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Sample records for chlamydiales

  1. Survey of Infectious Etiologies of Bovine Abortion during Mid- to Late Gestation in Dairy Herds

    OpenAIRE

    Barkallah, Mohamed; Gharbi, Yaakoub; Ben Hassena, Amal; Ben Slima, Ahlem; Mallekh, Zouhir; Gautier, Michel; Greub, Gilbert; Gdoura, Radhouane

    2014-01-01

    Bovine abortion of unknown infectious etiology still remains a major economic problem. Thus, we investigated whether Brucella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Coxiella burnetii are associated with abortion and/or stillbirth in Tunisian dairy cattle. Using a pan-Chlamydiales PCR, we also investigated the role of Chlamydiaceae, Waddlia chondrophila, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and other members of the Chlamydiales order in this setting. Veterinary samples ta...

  2. Survey of Infectious Etiologies of Bovine Abortion during Mid- to Late Gestation in Dairy Herds.

    OpenAIRE

    Barkallah M.; Gharbi Y.; Hassena A.B.; Slima A.B.; Mallek Z.; Gautier M.; Greub G; Gdoura R.; Fendri I.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine abortion of unknown infectious etiology still remains a major economic problem. Thus, we investigated whether Brucella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Coxiella burnetii are associated with abortion and/or stillbirth in Tunisian dairy cattle. Using a pan-Chlamydiales PCR, we also investigated the role of Chlamydiaceae, Waddlia chondrophila, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and other members of the Chlamydiales order in this setting. Veterinary samples ta...

  3. Was the Chlamydial Adaptative Strategy to Tryptophan Starvation an Early Determinant of Plastid Endosymbiosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Ugo; Ducatez, Mathieu; Kadouche, Derifa; Colleoni, Christophe; Ball, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiales were recently proposed to have sheltered the future cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids in a common inclusion. The intracellular pathogens are thought to have donated those critical transporters that triggered the efflux of photosynthetic carbon and the consequent onset of symbiosis. Chlamydiales are also suspected to have encoded glycogen metabolism TTS (Type Three Secretion) effectors responsible for photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the eukaryotic cytosol. We now review the reasons underlying other chlamydial lateral gene transfers evidenced in the descendants of plastid endosymbiosis. In particular we show that half of the genes encoding enzymes of tryptophan synthesis in Archaeplastida are of chlamydial origin. Tryptophan concentration is an essential cue triggering two alternative modes of replication in Chlamydiales. In addition, sophisticated tryptophan starvation mechanisms are known to act as antibacterial defenses in animal hosts. We propose that Chlamydiales have donated their tryptophan operon to the emerging plastid to ensure increased synthesis of tryptophan by the plastid ancestor. This would have allowed massive expression of the tryptophan rich chlamydial transporters responsible for symbiosis. It would also have allowed possible export of this valuable amino-acid in the inclusion of the tryptophan hungry pathogens. Free-living single cell cyanobacteria are devoid of proteins able to transport this amino-acid. We therefore investigated the phylogeny of the Tyr/Trp transporters homologous to E. coli TyrP/Mre and found yet another LGT from Chlamydiales to Archaeplastida thereby considerably strengthening our proposal. PMID:27446814

  4. The Waddlia genome: a window into chlamydial biology

    OpenAIRE

    C. Bertelli; Collyn, F.; Croxatto, A; Rückert, C; Polkinghorne, A; Kebbi-Beghdadi, C; Goesmann, A; Vaughan, L.; Greub, G

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that a novel member of the Chlamydiales order, Waddlia chondrophila, is a potential agent of miscarriage in humans and abortion in ruminants. Due to the lack of genetic tools to manipulate chlamydia, genomic analysis is proving to be the most incisive tool in stimulating investigations into the biology of these obligate intracellular bacteria. 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina technologies were thus used to sequence and assemble de novo the full genome of the first repre...

