.

  18. Low contribution of PbO2-coated lead service lines to water lead contamination at the tap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllidou, Simoni; Schock, Michael R; DeSantis, Michael K; White, Colin

    2015-03-17

    To determine if residential water sampling corroborates the expectation that formation of stable PbO2 coatings on lead service lines (LSLs) provides an effective lead release control strategy, lead profile sampling was evaluated for eight home kitchen taps in three U.S. cities with observed PbO2-coated LSLs (Newport, Rhode Island; Cincinnati and Oakwood, Ohio). After various water standing times, these LSLs typically released similar or lower peak lead levels (1 to 18 μg/L) than the lead levels from the respective kitchen faucets (1 to 130 μg/L), and frequently 50-80% lower than the lead levels typically reported from Pb(II)-coated LSLs in comparable published sampling studies. Prolonged stagnation (10-101 h) at the Cincinnati sites produced varying results. One site showed minimal (0-4 μg/L) increase in lead release from the PbO2-coated LSL, and persistence of free chlorine residual. However, the other site showed up to a 3-fold increase proportional to standing time, with essentially full depletion of the chlorine residual. Overall, lead release was consistently much lower than that reported in studies of Pb(II)-coated LSL scales, suggesting that natural formation of PbO2 in LSLs is an effective lead "corrosion" control strategy.

  19. Transforming properties of Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in vitro and their transcriptional activity in feline squamous cell carcinoma in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altamura, Gennaro, E-mail: gennaro.altamura@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Corteggio, Annunziata, E-mail: ancorteg@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Pacini, Laura, E-mail: PaciniL@students.iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Conte, Andrea, E-mail: andreaconte88@hotmail.it [Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria, E-mail: gmpieran@unina.it [Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tommasino, Massimo, E-mail: tommasinom@iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Accardi, Rosita, E-mail: accardir@iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Borzacchiello, Giuseppe, E-mail: borzacch@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 (FcaPV2) DNA is found in feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs); however, its biological properties are still uncharacterized. In this study, we successfully expressed FcaPV2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in feline epithelial cells and demonstrated that FcaPV2 E6 binds to p53, impairing its protein level. In addition, E6 and E7 inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-triggered accumulation of p53, p21 and pro-apoptotic markers such as Cleaved Caspase3, Bax and Bak, suggesting a synergistic action of the virus with UV exposure in tumour pathogenesis. Furthermore, FcaPV2 E7 bound to feline pRb and impaired pRb levels, resulting in upregulation of the downstream pro-proliferative genes Cyclin A and Cdc2. Importantly, we demonstrated mRNA expression of FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 in feline SCC samples, strengthening the hypothesis of a causative role in the development of feline SCC. - Highlights: • FcaPV2 E6 binds to and deregulates feline p53 protein. • FcaPV2 E7 binds to and deregulates feline pRb protein. • FcaPV2 oncogenes inhibit UVB-induced apoptosis. • FcaPV2 E6E7 and E7 increase the lifespan of primary cells. • FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 are expressed at the mRNA level in feline SCC in vivo.

  20. An unusual case of reversible acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathina, Gangadhar; Yadla, Manjusha; Burri, Srikanth; Enganti, Rama; Prasad Ch, Rajendra; Deshpande, Pradeep; Ch, Ramesh; Prayaga, Aruna; Uppin, Megha

    2013-09-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a commonly used water disinfectant. Toxicity of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites is rare. In experimental studies, it was shown that acute and chronic toxicity were associated with insignificant hematological changes. Acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide was not reported. Two cases of renal toxicity due to its metabolites, chlorate and chlorite were reported. Herein, we report a case of chlorine dioxide poisoning presenting with acute kidney injury.

  1. Chlorine dioxide water disinfection: a prospective epidemiology study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, G.E.; Miday, R.K.; Bercz, J.P.; Miller, R.G.; Greathouse, D.G.; Kraemer, D.F.; Lucas, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of 198 persons exposed for 3 months to drinking water disinfected with chlorine dioxide was conducted in a rural village. A control population of 118 nonexposed persons was also studied. Pre-exposure hematologic and serum chemical parameters were compared with test results after 115 days of exposure. Chlorite ion levels in the water averaged approximately 5 ppM during the study period. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) of the data failed to identify any significant exposure-related effects. This study suggests that future evaluations of chlorine dioxide disinfection should be directed toward populations with potentially increased sensitivity to hemolytic agents.

  2. Kinetics and Mechanism of Bacterial Disinfection by Chlorine Dioxide1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarde, Melvin A.; Snow, W. Brewster; Olivieri, Vincent P.; Davidson, Burton

    1967-01-01

    Survival data are presented for a fecal strain of Escherichia coli exposed to three concentrations of chlorine dioxide at four temperatures. Chick's first-order reaction equation is generalized to a pseudo nth-order model. Nonlinear least squares curve-fitting of the survival data to the nth order model was performed on an analogue computer. The data were observed to follow fractional order kinetics with respect to survival concentration, with an apparent activation energy of 12,000 cal/mole. Initial experiments support the thesis that the mechanism of chlorine dioxide kill occurs via disruption of protein synthesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:5339839

  3. Thermodynamic equilibrium diagram of the chlorine-titanium system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ailing; GUO Xiaofei; ZHANG Heming; LIU Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical equilibria of the chlorine-titanium system in the presence of gaseous phase were investigated. Many species, which consisted of chlorine and titanium, were considered. Various thermodynamic equilibria were calculated in the different pressures at different temperatures. The calculated results were shown as log p-1/T and E-T diagrams. These diagrams may be used as important tools for corrosion study and titanium production. The diagrams are also used to thermodynamically determine the existence areas of various species and so on.

  4. Sonochemical Treatment of Water Polluted by Chlorinated Organocompounds. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Louisnard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As one of several types of pollutants in water, chlorinated compounds have been routinely subjected to sonochemical analysis to check the environmental applications of this technology. In this review, an extensive study of the influence of the initial concentration, ultrasonic intensity and frequency on the kinetics, degradation efficiency and mechanism has been analyzed. The sonochemical degradation follows a radical mechanism which yields a very wide range of chlorinated compounds in very low concentrations. Special attention has been paid to the mass balance comparing the results from several analytical techniques. As a conclusion, sonochemical degradation alone is not an efficient treatment to reduce the organic pollutant level in waste water.

  5. Oxidation of pharmaceuticals by chlorine dioxide in biologically treated wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, G.; Grabic, R.; Ledin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Biologically treated wastewater spiked with a mixture of 56 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) was treated with 0–20mg/L chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution in laboratory-scale experiments. Wastewater effluents were collected from two wastewater treatment plants in Sweden, one with extended......O2, while in high COD effluent a significant increase in API oxidation was observed after treatment with 8mg/L ClO2. This study illustrates the successful degradation of several APIs during treatment of wastewater effluents with chlorine dioxide....

