WorldWideScience

Sample records for chiropractic manual therapy

  1. The journal 'chiropractic & osteopathy' changes its title to 'chiropractic & manual therapies'. a new name, a new era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chiropractic & Osteopathy changes its title to Chiropractic & Manual Therapies in January 2011. This change reflects the expanding base of submissions from clinical scientists interested in the discipline of manual therapy. It is also in accord with the findings of a review of the journal content and a joint venture between the original parent organisation the Chiropractic and Osteopathic College of Australasia and a new partner the European Academy of Chiropractic, which is a subsidiary body of the European Chiropractors' Union. The title change should encourage submissions from all professionals interested in manual therapy including chiropractors, osteopaths, physiotherapists, medical doctors and scientists interested in this field.

  2. The journal 'chiropractic & osteopathy' changes its title to 'chiropractic & manual therapies'. a new name, a new era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, Bruce F; French, Simon D; Cameron, Melanie; Perle, Stephen M; Lebouef-Yde, Charlotte; Rubinstein, Sidney M

    2011-01-01

    Chiropractic & Osteopathy changes its title to Chiropractic & Manual Therapies in January 2011. This change reflects the expanding base of submissions from clinical scientists interested in the discipline of manual therapy. It is also in accord with the findings of a review of the journal content

  3. Active versus passive adverse event reporting after pediatric chiropractic manual therapy: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, Katherine A; Carroll, Linda; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Hartling, Lisa; Vohra, Sunita

    2017-12-01

    Patient safety performance can be assessed with several systems, including passive and active surveillance. Passive surveillance systems provide opportunity for health care personnel to confidentially and voluntarily report incidents, including adverse events, occurring in their work environment. Active surveillance systems systematically monitor patient encounters to seek detailed information about adverse events that occur in work environments; unlike passive surveillance, active surveillance allows for collection of both numerator (number of adverse events) and denominator (number of patients seen) data. Chiropractic manual therapy is commonly used in both adults and children, yet few studies have been done to evaluate the safety of chiropractic manual therapy for children. In an attempt to evaluate this, this study will compare adverse event reporting in passive versus active surveillance systems after chiropractic manual therapy in the pediatric population. This cluster randomized controlled trial aims to enroll 70 physicians of chiropractic (unit of randomization) to either passive or active surveillance system to report adverse events that occur after treatment for 60 consecutive pediatric (13 years of age and younger) patient visits (unit of analysis). A modified enrollment process with a two-phase consent procedure will be implemented to maintain provider blinding and minimize dropouts. The first phase of consent is for the provider to confirm their interest in a trial investigating the safety of chiropractic manual therapy. The second phase ensures that they understand the specific requirements for the group to which they were randomized. Percentages, incidence estimates, and 95% confidence intervals will be used to describe the count of reported adverse events in each group. The primary outcome will be the number and quality of the adverse event reports in the active versus the passive surveillance group. With 80% power and 5% one-sided significance

  4. Unravelling functional neurology: a scoping review of theories and clinical applications in a context of chiropractic manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Anne-Laure; Meyer, Amanda; Etherington, Sarah; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Functional Neurology (FN), a seemingly attractive treatment approach used by some chiropractors, proposes to have an effect on a multitude of conditions but some of its concepts are controversial. A scoping review was performed to describe, in the context of chiropractic manual therapy, 1) the FN theories, and 2) its clinical applications (i.e. its indications, examination procedures, treatment modalities, treatment plans, and clinical outcomes) using four sources: i) one key textbook, ii) the scientific peer-reviewed literature, iii) websites from chiropractors using FN, and iv) semi-structured interviews of chiropractors using FN. The scientific literature was searched in PubMed, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus, completed by a hand search in the journal Functional Neurology, Rehabilitation and Ergonomics (November 2016 and March 2017, respectively). The only textbook on the topic we found was included and articles were chosen if they had an element of manual therapy. There was no restriction for study design but discussion papers were excluded. Websites were found in Google using the search term "Functional Neurology". Chiropractors, known to use FN, were invited based on their geographical location. Theories were mainly uncovered in the textbook as were all aspects of the clinical applications except treatment plans. The other three sources were used for the five aspects of clinical applications. Results were summarized and reported extensively in tables. Eleven articles were included, five websites scrutinized, and four semi-structured interviews performed. FN is based on the belief that reversible lesions in the nervous system are the cause of a multitude of conditions and that specific clusters of neurons can be positively affected by manipulative therapy, but also by many other stimuli. Diagnostic procedures include both conventional and unusual tests, with an interpretation specific to FN. Initial treatment is intense and clinical outcomes reported as positive

  5. Manual Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hakgüder, Aral; Kokino, Siranuş

    2002-01-01

    Manual therapy has been used in the treatment of pain and dysfunction of spinal and peripheral joints for more than a hundred years. Manual medicine includes manipulation, mobilization, and postisometric relaxation techniques. The aim of manual therapy is to enhance restricted movement caused by blockage of joints keeping postural balance, restore function and maintain optimal body mechanics. Anatomic, biomechanical, and neurophysiological evaluations of the leucomotor system is essential for...

  6. The effect of a sports chiropractic manual therapy intervention on the prevention of back pain, hamstring and lower limb injuries in semi-elite Australian Rules footballers: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollard Henry

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hamstring injuries are the most common injury in Australian Rules football. It was the aims to investigate whether a sports chiropractic manual therapy intervention protocol provided in addition to the current best practice management could prevent the occurrence of and weeks missed due to hamstring and other lower-limb injuries at the semi-elite level of Australian football. Methods Sixty male subjects were assessed for eligibility with 59 meeting entry requirements and randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 29 or control group (n = 30, being matched for age and hamstring injury history. Twenty-eight intervention and 29 control group participants completed the trial. Both groups received the current best practice medical and sports science management, which acted as the control. Additionally, the intervention group received a sports chiropractic intervention. Treatment for the intervention group was individually determined and could involve manipulation/mobilization and/or soft tissue therapies to the spine and extremity. Minimum scheduling was: 1 treatment per week for 6 weeks, 1 treatment per fortnight for 3 months, 1 treatment per month for the remainder of the season (3 months. The main outcome measure was an injury surveillance with a missed match injury definition. Results After 24 matches there was no statistical significant difference between the groups for the incidence of hamstring injury (OR:0.116, 95% CI:0.013-1.019, p = 0.051 and primary non-contact knee injury (OR:0.116, 95% CI:0.013-1.019, p = 0.051. The difference for primary lower-limb muscle strains was significant (OR:0.097, 95%CI:0.011-0.839, p = 0.025. There was no significant difference for weeks missed due to hamstring injury (4 v14, χ2:1.12, p = 0.29 and lower-limb muscle strains (4 v 21, χ2:2.66, p = 0.10. A significant difference in weeks missed due to non-contact knee injury was noted (1 v 24, χ2:6.70, p = 0.01. Conclusions This study

  7. Chiropractic manipulative therapy of the thoracic spine in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kim Castello Branco

    postural kyphosis but Group 2's treatment protocol, consisting of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy to ... In older women (twenty five to forty five years of age), the increased .... angle of kyphosis measured, which had to fall within the angle of ... with the application of a controlled force, leverage, direction and velocity to ...

  8. What is chiropractic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; French, Simon

    2017-01-01

    While in some jurisdictions chiropractic is fully integrated in public and insurance funded health care systems, in others it is outside and considered as complementary or alternative health care. There is a paucity of data and rigorous scientific studies regarding most aspects of chiropractic pr...... practice although research activity has been increasing in recent years. We call for papers for a thematic series inChiropractic and Manual Therapiesthat can help define chiropractic better to stakeholders inside and outside the profession under the themeWhat is Chiropractic?...

  9. Nontraditional Therapies (Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and Chiropractic) in Exotic Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziani, Jessica A

    2018-05-01

    The nontraditional therapies of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and chiropractic care are adjunct treatments that can be used in conjunction with more conventional therapies to treat a variety of medical conditions. Nontraditional therapies do not need to be alternatives to Western medicine but, instead, can be used simultaneously. Exotic animal practitioners should have a basic understanding of nontraditional therapies for both client education and patient referral because they can enhance the quality of life, longevity, and positive outcomes for various cases across multiple taxa. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chiropractic care and public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this collaborative summary is to document current chiropractic involvement in the public health movement, reflect on social ecological levels of influence as a profession, and summarize the relationship of chiropractic to the current public health topics of: safety, health issues...... disorders? How can chiropractic use cognitive behavioral therapy to address chronic low back pain as a public health problem? What opportunities exist for doctors of chiropractic to more effectively serve the aging population? What is the role of ethics and the contribution of the chiropractic profession...

  11. Manual therapy as a conservative treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrini Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is contingent upon many variables. Simple observation is enough for less serious curvatures, but for very serious cases surgical intervention could be proposed. Between these there is a wide range of different treatments. Manual therapy is commonly used: the aim of this paper is to verify the data existing in the literature on the efficacy of this approach. Methods A systematic review of the scientific literature published internationally has been performed. We have included in the term manual therapy all the manipulative and generally passive techniques performed by an external operator. In a more specific meaning, osteopathic, chiropractic and massage techniques have been considered as manipulative therapeutic methods. We performed our systematic research in Medline, Embase, Cinhal, Cochrane Library, Pedro with the following terms: idiopathic scoliosis combined with chiropractic; manipulation; mobilization; manual therapy; massage; osteopathy; and therapeutic manipulation. The criteria for inclusion were as follows: Any kind of research; diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis; patients treated exclusively by one of the procedures established as a standard for this review (chiropractic manipulation, osteopathic techniques, massage; and outcome in Cobb degrees. Results We founded 145 texts, but only three papers were relevant to our study. However, no one of the three satisfied all the required inclusion criteria because they were characterized by a combination of manual techniques and other therapeutic approaches. Conclusion The lack of any kind of serious scientific data does not allow us to draw any conclusion on the efficacy of manual therapy as an efficacious technique for the treatment of Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  12. Manual therapy as a conservative treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Michele; Negrini, Stefano

    2008-01-22

    The treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is contingent upon many variables. Simple observation is enough for less serious curvatures, but for very serious cases surgical intervention could be proposed. Between these there is a wide range of different treatments. Manual therapy is commonly used: the aim of this paper is to verify the data existing in the literature on the efficacy of this approach. A systematic review of the scientific literature published internationally has been performed. We have included in the term manual therapy all the manipulative and generally passive techniques performed by an external operator. In a more specific meaning, osteopathic, chiropractic and massage techniques have been considered as manipulative therapeutic methods. We performed our systematic research in Medline, Embase, Cinhal, Cochrane Library, Pedro with the following terms: idiopathic scoliosis combined with chiropractic; manipulation; mobilization; manual therapy; massage; osteopathy; and therapeutic manipulation. The criteria for inclusion were as follows: Any kind of research; diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis; patients treated exclusively by one of the procedures established as a standard for this review (chiropractic manipulation, osteopathic techniques, massage); and outcome in Cobb degrees. We founded 145 texts, but only three papers were relevant to our study. However, no one of the three satisfied all the required inclusion criteria because they were characterized by a combination of manual techniques and other therapeutic approaches. The lack of any kind of serious scientific data does not allow us to draw any conclusion on the efficacy of manual therapy as an efficacious technique for the treatment of Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  13. The impact of chiropractic manipulative therapy on chronic recurrent lateral ankle sprain syndrome in two young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Scott F

    2004-01-01

    To describe two cases of abrupt resolution of chronic, recurrent, inversion sprain to ankles in young recreational athletes. A 13-year-old, female, avid recreational soccer player with ankles that would spontaneously invert during various inconsistent points in the weight bearing gait cycle, sometimes with acute pain or sprain to the ankle. No intervention was attempted prior to her entry to the chiropractic office. A 17-year-old male avid skate- boarder and snowboarder whose left ankle routinely "gave out" into inversion upon mundane weight bearing activity, usually with pain and with dependence on wearing an ankle support when skateboarding to lessen ankle pain. The patient had used an ankle support prior to seeking chiropractic care. High velocity, low amplitude chiropractic manipulative therapy applied to the spine, pelvis and extremity joints was the primary intervention in both cases, with particular focus on the ankle. Other procedures used included taping and orthotics, but not before the manipulation effect was noted. High velocity, low amplitude chiropractic manipulative therapy to the spine, pelvis, and extremities, particularly at the ankle, should be considered when managing young recreational athletes with functional chronic, recurrent, ankle inversion sprains.

  14. Adding chiropractic to standard medical therapy for nonspecific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Long, Cynthia R; Hondras, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Randomized controlled trial.Objective. To assess changes in pain levels and physical functioning in response to standard medical care (SMC) versus SMC plus chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) for the treatment of low back pain (LBP) among 18 to 35-year-old active-duty military...... physical functioning when compared with only standard care, for men and women between 18 and 35 years of age with acute LBP........ The primary outcome measures were changes in back-related pain on the numerical rating scale and physical functioning at 4 weeks on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and back pain functional scale (BPFS).Results. Mean Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire scores decreased in both groups during...

  15. Movement and manual therapy for adults with arthritis: 2012 National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pure, Elise; Terhorst, Lauren; Baker, Nancy

    2018-04-01

    The use of manual therapies (chiropractic manipulation, massage) and movement therapies (yoga, tai chi) by people with arthritis may relate to their personal characteristics, and the reported emotional and physical health outcomes may differ by type of therapy. To describe personal characteristics and predictors of manual and movement therapy use for people with arthritis, and to compare the use of manual versus movement therapy to improve physical and emotional health outcomes for people with arthritis. CAM respondents with arthritis were identified from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (n = 8229). Data were analyzed to determine the overall percentages of CAM users, and to examine the associations between use/nonuse using multivariable linear regressions. White, well-educated, physically active females were more likely to use both types of therapy. Movement therapy users reported positive emotional health outcomes twice as much as manual therapy users and 10% more reported positive physical health outcomes. While both movement and manual therapies can have positive effects on people with arthritis, it appears that active therapies are more beneficial than passive therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Manual Therapy in the Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis. Analysis of Current Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaprowski, Dariusz

    2016-10-28

    Apart from the recommended specific physiotherapy, the treatment of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) also incorporates non-specific manual therapy (NMT). The aim of this paper is to assess the efficacy of NMT (manual therapy, chiropractic, osteopathy) used in the treatment of children and adolescents with IS. The study analysed systematic reviews (Analysis 1) and other recent scientific publications (Analysis 2). Analysis 1 encompassed papers on the use of NMT in patients with IS. Works concerning specific physiotherapy (SP) or bracing (B) and other types of scoliosis were excluded from the analysis. Inclusion criteria for Analysis 2 were: treatment with NMT; subjects aged 10-18 years with IS. The following types of papers were excluded: works analysing NMT combined with SP or B, reports concerning adult pa tients, analyses of single cases and publications included in Analysis 1. Analysis 1: six systematic reviews contained 6 papers on the efficacy of NMT in the treatment of IS. The results of these studies are contradictory, ranging from Cobb angle reduction to no treatment effects whatsoever. The papers analysed are characterised by poor methodological quality: small group sizes, incomplete descriptions of the study groups, no follow-up and no control groups. Analysis 2: in total, 217 papers were found. None of them met the criteria set for the analysis. 1. Few papers verifying the efficacy of manual therapy, chiropractic and osteopathy in the treatment of idiopathic scoliosis have been published to date. 2. The majority are experimental studies with poor methodology or observational case studies. 3. At present, the efficacy of non-specific manual therapy in the treatment of patients with idiopathic scoliosis cannot be reliably evaluated. 4. It is necessary to conduct further research based on appropriate methods (prospective, rando mi s ed, controlled studies) in order to reliably assess the usefulness of non-specific manual therapy in the treatment of idiopathic

  17. Reconceptualising manual therapy skills in contemporary practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabey, Martin; Hall, Toby; Hebron, Clair

    2017-01-01

    With conflicting evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual therapy calls have arisen within some quarters of the physiotherapy profession challenging the continued use of manual skills for assessment and treatment. A reconceptualisation of the importance of manual examination findings is put...

  18. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Chiropractic services are part of the Sports Medicine and Rehabilitative Therapy Clinic and have been avail- able since September 2003. A single DC...manual ma- nipulation of upper and lower extremity joints and other spinal regions, interferential current therapy, ultrasound therapy, cryotherapy

  19. Balance chiropractic therapy for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Li, Wen-Xiong; Liu, Zhu; Liu, Li

    2016-10-22

    Cervical spondylosis is a very common disorder and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) is the most common form of spinal degenerative disease. Its clinical manifestations focus on pain and numbness of the neck and arm as well as restricted movement of the neck, which greatly affect the patient's life and work. The orthopedic of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory holds that the basic pathologic change in spinal degenerative diseases is the imbalance between the dynamic system and the static system of the cervical spine. Based on this theory, some Chinese physicians have developed a balance chiropractic therapy (BCT) to treat CSR, which has been clinically examined for more than 50 years to effectively cure CSR. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of BCT on CSR and to investigate the mechanism by which the efficacy is achieved. We propose a multicenter, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BCT for CSR. Participants aged 18 to 65 years, who are in conformity with the diagnostic criteria of CSR and whose pain score on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) is more than 4 points and less than 8 points, will be included and randomly allocated into two groups: a treatment group and a control group. Participants in the treatment group will be treated with BCT, while the control group will receive traction therapy (TT). The primary outcome is pain severity (measured with a VAS). Secondary outcomes will include cervical curvature (measured by the Borden Index), a composite of functional status (measured by the Neck Disability Index, NDI), patient health status (evaluated by the SF-36 health survey) and adverse events (AEs) as reported in the trial. If BCT can relieve neck pain without adverse effects, it may be a novel strategy for the treatment of CSR. Furthermore, the mechanism of BCT for CSR will be partially elucidated. Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02705131 . Registered on 9

  20. Chiropractic manipulative therapy of the thoracic spine in combination with stretch and strengthening exercises, in improving postural kyphosis in woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Castello Branco

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The study showed that all three treatment protocols for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were effective. However, Group 1 had not shown a great improvement in their postural kyphosis, Group 3 had shown a relatively good improvement in their posture, while Group 2 had shown the best results with regards to improvement of the participants' posture. Therefore, in conclusion, Groups 2 and 3 treatment protocols can be used effectively to treat postural kyphosis but Group 2's treatment protocol, consisting of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy to the thoracic spine in combination with stretch and strengthening exercises, will yield the best results.

  1. Physical Therapy and Manual Physical Therapy: Differences in Patient Characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M; Pool, Jan J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  2. Physical therapy and manual physical therapy: Differences in patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, G.G.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  3. Physical Therapy and Manual Physical Therapy: Differences in Patient Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G. M.; Pool, Jan J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  4. Reconceptualising manual therapy skills in contemporary practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabey, Martin; Hall, Toby; Hebron, Clair; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Christensen, Steffan Wittrup; Moloney, Niamh

    2017-06-01

    With conflicting evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual therapy calls have arisen within some quarters of the physiotherapy profession challenging the continued use of manual skills for assessment and treatment. A reconceptualisation of the importance of manual examination findings is put forward, based upon a contemporary understanding of pain science, rather than considering these skills only in terms of how they should "guide" manual therapy interventions. The place for manual examination findings within complex, multidimensional presentations is considered using vignettes describing the presentations of five people with low back pain. As part of multidimensional, individualised management, the balance of evidence relating to the effectiveness, mechanisms of action and rationale for manual skills is discussed. It is concluded that if manual examination and therapeutic skills are used in a manner consistent with a contemporary understanding of pain science, multidimensional patient profiles and a person-centred approach, their selective and judicious use still has an important role. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chiropractic manipulative therapy of the thoracic spine in combination with stretch and strengthening exercises, in improving postural kyphosis in woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim C. Branco

    2016-10-01

    Method: A randomised study design with thirty female participants between the ages of twenty and  thirty nine was selected. Group 1 (n = 10 received chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy to the thoracic spine. Group 2 (n = 10 received chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy to the thoracic spine as well as stretch and strengthening exercises i.e. stretching the pectoralis major muscles and strengthening the rhomboid, middle and inferior trapezius muscles. Group 3 (n = 10 received stretch and strengthening exercises. The stretch and strengthening exercises were performed in the consultation rooms to ensure that the participants were complying with the treatment and doing the exercises properly. The study consisted of seven consultations for Group 1 (they received treatment once a week for six weeks and for Groups 2 and 3 there were nineteen consultations (they received three treatments a week for six weeks. Objective data was recorded at the beginning of the first, fourth and seventh consultations for Group 1, and the first, tenth and nineteenth consultations for Groups 2 and 3. On the seventh consultation (for Group 1 and nineteenth consultation for Groups 2 and 3, only data collection was done. Objective data were obtained by using the Flexicurve® Ruler measurements for the angle of kyphosis. Visual analysis was done by taking lateral (sagittal view photographs at the beginning of the initial and final consultations. Results: Statistical analysis revealed significant statistical changes for the intragroup results for all three groups. No significant statistical difference was found between the groups for the inter-group analysis. Conclusion: The study showed that all three treatment protocols for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were effective. However, Group 1 had not shown a great improvement in their postural kyphosis, Group 3 had shown a relatively good improvement in their posture, while Group 2 had shown the best results with regards to improvement of the

  6. Manual therapy for unsettled, distressed and excessively crying infants: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Dawn; Plunkett, Austin; Ellwood, Julie; Miles, Clare

    2018-01-24

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analyses to assess the effect of manual therapy interventions for healthy but unsettled, distressed and excessively crying infants and to provide information to help clinicians and parents inform decisions about care. We reviewed published peer-reviewed primary research articles in the last 26 years from nine databases (Medline Ovid, Embase, Web of Science, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Osteopathic Medicine Digital Repository , Cochrane (all databases), Index of Chiropractic Literature, Open Access Theses and Dissertations and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature). Our inclusion criteria were: manual therapy (by regulated or registered professionals) of unsettled, distressed and excessively crying infants who were otherwise healthy and treated in a primary care setting. Outcomes of interest were: crying, feeding, sleep, parent-child relations, parent experience/satisfaction and parent-reported global change. Nineteen studies were selected for full review: seven randomised controlled trials, seven case series, three cohort studies, one service evaluation study and one qualitative study.We found moderate strength evidence for the effectiveness of manual therapy on: reduction in crying time (favourable: -1.27 hours per day (95% CI -2.19 to -0.36)), sleep (inconclusive), parent-child relations (inconclusive) and global improvement (no effect). The risk of reported adverse events was low: seven non-serious events per 1000 infants exposed to manual therapy (n=1308) and 110 per 1000 in those not exposed. Some small benefits were found, but whether these are meaningful to parents remains unclear as does the mechanisms of action. Manual therapy appears relatively safe. CRD42016037353. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. A case study of chiropractic management of pregnancy-related heartburn with postulated fetal epigenome implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    This case study reports on chiropractic care for pregnancy-related heartburn. The purpose of this article is to relate the benefit of chiropractic treatment for one individual, to contrast chiropractic management with the biomedical standard of care for pregnancy-related heartburn, and to point to potential epigenetic implications of the standard of care. A 32-year-old woman who was 24 weeks pregnant presented with persistent heartburn that she was treating with ranitidine (Zantac®) and calcium carbonate (Tums®) daily at the initiation of chiropractic care. Findings of the initial examination were thoracic intersegmental dysfunction and pain upon palpation of the diaphragm, with hypertonicity noted. Therapy localization was positive for reflexes associated with the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter, suggesting spasms. Emotional components also were identified in association with the symptoms by the use of a mind-body therapy called NeuroEmotional Technique. The patient was treated by adjusting the thoracic spine, manually releasing the diaphragm spasms, and releasing the esophageal spasm with an activator (a small hand-held instrument that creates a percussive force). The patient was symptom-free and did not use medication after the fifth treatment. She was followed throughout the remainder of her pregnancy and was asymptomatic and required no further treatment. A larger study should investigate the effectiveness of chiropractic care for the treatment of pregnancy-related heartburn. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Possible adverse events in children treated by manual therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphreys B Kim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric manual therapy is controversial within the medical community particularly with respect to adverse events. Pediatric manual therapy (Ped MT is commonly used by a number of professions such as chiropractors, osteopaths and naturopaths for a variety of treatments in children. Ped MT interventions range from advice, light touch, massage, through to mobilisation and high velocity spinal manipulation. However, current evidence related to adverse events associated with Ped MT is not well understood. Objective To update the clinical research literature from the 2007 report by Vohra, Johnston, Cramer and Humphreys on possible adverse events in children treated by spinal manipulation. Methods A review of the clinical research literature from June 2004 until January 2010 as reported in MEDLINE, PubMed and PubMed Central for adverse events specifically related to the treatment of pediatric cases by manual therapy. Results Only three new clinical studies, one systematic review with meta-analysis and one evidence report were identified. Two clinical studies reported on chiropractic care and one on osteopathic spinal manipulation in children. The systematic review investigated all studies of adverse events and manual therapy and was not specific for pediatric patients. The evidence review focused on effectiveness of spinal manipulation in a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. No serious or catastrophic adverse events were reported in the clinical studies or systematic review. However for adults, it has been estimated that between 0.003% and 0.13% of manual therapy treatments may result in a serious adverse event. Although mild to moderate adverse events are common in adults, an accurate estimate from high quality pediatric studies is currently not available. Conclusions There is currently insufficient research evidence related to adverse events and manual therapy. However, clinical studies and systematic reviews from adult

  9. Cost-effectiveness of manual therapy for the management of musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of evidence from randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Clar, Christine; Court, Rachel; Clarke, Aileen; Mistry, Hema; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review trial-based economic evaluations of manual therapy relative to other alternative interventions used for the management of musculoskeletal conditions. A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in major medical, health-related, science and health economic electronic databases. Twenty-five publications were included (11 trial-based economic evaluations). The studies compared cost-effectiveness and/or cost-utility of manual therapy interventions to other treatment alternatives in reducing pain (spinal, shoulder, ankle). Manual therapy techniques (e.g., osteopathic spinal manipulation, physiotherapy manipulation and mobilization techniques, and chiropractic manipulation with or without other treatments) were more cost-effective than usual general practitioner (GP) care alone or with exercise, spinal stabilization, GP advice, advice to remain active, or brief pain management for improving low back and shoulder pain/disability. Chiropractic manipulation was found to be less costly and more effective than alternative treatment compared with either physiotherapy or GP care in improving neck pain. Preliminary evidence from this review shows some economic advantage of manual therapy relative to other interventions used for the management of musculoskeletal conditions, indicating that some manual therapy techniques may be more cost-effective than usual GP care, spinal stabilization, GP advice, advice to remain active, or brief pain management for improving low back and shoulder pain/disability. However, at present, there is a paucity of evidence on the cost-effectiveness and/or cost-utility evaluations for manual therapy interventions. Further improvements in the methodological conduct and reporting quality of economic evaluations of manual therapy are warranted in order to facilitate adequate evidence-based decisions among policy makers, health care practitioners, and patients. Copyright © 2014 National University

  10. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Sykhorychko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  11. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    A.N. Sykhorychko; Т.G. Kovalenko; М.А. Sykhorychko

    2012-01-01

    The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  12. Manual therapy for plantar heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Yosefa; Shashua, Anat; Kalichman, Leonid

    2018-03-01

    Manual therapy employed in the treatment of plantar heel pain includes joint or soft tissue mobilizations. Efficacy of these methods is still under debate. To determine whether manual therapy, consisting of deep massage, myofascial release or joint mobilization is effective in treating plantar heel pain. A critical review of all available studies with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. PubMed, PEDro, and Google Scholar databases were searched for keywords relating to plantar heel pain, joint, and soft tissue mobilizations. There were no search limitations or language restrictions. The reference lists of all retrieved articles were searched. The PEDro score was used to assess the quality of the reviewed papers. A total of six relevant RCTs were found: two examined the effectiveness of joint mobilization on plantar heel pain and four the effectiveness of soft tissue techniques. Five studies showed a positive short-term effect after manual therapy treatment, mostly soft tissue mobilizations, with or without stretching exercises for patients with plantar heel pain, compared to other treatments. One study observed that adding joint mobilization to the treatment of plantar heel pain was not effective. The quality of all studies was moderate to high. According to reviewed moderate and high-quality RCTs, soft tissue mobilization is an effective modality for treating plantar heel pain. Outcomes of joint mobilizations are controversial. Further studies are needed to evaluate the short and long-term effect of different soft tissue mobilization techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A descriptive study of a manual therapy intervention within a randomised controlled trial for hamstring and lower limb injury prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoskins Wayne

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little literature describing the use of manual therapy performed on athletes. It was our purpose to document the usage of a sports chiropractic manual therapy intervention within a RCT by identifying the type, amount, frequency, location and reason for treatment provided. This information is useful for the uptake of the intervention into clinical settings and to allow clinicians to better understand a role that sports chiropractors offer. Methods All treatment rendered to 29 semi-elite Australian Rules footballers in the sports chiropractic intervention group of an 8 month RCT investigating hamstring and lower-limb injury prevention was recorded. Treatment was pragmatically and individually determined and could consist of high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA manipulation, mobilization and/or supporting soft tissue therapies. Descriptive statistics recorded the treatment rendered for symptomatic or asymptomatic benefit, delivered to joint or soft tissue structures and categorized into body regions. For the joint therapy, it was recorded whether treatment consisted of HVLA manipulation, HVLA manipulation and mobilization, or mobilization only. Breakdown of the HVLA technique was performed. Results A total of 487 treatments were provided (mean 16.8 consultations/player with 64% of treatment for asymptomatic benefit (73% joint therapies, 57% soft tissue therapies. Treatment was delivered to approximately 4 soft tissue and 4 joint regions each consultation. The most common asymptomatic regions treated with joint therapies were thoracic (22%, knee (20%, hip (19%, sacroiliac joint (13% and lumbar (11%. For soft tissue therapies it was gluteal (22%, hip flexor (14%, knee (12% and lumbar (11%. The most common symptomatic regions treated with joint therapies were lumbar (25%, thoracic (15% and hip (14%. For soft tissue therapies it was gluteal (22%, lumbar (15% and posterior thigh (8%. Of the joint therapy, 56% was HVLA

  14. Unraveling the Mechanisms of Manual Therapy: Modeling an Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialosky, Joel E; Beneciuk, Jason M; Bishop, Mark D; Coronado, Rogelio A; Penza, Charles W; Simon, Corey B; George, Steven Z

    2018-01-01

    Synopsis Manual therapy interventions are popular among individual health care providers and their patients; however, systematic reviews do not strongly support their effectiveness. Small treatment effect sizes of manual therapy interventions may result from a "one-size-fits-all" approach to treatment. Mechanistic-based treatment approaches to manual therapy offer an intriguing alternative for identifying patients likely to respond to manual therapy. However, the current lack of knowledge of the mechanisms through which manual therapy interventions inhibit pain limits such an approach. The nature of manual therapy interventions further confounds such an approach, as the related mechanisms are likely a complex interaction of factors related to the patient, the provider, and the environment in which the intervention occurs. Therefore, a model to guide both study design and the interpretation of findings is necessary. We have previously proposed a model suggesting that the mechanical force from a manual therapy intervention results in systemic neurophysiological responses leading to pain inhibition. In this clinical commentary, we provide a narrative appraisal of the model and recommendations to advance the study of manual therapy mechanisms. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(1):8-18. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.7476.

  15. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita; D'Sylva, Jonathan; Burnie, Stephen J.; Goldsmith, Charles H.; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient

  16. The use of manual therapy in paediatric physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Skoutelis V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Manual therapy is the most common complementary or alternative treatment approach for orthopedic and non-musculoskeletal conditions in adult patients. In recent years, manual therapy techniques are increasingly used by physiotherapists in therapeutic programmes for children with neurological and orthopedic impairments. There is also a continuous increase in the number of children visits to alternative therapies, especially joint manipulation procedures. The purpose o...

  17. Professional Identity at Los Angeles College of Chiropractic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Melissa Nagare; Russell, Robb; Scaringe, John

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this article is to describe chiropractic professional identity as espoused by the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic. Professional identity is a construct that begins formation prior to career selection, can be considered the backbone of health care education, and has been linked to career success. Los Angeles College of Chiropractic's professional identity is shaped by a philosophy of health care that is focused on vitalism, holism, naturalism, therapeutic conservatism, critical rationalism, phenomenology, humanism, and interprofessionalism. Other distinguishing aspects include portal-of-entry professionals with broad diagnostic skills; a focus on spine care; promotion of public-health; and delivery of manual treatments. The chiropractic professional identity at the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic focuses on serving the needs of the people who entrust their health to its graduates and will continue to evolve on the basis of many factors, such as politics, social perceptions, and economic conditions.

  18. Chiropractic approach to the management of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Joyce

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chiropractic (Greek: done by hand is a health care profession concerned with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disorders of the neuromusculoskeletal system and the effects of these disorders on general health. There is an emphasis on manual techniques, including joint adjustment and/or manipulation, with a particular focus on joint subluxation (World Health Organization 2005 or mechanical lesion and restoring function. The chiropractor's role in wellness care, prevention and treatment of injury or illness is based on education in anatomy and physiology, nutrition, exercise and healthy lifestyle counseling as well as referral to other health practitioners. Depending on education, geographic location, scope of practice, as well as consumer preference, chiropractors may assume the role of primary care for families who are pursuing a more natural and holistic approach to health care for their families. Objective To present a perspective on current management of the paediatric patient by members of the chiropractic profession and to make recommendations as to how the profession can safely and effectively manage the paediatric patient. Discussion The chiropractic profession holds the responsibility of ethical and safe practice and requires the cultivation and mastery of both an academic foundation and clinical expertise that distinguishes chiropractic from other disciplines. Research into the effectiveness of chiropractic care for paediatric patients has lagged behind that of adult care, but this is being addressed through educational programs where research is now being incorporated into academic tracks to attain advanced chiropractic degrees. Conclusion Studies in the United States show that over the last several decades, chiropractors are the most common complementary and alternative medicine providers visited by children and adolescents. Chiropractors continue to seek integration with other healthcare providers to

  19. Recruitment and accrual of women in a placebo-controlled clinical pilot study on manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Hawk, Cheryl; Evans, Roni; Long, Cynthia R

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the accrual rates and recruitment processes among 3 Midwestern sites during a pilot study on manual therapy for chronic pelvic pain. Multisite pilot study for a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Three chiropractic institutions in or near major metropolitan cities in the Midwestern United States. Thirty-nine women aged 18 to 45 with chronic pelvic pain of at least 6 months duration, diagnosed by a board certified gynecologist. The method of recruitment was collected for each individual who responded to an advertisement and completed an interviewer-administered telephone screen. Participants who were willing and eligible after 3 baseline visits were entered into a randomized clinical trial. The number of responses and accrual rates were determined for the overall study, each of the 3 treatment sites, and each of the 5 recruitment efforts. In this study, 355 women were screened over the telephone and 39 were randomized, making the rate of randomization approximately 10%. The most effective recruitment methods leading to randomization were direct mail (38%) and radio advertisements (34%). However, success of the recruitment process differed by site. Based on the accrual of this multisite pilot study, a full-scale trial would not be feasible using this study's parameters. However, useful information was gained on recruitment effectiveness, eligibility criteria, and screening protocols among the 3 metropolitan sites.

  20. Economic evaluation of manual therapy for musculoskeletal diseases: a protocol for a systematic review and narrative synthesis of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Gon; Mun, Su-Jeong; Kim, Ka-Na; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Kim, Nam-Kwen; Lee, Dong-Hyo; Lee, Jung-Han

    2016-05-13

    Manual therapy is the non-surgical conservative management of musculoskeletal disorders using the practitioner's hands on the patient's body for diagnosing and treating disease. The aim of this study is to systematically review trial-based economic evaluations of manual therapy relative to other interventions used for the management of musculoskeletal diseases. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) on the economic evaluation of manual therapy for musculoskeletal diseases will be included in the review. The following databases will be searched from their inception: Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Econlit, Mantis, Index to Chiropractic Literature, Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), National Health Service Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (NHS DARE), National Health Service Health Technology Assessment Database (NHS HTA), National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), CENTRAL, five Korean medical databases (Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System (OASIS), Research Information Service System (RISS), DBPIA, Korean Traditional Knowledge Portal (KTKP) and KoreaMed) and three Chinese databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP and Wanfang). The evidence for the cost-effectiveness, cost-utility and cost-benefit of manual therapy for musculoskeletal diseases will be assessed as the primary outcome. Health-related quality of life and adverse effects will be assessed as secondary outcomes. We will critically appraise the included studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Drummond checklist. Results will be summarised using Slavin's qualitative best-evidence synthesis approach. The results of the study will be disseminated via a peer-reviewed journal and/or conference presentations

  1. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C.M.; Ostelo, Raymond W.J.G.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical

  2. The efficacy of chiropractic adjustments and PAIN®GONE therapy in the treatment of trapezius myofascial pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Tech. (Chiropractic) Myofascial trigger points are very common and can become a painful part of most people’s life at one time or another. According to Travell and Simons (1999), active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points are common in patients presenting with neck pain. Myofascial pain syndrome is a regional muscle disorder that is one of the most common causes of persistent pain in the head, face and neck regions (Rachlin, 2002). The PAIN®GONE pen is a device that produces a high...

  3. Manual therapy and exercise for rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally; McBain, Brodwen; Surace, Stephen J; Deitch, Jessica; Lyttle, Nicolette; Mrocki, Marshall A; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2016-06-10

    Management of rotator cuff disease often includes manual therapy and exercise, usually delivered together as components of a physical therapy intervention. This review is one of a series of reviews that form an update of the Cochrane review, 'Physiotherapy interventions for shoulder pain'. To synthesise available evidence regarding the benefits and harms of manual therapy and exercise, alone or in combination, for the treatment of people with rotator cuff disease. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2015), Ovid EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2015), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO, January 1937 to March 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP clinical trials registries up to March 2015, unrestricted by language, and reviewed the reference lists of review articles and retrieved trials, to identify potentially relevant trials. We included randomised and quasi-randomised trials, including adults with rotator cuff disease, and comparing any manual therapy or exercise intervention with placebo, no intervention, a different type of manual therapy or exercise or any other intervention (e.g. glucocorticoid injection). Interventions included mobilisation, manipulation and supervised or home exercises. Trials investigating the primary or add-on effect of manual therapy and exercise were the main comparisons of interest. Main outcomes of interest were overall pain, function, pain on motion, patient-reported global assessment of treatment success, quality of life and the number of participants experiencing adverse events. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted the data, performed a risk of bias assessment and assessed the quality of the body of evidence for the main outcomes using the GRADE approach. We included 60 trials (3620 participants), although only 10 addressed the main comparisons of interest. Overall risk of bias was low in three, unclear in 14 and high in

  4. Chiropractic biophysics technique: a linear algebra approach to posture in chiropractic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D D; Janik, T J; Harrison, G R; Troyanovich, S; Harrison, D E; Harrison, S O

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses linear algebra as applied to human posture in chiropractic, specifically chiropractic biophysics technique (CBP). Rotations, reflections and translations are geometric functions studied in vector spaces in linear algebra. These mathematical functions are termed rigid body transformations and are applied to segmental spinal movement in the literature. Review of the literature indicates that these linear algebra concepts have been used to describe vertebral motion. However, these rigid body movers are presented here as applying to the global postural movements of the head, thoracic cage and pelvis. The unique inverse functions of rotations, reflections and translations provide a theoretical basis for making postural corrections in neutral static resting posture. Chiropractic biophysics technique (CBP) uses these concepts in examination procedures, manual spinal manipulation, instrument assisted spinal manipulation, postural exercises, extension traction and clinical outcome measures.

  5. The efficacy of chiropractic manipulation for back pain : Blinded review of relevant randomized clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assendelft, W. J J; Koes, B. W.; Van der Heijden, G. J M G; Bouter, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of chiropractic for patients with back pain. Data Sources: Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on spinal manipulation were identified with a Medline search (1966-1990), by citation tracking, and by manual examination of the relevant chiropractic reference systems

  6. Considerations to improve the safety of cervical spine manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutting, Nathan; Kerry, Roger; Coppieters, Michel W; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M

    2018-02-01

    Manipulation and mobilisation of the cervical spine are well established interventions in the management of patients with headache and/or neck pain. However, their benefits are accompanied by potential, yet rare risks in terms of serious adverse events, including neurovascular insult to the brain. A recent international framework for risk assessment and management offers directions in the mitigation of this risk by facilitating sound clinical reasoning. The aim of this article is to critically reflect on and summarize the current knowledge about cervical spine manual therapy and to provide guidance for clinical reasoning for cervical spine manual therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Manual Therapy With Cryotherapy Versus Manual Therapy With Kinesio Taping for Males With Lumbar Discopathy: A Pilot Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizis, Pawel; Kobza, Wojciech

    2017-06-23

    Context • Numerous modalities of therapeutic interventions exist for lumbar discopathy. Manual therapy is one option, although its effectiveness remains controversial. The addition of cryotherapy to manual therapy may enhance the health benefits in patients with lumbar discopathy.  Objective • The study intended to evaluate the efficacy of manual therapy combined with cryotherapy vs manual therapy combined with Kinesio taping for males with lumbar discopathy. Design • The research team designed a pilot randomized trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. Setting • The study occurred in the Physiotherapy Outpatient Department of the Regional Hospital (Zywiec, Poland). Participants • The participants were 40 males with lumbar discopathy, aged 30-75 y, who were patients in the department at the hospital. Intervention • The participants were randomly assigned to an intervention group that received Kaltenborn-Evjenth orthopedic manual therapy (KEOMT) combined with cryotherapy, the KEOMT-C group (n = 20), or to a control group that received KEOMT combined with Kinesio taping, the KEOMT-K group (n = 20). The participants in both groups received 10 treatments, 2 per wk for 5 wk. Outcome Measures • The primary outcome was measured using a visual analog scale and the Laitinen scale pain ratings. The secondary outcome measured the quality of life using the short form-36 questionnaire. The participants completed the tests at baseline and postintervention. Results • After the treatments, the intervention group had significantly lower scores than the control group for pain as well as significantly higher scores for quality of life. Conclusions • Patients achieved better health benefits from manual therapy when it was combined with cryotherapy.

  8. Conservative chiropractic management of urinary incontinence using applied kinesiology: a retrospective case-series report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Scott C; Rosner, Anthony L

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this case series is to describe the chiropractic management of 21 patients with daily stress and occasional total urinary incontinence (UI). Twenty-one case files of patients 13 to 90 years of age with UI from a chiropractic clinic were reviewed. The patients had a 4-month to 49-year history of UI and associated muscle dysfunction and low back and/or pelvic pain. Eighteen wore an incontinence pad throughout the day and night at the time of their appointments because of unpredictable UI. Patients were evaluated for muscle impairments in the lumbar spine, pelvis, and pelvic floor and low back and/or hip pain. Positive manual muscle test results of the pelvis, lumbar spine muscles, and pelvic floor muscles were the most common findings. Lumbosacral dysfunction was found in 13 of the cases with pain provocation tests (applied kinesiology sensorimotor challenge); in 8 cases, this sensorimotor challenge was absent. Chiropractic manipulative therapy and soft tissue treatment addressed the soft tissue and articular dysfunctions. Chiropractic manipulative therapy involved high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation; Cox flexion distraction manipulation; and/or use of a percussion instrument for the treatment of myofascial trigger points. Urinary incontinence symptoms resolved in 10 patients, considerably improved in 7 cases, and slightly improved in 4 cases. Periodic follow-up examinations for the past 6 years, and no less than 2 years, indicate that for each participant in this case-series report, the improvements of UI remained stable. The patients reported in this retrospective case series showed improvement in UI symptoms that persisted over time.