  5. The Waddlia genome: a window into chlamydial biology.

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Bertelli; François Collyn; Antony Croxatto; Christian Rückert; Adam Polkinghorne; Carole Kebbi-Beghdadi; Alexander Goesmann; Lloyd Vaughan; Gilbert Greub

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that a novel member of the Chlamydiales order, Waddlia chondrophila, is a potential agent of miscarriage in humans and abortion in ruminants. Due to the lack of genetic tools to manipulate chlamydia, genomic analysis is proving to be the most incisive tool in stimulating investigations into the biology of these obligate intracellular bacteria. 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina technologies were thus used to sequence and assemble de novo the full genome of the first repre...

  6. Detection of leptospira and chlamydia in rodents in China / y Szeto Chun Wai

    OpenAIRE

    Szeto, Chun-wai; 司徒俊偉

    2015-01-01

    Rodentia is the most diversified order of mammals which are natural reservoirs for bacterial pathogens such as Leptospira, Rickettsia akari, Bartonella, Chlamydiales etc. It is also the important source of transmission of leptospirosis to human. However, only a few epidemiological studies had been done for leptospiral and chlamydial infections in rodents in Hong Kong. In this study, molecular epidemiological studies had been performed to investigate the prevalence of leptospiral and chlamydia...

  7. The Waddlia genome: a window into chlamydial biology.

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    Claire Bertelli

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that a novel member of the Chlamydiales order, Waddlia chondrophila, is a potential agent of miscarriage in humans and abortion in ruminants. Due to the lack of genetic tools to manipulate chlamydia, genomic analysis is proving to be the most incisive tool in stimulating investigations into the biology of these obligate intracellular bacteria. 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina technologies were thus used to sequence and assemble de novo the full genome of the first representative of the Waddliaceae family, W. chondrophila. The bacteria possesses a 2'116'312 bp chromosome and a 15'593 bp low-copy number plasmid that might integrate into the bacterial chromosome. The Waddlia genome displays numerous repeated sequences indicating different genome dynamics from classical chlamydia which almost completely lack repetitive elements. Moreover, W. chondrophila exhibits many virulence factors also present in classical chlamydia, including a functional type III secretion system, but also a large complement of specific factors for resistance to host or environmental stresses. Large families of outer membrane proteins were identified indicating that these highly immunogenic proteins are not Chlamydiaceae specific and might have been present in their last common ancestor. Enhanced metabolic capability for the synthesis of nucleotides, amino acids, lipids and other co-factors suggests that the common ancestor of the modern Chlamydiales may have been less dependent on their eukaryotic host. The fine-detailed analysis of biosynthetic pathways brings us closer to possibly developing a synthetic medium to grow W. chondrophila, a critical step in the development of genetic tools. As a whole, the availability of the W. chondrophila genome opens new possibilities in Chlamydiales research, providing new insights into the evolution of members of the order Chlamydiales and the biology of the Waddliaceae.

  8. Chlamydia exploit the mammalian tryptophan-depletion defense strategy as a counter-defensive cue to trigger a survival state of persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Carol A; Byrne, Gerald I; Jensen, Roy A

    2014-01-01

    We previously proposed that in Chlamydiaceae rapid vegetative growth and a quiescent state of survival (persistence) depend upon alternative protein translational profiles dictated by host tryptophan (Trp) availability. These alternative profiles correspond, respectively, with a set of chlamydial proteins having higher-than-predicted contents of Trp ("Up-Trp" selection), or with another set exhibiting lower-than-predicted contents of Trp ("Down-Trp" selection). A comparative evaluation of Chlamydiaceae proteomes for Trp content has now been extended to a number of other taxon families within the Chlamydiales Order. At the Order level, elevated Trp content occurs for transporters of nucleotides, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), dicarboxylate substrates, and Trp itself. For Trp and nucleotide transporters, this is even more pronounced in other chlamydiae families (Parachlamydiaceae, Waddliaceae, and Simkaniaceae) due to extensive paralog expansion. This suggests that intracellular Trp availability served as an ancient survival cue for enhancement or restraint of chlamydial metabolism in the common Chlamydiales ancestor. The Chlamydiaceae Family further strengthened Up-Trp selection for proteins that function in cell division, lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, and methyltransferase reactions. Some proteins that exhibit Up-Trp selection are uniquely present in the Chlamydiaceae, e.g., cytotoxin and the paralog families of polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmp's). A striking instance of Down-Trp selection in the Chlamydiaceae is the chorismate biosynthesis pathway and the connecting menaquinone pathway. The newly recognized 1,4-dihydroxy-6-napthoate pathway of menaquinone biosynthesis operates in Chlamydiaceae, whereas the classic 2-napthoate pathway is used in the other Chlamydiales families. Because of the extreme Down-Trp selection, it would appear that menaquinone biosynthesis is particularly important to the integrity of the persistent state maintained under conditions of