  6. Chlorine international thermodynamic tables of the fluid state

    CERN Document Server

    Angus, S; de Reuck, K M

    1985-01-01

    Chlorine: International Thermodynamic Tables of the Fluid State-8 is a four-chapter book that covers available and estimated data on chlorine; estimation of the element's properties; the correlating equations for the element; and how the tabulated properties are calculated from chosen equation. The tables in this book give the volume, entropy, enthalpy, isobaric heat capacity, compression factor, fugacity/pressure ratio, Joule-Thomson coefficient, ratio of the heat capacities, and speed of sound as a function of pressure and temperature. Given in the tables as well are the pressure, entropy, i

  7. Recommendations of technical specifications for ethanol and its blends (E6) and the infrastructure for their management in Mexico; Recomendaciones de especificaciones tecnicas para el etanol y sus mezclas (E6) y la infraestructura para su manejo en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes the importance and benefits of using ethanol-gasoline blend as a substitute for pure gasoline. It presents data of global ethanol market, as well as major producers, processes involved for different raw materials and productivity indicators. It discusses the main properties to be monitored in ethanol and the importance of each one. It also examines the impact of the addition of ethanol in automotive gasoline and the influence of each property in the operation of the cars and the environment. It presents an assessment of the international specifications anhydrous ethanol used in the United States, Brazil and the European Union as well as suggestions for limits harmonization of the main parameters and methodologies, from recently published studies (White Paper-Bioetahnol Guidelines Task Force and to Ethanol from Worldwide Fuel Charter Committee). It includes the specification of Brazilian gasoline, added with 25% of ethanol (E25). It suggests an anhydrous ethanol specification and a specification for gasoline mixtures / ethanol E6 for implementation in Mexico. It presents a prioritization of laboratory testing methods for ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline in three categories, indicating the most appropriate test to be used at different points in the distribution chain of products. It discusses the impact of ethanol on the distribution facilities for fuels, actions to control potential problems, selection of materials and equipment, safety procedures and presents the mixing gasoline / ethanol. It also describes the Brazilian system of production / distribution of fuels and the experience of this country to control fuel quality from the legislation. It includes a table with the top teams, their costs, Brazilian suppliers and a list of Brazilian standards for fuel storage and transport. Finally, we present some suggestions that may be important to ensure the evolution of specifications of ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline in the course of the

  8. HPV16 E6蛋白与hDaxx的相互作用及其对HeLa细胞凋亡的影响%Apoptosis of HeLa cells inhibited by human papillomavirus type 16 E6 protein interacting with hDaxx

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aitao He; Xin Wang; Cuiming Zhu; Hengling Cai; Yanping Wan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the interaction of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 E6) protein and human death do-main associated protein (hDaxx) and its effect on apoptosis of HeLa cells to provide the experimental basis for exploring the oncogenic mechanism of HPV16 E6 protein. Methods: Recombinant vector of pGADT7/E6 or pGBKT7/hDaxx was con-structed. The interaction of E6 protein and hDaxx was detected by yeast two-hybrid system. Their expression in yeast was detected by Western blotting. The eukaryotic plasmids of E6 and hDaxx were co-transfected into HeLa cells. Apoptosis was induced by 5-FU. The apoptotic rate was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). Results: E6 protein had intracellular interaction with hDaxx. The apoptotic rate was rising with the increase in the transfection quantity of pcDNA3.1 (-)/ hDaxx in pcDNA3.1 (-)/E6 and pcDNA3.1 (-) / hDaxx co-transfected cells. The difference was significant ( P < 0. 01). Conclusion: There is intracellular interaction between HPV16 E6 protein and hDaxx. The over-expression of hDaxx can increase the sensitivity of E6 protein positive HeLa cells to 5-FU. The effect was in a dose dependent manner. HPV16 E6 protein inhibited the apoptosis of HeLa cells by interacting with hDaxx.

  9. Chlorine cell disinfection determination with flow cell cytometry and plate count (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M.C.F.M.; Keuten, M.G.A.; De Kreuk, M.K.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine is used for disinfection in different water systems. This research focuses on chlorine disinfection in swimming pool water. In the Netherlands, free available chlorine concentrations in swimming pools are limited between 0.5-1.5 mg/L, which is based on a 4-log removal of Pseudomonas aerugin

  10. Estimates of Gibbs free energies of formation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolfing, Jan; Janssen, Dick B.

    1994-01-01

    The Gibbs free energy of formation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds was estimated with Mavrovouniotis' group contribution method. The group contribution of chlorine was estimated from the scarce data available on chlorinated aliphatics in the literature, and found to vary somewhat according to the

  11. Transfection with the ribozyme targeting HPVE6 mRNA results in growth inhibition of E6-expressing cervical carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑燕芳; 张积仁

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To acquire a ribozyme against the E6 gene of human papillomaviruses type 16 (HPV16E6) and investigate its effects on the phenotypes and gene expression of cervical cancer cell line. Methods: Anti-HPV16E6 ribozyme (HRz) was designed by computer programs and its activity identified by cleavage experiment in vitro before its transfection via lipofectin into CaSKi cells with the empty eucaryotic expression plasmid transfection of the cells also performed, the resultant cells designated as CaSKi-R, CaSKi-P respectively. The morphology and the soft agar forming ability were studied in CaSKi cells and the transfected cells, and the expression of E6, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and C-erbB-2 genes assayed by flow cytometry. The tumorgenicity of each cell line was evaluated in nude mice receiving inoculations of CaSKi, CaSKi-R and CaSKi-P cells separately, while in one group, both CaSKi and CaSKi-R cells were inoculated on different sides of the mice. Results: HRz was able to cleave HPV16E6 mRNA in a site-specific manner and could be expressed stably in transfected CaSKi cells. Northern blot analysis showed that E6 mRNA was less in CaSKi-R than in CaSKi cells, and no significant difference in the morphology and growth rate was observed between CaSKi and CaSKi-P cells, but the growth rate CaSKi-R was lowered. The colony-forming rate of CaSKi-P in soft agar was similar to that of CaSKi cells, while that of CaSKi-R was decreased. Flow cytometry showed that anti-HPV16E6 ribozyme reduced the expression of E6, PCNA and C-erbB-2 genes in CaSKi-R cells, but not in CaSKi-P cells. The tumorgenicity of CaSKi-R in nude mice was decreased compared with CaSKi cells. Conclusion: HRz can partially reverse the malignant phenotype of CaSKi cells, possibly due to decreased E6 gene expression, and the consequent decrease of PCNA and C-erbB-2 gene expressions.

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo Synergistic Therapeutic Effect of Cisplatin with Human Papillomavirus16 E6/E7 CRISPR/Cas9 on Cervical Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Zhen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 is one of the major etiologic factors of cervical cancer. Our study aims to investigate the potentiality of the antiviral clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated Cas9 system (CRISPR/Cas9 targeting the E6 and E7 oncogenes of HPV16 as a potential chemosensitizer of cisplatin (cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II; CDDP for cervical cancer. METHODS: Specifically, the therapeutic efficacy of combination of CDDP and HPV16 E6 + E7-CRISPR/Cas9 was assessed in cervical cancer cells and cervical cancer xenograft models. RESULTS: In vitro experiments showed that long-term exposure of SiHa cells to the HPV16 E6 + E7-CRISPR/Cas9 induced apoptosis, and its pro-apoptosis effect became more obvious when combined with CDDP. In vivo study found the efficacy of the combination of HPV16 E6 + E7-CRISPR/Cas9 and CDDP were superior to either of the treatments in term of apoptosis induction and metastasis inhibition. CONCLUSION: Collectively, our results suggested that HPV16 E6 + E7-CRISPR/Cas9 could be an effective sensitizer of CDDP chemotherapy in cervical cancer.