  9. Sport Concussion Knowledge and Clinical Practices: A Survey of Doctors of Chiropractic With Sports Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, William J; Nabhan, Dustin C; Walden, Taylor

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the knowledge base and clinical practices regarding concussion by sports-certified doctors of chiropractic. A 21-item survey was distributed to the 312 attendees of the 2014 American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians Sports Sciences Symposium. Results were measured by frequency analysis and descriptive statistics for all surveys completed by sports-certified chiropractors. Seventy-six surveys were returned by sports-certified doctors of chiropractic. All (N = 76) 100% of respondents believe that the evaluation of concussion should be performed by a health care provider with training in concussion. The respondents actively assess and manage concussion in adults (96%), adolescents (95%), and children (75%). A majority (79%) of respondents believe that the Sideline Concussion Assessment Tool-3 represents a current standard of care for the sideline evaluation of the athlete who possibly has sustained a sport concussion. Most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that manual therapies may be appropriate in certain circumstances in adults (80%) and minors (80%). This cross section of certified sports chiropractors strongly believes that the evaluation of concussion should be performed by a health care provider with specific training in concussion. A high percentage of the sports-certified chiropractors who responded assess and manage sport concussion in their practice, and many of them endorse the use of the Sideline Concussion Assessment Tool-3 as a sideline assessment tool.

  10. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Heering, A.; Lubbe, N. van der; Vel, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy program compared with an exercise therapy program in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial of 109 hip OA patients was carried out in the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of

  11. The working mechanism of manual therapy in participants with chronic tension-type headache

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castien, R.F.; Blankenstein, A.H.; van der Windt, D.; Heijmans, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal study.OBJECTIVE: To explore the working mechanism of manual therapy, we investigated whether 3 cervical spine variables were mediators of the effect of manual therapy on headache frequency.BACKGROUND: Manual therapy has been shown to reduce headache frequency

  12. The role of chiropractic care in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Paul E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults.

  13. The immediate effect of soft tissue manual therapy intervention on lung function in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Montecinos C

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Cruz-Montecinos,1–3 Diego Godoy-Olave,4 Felipe A Contreras-Briceño,5 Paulina Gutiérrez,4 Rodrigo Torres-Castro,2 Leandro Miret-Venegas,3 Roger M Engel6 1Laboratory of Biomechanics and Kinesiology, San José Hospital, Santiago, Chile; 2Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; 3Unit of Kinesiology and Physical Therapy, San José Hospital, Santiago, Chile; 4Departamento de Kinesiología, Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación, Santiago, Chile; 5Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; 6Department of Chiropractic, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia Background and objective: In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, accessory respiratory muscles are recruited as a compensatory adaptation to changes in respiratory mechanics. This results in shortening and overactivation of these and other muscles. Manual therapy is increasingly being investigated as a way to alleviate these changes. The aim of this study was to measure the immediate effect on lung function of a soft tissue manual therapy protocol (STMTP designed to address changes in the accessory respiratory muscles and their associated structures in patients with severe COPD.Methods: Twelve medically stable patients (n=12 with an existing diagnosis of severe COPD (ten: GOLD Stage III and two: GOLD Stage IV were included. Residual volume, inspiratory capacity and oxygen saturation (SpO2 were recorded immediately before and after administration of the STMTP. A Student’s t-test was used to determine the effect of the manual therapy intervention (P<0.05.Results: The mean age of the patients was 62.4 years (range 46–77. Nine were male. Residual volume decreased from 4.5 to 3.9 L (P=0.002, inspiratory capacity increased from 2.0 to 2.1 L (P=0.039 and SpO2 increased from 93% to 96% (P=0.001.Conclusion: A single application of an STMTP appears to have the potential to produce

  14. Chiropractic and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Hestbæk, Lise

    2010-01-01

    of problems were identified: the lack of research in general and the lack of research using the appropriate study designs and methodology in particular. Therefore, we discuss the meager research noted in the areas of chiropractic care in children and the clinical consequences this should have...

  15. Chiropractic: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 354–362. Kaptchuk TJ, Eisenberg DM. Chiropractic: origins, controversies, and contributions. Archives of Internal Medicine . 1998;158( ... external links LinkedIn E-mail Updates NCCIH Home Privacy and Policies Accessibility en Español FOIA Site Map ...

  16. Manual therapy treatment of lumbar radiculopathy: A single case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Riley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients  with  lumbar  radiculopathy  are  often  managed with  manual therapy.  The  aim  of  this  single  case  study  was  to  describe  the outcome of manual therapy treatment of a patient with lumbar radiculopathy.  A 47-year-old female presented with acute, severe left buttock and postero-lateral thigh pain.  Symptom provocation occurred during lumbar flexion, coughing, sneezing, driving and prolonged sitting. her left straight leg raise neurodynamic test was limited and reproduced her pain, as did trigger points in the left lumbar and gluteal muscles. clinical neuro-conduction testing revealed weakness of the big and other toe extensors, as well as eversion and plantar flexion of the left ankle, and a diminished left ankle reflex. This indicated possible involvement of both the l5 and S1 nerve roots.   A  manual  therapy  treatment  approach including  lumbar rotation mobilisations (Maitland approach, massage, trigger point pressure release  and  Transversus  Abdominus muscle activation  was  used.   The  patient  was  symptom  free,  had  full pain-free  range  of  all  lumbar  movements,  a full  pain-free  left  straight leg  raise  neurodynamic  test  and  normal  neurological  conduction  six weeks  after  onset, following seven manual therapy treatments.  Although the results of this case report cannot be generalised, it describes the successful outcome of a patient with severe radicular pain and neurological deficits, whose signs and symptoms  had completely resolved following manual therapy treatment.

  17. EFFECTIVENESS OF MANUAL THERAPY VERSUS EXERCISE THERAPY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS IN KARACHI PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Zakir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among musculoskeletal disorders knee Osteoarthritis (OA is exceedingly prevailing articular disorder affecting people and it is a major cause of disability and socioeconomic burden. It is more common in women than men. Entities with knee OA must often undergo a variety of problems, such as pain and tenderness in joints, movement limitation, crepitus on movement, swelling, recurrent effusion, and local inflammation which ultimately leads to limitation in physical function, like lack of ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL or Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL. For reducing knee pain in osteoarthritis several conventional treatment methods are used world widely but most extensively used in our country are pharmacologic and physical therapy. The objective of the study is to find out the effectiveness of Manual therapy verses Exercise therapy for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sixty patients including both male and female with mean age (51years and SD of (5.1 were enrolled in the study and divided randomly in to two groups. Those who were assigned as group A had received Manual therapy and those who were assigned as group B had received Exercise therapy. Participants had received three treatment sessions of 30 min per week for consecutive 4 weeks. OUTCOME MEASURE: WOMAC index score for pain, stiffness and physical function was used to evaluate the baseline score and treatment effects after 12 therapy sessions. Results: Study showed significant improvement in both groups before and after the treatment but in comparison manual therapy group showed significant results with respect to pain subscale (p=0.003 and physical function subscale (p=0.004. Conclusion: Significant difference found between manual therapy and exercise therapy treatment approaches in treating knee osteoarthritis. Findings of this study revealed the fact that short term treatment sessions of manual therapy were superior to

  18. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Koes, B.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  19. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. A randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan Lucas; Koes, Bart W.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; van Mameren, Henk; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.; Pool, Jan J. M.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  20. Straight chiropractic philosophy as a barrier to Medicare compliance: a discussion of 5 incongruent issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, David R; Soltys, Jonathan R

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to discuss potential 5 factors within straight chiropractic philosophy and practice that may prevent Medicare compliance. The national Medicare Benefit Policy Manual and the Florida Local Coverage Determination were reviewed to identify documentation and conceptual issues regarding chiropractic practice. Five Medicare positions were contrasted with tenets of straight chiropractic philosophy. Based on Medicare's documentation requirements, Medicare defines subluxation and chiropractic practice from the perspective of treating spinal pain and related functional disability. In contrast, traditional straight chiropractic philosophy is not based on the treatment of spinal pain and disability or other symptomatic presentations. In this context, 5 potential areas of conflict are discussed. The Medicare version of chiropractic practice is not consistent with traditional straight chiropractic philosophy, which may play a role in preventing Medicare compliance. The chiropractic profession may need to consider the fashion in which "philosophy" as it relates to technique and practice is presented to students and doctors to facilitate compliance with the documentation requirements of Medicare.

  1. Placebo Mechanisms of Manual Therapy: A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Penza, Charles W

    2017-05-01

    When a physical therapist provides a manual therapy (MT) intervention for a patient presenting with pain and the patient experiences a positive clinical outcome, we cannot answer as to why this occurs. Would we continue to devote valuable time and financial resources to learning and improving our skills in providing MT interventions if the related clinical outcomes were placebo responses? In this Viewpoint, the authors conceptualize placebo as an active and important mechanism of MT and argue that placebo mechanisms deserve consideration as an important component of the treatment effect. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(5):301-304. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0604.

  2. Clinical presentation and manual therapy for lower quadrant musculoskeletal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Carol A; Clark, Jeffrey D; Duncombe, Alison M; O'Hearn, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    Chronic lower quadrant injuries constitute a significant percentage of the musculoskeletal cases seen by clinicians. While impairments may vary, pain is often the factor that compels the patient to seek medical attention. Traumatic injury from sport is one cause of progressive chronic joint pain, particularly in the lower quarter. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in different lower quadrant pain syndromes, such as lumbar spine related leg pain, osteoarthritis of the knee, and following acute injuries such as lateral ankle sprain and anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Proper management of lower quarter conditions should include assessment of balance and gait as increasing pain and chronicity may lead to altered gait patterns and falls. In addition, quantitative sensory testing may provide insight into pain mechanisms which affect management and prognosis of musculoskeletal conditions. Studies have demonstrated analgesic effects and modulation of spinal excitability with use of manual therapy techniques, with clinical outcomes of improved gait and functional ability. This paper will discuss the evidence which supports the use of manual therapy for lower quarter musculoskeletal dysfunction.

  3. Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using a modeled manual therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey M Bove

    Full Text Available Postoperative adhesions are pathological attachments that develop between abdominopelvic structures following surgery. Considered unavoidable and ubiquitous, postoperative adhesions lead to bowel obstructions, infertility, pain, and reoperations. As such, they represent a substantial health care challenge. Despite over a century of research, no preventive treatment exists. We hypothesized that postoperative adhesions develop from a lack of movement of the abdominopelvic organs in the immediate postoperative period while rendered immobile by surgery and opiates, and tested whether manual therapy would prevent their development. In a modified rat cecal abrasion model, rats were allocated to receive treatment with manual therapy or not, and their resulting adhesions were quantified. We also characterized macrophage phenotype. In separate experiments we tested the safety of the treatment on a strictureplasty model, and also the efficacy of the treatment following adhesiolysis. We show that the treatment led to reduced frequency and size of cohesive adhesions, but not other types of adhesions, such as those involving intraperitoneal fatty structures. This effect was associated with a delay in the appearance of trophic macrophages. The treatment did not inhibit healing or induce undesirable complications following strictureplasty. Our results support that that maintained movements of damaged structures in the immediate postoperative period has potential to act as an effective preventive for attenuating cohesive postoperative adhesion development. Our findings lay the groundwork for further research, including mechanical and pharmacologic approaches to maintain movements during healing.

  4. Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using a modeled manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Geoffrey M; Chapelle, Susan L; Hanlon, Katherine E; Diamond, Michael P; Mokler, David J

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative adhesions are pathological attachments that develop between abdominopelvic structures following surgery. Considered unavoidable and ubiquitous, postoperative adhesions lead to bowel obstructions, infertility, pain, and reoperations. As such, they represent a substantial health care challenge. Despite over a century of research, no preventive treatment exists. We hypothesized that postoperative adhesions develop from a lack of movement of the abdominopelvic organs in the immediate postoperative period while rendered immobile by surgery and opiates, and tested whether manual therapy would prevent their development. In a modified rat cecal abrasion model, rats were allocated to receive treatment with manual therapy or not, and their resulting adhesions were quantified. We also characterized macrophage phenotype. In separate experiments we tested the safety of the treatment on a strictureplasty model, and also the efficacy of the treatment following adhesiolysis. We show that the treatment led to reduced frequency and size of cohesive adhesions, but not other types of adhesions, such as those involving intraperitoneal fatty structures. This effect was associated with a delay in the appearance of trophic macrophages. The treatment did not inhibit healing or induce undesirable complications following strictureplasty. Our results support that that maintained movements of damaged structures in the immediate postoperative period has potential to act as an effective preventive for attenuating cohesive postoperative adhesion development. Our findings lay the groundwork for further research, including mechanical and pharmacologic approaches to maintain movements during healing.

  5. Chiropractic & Osteopathy. A new journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce F

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both chiropractic and osteopathy are over a century old. They are now regarded as complementary health professions. There is an imperative for both professions to research the principles and claims that underpin them, and the new journal Chiropractic & Osteopathy provides a scientific forum for the publication of such research.

  6. The Use of Treatment Manuals in Cognitive Therapy: Experience and Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Keith S.; Shaw, Brian F.

    1988-01-01

    Traces historical developments in use of treatment manuals in psychotherapy research and reviews characteristics that have facilitated development of cognitive therapy manuals. Reviews arguments in favor of and opposed to further development of treatment manuals. Discusses relevant research and suggests three areas for future treatment manual…

  7. The Role of Descending Modulation in Manual Therapy and Its Analgesic Implications: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Vigotsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual therapy has long been a component of physical rehabilitation programs, especially to treat those in pain. The mechanisms of manual therapy, however, are not fully understood, and it has been suggested that its pain modulatory effects are of neurophysiological origin and may be mediated by the descending modulatory circuit. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the neurophysiological response to different types of manual therapy, in order to better understand the neurophysiological mechanisms behind each therapy’s analgesic effects. It is concluded that different forms of manual therapy elicit analgesic effects via different mechanisms, and nearly all therapies appear to be at least partially mediated by descending modulation. Additionally, future avenues of mechanistic research pertaining to manual therapy are discussed.

  8. Children and chiropractic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Hestbaek, Lise

    2009-01-01

    Health and lifestyle early in life have profound impact on health and quality of life in later years. Common public health problems such as musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular disease, and depression tend to cluster in individuals, and this pattern is established early. At present, no health...... care profession has convincingly assumed the responsibility of spinal and musculoskeletal health for children. Considering the magnitude of the challenges ahead for both researchers and clinicians, this may be a good opportunity for doctors of chiropractic to take responsibility and engage...

  9. 伏九贴联合捏脊疗法防治小儿哮喘临床研究%Clinical observation of external application therapy combined with chiropractic therapy on the pediatric asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐敏; 杨红新; 杨建玲; 张岚

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of external application therapy combined with chiropractic therapy on the pediatric asthma.Methods A total of 55 patients were randomly assigned into the treatment group (28 patients) and the control group (27 patients), The treatment group was treated with external application therapy combined with chiropractic therapyin the the hottest and coldest weather of each year; while the control group was only treated with chiropractic therapy. Both groups were treated for 3 years. After the treatment, the total effective rate, the clinical control rate, and the frequency of asthma attacks were detected.Results The total effective rate was 92.9% (26/28) and the clinical control rate was 64.3% (18/28) in observation group, which were better than those of 70.4% (19/27) and 22.2% (6/27) in the control group (χ2=4.073,P=0.044, andχ2=8.823,P=0.003). After 3 years’ treatment, the asthma grading distributionin the treatment group was significantly different from the control group (χ2=10.776,P=0.005). The frequency of asthma attacks in the treatment group after the first year treatment (4.5 ± 0.5 timesvs. 5.0 ± 0.5 times,t=3.708,P<0.01) was significantly lower than that in the control group; so did the second years after treatment (3.0 ± 0.5 timesvs.4.3 ± 0.5 times,t=9.728,P<0.01), and the third years (1.5 ± 0.5 times vs. 3.0 ± 0.5 times,t=11.225,P<0.01).ConclusionsThe external application therapy combined with chiropractic therapy could prevent asthma in children patients.%目的:评估中药伏九贴联合捏脊疗法防治小儿哮喘的疗效。方法将符合入选标准的小儿哮喘患者55例采用随机数字表法分为治疗组28例,对照组27例,治疗组于每年三伏与三九期间采用伏九贴联合捏脊疗法治疗,对照组单纯行捏脊疗法。2组均治疗3年。治疗结束后观察患儿总有效率与临床控制率,比较2组患儿哮喘发作次数。结果治疗组总有效率为92.9%(26/28)

  10. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Combined With Physical Therapy in Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Arnal-Gómez, Anna; Balasch-Bernat, Mercè; Inglés, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the treatment effectiveness of the combination of manual therapy (MT) with other physical therapy techniques. Systematic searches of scientific literature were undertaken on PubMed and the Cochrane Library (2004-2014). The following terms were used: "patellofemoral pain syndrome," "physical therapy," "manual therapy," and "manipulation." RCTs that studied adults diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) treated by MT and physical therapy approaches were included. The quality of the studies was assessed by the Jadad Scale. Five RCTs with an acceptable methodological quality (Jadad ≥ 3) were selected. The studies indicated that MT combined with physical therapy has some effect on reducing pain and improving function in PFPS, especially when applied on the full kinetic chain and when strengthening hip and knee muscles. The different combinations of MT and physical therapy programs analyzed in this review suggest that giving more emphasis to proximal stabilization and full kinetic chain treatments in PFPS will help better alleviation of symptoms.

  11. Manual Therapy: The Historical, Current, and Future Role in the Treatment of Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Russell Smith

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual therapy has been an approach in the management of patients with various disorders dating back to ancient times and continues to play a significant role in current health care. The future role of manual therapy in health care is an important area of research. This paper reviews the history of manual therapy, examines the current literature related to the use of manual techniques (including manipulation, massage, and nerve manipulation, and discusses future research topics. The literature related to manual therapy has historically been anecdotal and theoretical, and current research tends to have a generic approach with broad definitions of manual therapy and inconsistencies in the classification of specific disorders. Systematic reviews of various types of manual therapy have differed on their conclusions regarding the effectiveness of this treatment modality. The current demand in health care for evidence-based practice necessitates a movement towards more specificity in the research of the effectiveness of manual therapy, with emphasis on specific patient signs and symptoms and specific manual techniques that result in effective care.

  12. Manual Therapy: The Historical, Current, and Future Role in the Treatment of Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. Russell

    2007-01-01

    Manual therapy has been an approach in the management of patients with various disorders dating back to ancient times and continues to play a significant role in current health care. The future role of manual therapy in health care is an important area of research. This paper reviews the history of manual therapy, examines the current literature related to the use of manual techniques (including manipulation, massage, and nerve manipulation), and discusses future research topics. The literature related to manual therapy has historically been anecdotal and theoretical, and current research tends to have a generic approach with broad definitions of manual therapy and inconsistencies in the classification of specific disorders. Systematic reviews of various types of manual therapy have differed on their conclusions regarding the effectiveness of this treatment modality. The current demand in health care for evidence-based practice necessitates a movement towards more specificity in the research of the effectiveness of manual therapy, with emphasis on specific patient signs and symptoms and specific manual techniques that result in effective care. PMID:17334604

  13. Thoracic manual therapy is not more effective than placebo thoracic manual therapy in patients with shoulder dysfunctions: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Paolo; Buzzatti, Luca; Cattrysse, Erik; Scafoglieri, Aldo

    2018-02-01

    Manual treatments targeting different regions (shoulder, cervical spine, thoracic spine, ribs) have been studied to deal with patients complaining of shoulder pain. Thoracic manual treatments seem able to produce beneficial effects on this group of patients. However, it is not clear whether the patient improvement is a consequence of thoracic manual therapy or a placebo effect. To compare the efficacy of thoracic manual therapy and placebo thoracic manual treatment for patients with shoulder dysfunction. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CENTRAL, PEDro, CINAHL, WoS, EMBASE, ERIC) were searched through November 2016. Randomized Controlled Trials assessing pain, mobility and function were selected. The Cochrane bias estimation tool was applied. Outcome results were either extracted or computed from raw data. Meta-analysis was performed for outcomes with low heterogeneity. Four studies were included in the review. The methodology of the included studies was generally good except for one study that was rated as high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed no significant effect for "pain at present" (SMD -0.02; 95% CI: -0.35, 0.32) and "pain during movement" (SMD -0.12; 95% CI: -0.45, 0.21). There is very low to low quality of evidence that a single session of thoracic manual therapy is not more effective than a single session of placebo thoracic manual therapy in patients with shoulder dysfunction at immediate post-treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Chiropractic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketing Patient Fact Sheets Contact the ACA State Licensing Boards Research JMPT Abstracts Latest Issue Evidence in ... Chiropractic Posture Backpack Safety Spinal Health Winter Activities Kids and Sports Exercising Outdoors with Baby Gardening Chronic ...

  15. Chiropractic: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for back pain (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Chiropractic updates by ... ENCYCLOPEDIA Chiropractic care for back pain Related Health Topics Back Pain Complementary and Integrative Medicine National Institutes ...

  16. PAEDIATRIC ASTHMA AND MANUAL THERAPY- A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pandey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asthma is an inflammatory clutter of the airways that causes wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. In India, approximate calculation indicates a prevalence of between 10% and 15% in 5-11 year old children. Modern Western treatment focuses on controlling asthma with two classes of medication corticosteroids and bronchodilatorss. Another plan of action for reducing and potentially even throw out asthma manifestation affects manipulation of the craniosacral fascial system. This system is a unification of the craniosacral and fascial or connective tissue part. This idea can help in making clear the greatly high rate of achievement with manual therapy in pediatric asthma. Methods: In this case report first I have taken a brief history of the patient condition after the full assessment like brain cycle rhythm, chest and systemic. I have given cranio sacral therapy, Intercostal release, PNF for diaphragm release on child for seven sitting of about 45 minutes of each session. Results: After completion of treatment session of seven sitting his lungs to be bright of any wheezing or other impediment. Brain cycle was of 90 seconds. His peak flow meter readings were between 250 and 300 Liters/minute, which were in a satisfactory range for him. The physician suggested that at this point there was no requirement for any additional asthma medicines. Conclusion: It comes into sight that the loss to the respiratory system caused by fascial burden early in life may be fully reversible, if treated immediately. The latent grace of this interdependent approach is that it crop up to address the pathological origin of asthma.

  17. Regional interdependence and manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Amy; Young, Jodi; Mintken, Paul; Cleland, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine manipulation is commonly used by physical therapists for the management of patients with upper quarter pain syndromes. The theoretical construct for using thoracic manipulation for upper quarter conditions is a mainstay of a regional interdependence (RI) approach. The RI concept is likely much more complex and is perhaps driven by a neurophysiological response including those related to peripheral, spinal cord and supraspinal mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that thoracic spine manipulation results in neurophysiological changes, which may lead to improved pain and outcomes in individuals with musculoskeletal disorders. The intent of this narrative review is to describe the research supporting the RI concept and its application to the treatment of individuals with neck and/or shoulder pain. Treatment utilizing both thrust and non-thrust thoracic manipulation has been shown to result in improvements in pain, range of motion and disability in patients with upper quarter conditions. Research has yet to determine optimal dosage, techniques or patient populations to which the RI approach should be applied; however, emerging evidence supporting a neurophysiological effect for thoracic spine manipulation may negate the need to fully answer this question. Certainly, there is a need for further research examining both the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of manual therapy interventions utilized in the RI model as well as the neurophysiological effects resulting from this intervention.

  18. The working mechanism of manual therapy in participants with chronic tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castien, René; Blankenstein, Annette; van der Windt, Daniëlle; Heymans, Martijn W; Dekker, Joost

    2013-10-01

    Prospective longitudinal study. To explore the working mechanism of manual therapy, we investigated whether 3 cervical spine variables were mediators of the effect of manual therapy on headache frequency. Background Manual therapy has been shown to reduce headache frequency in participants with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). To what extent specific elements of treatment contribute to the effectiveness of manual therapy in CTTH is unknown. One hundred eighty-two participants with CTTH participated in a prospective longitudinal study: 142 underwent manual therapy and 40 participants received usual care by their general practitioner. Regression analysis was performed according to the steps described by Baron and Kenny, and the proportion of mediated effect was estimated for 3 potential mediators: (1) cervical range of motion, (2) neck flexor endurance, and (3) forward head posture. Outcome was defined as a 50% or greater reduction in headache days. Neck flexor endurance mediated 24.5% of the effect of manual therapy. Cervical range of motion and forward head posture showed no mediated effect. Increased neck flexor endurance appears to be a working mechanism of manual therapy. This finding supports isometric training of neck flexors in participants with CTTH. Trial registered with Netherlands Trial Register (TR 1074).

  19. Manual therapy with and without vestibular rehabilitation for cervicogenic dizziness: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lystad Reidar P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manual therapy is an intervention commonly advocated in the management of dizziness of a suspected cervical origin. Vestibular rehabilitation exercises have been shown to be effective in the treatment of unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders, and have also been suggested in the literature as an adjunct in the treatment of cervicogenic dizziness. The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence for manual therapy, in conjunction with or without vestibular rehabilitation, in the management of cervicogenic dizziness. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted in the databases Scopus, Mantis, CINHAL and the Cochrane Library for terms related to manual therapy, vestibular rehabilitation and cervicogenic dizziness. Included studies were assessed using the Maastricht-Amsterdam criteria. Results A total of fifteen articles reporting findings from thirteen unique investigations, including five randomised controlled trials and eight prospective, non-controlled cohort studies were included in this review. The methodological quality of the included studies was generally poor to moderate. All but one study reported improvement in dizziness following either unimodal or multimodal manual therapy interventions. Some studies reported improvements in postural stability, joint positioning, range of motion, muscle tenderness, neck pain and vertebrobasilar artery blood flow velocity. Discussion Although it has been argued that manual therapy combined with vestibular rehabilitation may be superior in the treatment of cervicogenic dizziness, there are currently no observational and experimental studies demonstrating such effects. A rationale for combining manual therapy and vestibular rehabilitation in the management of cervicogenic dizziness is presented. Conclusion There is moderate evidence to support the use of manual therapy, in particular spinal mobilisation and manipulation, for cervicogenic dizziness. The evidence

  20. Themes Underlying Australian General Practitioner Views towards Chiropractic and Osteopathy: An Assessment of Free Text Data from a Cross-Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Grace

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Australian chiropractic and osteopathic professions underwent a period of significant transformation between 1960 and 2000. This resulted in an improvement in the views held by the medical profession towards the two professions. However, a recent survey of Australian general practitioners (GPs reported that a number of GPs still hold negative views towards chiropractors and osteopaths. This paper examines these views from the perspective of critical realism and explores the generative mechanisms that can influence the willingness of health practitioners to collaborate over patient care. A qualitative analysis of open-ended responses to a survey of 630 Australian GPs was conducted. Unfavourable attitudes of GPs towards chiropractors and osteopaths included perceived lack of safety, efficacy, and inadequacy of training, despite chiropractic’s and osteopathy’s reliance on the same evidence base and similar training to those of other manual therapy professions such as physiotherapy. These attitudes may be underpinned by the professional biases against chiropractic and osteopathy that continue to marginalise the professions within the Australian healthcare system. Continued investment in the research base for chiropractic and osteopathic practice is required, along with raising the awareness of GPs about the education and skills of chiropractors and osteopaths.

  1. The Quality of Life of Children Under Chiropractic Care Using PROMIS-25: Results from a Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Joel; Lamont, Andrea E; Ohm, Jeanne; Alcantara, Junjoe

    2018-04-01

    To characterize pediatric chiropractic and assess pediatric quality of life (QoL). A prospective cohort. Setting/Locations: Individual offices within a practice-based research network located throughout the United States. A convenience sample of children (8-17 years) under chiropractic care and their parents. Chiropractic spinal adjustments and adjunctive therapies. Survey instrument measuring sociodemographic information and correlates from the clinical encounter along with the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-25 to measure QoL (i.e., depression, anxiety, and pain interference). Sociodemographic and clinical correlates were analyzed using descriptive statistics (i.e., frequencies/percentages, means, and standard deviations). The PROMIS-25 data were analyzed using scoring manuals, converting raw scores to T score metric (mean = 50; SD = 10). A generalized linear mixed model was utilized to examine covariates (i.e., sex, number of visits, and motivation for care) that may have played an important role on the PROMIS outcome. The original data set consisted of 915 parent-child dyads. After data cleaning, a total of 881 parents (747 females, 134 males; mean age = 42.03 years) and 881 children (467 females and 414 males; mean age = 12.49 years) comprised this study population. The parents were highly educated and presented their child for mainly wellness care. The mean number of days and patient visits from baseline to comparative QoL measures was 38.12 days and 2.74 (SD = 2.61), respectively. After controlling for the effects of motivation for care, patient visits, duration of complaint, sex, and pain rating, significant differences were observed in the probability of experiencing problems (vs. no reported problems) across all QoL domains (Wald = 82.897, df = 4, p < 0.05). Post hoc comparisons demonstrated the children were less likely to report any symptoms of depression (Wald = 6.1474, df = 1

  2. Effectiveness of manual therapies: the UK evidence report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfort, Gert; Haas, Mitch; Evans, Roni; Leininger, Brent; Triano, Jay

    2010-02-25

    The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct but comprehensive summary of the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual treatment for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions. The conclusions are based on the results of systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), widely accepted and primarily UK and United States evidence-based clinical guidelines, plus the results of all RCTs not yet included in the first three categories. The strength/quality of the evidence regarding effectiveness was based on an adapted version of the grading system developed by the US Preventive Services Task Force and a study risk of bias assessment tool for the recent RCTs. By September 2009, 26 categories of conditions were located containing RCT evidence for the use of manual therapy: 13 musculoskeletal conditions, four types of chronic headache and nine non-musculoskeletal conditions. We identified 49 recent relevant systematic reviews and 16 evidence-based clinical guidelines plus an additional 46 RCTs not yet included in systematic reviews and guidelines.Additionally, brief references are made to other effective non-pharmacological, non-invasive physical treatments. Spinal manipulation/mobilization is effective in adults for: acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain; migraine and cervicogenic headache; cervicogenic dizziness; manipulation/mobilization is effective for several extremity joint conditions; and thoracic manipulation/mobilization is effective for acute/subacute neck pain. The evidence is inconclusive for cervical manipulation/mobilization alone for neck pain of any duration, and for manipulation/mobilization for mid back pain, sciatica, tension-type headache, coccydynia, temporomandibular joint disorders, fibromyalgia, premenstrual syndrome, and pneumonia in older adults. Spinal manipulation is not effective for asthma and dysmenorrhea when compared to sham manipulation, or for Stage 1

  3. Effectiveness of manual therapies: the UK evidence report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leininger Brent

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct but comprehensive summary of the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual treatment for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions. Methods The conclusions are based on the results of systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs, widely accepted and primarily UK and United States evidence-based clinical guidelines, plus the results of all RCTs not yet included in the first three categories. The strength/quality of the evidence regarding effectiveness was based on an adapted version of the grading system developed by the US Preventive Services Task Force and a study risk of bias assessment tool for the recent RCTs. Results By September 2009, 26 categories of conditions were located containing RCT evidence for the use of manual therapy: 13 musculoskeletal conditions, four types of chronic headache and nine non-musculoskeletal conditions. We identified 49 recent relevant systematic reviews and 16 evidence-based clinical guidelines plus an additional 46 RCTs not yet included in systematic reviews and guidelines. Additionally, brief references are made to other effective non-pharmacological, non-invasive physical treatments. Conclusions Spinal manipulation/mobilization is effective in adults for: acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain; migraine and cervicogenic headache; cervicogenic dizziness; manipulation/mobilization is effective for several extremity joint conditions; and thoracic manipulation/mobilization is effective for acute/subacute neck pain. The evidence is inconclusive for cervical manipulation/mobilization alone for neck pain of any duration, and for manipulation/mobilization for mid back pain, sciatica, tension-type headache, coccydynia, temporomandibular joint disorders, fibromyalgia, premenstrual syndrome, and pneumonia in older adults. Spinal manipulation is not effective for asthma and

  4. The Effect of Manual Therapy on the Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in a 28 Years Old Woman

    OpenAIRE

    Marzieh Mohamadi; Farahnaz Ghaffari-Nejhad

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is the most common type of scoliosis. Clinical signs and symptoms of scoliosis impair quality of life and daily function. Manual therapy is commonly used for treatment of scoliosis. This is a case report of scoliosis treatment with manual therapy in a 28 years old patient. A 28 years old woman complained of low back pain for 4 years. Spine x-ray, showed scoliosis with a 32 degrees Cobb angle. The patient received a manual therapy procedure of two visits per week for ...

  5. Can Independent Judges Recognize Different Psychotherapies? An Experience with Manual-Guided Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luborsky, Lester; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Tested whether independent judges could recognize three different manual-guided psychotherapies, drug counseling, supportive-expressive psychotherapy, and cognitive-behavioral using a special rating form containing scales for the characteristic aspects of each type. Results indicated that manual-guided therapies can be reliably recognized.…

  6. Analgesic effects of manual therapy in patients with musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Nijs; Dr. L.P. Voogt; F. Struyf; M. Meeys; D. Meuffels; J. de Vries

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current evidence shows that manual therapy elicits analgesic effect in different populations (healthy, pain inflicted and patients with musculoskeletal pain) when carried out at the spinal column, although the clinical significance of these effects remains unclear. Also the analgesic

  7. The Effect of Manual Therapy on the Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in a 28 Years Old Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Mohamadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic scoliosis (IS is the most common type of scoliosis. Clinical signs and symptoms of scoliosis impair quality of life and daily function. Manual therapy is commonly used for treatment of scoliosis. This is a case report of scoliosis treatment with manual therapy in a 28 years old patient. A 28 years old woman complained of low back pain for 4 years. Spine x-ray, showed scoliosis with a 32 degrees Cobb angle. The patient received a manual therapy procedure of two visits per week for 16 weeks including myofascial release technique, mobilization and manipulation. The Cobb angle was reduced 15.62% after 8 weeks and 21.87% after 16 weeks. In addition the pain was reduced by 50%. We can state that manual therapy was useful for this patient.

  8. Developing a Manualized Occupational Therapy Diabetes Management Intervention: Resilient, Empowered, Active Living With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Carandang, Kristine; Davis, Shain

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on the development of a manualized occupational therapy intervention for diabetes management. An initial theoretical framework and core content areas for a Stage I intervention manual were developed based on an in-depth needs assessment and review of existing literature. After evaluation by a panel of experts and completion of a feasibility study, the intervention was revised into a Stage 2 manual in preparation for a randomized study evaluating the intervention's efficacy. In developing the initial manual, we delineated core theoretical principles to allow for flexible application and tailoring of the intervention's content areas. Expert panel feedback and feasibility study results led to changes to the intervention structure and content as we developed the Stage 2 manual. Through describing this process, we illustrate the dynamic evolution of intervention manuals, which undergo revisions due to both theoretical and practical considerations at each stage of the research-to-clinical practice pipeline.

  9. Manualization of Occupational Therapy Interventions: Illustrations from the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Fogelberg, Donald; Diaz, Jesus; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The manualization of a complex occupational therapy intervention is a crucial step in ensuring treatment fidelity for both clinical application and research purposes. Towards this latter end, intervention manuals are essential for assuring trustworthiness and replicability of randomized controlled trials (RCT’s) that aim to provide evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy. In this paper, literature on the process of intervention manualization is reviewed. The prescribed steps are then illustrated through our experience in implementing the University of Southern California/Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center’s collaborative Pressure Ulcer Prevention Project (PUPP). In this research program, qualitative research provided the initial foundation for manualization of a multifaceted occupational therapy intervention designed to reduce incidence of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with SCI. PMID:22214116

  10. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in specific subgroups of patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS: The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  11. Manualization of Occupational Therapy Using Ayres Sensory Integration® for Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Joanne; van Hooydonk, Elke; Faller, Patricia; Mailloux, Zoe; Schaaf, Roseann

    2017-07-01

    This article reports on the development of a Stage 3 manual (following pilot effectiveness study) for implementing occupational therapy using Ayres Sensory Integration® (OT/ASI) for children with autism spectrum disorders to enhance participation in daily occupations. Three stakeholder groups were surveyed to aid in translation of manual from research to practice (i.e., Stage 3 manual) and an expert consensus meeting was held to finalize recommendations. Data indicated that the manuals usability could be improved by including a section on frequently encountered problems and solutions, and by including video case examples. Also recommended were greater chapter uniformity, improved clarity of forms and charts, and inclusion of a glossary. Changes were made and subject to expert review and consensus using modified Delphi process. The Stage 3 manual has been rigorously vetted and is ready for practice and research replication.

  12. Manual therapy in the treatment of patients with hemophilia B and inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Rubén; Trelles-Martínez, Roberto O

    2018-01-22

    The main clinical manifestations of hemophilia are muscle and joint bleeding. Recurrent bleeding leads to a degenerative process known as hemophilic arthropathy. The development of inhibitors (antibodies against FVIII/FIX concentrates) is the main complication in the treatment of hemophilia. The objective was to assess the safety and efficacy of manual therapy treatment in a patient with hemophilia and inhibitor. A 26-year-old patient with hemophilia B and inhibitor received physiotherapy treatment based on manual therapy for 3 months, with a frequency of 2 sessions per week. The joint status was evaluated using the Hemophilia Joint Health Score; pain was assessed with the Visual Analog Scale; and the range of movement was evaluated using a universal goniometer. The patient developed no joint bleeding in the knees or ankles as a result of the physiotherapy treatment. Following treatment, improvements were noted in the range of movement of knees and ankles, the perception of pain in both knees, and ankle functionality. Until now, manual therapy using joint traction was contraindicated in patients with hemophilia and inhibitor, as it was feared to cause possible joint bleeding. This is the first case study to address the safety and efficacy of manual therapy in a patient with hemophilia and an inhibitor. The results of this study may help to establish which manual therapy treatments are indicated in patients with hemophilic arthropathy and inhibitors. Thus, a physiotherapy program based on manual therapy may be safe in patients with hemophilia and inhibitor and such therapy may improve joint condition, pain, and joint range of motion in patients with hemophilia and inhibitor. Randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm the results of this case study.

  13. Effectiveness of manual therapies: the UK evidence report

    OpenAIRE

    Bronfort, Gert; Haas, Mitch; Evans, Roni; Leininger, Brent; Triano, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct but comprehensive summary of the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual treatment for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions. Methods The conclusions are based on the results of systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), widely accepted and primarily UK and United States evidence-based clinical guidelines, plus the results of all RCTs not yet incl...

  14. Effectiveness of exercise therapy and manual mobilisation in ankle sprain and functional instability: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wees, Philip J; Lenssen, Anton F; Hendriks, Erik J M; Stomp, Derrick J; Dekker, Joost; de Bie, Rob A

    2006-01-01

    This study critically reviews the effectiveness of exercise therapy and manual mobilisation in acute ankle sprains and functional instability by conducting a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Trials were searched electronically and manually from 1966 to March 2005. Randomised controlled trials that evaluated exercise therapy or manual mobilisation of the ankle joint with at least one clinically relevant outcome measure were included. Internal validity of the studies was independently assessed by two reviewers. When applicable, relative risk (RR) or standardised mean differences (SMD) were calculated for individual and pooled data. In total 17 studies were included. In thirteen studies the intervention included exercise therapy and in four studies the effects of manual mobilisation of the ankle joint was evaluated. Average internal validity score of the studies was 3.1 (range 1 to 7) on a 10-point scale. Exercise therapy was effective in reducing the risk of recurrent sprains after acute ankle sprain: RR 0.37 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.74), and with functional instability: RR 0.38 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.62). No effects of exercise therapy were found on postural sway in patients with functional instability: SMD: 0.38 (95% CI -0.15 to 0.91). Four studies demonstrated an initial positive effect of different modes of manual mobilisation on dorsiflexion range of motion. It is likely that exercise therapy, including the use of a wobble board, is effective in the prevention of recurrent ankle sprains. Manual mobilisation has an (initial) effect on dorsiflexion range of motion, but the clinical relevance of these findings for physiotherapy practice may be limited.

  15. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy and Stretching for Baseball Players With Shoulder Range of Motion Deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Lane B; Thigpen, Charles A; Hawkins, Richard J; Beattie, Paul F; Shanley, Ellen

    Baseball players displaying deficits in shoulder range of motion (ROM) are at increased risk of arm injury. Currently, there is a lack of consensus regarding the best available treatment options to restore shoulder ROM. Instrumented manual therapy with self-stretching will result in clinically significant deficit reductions when compared with self-stretching alone. Controlled laboratory study. Shoulder ROM and humeral torsion were assessed in 60 active baseball players (mean age, 19 ± 2 years) with ROM deficits (nondominant - dominant, ≥15°). Athletes were randomly assigned to receive a single treatment of instrumented manual therapy plus self-stretching (n = 30) or self-stretching only (n = 30). Deficits in internal rotation, horizontal adduction, and total arc of motion were compared between groups immediately before and after a single treatment session. Treatment effectiveness was determined by mean comparison data, and a number-needed-to-treat (NNT) analysis was used for assessing the presence of ROM risk factors. Prior to intervention, players displayed significant ( P < 0.001) dominant-sided deficits in internal rotation (-26°), total arc of motion (-18°), and horizontal adduction (-17°). After the intervention, both groups displayed significant improvements in ROM, with the instrumented manual therapy plus self-stretching group displaying greater increases in internal rotation (+5°, P = 0.010), total arc of motion (+6°, P = 0.010), and horizontal adduction (+7°, P = 0.004) compared with self-stretching alone. For horizontal adduction deficits, the added use of instrumented manual therapy with self-stretching decreased the NNT to 2.2 (95% CI, 2.1-2.4; P = 0.010). Instrumented manual therapy with self-stretching significantly reduces ROM risk factors in baseball players with motion deficits when compared with stretching alone. The added benefits of manual therapy may help to reduce ROM deficits in clinical scenarios where stretching alone is

  16. Management of Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis With Manual Therapy and Local Cryostimulation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Nadia; Marchand, Andrée-Anne; Descarreaux, Martin

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of adding cryostimulation to manual therapy in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis. The control group (n = 19) was treated with manual therapy consisting of soft-tissue therapy and radial head mobilizations. The experimental group (n = 18) received cryostimulation in addition to manual therapy care similar to that for the control group. Both protocols consisted of 8 treatments over a 4-week period. Outcome measures included pain intensity (visual analog scale), pain-free grip strength (handheld dynamometer), and functional index (Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation questionnaire). Assessments were performed at baseline, postintervention, and 3-month follow-up. Adherence and dropout rates were also considered. Both groups exhibited significant improvements in pain intensity and functional index at postintervention assessments, which were maintained at follow-up. All participants attended the prescribed number of treatments, but 27% were lost at follow-up. Minor adverse events were reported after cryostimulation in 4 cases. This study indicated that it is feasible to complete a clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of adding cryostimulation to manual therapy in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis. On the basis of these preliminary data, the combination of cryostimulation and manual therapy care did not provide any additional benefits in both the short term and the long term. Manual myofascial point treatment and mobilization techniques yielded positive outcomes in chronic lateral epicondylitis. Further studies should focus on the sole therapeutic effect of cryostimulation in both patients with acute and those with chronic conditions.