  9. Detection of Chlamydophila psittaci from pigeons by polymerase chain reaction in Ahvaz

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    Masoud Ghorbanpoor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Chlamydophila psittaci is a lethal bacterium that causes endemic avian chlamydiosis, and respiratory psittacosis. Laboratory diagnosis of Chlamydophila psittaci is difficult by culture. This study was design to investigate the presence of Chlamydophila psittaci in collected pharyngeal swabs from asyptomatic pigeons by PCR.Materials and Methods: Pharyngeal samples from pigeons with no symptoms of disease (n=280 were collected during hot and cold seasons in different parts of Ahvaz. DNA was extracted from specimens and subjected to PCR targeting pmp genes and 16s-23s rRNA intergenic spacer of Cp. psittaci and chlamydiales specific primers.Results: Of 280 samples 2 (0.7% harbor were positive for chlamydiales (16s-23s intergenic spacer and Cp. psittaci specific genes (pmp gene.Conclusions: In this research the pigeons were asymptomatic carriers for Cp. psittaci in their respiratory discharges. These results suggest that Cp. psittaci infection of human can occur in very close and continuous contact with pigeons.

  10. Survey of infectious etiologies of bovine abortion during mid- to late gestation in dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkallah, Mohamed; Gharbi, Yaakoub; Hassena, Amal Ben; Slima, Ahlem Ben; Mallek, Zouhir; Gautier, Michel; Greub, Gilbert; Gdoura, Radhouane; Fendri, Imen

    2014-01-01

    Bovine abortion of unknown infectious etiology still remains a major economic problem. Thus, we investigated whether Brucella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Coxiella burnetii are associated with abortion and/or stillbirth in Tunisian dairy cattle. Using a pan-Chlamydiales PCR, we also investigated the role of Chlamydiaceae, Waddlia chondrophila, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and other members of the Chlamydiales order in this setting. Veterinary samples taken from mid to late-term abortions from twenty dairy herds were tested. From a total of 150 abortion cases collected, infectious agents were detected by PCR in 73 (48.66%) cases, 13 (8.66%) of which represented co-infections with two infectious agents. Detected pathogens include Brucella spp (31.3%), Chlamydiaceae (4.66%), Waddlia chondrophila (8%), Parachlamydia acanthamoebae (5.33%), Listeria monocytogenes (4.66%) and Salmonella spp. (3.33%). In contrast, Campylobacter spp. and Coxiella burnetii DNA were not detected among the investigated veterinary samples. This demonstrates that different bacterial agents may cause bovine abortion in Tunisia. This is the first report suggesting the role of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae in bovine abortion in Africa. Further studies with a larger number of samples are necessary to confirm whether this emerging pathogen is directly linked to abortion in cattle. PMID:24662769

  11. Survey of infectious etiologies of bovine abortion during mid- to late gestation in dairy herds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Barkallah