  13. E6/E7-P53-POU2F1-CTHRC1 axis promotes cervical cancer metastasis and activates Wnt/PCP pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Lu, Huan; Lyu, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Xiao-mei; Zhu, Lin-yan; Yang, Guang-dong; Jiang, Peng-cheng; Re, Yuan; Song, Wei-wei; Wang, Jin-hao; Zhang, Can-can; Gu, Fei; Luo, Tian-jiao; Wu, Zhi-yong; Xu, Cong-jian

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is an infectious cancer and the most common gynecologic cancer worldwide. E6/E7, the early genes of the high-risk mucosal human papillomavirus type, play key roles in the carcinogenic process of cervical cancer. However, little was known about its roles in modulating tumor microenvironment, particular extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we found that E6/E7 could regulate multiple ECM proteins, especially collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1). CTHRC1 is highly expressed in cervical cancer tissue and serum and closely correlated with clinicopathological parameters. CTHRC1 promotes cervical cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. E6/E7 regulates the expression of CTHRC1 in cervical cancer by E6/E7-p53-POU2F1 (POU class 2 homeobox 1) axis. Futhermore, CTHRC1 activates Wnt/PCP signaling pathway. Take together, E6/E7-p53-POU2F1-CTHRC1 axis promotes cervical cancer cell invasion and metastasis and may act as a potential therapeutic target for interventions against cervical cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:28303973

  14. Expression of E6, p53 and p21 proteins and physical state of HPV16 in cervical cytologies with and without low grade lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Diana K Jiménez; Sotelo, Daniel Hernández; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Leyva-Vazquez, Marco A; Alfaro, Eugenia Flores; Coronel, Yaneth Castro; Hernández, Oscar Del Moral; Romero, Luz Del Carmen Alarcón

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between expression of HPV16 E6, p53 and p21 proteins and the physical state of HPV16 in cervical cytologies without squamous intraepithelial lesions (Non-SIL) and with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), both with HPV16 infection. 101 liquid-based cytological samples were analyzed. 50 samples were without squamous intraepithelial lesions (Non-IL) and 51 samples of low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), both with HPV16 infection. HPV16 infection was determined by PCR-RFLP, and the physical state of HPV16 by in situ hybridization with tyramide-amplification. The expression of E6, p53 and p21 proteins was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. The expression of HPV16 E6 protein was significantly higher in LSIL that in Non-SIL samples (p=0.006). We found a significant correlation between E6 expression and the physical state of HPV16 in Non-SIL (p=0.049). Our results suggest that high expression of E6 in LSIL is an early event of cervical carcinogenesis and perhaps can be used as an early marker.

  15. 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) treatment downregulates the HPV E6 and E7 oncogene expression and blocks neoplastic growth of HPV-associated cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, Maximilian; Ganss, Lennard; Puschhof, Jens; Prigge, Elena-Sophie; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Guiterrez, Ana; Vinokurova, Svetlana; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2016-07-16

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (hr HPVs) may cause various human cancers and associated premalignant lesions. Transformation of the host cells is triggered by overexpression of the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that deregulate the cell cycle and induce chromosomal instability. This process is accompanied by hypermethylation of distinct CpG sites resulting in silencing of tumor suppressor genes, inhibition of the viral E2 mediated control of E6 and E7 transcription as well as deregulated expression of host cell microRNAs. Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with demethylating agents might restore those regulatory mechanisms. Here we show that treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) strongly decreases the expression of E6 and E7 in a panel of HPV-transformed cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Reduction of E6 and E7 further resulted in increased target protein levels including p53 and p21 reducing the proliferation rates and colony formation abilities of the treated cell lines. Moreover, DAC treatment led to enhanced expression of tumor the suppressive miRNA-375 that targets and degrades E6 and E7 transcripts. Therefore, we suggest that DAC treatment of HPV-associated cancers and respective precursor lesions may constitute a targeted approach to subvert HPV oncogene functions that deserves testing in clinical trials.

  16. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen P; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Groves, Ian J; Odle, Richard I; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-07-26

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of 'master regulators' for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins.

  17. The Immediate Pulmonary Disease Pattern following Exposure to High Concentrations of Chlorine Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi P. Balte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Classification of pulmonary disease into obstructive, restrictive, and mixed patterns is based on 2005 ATS/ERS guidelines and modified GOLD criteria by Mannino et al. (2003, but these guidelines are of limited use for simple spirometry in situations involving mass casualties. Aim. The purpose of this study was to apply these guidelines to patients who underwent simple spirometry following high concentration of chlorine gas inhalation after a train derailment in Graniteville, South Carolina. Methods. We retrospectively investigated lung functions in ten patients. In order to classify pulmonary disease pattern, we used 2005 ATS/ERS guidelines and modified GOLD criteria along with our own criteria developed using available simple spirometry data. Results. We found predominant restrictive pattern in our patients with both modified GOLD and our criteria, which is in contrast to other chlorine exposure studies where obstructive pattern was more common. When compared to modified GOLD and our criteria, 2005 ATS/ERS guidelines underestimated the frequency of restrictive disease. Conclusion. Diagnosis of pulmonary disease patterns is of importance after irritant gas inhalation. Acceptable criteria need to be developed to evaluate pulmonary disease through simple spirometry in events leading to mass casualty and patient surge in hospitals.

  18. Use of chlorine kinetic isotope effects for evaluating ion pairing in nucleophilic displacements at saturated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Taylor, J.W.; Turnquist, C.R.

    1978-11-08

    Use of the Winstein scheme to describe ion pairing leads to the conclusion that chlorine kinetic isotope effects (KIE) are primarily responsive to processes involving the covalently bound chlorine and less indicative of reactions which occur after the formation of the initial ion pair. This conclusion has been tested by showing that the calculated equilibrium isotope effect (1.0057) and observed (1.0059/sub 6/ +- 0.0001/sub 1/) KIE are nearly identical when the solvolysis of p-methylbenzyl chloride is forced toward a limiting case with 97% trifluoroethanol as solvent. The reaction of p-phenoxybenzyl chloride showed similar behavior with an equilibrium KIE value of 1.0058/sub 4/ +- 0.0001/sub 1/. These results suggest that competing ion-pair and S/sub N/2 processes may be one factor contributing to Hammett plot curvature for these nucleophilic displacement reactions. Chloride KIE values for the reaction of n-butyl chloride with thiophenoxide anion, where ion pairing does not occur, show little variation with a wide variety of solvents. 3 tables.

  19. Predicting total organic halide formation from drinking water chlorination using quantitative structure-property relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luilo, G B; Cabaniss, S E

    2011-10-01

    Chlorinating water which contains dissolved organic matter (DOM) produces disinfection byproducts, the majority of unknown structure. Hence, the total organic halide (TOX) measurement is used as a surrogate for toxic disinfection byproducts. This work derives a robust quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) for predicting the TOX formation potential of model compounds. Literature data for 49 compounds were used to train the QSPR in moles of chlorine per mole of compound (Cp) (mol-Cl/mol-Cp). The resulting QSPR has four descriptors, calibration [Formula: see text] of 0.72 and standard deviation of estimation of 0.43 mol-Cl/mol-Cp. Internal and external validation indicate that the QSPR has good predictive power and low bias (‰<‰1%). Applying this QSPR to predict TOX formation by DOM surrogates - tannic acid, two model fulvic acids and two agent-based model assemblages - gave a predicted TOX range of 136-184 µg-Cl/mg-C, consistent with experimental data for DOM, which ranged from 78 to 192 µg-Cl/mg-C. However, the limited structural variation in the training data may limit QSPR applicability; studies of more sulfur-containing compounds, heterocyclic compounds and high molecular weight compounds could lead to a more widely applicable QSPR.

  20. 21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlorinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as... producing, manufacturing, packing, processing, preparing, treating, packaging, transporting, or holding food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyether resins, chlorinated. 177.2430 Section...

  1. Riverine input of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the coastal pollution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; Everaarts, J.M.

    of various chlorinated hydrocarbons. It deals with an in-depth analysis of pollution of the coastal ecosystem around the Netherlands, U.K. and Germany due to inputs of contaminants from the rivers namely, Elbe, Weser, Ems Ijssel, Rhine, Meuse, Scheldt, Thames...