  17. Development of a manualized protocol of massage therapy for clinical trials in osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ather

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trial design of manual therapies may be especially challenging as techniques are often individualized and practitioner-dependent. This paper describes our methods in creating a standardized Swedish massage protocol tailored to subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee while respectful of the individualized nature of massage therapy, as well as implementation of this protocol in two randomized clinical trials. Methods The manualization process involved a collaborative process between methodologic and clinical experts, with the explicit goals of creating a reproducible semi-structured protocol for massage therapy, while allowing some latitude for therapists’ clinical judgment and maintaining consistency with a prior pilot study. Results The manualized protocol addressed identical specified body regions with distinct 30- and 60-min protocols, using standard Swedish strokes. Each protocol specifies the time allocated to each body region. The manualized 30- and 60-min protocols were implemented in a dual-site 24-week randomized dose-finding trial in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, and is currently being implemented in a three-site 52-week efficacy trial of manualized Swedish massage therapy. In the dose-finding study, therapists adhered to the protocols and significant treatment effects were demonstrated. Conclusions The massage protocol was manualized, using standard techniques, and made flexible for individual practitioner and subject needs. The protocol has been applied in two randomized clinical trials. This manualized Swedish massage protocol has real-world utility and can be readily utilized both in the research and clinical settings. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970008 (18 August 2009

  18. Effectiveness of using ultrasound therapy and manual therapy in the conservative treatment of calcaneal spur – pilot study

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    Twarowska Natalia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calcaneal spur is a pathology of the fibrocartilage enthesis of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia or a pathology of the mixed enthesis of the flexor digitorum brevis muscle. Ultrasound therapy is commonly applied in the conservative treatment of a calcaneal spur. Foot muscle strengthening exercises, stretching exercises and soft tissue therapy are indicated as effective methods of conservative treatment. The aim of the study was to compare and assess the effects of ultrasound therapy and selected techniques of manual therapy on pain level and functional state in patients with calcaneal spur.

  19. Changes in rat spinal cord gene expression after inflammatory hyperalgesia of the joint and manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlen, Rachel L; Singh, Vineet K; Pazdernik, Vanessa K; Towns, Lex C; Snider, Eric J; Sargentini, Neil J; Degenhardt, Brian F

    2014-10-01

    Mobilization of a joint affects local tissue directly but may also have other effects that are mediated through the central nervous system. To identify differential gene expression in the spinal cords of rats with or without inflammatory joint injury after manual therapy or no treatment. Rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups: no injury and no touch (NI/NT), injury and no touch (I/NT), no injury and manual therapy (NI/MT), and injury and manual therapy (I/MT). We induced acute inflammatory joint injury in the rats by injecting carrageenan into an ankle. Rats in the no-injury groups did not receive carrageenan injection. One day after injury, rats received manual therapy to the knee of the injured limb. Rats in the no-touch groups were anesthetized without receiving manual therapy. Spinal cords were harvested 30 minutes after therapy or no touch, and spinal cord gene expression was analyzed by microarray for 3 comparisons: NI/NT vs I/NT, I/MT vs I/NT, and NI/NT vs NI/MT. Three rats were assigned to each group. Of 38,875 expressed sequence tags, 755 were differentially expressed in the NI/NT vs I/NT comparison. For the other comparisons, no expressed sequence tags were differentially expressed. Cluster analysis revealed that the differentially expressed sequence tags were over-represented in several categories, including ion homeostasis (enrichment score, 2.29), transmembrane (enrichment score, 1.55), and disulfide bond (enrichment score, 2.04). An inflammatory injury to the ankle of rats caused differential expression of genes in the spinal cord. Consistent with other studies, genes involved in ion transport were among those affected. However, manual therapy to the knees of injured limbs or to rats without injury did not alter gene expression in the spinal cord. Thus, evidence for central nervous system mediation of manual therapy was not observed. © 2014 The American Osteopathic Association.

  20. Exercise therapy, manual therapy, or both, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a factorial randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter G David

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological, non-surgical interventions are recommended as the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis (OA of the hip and knee. There is evidence that exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and improving function in patients with knee OA, some evidence that exercise therapy is effective for hip OA, and early indications that manual therapy may be efficacious for hip and knee OA. There is little evidence as to which approach is more effective, if benefits endure, or if providing these therapies is cost-effective for the management of this disorder. The MOA Trial (Management of OsteoArthritis aims to test the effectiveness of two physiotherapy interventions for improving disability and pain in adults with hip or knee OA in New Zealand. Specifically, our primary objectives are to investigate whether: 1. Exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy improves disability at 12 months; 2. Manual physiotherapy versus no manual therapy improves disability at 12 months; 3. Providing physiotherapy programmes in addition to usual care is more cost-effective than usual care alone in the management of osteoarthritis at 24 months. Methods This is a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial. We plan to recruit 224 participants with hip or knee OA. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either: (a a supervised multi-modal exercise therapy programme; (b an individualised manual therapy programme; (c both exercise therapy and manual therapy; or, (d no trial physiotherapy. All participants will continue to receive usual medical care. The outcome assessors, orthopaedic surgeons, general medical practitioners, and statistician will be blind to group allocation until the statistical analysis is completed. The trial is funded by Health Research Council of New Zealand Project Grants (Project numbers 07/199, 07/200. Discussion The MOA Trial will be the first to investigate the effectiveness and cost

  1. Manual therapy in the management of a patient with a symptomatic Morton's Neuroma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sault, Josiah D; Morris, Matthew V; Jayaseelan, Dhinu J; Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J

    2016-02-01

    Patients with Morton's neuroma are rarely referred to physical therapy. This case reports the resolution of pain, increase in local pressure pain thresholds, and improvement of scores on the Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure following a course of joint based manual therapy for a patient who had failed standard conservative medical treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Case Study: Manual Therapy in Patient of 18 Years with Youthful Scoliosis Idiopathic Summary

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    Claudia Yaneth Franco Monsalve

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is a lateral deviation of the spine from the mean line, characterized by a lateral curvature and a vertebral rotation. It is generallyof idiopathic character and appears mainly in adolescent females. Multiple techniques of conservative treatment for the scoliosis exist such as the manual therapy that complements the treatment for this pathology. This technique uses manipulation of soft tissue and bone, obtainingtherefore a more effective recovery, improving the quality of life of the patient. The objective of this study of case was to compareand to describe the changes in the conditionsof an eighteen years old patient, with left thoracolumbar scoliosis by the application of manual therapy; integral valuation was carried out by manual therapy, orthopedic, computerizedposition analysis, analyses the place of job, treatments with physical instruments, mobilizationsof the thoracic and lumbar joints (segmentsT5-T6, T6-T7, T7-T8, T8-T9, muscular energy techniques, exercises of global postural re-education, cervical and lumbar stabilization, exercises of fortification for weak musculature and stretching exercises to elongate retracted musculature. At the beginning of the treatment, the angle of Cobb was 24º ,verified through ax-ray, and after the sessions of manual therapy it was 18º, demonstrating significantly improved angle (6º. The effectiveness of the treatment was verified: diminution of the pain, increase of the muscular force, postural realignment, the satisfactionof the patient and significant recovery confirmed by the radiographic studies.

  3. Manual therapy in adults with tension-type headache: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumplido-Trasmonte, C; Fernández-González, P; Alguacil-Diego, I M; Molina-Rueda, F

    2018-03-07

    Tension-type headache is the most common primary headache, with a high prevalence and a considerable socioeconomic impact. Manual physical therapy techniques are widely used in the clinical field to treat the symptoms associated with tension-type headache. This systematic review aims to determine the effectiveness of manual and non-invasive therapies in the treatment of patients with tension-type headache. We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials in the following databases: Brain, PubMed, Web of Science, PEDro, Scopus, CINAHL, and Science Direct. Ten randomised controlled trials were included for analysis. According to these studies, manual therapy improves symptoms, increasing patients' well-being and improving the outcome measures analysed. Manual therapy has positive effects on pain intensity, pain frequency, disability, overall impact, quality of life, and craniocervical range of motion in adults with tension-type headache. None of the techniques was found to be superior to the others; combining different techniques seems to be the most effective approach. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Therapist Adherence and Competence with Manualized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD Delivered via Videoconferencing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, B. Christopher; Monnier, Jeannine; Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Elhai, Jon D.; Yim, Eunsil; Knapp, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Using secondary analyses from a randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder, we compared ratings of therapist competency and adherence between two service delivery modes: telepsychiatry (TP) and same room (SR). Patients were 38 male treatment-seeking veterans recruited…

  5. A clinical perspective on a pain neuroscience education approach to manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Nijs, Jo; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience education (PNE) in physical therapy. There is growing evidence for the efficacy of PNE to decrease pain, disability, fear-avoidance, pain catastrophization, limited movement, and health care utilization in people struggling with pain. PNE teaches people in pain more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience including processes such as central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, allodynia, inhibition, facilitation, neuroplasticity and more. PNE's neurobiological model often finds itself at odds with traditional biomedical models used in physical therapy. Traditional biomedical models, focusing on anatomy, pathoanatomy, and biomechanics have been shown to have limited efficacy in helping people understand their pain, especially chronic pain, and may in fact even increase a person's pain experience by increasing fear-avoidance and pain catastrophization. An area of physical therapy where the biomedical model is used a lot is manual therapy. This contrast between PNE and manual therapy has seemingly polarized followers from each approach to see PNE as a 'hands-off' approach even having clinicians categorize patients as either in need of receiving PNE (with no hands-on), or hands-on with no PNE. In this paper, we explore the notion of PNE and manual therapy co-existing. PNE research has shown to have immediate effects of various clinical signs and symptoms associated with central sensitization. Using a model of sensitization (innocuous, noxious, and allodynia), we argue that PNE can be used in a manual therapy model, especially treating someone where the nervous system has become increasingly hypervigilant. Level of Evidence : VII.

  6. Manual therapy and therapeutic exercise in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hip: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romeo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review aimed at investigating the role of therapeutic exercise and/or manual therapy in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis (OA. Two independent reviewers (AR, CV searched PubMed, Cinahl, Cochrane Library, PEDro and Scopus databases and a third one (SP was consulted in case of disagreement. The research criteria were publication period (from May 2007 to April 2012 and publication language (English or Italian. Ten randomized controlled trials matched inclusion criteria, eight of which concerning therapeutic exercise and two manual therapy. Few good quality studies were found. At mid- and long-term follow-up land-based exercises showed insufficient evidence of effectiveness with respect to pain and quality of life, but positive results were found for physical function. Water exercises significantly reduced fall risk when combined with functional exercises. Programs containing progressive and gradual exposure of difficult activities, education and exercises promoted better outcomes, higher adherence to home program and increased amount of physical activity, especially walking. Manual therapy seemed to reduce pain and decrease disability at short-term. Less use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was statistically significant at long-term follow-up in patients treated with manual therapy. The relationship between clinical results and radiological grade of OA was not investigated. Encouraging results were found in recent literature for manual therapy and functional training. Further research is needed to elucidate this issue through high-quality trials, especially addressing the aspects that have not been thoroughly explored yet, for instance type, amount and scheduling of conservative treatment.

  7. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-01-01

    Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical therapy, particularly active exercise therapy (PT) in patients with non-specific neck pain. Patients neck pain, aged between 18-70 years, were included in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect and functioning (Neck Disability Index), the secondary outcome was pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale for Pain). Outcomes were measured at 3, 7, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. Multilevel analyses (intention-to-treat) were the primary analyses for overall between-group differences. Additional to the primary and secondary outcomes the number of treatment sessions of the MTU group and PT group was analyzed. Data were collected from September 2008 to February 2011. A total of 181 patients were included. Multilevel analyses showed no statistically significant overall differences at one year between the MTU and PT groups on any of the primary and secondary outcomes. The MTU group showed significantly lower treatment sessions compared to the PT group (respectively 3.1 vs. 5.9 after 7 weeks; 6.1 vs. 10.0 after 52 weeks). Patients with neck pain improved in both groups without statistical significantly or clinically relevant differences between the MTU and PT groups during one-year follow-up. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843.

  8. Chiropractic manipulation in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: a pilot study

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    Stoline Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS remains the most common deforming orthopedic condition in children. Increasingly, both adults and children are seeking complementary and alternative therapy, including chiropractic treatment, for a wide variety of health concerns. The scientific evidence supporting the use chiropractic intervention is inadequate. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot study and explore issues of safety, patient recruitment and compliance, treatment standardization, sham treatment refinement, inter-professional cooperation, quality assurance, and outcome measure selection. Methods Six patients participated in this 6-month study, 5 of whom were female. One female was braced. The mean age of these patients was 14 years, and the mean Cobb angle was 22.2 degrees. The study design was a randomized controlled clinical trial with two independent and blinded observers. Three patients were treated by standard medical care (observation or brace treatment, two were treated with standard medical care plus chiropractic manipulation, and one was treated with standard medical care plus sham manipulation. The primary outcome measure was Cobb, and the psychosocial measure was Scoliosis Quality of Life Index. Results Orthopedic surgeons and chiropractors were easily recruited and worked cooperatively throughout the trial. Patient recruitment and compliance was good. Chiropractic treatments were safely employed, and research protocols were successful. Conclusion Overall, our pilot study showed the viability for a larger randomized trial. This pilot confirms the strength of existing protocols with amendments for use in a full randomized controlled trial. Trial registration This trial has been assigned an international standard randomized controlled trial number by Current Controlled Trials, Ltd. http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/. The number is ISRCTN41221647.

  9. Description of the case mix experienced by chiropractic students during a clinical internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Aaron A; Reinhart, Christine J; Injeyan, H Stephen; Tibbles, Anthony

    2017-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the case mix experienced by chiropractic students during their clinical internship at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College. Secondary objectives were to characterize teaching clinic patient populations, assess the similarity to previously published data for practicing chiropractors, and describe the treatment plans being recommended by interns. A prospective, observational study was conducted using a convenience sample of 24 chiropractic interns. Data were collected by interns using a standardized form that was completed for each new patient and each new complaint examined during the 1-year internship. Standardized forms included data regarding patient demographics, complaint characteristics, and treatment recommendations. Data were included for 23 of 24 participating interns, who described 828 patients and a total of 948 unique complaint presentations. Overall, 60% of patients were female, 86% were 18 to 64 years old, and 23% were naive to chiropractic care. Of all presenting complaints, 93% were pain-based, 67% were chronic, 65% included spinal complaints, and 7% presented with red flags; individual interns' experiences were variable and are described. On average, treatment recommendations called for 9.4 visits and often included multimodal treatment approaches, most commonly soft-tissue therapies (91%), home-based active care (84%), and spine manipulation (70%). The findings of this study suggest that patients presenting to CMCC teaching clinics are similar to those reported previously to attend private chiropractic clinics. While all participating interns encountered multiple complex clinical cases, very few had experience with pediatric populations. This study adds to the few that detail the characteristics of patients attending chiropractic teaching clinics; to our knowledge it is the first to describe average case loads of chiropractic interns.

  10. Comparative study between manual therapy and TENS Burst in patients with tension-type cephalalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Vasconcelos Fernandes

    Full Text Available Introduction Cephalgia or cephalalgia is one of the most common symptoms in the general population. Objective To compare the efficacy of physical therapy modalities, through manual therapy and the effect of Transcutaneous Nerve Stimulation (TENS for tension-type cephalalgia. Materials and methods The study was compounded by 60 subjects, but only 40 of them completed it, due to the exclusion criteria. These were divided into control group and intervention group. The control group received treatment — manual therapy. The intervention group received TENS Burst. Patients underwent ten sessions of treatment, made at every two days on a week, lasting 30 minutes each session. Results The characteristics related to lifestyle, postural issues and range of motion are responsible for the main causes of tension-type cephalalgia. Discussion treatments showed effective results in all cases in relation to pain intensity, but the use of manual therapy techniques give the patient a better quality of life compared to the use of TENS. Final considerations The treatment of this condition deserves analysis and studies; however, there are only a few studying physical therapy techniques, especially regarding to the use of TENS.

  11. Chiropractic care for paediatric and adolescent Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A systematic review

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    Bonello Rod

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychostimulants are first line of therapy for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD. The evidence suggests that up to 30% of those prescribed stimulant medications do not show clinically significant outcomes. In addition, many children and adolescents experience side-effects from these medications. As a result, parents are seeking alternate interventions for their children. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for behavioural disorders such as AD/HD are increasing with as many as 68% of parents having sought help from alternative practitioners, including chiropractors. Objective The review seeks to answer the question of whether chiropractic care can reduce symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD. Methods Electronic databases (Cochrane CENTRAL register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Scopus, ISI Web of Science, Index to Chiropractic Literature were searched from inception until July 2009 for English language studies for chiropractic care and AD/HD. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select studies. All randomised controlled trials were evaluated using the Jadad score and a checklist developed from the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines. Results The search yielded 58 citations of which 22 were intervention studies. Of these, only three studies were identified for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD cohorts. The methodological quality was poor and none of the studies qualified using inclusion criteria. Conclusions To date there is insufficient evidence to evaluate the efficacy of chiropractic care for paediatric and adolescent AD/HD. The claim that chiropractic care improves paediatric and adolescent AD/HD, is only supported by low levels of scientific evidence. In the interest of paediatric and adolescent health, if chiropractic care for AD/HD is to continue, more rigorous

  12. Chiropractic and CAM Utilization: A Descriptive Review

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    Meeker William C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions Data Sources A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations. Data Selection A total of 137 papers were selected, based upon including information about chiropractic utilization, CAM utilization and low back pain and other conditions. Data Synthesis Information was extracted from each paper addressing use of chiropractic and CAM, and is summarized in tabular form. Results Thematic analysis of the paper topics indicated that there were 5 functional areas covered by the literature: back pain papers, general chiropractic papers, insurance-related papers, general CAM-related papers; and worker's compensation papers. Conclusion Studies looking at chiropractic utilization demonstrate that the rates vary, but generally fall into a range from around 6% to 12% of the population, most of whom seek chiropractic care for low back pain and not for organic disease or visceral dysfunction. CAM is itself used by people suffering from a variety of conditions, though it is often used not as a primary intervention, but rather as an additional form of care. CAM and chiropractic often offer lower costs for comparable results compared to conventional medicine.

  13. Chiropractic and CAM utilization: a descriptive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Dana J; Meeker, William C

    2007-01-22

    To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations. A total of 137 papers were selected, based upon including information about chiropractic utilization, CAM utilization and low back pain and other conditions. Information was extracted from each paper addressing use of chiropractic and CAM, and is summarized in tabular form. Thematic analysis of the paper topics indicated that there were 5 functional areas covered by the literature: back pain papers, general chiropractic papers, insurance-related papers, general CAM-related papers; and worker's compensation papers. Studies looking at chiropractic utilization demonstrate that the rates vary, but generally fall into a range from around 6% to 12% of the population, most of whom seek chiropractic care for low back pain and not for organic disease or visceral dysfunction. CAM is itself used by people suffering from a variety of conditions, though it is often used not as a primary intervention, but rather as an additional form of care. CAM and chiropractic often offer lower costs for comparable results compared to conventional medicine.

  14. Efficacy of Manual Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy in Chronic Low Back Pain Due to Lumbar Spondylosis. A Pilot Study

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    Arti Sharma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this work was to compare the efficacy of Maitland mobilization and conventional physical therapy on pain response, range of motion (ROM and functional ability in patients with chronic low back pain due to lumbar spondylosis. Methods: A total sample of 30 subjects (40–70 years of age with complaints of slow insidious onset of low back pain (LBP, with or without radiation not less than three months duration and decrease ROM were randomly assigned to: group-I, Maitland mobilization and lumbar stabilization exercises; group-II conventional physical therapy (traction, strengthening, stretching exercises. and outcomes were assessed for dependent variables. Results: There is statically a significant difference between pre and post measurement readings with time (p = 0.00 and between groups (p < 0.05 with respect to pain and function, but, with respect to ROM readings, showed statistical significance with time (p = 0.00 and no significance between groups (p > 0.05, indicating manual therapy group-I is improving faster and better than conventional physical therapy group-II. Conclusion: Our results showed that manual therapy interventions are more effective in managing low back pain, and function and range of motion of the lumbar spine than conventional physical therapy treatment.

  15. Influence of manual therapy on functional mobility after joint injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlen, Rachel L; Snider, Eric J; Sargentini, Neil J; Worthington, Bart D; Singh, Vineet K; Pazdernik, Vanessa K; Johnson, Jane C; Degenhardt, Brian F

    2013-10-01

    Animal models can be used to investigate manual therapy mechanisms, but testing manipulation in animal models is problematic because animals cannot directly report their pain. To develop a rat model of inflammatory joint injury to test the efficacy of manual therapy in reducing nociception and restoring function. The authors induced acute inflammatory joint injury in rats by injecting carrageenan into the ankle and then measured voluntary running wheel activity in treated and untreated rats. Treatments included manual therapy applied to the ankle and knee of the injured limb and several analgesic medications (eg, morphine, ketorolac, prednisone). Intra-articular injection of carrageenan to the ankle produced significant swelling (diameter of the ankle increased by 64% after injection; P=.004) and a robust reduction in voluntary running wheel activity (running distance reduced by 91% compared with controls; Pmanual therapy nor analgesic medications increased running wheel activity relative to untreated rats. Voluntary running wheel activity appears to be an appropriate functional measure to evaluate the impact of an acute inflammatory joint injury. However, efforts to treat the injury did not restore running relative to untreated rats.

  16. Development of iPad application "Postima" for quantitative analysis of the effects of manual therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Naruhisa; Shirakawa, Tomohiro

    2017-07-01

    The technical difficulty of diagnosing joint misalignment and/or dysfunction by quantitative evaluation is commonly acknowledged among manual therapists. Usually, manual therapists make a diagnosis based on a combination of observing patient symptoms and performing physical examinations, both of which rely on subjective criteria and thus contain some uncertainty. We thus sought to investigate the correlations among posture, skeletal misalignment, and pain severity over the course of manual therapy treatment, and to explore the possibility of establishing objective criteria for diagnosis. For this purpose, we developed an iPad application that realizes the measurement of patients' postures and analyzes them quantitatively. We also discuss the results and effectiveness of the measurement and analysis.

  17. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy

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    Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques da Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. Method: descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. Results: the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate <80%, and was reformulated based on the participants' suggestions. All other items were considered appropriate and/or complete appropriate in the three blocks proposed: objectives - 92.38%, structure and form - 89.74%, and relevance - 94.44%. Conclusion: the face and content validation of the educative manual proposed were attended to. This can contribute to the understanding of the therapeutic process the head and neck cancer patient is submitted to during the radiation therapy, besides supporting clinical practice through the nursing consultation.

  18. Ankle sprains: combination of manual therapy and supervised exercise leads to better recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ankle sprains often occur when running, walking on uneven ground, or jumping. Usually, people are told to rest, elevate the foot, apply ice, and use an elastic wrap to reduce swelling. This treatment is typically followed by exercises that can be performed at home. Although the pain and swelling usually improve quickly, more than 70% of people who sprain their ankles continue to have problems with them and up to 80% will sprain their ankles again. This suggests that it is important to better care for ankle sprains. One option is manual therapy, where the therapist moves the ankle and surrounding joints to help restore normal joint movement. A research report published in the July 2013 issue of JOSPT examines and compares the outcomes of a home exercise program with a more involved treatment program that includes manual therapy and supervised exercises.

  19. Understanding and working with the psychodynamics of practitioner-patient relationships in the manual therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Danny; Sher, Mannie

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we argue that practitioner-patient relationships in the manual therapies would be strengthened by a deeper understanding of the psychodynamics and emotions of those relationships. We suggest that in many cases, a purely bio-mechanical approach may neglect underlying psychological and emotional reasons of the patient's presenting condition, and consequently, lead to a less than adequate outcome for the patient. We offer easily adopted suggestions that could enhance the practice of practitioners of manual therapies as well as other professions that rely on the application of physical methods of diagnosis and treatment. These suggestions could lead to improved prognosis and increased professional satisfaction for practitioners. This paper describes five key dynamics that characterize practitioner-patient relationships: (i) pain as a form of communication; (ii) the 'heart-sink' patient; (iii) dependency; (iv) the erotic transference; (v) endings and loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Manual therapy is an effective treatment for frozen shoulder in diabetics: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, Irem; Baltaci, Gül; Atay, Ozgür Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to compare the efficacy of manual therapy in the frozen shoulder patients with or without diabetes mellitus. Between May 2006 and January 2008, 50 patients (10 males, 40 females; mean age 52 ± 10 years; range 40 to 65 years) orthopedic surgeons referred to the Sports Physiotherapy Unit were included in the study. The patients were divided into two groups, including patients with primary frozen shoulder with type II diabetes mellitus (n=12) and non diabetics (n=38). All patients underwent a rehabilitation program including cold application, manual therapy and exercises twice a week. A total of 16 treatment sessions were performed. The most important part of the manual therapy included scapular mobilization and posterior capsule stretching. The range of motion was measured by goniometry. Functional activity status was assessed by Constant's score. The pain level was evaluated by visual analog scale, while muscle strength was evaluated by hand-held dynamometer. Student t-test was used to compare between the parameters of groups, while Paired sample t-test was used to compare pre- and post-treatment parameters of the patients. The range of motion, functional activity status and muscular strength were improved and the pain level was reduced after rehabilitation in all of the patients in both groups (p0.05). There were no differences in range of motion, functional activity status, pain level, and muscle strength before and after rehabilitation between the groups (p>0.05). Manual therapy approaches may be safely applied in diabetic patients with frozen shoulder.

  1. Remodelling of motor act and manual therapy application at humeroscapular periarthrosis

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    V.V. Gubanov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to develop methods for reducing terms and possible complications of humeroscapular periarthrosis treatment. 30 patients with various nosologic disease units were under observation. the comparison group consisted of 50 patients having the same age, sex and nosologic criteria (according to ambulatory card in comparison with the main group. the treatment was conducted by manual therapy and remodelling of motor act. this method proved to be effective at acute tendonitis and could be used as monotherapy

  2. Case Study: Manual Therapy in Patient of 18 Years with Youthful Scoliosis Idiopathic Summary

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Yaneth Franco Monsalve; Zorika María Guerra Corena; María Patricia Otero Samudio

    2007-01-01

    Scoliosis is a lateral deviation of the spine from the mean line, characterized by a lateral curvature and a vertebral rotation. It is generallyof idiopathic character and appears mainly in adolescent females. Multiple techniques of conservative treatment for the scoliosis exist such as the manual therapy that complements the treatment for this pathology. This technique uses manipulation of soft tissue and bone, obtainingtherefore a more effective recovery, improving the quality of life of th...

  3. Manual therapy as a conservative treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Michele; Negrini, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is contingent upon many variables. Simple observation is enough for less serious curvatures, but for very serious cases surgical intervention could be proposed. Between these there is a wide range of different treatments. Manual therapy is commonly used: the aim of this paper is to verify the data existing in the literature on the efficacy of this approach. Methods A systematic review of the scientific literature published i...

  4. Risk of Carotid Stroke after Chiropractic Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassidy, J. David; Boyle, Eleanor; Côté, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Chiropractic manipulation is a popular treatment for neck pain and headache, but may increase the risk of cervical artery dissection and stroke. Patients with carotid artery dissection can present with neck pain and/or headache before experiencing a stroke. These are common symptoms seen...... by both chiropractors and primary care physicians (PCPs). We aimed to assess the risk of carotid artery stroke after chiropractic care by comparing association between chiropractic and PCP visits and subsequent stroke. Methods A population-based, case-crossover study was undertaken in Ontario, Canada. All...... incident cases of carotid artery stroke admitted to hospitals over a 9-year period were identified. Cases served as their own controls. Exposures to chiropractic and PCP services were determined from health billing records. Results We compared 15,523 cases to 62,092 control periods using exposure windows...

  5. Why Neck Pain Patients Are Not Referred to Manual Therapy: A Qualitative Study among Dutch Primary Care Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikkers, Marije F; Westerman, Marjan J; Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Tulder, Maurits W; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of neck pain with manual therapy demonstrated to be more effective and cost-effective than general practitioner (GP) care or physiotherapy in a high quality RCT in the Netherlands in 2002. However, referral to manual therapy for neck pain is still relatively low. This study aims to explore the barriers and facilitators affecting the implementation of manual therapy in neck pain management in primary care. An explorative study was conducted comprising semi-structured interviews with GPs (n = 13), physiotherapists (n = 10), manual therapists (n = 7) and their patients with neck pain (n = 27), and three focus groups with additional stakeholders (n = 10-12 per group). A thematic analysis approach was used. Different barriers and facilitators for referral were found for patients, GPs and physiotherapists on the individual level, but also in the interaction between stakeholders and their context. Individual perceptions such as knowledge and beliefs about manual therapy for neck pain either impeded or facilitated referral. Fear for complications associated with cervical manipulation was an important barrier for patients as well as GPs. For GPs and physiotherapists it was important whether they perceived it was part of their professional role to refer for manual therapy. Existing relations formed referral behavior, and the trust in a particular practitioner was a recurrent theme among GPs and physiotherapist as well as patients. The contextual factor availability of manual therapy played a role for all stakeholders. Barriers and facilitators were found especially in individual perceptions on manual therapy for neck pain (e.g. knowledge and beliefs), the interaction between stakeholders (e.g. collaboration and trust) and the organizational context. Implementation strategies that focus on these different aspects seem to be likely to optimize referral rates and the use of manual therapy in primary care management of neck pain.

  6. Why Neck Pain Patients Are Not Referred to Manual Therapy: A Qualitative Study among Dutch Primary Care Stakeholders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije F Dikkers

    Full Text Available Treatment of neck pain with manual therapy demonstrated to be more effective and cost-effective than general practitioner (GP care or physiotherapy in a high quality RCT in the Netherlands in 2002. However, referral to manual therapy for neck pain is still relatively low. This study aims to explore the barriers and facilitators affecting the implementation of manual therapy in neck pain management in primary care.An explorative study was conducted comprising semi-structured interviews with GPs (n = 13, physiotherapists (n = 10, manual therapists (n = 7 and their patients with neck pain (n = 27, and three focus groups with additional stakeholders (n = 10-12 per group. A thematic analysis approach was used.Different barriers and facilitators for referral were found for patients, GPs and physiotherapists on the individual level, but also in the interaction between stakeholders and their context. Individual perceptions such as knowledge and beliefs about manual therapy for neck pain either impeded or facilitated referral. Fear for complications associated with cervical manipulation was an important barrier for patients as well as GPs. For GPs and physiotherapists it was important whether they perceived it was part of their professional role to refer for manual therapy. Existing relations formed referral behavior, and the trust in a particular practitioner was a recurrent theme among GPs and physiotherapist as well as patients. The contextual factor availability of manual therapy played a role for all stakeholders.Barriers and facilitators were found especially in individual perceptions on manual therapy for neck pain (e.g. knowledge and beliefs, the interaction between stakeholders (e.g. collaboration and trust and the organizational context. Implementation strategies that focus on these different aspects seem to be likely to optimize referral rates and the use of manual therapy in primary care management of neck pain.

  7. Manual therapy in addition to physiotherapy does not improve clinical or economic outcomes after ankle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Moseley, Anne M; Haas, Marion; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Herbert, Robert D

    2008-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of adding manual therapy to a physiotherapy programme for ankle fracture. Assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial. Ninety-four adults were recruited within one week of cast removal for isolated ankle fracture. Inclusion criteria were: they were able to weight-bear as tolerated or partial weight-bear, were referred for physiotherapy, and experienced pain. Ninety-one participants completed the study. Participants were randomly allocated to receive manual therapy (anterior-posterior joint mobilization over the talus) plus a standard physiotherapy programme (experimental), or the standard physiotherapy programme only (control). They were assessed by a blinded assessor at baseline, and at 4, 12 and 24 weeks. The main outcomes were activity limitation and quality of life. Information on costs and healthcare utilization was collected every 4 weeks up to 24 weeks. There were no clinically worthwhile differences in activity limitation or quality of life between groups at any time-point. There was also no between-group difference in quality-adjusted life-years, but the experimental group incurred higher out-of-pocket costs (mean between-group difference = AU$200, 95% confidence interval 26-432). When provided in addition to a physiotherapy programme, manual therapy did not enhance outcome in adults after ankle fracture.

  8. The effectiveness of manual therapy in treating cervicogenic dizziness: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Khalid; Hendrick, Paul; Ismail, Ayah; Felemban, Mohannad; Alshehri, Mansour Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] This review provides an evaluation of the evidence for the effectiveness of using manual therapy to treat cervicogenic dizziness. [Subjects and Methods] The literature was systematically searched on the May 2, 2016 using the following online databases: Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and PEDro. This review included randomised controlled trials and compared the efficacy of manual therapy for the treatment of cervicogenic dizziness, compared to other types of intervention. This study measured changes based on dizziness intensity and frequency. [Results] The primary search found 30 articles, but only four articles met the inclusion criteria. Assessment of methodological quality was performed by two researchers using the PEDro scale. The level of evidence was determined using a recognised grading scale. Three out of the four articles were deemed to have high methodological quality, while the fourth was rated as moderate quality. The attributed level of evidence was moderate (level 2). [Conclusion] Manual therapy is potentially effective for managing cervicogenic dizziness. However, due to the heterogeneity of the results and techniques and the low number of studies, further research is recommended to provide conclusive evidence.

  9. The functional manual therapy intervention in infants with nonsynostotic plagiocephaly: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, Mariangela; Greco, Angelo; Colonneli, Paola; Volpi, Giordana; Valente, Donatella; Galeoto, Giovanni

    2017-10-25

    To document the evolution of cranial asymmetries in infants with signs of nonsynostotic occipital plagiocephaly (NSOP) who were undergo to many functional manual therapy treatments (in addition to the standard positioning recommendations) as well as to determine the feasibility of this methodology to conduct an outcome research investigating the impact of this intervention for infants with NSOP. Pilot clinical standardization project using pre-post design in which 10 infants participated. Nine infants presented an initial Oblique Diameter Difference Index (ODDI) over 104%, three an initial Ear Deviation Index (EDI) over 4%, and three a Cranial Proportional Index (CPI) over 90%. Infants received three functional manual therapy treatments for week during the first month of intervention and two ones for week during the second month. Plagiocephalometric measurememts were administered at the first assessment pre-intervention (T0), after 30 days (+/-5) (T1) and at a third time after 60 days (+/5) of treatment (T2). 9/10 participants showed a significant decrease in ODDI under 104% between T0 and T2 assessments. 5/10 infants showed an EDI under 4%, and 3/10 showed a value about 0%. 3/10 maintained their CPI over 90% with a considerable decrease. These clinical findings support the hypothesis that functional manual therapy treatments contribute to the improvement of cranial asymmetries in infants younger than 6.5 months old presenting with NSOP.

  10. Psychodynamic psychotherapy for social phobia: a treatment manual based on supportive-expressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Beutel, Manfred; Leibing, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Social phobia is a very frequent mental disorder characterized by an early onset, a chronic unremitting course, severe psychosocial impairments and high socioeconomic costs. To date, no manual for the psychodynamic treatment of social phobia exists. After a brief description of the disorder, a manual for a short-term psychodynamic treatment of social phobia is presented. The treatment is based on Luborsky s supportive-expressive (SE) therapy, which is complemented by treatment elements specific to social phobia. The treatment includes the characteristic elements of SE therapy, that is, setting goals, focus on the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme (CCRT) associated with the patient s symptoms, interpretive interventions to enhance insight into the CCRT, and supportive interventions, in particular fostering a helping alliance. In order to tailor the treatment more specifically to social phobia, treatment elements have been added, for example informing the patient about the disorder and the treatment, a specific focus on shame and on unrealistic demands, and encouraging the patient to confront anxiety-producing situations. More directive interventions are included as well, such as specific prescriptions to stop persisting self-devaluations. The treatment manual is presently being used in a large-scale randomized controlled multicenter study comparing short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy in the treatment of social phobia.

  11. IS MANUAL THERAPY A RATIONAL APPROACH TO IMPROVING HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN PEOPLE WITH ARTHRITIS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Melainie

    2002-01-01

    Background: People with arthritic disease are advised to participate in gentle exercise on a regular basis, and pursue long-term medication regimes. Alternative therapies are also used by people with arthritis, and may sometimes be recommended by rheumatologists and other medical personnel. Alternative therapies may be divided into two types: active therapies, in which the patient takes a driving role, and passive therapies, in which the therapy cannot proceed unless driven by a therapist. Objective: To review the effectiveness of manual therapy in improving the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of people with two common arthritis conditions: Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Discussion: Massage, and other passive (practitioner-driven) manual therapies, have been anecdotally reported to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in people with arthritis. Many manual therapists consult with patients who have arthritic diseases, receive referrals from rheumatologists, and consider the arthritic diseases to be within their field of practise. Although there is empirical evidence that manual therapy with some types of arthritis is beneficial, the level of effectiveness however is under-researched. Medical authorities are reluctant to endorse manual therapies for arthritis due to a lack of scientific evidence demonstrating efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness. PMID:17987169

  12. Manual therapy intervention in the treatment of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: median nerve mobilization versus medical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten I Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion CTS improves after median nerve mobilization, which is better than conventional medical treatment. It provides support for the use of manual therapy in conservative management of CTS with satisfactory Results .

  13. Chiropractic Care for a Patient with Spasmodic Dysphonia Associated with Cervical Spine Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Roger K.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss the diagnosis and response to treatment of spasmodic dysphonia in a 25-year-old female vocalist following an auto accident. Clinical Features The voice disorder and neck pain appeared after the traumatic incident. Examination of the cervical spine revealed moderate pain, muscle spasm and restricted joint motion at C-1 and C-5 on the left side. Cervical range of motion was reduced on left rotation. Bilateral manual muscle testing of the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles, which share innervation with the laryngeal muscles by way of the spinal accessory nerve, were weak on the left side. Pre and post accident voice range profiles (phonetograms) that measure singing voice quality were examined. The pre- and post-accident phonetograms revealed significant reduction in voice intensity and fundamental frequency as measured in decibels and hertz. Intervention and Outcome Low-force chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy to C-1 and C-5 was employed. Following a course of care, the patient's singing voice returned to normal, as well as a resolution of her musculo- skeletal complaints. Conclusion It appears that in certain cases, the singing voice can be adversely affected if neck or head trauma is severe enough. This case proposes that trauma with irritation to the cervical spine nerve roots as they communicate with the spinal accessory, and in turn the laryngeal nerves, may be contributory in some functional voice disorders or muscle tension dysphonia. PMID:19674642

  14. Lumbar segmental instability: a criterion-related validity study of manual therapy assessment

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    Chapple Cathy

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal physiotherapists routinely assess lumbar segmental motion during the clinical examination of a patient with low back pain. The validity of manual assessment of segmental motion has not, however, been adequately investigated. Methods In this prospective, multi-centre, pragmatic, diagnostic validity study, 138 consecutive patients with recurrent or chronic low back pain (R/CLBP were recruited. Physiotherapists with post-graduate training in manual therapy performed passive accessory intervertebral motion tests (PAIVMs and passive physiological intervertebral motion tests (PPIVMs. Consenting patients were referred for flexion-extension radiographs. Sagittal angular rotation and sagittal translation of each lumbar spinal motion segment was measured from these radiographs, and compared to a reference range derived from a study of 30 asymptomatic volunteers. Motion beyond two standard deviations from the reference mean was considered diagnostic of rotational lumbar segmental instability (LSI and translational LSI. Accuracy and validity of the clinical assessments were expressed using sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio statistics with 95% confidence intervals (CI. Results Only translation LSI was found to be significantly associated with R/CLBP (p Conclusion This study provides the first evidence reporting the concurrent validity of manual tests for the detection of abnormal sagittal planar motion. PAIVMs and PPIVMs are highly specific, but not sensitive, for the detection of translation LSI. Likelihood ratios resulting from positive test results were only moderate. This research indicates that manual clinical examination procedures have moderate validity for detecting segmental motion abnormality.

  15. Manual hyperinflation and the role of physical therapy in intensive care and emergency units

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    Rafael Vinícius Santos Cruz

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Although manual hyperinflation (MHI is a physical therapy technique commonly used in intensive care and emergency units, there is little consensus about its use. Objective: To investigate the knowledge of physical therapists working in intensive care and emergency units about manual hyperinflation. Methods: Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires on manual hyperinflation. Data collection took place between September 2014 and January 2015, in Itabuna and Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil. Results: The study sample was composed of 32 physical therapists who had between 4 months and 10 years working experience. All respondents affirmed that they used the technique in their professional practice. However, only 34.4% reported it to be a routine practice. 90.6% stated that the most common patient position during manual hyperinflation is “supine”. Participants were almost unanimous (93.8% in citing secretion removal and cough stimulation as perceived benefits of MHI. High peak airway pressure was identified as being a precaution to treatment with MHI by 84.4% of participants, whilst 100% of the sample agreed that an undrained pneumothorax was a contraindication to MHI. Conclusion: The most common answers to the questionnaire were: supine position during MHI; secretion removal and cough stimulation as perceived benefits; high peak airway pressure as a precaution; and an undrained pneumothorax as a contraindication.

  16. Case report: manualized trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy with an unaccompanied refugee minor girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterhitzenberger, Johanna; Rosner, Rita

    2016-01-01

    There is uncertainty whether young traumatized refugees should be treated with culturally adapted psychotherapy or with an evidence-based western approach. As yet, empirical studies on culturally adapted treatments for unaccompanied young refugees in industrialized host countries are not available. Studies do, however, suggest that trauma-focused treatment is promising for this group. We describe the treatment of an unaccompanied refugee minor girl with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who underwent manualized trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT; Cohen, Mannarino, & Deblinger, 2006). A 17-year-old girl from East Africa, who came to Germany without a caregiver, was treated for PTSD resulting from several traumatic experiences and losses in her home country and while fleeing. She lived in a group home for adolescents. Baseline, post, and follow-up data are reported. The girl participated in 12 sessions of manualized TF-CBT. Her caregiver from the youth services received another 12 sessions in line with the treatment manual. Symptoms decreased in a clinically significant manner; at the end of the treatment, the girl was deemed to have recovered from PTSD. Treatment success remained stable over 6 months. Manualized TF-CBT is feasible for young refugees without significant cultural adaptations. It can, however, be seen as culturally sensitive.