    Full Text Available Bovine abortion of unknown infectious etiology still remains a major economic problem. Thus, we investigated whether Brucella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Coxiella burnetii are associated with abortion and/or stillbirth in Tunisian dairy cattle. Using a pan-Chlamydiales PCR, we also investigated the role of Chlamydiaceae, Waddlia chondrophila, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and other members of the Chlamydiales order in this setting. Veterinary samples taken from mid to late-term abortions from twenty dairy herds were tested. From a total of 150 abortion cases collected, infectious agents were detected by PCR in 73 (48.66% cases, 13 (8.66% of which represented co-infections with two infectious agents. Detected pathogens include Brucella spp (31.3%, Chlamydiaceae (4.66%, Waddlia chondrophila (8%, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae (5.33%, Listeria monocytogenes (4.66% and Salmonella spp. (3.33%. In contrast, Campylobacter spp. and Coxiella burnetii DNA were not detected among the investigated veterinary samples. This demonstrates that different bacterial agents may cause bovine abortion in Tunisia. This is the first report suggesting the role of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae in bovine abortion in Africa. Further studies with a larger number of samples are necessary to confirm whether this emerging pathogen is directly linked to abortion in cattle.

  12. Aetiology of bovine abortion in Switzerland from 1986 to 1995--a retrospective study with emphasis on detection of Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitt, K; Hilbe, M; Voegtlin, A; Corboz, L; Haessig, M; Pospischil, A

    2007-02-01

    In a retrospective study, covering the period from 1986 to 1995, tissues of aborted fetuses were re-examined. A total of 347 cases were tested immunohistochemically, among them samples of 223 brains were examined for Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii and Bovine Virus Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV), and 249 placentae for Chlamydiaceae. Two real-time PCR assays, one for N. caninum, and one for T. gondii, were developed. These potential abortion-inducing agents were detected - and confirmed by PCR, except for BVDV - in 16.1% (N. caninum), 0% (T. gondii), 9.9% (BVDV) and 0.8% (Chlamydiales) of the cases examined. Immunohistochemistry proved to be inadequate for the detection of the protozoal epitopes, whereas it was confirmed as a very useful tool for the detection of BVDV. In abortion material, PCR is considered to be more suitable for the detection of protozoa and Chlamydophila abortus, an adequate sampling presupposed. PMID:17359449

  13. Searching Simkania negevensis in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Leonardo Martín; Codony, Francesc; Ríos, Karina; Peñuela, Gustavo; Adrados, Bárbara; Fittipaldi, Mariana; de Dios, Gregori; Morató, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Simkania negevensis is an obligate intracellular bacterium grouped into the order Chlamydiales. This new amoeba-resistant bacterium represents a novel aetiologic agent of bronchiolitis and community-acquired pneumonia in both adults and children. It has been suggested that Simkania could be an ubiquitous microorganism presented in water environments. In the natural history of infections with amoeba-related bacteria encountered in aquatic habitats, the transmissions by environmental aerosols or contaminated water/air systems have been extensively recognized. Therefore, understanding the feasibility of Simkania infection by these or similar routes is relevant. In the present work, we investigated the prevalence of this novel disease-associated microorganism in water samples from different sources by real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results show Simkania detection in 5 of 185 water analyzed samples (2.7%: 2 of 88 cooling towers and 3 of 8 waste water samples). However, no Simkania was detected in a drinking water. PMID:22135095

  14. Developmental Cycle and Genome Analysis of "Rubidus massiliensis," a New Vermamoeba vermiformis Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Khalil, Jacques Y; Benamar, Samia; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Croce, Olivier; Blanc-Tailleur, Caroline; Pagnier, Isabelle; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The study of amoeba-associated Chlamydiae is a dynamic field in which new species are increasingly reported. In the present work, we characterized the developmental cycle and analyzed the genome of a new member of this group associated with Vermamoeba vermiformis, we propose to name "Rubidus massiliensis." This bacterium is well-adapted to its amoeba host and do not reside inside of inclusion vacuoles after phagocytosis. It has a developmental cycle typical of this family of bacteria, with a transition from condensed elementary bodies to hypodense replicative reticulate bodies. Multiplication occurs through binary fission of the reticulate bodies. The genome of "R. massiliensis" consists of a 2.8 Mbp chromosome and two plasmids (pRm1, pRm2) consisting of 39,075 bp and 80,897 bp, respectively, a feature that is unique within this group. The Re-analysis of the Chlamydiales genomes including the one of "R. massiliensis" slightly modified the previous phylogeny of the tlc gene encoding the ADP/ATP translocase. Our analysis suggested that the tlc gene could have been transferred to plant and algal plastids before the transfer to Rickettsiales, and that this gene was probably duplicated several times. PMID:27014641