  2. Physical property determinations of short chain chlorinated paraffins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouillard, K.G.D. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Soil Science; Hiebert, T.; Friesen, K.J. [Univ. of Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Muir, D.C.G. [Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Chlorinated paraffins (CP) are chlorinated derivatives of n-alkanes commonly utilized in commercial formulations of flame retardants, plasticizers and high pressure lubricants. Recent reviews on CPs have expressed concern regarding the potential toxicity and carcinogenic properties of these compounds. Of the various classes of CPs, short chain compounds (carbon chain lengths 10 to 13) appear to pose the greatest risk. There is little data available concerning key physical properties of CPs required to assess their environmental behavior and mobility. In this study, water solubilities, dissolved organic matter water partition coefficients (K{sub DOM}) and Henry`s Law constants were determined for short chain chlorinated paraffins by generator column, apparent solubility enhancement and gas-purging techniques. Water solubilities were determined for synthesized, isolated products of polychlorinated decanes, undecanes and dodecanes. Solubilities at 25 C were on the order of 2 to 140 {micro}g/L for tetra- to hexachlorodecane products. The Henry`s Law constants for tetra- and pentachlorodecane were determined to be 6.6 {+-} 0.6 and 3.5 {+-} 0.6 Pa{center_dot}m{sup 3}{center_dot}mol{sup {minus}1} respectively. Relationships between carbon chain length and degree of chlorination on the determined physical properties will be discussed.

  3. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Vaughn, J.M. (Univ. of New England College of Medicine, Biddeford, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  4. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y S; Vaughn, J M

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4 degrees C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10(5)-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate at neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants. PMID:2160222

  5. Biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in a water unsaturated topsoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, T.; Ambus, P.; Laturnus, F.

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate topsoils as potential sinks for chlorinated solvents from the atmosphere, the degradation of trichloromethane (CHCl3), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (CH3CCl3), tetrachloromethane (CCl4), trichloroethene (C2HCl3) and tetrachloroethene (C2Cl4) was studied in anoxic laboratory experi...

  6. Transformation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons on Synthetic Green Rusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green rusts (GRs) are layered double hydroxides that contain both ferrous and ferric ions in their structure. GRs can potentially serve as a chemical reductant for degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. GRs are found in zerovalent iron based permeable reactive barriers and in c...

  7. Release of Chlorine and Sulfur during Biomass Torrefaction and Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, Suriyati Binti; Flensborg, Julie Pauline; Shoulaifar, Tooran Khazraie

    2014-01-01

    -forming elements were torrefied/pyrolyzed in the temperature range of 150-500 degrees C. The relative release of chlorine and sulfur was calculated based on mass balance and analysis of the biomass before and after torrefaction. In selected cases, measurement of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) in the gas from straw...

  8. Transformation of chlorinated compounds by methanogenic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekert, van M.H.A.

    1999-01-01

    Chlorinated compounds are an important group of contaminants often found in sediments, groundwater, soils, wastewaters, and off-gasses. Many of these pollutants are found on the EPA list of Priority Pollutants indicating their potential hazard for the environment. Initial degradation can occur via d

  9. Degradation of Chlorinated Aromatic Compounds in UASB Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nina; Hendriksen, Hanne Vang; Järvinen, Kimmo T.;

    1995-01-01

    Data on anaerobic degradation of chloroaromatic compounds in Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactors (UASB-reactor) are presented and compared. Special attention is given to the metabolic pathways for degradation of chlorinated phenols by granular sludge. Results indicate that PCP can be degraded...

  10. ANALYSIS OF NASAL TISSUE FOR BIOMARKERS OF CHLORINE EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both 3-chloro-tyrosine (CT) and 3,5-dichloro-tyrosine (dCT) are sensitive and specific biomarkers for evaluating exposure to chlorine gas (Cl2) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Previous investigations have focused on the formation of CT and dCT resulting from biochemical responses ...

  11. Electrochemical chlorine evolution at rutile oxide (110) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heine Anton; Man, Isabela Costinela; Studt, Felix;

    2010-01-01

    of the oxygen binding energy, giving rise to a Sabatier volcano. By combining the surface phase diagram and the volcano describing the catalytic activity, we find that the reaction mechanism differs depending on catalyst material. The flexibility in reaction path means that the chlorine evolution activity...

  12. Disinfection byproduct yields from the chlorination of natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Yields for the formation of trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-halide disinfection byproducts were determined as a function of pH and initial free-chlorine concentration for the chlorination of water from the Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers. Samples were collected at 12 sites on the Mississippi River from Minneapolis, MN, to New Orleans. LA, and on the Missouri and Ohio Rivers 1.6 km above their confluences with the Mississippi during the summer, fall, and spring seasons of the year. Yields varied little with distance along the Mississippi River, although the dissolved organic-carbon concentration decreased considerably with distance downstream. Yields for the Missouri and Ohio were comparable to yields for the Mississippi, despite much higher bromide concentrations for the Missouri and Ohio. Trihalomethane yields increased as the pH and initial free- chlorine concentration increased. Nonpurgeable total organic-halide yields also increased as the initial free-chlorine concentration increased, but decreased as the pH increased.

  13. Clustering chlorine reactivity of haloacetic acid precursors in inland lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Teng; Arnold, William A

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents the major pool of organic precursors for harmful disinfection byproducts, such as haloacetic acids (HAAs), formed during drinking water chlorination, but much of it remains molecularly uncharacterized. Knowledge of model precursors is thus a prerequisite for understanding the more complex whole water DOM. The utility of HAA formation potential data from model DOM precursors, however, is limited due to the lack of comparability to water samples. In this study, the formation kinetics of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), the two predominant HAA species, were delineated upon chlorination of seventeen model DOM precursors and sixty-eight inland lake water samples collected from the Upper Midwest region of the United States. Of particular interest was the finding that the DCAA and TCAA formation rate constants could be grouped into four statistically distinct clusters reflecting the core structural features of model DOM precursors (i.e., non-β-diketone aliphatics, β-diketone aliphatics, non-β-diketone phenolics, and β-diketone phenolics). A comparative approach built upon hierarchical cluster analysis was developed to gain further insight into the chlorine reactivity patterns of HAA precursors in inland lake waters as defined by the relative proximity to four model precursor clusters. This work highlights the potential for implementing an integrated kinetic-clustering approach to constrain the chlorine reactivity of DOM in source waters.

  14. The chlorine isotope fingerprint of the lunar magma ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Jeremy W; Treiman, Allan H; Guan, Yunbin; Ma, Chi; Eiler, John M; Gross, Juliane; Greenwood, James P; Stolper, Edward M

    2015-09-01

    The Moon contains chlorine that is isotopically unlike that of any other body yet studied in the Solar System, an observation that has been interpreted to support traditional models of the formation of a nominally hydrogen-free ("dry") Moon. We have analyzed abundances and isotopic compositions of Cl and H in lunar mare basalts, and find little evidence that anhydrous lava outgassing was important in generating chlorine isotope anomalies, because (37)Cl/(35)Cl ratios are not related to Cl abundance, H abundance, or D/H ratios in a manner consistent with the lava-outgassing hypothesis. Instead, (37)Cl/(35)Cl correlates positively with Cl abundance in apatite, as well as with whole-rock Th abundances and La/Lu ratios, suggesting that the high (37)Cl/(35)Cl in lunar basalts is inherited from urKREEP, the last dregs of the lunar magma ocean. These new data suggest that the high chlorine isotope ratios of lunar basalts result not from the degassing of their lavas but from degassing of the lunar magma ocean early in the Moon's history. Chlorine isotope variability is therefore an indicator of planetary magma ocean degassing, an important stage in the formation of terrestrial planets.