  17. Case report: manualized trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy with an unaccompanied refugee minor girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Unterhitzenberger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is uncertainty whether young traumatized refugees should be treated with culturally adapted psychotherapy or with an evidence-based western approach. As yet, empirical studies on culturally adapted treatments for unaccompanied young refugees in industrialized host countries are not available. Studies do, however, suggest that trauma-focused treatment is promising for this group. Objective: We describe the treatment of an unaccompanied refugee minor girl with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD who underwent manualized trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT; Cohen, Mannarino, & Deblinger, 2006. Methods: A 17-year-old girl from East Africa, who came to Germany without a caregiver, was treated for PTSD resulting from several traumatic experiences and losses in her home country and while fleeing. She lived in a group home for adolescents. Baseline, post, and follow-up data are reported. Results: The girl participated in 12 sessions of manualized TF-CBT. Her caregiver from the youth services received another 12 sessions in line with the treatment manual. Symptoms decreased in a clinically significant manner; at the end of the treatment, the girl was deemed to have recovered from PTSD. Treatment success remained stable over 6 months. Conclusions: Manualized TF-CBT is feasible for young refugees without significant cultural adaptations. It can, however, be seen as culturally sensitive.

  18. Effects of Maitland manual therapy on the treatment of pain syndromes of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Dzierżek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was evaluate the effect of Maitland's manual therapy on selected motor function parameters in cervical spine pain syndromes. Material and Methods: 30 subjects were enrolled, in the age from 27 to 66, including 15 men and 15 women with chronic functional cervical spine syndrome who had a 10-day physiotherapy cycle that did not produce the expected results. The study included: pain assessment in the Dziak scale, measurements of mobility of the cervical spine and shoulder joints, functional evaluation by Hautanta, De`Klein, Jackson, and palpation of muscle irritation. Results: A comparison of average pain scores before and after therapy indicated that the pain level after treatment decreased (p 0.05. There has been a decrease in positive clinical trials and muscle irritation after therapy. Conclusions: Maitland manual therapy is effective in the treatment of cervical spine pain syndromes. The technique results in a significant increase in the mobility of the cervical spine as well as an improvement in the functional state of the cervical segment without affecting the mobility of the shoulder ridge. There was a decrease in palpate tenderness of the soft tissue studied.

  19. Efficacy of manual therapy in the treatment of tension-type headache. A systematic review from 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano López, C; Mesa Jiménez, J; de la Hoz Aizpurúa, J L; Pareja Grande, J; Fernández de Las Peñas, C

    2016-01-01

    To study the efficacy of manual therapy in the treatment of tension-type headache (TTH) by assessing the quality of randomized control trials (RCTs) published from the year 2000 to April 2013. A search was performed in the following databases: MEDLINE, EBSCO, CINAHL, SCOPUS, PEDRO and OVID. An analysis was made of RCT including patients with TTH receiving any manual therapy, and assessing outcome measures including the intensity, and frequency or duration of the headache. Two independent referees reviewed the methodological quality of RCTs using the Jadad scale. Data from the studies were extracted by two different reviewers. A total of fourteen RCTs were selected. Twelve studies showed acceptable quality (Jadad scale ≥3), and the remaining 2 had low quality (Jadad=2). The studies showed positive results, including reduction in headache intensity and/or frequency, reduction of medication consumption, and improvement in quality of life. The effectiveness of manual therapy for TTH cannot be completely assessed due to the heterogeneity in study design, outcome measures, and different treatments. Nevertheless, the results suggest patients with TTH receiving manual therapies showed better progress than those receiving conventional treatment or placebo. Further studies of high quality using manual therapy protocols, and also including standardized outcome measures, are now needed to clarify the efficacy of manual therapy in the management of TTH. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative study between the effects of isolated manual therapy techniques and those associated with low level laser therapy on pain in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Frare

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study sought to evaluate the pain condition in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction after applying manual therapy techniques and those associated with this low level laser therapy. Methods: The study involved 20 patients with temporomandibular dysfunction, divided randomly into two groups: G1 (n = 10, formed by 7 women and 3 men, average age 28.2 years (± 7, treated with manual therapy techniques and G2 (n = 10, formed by 8 women and 2 men, with average age 24.01 (± 6.04, treated with the combination of manual therapy techniques and low level laser therapy. The patients were treated three times a week for four consecutive weeks. The memorandum of manual therapy techniques based on Chaintow,Makofsky and Bienfaint was used. For low level laser therapy GaAs laser (904 nm, 6 J/cm2, 0.38 mW/cm2 was used, applied at 4pre-auricular points. To analyze the pain level, the visual analog pain scale was used. For data analysis the Student’s-t and Wilcoxon tests were used, both with significance level of 5% (p <0.05.Results: There was significant reduction (p <0.05 in the level of pain in both groups treated, but in G2 the significance was higher.Conclusion: Manual therapy techniques, either alone or associated with low level laser therapy showed satisfactory results for pain control in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction.

  1. Manual Physical Therapy Following Immobilization for Stable Ankle Fracture: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Elizabeth E; Deyle, Gail D; Allen, Christopher; Petersen, Evan J; Croy, Theodore; Rivera, Kenneth P

    2015-09-01

    Case series. Ankle fractures commonly result in persistent pain, stiffness, and functional impairments. There is insufficient evidence to favor any particular rehabilitation approach after ankle fracture. The purpose of this case series was to describe an impairment-based manual physical therapy approach to treating patients with conservatively managed ankle fractures. Patients with stable ankle fractures postimmobilization were treated with manual physical therapy and exercise targeted at associated impairments in the lower limb. The primary outcome measure was the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Secondary outcome measures included the ankle lunge test, numeric pain-rating scale, and global rating of change. Outcome measures were collected at baseline (performed within 7 days of immobilization removal) and at 4 and 12 weeks postbaseline. Eleven patients (mean age, 39.6 years; range, 18-64 years; 2 male), after ankle fracture-related immobilization (mean duration, 48 days; range, 21-75 days), were treated for an average of 6.6 sessions (range, 3-10 sessions) over a mean of 46.1 days (range, 13-81 days). Compared to baseline, statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements were observed in Lower Extremity Functional Scale score (P = .001; mean change, 21.9 points; 95% confidence interval: 10.4, 33.4) and in the ankle lunge test (P = .001; mean change, 7.8 cm; 95% confidence interval: 3.9, 11.7) at 4 weeks. These changes persisted at 12 weeks. Statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in self-reported function and ankle range of motion were observed at 4 and 12 weeks following treatment with impairment-based manual physical therapy. All patients tolerated treatment well. Results suggest that this approach may have efficacy in this population. Therapy, level 4.

  2. Spine Care as a Framework for the Chiropractic Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Michael; Murphy, Donald; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    chiropractic services for back and neck pain. Insurance company utilization data confirm these findings. Regulatory and legal language found in chiropractic practice acts reveals that most jurisdictions define the chiropractic scope of practice as based on a foundation of spine care. Educational accrediting...

  3. Group cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression in Spanish: culture-sensitive manualized treatment in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Adrian; Garza, Monica J; Muñoz, Ricardo F

    2010-08-01

    The authors applied cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression using the Healthy Management of Reality treatment manual. This 16-week group treatment comprised four 4-week modules: thoughts (cognitive restructuring), activities (behavioral activation), people (interpersonal skills training), and health (addresses physical health and depression). They illustrated the use of the culture-sensitive treatment manuals by way of the member characteristics and clinical process of a Spanish-language CBT group for depression. They highlighted the challenges and satisfactions of working with a Spanish-speaking population in the public sector, and focused on how culture and socioeconomic status influence patients, and how to adapt treatment to these factors. Last, they demonstrated how technological advances integrate with culture-sensitive, evidence-based treatments to better serve this population and reduce disparities.

  4. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Spanish: Culture-Sensitive Manualized Treatment in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Adrian; Garza, Monica J.; Muñoz, Ricardo F.

    2014-01-01

    The authors applied cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression using the Healthy Management of Reality treatment manual. This 16-week group treatment comprised four 4-week modules: thoughts (cognitive restructuring), activities (behavioral activation), people (interpersonal skills training), and health (addresses physical health and depression). They illustrated the use of the culture-sensitive treatment manuals by way of the member characteristics and clinical process of a Spanish-language CBT group for depression. They highlighted the challenges and satisfactions of working with a Spanish-speaking population in the public sector, and focused on how culture and socioeconomic status influence patients, and how to adapt treatment to these factors. Last, they demonstrated how technological advances integrate with culture-sensitive, evidence-based treatments to better serve this population and reduce disparities. PMID:20549680

  5. Emission of Biophotons and Adjustable Sounds by the Fascial System: Review and Reflections for Manual Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, Fabiola; Morabito, Bruno; Sacconi, Beatrice

    2018-01-01

    Every body structure is wrapped in connective tissue or fascia, creating a structural continuity that gives form and function to every tissue and organ. The fascial tissue is uniformly distributed throughout the body, enveloping, interacting with and permeating blood vessels, nerves, viscera, meninges, bones and muscles, creating various layers at different depths and forming a tridimensional metabolic and mechanical matrix. This article reviews the literature on the emission of biophotons and adjustable sounds by the fascial system, because these biological changes could be a means of local and systemic cellular communication and become another assessment tool for manual (therapy) practitioners. This is the first article that discusses these topics in a single text, attempting to bring such information into an area of application that is beneficial to osteopaths, chiropractors, and manual therapists.

  6. Chiropractic management of Bell palsy with low level laser and manipulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubis, Lisa M

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic management including the use of cold laser and chiropractic manipulation in the treatment of a patient with Bell palsy. A 40-year-old male patient had a 10-day history of facial paralysis on his left side, including the inability to close his left eye, which also had tearing and a burning sensation. The patient had trouble lifting his left lip and complained of drooling while brushing his teeth. There was no previous history of similar symptoms or a recent infection. Prior treatment had included oral steroids. The patient was treated with low-level laser therapy and chiropractic manipulation 2 times in 4 days. The laser was applied along the course of the facial nerve for 30 seconds at each point and for 1 minute at the stylomastoid foramen. The laser used was a GaAs class 4 laser with a wavelength of 910 nm. The patient perceived a 70% to 80% improvement of facial movement after the first treatment. After the second treatment, the patient reported full control of his facial movements. A patient with acute facial paralysis appeared to have complete resolution of his symptoms following the application of low-level laser therapy and chiropractic manipulation.

  7. Does an online psychological intervention improve self-efficacy and disability in people also receiving Multimodal Manual Therapy for chronic low back pain compared to Multimodal Manual Therapy alone? Design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrozzi, M.J.; Leaver, A.; Jones, M.K.; Ferreira, P.H.; Rubinstein, S.M.; Mackey, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various interventions are available for the treatment of chronic low back pain (LBP), including Manual Therapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the addition of an internet-based CBT program leads to better outcomes in patients who

  8. Best Practices for Chiropractic Care for Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Consensus Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Cheryl; Schneider, Michael J; Haas, Mitchell; Katz, Paul; Dougherty, Paul; Gleberzon, Brian; Killinger, Lisa Z; Weeks, John

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to update evidence-based recommendations on the best practices for chiropractic care of older adults. The project consisted of a systematic literature review and a consensus process. The following were searched from October 2009 through January 2016: MEDLINE, Index to Chiropractic Literature, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine Database), Alt HealthWatch, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane Registry of Controlled Trials. Search terms were: (manipulation, spinal OR manipulation, chiropractic OR chiropract*) AND (geriatric OR "older adult*"). Two reviewers independently screened articles and abstracts using inclusion and exclusion criteria. The systematic review informed the project steering committee, which revised the previous recommendations. A multidisciplinary panel of experts representing expertise in practice, research, and teaching in a variety of health professions serving older adults rated the revised recommendations. The RAND Corporation/University of California, Los Angeles methodology for a modified Delphi consensus process was used. A total of 199 articles were found; after exclusion criteria were applied, 6 articles about effectiveness or efficacy and 6 on safety were added. The Delphi process was conducted from April to June 2016. Of the 37 Delphi panelists, 31 were DCs and 6 were other health care professionals. Three Delphi rounds were conducted to reach consensus on all 45 statements. As a result, statements regarding the safety of manipulation were strengthened and additional statements were added recommending that DCs advise patients on exercise and that manipulation and mobilization contribute to general positive outcomes beyond pain reduction only. This document provides a summary of evidence-informed best practices for doctors of chiropractic for the evaluation, management, and manual treatment of older adult patients

  9. The effects of sustained manual pressure stimulation according to Vojta Therapy on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opavsky, Jaroslav; Slachtova, Martina; Kutin, Miroslav; Hok, Pavel; Uhlir, Petr; Opavska, Hana; Hlustik, Petr

    2018-05-23

    The physiotherapeutic technique of Vojta reflex locomotion is often accompanied by various autonomic activity changes and unpleasant sensations. It is unknown whether these effects are specific to Vojta Therapy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare changes in cardiac autonomic control after Vojta reflex locomotion stimulation and after an appropriate sham stimulation. A total of 28 young healthy adults (20.4 - 25.7 years) were enrolled in this single-blind randomized cross-over study. Participants underwent two modes of 20-minute sustained manual pressure stimulation on the surface of the foot on two separate visits. One mode used manual pressure on the lateral heel, i.e., in a zone employed in the Vojta Therapy (active stimulation). The other mode used pressure on the lateral ankle (control), in an area not included among the active zones used by Vojta Therapy and whose activation does not evoke manifestations of reflex locomotion. Autonomic nervous system activity was evaluated using spectral analysis of heart rate variability before and after the intervention. The active stimulation was perceived as more unpleasant than the control stimulation. Heart rate variability parameters demonstrated almost identical autonomic responses after both stimulation types, showing either modest increase in parasympathetic activity, or increased heart rate variability with similar contribution of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The results demonstrate changes of cardiac autonomic control in both active and control stimulation, without evidence for a significant difference between the two.

  10. An online community of practice to support evidence-based physiotherapy practice in manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cathy; Yeung, Euson; Markoulakis, Roula; Guilcher, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how a community of practice promoted the creation and sharing of new knowledge in evidence-based manual therapy using Wenger's constructs of mutual engagement, joint enterprise, and shared repertoire as a theoretical framework. We used a qualitative approach to analyze the discussion board contributions of the 19 physiotherapists who participated in the 10-week online continuing education course in evidence-based practice (EBP) in manual therapy. The course was founded on community of practice, constructivism, social, and situated learning principles. The 1436 postings on 9 active discussion boards revealed that the community of practice was a social learning environment that supported strong participation and mutual engagement. Design features such as consistent facilitation, weekly guiding questions, and collaborative assignments promoted the creation and sharing of knowledge. Participants applied research evidence to the contexts in which they worked through reflective comparison of what they were reading to its applicability in their everyday practice. Participants' shared goals contributed to the common ground established in developing collective knowledge about different study designs, how to answer research questions, and the difficulties of conducting sound research. An online longitudinal community of practice utilized as a continuing education approach to deliver an online course based on constructivist and social learning principles allowed geographically dispersed physiotherapists to be mutually engaged in a joint enterprise in evidence-based manual therapy. Advantages included opportunity for reflection, modeling, and collaboration. Future studies should examine the impact of participation on clinical practice. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital

  11. Pelvic floor myofascial trigger points: manual therapy for interstitial cystitis and the urgency-frequency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J M

    2001-12-01

    The effectiveness of manual physical therapy was evaluated in patients with interstitial cystitis and the urethral syndrome, that is urgency-frequency with or without pelvic pain. The rationale was based on the hypothesis that pelvic floor myofascial trigger points are not only a source of pain and voiding symptoms, but also a trigger for neurogenic bladder inflammation via antidromic reflexes. From September 1995 to November 2000, 45 women and 7 men, including 10 with interstitial cystitis and 42 with the urgency-frequency syndrome, underwent manual physical therapy to the pelvic floor for 1 to 2 visits weekly for 8 to 12 weeks. Results were determined by patient completed symptom score sheets indicating the rate of improvement according to outcome parameters, including 25% to 50%-mild, 51% to 75%-moderate, 76% to 99%-marked and 100%-complete resolution. In 10 cases these subjective results were confirmed by measuring resting pelvic floor tension by electromyography before and after the treatment course. Of the 42 patients with the urgency-frequency syndrome with or without pain 35 (83%) had moderate to marked improvement or complete resolution, while 7 of the 10 (70%) with interstitial cystitis had moderate to marked improvement. The mean duration of symptoms before treatment in those with interstitial cystitis and the urgency-frequency syndrome was 14 (median 12) and 6 years (median 2.5), respectively. In patients with no symptoms or brief, low intensity flares mean followup was 1.5 years. In 10 patients who underwent electromyography mean resting pelvic floor tension decreased from 9.73 to 3.61 microV., which was a 65% improvement. Pelvic floor manual therapy for decreasing pelvic floor hypertonus effectively ameliorates the symptoms of the urgency/frequency syndrome and interstitial cystitis.

  12. The forgotten cousins : dental and chiropractic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, G.; Cartwright, P.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation protection surveillance methods should be appropriate to the particular use of x-rays employed. Dentists use small fixed position radiation fields with low output machines, making frequent routine visits unnecessary. There are also large numbers of them. On the other hand chiropractors use large fields and potentially high doses as well as a wide variety of projections and filters, which makes routine visits necessary. These differences have not unsurprisingly led to the National Radiation Laboratory adopting quite different approaches to monitoring these domains. In dental radiography past surveys have shown that the x-ray units themselves to be very robust and stable. A simple postal test was developed for dentists. A small number of visits are also made to dental x-ray facilities per year. Because of the greater possible level of hazard involved routine visits are made to chiropractic establishments. Chiropractic radiation protection surveys have now been extended to include calculating patient doses. The wide variety of projections and the extensive use of beam shaping filters and diaphragms means that we had to develop a program (called Chirodos) to allow for these filters in calculating the chiropractic patient doses. Data collected during the radiation protection surveys includes technique factors, filter materials, positions, and shielding. A national database of chiropractic doses has led us to establish reference doses for chiropractic x-ray exams. (author)

  13. Resolution of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) by correcting a lateral head translation posture following previous failed traditional chiropractic therapy: a CBP® case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Jason O; Oakley, Paul A; Moore, Robert R; Ruggeroli, Edward P; Harrison, Deed E

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] To present the case of the resolution of right temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) following the correction of a right lateral head translation posture. [Subject and Methods] A 24 year old female reported facial pain and jaw clicking in the right TMJ. Radiography revealed a 19 mm right head (shift) translation posture. TMJ vibration analysis showed characteristic abnormalities for the right TMJ. The patient was treated with CBP ® technique mirror image ® left sided exercises, and traction methods as well as spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). [Results] After 36 treatments over a 12-week time period, a complete correction of the lateral head posture was achieved corresponding with a complete resolution of jaw pain and clicking. TMJ vibration analysis demonstrated normal right side TMJ characteristics following treatment. [Conclusion] Abnormal head/neck postures, such as lateral head translation, may be an unrealized source of TMJD and may be explained through the 'regional interdependence' model or by how seemingly unrelated anatomy may be associated with a primary complaint.

  14. Energy costs of manual therapy: effects of plinth height and an assistive device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, D G; Holmes, C F; Santos, J L; Jordan, E; Acosta, F

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the metabolic and cardiopulmonary responses of an experienced therapist (8 years experience) performing manual therapy at standard (S) plinth height (31 in), elevated (E) plinth height (38 in), and standard (SMTH) and elevated (EMTH) plinth height wearing a manual therapy harness (MTH). The MTH, developed by one of the investigators (J.L.S.), is a vestlike device worn by the therapist, which, when attached to the patient, can be used to distract articular surfaces. The MTH allows the therapist more freedom of hand movement and use of body weight to help provide joint distraction. Inferior glide (Grade 3-Maitland) was provided to the lift hip of 12 individuals at a rate of 20 oscillations per minute for 4 minutes, continuously, so that steady-rate metabolic conditions could be established. Mean body mass and height for the 12 individuals was 70±10.5 kg and 174.5±13 cm, respectively. The therapist's heart rate returned to resting levels between each of the randomly assigned treatments. One subject was treated daily. The therapist (age 32) was chosen because of his clinical experience, similar height (172 em) and weight (73 kg) to the average adult American male, and excellent intra- and interday (5%≤ METs, 5%≤ HR) reproducibility. Metabolic equivalents (METs), heart rate (HR), and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured and averaged for the last 2 minutes of each treatment condition. The therapist was unaware of day-to-day test results except for RPE. Mean METs were 3. 7,3.2,2.6, and 2.4 for S, E, SMTH, and EMTH, respectively. Mean HRs were .117, 110, 104, and 93 beats/min for S, E, SMTH, and EMTH, respectively. RPE was 11. 0,8.7, 7.9, and 7.3jorS, E, SMTH, and EMTH, respectively. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (Scheffé F-test) revealed that SMTH and EMTH METs were similar, and significantly different (p≤0.05) from Sand E. METs for E were significantly different and lower than for S. HRs were

  15. Immediate Changes After Manual Therapy in Patients With Persistent, Nonspecific Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Ruescas-Nicolau, Maria-Arantzazu; Sanchez-Sanchez, M Luz; Arnal-Gómez, Anna; Balasch-Bernat, Mercè; Marques-Sule, Elena

    2018-02-10

    Context • Thoracic manipulation decreases pain and disability. However, when such manipulation is contraindicated, the use of other manual techniques based on the regional interdependence of the thoracic spine, upper ribs, and shoulders is an alternative approach. Objective • The study intended to investigate the immediate changes resulting from 3 manual therapy treatments on spinal mobility, flexibility, comfort, and pain perception in patients with persistent, nonspecific back pain as well as changes in their sense of physical well-being and their perception of change after treatment. Design • The study was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. Setting • The study took place in the Department of Physiotherapy of the Faculty of Physiotherapy at the University of Valencia (Valencia, Spain). Participants • Participants were 112 individuals from the community-56.6% female, with a mean age of 21.8 ± 0.2 y-who had persistent, nonspecific back pain. Intervention • Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups, receiving (1) neurolymphatic therapy (NL group), (2) articulatory spinal manual therapy (AS group), or (3) articulatory costal manual therapy (AC group). Outcome Measures • Cervical mobility, lumbar flexibility, comfort, pain perception, and physical well-being were assessed at baseline and immediately postintervention. Perception of change was evaluated postintervention. Results • Between baseline and postintervention, the AC group showed a significant increase in cervical flexion (P = .010), whereas the NL and AS groups improved in lumbar flexibility, P = .047 and P = .012, respectively. For that period, significant changes were found in lumbar comfort for the AS group (P < .001) and the NL group (P < .026) and in thoracic comfort (P < .001) for the AC group. All groups improved in physical well-being and pain perception (P < .05). Changes in thoracic comfort, lumbar comfort, and physical well-being differed among the groups, with

  16. Effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery in pain processing due to carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, C; Cleland, J; Palacios-Ceña, M; Fuensalida-Novo, S; Alonso-Blanco, C; Pareja, J A; Alburquerque-Sendín, F

    2017-08-01

    People with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) exhibit widespread pressure pain and thermal pain hypersensitivity as a manifestation of central sensitization. The aim of our study was to compare the effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery for improving pain and nociceptive gain processing in people with CTS. The trial was conducted at a local regional Hospital in Madrid, Spain from August 2014 to February 2015. In this randomized parallel-group, blinded, clinical trial, 100 women with CTS were randomly allocated to either manual therapy (n = 50), who received three sessions (once/week) of manual therapies including desensitization manoeuvres of the central nervous system, or surgical intervention (n = 50) group. Outcomes including pressure pain thresholds (PPT), thermal pain thresholds (HPT or CPT), and pain intensity which were assessed at baseline, and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the intervention by an assessor unaware of group assignment. Analysis was by intention to treat with mixed ANCOVAs adjusted for baseline scores. At 12 months, 95 women completed the follow-up. Patients receiving manual therapy exhibited higher increases in PPT over the carpal tunnel at 3, 6 and 9 months (all, p < 0.01) and higher decrease of pain intensity at 3 month follow-up (p < 0.001) than those receiving surgery. No significant differences were observed between groups for the remaining outcomes. Manual therapy and surgery have similar effects on decreasing widespread pressure pain sensitivity and pain intensity in women with CTS. Neither manual therapy nor surgery resulted in changes in thermal pain sensitivity. The current study found that manual therapy and surgery exhibited similar effects on decreasing widespread pressure pain sensitivity and pain intensity in women with carpal tunnel syndrome at medium- and long-term follow-ups investigating changes in nociceptive gain processing after treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  17. Manual lymphatic drainage therapy in patients with breast cancer related lymphoedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Helena

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphoedema is a common and troublesome condition that develops following breast cancer treatment. The aim of this study is to analyze the effectiveness of Manual Lymphatic Drainage in the treatment of postmastectomy lymphoedema in order to reduce the volume of lymphoedema and evaluate the improvement of the concomitant symptomatology. Methods A randomized, controlled clinical trial in 58 women with post-mastectomy lymphoedema. The control group includes 29 patients with standard treatment (skin care, exercise and compression measures, bandages for one month and, subsequently, compression garnments. The experimental group includes 29 patients with standard treatment plus Manual Lymphatic Drainage. The therapy will be administered daily for four weeks and the patient's condition will be assessed one, three and six months after treatment. The primary outcome parameter is volume reduction of the affected arm after treatment, expressed as a percentage. Secondary outcome parameters include: duration of lymphoedema reduction and improvement of the concomitant symptomatology (degree of pain, sensation of swelling and functional limitation in the affected extremity, subjective feeling of being physically less atractive and less feminine, difficulty looking at oneself naked and dissatisfaction with the corporal image. Discussion The results of this study will provide information on the effectiveness of Manual Lymphatic Drainage and its impact on the quality of life and physical limitations of these patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials (NCT: NCT01152099

  18. Initial Sleep Time Predicts Success in Manual-Guided Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothelius, Kristoffer; Kyhle, Kicki; Broman, Jan-Erik; Gordh, Torsten; Fredrikson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy produces significant and long-lasting improvement for individuals with insomnia, but treatment resources are scarce. A "stepped care" approach has therefore been proposed, but knowledge is limited on how to best allocate patients to different treatment steps. In this study, 66 primary-care patients with insomnia attended a low-end treatment step: manual-guided cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia delivered by ordinary primary-care personnel. Based on clinically significant treatment effects, subjects were grouped into treatment responders or nonresponders. Baseline data were analyzed to identify predictors for treatment success. Long total sleep time at baseline assessment was the only statistically significant predictor for becoming a responder, and sleep time may thus be important to consider before enrolling patients in low-end treatments.

  19. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques da; Ferreira, Elaine Barros; Vasques, Christiane Inocêncio; Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira da; Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz Dos

    2016-06-14

    develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate publicidade. Foi considerado o índice de concordância de, no mínimo, 80% para se garantir a validação do material. os itens abordados no instrumento de avaliação do manual educativo foram divididos em três blocos: objetivos, estrutura e apresentação, e relevância. Apenas um item, relacionado ao nível sociocultural do público-alvo, obteve índice de concordância publicidad. Fue considerado un índice de concordancia que fuese, por lo menos, de 80%, para garantizar la validación del material. los ítems abordados en el instrumento de evaluación del manual educativo fueron divididos en tres bloques: objetivos, estructura y presentación, y relevancia. Apenas un ítem, relacionado al nivel sociocultural del público-objetivo, obtuvo un índice de concordancia <80%, habiendo sido reformulado con base en las sugestiones de los participantes. Todos los otros ítems fueron considerados adecuados y/o totalmente adecuados en los tres bloques propuestos: objetivos (92,38%), estructura y presentación (89,74%), y relevancia (94,44%). el manual educativo propuesto fue considerado válido en lo que se refiere al contenido y a la apariencia. Se sugiere que puede contribuir para la comprensión del proceso terapéutico, al cual el paciente con cáncer de cabeza y cuello es sometido al

  20. Manual therapy in the treatment of ankle hemophilic arthropathy. A randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Rubén; Gómez-Conesa, Antonia; López-Pina, José-Antonio

    2014-11-01

    Although physiotherapy has demonstrated effectiveness in preventing ankle arthropathy compared to prophylaxis treatment from early ages, there have been no conclusive studies examining physiotherapy intervention once hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle has been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two physiotherapy interventions, in patients with hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle that had not been operated on previously. Nine patients with hemophilia (mean age of 35.7 SD 11.9 years) were randomized to a mobilization group (n = 5) and manual therapy group (n = 4). The two physiotherapy interventions were: (1) passive mobilization and stretching; and (2) manual orthopaedic therapy, both with proprioception training. The study lasted for six weeks, with two sessions a week. Ankle mobility and pain perception, lower limb proprioception and quality of life were the outcome measures. Both treatments improved all ankle movements (p ankle arthropathy. No haemarthrosis was recorded during treatment or during the follow-up period.

  1. PNF and manual therapy treatment results of patients with cervical spine osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maicki, Tomasz; Bilski, Jan; Szczygieł, Elżbieta; Trąbka, Rafał

    2017-09-22

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PNF and manual therapy methods in the treatment of patients with cervical spine osteoarthritis, especially their efficacy in reducing pain and improving functionality in everyday life. Long-term results were also compared in order to determine which method of treatment is more effective. Eighty randomly selected females aged 45-65 were included in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups of 40 persons. One group received PNF treatment and the other received manual therapy (MAN.T). To evaluate functional capabilities, the Functional Rating Index was used. To evaluate changes in pain, a shortened version of the McGill Questionnaire was used. The PNF group achieved a greater reduction in pain than the MAN.T group. The PNF group showed a greater improvement in performing daily activities such as sleeping, personal care, travelling, work, recreation, lifting, walking and standing as well as decreased intensity and frequency of pain compared to the MAN.T group. The PNF method proved to be more effective in both short (after two weeks) and long (after three months) term.

  2. Treating Small Bowel Obstruction with a Manual Physical Therapy: A Prospective Efficacy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda D. Rice

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel obstructions (SBOs caused by adhesions are a common, often life-threatening postsurgical complication with few treatment options available for patients. This study examines the efficacy of a manual physical therapy treatment regimen on the pain and quality of life of subjects with a history of bowel obstructions due to adhesions in a prospective, controlled survey based study. Changes in six domains of quality of life were measured via ratings reported before and after treatment using the validated Small Bowel Obstruction Questionnaire (SBO-Q. Improvements in the domains for pain (p=0.0087, overall quality of life (p=0.0016, and pain severity (p=0.0006 were significant when average scores before treatment were compared with scores after treatment. The gastrointestinal symptoms (p=0.0258 domain was marginally significant. There was no statistically significant improvement identified in the diet or medication domains in the SBO-Q for this population. Significant improvements in range of motion in the trunk (p≤0.001, often limited by adhesions, were also observed for all measures. This study demonstrates in a small number of subjects that this manual physical therapy protocol is an effective treatment option for patients with adhesive small bowel obstructions as measured by subject reported symptoms and quality of life.

  3. Shoulder functionality after manual therapy in subjects with shoulder impingement syndrome: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; López-Hervás, Antonia; Herrera-Monge, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Leonard, Ana; Piña-Pozo, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the differences in functionality of the upper limb in subjects suffering from shoulder impingement syndrome after intervention by two manual therapy protocols. Randomized, single-blind study with a sample of 22 subjects (58 ± 10.86 years old) divided into two groups. The conventional-group (n = 11) received mobilizations of the shoulder and the experimental-group (n = 11) was treated with soft tissue techniques in the cervical and upper thoracic regions. These two groups received electrotherapy and postural advices. The treatment lasted three weeks (15 daily sessions of 1 h and 30 min). Both active and passive range of motion (ROM) and self-perceived functionality of the upper limb (DASH questionnaire) were measured. The experimental group showed a significant improvement in the DASH scores and both groups improved mobility in the intra-group comparison pre-intervention versus post-intervention (p .05). Our results suggest that a combined treatment with electrotherapy, postural hygiene and manual therapy, regardless of the protocol, improves shoulder mobility and functionality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Work-related thumb disorders in South African physiotherapists treating musculoskeletal conditions using manual therapy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Jenkins

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the prevalence of and factors associated with work-related thumb problems (WRTP in South African physiotherapists treating musculoskeletal conditions using manual therapy techniques? Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive study design was used and data were collected using two Internet-based questionnaires. Participants: The sample size calculated for the study was 284 using 95% confidence levels and a 5% margin of error. There were 395 participants that were included in the study. Outcome measures: The variables measured included demographic, employment, educational and occupational factors. Results: The lifetime prevalence of WRTP in the physiotherapists was 65.3%. The manual techniques that were significantly associated with WRTP in the respondents who reported thumb problems were all grades of transverse glides applied to the spine as well as grade II–IV unilateral and central posterior-anterior pressures to the spine. The factors that remained significantly associated with WRTP in all 395 respondents after regression analysis were the cervical treatment of up to six patients a day and hyperextension > 30° of the non-dominant interphalangeal (IP joint of the thumb. Conclusion: This study confirms that a high percentage of physiotherapists using manual therapy techniques to treat musculoskeletal conditions are experiencing WRTP. Recommendations: The development of a valid and reliable WRTP screening tool is needed to aid in the identification of physiotherapists at risk and thus in the primary prevention of WRTP. A longitudinal study which follows newly qualified physiotherapists is recommended to investigate a possible cause-effect relationship and preventative strategies for WRTP in physiotherapists.

  5. A manual therapy and exercise approach to meralgia paresthetica in pregnancy: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaggs, Clayton D.; Winchester, Brett A.; Vianin, Michael; Prather, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present a case of a pregnant patient with meralgia paresthetica who improved using manual therapy and exercise procedures. Clinical Features A 22-year-old patient in the sixteenth week of pregnancy had low back pain, bilateral anterolateral thigh paresthesia and groin pain for a duration of 1 month. She had no motor deficits in either lower extremity and her reflexes were intact. As a standard clinic procedure, a battery of functional tests were performed including: active straight leg raise, long dorsal ligament test, and the pelvic pain provocation procedure. Based on her clinical history and physical responses to the aforementioned functional tests, the diagnosis of meralgia paresthetica was deduced. Intervention and Outcome Treatment was provided at 6 visits over a 6-week period where the patient underwent evaluation, manual intervention, and exercise prescription. Active Release Technique (ART) was performed to the restricted right sacroiliac (SIJ) complex and quadratus lumborum muscles. ART and post-isometric relaxation were applied to the illiopsoas muscles. The home exercise program consisted of pelvic/low back mobility, stabilization and relaxation exercises. After 6 treatments, the patient reported complete resolution of low back pain and left lower extremity symptoms and a 90% improvement in the right thigh symptoms. At her one-year follow-up, the patient reported no further complications and the absence of pain. Conclusions Manual therapy and exercises may serve as an effective treatment protocol for pregnant patients experiencing low back pain complicated by paresthesia. Because these conservative procedures offer a low-risk intervention, additional clinical studies are warranted to further study this treatment. PMID:19674679

  6. Identification of potential neuromotor mechanisms of manual therapy in patients with musculoskeletal disablement: rationale and description of a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Beth E; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia; Wu, Allan D

    2009-05-21

    Many health care practitioners use a variety of hands-on treatments to improve symptoms and disablement in patients with musculoskeletal pathology.Research to date indirectly suggests a potentially broad effect of manual therapy on the neuromotor processing of functional behavior within the supraspinal central nervous system (CNS) in a manner that may be independent of modification at the level of local spinal circuits. However, the effect of treatment speed, as well as the specific mechanism and locus of CNS changes, remain unclear. We developed a placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the hypothesis that manual therapy procedures directed to the talocrural joint in individuals with post-acute ankle sprain induce a change in corticospinal excitability that is relevant to improve the performance of lower extremity functional behavior. This study is designed to identify potential neuromotor changes associated with manual therapy procedures directed to the appendicular skeleton, compare the relative effect of treatment speed on potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures, and determine the behavioral relevance of potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00847769.

  7. Identification of potential neuromotor mechanisms of manual therapy in patients with musculoskeletal disablement: rationale and description of a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulig Kornelia

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many health care practitioners use a variety of hands-on treatments to improve symptoms and disablement in patients with musculoskeletal pathology. Research to date indirectly suggests a potentially broad effect of manual therapy on the neuromotor processing of functional behavior within the supraspinal central nervous system (CNS in a manner that may be independent of modification at the level of local spinal circuits. However, the effect of treatment speed, as well as the specific mechanism and locus of CNS changes, remain unclear. Methods/Design We developed a placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the hypothesis that manual therapy procedures directed to the talocrural joint in individuals with post-acute ankle sprain induce a change in corticospinal excitability that is relevant to improve the performance of lower extremity functional behavior. Discussion This study is designed to identify potential neuromotor changes associated with manual therapy procedures directed to the appendicular skeleton, compare the relative effect of treatment speed on potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures, and determine the behavioral relevance of potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00847769.

  8. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques; Ferreira, Elaine Barros; Vasques, Christiane Inocêncio; da Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira; dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. Method: descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. Results: the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate manual proposed were attended to. This can contribute to the understanding of the therapeutic process the head and neck cancer patient is submitted to during the radiation therapy, besides supporting clinical practice through the nursing consultation. PMID:27305178

  9. Concussion knowledge among Sport Chiropractic Fellows from the Royal College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences (Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mohsen; Bogumil, Mary Emma; Vora, Khushboo

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the degree of knowledge that sports chiropractors have in regard to concussion diagnosis and management. A concussion knowledge survey was administered to Sport Chiropractic Fellows of the Royal College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences - Canada (RCCSS(C)) (n=44) via SurveyMonkey.com. Sports chiropractors scored statistically higher on the survey when compared to chiropractic residents (mean =5.57 vs. 5.25; t=2.12; p=0.04) and to fourth year chiropractic interns (mean = 5.57 vs 5.2; t=2.45; p=0.02). Additionally, with our modified scoring, the sports chiropractors scored 85.3%. A few knowledge gaps were identified in the sample population. Sports chiropractors demonstrated the skills and knowledge to diagnose concussion and excel at identifying the definition and mechanism of concussion, but knowledge gaps regarding diagnosis and management of concussion were found in the sample population.

  10. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy as a Manualized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Houston, Marsha-Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Family Therapy (MDT) in an outpatient setting as compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU). MDT is an evidence-based psychotherapy and has been shown to be effective treating adolescents with a variety of problems involving emotional disorder, physical and sexual aggression, as well as…

  11. The comparison of manual lymph drainage and ultrasound therapy on the leg swelling caused by wearing high heels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yeop; Han, Ji-Su; Jang, Eun-Ji; Seo, Dong-Kwon; Hong, Ji-Heon; Lee, Sang-Sook; Lee, Dong-Geol; Yu Lee, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    One of the major symptoms when women are wearing high heels for a long time is leg swelling. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of manual lymph drainage with ultrasound therapy. The forty-five healthy women of twenties were participated in this study and divided randomly into three groups; manual lymph drainage group (n=15), ultrasound therapy group (n=15) and control group (n=15). Swelling was measured before wearing the high heels (10 cm-height), after one-hour of wearing the high heels, wearing the high heels of one-hour after the intervention of 15 minutes. Also swelling was calculated by using a tape measure, volumeter and body composition analyzer. Statistical analysis of the comparison between the three groups was performed by one-way ANOVA. Also comparison to the mean value in swelling according to the time was performed by repeated measure ANOVA. As the result of this study, a significant changes have emerged within each of manual lymph drainage, ultrasound therapy and control group (p 0.05). But the mean value of manual lymph drainage group showed the tendency of fast recovering before causing swelling. Therefore, we consider that the clinical treatment of manual lymph drainage and ongoing studies will be made since manual lymph drainage is very effective in releasing the leg swelling caused by wearing high heels and standing for a long time at work.

  12. Increasing Orgasm and Decreasing Dyspareunia by a Manual Physical Therapy Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurn, Lawrence J; Wurn, Belinda F; Roscow, Amanda S; King, C Richard; Scharf, Eugenia S; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2004-01-01

    Context Female sexual pain and dysfunction Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a new site-specific, manual soft-tissue therapy in increasing orgasm and reducing dyspareunia (painful intercourse) in women with histories indicating abdominopelvic adhesion formation. Design and Intervention A total of 29 new patients presenting with infertility or abdominopelvic pain-related problems, and also indicating sexual pain or dysfunction, received a series of treatments (mean, 19.5 hours) designed to address biomechanical dysfunction and restricted mobility due to adhesions affecting the reproductive organs and adjacent structures. Outcome Measures Primary outcome measures were post-test vs pretest scores on: (1) the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) full scale, orgasm domain, and pain domain; and (2) 3 supplemental 10-point rating scales of sexual pain levels. Secondary outcome measures were post-test vs pretest scores in the other 4 FSFI domains (desire, arousal, lubrication, and satisfaction). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for all statistical analyses. Results For the 23 patients available for follow-up, the paired FSFI post-test vs pretest scores were significant (P ≤ .003) on all measures. Of the 17 patients who completed the 3 sexual pain scales, the paired post-test vs pretest scores were significant (P ≤ .002) Conclusions Many cases of inhibited orgasm, dyspareunia, and other aspects of sexual dysfunction seem to be treatable by a distinctive, noninvasive manual therapy with no risks and few, if any, adverse effects. The therapy should be considered a new adjunct to existing gynecologic and medical treatments. PMID:15775874

  13. Multimodal manual therapy vs. pharmacological care for management of tension type headache: A meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Jiménez, Juan A; Lozano-López, Cristina; Angulo-Díaz-Parreño, Santiago; Rodríguez-Fernández, Ángel L; De-la-Hoz-Aizpurua, Jose L; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar

    2015-12-01

    Manual therapies are generally requested by patients with tension type headache. To compare the efficacy of multimodal manual therapy vs. pharmacological care for the management of tension type headache pain by conducting a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, EBSCO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Collaboration Trials Register, PEDro and SCOPUS were searched from their inception until June 2014. All randomized controlled trials comparing any manual therapy vs. medication care for treating tension type headache adults were included. Data were extracted and methodological quality assessed independently by two reviewers. We pooled headache frequency as the main outcome and also intensity and duration. The weighted mean difference between manual therapy and pharmacological care was used to determine effect sizes. Five randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled analyses found that manual therapies were more effective than pharmacological care in reducing frequency (weighted mean difference -0.8036, 95% confidence interval -1.66 to -0.44; three trials), intensity (weighted mean difference -0.5974, 95% confidence interval -0.8875 to -0.3073; five trials) and duration (weighted mean difference -0.5558, 95% confidence interval -0.9124 to -0.1992; three trials) of the headache immediately after treatment. No differences were found at longer follow-up for headache intensity (weighted mean difference -0.3498, 95% confidence interval -1.106 to 0.407; three trials). Manual therapies were associated with moderate effectiveness at short term, but similar effectiveness at longer follow-up for reducing headache frequency, intensity and duration in tension type headache than pharmacological medical drug care. However, due to the heterogeneity of the interventions, these results should be considered with caution at this stage. © International Headache

  14. The chiropractic profession in Norway 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvammen, O. C.; Leboeuf-Yde, C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The chiropractic profession in Norway has increased five-fold in the last two decades. As there is no academic graduate program in Norway, all chiropractors have been trained outside of Norway, in either Europe, America or Australia. This might have given Norwegian chiropractors heter...