  15. Undressing of Waddlia chondrophila to enrich its outer membrane proteins to develop a new species-specific ELISA

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    J. Lienard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Waddlia chondrophila, an obligate intracellular bacterium of the Chlamydiales order, is considered as an agent of bovine abortion and a likely cause of miscarriage in humans. Its role in respiratory diseases was questioned after the detection of its DNA in clinical samples taken from patients suffering from pneumonia or bronchiolitis. To better define the role of Waddlia in both miscarriage and pneumonia, a tool allowing large-scale serological investigations of Waddlia seropositivity is needed. Therefore, enriched outer membrane proteins of W. chondrophila were used as antigens to develop a specific ELISA. After thorough analytical optimization, the ELISA was validated by comparison with micro-immunofluorescence and it showed a sensitivity above 85% with 100% specificity. The ELISA was subsequently applied to human sera to specify the role of W. chondrophila in pneumonia. Overall, 3.6% of children showed antibody reactivity against W. chondrophila but no significant difference was observed between children with and without pneumonia. Proteomic analyses were then performed using mass spectrometry, highlighting members of the outer membrane protein family as the dominant proteins. The major Waddlia putative immunogenic proteins were identified by immunoblot using positive and negative human sera. The new ELISA represents an efficient tool with high throughput applications. Although no association with pneumonia and Waddlia seropositivity was observed, this ELISA could be used to specify the role of W. chondrophila in miscarriage and in other diseases.

  16. Microbial Diversity of Planctomycetes and Related Bacteria in Wetlands with Different Anthropogenic Disturbances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Guibing Zhu; Erwin van der Biezen; Mike S M Jetten; Chengqing Yin

    2013-01-01

    The diversity of Planctomycetes and related bacteria in 3 types of freshwater wetlands with different anthropogenic disturbances were investigated by cloning and sequencing PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes.Three clone libraries were constructed using 16S rRNA-targeted forward PCR primer specific for Planctomycetales and general bacterial reverse primer.Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences defined 95 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with 163 sequences.The clone libraries covered a wide microbial diversity of Proteobacteria and the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiales (PVC) superphylum.The majority of the OTUs were related to the phylum of Planctomycetes (33 OTUs),Proteobacteria (22 OTUs) and Verrucomicrobia (22 OTUs).Four known genera from the Planctomycetes phylum were all detected.The genus Pirellula (18 OTUs) dominated the Planetomycetes community,but different patterns of distribution were observed in the wetlands.The littoral wetlands of Baiyangdian Lake with the least anthropogenic disturbances covered more species and showed the highest biodiversity.However,the Jiaxing paddy fields with the highest anthropogenic disturbances showed a higher biodiversity than that in the riparian wetlands of the North Canal.Bacteria distantly related to anammox bacteria were also detected with a small proportion (4 OTUs).It showed that wetlands hold a great biodiversity of phyla Planctomycetes and related bacteria; furthermore,there is ample opportunity to discover novel phylotypes of Planctomycctes in the wctland ecosystems.