  15. Novel anti-metastatic action of cidofovir mediated by inhibition of E6/E7, CXCR4 and Rho/ROCK signaling in HPV tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessamad Amine

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is frequently associated with HPV infection. The expression of E6 and E7 HPV oncoproteins is a key factor in its carcinogenicity and might also influence its virulence, including metastatic conversion. The cellular mechanisms involved in metastatic spread remain elusive, but pro-adhesive receptors and their ligands, such as SDF-1alpha and CXCR4 are implicated. In the present study, we assessed the possible relationship between SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 signaling, E6/E7 status and the metastatic process. We found that SDF-1alpha stimulated the invasion of E6/E7-positive cancer cell lines (HeLa and TC-1 in Matrigel though CXCR4 and subsequent Rho/ROCK activation. In pulmonary metastatic foci generated by TC-1 cells IV injection a high proportion of cells expressed membrane-associated CXCR4. In both cases models (in vitro and in vivo cell adhesion and invasion was abrogated by CXCR4 immunological blockade supporting a contribution of SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 to the metastatic process. E6 and E7 silencing using stable knock-down and the approved anti-viral agent, Cidofovir decreased CXCR4 gene expression as well as both, constitutive and SDF-1alpha-induced cell invasion. In addition, Cidofovir inhibited lung metastasis (both adhesion and invasion supporting contribution of E6 and E7 oncoproteins to the metastatic process. Finally, potential signals activated downstream SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 and involved in lung homing of E6/E7-expressing tumor cells were investigated. The contribution of the Rho/ROCK pathway was suggested by the inhibitory effect triggered by Cidofovir and further confirmed using Y-27632 (a small molecule ROCK inhibitor. These data suggest a novel and highly translatable therapeutic approach to cervix cancer, by inhibition of adhesion and invasion of circulating HPV-positive tumor cells, using Cidofovir and/or ROCK inhibition.

  16. Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA detection in cervical exfoliated cells: a potential triage for HPV-positive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ye-Li; Tian, Qi-Fang; Cheng, Bei; Cheng, Yi-Fan; Ye, Jing; Lu, Wei-Guo

    Cytology triage has been generally recommended for human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive women, but is highly dependent on well-trained cytologists. The present study was designed to explore whether HPV E6/E7 mRNA detection in cervical exfoliated cells can be a potential triage for HPV-positive women from a clinic-based population. Both the primary HPV testing and Papanicolaou (Pap) test were performed on all eligible HPV-positive women. HPV E6/E7 mRNA was detected by QuantiVirus(®) HPV E6/E7 mRNA assay in cervical exfoliated cells. All HPV-positive women underwent colposcopy and further biopsy if indicated. The data were assessed by Pearson's Chi-squared test and the receiver operating characteristic curve. A total of 404 eligible HPV-positive women were enrolled. Positive rate of E6/E7 mRNA in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) cases was higher than that in low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) or normal cases. There was no statistical difference found between mRNA and cytological testing with sensitivity (89.52% vs. 86.67%, P=0.671), specificity (48.96% vs. 48.96%, P=1.000), positive predictive value (39.00% vs. 38.24%, P=1.000), and negative predictive value (92.76% vs. 90.97%, P=0.678) for detecting ≥HSIL. HPV E6/E7 mRNA detection in cervical exfoliated cells shows the same performance as Pap triage for HSIL identification for HPV-positive women. Detection of HPV E6/E7 mRNA may be used as a new triage option for HPV-positive women.

  17. Large-scale analysis of protein expression changes in human keratinocytes immortalized by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnouk Hilal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with high-risk type human papilloma viruses (HPVs is associated with cervical carcinomas and with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes cooperate to achieve cell immortalization by a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Here, human keratinocytes were immortalized by long-term expression of HPV type 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, or both. Proteomic profiling was used to compare expression levels for 741 discrete protein features. Results Six replicate measurements were performed for each group using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. The median within-group coefficient of variation was 19–21%. Significance of between-group differences was tested based on Significance Analysis of Microarray and fold change. Expression of 170 (23% of the protein features changed significantly in immortalized cells compared to primary keratinocytes. Most of these changes were qualitatively similar in cells immortalized by E6, E7, or E6/7 expression, indicating convergence on a common phenotype, but fifteen proteins (~2% were outliers in this regulatory pattern. Ten demonstrated opposite regulation in E6- and E7-expressing cells, including the cell cycle regulator p16INK4a; the carbohydrate binding protein Galectin-7; two differentially migrating forms of the intermediate filament protein Cytokeratin-7; HSPA1A (Hsp70-1; and five unidentified proteins. Five others had a pattern of expression that suggested cooperativity between the co-expressed oncoproteins. Two of these were identified as forms of the small heat shock protein HSPB1 (Hsp27. Conclusion This large-scale analysis provides a framework for understanding the cooperation between E6 and E7 oncoproteins in HPV-driven carcinogenesis.

  18. Tumourigenesis driven by the human papillomavirus type 16 Asian-American e6 variant in a three-dimensional keratinocyte model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jackson

    Full Text Available Infection with a transforming human papillomavirus (HPV such as type 16 (of species Alphapapillomavirus 9 causes ano-genital and oral tumours via viral persistence in human squamous cell epithelia. Epidemiological studies showed that the naturally occurring HPV16 Asian-American (AA variant (sublineage D2/D3 is found more often than the European Prototype (EP (sublineage A1 in high-grade cervical neoplasia and tumours compared to non-cancer controls. Just three amino acid changes within the early gene, E6, of HPV16 AA have been linked to this augmented tumourigenicity. The AAE6 variant's greater immortalizing and transforming potential over EPE6 has recently been confirmed in retrovirally-transduced keratinocytes expressing the E6 gene only. However, the tumourigenic role of the full-length viral genome of HPV16 has not yet been addressed with regard to these E6 variants. To investigate this process in the context of these two HPV16 E6 genotypes, an organotypic tissue culture model was used to simulate the HPV infectious life cycle. The AAE6 variant demonstrated an enhanced ability over EPE6 to drive the viral life cycle toward tumourigenesis, as evidenced phenotypically-by a more severe grade of epithelial dysplasia with higher proliferation and deregulated differentiation, and molecularly-by high viral oncogene E6 and E7 expression, but lack of productive viral life cycle markers. In contrast, EPE6 had low E6 and E7 but high E1∧E4 expression, indicative of a productive life cycle. We suggest increased viral integration into the host genome for AAE6 as one possible mechanism for these observed differences from EPE6. Additionally, we found downstream effects on immortalization and host innate immune evasion. This study highlights how minor genomic variations in transforming viruses can have a significant affect on their tumourigenic ability.