  15. Chiropractic Colleges Seek Legitimacy amid Financial Woes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Many of the nation's chiropractic colleges, like other small colleges that rely heavily on tuition, are struggling to stay in business. At the same time that they are working to improve their stature in higher education and broadening their missions to increase their appeal, a number of the colleges are seeing enrollments plummet--and revenues are…

  16. Examinations on Applications of Manual Calculation Programs on Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy Using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Dae Sup; Hong, Dong Ki; Back, Geum Mun; Kwak, Jung Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, , Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    There was a problem with using MU verification programs for the reasons that there were errors of MU when using MU verification programs based on Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) Algorithm with radiation treatment plans around lung using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA). On this study, we studied the methods that can verify the calculated treatment plans using AAA. Using Eclipse treatment planning system (Version 8.9, Varian, USA), for each 57 fields of 7 cases of Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT), we have calculated using PBC and AAA with dose calculation algorithm. By developing MU of established plans, we compared and analyzed with MU of manual calculation programs. We have analyzed relationship between errors and 4 variables such as field size, lung path distance of radiation, Tumor path distance of radiation, effective depth that can affect on errors created from PBC algorithm and AAA using commonly used programs. Errors of PBC algorithm have showned 0.2{+-}1.0% and errors of AAA have showned 3.5{+-}2.8%. Moreover, as a result of analyzing 4 variables that can affect on errors, relationship in errors between lung path distance and MU, connection coefficient 0.648 (P=0.000) has been increased and we could calculate MU correction factor that is A.E=L.P 0.00903+0.02048 and as a result of replying for manual calculation program, errors of 3.5{+-}2.8% before the application has been decreased within 0.4{+-}2.0%. On this study, we have learned that errors from manual calculation program have been increased as lung path distance of radiation increases and we could verified MU of AAA with a simple method that is called MU correction factor.

  17. Examinations on Applications of Manual Calculation Programs on Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy Using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Dae Sup; Hong, Dong Ki; Back, Geum Mun; Kwak, Jung Won

    2012-01-01

    There was a problem with using MU verification programs for the reasons that there were errors of MU when using MU verification programs based on Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) Algorithm with radiation treatment plans around lung using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA). On this study, we studied the methods that can verify the calculated treatment plans using AAA. Using Eclipse treatment planning system (Version 8.9, Varian, USA), for each 57 fields of 7 cases of Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT), we have calculated using PBC and AAA with dose calculation algorithm. By developing MU of established plans, we compared and analyzed with MU of manual calculation programs. We have analyzed relationship between errors and 4 variables such as field size, lung path distance of radiation, Tumor path distance of radiation, effective depth that can affect on errors created from PBC algorithm and AAA using commonly used programs. Errors of PBC algorithm have showned 0.2±1.0% and errors of AAA have showned 3.5±2.8%. Moreover, as a result of analyzing 4 variables that can affect on errors, relationship in errors between lung path distance and MU, connection coefficient 0.648 (P=0.000) has been increased and we could calculate MU correction factor that is A.E=L.P 0.00903+0.02048 and as a result of replying for manual calculation program, errors of 3.5±2.8% before the application has been decreased within 0.4±2.0%. On this study, we have learned that errors from manual calculation program have been increased as lung path distance of radiation increases and we could verified MU of AAA with a simple method that is called MU correction factor.

  18. Manual therapy and eccentric exercise in the management of Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaseelan, Dhinu J; Kecman, Michael; Alcorn, Daniel; Sault, Josiah D

    2017-05-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is an overuse condition seen among runners. Eccentric exercise can decrease pain and improve function for those with chronic degenerative tendon changes; however, some individuals have continued pain requiring additional intervention. While joint mobilization and manipulation has not been studied in the management in Achilles tendinopathy, other chronic tendon dysfunction, such as lateral epicondylalgia, has responded well to manual therapy (MT). Three runners were seen in physical therapy (PT) for chronic AT. They were prescribed eccentric loading exercises and calf stretching. Joint mobilization and manipulation was implemented to improve foot and ankle mobility, decrease pain, and improve function. Immediate within-session changes in pain, heel raise repetitions, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were noted following joint-directed MT in each patient. Each patient improved in self-reported function on the Achilles tendon specific Victorian Institute for Sport Assessment questionnaire (VISA-A), pain levels, PPT, joint mobility, ankle motion, and single-leg heel raises at discharge and 9-month follow-up. The addition of MT directed at local and remote sites may enhance the rehabilitation of patients with AT. Further research is necessary to determine the efficacy of adding joint mobilization to standard care for AT. Case series. Therapy, Level 4.

  19. Novel use of a manual therapy technique and management of a patient with peroneal tendinopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Craig P; Kavchak, Alicia J Emerson

    2012-02-01

    Peroneal tendinopathy is an uncommon but underappreciated source of lateral hindfoot pain and dysfunction. There is a paucity of literature describing optimal intervention for those suffering with pain secondary to peroneal tendinopathy. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation and treatment incorporating manual therapy and therapeutic exercise for a patient diagnosed with peroneal tendinopathy. The patient was a 50 year-old female with a history of chronic lateral ankle pain and whose presentation was consistent with peroneal tendinopathy. Despite attempts to improve pain and function with over-the-counter orthotics, manual therapy to a hypomobile talocrural joint, and strengthening of the peroneal tendons, successful response was not reported until a lateral calcaneal glide was added. Improvement in impairments (pain, talocrural dorsiflexion, unilateral heel raises, and Star Excursion Balance Test) and function (Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Global Rating of Change), were observed over a course of eight visits. The patient was able to return to work and her recreational work out routine without limitations. In conclusion a successful physical therapy intervention for a patient with peroneal tendinopathy included a unique manual therapy technique, the lateral calcaneal glide, in conjunction with other manual therapy techniques and a structured home exercise program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The sterno-clavicular joint: anatomy, biomechanic, clinical features and aspects of manual therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sterno-clavicular joint covers one remarkable importance in the complex of the shoulder girdle. This review investigates the anatomy, biomechanics, main affections and involvement of this joint in the pathological processes of the shoulder girdle in its complex. Moreover, it focuses on the opportunities offered from the conservative treatment, using in particular the manual therapy. Active and passive, as well as against isometric resistance movements, are discussed. In particular, the passive mobilization is demonstrated effective in the restoration of joint mobility. The sterno- clavicular joint is not structured in order to complete great work loads and has the tendency to become hypermotile or unstable, if subordinate to overload works, becoming painful. In this case, the techniques of passive mobilization and of modulation of the pain turn out effective.

  1. Therapy response evaluation of malignant lymphoma in a multicenter study. Comparison of manual and semiautomatic measurements in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessling, J.; Schuelke, C.; Koch, R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of manual one-/bi-dimensional measurements versus semi-automatically derived one-/bi-dimensional and volumetric measurements for therapy response evaluation of malignant lymphoma during CT follow-up examinations in a multicenter setting. Materials and Methods: MSCT data sets of patients with malignant lymphoma were evaluated before (baseline) and after two cycles of chemotherapy (follow-up) at radiological centers of five university hospitals. The long axis diameter (LAD), the short axis diameter (SAD) and the bi-dimensional WHO of 307 target lymph nodes were measured manually and semi-automatically using dedicated software. Lymph node volumetry was performed semi-automatically only. The therapeutic response was evaluated according to lymphoma-adapted RECIST. Results: Based on a single lymph node, semi-automatically derived multidimensional parameters allowed for significantly more accurate therapy response classification than the manual or the semi-automatic unidimensional parameters. Incorrect classifications were reduced by up to 9.6%. Compared to the manual approach, the influence of the study center on correct therapy classification is significantly less relevant when using semi-automatic measurements. Conclusion: Semi-automatic volumetry and bi-dimensional WHO significantly reduce the number of incorrectly classified lymphoma patients by approximately 9.6% in the multicenter setting in comparison to linear parameters. Semi-automatic quantitative software tools may help to significantly reduce wrong classifications that are associated with the manual assessment approach. (orig.)

  2. Therapy response evaluation of malignant lymphoma in a multicenter study. Comparison of manual and semiautomatic measurements in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessling, J.; Schuelke, C. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Koch, R. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Informatics and Biomathematics; and others

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Comparison of manual one-/bi-dimensional measurements versus semi-automatically derived one-/bi-dimensional and volumetric measurements for therapy response evaluation of malignant lymphoma during CT follow-up examinations in a multicenter setting. Materials and Methods: MSCT data sets of patients with malignant lymphoma were evaluated before (baseline) and after two cycles of chemotherapy (follow-up) at radiological centers of five university hospitals. The long axis diameter (LAD), the short axis diameter (SAD) and the bi-dimensional WHO of 307 target lymph nodes were measured manually and semi-automatically using dedicated software. Lymph node volumetry was performed semi-automatically only. The therapeutic response was evaluated according to lymphoma-adapted RECIST. Results: Based on a single lymph node, semi-automatically derived multidimensional parameters allowed for significantly more accurate therapy response classification than the manual or the semi-automatic unidimensional parameters. Incorrect classifications were reduced by up to 9.6%. Compared to the manual approach, the influence of the study center on correct therapy classification is significantly less relevant when using semi-automatic measurements. Conclusion: Semi-automatic volumetry and bi-dimensional WHO significantly reduce the number of incorrectly classified lymphoma patients by approximately 9.6% in the multicenter setting in comparison to linear parameters. Semi-automatic quantitative software tools may help to significantly reduce wrong classifications that are associated with the manual assessment approach. (orig.)

  3. Strength training alone, exercise therapy alone, and exercise therapy with passive manual mobilisation each reduce pain and disability in people with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Mariette J; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lenssen, Antoine F; Hendriks, Erik J M; de Bie, Rob A

    2011-01-01

    What are the effects of strength training alone, exercise therapy alone, and exercise with additional passive manual mobilisation on pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis compared to control? What are the effects of these interventions relative to each other? A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Adults with osteoarthritis of the knee. INTERVENTION TYPES: Strength training alone, exercise therapy alone (combination of strength training with active range of motion exercises and aerobic activity), or exercise with additional passive manual mobilisation, versus any non-exercise control. Comparisons between the three interventions were also sought. The primary outcome measures were pain and physical function. 12 trials compared one of the interventions against control. The effect size on pain was 0.38 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.54) for strength training, 0.34 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.49) for exercise, and 0.69 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.96) for exercise plus manual mobilisation. Each intervention also improved physical function significantly. No randomised comparisons of the three interventions were identified. However, meta-regression indicated that exercise plus manual mobilisations improved pain significantly more than exercise alone (p = 0.03). The remaining comparisons between the three interventions for pain and physical function were not significant. Exercise therapy plus manual mobilisation showed a moderate effect size on pain compared to the small effect sizes for strength training or exercise therapy alone. To achieve better pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis physiotherapists or manual therapists might consider adding manual mobilisation to optimise supervised active exercise programs. Copyright © 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison between effectiveness of Mechanical and Manual Traction combined with mobilization and exercise therapy in Patients with Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed Rehan Iftikhar; Shakil-Ur-Rehman, Syed; Ahmad, Shakeel; Naeem, Aamer

    2016-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common neuro-musculo-skeletal disorder causing pain and disability. Traction is part of the evidence based manual physical therapy management due to its mechanical nature, type of traction and parameters related to its applicability and are still to be explored more through research. Our objective was to determine the Effects of Mechanical versus Manual Traction in Manual Physical Therapy combined with segmental mobilization and exercise therapy in the physical therapy management of Patients with Cervical Radiculopathy. This randomized control trial was conducted at department of physical therapy and rehabilitation, Rathore Hospital Faisalabad, from February to July 2015. Inclusion criteria were both male and female patients with evident symptoms of cervical spine radiculopathy and age ranged between 20-70 years. The exclusion criteria were Patients with history of trauma, neck pain without radiculopathy, aged less than 20 and more than 70. A total of 72 patients with cervical radiculopathy were screened out as per the inclusion criteria, 42 patients were randomly selected and placed into two groups by toss and trial method, and only 36 patients completed the study, while 6 dropped out. The mechanical traction was applied in group A and manual traction in group B along with common intervention of segmental mobilization and exercise therapy in both groups for 6 weeks. The patient's outcomes were assessed by self reported NPRS and NDI at the baseline and after completion of 06 weeks exercise program at 3 days per week. The data was analyzed through SPSS version-21, and paired T test was applied at 95% level significance to determine the statistical deference between two groups. Clinically the group of patients treated with mechanical traction managed pain (mean pre 6.26, mean post 1.43), and disability (mean pre 24.43 and mean post 7.26) more effectively as compared with the group of patients treated with manual traction (Pain mean pre 6

  5. Chiropractic practice in the Danish public health care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie

    2009-01-01

    This commentary offers preliminary considerations around a phenomenological investigation of chiropractic services in a Danish public sector setting. In this narrative description, the main venue for chiropractic public (secondary) sector practice in the Danish context is briefly described...... and defined. Furthermore, a contextually relevant definition of an integral health care service is presented; and the professional importance for chiropractic in providing such services is also discussed. Finally, salient questions requiring empirical investigation in this context are posed; and selected...

  6. Becoming a Manual Occupation? The Construction of a Therapy Manual for Use with Language Impaired Children in Mainstream Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Elspeth; Boyle, James; Bannatyne, Susan; Jessiman, Emma; Campbell, Cathy; Kelsey, Cherry; Smith, Jennifer; O'Hare, Anne

    2003-01-01

    The construction of therapy protocols for a large-scale randomized controlled trial comparing speech and language therapists and assistants, and group and individual therapy approaches for children aged 6-11 in mainstream schools is outlined. The aim was to outline the decision-making processes that led to the construction of the research therapy…

  7. Manual Therapy and Exercise to Improve Outcomes in Patients With Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a common voice disorder that is not commonly referred for physical therapy intervention, is characterized by excessive muscle recruitment, resulting in incorrect vibratory patterns of vocal folds and an alteration in voice production. This case series was conducted to determine whether physical therapy including manual therapy, exercise, and stress management education would be beneficial to this population by reducing excess muscle tension. Case Description Nine patients with MTD completed a minimum of 9 sessions of the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes of pain, function, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and the conclusion of treatment. The outcome measures were the numeric rating scale (NRS), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and Voice Handicap Index (VHI). Cervical and jaw range of motion also were assessed at baseline and postintervention using standard goniometric measurements. Outcomes Eight of the patients had no pain after treatment. All 9 of the patients demonstrated an improvement in PSFS score, with 7 patients exceeding a clinically meaningful improvement at the conclusion of the intervention. Three of the patients also had a clinically meaningful change in VHI scores. All 9 of the patients demonstrated improvement in cervical flexion and lateral flexion and jaw opening, whereas 8 patients improved in cervical extension and rotation postintervention. Discussion The findings suggest that physical therapists can feasibly implement an intervention to improve outcomes in patients with MTD. However, a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results of this case series and the efficacy of the intervention. A clinical implication is the expansion of physical therapy to include referrals from voice centers for the treatment of MTD. PMID:25256740

  8. Somato-Visceral Effects in the Treatment of Dysmenorrhea: Neuromuscular Manual Therapy and Standard Pharmacological Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barassi, Giovanni; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia; Porreca, Annamaria; Di Felice, Piera Attilia; Prosperi, Loris; Saggini, Raoul

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to verify whether neuromuscular therapy (NMT) or pharmacology therapy (PT) is more effective for reducing symptoms in women affected by primary dysmenorrhea and the effects associated with each treatment. A controlled, randomized, single-blind clinical trial within the framework of the chair of physical medicine and rehabilitation of the University "G. d'Annunzio" of Chieti-Pescara. The study was conducted on a sample of 60 women suffering from primary dysmenorrhea. Subjects were randomly divided in two groups (A and B). Group A was treated with NMT and group B with PT. Group B was given ibuprofen or naproxen because they are considered the best painkillers for this condition. Group A was treated with 8 neuromuscular manual lumbosacral and abdominal therapy sessions twice per week for 4 weeks. Results were analyzed at the beginning (T0) and end (T1) of the study with a menstrual distress questionnaire, brief pain inventory, and visual analogue scale. Twenty patients from Group A were selected for evaluation of their maintenance of the eventual improvement that was detected in T1 at follow-up (T2). Both therapies had significant short-term effects in reducing the perception and duration of pain. However, NMT appears to give more improvements in the duration of pain. NMT had a long-term effect on perception of pain because patients conserved the positive effects of treatment after 4 weeks. NMT also had a long-term effect on duration of pain because patients conserved benefits of treatment, but this improvement started to decrease after 4 weeks. In the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea, NMT represents a valid therapeutic alternative method to PT. NMT is free from potential adverse effects of analgesics, is noninvasive, and is easy to perform.

  9. EFFECTIVENESS OF CHIROPRACTIC ADJUSTMENT IN LUMBAR PAIN IN CROSSFIT PRACTITIONERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DESIREE MOEHLECKE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of acute chiropractic adjustment in individuals who practice CrossFit with regard to complaints of low back pain and the joint range of motion in this region. Methods: A randomized clinical trial comprised of CrossFit practitioners from a box in Novo Hamburgo-RS, of both sexes and aged 18 to 40 years who had low back pain at the time of the study. The following tools were used: Semi-structured Anamnesis Questionnaire, Visual Analog Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire, and SF-36 Quality of Life Questionnaire. Individuals in the control group answered the questionnaires before and after CrossFit training. The chiropractic group performed the same procedure, plus pre-training chiropractic adjustment and joint range of motion (ROM before and after lumbar adjustment. Results: There was a significant increase in pain in the control group, and a significant decrease in pain in the chiropractic group, including one day after the chiropractic adjustment. In the chiropractic group, the joint ranges of motion had a significant increase in flexion and extension of the lumbar spine after chiropractic adjustment. Conclusion: The chiropractic group achieved a significant improvement in pain level and joint range of motion, suggesting that acute chiropractic adjustment was effective in reducing low back pain.

  10. Cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and general practitioner care for neck pain: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals-de Bos, Ingeborg B. C.; Hoving, Jan L.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P. M. H.; Adèr, Herman J.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Koes, Bart W.; Vondeling, Hindrik; Bouter, Lex M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. DESIGN: Economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Primary care. PARTICIPANTS: 183 patients with neck pain for at least two weeks

  11. Orofacial manual therapy improves cervical movement impairment associated with headache and features of temporomandibular dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, Harry; Hall, Toby

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence that temporomandibular disorder (TMD) may be a contributing factor to cervicogenic headache (CGH), in part because of the influence of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint on the cervical spine. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine whether orofacial treatment in addition to cervical manual therapy, was more effective than cervical manual therapy alone on measures of cervical movement impairment in patients with features of CGH and signs of TMD. In this study, 43 patients (27 women) with headache for more than 3-months and with some features of CGH and signs of TMD were randomly assigned to receive either cervical manual therapy (usual care) or orofacial manual therapy to address TMD in addition to usual care. Subjects were assessed at baseline, after 6 treatment sessions (3-months), and at 6-months follow-up. 38 subjects (25 female) completed all analysis at 6-months follow-up. The outcome criteria were: cervical range of movement (including the C1-2 flexion-rotation test) and manual examination of the upper 3 cervical vertebra. The group that received orofacial treatment in addition to usual care showed significant reduction in all aspects of cervical impairment after the treatment period. These improvements persisted to the 6-month follow-up, but were not observed in the usual care group at any point. These observations together with previous reports indicate that manual therapists should look for features of TMD when examining patients with headache, particularly if treatment fails when directed to the cervical spine. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Manual de Adiestramiento sobre Terapia de Rehidratacion Oral y Control de las Enfermedades Diarreicas (Oral Rehydration Therapy and the Control of Diarrheal Diseases). Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mari; And Others

    This Spanish-language manual was developed to train Peace Corps volunteers and other community health workers in Spanish-speaking countries in oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and the control of diarrheal diseases. Using a competency-based format, the manual contains three training modules (organized in seven sessions) that focus on interrelated…

  13. Sports chiropractic management at the World Ice Hockey Championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitiello Andrew L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ice hockey is an international sport. Injuries occur in a full body fashion, to a number of tissues, commonly through body contact. There is a lack of literature documenting the scope of sports chiropractic practice. Thus, it was the aim to document the type, scope and severity of conditions presenting to, and the treatment provided by, the New Zealand team chiropractor acting as a primary health provider for the duration of the 2007 World Ice Hockey Championships. Methods All conditions presenting were recorded. Diagnosis was recorded along with clinical parameters of injury: injury type, severity, mechanism and whether referral or advanced imaging was required. All treatment provided was continuously recorded, including information on the number of treatments required and the reason, duration, type and location of treatment. Results Players presented for diagnosis of injury 50 times. Muscle (34%, joint (24% and tendon injuries (18% were most common. Players presented with a new injury 76% of the time. Most injuries had been present for less than one week (84%, with 53% occurring through a contact mechanism. Injuries were common at training and match locations. Only two injuries required the player to stop playing or training, both of which were referred for advanced imaging. During the study, 134 treatment consultations were rendered to 45 player injuries. Eighty per-cent of injuries were managed with four or less treatments. Three quarters of treatment was provided at training locations with treatment duration predominantly being between 11-15 minutes (71% and 16-20 minutes (27%. Most treatment delivered was passive in nature (71% although combination active and passive care was provided (27%. Treatment typically involved joint (81% and soft tissue based therapies (81% and was delivered in a full body manner. Conclusions This study documented the injury profile of ice hockey at an international level of competition. It

  14. The effect of manual therapy and exercise in patients with chronic low back pain: Double blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulger, Ozlem; Demirel, Aynur; Oz, Müzeyyen; Tamer, Seval

    2017-11-06

    To determine the effects of spinal stabilization exercises (SSE) and manual therapy methods on pain, function and quality of life (QoL) levels in individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP). A total of one-hundred thirteen patients diagnosed as CLBP were enrolled to the study. The patients allocated into Spinal Stabilization group (SG) and manual therapy group (MG), randomly. While SSE performed in SG, soft tissue mobilizations, muscle-energy techniques, joint mobilizations and manipulations were performed in MG. While the severity of pain was assessed with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form 36 (SF-36) assessments were performed to evaluate the functional status and QoL, respectively. All assessments were repeated before and after the treatment. Intragroup analyses both treatments were effective in terms of sub parameters of pain, function and life quality (p< 0.05). Inter group analyses, there was more reduction in pain and improvement in functional status in favor of MG (p< 0.05). This study showed that SSE and manual therapy methods have the same effects on QoL, while the manual treatment is more effective on the pain and functional parameters in particular.

  15. Immediate effect of manual therapy on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz Yelvar GD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gul Deniz Yilmaz Yelvar,1 Yasemin Çirak,2 Yasemin Parlak Demir,3 Murat Dalkilinç,1 Bülent Bozkurt4 1Department of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, 2Department of Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy, 3Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, School of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Turgut Özal University, Ankara, Turkey Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate effect of manual therapy (MT on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD.Participants and methods: Thirty patients with severe COPD (eight females and 22 males; mean age 62.4±6.8 years referred to pulmonary physiotherapy were included in this study. The patients participated in a single session of MT to measure the short-term effects. The lung function was measured using a portable spirometer. An electronic pressure transducer was used to measure respiratory muscle strength. Heart rate, breathing frequency, and oxygen saturation were measured with a pulse oximeter. For fatigue and dyspnea perception, the modified Borg rating of perceived exertion scale was used. All measurements were taken before and immediately after the first MT session. The ease-of-breathing visual analog scale was used for rating patients’ symptoms subjectively during the MT session.Results: There was a significant improvement in the forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, and vital capacity values (P<0.05. The maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values increased significantly after MT, compared to the pre-MT session (P<0.05. There was a significant decrease in heart rate, respiratory rate (P<0.05, and dyspnea and fatigue perception (P<0.05.Conclusion: A single MT session immediately improved pulmonary function, inspiratory muscle strength, and oxygen saturation and reduced dyspnea, fatigue, and heart and respiratory rates in patients with

  16. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlappi Mark

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or

  17. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) and Laryngeal Manual Therapy (LMT): Immediate Effects in Women With Dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Mariana de Cásisa Macedo; Siqueira, Larissa Thaís Donalonso; Vendramini, José Eduardo; Brasolotto, Alcione Ghedini; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus; Silverio, Kelly Cristina Alves

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to verify the immediate effect of low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and laryngeal manual therapy (LMT) in musculoskeletal pain, voice quality, and self-reported signs in women with dysphonia. Thirty women with behavioral dysphonia were randomly divided into the TENS group and the LMT group. All participants fulfilled the pain survey and had their voices recorded to posterior perceptual and acoustic analysis before and after intervention. The TENS group received a unique low-frequency TENS session (20 minutes). The LMT group received LMT (20 minutes) with soft and superficial massage in the sternocleidomastoid muscle, suprahyoid muscles, and larynx. Afterward, the volunteers reported their voice, larynx, breathing, and articulatory signs. Pre and post data were compared by parametric and nonparametric tests. After TENS, a decrease in pain intensity in the posterior or anterior region of the neck, shoulders, upper or lower back, and masseter was observed. After LMT, a decrease in pain intensity in the neck anterior region, shoulders, lower back, and temporal region was observed. Also, after TENS, there was an improvement in vowel /a/ instability; after LMT, there was a general improvement in voice quality, decrease in tension, and decrease in breathiness in speech. Positive voice and laryngeal signs were reported after TENS, and positive laryngeal signs and articulation were reported after LMT. TENS and LMT may be used in voice treatment of women with behavioral dysphonia, and both may be considered important therapy resources that reduce musculoskeletal pain and cause positive laryngeal signs. Both TENS and LMT are able to partially improve voice quality, but TENS presented better results. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using PubMed search strings for efficient retrieval of manual therapy research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillastrini, Paolo; Vanti, Carla; Curti, Stefania; Mattioli, Stefano; Ferrari, Silvano; Violante, Francesco Saverio; Guccione, Andrew

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to construct PubMed search strings that could efficiently retrieve studies on manual therapy (MT), especially for time-constrained clinicians. Our experts chose 11 Medical Subject Heading terms describing MT along with 84 additional potential terms. For each term that was able to retrieve more than 100 abstracts, we systematically extracted a sample of abstracts from which we estimated the proportion of studies potentially relevant to MT. We then constructed 2 search strings: 1 narrow (threshold of pertinent articles ≥40%) and 1 expanded (including all terms for which a proportion had been calculated). We tested these search strings against articles on 2 conditions relevant to MT (thoracic and temporomandibular pain). We calculated the number of abstracts needed to read (NNR) to identify 1 potentially pertinent article in the context of these conditions. Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of the proposed PubMed search strings to identify relevant articles included in a systematic review on spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low back pain. Fifty-five search terms were able to extract more than 100 citations. The NNR to find 1 potentially pertinent article using the narrow string was 1.2 for thoracic pain and 1.3 for temporomandibular pain, and the NNR for the expanded string was 1.9 and 1.6, respectively. The narrow search strategy retrieved all the randomized controlled trials included in the systematic review selected for comparison. The proposed PubMed search strings may help health care professionals locate potentially pertinent articles and review a large number of MT studies efficiently to better implement evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adverse effects as a consequence of being the subject of orthopaedic manual therapy training, a worldwide retrospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoomes-de Graaf, M; Thoomes, E; Carlesso, L; Kerry, R; Rushton, A

    2017-06-01

    Physical therapists (PTs) use a range of manual therapy techniques developed to an advanced level through postgraduate orthopaedic manipulative physical therapy (OMPT) programmes. The aim of this study was to describe the adverse effects experienced by students after having techniques performed on them as part of their OMPT training. A descriptive online survey of current students and recent graduates (≤5 years)m of OMPT programmes across the 22 Member Organisations of the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapists. The questionnaire was completed by 1640 respondents across 22 countries (1263 graduates, 377 students. Some 60% of respondents reported never having experienced adverse effects during their manual therapy training. Of the 40% who did, 66.4% reported neck pain, 50.9% headache and 32% low back pain. Most reports of neck pain started after a manipulation and/or mobilisation, of which 53.4% lasted ≤24 h, 38.1% > 24 h but <3 months and 13.7% still experienced neck pain to date. A small percentage of respondents (3.3%) reported knowing of a fellow student experiencing a major adverse effect. Mild to moderate adverse effects after practising manual therapy techniques are commonly reported, but usually resolve within 24 h. However, this survey has identified the reported occurrence of major adverse effects that warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Development of a Postgraduate Orthopaedic Manual Therapy Residency Program in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shala Cunningham

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThere are very few opportunities for long-term, comprehensive postgraduate education in developing countries because of fiscal and human resource constraints. Therefore, physiotherapists have little opportunity following graduation to advance their skills through the improvement of clinical reasoning and treatment planning and application.BackgroundTo address the need for sustainable advanced instruction in physiotherapy within the country, a postgraduate Residency program was initiated in Nairobi, Kenya in 2012. The mission of the program is to graduate advanced orthopedic practitioners who can lead their communities and local profession in the advancement of clinical care and education. Since its inception, six cohorts have been initiated for a total of 90 resident participants. In addition, six program graduates are being trained to continue the Residency program and are serving as teaching assistants for the on campus modules. This training will result in a self-sustaining program by 2020.DiscussionThe manual therapy Residency education model allowed for advancement of the participating physiotherapists professional development utilizing evidence-based practice. This was done without altering the current education system within the country, or accessing expensive equipment.Concluding remarksThe Residency program was developed and established with the cooperation of a local education institution and a non-profit corporation in the United States. This collaboration has facilitated the advancement of orthopedic clinical standards in the country and will, hopefully, one day serve an as a template for future programs.

  1. The Development of a Postgraduate Orthopaedic Manual Therapy Residency Program in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shala; Jackson, Richard; Muli, Daniel Kangutu; McFelea, Joni

    2017-01-01

    There are very few opportunities for long-term, comprehensive postgraduate education in developing countries because of fiscal and human resource constraints. Therefore, physiotherapists have little opportunity following graduation to advance their skills through the improvement of clinical reasoning and treatment planning and application. To address the need for sustainable advanced instruction in physiotherapy within the country, a postgraduate Residency program was initiated in Nairobi, Kenya in 2012. The mission of the program is to graduate advanced orthopedic practitioners who can lead their communities and local profession in the advancement of clinical care and education. Since its inception, six cohorts have been initiated for a total of 90 resident participants. In addition, six program graduates are being trained to continue the Residency program and are serving as teaching assistants for the on campus modules. This training will result in a self-sustaining program by 2020. The manual therapy Residency education model allowed for advancement of the participating physiotherapists professional development utilizing evidence-based practice. This was done without altering the current education system within the country, or accessing expensive equipment. The Residency program was developed and established with the cooperation of a local education institution and a non-profit corporation in the United States. This collaboration has facilitated the advancement of orthopedic clinical standards in the country and will, hopefully, one day serve an as a template for future programs.

  2. The EdUReP approach plus manual therapy for the management of insertional Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorio, Francesco; Zanetta, Anna; Ferriero, Giorgio; Bravini, Elisabetta; Vercelli, Stefano

    2018-05-01

    Insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT) is a challenging overuse disorder. The aim of this case report was to study the feasibility of a comprehensive rehabilitative approach according to the Education, Unloading, Reloading, and Prevention (EdUReP) framework combined with Instrument-Augmented Soft Tissue Mobilization (I-ASTM). An active 51-year-old man patient with chronic IAT was studied. Clinical assessment battery was composed by visual analogue scale for pain during the Achilles tendon palpation test, passive straight leg raise test, single leg hop test, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure. The patient was treated over a 8 weeks period using the EdUReP guidelines plus 8 sessions of I-ASTM, applied with a solid instrument to the Achilles tendon and to the muscle fibrotic areas previously identified during evaluation. Clinically significant improvements were observed in all outcome measures, and a resume of patient's usual sports activities without pain or limitations was possible after treatment. Results lasted over a 6-month follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study applying a comprehensive approach based on accurate physical assessment, and using the EdUReP theoretical model. The combination of the EdUReP model and manual therapy was effective in resolving the patient's symptoms and restore his usual sport activities. While these results cannot be generalized, the present findings could provide a valuable foundation for future researches.

  3. Core Competencies of the Certified Pediatric Doctor of Chiropractic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hewitt, Elise; Hestbaek, Lise; Pohlman, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    An outline of the minimum core competencies expected from a certified pediatric doctor of chiropractic was developed using a Delphi consensus process. The initial set of seed statements and substatements was modeled on competency documents used by organizations that oversee chiropractic and medical...... education. These statements were distributed to the Delphi panel, reaching consensus when 80% of the panelists approved each segment. The panel consisted of 23 specialists in chiropractic pediatrics (14 females) from across the broad spectrum of the chiropractic profession. Sixty-one percent of panelists...... had postgraduate pediatric certifications or degrees, 39% had additional graduate degrees, and 74% were faculty at a chiropractic institution and/or in a postgraduate pediatrics program. The panel were initially given 10 statements with related substatements formulated by the study's steering...

  4. Use of the measure your medical outcome profile (MYMOP2 and W-BQ12 (Well-Being outcomes measures to evaluate chiropractic treatment: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polus Barbara I

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to assess the use of the Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2 and W-BQ12 well-being questionnaire for measuring clinical change associated with a course of chiropractic treatment. Methods Chiropractic care of the patients involved spinal manipulative therapy (SMT, mechanically assisted techniques, soft tissue therapy, and physiological therapeutic devices. Outcome measures used were MYMOP2 and the Well-Being Questionnaire 12 (W-BQ12. Results Statistical and clinical significant changes were demonstrated with W-BQ12 and MYMOP2. Conclusions The study demonstrated that MYMOP2 was responsive to change and may be a useful instrument for assessing clinical changes among chiropractic patients who present with a variety of symptoms and clinical conditions.

  5. The Council on Chiropractic Education's New Wellness Standard: A call to action for the chiropractic profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Ronald

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chiropractic profession has long considered itself to be a preventive science. Recently the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE has defined a set of standards that must be implemented at all US chiropractic colleges as of January of 2007. These are specific to wellness measures and health promoting efforts that should be performed by chiropractors. This will mandate traditional health promotion and prevention methods be taught to students at accredited colleges and to practicing chiropractors. Objective To present the idea of performing traditional health promotion and wellness-concepts in chiropractic practice as a call to action for clinicians and generate discussion on the topic. Discussion This manuscript discusses relevant topics of health promotion and prevention for chiropractors and other practicing clinicians that should be made priorities with patients in order to enhance both patient health and community and population health. Conclusion All practicing chiropractors, as well as other clinicians should take these new standards from the CCE as a call to action to begin helping patients address the removable causes of morbidity, disability and premature mortality where they exist, in addition to treating their painful spinal conditions.

  6. Prognostic factors for recurrences in neck pain patients up to 1 year after chiropractic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Anke; Humphreys, B Kim; Swanenburg, Jaap; Peterson, Cynthia K

    2015-09-01

    Information about recurrence and prognostic factors is important for patients and practitioners to set realistic expectations about the chances of full recovery and to reduce patient anxiety and uncertainty. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess recurrence and prognostic factors for neck pain in a chiropractic patient population at 1 year from the start of the current episode. Within a prospective cohort study, 642 neck pain patients were recruited by chiropractors in Switzerland. After a course of chiropractic therapy, patients were followed up for 1 year regarding recurrence of neck pain. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess prognostic factors for recurrent neck pain. The independent variables age, pain medication usage, sex, work status, duration of complaint, previous episodes of neck pain and trauma onset, numerical rating scale, and Bournemouth questionnaire for neck pain were analyzed. Prognostic factors that have been identified in previous studies to influence recovery of neck pain are psychologic distress, poor general health at baseline, and a previous history of pain elsewhere. Five hundred forty five patients (341 females), with a mean age of 42.1 years (SD, 13.1) completed the 1-year follow-up period. Fifty-four participants (11%) were identified as "recurrent." Prognostic factors associated with recurrent neck pain were previous episodes of neck pain and increasing age. The results of this study suggest that recurrence of neck pain within 1 year after chiropractic intervention in Swiss chiropractic patients presenting from varied onsets is low. This study found preliminary findings that older age and a previous episode of neck may be useful predictors of neck pain recurrence within 1 year. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Terapia manual no tratamento da espondilólise e espondilolistese: revisão de literatura Manual therapy for treating spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício José Jassi

    2010-12-01

    /listhesis, especially manual therapy, in order to guide practitioners for effective intervention. Results show that both manual therapy and conventional physiotherapy were effective in relieving low-back pain and beneficial for patient's functional outcome. Manual therapy involved spine manipulation, sacroiliac joint manipulation, muscle-energy techniques and stretching affected muscles. Stabilizing lombopelvic exercises, postural muscles strengthening, and hamstring and psoas stretching were also considered important in treating spondylolysis/listhesis. Each case's clinical and radiological features must be individually considered in order to determinate therapeutic strategy. Among non-surgical options, none has proved better than others and all may be included in symptomatic treatment of patients with spondylolysis/listhesis.

  8. Exercise, Manual Therapy, and Booster Sessions in Knee Osteoarthritis: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis From a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Allyn M; Smith, Kenneth J; Bise, Christopher G; Fritz, Julie M; Childs, John; Brennan, Gerard P; Abbott, J Haxby; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2018-01-01

    Limited information exists regarding the cost-effectiveness of rehabilitation strategies for individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The study objective was to compare the cost-effectiveness of 4 different combinations of exercise, manual therapy, and booster sessions for individuals with knee OA. This economic evaluation involved a cost-effectiveness analysis performed alongside a multicenter randomized controlled trial. The study took place in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Salt Lake City, Utah; and San Antonio, Texas. The study participants were 300 individuals taking part in a randomized controlled trial investigating various physical therapy strategies for knee OA. Participants were randomized into 4 treatment groups: exercise only (EX), exercise plus booster sessions (EX+B), exercise plus manual therapy (EX+MT), and exercise plus manual therapy and booster sessions (EX+MT+B). For the 2-year base case scenario, a Markov model was constructed using the United States societal perspective and a 3% discount rate for costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated to compare differences in cost per QALY gained among the 4 treatment strategies. In the 2-year analysis, booster strategies (EX+MT+B and EX+B) dominated no-booster strategies, with both lower health care costs and greater effectiveness. EX+MT+B had the lowest total health care costs. EX+B cost ${\\$}$1061 more and gained 0.082 more QALYs than EX+MT+B, for an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of ${\\$}$12,900/QALY gained. The small number of total knee arthroplasty surgeries received by individuals in this study made the assessment of whether any particular strategy was more successful at delaying or preventing surgery in individuals with knee OA difficult. Spacing exercise-based physical therapy sessions over 12 months using periodic booster sessions was less costly and more effective over 2 years than strategies not containing booster sessions for

  9. Efficacy of complete decongestive therapy and manual lymphatic drainage on treatment-related lymphedema in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, Rashmi; Dufan, Tarek; Russell, Catherine; Guenther, Wanda; Nugent, Zoan; Sun Xuyan; Cooke, Andrew L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results of combined decongestive therapy and manual lymphatic drainage in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. Methods and Materials: The data from 250 patients were reviewed. The pre- and posttreatment volumetric measurements were compared, and the correlation with age, body mass index, and type of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy was determined. The Spearman correlation coefficients and Wilcoxon two-sample test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 250 patients, 138 were included in the final analysis. The mean age at presentation was 54.3 years. Patients were stratified on the basis of the treatment modality used for breast cancer management. Lymphedema was managed with combined decongestive therapy in 55%, manual lymphatic drainage alone in 32%, and the home program in 13%. The mean pretreatment volume of the affected and normal arms was 2929 and 2531 mL. At the end of 1 year, the posttreatment volume of the affected arm was 2741 mL. The absolute volume of the affected arm was reduced by a mean of 188 mL (p < 0.0001). The type of surgery (p = 0.0142), age (p = 0.0354), and body mass index (p < 0.0001) were related to the severity of lymphedema. Conclusion: Combined decongestive therapy and manual lymphatic drainage with exercises were associated with a significant reduction in the lymphedema volume

  10. [History of conservative spinal therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kladny, B

    2015-12-01

    Hippocrates was the first to intensively describe and document the principles for the treatment of injuries and diseases of the spine. His principles for abrupt treatment of the "hunchback" were followed by physicians even up to the end of the nineteenth century. The non-operative treatment of scoliosis was improved in the beginning of the sixteenth century by the introduction of mechanical devices that started the development of corsets which are still in use in modern scoliosis treatment. Stretching beds were only in temporary use. With the beginning of the nineteenth century gymnastics and physiotherapy became more and more important. Manual therapy was exercised by physicians until the late Middle Ages. After a long period of time in which bonesetters and other laymen performed manual therapy it was professionalized at the end of the nineteenth century again by the introduction of osteopathy and chiropractic. In Germany the development and introduction of manual treatment started relatively late in the twentieth century, predominantly as manual medicine.

  11. Ted L. Shrader, D.C., F.I.C.C.: a gentle force for improvement in chiropractic. 1998 Lee-Homewood Chiropractic Heritage Award recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, B N; Johnson, C D; Keating, J C

    1998-06-01

    Long before technology assessment and continuous quality improvement were in vogue in chiropractic, Ted L. Shrader, D.C., F.I.C.C., was working toward these goals in the profession. Convinced that chiropractic must change from within for the benefit of society, Dr. Shrader has made a career-long commitment to evaluating chiropractic procedures and establishing consensus statements regarding chiropractic principle. Determined in mind, moral by nature, and unobtrusive in manner, Dr. Shrader has been decidedly effective in his endeavors. He has encouraged in chiropractic a mind for critical thinking. The fruits of his labor can be seen today in chiropractic publication, among chiropractic scholars, within the American Chiropractic Association Council on Technique, in conference proceedings, and in our institutions.

  12. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: • Acupressure and acupuncture • Aromatherapy • Art therapy and music therapyChiropractic medicine and massage • Guided imagery • Meditation and ... should I avoid? • Is this complementary therapy (name therapy) safe? Is there research showing it is safe? • Are there side effects ...

  13. Does manual therapy improve pain and function in patients with plantar fasciitis? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John J; Corbett, Revay; Donner, Chris; Hertel, Jay

    2018-05-01

    To assess if manual therapy (MT) in the treatment of plantar fasciitis (PF) patients improves pain and function more effectively than other interventions. A systematic review of all randomized control trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of MT in the treatment of human patients with PF, plantar fasciosis, and heel pain published in English on PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases was conducted. Research quality was appraised utilizing the PEDro scale. Cohen's d effect sizes (ES) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated between treatment groups. Seven RCTs were selected that employed MT as a primary independent variable and pain and function as dependent variables. Inclusion of MT in treatment yielded greater improvement in function (6 of 7 studies, CI that did not cross zero in 14 of 25 variables, ES = 0.5-21.5) and algometry (3 of 3 studies, CI that did not cross zero in 9 of 10 variables, ES = 0.7-3.0) from 4 weeks to 6 months when compared to interventions such as stretching, strengthening, or modalities. Though pain improved with the inclusion of MT, ES calculations favored MT in only 2 of 6 studies (3 of 13 variables) and was otherwise equivalent in effectiveness to comparison interventions. MT is clearly associated with improved function and may be associated with pain reduction in PF patients. It is recommended that clinicians consider use of both joint and soft tissue mobilization techniques in conjunction with stretching and strengthening when treating patients with PF. Treatment, level 1a.