  17. Sequencing and characterizing the genome of Estrella lausannensis as an undergraduate project: training students and biological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Claire; Aeby, Sébastien; Chassot, Bérénice; Clulow, James; Hilfiker, Olivier; Rappo, Samuel; Ritzmann, Sébastien; Schumacher, Paolo; Terrettaz, Céline; Benaglio, Paola; Falquet, Laurent; Farinelli, Laurent; Gharib, Walid H; Goesmann, Alexander; Harshman, Keith; Linke, Burkhard; Miyazaki, Ryo; Rivolta, Carlo; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread availability of high-throughput sequencing technologies, sequencing projects have become pervasive in the molecular life sciences. The huge bulk of data generated daily must be analyzed further by biologists with skills in bioinformatics and by "embedded bioinformaticians," i.e., bioinformaticians integrated in wet lab research groups. Thus, students interested in molecular life sciences must be trained in the main steps of genomics: sequencing, assembly, annotation and analysis. To reach that goal, a practical course has been set up for master students at the University of Lausanne: the "Sequence a genome" class. At the beginning of the academic year, a few bacterial species whose genome is unknown are provided to the students, who sequence and assemble the genome(s) and perform manual annotation. Here, we report the progress of the first class from September 2010 to June 2011 and the results obtained by seven master students who specifically assembled and annotated the genome of Estrella lausannensis, an obligate intracellular bacterium related to Chlamydia. The draft genome of Estrella is composed of 29 scaffolds encompassing 2,819,825 bp that encode for 2233 putative proteins. Estrella also possesses a 9136 bp plasmid that encodes for 14 genes, among which we found an integrase and a toxin/antitoxin module. Like all other members of the Chlamydiales order, Estrella possesses a highly conserved type III secretion system, considered as a key virulence factor. The annotation of the Estrella genome also allowed the characterization of the metabolic abilities of this strictly intracellular bacterium. Altogether, the students provided the scientific community with the Estrella genome sequence and a preliminary understanding of the biology of this recently-discovered bacterial genus, while learning to use cutting-edge technologies for sequencing and to perform bioinformatics analyses. PMID:25745418

  18. Evidence that the intra-amoebal Legionella drancourtii acquired a sterol reductase gene from eukaryotes

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    Fournier Pierre-Edouard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Free-living amoebae serve as a natural reservoir for some bacteria that have evolved into «amoeba-resistant» bacteria. Among these, some are strictly intra-amoebal, such as Candidatus "Protochlamydia amoebophila" (Candidatus "P. amoebophila", whose genomic sequence is available. We sequenced the genome of Legionella drancourtii (L. drancourtii, another recently described intra-amoebal bacterium. By comparing these two genomes with those of their closely related species, we were able to study the genetic characteristics specific to their amoebal lifestyle. Findings We identified a sterol delta-7 reductase-encoding gene common to these two bacteria and absent in their relatives. This gene encodes an enzyme which catalyses the last step of cholesterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes, and is probably functional within L. drancourtii since it is transcribed. The phylogenetic analysis of this protein suggests that it was acquired horizontally by a few bacteria from viridiplantae. This gene was also found in the Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus genome, a virus that grows in amoebae and possesses the largest viral genome known to date. Conclusion L. drancourtii acquired a sterol delta-7 reductase-encoding gene of viridiplantae origin. The most parsimonious hypothesis is that this gene was initially acquired by a Chlamydiales ancestor parasite of plants. Subsequently, its descendents transmitted this gene in amoebae to other intra-amoebal microorganisms, including L. drancourtii and Coxiella burnetii. The role of the sterol delta-7 reductase in prokaryotes is as yet unknown but we speculate that it is involved in host cholesterol parasitism.

  19. A genomic island present along the bacterial chromosome of the Parachlamydiaceae UWE25, an obligate amoebal endosymbiont, encodes a potentially functional F-like conjugative DNA transfer system

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    Guy Lionel

    2004-12-01

    Parachlamydiaceae and Chlamydiaceae, when the Parachlamydia-related symbiont was an intracellular bacteria. It suggests that this heterologous DNA was acquired from a phylogenetically-distant bacteria sharing an amoebal vacuole. Since Parachlamydiaceae are emerging agents of pneumonia, this GI might be involved in pathogenicity. In future, conjugative systems might be developed as genetic tools for Chlamydiales.