  19. Molecular genetic characterization of p53 mutated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells transformed with human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Oh; Shin, Jung-Young; Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Won, Hye-Sung; Chun, Sang-Hoon; Jung, Chan-Kwon; Park, Won-Sang; Nam, Suk-Woo; Eun, Jung-Woo; Kang, Jin-Hyoung

    2013-08-01

    Patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer show better tumor response to radiation or chemotherapy than patients with HPV-negative cancer. HPV oncoprotein E6 binds and degrades a typically wild-type p53 protein product. However, HPV16 infection and p53 mutation infrequently coexist in a subset of HNSCCs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms through which tumor biology and molecular genetic mechanisms change when two HPV-negative, p53-mutated oropharyngeal cell lines (YD8, non-disruptive p53 mutation; YD10B, disruptive p53 mutation) derived from patients with a history of heavy smoking are transfected with HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes in vitro. Transfection with HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes in YD8, reduced the abundance of proteins encoded by tumor suppressor genes, such as p-p53 and p-Rb. Cell proliferative activity was increased in the cells transfected with E6E7 compared to cells transfected with vector alone (P=0.09), whereas the invasiveness of E6E7-transfected cells was significantly reduced (P=0.02). cDNA microarray of the transfected cells with E6E7 showed significant changes in mRNA expression in several signaling pathways, including focal adhesion, JAK-STAT signaling pathway, cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway. Regarding the qPCR array for the p53 signaling pathway, the mRNA expression of STAT1 was remarkably upregulated by 6.47-fold (Pcell carcinoma cases with non-disruptive p53 mutations.

  20. Chlorine-36 and the initial value problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Stanley N.; Cecil, DeWayne; Zreda, Marek; Sharma, Pankaj

    Chlorine-36 is a radionuclide with a half-life of 3.01×105a. Most 36Cl in the hydrosphere originates from cosmic radiation interacting with atmospheric gases. Large amounts were also produced by testing thermonuclear devices during 1952-58. Because the monovalent anion, chloride, is the most common form of chlorine found in the hydrosphere and because it is extremely mobile in aqueous systems, analyses of both total Cl- as well as 36Cl have been important in numerous hydrologic studies. In almost all applications of 36Cl, a knowledge of the initial, or pre-anthropogenic, levels of 36Cl is useful, as well as essential in some cases. Standard approaches to the determination of initial values have been to: (a) calculate the theoretical cosmogenic production and fallout, which varies according to latitude; (b) measure 36Cl in present-day precipitation and assume that anthropogenic components can be neglected; (c) assume that shallow groundwater retains a record of the initial concentration; (d) extract 36Cl from vertical depth profiles in desert soils; (e) recover 36Cl from cores of glacial ice; and (f) calculate subsurface production of 36Cl for water that has been isolated from the atmosphere for more than one million years. The initial value from soil profiles and ice cores is taken as the value that occurs directly below the depth of the easily defined bomb peak. All six methods have serious weaknesses. Complicating factors include 36Cl concentrations not related to cosmogenic sources, changes in cosmogenic production with time, mixed sources of chloride in groundwater, melting and refreezing of water in glaciers, and seasonal groundwater recharge that does not contain average year-long concentrations of 36Cl. Résumé Le chlore-36 est un radionucléide de période 3.01×105a. Pour l'essentiel, le 36Cl dans l'hydrosphère provient des effets du rayonnement cosmique sur les gaz atmosphériques. De grandes quantités de 36Cl ont aussi été produites au cours des

  1. Comparison of the efficacy of free residual chlorine and monochloramine against biofilms in model and full scale cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türetgen, Irfan

    2004-04-01

    The presence of microbial cells on surfaces results in the formation of biofilms, which may also give rise to microbiologically influenced corrosion. Biofilms accumulate on all submerged industrial and environmental surfaces. The efficacy of disinfectants is usually evaluated using planktonic cultures, which often leads to an underestimate of the concentration required to control a biofilm. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of monochloramine on biofilms developed in a cooling tower. The disinfectants selected for the study were commercial formulations recommended for controlling microbial growth in cooling towers. A cooling tower and a laboratory model recirculating water system were used as biofilm reactors. Although previous studies have evaluated the efficacy of free chlorine and monochloramine for controlling biofilm growth, there is a lack of published data concerning the use monochloramine in cooling towers. Stainless steel coupons were inserted in each tower basin for a period of 30 d before removal. Monochloramine and free chlorine were tested under identical conditions on mixed biofilms which had been allowed to grow on coupons. Monochloramine was found to be significantly more effective than free chlorine against cooling tower biofilms.

  2. Proportion of bromo-DBPs in total DBPs during reclaimed-water chlorination and its related influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; QU JiuHui; LIU HuiJuan; ZHAO Xu

    2008-01-01

    During the chlorine disinfection of reclaimed-water, the proportion of bromo-disinfection by-products (bromo-DBPs) in total DBPs is affected by chlorine dosage, reaction time, Ph, ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) and preozonation. Results show that bromo-trihalomethanes (bromo-THMs) form more easily than bromo-haloacetic acids (bromo-HAAs) and bromine incorporation in DBPs decreases with the increase of chlorine dosage. Within 5 h, bromine incorporation in THMs (n(Br)) increases but bromine incorporation in HAAs (n'(Br)) decreases with the extension of reaction time; however, n(Br) decreases and n'(Br) keeps relatively constant at a longer reaction time. Furthermore, bromine incorporation in DBPs is low under acidic and alkaline conditions. The increase of NH3-N concentration inhibits the formation of chloro-DBPs, resulting in the increase of n(Br) and n'(Br) to some extent. Preozonation enhances the formation of HOBr and the increase of bromine incorporation in DBPs; however, ozone of a high concentration oxidizes HOBr to its salt form, leading to the decrease of bromine incorporation in DBPs.

  3. Proportion of bromo-DBPs in total DBPs during reclaimed-water chlorination and its related influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    During the chlorine disinfection of reclaimed-water, the proportion of bromo-disinfection by-products (bromo-DBPs) in total DBPs is affected by chlorine dosage, reaction time, pH, ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) and preozonation. Results show that bromo-trihalomethanes (bromo-THMs) form more easily than bromo-haloacetic acids (bromo-HAAs) and bromine incorporation in DBPs decreases with the increase of chlorine dosage. Within 5 h, bromine incorporation in THMs (n(Br)) increases but bromine incorpo-ration in HAAs (n′(Br)) decreases with the extension of reaction time; however, n(Br) decreases and n′(Br) keeps relatively constant at a longer reaction time. Furthermore, bromine incorporation in DBPs is low under acidic and alkaline conditions. The increase of NH3-N concentration inhibits the formation of chloro-DBPs, resulting in the increase of n(Br) and n′(Br) to some extent. Preozonation enhances the formation of HOBr and the increase of bromine incorporation in DBPs; however, ozone of a high con-centration oxidizes HOBr to its salt form, leading to the decrease of bromine incorporation in DBPs.

  4. [Electrochemical reduction characteristics and mechanism of chlorinated hydrocarbon at the copper electrode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Ying; Gao, Ting-Yao; Zhou, Rong-Feng; Ma, Lu-Ming

    2005-07-01

    The electrochemical reduction characteristics of chlorinated hydrocarbons were investigated by applying cyclic voltammetry technique. The reduction mechanism and reactivity of the chlorinated hydrocarbons at the copper electrodes were explored. The relation between the reductive reactivity at the copper electrode and the structures of this kind of compounds was discussed. The experimental results show that chlorinated paraffin hydrocarbons and a portion of chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons could be reduced directly at the copper electrode; however, chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons aren't easy to reduced directly at the copper electrode. The results provide a theoretical basis for the catalyzed iron inner electrolysis method.

  5. Selective synthesis and characterization of chlorins as sensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montforts, Franz-Peter; Kusch, Dirk; Hoper, Frank; Braun, Stefan; Gerlach, Benjamin; Brauer, Hans-Dieter; Schermann, Guido; Moser, Joerg G.