  14. Osteopathic manual therapy in heart failure patients: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Sergio R; Teixeira, Felipe A; de Lima, Alexandra C G B; Cipriano Júnior, Gerson; Formiga, Magno F; Cahalin, Lawrence Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Heart Failure (HF) patients usually present with increased arterial resistance and reduced blood pressure (BP) leading to an impaired functional capacity. Osteopathic Manual Therapy (OMT) focused on myofascial release techniques (MRT) and in the balancing of diaphragmatic tensions, has been shown to improve blood flow in individuals using the resistive index (RI). However, its effects in HF patients have not been examined. To evaluate the acute response of selected osteopathic techniques on RI, heart rate (HR), and BP in patients with HF. Randomized-controlled clinical trial of HF patients assigned to MRT (six different techniques with three aimed at the pelvis, two at the thorax, and one at the neck for 15 min) or Control group (subjects in supine position for 15 min without intervention). The RI of the femoral, brachial and carotid arteries was measured via doppler ultrasound while HR and BP were measured via sphygmomanometry before and after a single MRT or control intervention. Twenty-two HF patients equally distributed (50% male, mean age 53 years; range 32-69 years) (ejection fraction = 35.6%, VO 2peak : 12.9 mL/kg -1 min -1 ) were evaluated. We found no intra or inter group differences in RI of the carotid (Δ MRT : 0.07% vs Δ Control :11.8%), brachial (Δ MRT :0.17% vs Δ Control : 2.9%), or femoral arteries (Δ MRT :1.65% vs Δ Control : 0.97%) (P > 0.05) and no difference in HR or BP (Δ MRT :0.6% vs Δ Control : 3%), (P > 0.05). A single MRT session did not significantly change the RI, HR, or BP of HF patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral Rehydration Therapy and the Control of Diarrheal Diseases. Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mari; And Others

    This manual was developed to train Peace Corps volunteers and other community health workers in oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and the control of diarrheal diseases. Using a competency-based format, the manual contains six training modules (organized in 22 sessions) that focus on interrelated health education and technical content areas. Each…

  16. Chiropractic and children: Is more research enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboeuf-Yde Charlotte

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many health science research and review articles end with the words: "More research is needed". However, when it comes to research, it is not as much a question of quantity as of quality. There are a number of important prerequisites before research should be initiated. The three pillars, relevance, quality and ethics should be respected but for a project to be meaningful, it must also be based on plausible rationale. In evidence-based (informed practice, one takes into account not only research-based evidence but also clinical expertise and the patients' perspectives. In this paper, we briefly discuss how this should be handled in clinical practice is briefly discussed, using the concept of "traffic lights" (red, yellow, green. We explain how the combination of evidence and plausibility can be used to reach a decision as to whether a treatment or diagnostic procedure is suitable, possible, or unsuitable. In this thematic series of Chiropractic & Osteopathy a number of reviews are presented, in which the research status of pediatric chiropractic is scrutinized and found wanting. Two important aspects were studied in these reviews: the effect of treatment and safety issues. Two types of problems were identified: the lack of research in general and the lack of research using the appropriate study designs and methodology in particular. Therefore, we discuss the meager research noted in the areas of chiropractic care in children and the clinical consequences this should have. The prerequisites for "more research" are scrutinized and an example given of suitable research programs. Finally, the important issue of implementation of research findings is covered, emphasizing the responsibility of all stakeholders involved at both the undergraduate and the postgraduate level, within professional associations, and on an individual level.

  17. The Effectiveness of Manual Therapy for Relieving Pain, Stiffness, and Dysfunction in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinguang; Chen, Bei; Wang, Yueyi; Wang, Xuezong; Han, Dapeng; Ding, Daofang; Zheng, Yuxin; Cao, Yuelong; Zhan, Hongsheng; Zhou, Yao

    2017-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is the most common form of arthritis, leading to pain disability in seniors and increased health care utilization. Manual therapy is one widely used physical treatment for KOA. To evaluate the effectiveness and adverse events (AEs) of manual therapy compared to other treatments for relieving pain, stiffness, and physical dysfunction in patients with KOA. A systematic review and meta-analysis of manual therapy for KOA. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and Chinese databases for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of manual therapy for patients with KOA from the inception to October 2015 without language restrictions. RCTs compared manual therapy to the placebo or other interventional control with an appropriate description of randomization. Two reviewers independently conducted the search results identification, data extraction, and methodological quality assessment. The methodological quality was assessed by PEDro scale. Pooled data was expressed as standard mean difference (SMD), with 95% confident intervals (CIs) in a random effects model. The meta-analysis of manual therapy for KOA on pain, stiffness, and physical function were conducted. Fourteen studies involving 841 KOA participants compared to other treatments were included. The methodological quality of most included RCTs was poor. The mean PEDro scale score was 6.6. The meta-analyses results showed that manual therapy had statistically significant effects on relieving pain (standardized mean difference, SMD = -0.61, 95% CI -0.95 to -0.28, P = 76%), stiffness (SMD = -0.58, 95% CI -0.95 to -0.21, P = 81%), improving physical function (SMD = -0.49, 95% CI -0.76 to -0.22, P = 65%), and total score (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI -0.78 to -0.35, P = 50%). But in the subgroups, manual therapy did not show significant improvements on stiffness and physical function when treatment duration was less than 4 weeks. And the long-term information for manual therapy was

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Application of Percutaneous Electrolysis as an Adjunct to Exercise and Manual Therapy for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Miguel-Valtierra, Lorena; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Arias-Buría, José L

    2018-05-16

    This randomized clinical trial compared the effects of adding US-guided percutaneous electrolysis into a program consisting of manual therapy and exercise on pain, related-disability, function and pressure sensitivity in subacromial pain syndrome. Fifty patients with subacromial pain syndrome were randomized into manual therapy and exercise or percutaneous electrolysis group. All patients received the same manual therapy and exercise program, one session per week for 5 consecutive weeks. Patients assigned to the electrolysis group also received the application of percutaneous electrolysis at each session. The primary outcome was Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH). Secondary outcomes included pain, function (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index-SPADI) pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and Global Rating of Change (GROC). They were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3, and 6 months after treatment. Both groups showed similar improvements in the primary outcome (DASH) at all follow-ups (P=0.051). Subjects receiving manual therapy, exercise, and percutaneous electrolysis showed significantly greater changes in shoulder pain (P0.91) for shoulder pain and function at 3 and 6 months in favour of the percutaneous electrolysis group. No between-groups differences in PPT were found. The current clinical trial found that the inclusion of US-guided percutaneous electrolysis in combination with manual therapy and exercise resulted in no significant differences for related-disability (DASH) than the application of manual therapy and exercise alone in patients with subacromial pain syndrome. Nevertheless, differences were reported for some secondary outcomes such as shoulder pain and function (SPADI). Whether or not these effects are reliable should be addressed in future studies Perspective This study found that the inclusion of US-guided percutaneous electrolysis into a manual therapy and exercise program resulted in no significant differences for disability

  19. Efficacy of Manual Therapy Including Neurodynamic Techniques for the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, Tomasz; Saulicz, Edward; Linek, Paweł; Shacklock, Michael; Myśliwiec, Andrzej

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this randomized trial was to compare the efficacy of manual therapy, including the use of neurodynamic techniques, with electrophysical modalities on patients with mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The study included 140 CTS patients who were randomly assigned to the manual therapy (MT) group, which included the use of neurodynamic techniques, functional massage, and carpal bone mobilizations techniques, or to the electrophysical modalities (EM) group, which included laser and ultrasound therapy. Nerve conduction, pain severity, symptom severity, and functional status measured by the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire were assessed before and after treatment. Therapy was conducted twice weekly and both groups received 20 therapy sessions. A baseline assessment revealed group differences in sensory conduction of the median nerve (P < .01) but not in motor conduction (P = .82). Four weeks after the last treatment procedure, nerve conduction was examined again. In the MT group, median nerve sensory conduction velocity increased by 34% and motor conduction velocity by 6% (in both cases, P < .01). There was no change in median nerve sensory and motor conduction velocities in the EM. Distal motor latency was decreased (P < .01) in both groups. A baseline assessment revealed no group differences in pain severity, symptom severity, or functional status. Immediately after therapy, analysis of variance revealed group differences in pain severity (P < .01), with a reduction in pain in both groups (MT: 290%, P < .01; EM: 47%, P < .01). There were group differences in symptom severity (P < .01) and function (P < .01) on the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Both groups had an improvement in functional status (MT: 47%, P < .01; EM: 9%, P < .01) and a reduction in subjective CTS symptoms (MT: 67%, P < .01; EM: 15%, P < .01). Both therapies had a positive effect on nerve conduction, pain reduction, functional status, and subjective symptoms in

  20. Additional Effect of Static Ultrasound and Diadynamic Currents on Myofascial Trigger Points in a Manual Therapy Program for Patients With Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; de Oliveira, Alessandra Kelly; Girasol, Carlos Eduardo; Dias, Fabiana Rodrigues Cancio; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2017-04-01

    To assess the additional effect of static ultrasound and diadynamic currents on myofascial trigger points in a manual therapy program to treat individuals with chronic neck pain. A single-blind randomized trial was conducted. Both men and women, between ages 18 and 45, with chronic neck pain and active myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius were included in the study. Subjects were assigned to 3 different groups: group 1 (n = 20) was treated with manual therapy; group 2 (n = 20) was treated with manual therapy and static ultrasound; group 3 (n = 20) was treated with manual therapy and diadynamic currents. Individuals were assessed before the first treatment session, 48 hours after the first treatment session, 48 hours after the tenth treatment session, and 4 weeks after the last session. There was no group-versus-time interaction for Numeric Rating Scale, Neck Disability Index, Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale, pressure pain threshold, cervical range of motion, and skin temperature (F-value range, 0.089-1.961; P-value range, 0.106-0.977). Moreover, we found no differences between groups regarding electromyographic activity (P > 0.05). The use of static ultrasound or diadynamic currents on myofascial trigger points in upper trapezius associated with a manual therapy program did not generate greater benefits than manual therapy alone.

  1. Effect of Adding Interferential Current in an Exercise and Manual Therapy Program for Patients With Unilateral Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cid André Fidelis de Paula; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Moreira, William Arruda; Rivas, Shirley Quispe; Silva, Emanuela Dos Santos; Garrido, Ana Claudia Bogik

    The purpose of this study was to measure the additional effect of adding interferential current (IFC) to an exercise and manual therapy program for patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Forty-five participants were randomly assigned to group 1 (exercise and manual therapy), group 2 (exercise and manual therapy + IFC), or group 3 (exercise and manual therapy + placebo ultrasound). Individuals participated in 16 treatment sessions, twice a week for 8 weeks. The primary outcome of the study was total score of the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI). The secondary outcomes were the pain and disability subscales of SPADI, Numeric Rating Scale, and Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale. Adjusted between-group mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using linear mixed models. After 16 treatment sessions, statistically significant but not clinically important differences were identified in favor of the exercise and manual therapy program alone in the SPADI-total (group 1 vs group 2, MD 11.12 points, 95% CI 5.90-16.35; group 1 vs group 3, MD 13.43 points, 95% CI 8.21-18.65). Similar results were identified for secondary outcomes. The addition of IFC does not generate greater clinical effects in an exercise and manual therapy program for individuals with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The effectiveness of manual physical therapy interventions in pediatric patients with anterior hip pain: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleher, Mindy; Crowe, Briana; Selhorst, Mitchell

    2017-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) assess the benefit of adding manual therapy (MT) to physical therapy care in pediatric patients with anterior hip pain; (2) assess the relative risk of adverse reactions when MT is used; and (3) report the types of MT used. This study was a retrospective chart review of patients treated in a hospital-based sports medicine clinic. The charts of 201 patients (mean age = 14.23 ± 2.15 years) met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Patients were grouped into those who received MT during their episode of care, and those who did not. Pain efficiency (change in pain/number of visits), number and type of adverse reactions, as well as frequency and type of manual therapy interventions used, were the outcomes of interest. The mean pain efficiency was significantly less if manual therapy was performed (MT = 0.60 [95% CI 0.47-0.72], no MT = 0.80 [95% CI 0.71-0.90] p  = 0.01). There was no significant difference between groups in risk of adverse reactions (MT = 5, no MT = 5). The number of visits was significantly different between groups (MT = 9.43 ± 3.9 sessions, and no MT = 7.6 ± 5.2 sessions). MT did not increase the risk of an adverse reaction in pediatric patients with anterior hip pain. While it appears to be a safe intervention, it did not improve pain efficiency or patient adherence. Future research should be performed to assess the effectiveness of MT, when performed by skilled therapists, in pediatric patients with hip pain in a controlled manner. Level of Evidence: 3b.

  3. Use of localized human growth hormone and testosterone injections in addition to manual therapy and exercise for lower back pain: a case series with 12-month follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubick MN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marc N Dubick,1 Thomas H Ravin,2 Yvonne Michel,3 David C Morrisette4 1Interventional Pain Management, Division of Anesthesiology, Bon Secours St Francis Hospital, Charleston, SC, USA; 2Musculoskeletal Medicine, Val d'Isere Health Clinic, Denver, CO, USA; 3Statistical Consultant, Private Practice, Daniel Island, SC, USA; 4Division of Physical Therapy, Medical University of South Carolina, SC, USA Objective: The objective of this case series was to investigate the feasibility and safety of a novel method for the management of chronic lower back pain. Injections of recombinant human growth hormone and testosterone to the painful and dysfunctional areas in individuals with chronic lower back pain were used. In addition, the participants received manual therapies and exercise addressing physical impairments such as motor control, strength, endurance, pain, and loss of movement. Pain ratings and self-rated functional outcomes were assessed.Study design: This is a case series involving consecutive patients with chronic lower back pain who received the intervention of injections of recombinant human growth hormone and testosterone, and attended chiropractic and/or physical therapy. Outcomes were measured at 12 months from the time of injection.Setting: A community based hospital affiliated office, and a private practice block suite.Participants: A total of 60 consecutive patients attending a pain management practice for chronic lower back pain were recruited for the experimental treatment. Most participants were private pay.Interventions: Participants who provided informed consent and were determined not to have radicular pain received diagnostic blocks. Those who responded favorably to the diagnostic blocks received injections of recombinant human growth hormone and testosterone in the areas treated with the blocks. Participants also received manipulation- and impairment-based exercises.Outcome measures: Outcomes were assessed at 12 months through pain

  4. Process versus outcome: challenges of the chiropractic wellness paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Eric G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to discuss the term wellness in the context of the philosophy of chiropractic. Discussion PubMed and Index to Chiropractic Literature show an upward trend in use of the term wellness. Wellness may be used differently depending upon the profession and may be considered a process by some and an outcome by others. Conclusion There appears to be no consensus on the definition of wellness or how it is being used. Wellness is not exclusive to chiropractic, and wellness is not synonymous with health, although is often used that way. Wellness is a societal trend, and chiropractic as a health care profession may be a good fit for this concept. PMID:22693468

  5. Treatment of a patient with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) with chiropractic manipulation and Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS): A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francio, Vinicius T; Boesch, Ron; Tunning, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative syndrome which unusual symptoms include deficits of balance, bodily orientation, chronic pain syndrome and dysfunctional motor patterns. Current research provides minimal guidance on support, education and recommended evidence-based patient care. This case reports the utilization of chiropractic spinal manipulation, dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS), and other adjunctive procedures along with medical treatment of PCA. A 54-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with non-specific back pain associated with visual disturbances, slight memory loss, and inappropriate cognitive motor control. After physical examination, brain MRI and PET scan, the diagnosis of PCA was recognized. Chiropractic spinal manipulation and dynamic neuromuscular stabilization were utilized as adjunctive care to conservative pharmacological treatment of PCA. Outcome measurements showed a 60% improvement in the patient's perception of health with restored functional neuromuscular pattern, improvements in locomotion, posture, pain control, mood, tolerance to activities of daily living (ADLs) and overall satisfactory progress in quality of life. Yet, no changes on memory loss progression, visual space orientation, and speech were observed. PCA is a progressive and debilitating condition. Because of poor awareness of PCA by physicians, patients usually receive incomplete care. Additional efforts must be centered on the musculoskeletal features of PCA, aiming enhancement in quality of life and functional improvements (FI). Adjunctive rehabilitative treatment is considered essential for individuals with cognitive and motor disturbances, and manual medicine procedures may be consider a viable option.

  6. Efficacy of manual therapy treatments for people with cervicogenic dizziness and pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Susan A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervicogenic dizziness is a disabling condition characterised by postural unsteadiness that is aggravated by cervical spine movements and associated with a painful and/or stiff neck. Two manual therapy treatments (Mulligan’s Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glides (SNAGs and Maitland’s passive joint mobilisations are used by physiotherapists to treat this condition but there is little evidence from randomised controlled trials to support their use. The aim of this study is to conduct a randomised controlled trial to compare these two forms of manual therapy (Mulligan glides and Maitland mobilisations to each other and to a placebo in reducing symptoms of cervicogenic dizziness in the longer term and to conduct an economic evaluation of the interventions. Methods Participants with symptoms of dizziness described as imbalance, together with a painful and/or stiff neck will be recruited via media releases, advertisements and mail-outs to medical practitioners in the Hunter region of NSW, Australia. Potential participants will be screened by a physiotherapist and a neurologist to rule out other causes of their dizziness. Once diagnosed with cervciogenic dizziness, 90 participants will be randomly allocated to one of three groups: Maitland mobilisations plus range-of-motion exercises, Mulligan SNAGs plus self-SNAG exercises or placebo. Participants will receive two to six treatments over six weeks. The trial will have unblinded treatment but blinded outcome assessments. Assessments will occur at baseline, post-treatment, six weeks, 12 weeks, six months and 12 months post treatment. The primary outcome will be intensity of dizziness. Other outcome measures will be frequency of dizziness, disability, intensity of cervical pain, cervical range of motion, balance, head repositioning, adverse effects and treatment satisfaction. Economic outcomes will also be collected. Discussion This paper describes the methods for a randomised

  7. The effect of manual therapy and neuroplasticity education on chronic low back pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Farrell, Kevin; Landers, Merrill; Barclay, Martin; Goodman, Elise; Gillund, Jordan; McCaffrey, Sara; Timmerman, Laura

    2017-12-01

    To determine if a neuroplasticity educational explanation for a manual therapy technique will produce a different outcome compared to a traditional mechanical explanation. Sixty-two patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) were recruited for the study. Following consent, demographic data were obtained as well as pain ratings for low back pain (LBP) and leg pain (Numeric Pain Rating Scale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index), fear-avoidance (Fear-Avoidance-Beliefs Questionnaire), forward flexion (fingertips-to-floor), and straight leg raise (SLR) (inclinometer). Patients were then randomly allocated to receive one of two explanations (neuroplasticity or mechanical), a manual therapy technique to their lumbar spine, followed by post-intervention measurements of LBP, leg pain, forward flexion, and SLR. Sixty-two patients (female 35 [56.5%]), with a mean age of 60.1 years and mean duration of 9.26 years of CLBP participated in the study. There were no statistically significant interactions for LBP ( p  = .325), leg pain ( p  = .172), and trunk flexion ( p  = .818) between the groups, but SLR showed a significant difference in favor of the neuroplasticity explanation ( p  = .041). Additionally, the neuroplasticity group were 7.2 times (95% confidence interval = 1.8-28.6) more likely to improve beyond the MDC on the SLR than participants in the mechanical group. The results of this study show that a neuroplasticity explanation, compared to a traditional biomechanical explanation, resulted in a measureable difference in SLR in patients with CLBP when receiving manual therapy. Future studies need to explore if the increase in SLR correlated to changes in cortical maps of the low back.

  8. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Mjøsund, Hanne L; Petersen, Ditte H D

    2010-01-01

    A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted) treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outco...... outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP....

  9. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mjøsund Hanne L

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP. Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, AMED and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were electronically searched, reference lists were examined and citation tracking performed. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLPB that used trial designs capable of providing robust information on targeted treatment (treatment effect modification for the outcomes of activity limitation and pain. Included trials needed to be hypothesis-testing studies published in English, Danish or Norwegian. Method quality was assessed using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Results Four high-quality randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLBP met the inclusion criteria. One study showed statistically significant effects for short-term outcomes using McKenzie directional preference-based exercise. Research into subgroups requires much larger sample sizes than traditional two-group trials and other included studies showed effects that might be clinically important in size but were not statistically significant with their samples sizes. Conclusions The clinical implications of these results are that they provide very cautious evidence supporting the notion that treatment targeted to subgroups of patients with NSLBP may improve patient outcomes. The results of the

  10. Evaluation of a treatment manual and workshops for disseminating, parent-child interaction therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschell, Amy D; McNeil, Cheryl B; Urquiza, Anthony J; McGrath, Jean M; Zebell, Nancy M; Timmer, Susan G; Porter, Alissa

    2009-01-01

    This study's main purposes were to: (a) evaluate a treatment manual as a dissemination strategy, (b) compare two workshop formats for evidence-based treatment (EBT) training, and (c) provide preliminary data on therapist characteristics potentially associated with successful EBT adoption. Forty-two community-based clinicians were assigned to one of two training groups (didactic or experiential). Behavior observation and self-report data were collected at four time points. Results suggest that reading a treatment manual is useful, but not sufficient. Experiential and didactic training were equally effective in increasing knowledge, skill, and satisfaction; however, after a 2-day training, few participants demonstrated mastery of skills.

  11. Effects of exercise and manual therapy on pain associated with hip osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Lucy; Wong, Jennie; Warden, Stuart J; Kemp, Joanne L; Foster, Paul; Crossley, Kay M

    2016-04-01

    To explore the effects of exercise (water-based or land-based) and/or manual therapies on pain in adults with clinically and/or radiographically diagnosed hip osteoarthritis (OA). A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed, with patient reported pain assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) or the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale. Data were grouped by follow-up time (0-3 months=short term; 4-12 months=medium term and; >12 months=long term), and standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% CIs were used to establish intervention effect sizes. Study quality was assessed using modified PEDro scores. 19 trials were included. Four studies showed short-term benefits favouring water-based exercise over minimal control using the WOMAC pain subscale (SMD -0.53, 95% CI -0.96 to -0.10). Six studies supported a short-term benefit of land-based exercise compared to minimal control on VAS assessed pain (SMD -0.49, 95% CI -0.70 to -0.29). There were no medium (SMD -0.23, 95% CI -0.48 to 0.03) or long (SMD -0.22, 95% CI -0.51 to 0.06) term benefits of exercise therapy, or benefit of combining exercise therapy with manual therapy (SMD -0.38, 95% CI -0.88 to 0.13) when compared to minimal control. Best available evidence indicates that exercise therapy (whether land-based or water-based) is more effective than minimal control in managing pain associated with hip OA in the short term. Larger high-quality RCTs are needed to establish the effectiveness of exercise and manual therapies in the medium and long term. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Third prize : A blinded randomized clinical trial of manual therapy and physiotherapy for chronic back and neck complaints: Physical outcome measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koes, B. W.; Bouter, L. M.; Van Mameren, H.; Essers, A. H M; Verstegen, G. M J R; Hofhuizen, D. M.; Houben, J. P.; Knipschild, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    In a blinded randomized clinical trial, we compared the effectiveness of manual therapy, physiotherapy, (continued) treatment by the general practitioner (GP), and a placebo therapy (detuned ultrasound and detuned short wave diathermy) for patients (n = 256) with chronic nonspecific back and neck

  13. The effectiveness of manual therapy, physiotherapy, and treatment by the general practitioner for nonspecific back and neck complaints : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koes, B. W.; Bouter, L. M.; Van Mameren, H.; Essers, A. H.; Verstegen, G. M.; Hofhuizen, D. M.; Houben, J. P.; Knipschild, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    In a randomized trial, the effectiveness of manual therapy, physiotherapy, continued treatment by the general practitioner, and placebo therapy (detuned ultrasound and detuned short-wave diathermy) were compared for patients (n = 256) with nonspecific back and neck complaints lasting for at least 6

  14. Pilot study: whole body manual subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) therapy improved pain and SAT structure in women with lipedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Karen L; Ussery, Christopher; Eekema, Alyna

    2017-09-20

    Background Lipedema is a common painful subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) disorder in women affecting the limbs. SAT therapy is a manual therapy to improve soft tissue quality. Objective Determine if SAT therapy improves pain and structure of lipedema SAT. Design Single arm prospective pilot study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients Seven women, 46 ± 5 years, weight 90 ± 19 kg, with lipedema. Intervention Twelve 90-min SAT therapy sessions over 4 weeks. Outcomes Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, SAT ultrasound (Vevo 2100), leg volumetrics, skin caliper assessment, tissue exam, weight, resting metabolic rate, pain assessment, lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) and body shape questionnaire (BSQ) at baseline and end of study. Results Weight, resting metabolic rate and BSQ did not change significantly. Limb fat over total body fat mass (p = 0.08) and trunk fat over total body mass trended down from baseline (p = 0.08) by DXA. Leg volume and caliper assessments in eight of nine areas (p < 0.007), LEFS (p = 0.002) and average pain (p = 0.007) significantly decreased from baseline. Fibrosis significantly decreased in the nodules, hips and groin. Ultrasound showed improved SAT structure in some subjects. Side effects included pain, bruising, itching, swelling and gastroesophageal reflux disease. All women said they would recommend SAT therapy to other women with lipedema. Limitations Small number of subjects. Conclusion SAT therapy in 4 weeks improved tissue structure, perceived leg function, and volume although shape was not affected. While side effects of SAT therapy were common, all women felt the therapy was beneficial.

  15. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 5. CPR, Oxygen Therapy. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the fifth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains two sections covering the following course content; cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (including artificial ventilation, foreign body obstructions, adjunctive equipment and special techniques, artificial…

  16. Articulatory Changes in Muscle Tension Dysphonia: Evidence of Vowel Space Expansion Following Manual Circumlaryngeal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nelson; Nissen, Shawn L.; Dromey, Christopher; Sapir, Shimon

    2009-01-01

    In a preliminary study, we documented significant changes in formant transitions associated with successful manual circumlaryngeal treatment (MCT) of muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), suggesting improvement in speech articulation. The present study explores further the effects of MTD on vowel articulation by means of additional vowel acoustic…

  17. Accuracy of computer-calculated and manual QRS duration assessments: Clinical implications to select candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pooter, Jan; El Haddad, Milad; Stroobandt, Roland; De Buyzere, Marc; Timmermans, Frank

    2017-06-01

    QRS duration (QRSD) plays a key role in the field of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Computer-calculated QRSD assessments are widely used, however inter-manufacturer differences have not been investigated in CRT candidates. QRSD was assessed in 377 digitally stored ECGs: 139 narrow QRS, 140 LBBB and 98 ventricular paced ECGs. Manual QRSD was measured as global QRSD, using digital calipers, by two independent observers. Computer-calculated QRSD was assessed by Marquette 12SL (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI, USA) and SEMA3 (Schiller, Baar, Switzerland). Inter-manufacturer differences of computer-calculated QRSD assessments vary among different QRS morphologies: narrow QRSD: 4 [2-9] ms (median [IQR]), p=0.010; LBBB QRSD: 7 [2-10] ms, p=0.003 and paced QRSD: 13 [6-18] ms, p=0.007. Interobserver differences of manual QRSD assessments measured: narrow QRSD: 4 [2-6] ms, p=non-significant; LBBB QRSD: 6 [3-12] ms, p=0.006; paced QRSD: 8 [4-18] ms, p=0.001. In LBBB ECGs, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were comparable for inter-manufacturer and interobserver agreement (ICC 0.830 versus 0.837). When assessing paced QRSD, manual measurements showed higher ICC compared to inter-manufacturer agreement (ICC 0.902 versus 0.776). Using guideline cutoffs of 130ms, up to 15% of the LBBB ECGs would be misclassified as <130ms or ≥130ms by at least one method. Using a cutoff of 150ms, this number increases to 33% of ECGs being misclassified. However, by combining LBBB-morphology and QRSD, the number of misclassified ECGs can be decreased by half. Inter-manufacturer differences in computer-calculated QRSD assessments are significant and may compromise adequate selection of individual CRT candidates when using QRSD as sole parameter. Paced QRSD should preferentially be assessed by manual QRSD measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Common Manual Therapy Practices in the Netherlands for Infants With Upper Cervical Dysfunction: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedt, Eric R I C; Driehuis, Femke; Hoogeboom, Thomas J; van der Woude, Bé H; de Bie, Rob A; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe common clinical practices of manual therapists (MTs) in the Netherlands for infants with indications of upper cervical dysfunction (UCD). A prospective observational cohort study was conducted to gain insight into characteristics, reasons for seeking care, and common clinical practice for infants (<27 weeks) with indications of UCD, referred to MTs. Pre- and posttreatment self-reported questionnaires were used to collect data from parents and MTs. Parents reported on infant characteristics and perceived effect of treatment. Manual therapists reported on diagnostics, therapeutic procedures, and outcomes. Between 2006 and 2007, data regarding 307 referred infants (mean age: 11.2 weeks) were collected by parents and 42 MTs. The most frequent reasons for seeking care were positional preference, restlessness, and/or abnormal head position. Manual therapists observed active, spontaneous, and provoked mobility and passive upper cervical mobility. Of the 307 infants, 295 were diagnosed with UCD based on positive outcomes on the flexion-rotation test and/or lateral flexion test. After treatment with mobilization techniques, positive outcomes on the flexion-rotation test decreased from 78.8% to 6.8%. For the lateral flexion test, the positive outcomes decreased from 91.5% to 6.2%. All parents perceived positive treatment effects. No serious adverse events were reported during this study. This is the first study to describe common clinical practice for infants referred for manual therapy. Infants with UCD were treated mainly with upper cervical mobilization techniques, and the greatest perceived effect was observed after approximately 2 treatment sessions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Acupuncture, chiropractic and osteopathy use in Australia: a national population survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Charlie CL; Zhang, Anthony L; Lin, Vivian; Myers, Ray; Polus, Barbara; Story, David F

    2008-01-01

    Background There have been no published national studies on the use in Australia of the manipulative therapies, acupuncture, chiropractic or osteopathy, or on matters including the purposes for which these therapies are used, treatment outcomes and the socio-demographic characteristics of users. Methods This study on the three manipulative therapies was a component of a broader investigation on the use of complementary and alternative therapies. For this we conducted a cross-sectional, population survey on a representative sample of 1,067 adults from the six states and two territories of Australia in 2005 by computer-assisted telephone interviews. The sample was recruited by random digit dialling. Results Over a 12-month period, approximately one in four adult Australians used either acupuncture (9.2%), chiropractic (16.1%) or osteopathy (4.6%) at least once. It is estimated that, adult Australians made 32.3 million visits to acupuncturists, chiropractors and osteopaths, incurring personal expenditure estimated to be A$1.58 billion in total. The most common conditions treated were back pain and related problems and over 90% of the users of each therapy considered their treatment to be very or somewhat helpful. Adverse events are reported. Nearly one fifth of users were referred to manipulative therapy practitioners by medical practitioners. Conclusion There is substantial use of manipulative therapies by adult Australians, especially for back-related problems. Treatments incur considerable personal expenditure. In general, patient experience is positive. Referral by medical practitioners is a major determinant of use of these manipulative therapies. PMID:18377663

  20. Manual Physical Therapy for Non-Surgical Treatment of Adhesion-Related Small Bowel Obstructions: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda D. Rice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesion formation is a widely acknowledged risk following abdominal or pelvic surgery. Adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis can cause or contribute to partial or total small bowel obstruction (SBO. These adhesions deter or prevent the passage of nutrients through the digestive tract, and may bind the bowel to the peritoneum, or other organs. Small bowel obstructions can quickly become life-threatening, requiring immediate surgery to resect the bowel, or lyse any adhesions the surgeon can safely access. Bowel repair is an invasive surgery, with risks including bowel rupture, infection, and peritonitis. An additional risk includes the formation of new adhesions during the healing process, creating the potential for subsequent adhesiolysis or SBO surgeries. Objective: Report the use of manual soft tissue physical therapy for the reversal of adhesion-related partial SBOs, and create an initial inquiry into the possibility of nonsurgical lysis of adhesions. Case Reports: Two patients presenting with SBO symptoms due to abdominal adhesions secondary to abdominal and pelvic surgery were treated with manual soft tissue physical therapy focused on decreasing adhesions. Conclusions: Successful treatment with resolution of symptom presentation of partial SBO and sustained results were observed in both patients treated.

  1. Does early change predict long-term (6 months) improvements in subjects who receive manual therapy for low back pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Chad; Petersen, Shannon; Donaldson, Megan; Wilhelm, Mark; Learman, Ken

    2017-09-01

    Early change is commonly assessed for manual therapy interventions and has been used to determine treatment appropriateness. However, current studies have only explored the relationship of between or within-session changes and short-/medium-term outcomes. The goal of this study was to determine whether pain changes after two weeks of pragmatic manual therapy could predict those participants with chronic low back pain who demonstrate continued improvements at 6-month follow-up. This study was a retrospective observational design. Univariate logistic regression analyses were performed using a 33% and a 50% pain change to predict improvement. Those who experienced a ≥33% pain reduction by 2 weeks had 6.98 (95% CI = 1.29, 37.53) times higher odds of 50% improvement on the GRoC and 4.74 (95% CI = 1.31, 17.17) times higher odds of 50% improvement on the ODI (at 6 months). Subjects who reported a ≥50% pain reduction at 2 weeks had 5.98 (95% CI = 1.56, 22.88) times higher odds of a 50% improvement in the GRoC and 3.99 (95% CI = 1.23, 12.88) times higher odds of a 50% improvement in the ODI (at 6 months). Future studies may investigate whether a change in plan of care is beneficial for patients who are not showing early improvement predictive of a good long-term outcome.

  2. Effect of manual therapy techniques on headache disability in patients with tension-type headache. Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, G V; Rodríguez-Blanco, C; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, A; Benítez-Martínez, J C; Lluch, E; Falla, D

    2014-12-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most common type of primary headache however there is no clear evidence as to which specific treatment is most effective or whether combined treatment is more effective than individual treatments. To assess the effectiveness of manual therapy techniques, applied to the suboccipital region, on aspects of disability in a sample of patients with tension-type headache. Randomized Controlled Trial. Specialized centre for headache treatment. Seventy-six (62 women) patients (age: 39.9 ± 10.9 years) with episodic chronic TTH. Patients were randomly divided into four treatment groups: 1) suboccipital soft tissue inhibition; 2) occiput-atlas-axis manipulation; 3) combined treatment of both techniques; 4) control. Four sessions were applied over 4 weeks and disability was assessed before and after treatment using the Headache Disability Inventory (HDI). Headache frequency, severity and the functional and emotional subscales of the questionnaire were assessed. Photophobia, phonophobia and pericranial tenderness were also monitored. Headache frequency was significantly reduced with the manipulative and combined treatment (Ptreatment groups (Ptreatment also reduced the score on the emotional subscale of the HDI (Ptreatments were combined, effectiveness was noted for all aspects of disability and other symptoms including photophobia, phonophobia and pericranial tenderness. Although individual manual therapy treatments showed a positive change in headache features, measures of photophobia, photophobia and pericranial tenderness only improved in the group that received the combined treatment suggesting that combined treatment is the most appropriate for symptomatic relief of TTH.

  3. [Critical care nurse learning of continuous renal replacement therapy: the efficacy of a self-learning manual].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Chen; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-02-01

    Many nurses have difficulty learning to use the complex, non-traditional, and regularly-updated critical care equipment. Failure to use such equipment properly can seriously compromise treatment and endanger patient health and lives. New self-learning materials for novice nurses are necessary to provide essential and effective guidance as a part of formal nursing training. Such materials can enhance the capabilities of critical care nurses and, thus, improve the general quality of critical care. The purpose of this research was to develop a continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT)-themed self-learning manual that would provide easily absorbed and understood knowledge in an easy-to-carry format for ICU nursing staff. This study also investigated CCRT skill learning efficacy. This study adopted a quasi-experimental design with pretests and posttests. Purposive sampling generated a sample of 66 critical care nurses currently working at one hospital in Taipei City. Participants submitted a completed self-assessment survey that rated their command of continuous renal replacement therapy before and after the self-learning manual intervention. Survey data were analyzed using SPSS Version 17.0 for Windows. The two major findings derived from the study included: (1) The mean response score from the self-assessment survey filled out after the intervention was 91.06 and 79.75 (SD = 9.49 and 11.65), respectively, for experimental and control groups. Such demonstrated significant difference. (2) The mean posttest score after the intervention for the experimental group was 91.06 ± 9.49. This represents a significant increase of 10.35 ± 10.35 over their mean pretest score (80.71 ± 11.82). The experimental group showed other significant differences in terms of the CRRT self-assessment survey posttest. Self-learning manuals may be introduced in nursing education as useful aids and catalysts to achieve more effective and satisfying learning experiences.

  4. The Effectiveness and Safety of Manual Therapy on Pain and Disability in Older Persons With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Katie E; Fang, Sheng Hung; Ong, Justin; Shin, Ki-Soo; Woods, Samuel; Tuchin, Peter J

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature of the effectiveness and safety of manual therapy interventions on pain and disability in older persons with chronic low back pain (LBP). A literature search of 4 electronic databases was performed (PubMed, EMBASE, OVID, and CINAHL). Inclusion criteria included randomized controlled trials of manual therapy interventions on older persons who had chronic LBP. Effectiveness was determined by extracting and examining outcomes for pain and disability, with safety determined by the report of adverse events. The PEDro scale was used for quality assessment of eligible studies. The search identified 405 articles, and 38 full-text articles were assessed. Four studies met the inclusion criteria. All trials were of good methodologic quality and had a low risk of bias. The included studies provided moderate evidence supporting the use of manual therapy to reduce pain levels and alleviate disability. A limited number of studies have investigated the effectiveness and safety of manual therapy in the management of older people with chronic LBP. The current evidence to make firm clinical recommendations is limited. Research with appropriately designed trials to investigate the effectiveness and safety of manual therapy interventions in older persons with chronic LBP is required. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. A study to evaluate the effect of manual therapy and exercise on the levator plate in women with pelvic organ prolapse.

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Maeve

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) symptoms, severity and pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength have been shown to improve significantly with pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). In this study, a new approach to conservative treatment of POP was investigated by the addition of manual physiotherapy to conventional PFMT. Aim & Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of internal manual therapy and PFMT on the levator plate angle (LPA) in women with stage I or I...

  6. Periosteal Electrical Dry Needling as an Adjunct to Exercise and Manual Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Multi-Center Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, James; Butts, Raymond; Young, Ian; Mourad, Firas; Galante, Victoria; Bliton, Paul; Tanner, Michelle; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2018-05-28

    To compare the effects of adding electrical dry needling into a manual therapy and exercise program on pain, stiffness, function, and disability in individuals with painful knee osteoarthritis (OA). Two hundred and forty-two participants (n=242) with painful knee OA were randomized to receive 6 weeks of electrical dry needling, manual therapy and exercise (n=121) or manual therapy and exercise (n=121). The primary outcome was related-disability as assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index at 3 months. Individuals receiving the combination of electrical dry needling, manual therapy and exercise experienced significantly greater improvements in related-disability (WOMAC: F=35.504; P0.82) for all outcome measures in favor of the electrical dry needling group at 3 months. The inclusion of electrical dry needling into a manual therapy and exercise program was more effective for improving pain, function and related-disability than the application of manual therapy and exercise alone in individuals with painful knee OA. Therapy, Level 1b. Prospectively registered February 10, 2015 on http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02373631)This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  7. Chiropractic and self-care for back-related leg pain: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Craig A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back-related leg pain (BRLP is a common variation of low back pain (LBP, with lifetime prevalence estimates as high as 40%. Often disabling, BRLP accounts for greater work loss, recurrences, and higher costs than uncomplicated LBP and more often leads to surgery with a lifetime incidence of 10% for those with severe BRLP, compared to 1-2% for those with LBP. In the US, half of those with back-related conditions seek CAM treatments, the most common of which is chiropractic care. While there is preliminary evidence suggesting chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy is beneficial for patients with BRLP, there is insufficient evidence currently available to assess the effectiveness of this care. Methods/Design This study is a two-site, prospective, parallel group, observer-blinded randomized clinical trial (RCT. A total of 192 study patients will be recruited from the Twin Cities, MN (n = 122 and Quad Cities area in Iowa and Illinois (n = 70 to the research clinics at WHCCS and PCCR, respectively. It compares two interventions: chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT plus home exercise program (HEP to HEP alone (minimal intervention comparison for patients with subacute or chronic back-related leg pain. Discussion Back-related leg pain (BRLP is a costly and often disabling variation of the ubiquitous back pain conditions. As health care costs continue to climb, the search for effective treatments with few side-effects is critical. While SMT is the most commonly sought CAM treatment for LBP sufferers, there is only a small, albeit promising, body of research to support its use for patients with BRLP. This study seeks to fill a critical gap in the LBP literature by performing the first full scale RCT assessing chiropractic SMT for patients with sub-acute or chronic BRLP using important patient-oriented and objective biomechanical outcome measures. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00494065

  8. Changes in co-contraction during stair descent after manual therapy protocol in knee osteoarthritis: A pilot, single-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Montecinos, Carlos; Flores-Cartes, Rodrigo; Montt-Rodriguez, Agustín; Pozo, Esteban; Besoaín-Saldaña, Alvaro; Horment-Lara, Giselle

    2016-10-01

    Manual therapy has shown clinical results in patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, the biomechanical aspects during functional tasks have not been explored in depth. Through surface electromyography, the medial and lateral co-contractions of the knee were measured while descending stairs, prior and posterior to applying a manual therapy protocol in the knee, with emphasis on techniques of joint mobilization and soft-tissue management. Sixteen females with slight or moderate knee osteoarthritis were recruited (eight experimental, eight control). It was observed that the lateral co-contraction index of the experimental group, posterior to intervention, increased by 11.7% (p = 0.014). The application of a manual therapy protocol with emphasis on techniques of joint mobilization and soft-tissue management modified lateral co-contraction, which would have a protective effect on the joint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of manual and manipulative therapy in the perception of pain and cervical motion in patients with tension-type headache: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma V; Gómez-Conesa, Antonia

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of manipulative and manual therapy treatments with regard to pain perception and neck mobility in patients with tension-type headache. A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 84 adults diagnosed with tension-type headache. Eighty-four subjects were enrolled in this study: 68 women and 16 men. Mean age was 39.76 years, ranging from 18 to 65 years. A total of 57.1% were diagnosed with chronic tension-type headache and 42.9% with tension-type headache. Participants were divided into 3 treatment groups (manual therapy, manipulative therapy, a combination of manual and manipulative therapy) and a control group. Four treatment sessions were administered during 4 weeks, with posttreatment assessment and follow-up at 1 month. Cervical ranges of motion pain perception, and frequency and intensity of headaches were assessed. All 3 treatment groups showed significant improvements in the different dimensions of pain perception. Manual therapy and manipulative treatment improved some cervical ranges of motion. Headache frequency was reduced with manipulative treatment (P treatment reported improvement after the treatment (P treatment and at follow-up with manipulative therapy (P treatment (P treatments, administered both separately and combined together, showed efficacy for patients with tension-type headache with regard to pain perception. As for cervical ranges of motion, treatments produced greater effect when separately administered.