    1996-04-01

    Chlorin type sensitizers have ideal photophysical properties for an application in PDT. The basic chlorin framework of these sensitizers has to be modified by attachment of lipophilic and hydrophilic residues to achieve a good cell uptake and tumor enrichment. In the present study we describe the selective synthesis of amphiphilic chlorins starting from the readily accessible red blood pigment heme. The photophysical properties of the well defined synthetic chlorins are characterized by photophysical investigations. The kinetic of cell uptake, the localization in the cell and the photodynamic behavior of the amphiphilic sensitizers are demonstrated by incubation of A 375 cancer cell lines with structurally different chlorins.

  6. Fixed points subgroups by two involutive automorphisms $\\sigma, \\gamma$ of compact exceptional Lie groups $F_4, E_6$ and $E_7$

    OpenAIRE

    Miyashita, Toshikazu

    2010-01-01

    For simply connected compact exceptional Lie groups $G = F_4, E_6$ and $E_7$, we consider two involutions $\\sigma, \\gamma$ and determine the group structure of subgroups $G^{\\sigma,\\gamma}$ of $G$ which are the intersection $G^\\sigma \\cap G^{\\gamma}$ of the fixed points subgroups of $G^\\sigma$ and $G^{\\gamma}$. The motivation is as follows. In [1](see the References of this paper), we determine the group structure of $(F_4)^{\\sigma, \\sigma'}, (E_6)^{\\sigma, \\sigma'}$ and $(E_7)^{\\sigma, \\sigm...

  7. Impact of January 2005 solar proton events on chlorine species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Damiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden changes in stratospheric chlorine species in the polar northern atmosphere, caused by the Solar Proton Events (SPEs of 17 and 20 January 2005, have been investigated and compared with version 4 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4. We used Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS measurements to monitor the variability of ClO, HCl, HOCl and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounder (MIPAS on ENVISAT to retrieve ClONO2. SPE-induced chlorine activation has been identified. HCl decrease occurred at nearly all the investigated altitudes with the lowest values (of less than 0.25 ppbv on 21 January. HOCl was found to be the main active chlorine species under nighttime conditions (with increases of more than 0.2 ppbv whereas both HOCl and ClO enhancements (about 0.1 ppbv have been observed at the polar night terminator. Further, small ClO decreases (of less than 0.1 ppbv and ClONO2 enhancements (about 0.2 ppbv have been observed at higher latitudes (i.e., at nighttime roughly above 2 hPa.

    While WACCM4 reproduces most of the SPE-induced variability in the chlorine species fairly well, in some particular regions discrepancies between the modeled and measured temporal evolution of the abundances of chlorine species were found. HOCl changes are modelled very well with respect to both magnitude and geographic distribution. ClO decreases are reproduced at high latitudes, whereas ClO enhancements in the terminator region are underestimated and attributed to background variations. WACCM4 also reproduces the HCl depletion in the mesosphere but it does not show the observed decrease below about 2 hPa. Finally, WACCM4 simulations indicate that the observed ClONO2 increase is dominated by background variability, although SPE-induced production might contribute by 0.1 ppbv.

  8. The potential feasibility of chlorinic photosynthesis on exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Johnson R

    2010-11-01

    The modern search for life-bearing exoplanets emphasizes the potential detection of O(2) and O(3) absorption spectra in exoplanetary atmospheres as ideal signatures of biology. However, oxygenic photosynthesis may not arise ubiquitously in exoplanetary biospheres. Alternative evolutionary paths may yield planetary atmospheres tinted with the waste products of other dominant metabolisms, including potentially exotic biochemistries. This paper defines chlorinic photosynthesis (CPS) as biologically mediated photolytic oxidation of aqueous Cl(-) to form halocarbon or dihalogen products, coupled with CO(2) assimilation. This hypothetical metabolism appears to be feasible energetically, physically, and geochemically, and could potentially develop under conditions that approximate the terrestrial Archean. It is hypothesized that an exoplanetary biosphere in which chlorinic photosynthesis dominates primary production would tend to evolve a strongly oxidizing, halogen-enriched atmosphere over geologic time. It is recommended that astronomical observations of exoplanetary outgoing thermal emission spectra consider signs of halogenated chemical species as likely indicators of the presence of a chlorinic biosphere. Planets that favor the evolution of CPS would probably receive equivalent or greater surface UV flux than is produced by the Sun, which would promote stronger abiotic UV photolysis of aqueous halides than occurred during Earth's Archean era and impose stronger evolutionary selection pressures on endemic life to accommodate and utilize halogenated compounds. Ocean-bearing planets of stars with metallicities equivalent to, or greater than, the Sun should especially favor the evolution of chlorinic biospheres because of the higher relative seawater abundances of Cl, Br, and I such planets would tend to host. Directed searches for chlorinic biospheres should probably focus on G0-G2, F, and A spectral class stars that have bulk metallicities of +0.0 Dex or greater.

  9. Degradation mechanisms of geosmin and 2-MIB during UV photolysis and UV/chlorine reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Kyoung; Moon, Bo-Ram; Kim, Taeyeon; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2016-11-01

    We conducted chlorination, UV photolysis, and UV/chlorin reactions to investigate the intermediate formation and degradation mechanisms of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) in water. Chlorination hardly removed geosmin and 2-MIB, while the UV/chlorine reaction at 254 nm completely removed geosmin and 2-MIB within 40 min and 1 h, respectively, with lesser removals of both compounds during UV photolysis. The kinetics during both UV photolysis and UV/chlorine reactions followed a pseudo first-order reaction. Chloroform was found as a chlorinated intermediate during the UV/chlorine reaction of both geosmin and 2-MIB. The pH affected both the degradation and chloroform production during the UV/chlorine reaction. The open ring and dehydration intermediates identified during UV/chlorine reactions were 1,4-dimethyl-adamantane, and 1,3-dimethyl-adamantane from geosmin, 2-methylenebornane, and 2-methyl-2-bornene from 2-MIB, respectively. Additionally, 2-methyl-3-pentanol, 2,4-dimethyl-1-heptene, 4-methyl-2-heptanone, and 1,1-dichloro-2,4-dimethyl-1-heptane were newly identified intermediates from UV/chlorine reactions of both geosmin and 2-MIB. These intermediates were degraded as the reaction progressed. We proposed possible degradation pathways during the UV photolysis and UV/chlorine reactions of both compounds using the identified intermediates.

  10. Simultaneous Control of Microorganisms and Disinfection By-products by Sequential Chlorination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO CHEN; XIAO-JIAN ZHANG; WEN-JIE HE; HONG-DA HAN

    2007-01-01

    Objective To introduce a new sequential chlorination disinfection process in which short-term free chlorine and chloramine are sequentially added. Methods Pilot tests of this sequential chlorination were carried out in a drinking water plant. Results The sequential chlorination disinfection process had the same or better efficiency on microbe (including virus)inactivation compared with the free chlorine disinfection process. There seemed to be some synergetic disinfection effect between free chlorine and monochloramine because they attacked different targets. The sequential chlorination disinfection process resulted in 35.7%-77.0% TTHM formation and 36.6%-54.8% THAA5 formation less than the free chlorination process.The poorer the water quality was, the more advantage the sequential chlorination disinfection had over the free chlorination.Conclusion This process takes advantages of free chlorine's quick inactivation of microorganisms and chloramine's low disinfection by-product (DBP) yield and long-term residual effect, allowing simultaneous control of microbes and DBPs in an effective and economic way.

  11. Diagnostic performance of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA RT-qPCR assays on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical tissue specimens from women with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Geehyuk; Cho, Hyemi; Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Dongsup; Park, Sunyoung; Park, Kwang Hwa; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, which is the third most common cancer in women. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and Ki67 are tumor cell markers indicating cancer cell proliferation in cancer patients, and activation of hTERT and Ki67 leads to progressive cervical carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the CervicGen HPVE6/E7 mRNA RT-qDx assay, which detects 16 HPV high-risk (HR) genotypes (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68 and 69), and the CervicGen hTERT and Ki67 mRNA RT-qDx assay using 117 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cervical cancer tissue samples. The diagnostic validity of the CervicGen HPV RT-qDx assay for detecting histologically proven prevalent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 94% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 77.8% positive predictive value (PPV), and 78.9% negative predictive value (NPV). The most common HPV genotypes detected in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples were HPV 16 (56%) and HPV 18 (10%). The positivity rate of hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expressions in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples on RT-qPCR was 65% and 93% respectively. Moreover, the positivity rates were 92% for a combination of HPV E6/E7 and hTERT mRNA expressions, 97% for HPV E6/E7 and Ki67 mRNA expressions, and 99% (99/100) for the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expressions. These data showed that SSC FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples correlated more strongly with high Ki67 mRNA expressions than with hTERT mRNA expressions. Notably, hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expression level was increased in high-grade cervical lesions, but was very low in normal samples. Our findings suggest that the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expression levels could be used in a complementary manner in diagnosing high-grade cervical lesions. Further studies are required to evaluate these assays as a useful predictive tool for screening low-grade cervical lesions.

  12. Formation of trichloromethane in chlorinated water and fresh-cut produce and as a result of reacting with citric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine (sodium hypochlorite) is commonly used by the fresh produce industry to sanitize wash water, fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. However, possible formation of harmful chlorine by-products is a concern. The objectives of this study were to compare chlorine and chlorine dioxide in t...

  13. Chlorine-36 alidation Study at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Paces

    2006-08-28

    The amount, spatial distribution, and velocity of water percolating through the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are important issues for assessing the performance of the proposed deep geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To help characterize the nature and history of UZ flow, isotopic studies were initiated in 1995, using rock samples collected from the Miocene ash-flow tuffs in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), an 8-km-long tunnel constructed along the north-south extent of the repository block, and the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift, a 2.5-km-long tunnel constructed across the repository block (Figure 1-1, Sources: Modified from DOE 2002 [Figure 1-14] and USBR 1996). Scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) analyzed for chlorine-36 ({sup 36}Cl) in salts leached from whole-rock samples collected from tunnel walls and subsurface boreholes, and scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) analyzed for isotopes of oxygen, carbon, uranium, lead, thorium, and strontium in secondary minerals collected from subsurface fractures and lithophysal cavities. Elevated values for ratios of {sup 36}Cl to total chloride ({sup 36}Cl/CL) at the level of the proposed repository indicated that small amounts of water carrying bomb-pulse {sup 36}Cl (i.e., {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios greater than 1250 x 10{sup -15} resulting from {sup 36}Cl produced by atmospheric testing of nuclear devices during the 1950s and early 1960s) had percolated through welded and nonwelded tuffs to depths of 200 to 300 meters (m) beneath the land surface over the past 50 years. Because of the implications of short travel times to the performance of the proposed repository, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Repository Development (ORD), decided to verify the {sup 36}Cl/Cl data with an independent validation study. DOE asked the USGS

  14. Reversed flow injection spectrophotometric determination of low residuals of chlorine dioxide in water using chlorophenol red

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel,simple,rapid,sensitive and highly selective flow injection procedure for the spectrophotometrie determination of chlorine dioxide in the presence of other chlorine species,viz,free chlorine,chlorite,chlorate and hypoehlorite,is developed.The method is based on the discoloration reaction between chlorine dioxide and chlorophenol red and can overcome the shortcomings existed in direct speetrophotometrie determination for chlorine dioxide owing to the serious interference of free and combined chlorine.The procedure gave a linear calibration graph over the range 0-0.71 mg/L of chlorine dioxide.With a detection limit of 0.024 mg/L and a sample throughput of 60 samples/h.

  15. Polychlorinated biphenyl toxicity to Japanese quail as related to degree of chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E.F.; Heath, R.G.; Spann, J.W.; Williams, J.D.

    1974-01-01

    To learn if the percentage of chlorine in a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) alone determines toxicity, Japanese quail were fed diets containing Aroelor 1248, 1254, or 1260 at levels that added equal amounts of chlorine to the feed. The experiment comprised two consecutive 5-day periods; three sublethal concentrations of chlorine were evaluated during the first period and three lethal concentrations during the second period. Evaluations utilized comparisons of mortality, time to death, weight change, and food consumption. Sublethal concentrations produced no detectable effects. Lethal concentrations with equal Chlorine showed Aroelor 1248 to be less toxic at the highest chlorine concentrations, but at lower concentrations Aroelor 1254 was more toxic than Aroclor 1260. Although chlorine percentage of a PCB is positively correlated with its avian toxicity, PCB toxicity is apparently not simply a function of chlorination.

  16. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  17. Fate of chlorinated fatty acids in migrating sockeye salmon and their transfer to arctic grayling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Ewald, G.; Nilsson, E.;

    2004-01-01

    organohalogen compounds in the salmon were halogenated fatty acids, predominantly chlorinated species that accounted for up to 35% of the extractable, organically bound chlorine (EOCl) in the fish tissues. The amount of chlorinated fatty acids in the salmon muscle decreased as a result of spawning migration....... The decrease was correlated with that of triacylglycerols in the salmon muscle, indicating the chlorinated fatty acids to be mobilized and metabolized to approximately the same extent as the other fatty acids. Chlorinated fatty acids were also transferred to the maturing roe in a manner similar...... to that of the unchlorinated fatty acids. Lipids of the Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus), a fish resident to the spawning lake of the salmon, contained higher concentrations of chlorinated fatty acids than grayling in a lake without migratory salmon. This may reflect a food-chain transfer of the chlorinated fatty acids...

  18. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF ACTIVE CHLORINE PRIOR TO DETERMINING AMES MUTAGENICITY OF CHLORINATED NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER (NOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many potable water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that result from the reaction of natural organic matter (NOM) with oxidizing chlorine are known or suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. The Ames assay is routinely used to assess an overall level of mutagenicity for all com...

  19. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-12-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes.

  20. Factors affecting lead release in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Emily; Payne, Sarah Jane O; Hofmann, Ron; Andrews, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Water quality parameters affecting sodium silicate performance in partial lead service line replacements were examined using a fractional factorial experimental design and static pipe systems. An external copper wire was used to create a galvanic connection between a former lead service line and a new copper pipe. The pipe systems were filled with lab prepared water made to mimic real water quality. Water was changed on a three times per week basis. A 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the impact of alkalinity (15 mg L(-1) or 250 mg L(-1) as CaCO3), nitrate (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as N), natural organic matter (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as dissolved organic carbon), and disinfectant type (1 mg L(-1) chlorine or 3 mg L(-1) monochloramine), resulting in eight treatment conditions. Fractional factorial analysis revealed that alkalinity, natural organic matter and monochloramine had a significant positive effect on galvanic current. Natural organic matter and monochloramine also had a significant positive effect with respect to both total and dissolved lead release. For the treatment conditions examined, 67-98% of the lead released through galvanic currents was stored as corrosion scales and predominantly comprised of particulate lead (96.1-99.9%) for all eight treatments. The use of monochloramine and the presence of natural organic matter (7 mg L(-1)) were not favourable for corrosion control in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements, although further studies would be required to characterize optimal water quality parameters for specific water quality types. For utilities operating with sodium silicate as a corrosion inhibitor, this work offers further evidence regarding the consideration of chlorine as a secondary disinfectant instead of monochloramine, as well as the value of controlling natural organic matter in distributed water.