  10. Ethics education in chiropractic colleges: a North American survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsinger, Stuart; Soave, David

    2012-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to survey Council on Chiropractic Education-accredited chiropractic colleges in North America and to describe curricular details on the teaching of bioethics. A custom-designed survey was sent to chiropractic colleges. Total number of contact hours, whether the ethics was a stand-alone course or integrated elsewhere, type of instructor, and if there was a required or recommended course text were queried. Of 19 surveys sent by mail, 15 surveys were returned. The average time in ethics instruction was 18.7 hours including lecture format, small group tutorial, and self-study. Chiropractic ethics education includes 8 areas of content (boundaries, law and jurisprudence, professionalism, basic ethic tenets/principles, ethical codes of conduct, prevention of financial and of sexual abuse, and resolving an ethical dilemma). Some colleges include content taught to students under the domain of law and jurisprudence. The results of this survey indicate that there are opportunities to further develop the educational ethics program at Council on Chiropractic Education-accredited colleges. All colleges currently offer bioethics teaching. An expanded role for this content is recommended so as to offer optimal benefit for students and practitioners. Copyright © 2012 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Case Study: Manual Therapy in Patient of 18 Years with Youthful Scoliosis Idiopathic Summary

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Monsalve, Claudia Yaneth; Guerra Corena, Zorika María; Otero Samudio, María Patricia

    2010-01-01

    La escoliosis es una desviación lateral de la columna vertebral desde la línea media, caracterizada por una curvatura lateral y por una rotación vertebral. Generalmente, es de carácter idiopático y se presenta, principalmente, en niñas adolescentes. Existen múltiples técnicas de tratamiento conservador para la escoliosis, entre las cuales se encuentran la terapia manual, que complementa el tratamiento para dicha patología. Esta terapia utiliza menos medios físicos, más manipulación de tejidos...

  12. Attitudes towards chiropractic: an analysis of written comments from a survey of north american orthopaedic surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busse Jason W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest by chiropractors in North America regarding integration into mainstream healthcare; however, there is limited information about attitudes towards the profession among conventional healthcare providers, including orthopaedic surgeons. Methods We administered a 43-item cross-sectional survey to 1000 Canadian and American orthopaedic surgeons that inquired about demographic variables and their attitudes towards chiropractic. Our survey included an option for respondants to include written comments, and our present analysis is restricted to these comments. Two reviewers, independantly and in duplicate, coded all written comments using thematic analysis. Results 487 surgeons completed the survey (response rate 49%, and 174 provided written comments. Our analysis revealed 8 themes and 24 sub-themes represented in surgeons' comments. Reported themes were: variability amongst chiropractors (n = 55; concerns with chiropractic treatment (n = 54; areas where chiropractic is perceived as effective (n = 43; unethical behavior (n = 43; patient interaction (n = 36; the scientific basis of chiropractic (n = 26; personal experiences with chiropractic (n = 21; and chiropractic training (n = 18. Common sub-themes endorsed by surgeon's were diversity within the chiropractic profession as a barrier to increased interprofessional collaboration, endorsement for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal complaints, criticism for treatment of non-musculoskeletal complaints, and concern over whether chiropractic care was evidence-based. Conclusions Our analysis identified a number of issues that will have to be considered by the chiropractic profession as part of its efforts to further integrate chiropractic into mainstream healthcare.

  13. A manual-based phenomenological art therapy for individuals diagnosed with moderate to severe depression (PATd): A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomdahl, Christina; Guregård, Suzanne; Rusner, Marie; Wijk, Helle

    2018-05-14

    This study investigated the effects of manual-based Phenomenological Art Therapy for individuals living with depression in addition to treatment as usual (PATd/TAU) compared with only treatment as usual (TAU) for individuals diagnosed with moderate to severe depression. 79 adults (men = 29.1%) were included in this randomized-controlled-trial (RCT), multicenter study in Sweden with an intention-to-treat design. Participants were randomized into either the PATd/TAU-group (n = 43) or TAU-group (n = 36). Data were collected at baseline and at end of treatment. The main outcomes were depression levels and self-esteem. Secondary outcomes were suicide ideation and sickness absence. The PATd/TAU-group showed a significant decrease of depression levels. The PATd/TAU-group returned to work to a higher degree than the TAU-group. Self-esteem significantly improved in both groups. Suicide ideation was unaffected. Manual-based PATd works as expected, being an effective treatment, and contributes to recovery for individuals with moderate to severe depression. This outcome needs to be confirmed and its long-term effects examined in further studies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Manual Intracardiac Electrogram Method Is Accurate Alternative to Echocardiography for Atrioventricular and Interventricular Optimization in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezo Nikolić, Borka; Lovrić, Daniel; Ljubas Maček, Jana; Rešković Lukšić, Vlatka; Matasić, Richard; Šeparović Hanževački, Jadranka

    2017-12-01

    Some manufacturers do not provide automated intracardiac electrogram method (IEGM) systems for atrioventricular (AV) and interventricular (VV) delay optimization in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of manual IEGM method in 48 patients previously implanted with Medtronic Syncra CRT. All patients underwent standard device interrogation followed by CRT optimization by IEGM method and by echocardiography one month after implantation. The patient mean age was 60.7±11.8 years and there were 33 (68.8%) males. After CRT implantation, the left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 28.0±7.9% to 39.1±11.0% (p<0.001). Optimal aortic flow Velocity Time Integral (aVTI) was obtained when VV was set to 20-50 ms left ventricular pre-activation. There was a strong correlation between VV values determined by echocardiography and IEGM (R=0.823, p<0.001). We found no significant difference in AV, VV and aVTI values between echocardiography and IEGM method. However, IEGM was significantly less time-consuming than echocardiography [20 (10-28) vs. 40 (35-60) minutes, p<0.001]. Manual IEGM method may be good alternative to echocardiography and automated IEGM method. It also emphasizes the need for implementation of automated IEGM systems in as many CRT devices as possible.

  15. Utilization of manual therapy to the lumbar spine in conjunction with traditional conservative care for individuals with bilateral lower extremity complex regional pain syndrome: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Zachary; Hernandez, Luis; Yake, Dale

    2018-06-06

    Conservative therapies for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) have traditionally focused on exercise and desensitization techniques targeted at the involved extremity. The primary purpose of this case series is to report on the potential benefit of utilizing manual therapy to the lumbar spine in conjunction with traditional conservative care when treating patients with lower extremity CRPS. Two patients with the diagnosis of lower extremity CRPS were treated with manual therapy to the lumbar spine in conjunction with education, exercise, desensitization, and soft tissue techniques for the extremity. Patient 1 received 13 sessions over 6 weeks resulting in a 34-point improvement in oswestry disability index (ODI) and 35-point improvement in lower extremity functional scale (LEFS). Patient 2 received 21 sessions over 12 weeks resulting in a 28-point improvement in ODI and a 41-point improvement in LEFS. Both patients exhibited reductions in pain and clinically meaningful improvements in function. Manual therapies when applied to the lumbar spine in these patients as part of a comprehensive treatment plan resulted in improved spinal mobility, decreased pain, and reduction is distal referred symptoms. Although one cannot infer a cause and effect relationship from a case series, this report identifies meaningful clinical outcomes potentially associated with manual physical therapy to the lumbar spine for two patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

  16. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Per Capita Supply of Doctors of Chiropractic and Opioid Use in Younger Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, William B; Goertz, Christine M

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the per-capita supply of doctors of chiropractic (DCs) or Medicare spending on chiropractic care was associated with opioid use among younger, disabled Medicare beneficiaries. Using 2011 data, at the hospital referral region level, we correlated the per-capita supply of DCs and spending on chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) with several measures of per-capita opioid use by younger, disabled Medicare beneficiaries. Per-capita supply of DCs and spending on CMT were strongly inversely correlated with the percentage of younger Medicare beneficiaries who had at least 1, as well as with 6 or more, opioid prescription fills. Neither measure was correlated with mean daily morphine equivalents per opioid user or per chronic opioid user. A higher per-capita supply of DCs and Medicare spending on CMT were inversely associated with younger, disabled Medicare beneficiaries obtaining an opioid prescription. However, neither measure was associated with opioid dosage among patients who obtained opioid prescriptions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Therapist adherence to manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy for anger management delivered to veterans with PTSD via videoconferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morland, Leslie A; Greene, Carolyn J; Grubbs, Kathleen; Kloezeman, Karen; Mackintosh, Margaret-Anne; Rosen, Craig; Frueh, B Christopher

    2011-06-01

    Therapist adherence to a manualized cognitive-behavioral anger management group treatment (AMT) was compared between therapy delivered via videoconference (VC) and the traditional in-person modality, using data from a large, randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of AMT for veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder. Therapist adherence was rated for the presence or absence of process and content treatment elements. Secondary analyses were conducted using a repeated measures ANOVA. Overall adherence to the protocol was excellent (M = 96%, SD = 1%). Findings indicate that therapist adherence to AMT is similar across delivery modalities and VC is a viable service delivery strategy that does not compromise a therapist's ability to effectively structure sessions and manage patient care. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Acute electromyographic responses of deep thoracic paraspinal muscles to spinal manual therapy interventions. An experimental, randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Gary; Bird, Michael; Robbins, Barry; Johnson, Jane C

    2017-07-01

    This single group, randomized, cross-over study explored whether manual therapy alters motor tone of deep thoracic back muscles by examining resting electromyographic activity (EMG) after 2 types of manual therapy and a sham control intervention. Twenty-two participants with thoracic spinal pain (15 females, 7 males, mean age 28.1 ± 6.4 years) had dual fine-wire, intramuscular electrodes inserted into deep transversospinalis muscles at a thoracic level where tissues appeared abnormal to palpation (AbP) and at 2 sites above and below normal and non-tender to palpation (NT). A surface electrode was on the contralateral paraspinal mass at the level of AbP. EMG signals were recorded for resting prone, two 3-s free neck extension efforts, two 3-s resisted maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC), and resting prone before the intervention. Randomized spinal manipulation, counterstrain, or sham manipulation was delivered and EMG re-measured. Participants returned 1 and 2 weeks later for the remaining 2 treatments. Reductions in resting EMG followed counterstrain in AbP (median decrease 3.3%, P = 0.01) and NT sites (median decrease 1.0%, P = 0.05) and for the surface electrode site (median decrease 2.0%, P = 0.009). Reduction in EMG following counterstrain during free neck extension was found for the surface electrode site (median decrease 2.7%, P < 0.01). Spinal manipulation produced no change in EMG, whereas counterstrain technique produced small significant reductions in paraspinal muscle activity during prone resting and free neck extension conditions. The clinical relevance of these changes is unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient education with or without manual therapy compared to a control group in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. A proof-of-principle three-arm parallel group randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, E; Hartvigsen, J; Christensen, H W

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a patient education (PE) program with or without the added effect of manual therapy (MT) compared to a minimal control intervention (MCI).......To investigate the effectiveness of a patient education (PE) program with or without the added effect of manual therapy (MT) compared to a minimal control intervention (MCI)....

  20. A randomized clinical trial of manual therapy and physiotherapy for persistent back and neck complaints : Subgroup analysis and relationship between outcome measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koes, B. W.; Bouter, L. M.; Van Mameren, H.; Essers, A. H M; Verstegen, G. J M G; Hofhuizen, D. M.; Houben, J. P.; Knipschild, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficacy of manual therapy and physiotherapy in subgroups of patients with persistent back and neck complaints. The second objective was to determine the correlation between three important outcome measures used in this trial. Design: Randomized clinical trial (subgroup

  1. The effectiveness and cost-evaluation of manual therapy and physical therapy in patients with sub-acute and chronic non specific neck pain. Rationale and design of a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Assen Luite

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manual Therapy applied to patients with non specific neck pain has been investigated several times. In the Netherlands, manual therapy as applied according to the Utrecht School of Manual Therapy (MTU has not been the subject of a randomized controlled trial. MTU differs in diagnoses and treatment from other forms of manual therapy. Methods/Design This is a single blind randomized controlled trial in patients with sub-acute and chronic non specific neck pain. Patients with neck complaints existing for two weeks (minimum till one year (maximum will participate in the trial. 180 participants will be recruited in thirteen primary health care centres in the Netherlands. The experimental group will be treated with MTU during a six week period. The control group will be treated with physical therapy (standard care, mainly active exercise therapy, also for a period of six weeks. Primary outcomes are Global Perceived Effect (GPE and functional status (Neck Disability Index (NDI-DV. Secondary outcomes are neck pain (Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, Eurocol, costs and quality of life (SF36. Discussion This paper presents details on the rationale of MTU, design, methods and operational aspects of the trial. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843

  2. Manual therapy and neurodynamic mobilization in a patient with peroneal nerve paralysis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Pillastrini, Paolo; Borboni, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe a therapeutic intervention for peroneal nerve paralysis involving the sciatic nerve. A 24-year-old man presented with peroneal nerve paralysis with decreased sensation, severe pain in the popliteal fossa, and steppage gait, which occurred 3 days prior to the consultation. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography confirmed lumbar disk herniation with sciatic common peroneal nerve entrapment in the popliteal fossa. A combined treatment protocol of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization including soft tissue work of the psoas and hamstring muscles was performed. Outcome measures were assessed at pretreatment, 1 week posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up and included numeric pain rating scale, range of motion, pressure pain threshold, and manual muscle testing. Treatment interventions were applied for 3 sessions over a period of 1 week. Results showed reduction of the patient's subjective pain and considerable improvement in range of motion, strength, and sensation in his left foot, which was restored to full function. A combined program of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization reduced pain, increased range of motion and strength, and restored full function to the left leg in this patient who had severe functional impairment related to a compressed left common peroneal nerve.

  3. Assessment of Robotic Patient Simulators for Training in Manual Physical Therapy Examination Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shun; Okamoto, Shogo; Isogai, Kaoru; Akiyama, Yasuhiro; Yanagihara, Naomi; Yamada, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Robots that simulate patients suffering from joint resistance caused by biomechanical and neural impairments are used to aid the training of physical therapists in manual examination techniques. However, there are few methods for assessing such robots. This article proposes two types of assessment measures based on typical judgments of clinicians. One of the measures involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different severities of a specified disease. Experienced clinicians were requested to rate the simulated symptoms in terms of severity, and the consistency of their ratings was used as a performance measure. The other measure involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different types of symptoms. In this case, the clinicians were requested to classify the simulated resistances in terms of symptom type, and the average ratios of their answers were used as performance measures. For both types of assessment measures, a higher index implied higher agreement among the experienced clinicians that subjectively assessed the symptoms based on typical symptom features. We applied these two assessment methods to a patient knee robot and achieved positive appraisals. The assessment measures have potential for use in comparing several patient simulators for training physical therapists, rather than as absolute indices for developing a standard. PMID:25923719

  4. Assessment of robotic patient simulators for training in manual physical therapy examination techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Robots that simulate patients suffering from joint resistance caused by biomechanical and neural impairments are used to aid the training of physical therapists in manual examination techniques. However, there are few methods for assessing such robots. This article proposes two types of assessment measures based on typical judgments of clinicians. One of the measures involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different severities of a specified disease. Experienced clinicians were requested to rate the simulated symptoms in terms of severity, and the consistency of their ratings was used as a performance measure. The other measure involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different types of symptoms. In this case, the clinicians were requested to classify the simulated resistances in terms of symptom type, and the average ratios of their answers were used as performance measures. For both types of assessment measures, a higher index implied higher agreement among the experienced clinicians that subjectively assessed the symptoms based on typical symptom features. We applied these two assessment methods to a patient knee robot and achieved positive appraisals. The assessment measures have potential for use in comparing several patient simulators for training physical therapists, rather than as absolute indices for developing a standard.

  5. Assessment of robotic patient simulators for training in manual physical therapy examination techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shun; Okamoto, Shogo; Isogai, Kaoru; Akiyama, Yasuhiro; Yanagihara, Naomi; Yamada, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Robots that simulate patients suffering from joint resistance caused by biomechanical and neural impairments are used to aid the training of physical therapists in manual examination techniques. However, there are few methods for assessing such robots. This article proposes two types of assessment measures based on typical judgments of clinicians. One of the measures involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different severities of a specified disease. Experienced clinicians were requested to rate the simulated symptoms in terms of severity, and the consistency of their ratings was used as a performance measure. The other measure involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different types of symptoms. In this case, the clinicians were requested to classify the simulated resistances in terms of symptom type, and the average ratios of their answers were used as performance measures. For both types of assessment measures, a higher index implied higher agreement among the experienced clinicians that subjectively assessed the symptoms based on typical symptom features. We applied these two assessment methods to a patient knee robot and achieved positive appraisals. The assessment measures have potential for use in comparing several patient simulators for training physical therapists, rather than as absolute indices for developing a standard.

  6. Manual therapy, exercise therapy or combined treatment in the management of adult neck pain - A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredin, Ken; Lorås, Håvard

    2017-10-01

    Neck pain is a common and often disabling musculoskeletal condition. Two therapies frequently prescribed for its management are manual therapy (MT) and exercise therapy (ET), and combining these treatment approaches are common. To assess whether or not combined treatment consisting of MT and ET is more effective than either therapy alone in relieving pain and improving function in adult patients with grade I-II neck pain. Systematic review with meta-analysis. A systematic search on EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED, CENTRAL and PEDro were performed until June 2017. Randomized controlled trials with adult grade I-II neck pain patients were included if they investigated the combined effect of MT and ET to the same ET or MT alone, and reported pain intensity or disability on numerical scales. Quality of life was assessed as a secondary outcome. Quality of the included trials was assessed with the PEDro scale, and the quality of evidence was assessed with GRADE. 1169 articles were screened, and 7 studies were included, all of which investigated the addition of ET to MT. Only very small and non-significant between group differences was found on pain intensity at rest, neck disability, and quality of life at immediate post-treatment, 6 months, and 12 months follow-up. The quality of evidence was moderate for pain-at-rest outcomes and moderate too low for neck disability and quality of life outcomes. Combined treatment consisting of MT and ET does not seem to be more effective in reducing neck pain intensity at rest, neck disability or improving quality of life in adult patients with grade I-II neck pain, than ET alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The role and position of passive intervertebral motion assessment within clinical reasoning and decision-making in manual physical therapy: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Trijffel, Emiel; Plochg, Thomas; van Hartingsveld, Frank; Lucas, Cees; Oostendorp, Rob A B

    2010-06-01

    Passive intervertebral motion (PIVM) assessment is a characterizing skill of manual physical therapists (MPTs) and is important for judgments about impairments in spinal joint function. It is unknown as to why and how MPTs use this mobility testing of spinal motion segments within their clinical reasoning and decision-making. This qualitative study aimed to explore and understand the role and position of PIVM assessment within the manual diagnostic process. Eight semistructured individual interviews with expert MPTs and three subsequent group interviews using manual physical therapy consultation platforms were conducted. Line-by-line coding was performed on the transcribed data, and final main themes were identified from subcategories. Three researchers were involved in the analysis process. Four themes emerged from the data: contextuality, consistency, impairment orientedness, and subjectivity. These themes were interrelated and linked to concepts of professionalism and clinical reasoning. MPTs used PIVM assessment within a multidimensional, biopsychosocial framework incorporating clinical data relating to mechanical dysfunction as well as to personal factors while applying various clinical reasoning strategies. Interpretation of PIVM assessment and subsequent decisions on manipulative treatment were strongly rooted within practitioners' practical knowledge. This study has identified the specific role and position of PIVM assessment as related to other clinical findings within clinical reasoning and decision-making in manual physical therapy in The Netherlands. We recommend future research in manual diagnostics to account for the multivariable character of physical examination of the spine.

  8. Systematic Clinical Reasoning in Physical Therapy (SCRIPT): Tool for the Purposeful Practice of Clinical Reasoning in Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sarah E; Painter, Elizabeth E; Morgan, Brandon C; Kaus, Anna L; Petersen, Evan J; Allen, Christopher S; Deyle, Gail D; Jensen, Gail M

    2017-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is essential to physical therapist practice. Solid clinical reasoning processes may lead to greater understanding of the patient condition, early diagnostic hypothesis development, and well-tolerated examination and intervention strategies, as well as mitigate the risk of diagnostic error. However, the complex and often subconscious nature of clinical reasoning can impede the development of this skill. Protracted tools have been published to help guide self-reflection on clinical reasoning but might not be feasible in typical clinical settings. This case illustrates how the Systematic Clinical Reasoning in Physical Therapy (SCRIPT) tool can be used to guide the clinical reasoning process and prompt a physical therapist to search the literature to answer a clinical question and facilitate formal mentorship sessions in postprofessional physical therapist training programs. The SCRIPT tool enabled the mentee to generate appropriate hypotheses, plan the examination, query the literature to answer a clinical question, establish a physical therapist diagnosis, and design an effective treatment plan. The SCRIPT tool also facilitated the mentee's clinical reasoning and provided the mentor insight into the mentee's clinical reasoning. The reliability and validity of the SCRIPT tool have not been formally studied. Clinical mentorship is a cornerstone of postprofessional training programs and intended to develop advanced clinical reasoning skills. However, clinical reasoning is often subconscious and, therefore, a challenging skill to develop. The use of a tool such as the SCRIPT may facilitate developing clinical reasoning skills by providing a systematic approach to data gathering and making clinical judgments to bring clinical reasoning to the conscious level, facilitate self-reflection, and make a mentored physical therapist's thought processes explicit to his or her clinical mentor. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  9. Adherence and competence in two manual-guided therapies for co-occurring substance use and posttraumatic stress disorders: clinician factors and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Andrea; McGovern, Mark P; Lambert-Harris, Chantal; McLeman, Bethany; Franklin, Anna; Saunders, Elizabeth C; Xie, Haiyi

    2015-01-01

    The challenges of implementing and sustaining evidence-based therapies into routine practice have been well-documented. This study examines the relationship among clinician factors, quality of therapy delivery, and patient outcomes. Within a randomized controlled trial, 121 patients with current co-occurring substance use and posttraumatic stress disorders were allocated to receive either manualized Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (ICBT) or Individual Addiction Counseling (IAC). Twenty-two clinicians from seven addiction treatment programs were trained and supervised to deliver both therapies. Clinician characteristics were assessed at baseline; clinician adherence and competence were assessed over the course of delivering both therapies; and patient outcomes were measured at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Although ICBT was delivered at acceptable levels, clinicians were significantly more adherent to IAC (p drug problem severity. The differential impact of adherence and competence for both therapy types is consistent with their purported primary target: ICBT for PTSD and IAC for substance use. These findings also suggest the benefits of considering clinician factors when implementing manual-guided therapies. Future research should focus on diverse clinician samples, randomization of clinicians to therapy type, and prospective designs to evaluate models of supervision and quality monitoring.

  10. The first research agenda for the chiropractic profession in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubinstein, Sidney M; Bolton, Jenni; Webb, Alexandra L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research involving chiropractors is evolving and expanding in Europe while resources are limited. Therefore, we considered it timely to initiate a research agenda for the chiropractic profession in Europe. The aim was to identify and suggest priorities for future research in order to ...

  11. The chiropractic profession in Denmark 2010-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Orla Lund; Kongsted, Alice; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The chiropractic profession has been well established in Denmark for several decades with state authorization, partial reimbursement by the state and a formal academic education. Biennial systematic data collections among all chiropractors and clinics have been performed since 2010 in...

  12. Prevalence of hip osteoarthritis in chiropractic practice in denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Christensen, Henrik W; Overgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the prevalence of clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA) and first-time diagnosis of hip OA in consecutive patients presenting to chiropractic practices in Denmark and to report the components of the initial treatment rendered...

  13. The self-concept of chiropractic students as science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Robert F.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To determine the self-concepts of chiropractic students as science students and if any personal variable affect their self-concepts. Participants Students in their first trimester and eighth trimester at the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic during the 1993 academic year (n=158). Methods Peterson-Yaakobi Q-Sort, National Assessment of Educational Progress, two-tailed T-test, one way analysis of variance and Spearman-rho correlation. Results The majority of students have positive self- concepts as science students and although there was a difference between the 2 trimesters, it was not significant. As a group they generally had less exposure to science compared to undergraduates from a selected science program. Variables of socio-economic status, undergraduate major, and highest completed level of education did not statistically affect their self-concept. Conclusion Chiropractic students had the self-concept that enables them to subscribe to the philosophical foundations of science and better engage in basic sciences and, later, science-based clinical research. Knowledge of this self- concept can be used in the development of a more rigorous basic science curricula and clinical research programs at chiropractic colleges with the ultimate goal of providing a more firm scientifically based foundation for the profession. PMID:19674649

  14. Chiropractic management of patients post-disc arthroplasty: eight case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descarreaux Martin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When conservative therapies for low back pain (LBP are not effective, elective surgery may be proposed to these patients. Over the last 20 years, a new technology, disc replacement, has become increasingly popular because it is believed to maintain or restore the integrity of spinal movement and minimize the side-effects compared to fusion. Although disc replacement may relieve a patient from pain and related disability, soreness and stiffness of the lumbopelvic region seem to be common aftermaths of the surgery. This prospective case series was undertaken to identify and describe potential adverse events of lumbar spinal manipulation, a common therapy for low back pain, in a group of patients with symptoms after disc prostheses. Cases presentation Eight patients who underwent lumbar spine total disc replacement were referred by an orthopaedic surgeon for chiropractic treatments. These patients had 1 or 2 total lumbar disc replacements and were considered stable according to the surgical protocol but presented persistent, post-surgical, non-specific LBP or pelvic pain. They were treated with lumbar spine side posture manipulations only and received 8 to 10 chiropractic treatments based on the clinical evolution and the chiropractor's judgment. Outcome measures included benign, self-limiting, and serious adverse events after low back spinal manipulative therapy. The Oswestry Disability Index, a pain scale and the fear avoidance belief questionnaire were administered to respectively assess disability, pain and fear avoidance belief about work and physical activity. This prospective case series comprised 8 patients who all had at least 1 total disc replacement at the L4/L5 or L5/S1 level and described persistent post-surgical LBP interfering with their daily activities. Commonly-reported side-effects of a benign nature included increased pain and/or stiffness of short duration in nearly half of the chiropractic treatment period

  15. Anger Management for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Clients: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Manual [and] Participant Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Patrick M.; Shopshire, Michael S.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Campbell, Torri A.

    This manual and workbook set focuses on anger management. The manual was designed for use by qualified substance abuse and mental health clinicians who work with substance abuse and mental health clients with concurrent anger programs. The manual describes a 12-week cognitive behavioral anger management group treatment. Each of the 12 90-minute…

  16. Chiropractic Health Care: A National Study of Cost of Education, Service Utilization, Number of Practicing Doctors of Chiropractic, and Other Key Policy Issues. Volumes I-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kuster, Thomas, Jr.

    Results from the first federally sponsored study of the chiropractic health care profession are presented, and a broad range of facts and issues of concern to policy-makers, the profession, and the public are described. The two-year project included three national surveys of: service providers (doctors of chiropractic in practice more than two…

  17. MSCT follow-up in malignant lymphoma. Comparison of manual linear measurements with semi-automated lymph node analysis for therapy response classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessling, J.; Puesken, M.; Kohlhase, N.; Persigehl, T.; Mesters, R.; Heindel, W.; Buerke, B.; Koch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Assignment of semi-automated lymph node analysis compared to manual measurements for therapy response classification of malignant lymphoma in MSCT. Materials and Methods: MSCT scans of 63 malignant lymphoma patients before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy (307 target lymph nodes) were evaluated. The long axis diameter (LAD), short axis diameter (SAD) and bi-dimensional WHO were determined manually and semi-automatically. The time for manual and semi-automatic segmentation was evaluated. The ref. standard response was defined as the mean relative change across all manual and semi-automatic measurements (mean manual/semi-automatic LAD, SAD, semi-automatic volume). Statistical analysis encompassed t-test and McNemar's test for clustered data. Results: Response classification per lymph node revealed semi-automated volumetry and bi-dimensional WHO to be significantly more accurate than manual linear metric measurements. Response classification per patient based on RECIST revealed more patients to be correctly classified by semi-automatic measurements, e.g. 96.0 %/92.9 % (WHO bi-dimensional/volume) compared to 85.7/84.1 % for manual LAD and SAD, respectively (mean reduction in misclassified patients of 9.95 %). Considering the use of correction tools, the time expenditure for lymph node segmentation (29.7 ± 17.4 sec) was the same as with the manual approach (29.1 ± 14.5 sec). Conclusion: Semi-automatically derived 'lymph node volume' and 'bi-dimensional WHO' significantly reduce the number of misclassified patients in the CT follow-up of malignant lymphoma by at least 10 %. However, lymph node volumetry does not outperform bi-dimensional WHO. (orig.)

  18. MSCT follow-up in malignant lymphoma. Comparison of manual linear measurements with semi-automated lymph node analysis for therapy response classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessling, J.; Puesken, M.; Kohlhase, N.; Persigehl, T.; Mesters, R.; Heindel, W.; Buerke, B. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Koch, R. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Biostatistics and Clinical Research

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Assignment of semi-automated lymph node analysis compared to manual measurements for therapy response classification of malignant lymphoma in MSCT. Materials and Methods: MSCT scans of 63 malignant lymphoma patients before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy (307 target lymph nodes) were evaluated. The long axis diameter (LAD), short axis diameter (SAD) and bi-dimensional WHO were determined manually and semi-automatically. The time for manual and semi-automatic segmentation was evaluated. The ref. standard response was defined as the mean relative change across all manual and semi-automatic measurements (mean manual/semi-automatic LAD, SAD, semi-automatic volume). Statistical analysis encompassed t-test and McNemar's test for clustered data. Results: Response classification per lymph node revealed semi-automated volumetry and bi-dimensional WHO to be significantly more accurate than manual linear metric measurements. Response classification per patient based on RECIST revealed more patients to be correctly classified by semi-automatic measurements, e.g. 96.0 %/92.9 % (WHO bi-dimensional/volume) compared to 85.7/84.1 % for manual LAD and SAD, respectively (mean reduction in misclassified patients of 9.95 %). Considering the use of correction tools, the time expenditure for lymph node segmentation (29.7 {+-} 17.4 sec) was the same as with the manual approach (29.1 {+-} 14.5 sec). Conclusion: Semi-automatically derived 'lymph node volume' and 'bi-dimensional WHO' significantly reduce the number of misclassified patients in the CT follow-up of malignant lymphoma by at least 10 %. However, lymph node volumetry does not outperform bi-dimensional WHO. (orig.)

  19. The Influence of an Orthopedic, Manual Therapy Residency Program on Improved Knowledge, Psychomotor Skills, and Clinical Reasoning in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shala; McFelea, Joni

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency program in Kenya on the development of physical therapists' (PTs) knowledge and clinical reasoning related to the performance of a musculoskeletal examination and evaluation as compared to an experience-matched control group of PTs waiting to enter the program. A cross-sectional design was utilized in which 12 graduating residents and 10 PTs entering the residency program completed a live-patient practical examination to assess the knowledge, clinical reasoning, and psychomotor skills related to the examination and evaluation of musculoskeletal conditions. The assessment utilized was based on the tasks, procedures, and knowledge areas identified as important to advanced clinicians in the US as outlined by the Orthopaedic Description of Specialty Practice. Inclusion criteria included participation in or acceptance to the residency program, practice as a PT between 3 and 25 years, and 50% of workday being involved in direct patient care. Overall pass rates were analyzed using the Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to determine if the graduating residents achieved significantly higher scores than experience-matched controls consisting of PTs entering the residency program. PTs completing a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency in Nairobi, Kenya, achieved higher scores and passing rates compared to their colleagues who had not completed a residency program as determined by a live-patient practical examination. Graduating residents demonstrated statistically significant higher scores in the categories of examination, evaluation, and diagnosis. The average live-patient practical examination score for PTs without residency training was 38.2%, and their pass rate was 0.0%. The average live-patient practical examination score for residency-trained PTs was 83.4%, and their pass rate was 92.3%. These findings are statistically significant ( p

  20. Mexican Sobadores in North Carolina: Manual Therapy in a New Settlement Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, Sara A; Sandberg, Joanne C; Graham, Alan; Mora, Dana C; Stub, Trine; Arcury, Thomas A

    2017-10-01

    Latino immigrants to the New Settlement area of the southeastern United States face structural and cultural obstacles to accessing the conventional health care system, and come from areas with long traditions of medical treatments from healers without professional training or licensure. Little is known about the use of such healers in New Settlement areas. This study focuses on sobadores, healers who use manipulative therapy. Goals were to describe sobadores practicing in North Carolina, including their background, conditions treated, and their understanding of the pathophysiology of their patients' conditions and how their treatments work. The paper also describes who sobadores treat and sobadores' understanding of where their treatment fits into patients' pursuit of relief from symptoms. This focused ethnography draws from in-depth, semi-structured interviews conducted with six sobadores from Mexico practicing in North Carolina. These sobadores appear to meet both structural and cultural needs for healthcare in the immigrant Latino population.

  1. Traditional manual acupuncture combined with rehabilitation therapy for shoulder hand syndrome after stroke within the Chinese healthcare system: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Le; Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Lan; Zuo, Hong-Xia; He, Xiao-Kuo; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of traditional manual acupuncture combined with rehabilitation therapy versus rehabilitation therapy alone for shoulder hand syndrome after stroke. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedicine Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Information Database, Wan Fang Database and reference lists of the eligible studies were searched up to July 2017 for relevant studies. Randomized controlled trials that compared the combined effects of traditional manual acupuncture and rehabilitation therapy to rehabilitation therapy alone for shoulder hand syndrome after stroke were included. Two reviewers independently screened the searched records, extracted the data and assessed risk of bias of the included studies. The treatment effect sizes were pooled in a meta-analysis using RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 20 studies involving 1918 participants were included in this study. Compared to rehabilitation therapy alone, the combined therapy significantly reduced pain on the visual analogue scale and improved limb movement on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale and the performance of activities of daily living (ADL) on the Barthel Index scale or Modified Barthel Index scale. Of these, the visual analogue scale score changes were significantly higher (mean difference = 1.49, 95% confidence interval = 1.15-1.82, P < 0.00001) favoring the combined therapy after treatment, with severe heterogeneity ( I 2  = 71%, P = 0.0005). Current evidence suggests that traditional manual acupuncture integrated with rehabilitation therapy is more effective in alleviating pain, improving limb movement and ADL. However, considering the relatively low quality of available evidence, further rigorously designed and large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the results.

  2. Degree of vertical integration between the undergraduate program and clinical internship with respect to cervical and cranial diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught at the canadian memorial chiropractic college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppington, Charmody; Gleberzon, Brian; Fortunato, Lisa; Doucet, Nicolea; Vandervalk, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cervical and cranial spine taught to students during the undergraduate program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College are required to be used during their internship by their supervising clinicians and, if so, to what extent these procedures are used. Course manuals and course syllabi from the Applied Chiropractic and Clinical Diagnosis faculty of the undergraduate chiropractic program for the academic year 2009-2010 were consulted and a list of all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cranial and cervical spine was compiled. This survey asked clinicians to indicate if they themselves used or if they required the students they were supervising to use each procedure listed and, if so, to what extent each procedure was used. Demographic information of each clinician was also obtained. In general, most diagnostic procedures of the head and neck were seldom used, with the exception of postural observation and palpation. By contrast, most cervical orthopaedic tests were often used, with the exception of tests for vertigo. Most therapeutic procedures were used frequently with the exception of prone cervical and "muscle" adjustments. There was a low degree of vertical integration for cranial procedures as compared to a much higher degree of vertical integration for cervical procedures between the undergraduate and clinical internship programs taught. Vertical integration is an important element of curricular planning and these results may be helpful to aid educators to more appropriately allocate classroom instruction.

  3. Australian chiropractic sports medicine: half way there or living on a prayer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragasevic George

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sports chiropractic within Australia has a chequered historical background of unorthodox individualistic displays of egocentric treatment approaches that emphasise specific technique preference and individual prowess rather than standardised evidence based management. This situation has changed in recent years with the acceptance of many within sports chiropractic to operate under an evidence informed banner and to embrace a research culture. Despite recent developments within the sports chiropractic movement, the profession is still plagued by a minority of practitioners continuing to espouse certain marginal and outlandish technique systems that beleaguer the mainstream core of sports chiropractic as a cohesive and homogeneous group. Modern chiropractic management is frequently multimodal in nature and incorporates components of passive and active care. Such management typically incorporates spinal and peripheral manipulation, mobilisation, soft tissue techniques, rehabilitation and therapeutic exercises. Externally, sports chiropractic has faced hurdles too, with a lack of recognition and acceptance by organized and orthodox sports medical groups. Whilst some arguments against the inclusion of chiropractic may be legitimate due to its historical baggage, much of the argument appears to be anti-competitive, insecure and driven by a closed-shop mentality.sequently, chiropractic as a profession still remains a pariah to the organised sports medicine world. Add to this an uncertain continuing education system, a lack of protection for the title 'sports chiropractor', a lack of a recognized specialist status and a lack of support from traditional chiropractic, the challenges for the growth and acceptance of the sports chiropractor are considerable. This article outlines the historical and current challenges, both internal and external, faced by sports chiropractic within Australia and proposes positive changes that will assist in

  4. Chuna (or Tuina Manual Therapy for Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Woo Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To review the literature and systematically evaluate the effectiveness of Chuna (or Tuina manual therapy (C[T]MT on pain and function for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. We searched 15 English, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean databases using relevant keywords. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs of C(TMT for musculoskeletal disorders were considered, and we limited analyses to studies with a low-risk bias for randomization and/or allocation concealment. Results. Sixty-six RCTs with 6,170 participants were included. One sham-controlled RCT showed that C(TMT relieved pain more effectively than a sham control (SMD -3.09 [-3.59, -2.59]. For active-controlled RCTs, pooled meta-analysis showed that C(TMT had statistically significant effects on pain reduction, especially compared to traction (P<0.00001, drugs (P=0.04, and physical therapies (P<0.0001. For functional improvement, combined effects of C(TMT with drugs (P=0.04 and traction (P=0.05 also showed similar positive effects. Conclusions. This systematic review suggests that C(TMT is safe and effective for pain reduction and functional improvement for musculoskeletal diseases; however, the evidence for functional improvement was not as strong as for pain reduction. For future studies, high-quality RCTs such as sham-controlled studies with standardized interventions are needed to provide sufficient evidence on the effects of C(TMT for musculoskeletal diseases. Protocol registration number is CRD42016038307 04/07/2016.

  5. A manual physical therapy intervention for symptoms of knee osteoarthritis and associated fall risk: A case series of four patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Chris; Sheehan, Riley; Deyle, Gail; Wilken, Jason; Gill, Norman

    2018-02-26

    Patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are at an increased risk of falling. Further, the symptoms associated with knee OA are correlated with fall risk. A manual physical therapy (MPT) approach consisting of mobilizing techniques and reinforcing exercise improves the symptoms and functional limitations associated with knee OA. The purpose of this case series is to evaluate an MPT intervention of mobilization techniques and exercise for knee OA on improving symptoms and quantify the secondary benefit of improving stumble recovery. Four patients with symptomatic knee OA and four matched controls completed a fall risk assessment. Following 4 weeks of intervention, patients were reevaluated. Initial Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores indicated notable symptoms and functional limitations in all patients. In addition, all patients displayed elevated fall risk and/or impaired stumble responses. Following 4 weeks of intervention, all patients reported meaningful reductions in all three WOMAC subscales and demonstrated improvements in at least two of the three fall risk measures. We identified potential connections between symptom relief in patients with knee OA, stumble response, and ultimately fall risk. The results suggest that MPT intervention designed to improve the signs and symptoms of knee OA may lead to a secondary benefit of improved gait stability and stumble response.

  6. A randomized controlled trial of manual therapy and pneumatic compression for recovery from prolonged running - an extended study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heapy, Amanda M; Hoffman, Martin D; Verhagen, Heidie H; Thompson, Samuel W; Dhamija, Pavitra; Sandford, Fiona J; Cooper, Mary C

    2018-03-07

    Manual therapy (MT) and intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) are recovery methods used by endurance athletes with little evidence supporting effectiveness. This randomized controlled trial evaluated effectiveness of four daily post-race treatments of a specific MT protocol and IPC compared with supine rest on recovery following an ultramarathon among 56 ultramarathoners. Groups were comparable across all characteristics examined, including post-race plasma creatine kinase concentration. Subject completed timed 400 m runs before the race and on days three, five, seven and 14 post- race, and also provided muscle pain and soreness ratings and fatigue scores immediately before and after treatments, and during the 14 days post- race. Daily subjective measures and 400 m run times were not improved by either treatment, but both treatments reduced (p < .05) muscular fatigue scores acutely after treatment following the race and on post-race day 1, and MT improved (p < .05) muscle pain and soreness acutely following the race.

  7. Hypoalgesic effects of three different manual therapy techniques on cervical spine and psychological interaction: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Perez, Jose Luis; Lopez-Lopez, Almudena; La Touche, Roy; Lerma-Lara, Sergio; Suarez, Emilio; Rojas, Javier; Bishop, Mark D; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which psychological factors interact with a particular manual therapy (MT) technique to induce hypoalgesia in healthy subjects. Seventy-five healthy volunteers (36 female, 39 males), were recruited in this double-blind, controlled and parallel study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive: High velocity low amplitude technique (HVLA), joint mobilization, or Cervical Lateral glide mobilization (CLGM). Pressure pain threshold (PPT) over C7 unilaterally, trapezius muscle and lateral epicondyle bilaterally, were measured prior to single technique MT was applied and immediately after to applied MT. Pain catastrophizing, depression, anxiety and kinesiophobia were evaluated before treatment. The results indicate that hypoalgesia was observed in all groups after treatment in the neck and elbow region (P < 0.05), but mobilization induces more hypoalgesic effects. Catastrophizing interacted with change over time in PPT, for changes in C7 and in manipulation group. All the MT techniques studied produced local and segmental hypoalgesic effects, supporting the results of previous studies studying the individual interventions. Interaction between catastrophizing and HVLA technique suggest that whether catastrophizing level is low or medium, the chance of success is high, but high levels of catastrophizing may result in poor outcome after HVLA intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov Registration Number: NCT02782585. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Laryngeal manual therapy palpatory evaluation scale: A preliminary study to examine its usefulness in diagnosis of occupational dysphonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Woźnicka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study has been to assess the larynx and soft tissue around the vocal tract in a group of people with healthy voice, and in a group of patients with occupational dysphonia using the new laryngeal manual therapy palpatory evaluation scale (LMTPE. Material and Methods: The examinations were performed in a study (dysphonic group of professional voice users who had developed voice disorders (N = 51 and in the control group of normophonic subjects (N = 50. All the participants underwent perceptual voice assessment and examination by means of the LMTPE scale. Additionally, phoniatric examination including VHI (Voice Handicap Index questionnaire, GRBAS (the Grade of hoarseness, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenic, Strained perceptual evaluation, maximum phonation time (MPT measurement and videostroboscopy was performed in the study group. Results: The comparison of the LMTPE total score showed that the results of the study group were significantly poorer than those of controls (p < 0.001. In the study group, correlations were found between the LMTPE results and the VHI scores (p < 0.05, perceptual evaluation by the GRBAS (p < 0.05 and the objective parameter MPT (p < 0.05. Conclusions: The study has proven that the LMTPE scale is characterized by the high score of Cronbach’s α ratio estimating the reliability of the test. The results have confirmed that the LMTPE scale seems to be a valuable tool, useful in diagnostics of occupational dysphonia, particularly of hyperfunction origin. Med Pr 2017;68(2:179–188

  9. Treatment effectiveness and fidelity of manual therapy to the knee: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamh, Paul; Cook, Chad; Reiman, Michael P; Sheets, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Manual therapy (MT) is a commonly used treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA) but to date only one systematic review has explored its effectiveness. The purpos e of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature, to determine the effectiveness and fidelity of studies using MT techniques in individuals with knee OA. Relevant studies were assessed for inclusion. Effectiveness was measured using effect sizes, and methodological bias and treatment fidelity were both explored. Effect sizes were calculated using standardized mean differences (SMD) based on pooled data depending on statistical and clinical heterogeneity, as well as risk of bias. The search captured 2,969 studies; after screening, 12 were included. Four had a low risk of bias and high treatment fidelity. For self-reported function, comparing MT with no treatment resulted in a large effect size (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.84), as did adding MT to a comparator treatment (SMD 0.78). A significant difference was found for pain when adding MT to a comparator treatment (SMD 0.73). The findings in the present meta-analytical review support the use of MT versus a number of different comparators for improvement in self-reported knee function. Lesser support is present for pain reduction, and no endorsement of functional performance can be made at this time. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Clinical variables associated with recovery in patients with chronic tension-type headache after treatment with manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castien, René F; van der Windt, Daniëlle A W M; Blankenstein, Annette H; Heymans, Martijn W; Dekker, Joost

    2012-04-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the course of chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) in participants receiving manual therapy (MT), and to develop a prognostic model for predicting recovery in participants receiving MT. Outcomes in 145 adults with CTTH who received MT as participants in a previously published randomised clinical trial (n=41) or in a prospective cohort study (n=104) were evaluated. Assessments were made at baseline and at 8 and 26 weeks of follow-up. Recovery was defined as a 50% reduction in headache days in combination with a score of 'much improved' or 'very much improved' for global perceived improvement. Potential prognostic factors were analyzed by univariable and multivariable regression analysis. After 8 weeks 78% of the participants reported recovery after MT, and after 26 weeks the frequency of recovered participants was 73%. Prognostic factors related to recovery were co-existing migraine, absence of multiple-site pain, greater cervical range of motion and higher headache intensity. In participants classified as being likely to be recovered, the posterior probability for recovery at 8 weeks was 92%, whereas for those being classified at low probability of recovery this posterior probability was 61%. It is concluded that the course of CTTH is favourable in primary care patients receiving MT. The prognostic models provide additional information to improve prediction of outcome. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. User's manual of a supporting system for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy. JAERI computational dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Torii, Yoshiya

    2002-09-01

    A boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with epithermal neutron beam is expected to treat effectively for malignant tumor that is located deeply in the brain. It is indispensable to estimate preliminarily the irradiation dose in the brain of a patient in order to perform the epithermal neutron beam BNCT. Thus, the JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS), which can calculate the dose distributions in the brain, has been developed. JCDS is a software that creates a 3-dimensional head model of a patient by using CT and MRI images and that generates a input data file automatically for calculation neutron flux and gamma-ray dose distribution in the brain by the Monte Carlo code: MCNP, and that displays the dose distribution on the head model for dosimetry by using the MCNP calculation results. JCDS has any advantages as follows; By treating CT data and MRI data which are medical images, a detail three-dimensional model of patient's head is able to be made easily. The three-dimensional head image is editable to simulate the state of a head after its surgical processes such as skin flap opening and bone removal for the BNCT with craniotomy that are being performed in Japan. JCDS can provide information for the Patient Setting System to set the patient in an actual irradiation position swiftly and accurately. This report describes basic design and procedure of dosimetry, operation manual, data and library structure for JCDS (ver.1.0). (author)

  12. Effectiveness of manual therapy compared to usual care by the general practitioner for chronic tension-type headache: design of a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekker Joost

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Chronic Tension Type Headache (CTTH report functional and emotional impairments (loss of workdays, sleep disturbances, emotional well-being and are at risk for overuse of medication. Manual therapy may improve symptoms through mobilisation of the spine, correction of posture, and training of cervical muscles. We present the design of a randomised clinical trial (RCT evaluating the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT compared to usual care by the general practitioner (GP in patients with CTTH. Methods and design Patients are eligible for participation if they present in general practice with CTTH according to the classification of the International Headache Society (IHS. Participants are randomised to either usual GP care according to the national Dutch general practice guidelines for headache, or manual therapy, consisting of mobilisations (high- and low velocity techniques, exercise therapy for the cervical and thoracic spine and postural correction. The primary outcome measures are the number of headache days and use of medication. Secondary outcome measures are severity of headache, functional status, sickness absence, use of other healthcare resources, active cervical range of motion, algometry, endurance of the neckflexor muscles and head posture. Follow-up assessments are conducted after 8 and 26 weeks. Discussion This is a pragmatic trial in which interventions are offered as they are carried out in everyday practice. This increases generalisability of results, but blinding of patients, GPs and therapists is not possible. The results of this trial will contribute to clinical decision making of the GP regarding referral to manual therapy in patients with chronic tension headache.

  13. Manualized cognitive therapy versus cognitive-behavioral treatment-as-usual for social anxiety disorder in routine practice: A cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Jürgen; Čolić, Jasmin; Pittig, Andre; Crawcour, Stephen; Moeser, Manuela; Ginzburg, Denise; Lin, Jihong; Wiltink, Joerg; Leibing, Eric; Stangier, Ulrich

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of manualized cognitive therapy (mCT) following the Clark-Wells approach versus non-manualized cognitive-behavioral treatment-as-usual (CBTAU) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) in routine practice. Forty-eight private practitioners were recruited within a multi-center trial and either received training in manualized CT for SAD or no such training. Practitioners treated 162 patients with SAD in routine practice (N = 107 completers, n = 57 for mCT, n = 50 for CBTAU). Social anxiety symptoms (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale; LSAS) and secondary measures were assessed before treatment, at treatment-hour 8, 15, and 25, at end of treatment, as well as 6 and 12 months after treatment. Patients in both groups showed significant reductions of SAD severity after treatment (d = 1.91 [mCT] and d = 1.80 [CBTAU], within-group effect sizes, intent-to-treat analyses, LSAS observer ratings), which remained stable at follow-up. There were no differences between groups in terms of symptom reduction and treatment duration. The present trial confirms the high effectiveness of CBTAU and mCT for SAD when practitioners conduct the treatments in routine practice. Additional training in the CT manual did not result in significant between-group effects on therapy outcome. Explanations for this unexpected result are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multidisciplinary approach to non-surgical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player treated with platelet-rich plasma, manual therapy and exercise: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Eric; MacIntyre, Ian G; Galea, Anthony M

    2015-12-01

    To present the clinical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player and highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. A professional hockey player with recurrent groin pain presented to the clinic after an acute exacerbation of pain while playing hockey. The patient received a clinical diagnosis of inguinal disruption. Imaging revealed a tear in the rectus abdominis. Management included two platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections to the injured tissue, and subsequent manual therapy and exercise. The patient returned to his prior level of performance in 3.5 weeks. This case demonstrated the importance of a multidisciplinary team and the need for advanced imaging in athletes with groin pain. Research quality concerning the non-surgical management of inguinal disruption remains low. This case adds evidence that PRP, with the addition of manual therapy and exercise may serve as a relatively quick and effective non-surgical management strategy.

  15. A comparison of two manual physical therapy approaches and electrotherapy modalities for patients with knee osteoarthritis: A randomized three arm clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya Mutlu, Ebru; Ercin, Ersin; Razak Ozdıncler, Arzu; Ones, Nadir

    2018-08-01

    A broad spectrum of physical therapy exercise programs provides symptom relief and functional benefit for patients with knee OA. Manual physical therapy, including tailored exercise programs provide relatively higher level benefit that persists to one year. It is currently unknown if there are important differences in the effects of different manual physical therapy techniques for patients with knee OA and there are virtually no studies comparing manual physical therapy and electrotherapy modalities. The aim of the study was to compare long-term results between three treatment groups (mobilization with movements [MWMs], passive joint mobilization [PJM], and electrotherapy) to determine which treatment is most effective in patients with knee OA. A single-blind randomized clinical trial with parallel design was conducted in patients with knee OA. Seventy-two consecutive patients (mean age 56.11 ± 6.80 years) with bilateral knee OA were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: MWMs, PJM, and electrotherapy. All groups performed an exercise program and received 12 sessions. The primary outcome measures of the functional assessment were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) and Aggregated Locomotor Function (ALF) test scores. The secondary outcome measures were pain level, measured using a pressure algometer and a visual analogue scale (VAS), range of motion (ROM), measured using a digital goniometer, and muscle strength, evaluated with a handheld dynamometer. Patients were assessed before treatment, after treatment and after 1 year of follow-up. Patients receiving the manual physical therapy interventions consisting of either MWM or PJM demonstrated a greater decrease in VAS scores at rest, during functional activities, and during the night compared to those in the electrotherapy group from baseline to after the treatment (p < 0.05). This improvement continued at the 1-year follow-up (p < 0.05). The MWMs and PJM

  16. The clinical and sonographic effects of kinesiotaping and exercise in comparison with manual therapy and exercise for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a preliminary trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Derya Ozer; Baltaci, Gul; Toprak, Ugur; Atay, Ahmet Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of manual therapy with exercise to kinesiotaping with exercise for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Randomized clinical before and after trial was used. Fifty-four patients diagnosed as having subacromial impingement syndrome who were referred for outpatient treatment were included. Eligible patients (between 30 and 60 years old, with unilateral shoulder pain) were randomly allocated to 2 study groups: kinesiotaping with exercise (n = 28) or manual therapy with exercise (n = 26). In addition, patients were advised to use cold packs 5 times per day to control for pain. Visual analog scale for pain, Disability of Arm and Shoulder Questionnaire for function, and diagnostic ultrasound assessment for supraspinatus tendon thickness were used as main outcome measures. Assessments were applied at the baseline and after completing 6 weeks of related interventions. At the baseline, there was no difference between the 2 group characteristics (P > .05). There were significant differences in both groups before and after treatment in terms of pain decrease and improvement of Disability of Arm and Shoulder Questionnaire scores (P .05). The only difference between the groups was at night pain, resulting in favor of the kinesiotaping with exercise group (P kinesiotaping with exercise and manual therapy with exercise. Both treatments may have similar results in reducing pain and disability in subacromial impingement in 6 weeks. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative analysis of individuals with and without chiropractic coverage: patient characteristics, utilization, and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta, Antonio P; Metz, R Douglas; Nelson, Craig F; Ray, Saurabh; Chernicoff, Helen Oster; Dinubile, Nicholas A

    2004-10-11

    Back pain accounts for more than $100 billion in annual US health care costs and is the second leading cause of physician visits and hospitalizations. This study ascertains the effect of systematic access to chiropractic care on the overall and neuromusculoskeletal-specific consumption of health care resources within a large managed-care system. A 4-year retrospective claims data analysis comparing more than 700 000 health plan members with an additional chiropractic coverage benefit and 1 million members of the same health plan without the chiropractic benefit. Members with chiropractic insurance coverage, compared with those without coverage, had lower annual total health care expenditures ($1463 vs $1671 per member per year, P<.001). Having chiropractic coverage was associated with a 1.6% decrease (P = .001) in total annual health care costs at the health plan level. Back pain patients with chiropractic coverage, compared with those without coverage, had lower utilization (per 1000 episodes) of plain radiographs (17.5 vs 22.7, P<.001), low back surgery (3.3 vs 4.8, P<.001), hospitalizations (9.3 vs 15.6, P<.001), and magnetic resonance imaging (43.2 vs 68.9, P<.001). Patients with chiropractic coverage, compared with those without coverage, also had lower average back pain episode-related costs ($289 vs $399, P<.001). Access to managed chiropractic care may reduce overall health care expenditures through several effects, including (1) positive risk selection; (2) substitution of chiropractic for traditional medical care, particularly for spine conditions; (3) more conservative, less invasive treatment profiles; and (4) lower health service costs associated with managed chiropractic care. Systematic access to managed chiropractic care not only may prove to be clinically beneficial but also may reduce overall health care costs.

  18. Horizontal integration of the basic sciences in the chiropractic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Basic science curricula at most chiropractic colleges consist of courses (eg, general anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, etc) that are taught as stand-alone content domains. The lack of integration between basic science disciplines causes difficulties for students who need to understand how the parts function together as an integrated whole and apply this understanding to solving clinical problems. More horizontally integrated basic science curricula could be achieved by several means: integrated Part I National Board of Chiropractic Examiners questions, a broader education for future professors, an increased emphasis on integration within the current model, linked courses, and an integrated, thematic basic science curriculum. Horizontally integrating basic science curricula would require significant efforts from administrators, curriculum committees, and instructional faculty. Once in place this curriculum would promote more clinically relevant learning, improved learning outcomes, and superior vertical integration.

  19. Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and modern foundation☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzon, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to trace the foundations of DD Palmer's sense of self and philosophy of chiropractic to its sources in modern Western philosophy as well as current metatheories about modernity. Discussion DD Palmer's sense of self was indicative of a modern self. A modern self is characterized as a self that developed after the Western Enlightenment and must come to terms with the insights of modernity such as Cartesian dualism, Spinoza's substance, Rousseau's expressivism, and Kant's critiques. It is argued that Palmer's philosophy can be viewed as part of the this tradition alongside his involvement in the 19th century American metaphysical religious culture, which was itself a response to these challenges of the modern self of modernity. Conclusion Palmer's development of chiropractic and its philosophy was a reaction to the challenges and promises of modernity. PMID:22693479

  20. Horizontal Integration of the Basic Sciences in the Chiropractic Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Basic science curricula at most chiropractic colleges consist of courses (eg, general anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, etc) that are taught as stand-alone content domains. The lack of integration between basic science disciplines causes difficulties for students who need to understand how the parts function together as an integrated whole and apply this understanding to solving clinical problems. More horizontally integrated basic science curricula could be achieved by several means: integrated Part I National Board of Chiropractic Examiners questions, a broader education for future professors, an increased emphasis on integration within the current model, linked courses, and an integrated, thematic basic science curriculum. Horizontally integrating basic science curricula would require significant efforts from administrators, curriculum committees, and instructional faculty. Once in place this curriculum would promote more clinically relevant learning, improved learning outcomes, and superior vertical integration. PMID:21048882

  1. A narrative review of manual muscle testing and implications for muscle testing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conable, Katharine M; Rosner, Anthony L

    2011-09-01

    Manual muscle testing (MMT) is used for a variety of purposes in health care by medical, osteopathic, chiropractic, physical therapy, rehabilitation, and athletic training professionals. The purpose of this study is to provide a narrative review of variations in techniques, durations, and forces used in MMT putting applied kinesiology (AK) muscle testing in context and highlighting aspects of muscle testing important to report in MMT research. PubMed, the Collected Papers of the International College of Applied Kinesiology-USA, and related texts were searched on the subjects of MMT, maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing, and make/break testing. Force parameters (magnitude, duration, timing of application), testing variations of MMT, and normative data were collected and evaluated. "Break" tests aim to evaluate the muscle's ability to resist a gradually increasing pressure and may test different aspects of neuromuscular control than tests against fixed resistances. Applied kinesiologists use submaximal manual break tests and a binary grading scale to test short-term changes in muscle function in response to challenges. Many of the studies reviewed were not consistent in reporting parameters for testing. To increase the chances for replication, studies using MMT should specify parameters of the tests used, such as exact procedures and instrumentation, duration of test, peak force, and timing of application of force. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Improvement in hearing after chiropractic care: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Duro Joseph O

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first chiropractic adjustment given in 1895 was reported to have cured deafness. This study examined the effects of a single, initial chiropractic visit on the central nervous system by documenting clinical changes of audiometry in patients after chiropractic care. Case presentation Fifteen patients are presented (9 male, 6 female with a mean age of 54.3 (range 34–71. A Welch Allyn AudioScope 3 was used to screen frequencies of 1000, 2000, 4000 and 500 Hz respectively at three standard decibel levels 20 decibels (dB, 25 dB and 40 dB, respectively, before and immediately after the first chiropractic intervention. Several criteria were used to determine hearing impairment. Ventry & Weinstein criteria of missing one or more tones in either ear at 40 dB and Speech-frequency criteria of missing one or more tones in either ear at 25 dB. All patients were classified as hearing impaired though greater on the right. At 40 dB using the Ventry & Weinstein criteria, 6 had hearing restored, 7 improved and 2 had no change. At 25 dB using the Speech-frequency criteria, none were restored, 11 improved, 4 had no change and 3 missed a tone. Conclusion A percentage of patients presenting to the chiropractor have a mild to moderate hearing loss, most notably in the right ear. The clinical progress documented in this report suggests that manipulation delivered to the neuromusculoskeletal system may create central plastic changes in the auditory system.

  3. Efeitos da terapia manual sobre a dor em mulheres com fibromialgia: uma revisão de literatura = Effects of manual therapy on pain in women with fibromyalgia: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziani, Marciele Monzon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar, através de uma revisão de literatura, os efeitos da terapia manual sobre a dor em mulheres com fibromialgia (FM. Materiais e Métodos: Trata-se de uma revisão integrativa, realizada nas bases de dados Pubmed, Lilacs, PEDro e Scielo, selecionando ensaios clínicos ou estudos quase experimental, nos idiomas português, inglês e espanhol, que objetivassem avaliar os efeitos da terapia manual sobre a dor em mulheres com FM. As palavras-chave e os operadores boleanos utilizados foram: “Musculoskeletal Manipulations OR manual therapy AND Fibromyalgia”. Resultados: De um total de 133 artigos encontrados, 9 deles foram selecionados para inclusão final no presente estudo. Desses, grande parte (55,5% dos estudos foram realizados no continente Europeu e apenas um foi conduzido na população brasileira. O tamanho amostral dos artigos variou de 12 a 86 indivíduos entre cada grupo estudado, sendo que 8 (88,8% deles utilizaram os critérios do Colégio Americano de Reumatologia para diagnóstico clínico da FM. As técnicas mais utilizadas foram à liberação miofascial (33,3%, a massagem de tecido conjuntivo (22,2% e a drenagem linfática manual (22,2%, sendo que a duração total do tratamento oscilou entre 3 e 20 semanas. Todos os estudos verificaram melhora da dor através das técnicas de terapia manual, com efeitos positivos também sobre os sintomas de ansiedade, sono, função física e qualidade de vida. Conclusão: Os achados da presente revisão demonstram que as técnicas de terapia manual parecem benéficas para o tratamento da dor em mulheres portadoras de FM

  4. Exercise and Manual therapy Arthritis Research Trial (EMPART) for osteoarthritis of the hip: A Multicentre Randomised Controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    French, Helen P

    2012-10-16

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy (ET) compared to ET with adjunctive manual therapy (ET+MT) for people with hip osteoarthritis (OA). A secondary aim was to identify if immediate commencement of ET or ET+MT was more beneficial than a 9 week waiting period for either intervention. DESIGN: Assessor-blind randomised controlled trial with 9 and 18 week follow-ups. SETTING: Four academic teaching hospitals, Dublin, Ireland. PARTICIPANTS: 131 patients with hip OA recruited from general practitioners, rheumatologists, orthopaedic surgeons, and other hospital consultants were randomised to one of three groups: ET (n=45), ET+MT (n=43) and wait-list control (n=43). INTERVENTIONS: Participants in both ET and ET+ MT groups received up to 8 treatments over 8 weeks. Control group participants were re-randomised into either ET or ET+MT group after 9 week follow-up. Their data were pooled with original treatment group data: ET (n=66) and ET+MT (n=65). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the WOMAC physical function (PF) subscale. Secondary outcomes included physical performance, pain, hip range of motion (HROM), anxiety\\/depression, quality of life, medication usage, patient-perceived change and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in WOMAC PF between ET (n=66) and ET+MT (n=65) groups at 9 weeks (mean diff 0.09 (95% CI -4.41, 5.25)) or at 18 weeks (mean diff 0.42 (95% CI -3.98, 6.83)), or other outcomes, except \\'patient satisfaction with outcome\\' which was higher in the ET+MT group (p=0.02). Improvements in WOMAC, HROM and patient-perceived change occurred in both treatment groups compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: Self-reported function, HROM and patient-perceived improvement occurred after an 8 week programme of ET for patients with hip OA MT as an adjunct provided no further benefit, except for higher patient satisfaction.

  5. Effect on healthcare utilization and costs of spinal manual therapy for acute low back pain in routine care: A propensity score matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jochen; Mertens, Ulf Kai; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Chenot, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    Spinal manual therapy (SMT) is a popular treatment option for low back pain (LBP). The aim of our analysis was to evaluate the effects of manual therapy delivered by general practitioners and ambulatory orthopedic surgeons in routine care on follow up consultations, sick leave, health service utilization and costs for acute LBP compared to matched patients not receiving manual therapy. This is a propensity score matched cohort study based on health claims data. We identified a total of 113.652 adult patients with acute LBP and no coded red flags of whom 21.021 (18%) received SMT by physicians. In the final analysis 17.965 patients in each group could be matched. Balance on patients' coded characteristics, comorbidity and prior health service utilization was achieved. The provision of SMT for acute LBP had no relevant impact on follow up visits and days of sick leave for LBP in the index billing period and the following year. SMT was associated with a higher proportion of imaging studies for LBP (30.6% vs. 23%, SMD: 0.164 [95% CI 0.143-0.185]). SMT did not lead to meaningful savings by replacing other health services for LBP. SMT for acute non-specific LBP in routine care was not clinically meaningful effective to reduce sick leave and reconsultation rates compared to no SMT and did not lead to meaningful savings by replacing other health services from the perspective of health insurance. This does not imply that SMT is ineffective but might reflect a problem with selection of suitable patients and the quality and quantity of SMT in routine care. National Manual Medicine societies should state clearly that imaging is not routinely needed prior to SMT in patients with low suspicion of presence of red flags and monitor the quality of provided services.

  6. Effect on healthcare utilization and costs of spinal manual therapy for acute low back pain in routine care: A propensity score matched cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Walker

    Full Text Available Spinal manual therapy (SMT is a popular treatment option for low back pain (LBP. The aim of our analysis was to evaluate the effects of manual therapy delivered by general practitioners and ambulatory orthopedic surgeons in routine care on follow up consultations, sick leave, health service utilization and costs for acute LBP compared to matched patients not receiving manual therapy. This is a propensity score matched cohort study based on health claims data. We identified a total of 113.652 adult patients with acute LBP and no coded red flags of whom 21.021 (18% received SMT by physicians. In the final analysis 17.965 patients in each group could be matched. Balance on patients' coded characteristics, comorbidity and prior health service utilization was achieved. The provision of SMT for acute LBP had no relevant impact on follow up visits and days of sick leave for LBP in the index billing period and the following year. SMT was associated with a higher proportion of imaging studies for LBP (30.6% vs. 23%, SMD: 0.164 [95% CI 0.143-0.185]. SMT did not lead to meaningful savings by replacing other health services for LBP. SMT for acute non-specific LBP in routine care was not clinically meaningful effective to reduce sick leave and reconsultation rates compared to no SMT and did not lead to meaningful savings by replacing other health services from the perspective of health insurance. This does not imply that SMT is ineffective but might reflect a problem with selection of suitable patients and the quality and quantity of SMT in routine care. National Manual Medicine societies should state clearly that imaging is not routinely needed prior to SMT in patients with low suspicion of presence of red flags and monitor the quality of provided services.

  7. Chiropractic at the crossroads or are we just going around in circles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reggars John W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chiropractic in Australia has seen many changes over the past 30 years. Some of these changes have advanced the professional status of chiropractic, improved undergraduate training and paved the way for a research culture. Unfortunately, other changes or lack of changes, have hindered the growth, public utilisation and professional standing of chiropractic in Australia. This article explores what influences have impacted on the credibility, advancement and public utilisation of chiropractic in Australia. Discussion The 1970's and 1980's saw a dramatic change within the chiropractic profession in Australia. With the advent of government regulation, came government funded teaching institutions, quality research and increased public acceptance and utilisation of chiropractic services. However, since that time the profession appears to have taken a backward step, which in the author's opinion, is directly linked to a shift by sections of the profession to the fundamentalist approach to chiropractic and the vertebral subluxation complex. The abandonment, by some groups, of a scientific and evidenced based approach to practice for one founded on ideological dogma is beginning to take its toll. Summary The future of chiropractic in Australia is at a crossroads. For the profession to move forward it must base its future on science and not ideological dogma. The push by some for it to become a unique and all encompassing alternative system of healthcare is both misguided and irrational.

  8. Chiropractic manipulative therapy of the thoracic spine in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health SA Gesondheid ... The stretch and strengthening exercises were performed in the consultation rooms to ensure that the participants ... Conclusion: The study showed that all three treatment protocols for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were effective.

  9. Do Subjects with Whiplash-Associated Disorders Respond Differently in the Short-Term to Manual Therapy and Exercise than Those with Mechanical Neck Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Matteo; Catena, Antonella; Chiarotto, Alessandro; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2017-04-01

    To compare the short-term effects of manual therapy and exercise on pain, related disability, range of motion, and pressure pain thresholds between subjects with mechanical neck pain and whiplash-associated disorders. Twenty-two subjects with mechanical neck pain and 28 with whiplash-associated disorders participated. Clinical and physical outcomes including neck pain intensity, neck-related disability, and pain area, as well as cervical range of motion and pressure pain thresholds over the upper trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles, were obtained at baseline and after the intervention by a blinded assessor. Each subject received six sessions of manual therapy and specific neck exercises. Mixed-model repeated measures analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) were used for the analyses. Subjects with whiplash-associated disorders exhibited higher neck-related disability ( P  = 0.021), larger pain area ( P  = 0.003), and lower pressure pain thresholds in the tibialis anterior muscle ( P  = 0.009) than those with mechanical neck pain. The adjusted ANCOVA revealed no between-group differences for any outcome (all P  > 0.15). A significant main effect of time was demonstrated for clinical outcomes and cervical range of motion with both groups experiencing similar improvements (all P   0.222). The current clinical trial found that subjects with mechanical neck pain and whiplash-associated disorders exhibited similar clinical and neurophysiological responses after a multimodal physical therapy intervention, suggesting that although greater signs of central sensitization are present in subjects with whiplash-associated disorders, this does not alter the response in the short term to manual therapy and exercises. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Do manual therapy techniques have a positive effect on quality of life in people with tension-type headache? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma V; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Angel; Molina-Martínez, Francisco; Falla, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of manual therapy for the relief of tension-type headache (TTH). However most studies have addressed the impact of therapy on the frequency and intensity of pain. No studies have evaluated the potentially significant effect on the patient's quality of life. To assess the quality of life of patients suffering from TTH treated for 4 weeks with different manual therapy techniques. Factorial, randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial. Specialized center for the treatment of headache. Seventy-six (62 women) patients aged between 18 and 65 years (age: 39.9±10.9) with either episodic or chronic TTH. Patients were divided into four groups: suboccipital inhibitory pressure; suboccipital spinal manipulation; a combination of the two treatments; control. Quality of life was assessed using the SF-12 questionnaire (considering both the overall score and the different dimensions) at the beginning and end of treatment, and after a one month follow-up. Compared to baseline, the suboccipital inhibition treatment group showed a significant improvement in their overall quality of life at the one month follow-up and also showed specific improvement in the dimensions related to moderate physical activities, and in their emotional role. All the treatment groups, but not the control group, showed improvements in their physical role, bodily pain, and social functioning at the one month follow-up. Post treatment and at the one month follow-up, the combined treatment group showed improved vitality and the two treatment groups that involved manipulation showed improved mental health. All three treatments were effective at changing different dimensions of quality of life, but the combined treatment showed the most change. The results support the effectiveness of treatments applied to the suboccipital region for patients with TTH. Manual therapy techniques applied to the suboccipital region, for as little as four weeks, offered a

  11. Chiropractic professionalization and accreditation: an exploration of the history of conflict between worldviews through the lens of developmental structuralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzon, Simon A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to describe the conflicts in the history of chiropractic's professionalization and conflict through the path of increasing educational standards and accreditation using the lens of developmental structuralism. Within the story of chiropractic's professionalization and accreditation lie the battles between competing worldviews. Gibbons proposed 4 periods of chiropractic's educational history; this article proposes a fifth period along with a new methodological approach to explore the complexity of chiropractic's history. The methodology draws upon constructive developmental psychology and proposes 5 levels of thinking common to the individuals from chiropractic's history. By using a psychological framework to analyze historical events, it appears that the battle within chiropractic education continues at present. Several important issues are explored: the Council on Chiropractic Education's origins in the medical paradigm and rational thinking, the pre-rational, rational, and post-rational critics of the Council on Chiropractic Education, the schools of thought that were reified or emerged from the history, as well as the more recent legal, economic, and social pressures, which helped to shape chiropractic's accreditation and professionalization. A transrational approach, one that includes the partial truths of all perspectives, is a first step to allow for a richer understanding of how the interior worldviews, individual actions, and the exterior forces (legal, economic, political, and educational) brought forth the chiropractic clashes together. Viewing the conflicts within chiropractic from this approach may foster new educational structures to evolve.

  12. Retraction: a descriptive study of a manual therapy intervention within a randomised controlled trial for hamstring and lower limb injury prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoskins Wayne

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The journal has been informed by its publisher BioMed Central that contrary to the statement in this article [Wayne Hoskins, Henry Pollard, Chiropractic & Osteopathy 2010, 18:23], they have been advised by the authors' institution Macquarie University, that its Human Research Ethics Committee did not approve this study. Because the study was conducted without institutional ethics committee approval it has been retracted.

  13. EXERCISE, MANUAL THERAPY AND POSTURAL RE-EDUCATION FOR UNCONTROLLED EAR TWITCHING AND RELATED IMPAIRMENTS AFTER WHIPLASH INJURY: A CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, Kelsey; Feldner, Heather

    2017-10-01

    Whiplash Associated Disorders and the interventions used to remediate them are well documented in physical therapy literature. However, specific interventions for spasms of the neck musculature that also involve constant ear twitching have yet to be addressed. The purpose of this case report is twofold. First, to describe comprehensive physical therapy management and outcomes for a subject with uncontrolled ear twitching and related musculoskeletal impairments, and second, to discuss the physical therapist's approach to evidence-based care when faced with a paucity of literature addressing physical therapy interventions for subjects with uncontrolled ear twitching. The subject was a 14-year-old female who sustained a right anterolateral whiplash injury when struck in the head by a volleyball seven months prior to physical therapy. Beginning five months after that injury, she experienced uncontrolled and constant superior/inferior movement of her right ear (hereafter described in this report as a twitch) in addition to facial and cervical pain from her initial injury. She was unable to participate in high school athletics due to her pain. A multimodal treatment approach including exercise, manual therapy, and postural reeducation was utilized during the subject's episode of care. After eight treatment sessions, the subjects's cervical range of motion and upper extremity strength improved. The reported frequency of ear twitching decreased, as did reports of neck and shoulder pain. In addition, her Neck Disability Index improved from a score of 22, indicating moderate disability, to 9, indicating mild disability and she was able to return to sport activity. With limited research to direct intervention, clinical reasoning was utilized to formulate an effective therapeutic intervention. A combination of manual therapy, exercise, and postural reeducation intervention was effective for this subject and could assist in guiding interventions for similarly unique clinical

  14. A longitudinal study of chiropractic use among older adults in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Michael P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Longitudinal patterns of chiropractic use in the United States, particularly among Medicare beneficiaries, are not well documented. Using a nationally representative sample of older Medicare beneficiaries we describe the use of chiropractic over fifteen years, and classify chiropractic users by annual visit volume. We assess the characteristics that are associated with chiropractic use versus nonuse, as well as between different levels of use. Methods We analyzed data from two linked sources: the baseline (1993-1994 interview responses of 5,510 self-respondents in the Survey on Assets and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD, and their Medicare claims from 1993 to 2007. Binomial logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with chiropractic use versus nonuse, and conditional upon use, to identify factors associated with high volume relative to lower volume use. Results There were 806 users of chiropractic in the AHEAD sample yielding a full period prevalence for 1993-2007 of 14.6%. Average annual prevalence between 1993 and 2007 was 4.8% with a range from 4.1% to 5.4%. Approximately 42% of the users consumed chiropractic services only in a single calendar year while 38% used chiropractic in three or more calendar years. Chiropractic users were more likely to be women, white, overweight, have pain, have multiple comorbid conditions, better self-rated health, access to transportation, higher physician utilization levels, live in the Midwest, and live in an area with fewer physicians per capita. Among chiropractic users, 16% had at least one year in which they exceeded Medicare's "soft cap" of 12 visits per calendar year. These over-the-cap users were more likely to have arthritis and mobility limitations, but were less likely to have a high school education. Additionally, these over-the-cap individuals accounted for 58% of total chiropractic claim volume. High volume users saw chiropractors the most among

  15. Manual Therapy, Therapeutic Patient Education, and Therapeutic Exercise, an Effective Multimodal Treatment of Nonspecific Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Alacreu, Hector; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; La Touche, Roy

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a multimodal treatment in the short and medium term for disability in nonspecific chronic neck pain. The design of this study is a single-blinded randomized controlled trial carried out in a university research laboratory. Forty-five patients between 18 and 65 yrs with nonspecific chronic neck pain were included in this study. Each patient was treated eight times over a 4-wk period. The sample was divided into three groups: control group, subjected to a protocol of manual therapy; experimental group 1, subjected to a protocol of manual therapy and therapeutic patient education; and experimental group 2, subjected to manual therapy, therapeutic patient education, and a therapeutic exercise protocol. Assessments were performed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 16 wks using the following measurements: the Neck Disability Index, the 11-item Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, the Neck Flexor Muscle Endurance Test, and the Visual Analog Fatigue Scale. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test for the Neck Disability Index showed statistically significant differences between baseline outcomes and all follow-up periods (P Kruskal-Wallis test, differences were found for the Visual Analog Fatigue Scale and the Neck Flexor Muscle Endurance Test in the follow-ups at 8 and 16 wks (P < 0.05). Analysis of variance for group × time interaction showed statistically significant changes (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, F = 3.613, P = 0.005; Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, F = 2.803, P = 0.022). Minimal detectable changes were obtained in both experimental groups for the 11-item Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia but not in the control group. Differences between experimental groups and the control group were found in the short and medium term. A multimodal treatment is a good method for reducing disability in patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain in the short and medium term.

  16. Manual therapy in joint and nerve structures combined with exercises in the treatment of recurrent ankle sprains: A randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Vergara-Vila, Marta; Val-Otero, Sandra; Rivera-Prieto, Cristina; Pecos-Martin, Daniel; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Romero-Franco, Natalia

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent ankle sprains often involve residual symptoms for which subjects often perform proprioceptive or/and strengthening exercises. However, the effectiveness of mobilization to influence important nerve structures due to its anatomical distribution like tibial and peroneal nerves is unclear. To analyze the effects of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises versus the same exercises and manual therapy including mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures in the management of recurrent ankle sprains. A randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial. Fifty-six patients with recurrent ankle sprains and regular sports practice were randomly assigned to experimental or control group. The control group performed 4 weeks of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises; the experimental group performed 4 weeks of the same exercises combined with manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures). Pain, self-reported functional ankle instability, pressure pain threshold (PPT), ankle muscle strength, and active range of motion (ROM) were evaluated in the ankle joint before, just after and one month after the interventions. The within-group differences revealed improvements in all of the variables in both groups throughout the time. Between-group differences revealed that the experimental group exhibited lower pain levels and self-reported functional ankle instability and higher PPT, ankle muscle strength and ROM values compared to the control group immediately after the interventions and one month later. A protocol involving proprioceptive and strengthening exercises and manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures) resulted in greater improvements in pain, self-reported functional joint stability, strength and ROM compared to exercises alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effectiveness of combining inspiratory muscle training with manual therapy and a therapeutic exercise program on maximum inspiratory pressure in adults with asthma: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Candelas-Fernández, Pablo; de-Diego-Cano, Beatriz; Mínguez-Calzada, Orcález; Del Corral, Tamara

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of manual therapy and therapeutic exercise protocol to inspiratory muscle training was more effective in improving maximum inspiratory pressure than inspiratory muscle training in isolation. This is a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. In total, 43 patients with asthma were included in this study. The patients were allocated into one of the two groups: (1) inspiratory muscle training ( n = 21; 20-minute session) or (2) inspiratory muscle training (20-minute session) combined with a program of manual therapy (15-minute session) and therapeutic exercise (15-minute session; n = 22). All participants received 12 sessions, two days/week, for six weeks and performed the domiciliary exercises protocol. The main measures such as maximum inspiratory pressure, spirometric measures, forward head posture, and thoracic kyphosis were recorded at baseline and after the treatment. For the per-protocol analysis, between-group differences at post-intervention were observed in maximum inspiratory pressure (19.77 cmH 2 O (11.49-28.04), P < .05; F = 22.436; P < .001; η 2 p  = 0.371) and forward head posture (-1.25 cm (-2.32 to -0.19), P < .05; F = 5.662; P = .022; η 2 p  = 0.13). The intention-to-treat analysis showed the same pattern of findings. The inspiratory muscle training combined with a manual therapy and therapeutic exercise program is more effective than its application in isolation for producing short-term maximum inspiratory pressure and forward head posture improvements in patients with asthma.

  18. The status of temporomandibular and cervical spine education in credentialed orthopedic manual physical therapy fellowship programs: a comparison of didactic and clinical education exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Courtney, Carol A; Sizer, Phillip S

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish a baseline of physical therapist education on temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related topics during credentialed orthopedic manual physical therapy fellowship training and compare it to cervical spine disorders education. An online survey was distributed electronically to each fellowship program credentialed by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and recognized by the Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT). Data were analyzed to compare overall exposure to TMD educational content, including a direct comparison of TMD and cervical spine disorders education. The response rate was 79%. Thirteen programs (87%) reported providing both didactic and clinical training on both TMD and cervical spine disorders. Didactic education for cervical spine disorders ranged from 16-20 hours to over 25 hours, whereas TMD hours ranged from 0 to 6-10 hours. Clinical education for cervical spine disorders ranged from 11-15 hours to over 25 hours, whereas TMD hours ranged from 0 to 6-10 hours. The number of hours of exposure during didactic training and the number of patients exposed to during clinical training were significantly different when comparing TMD to cervical spine disorders exposure (P<0.0001). The data indicate a lack of uniformity between credentialed fellowship programs in orthopedic manual physical therapy with respect to the extent to which programs expose trainees to evaluation and management of TMD. There is consistency in that all programs provided more training on cervical spine disorders than TMD. Despite a high level of clinical specialization, fellows-in-training receive minimal TMD education.

  19. Intervenção fisioterapêutica nas sequelas de drenagem linfática manual iatrogênica: relato de caso Physical therapy in sequelae of iatrogenic manual lymphatic drainage: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Eduardo Tacani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Atualmente, a drenagem linfática manual (DLM é um dos recursos de grande destaque no tratamento de edemas, linfedemas e condições inestéticas, porém, na prática clínica têm-se observado sua aplicação de forma iatrogênica. Os objetivos deste relato de caso foram apontar as sequelas da aplicação iatrogênica da DLM, em uma jovem caucasiana, e verificar os efeitos da intervenção fisioterapêutica no tratamento dessas. Voluntária de 27 anos, apresentava-se com uma equimose importante na região lateral da coxa esquerda (28 x 9,5 cm, telangiectasias, microvaricosidades e petéquias em ambas as coxas e pernas, dor de forte intensidade e edema, após ter se submetido a um procedimento manual iatrogênico com finalidade estética há dois dias. As condutas fisioterapêuticas adotadas foram: Ultrassom 3 MHz, pulsado (2 ms on, 8 ms off, 0,4 W/cm² SATP na região da equimose e DLM (Método Leduc durante 20 minutos, na coxa esquerda. Foram realizadas nove sessões até a alta no 16º dia pós-lesão, observando-se apenas a redução gradativa da dor e da equimose. Verificou-se a efetividade da intervenção fisioterapêutica em apenas algumas das sequelas provocadas pela iatrogenia, sem desconsiderar que a remissão espontânea dos sinais e sintomas também pode ter contribuído para tal. Destaca-se a importância de conscientizar os fisioterapeutas que atuam com este procedimento para que o aplique de forma adequada, evitando tais iatrogenias.Recently, the manual lymphatic drainage (MLD is an important resource in the treatment of edemas, lymphedemas, and other unaesthetic conditions. However, problems caused by the incorrect application of this therapy have been observed in the clinical practice. The aims of this case report were to describe sequelae resulting from the negligent application of MLD on a young patient, and to determine the effects of physical therapy on the treatment of sequelae. A 27-year-old Caucasian woman presented

  20. Chiropractic claims in the English-speaking world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Edzard; Gilbey, Andrew

    2010-04-09

    Some chiropractors and their associations claim that chiropractic is effective for conditions that lack sound supporting evidence or scientific rationale. This study therefore sought to determine the frequency of World Wide Web claims of chiropractors and their associations to treat, asthma, headache/migraine, infant colic, colic, ear infection/earache/otitis media, neck pain, whiplash (not supported by sound evidence), and lower back pain (supported by some evidence). A review of 200 chiropractor websites and 9 chiropractic associations' World Wide Web claims in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States was conducted between 1 October 2008 and 26 November 2008. The outcome measure was claims (either direct or indirect) regarding the eight reviewed conditions, made in the context of chiropractic treatment. We found evidence that 190 (95%) chiropractor websites made unsubstantiated claims regarding at least one of the conditions. When colic and infant colic data were collapsed into one heading, there was evidence that 76 (38%) chiropractor websites made unsubstantiated claims about all the conditions not supported by sound evidence. Fifty-six (28%) websites and 4 of the 9 (44%) associations made claims about lower back pain, whereas 179 (90%) websites and all 9 associations made unsubstantiated claims about headache/migraine. Unsubstantiated claims were made about asthma, ear infection/earache/otitis media, neck pain, The majority of chiropractors and their associations in the English-speaking world seem to make therapeutic claims that are not supported by sound evidence, whilst only 28% of chiropractor websites promote lower back pain, which is supported by some evidence. We suggest the ubiquity of the unsubstantiated claims constitutes an ethical and public health issue.

  1. A COMBINED TREATMENT APPROACH EMPHASIZING IMPAIRMENT-BASED MANUAL THERAPY AND EXERCISE FOR HIP-RELATED COMPENSATORY INJURY IN ELITE ATHLETES: A CASE SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Steve; Short, Gretchen; Strack, Donald; Anloague, Philip; Brewster, Brian

    2017-11-01

    Athletes experiencing hip, groin, and low back pain often exhibit similar clinical characteristics. Individuals with hip, groin and low back pain may have the presence of multiple concurrent pathoanatomical diagnoses. Regardless, similar regional characteristics and dysfunction may contribute to the patient's chief complaint, potentially creating a sub-group of individuals that may be defined by lumbopelvic and hip mobility limitations, motor control impairments, and other shared clinical findings. The purpose of this case series is to describe the conservative management of elite athletes, within the identified aforementioned sub-group, that emphasized regional manual therapy interventions, and therapeutic exercise designed to improve lumbopelvic and hip mobility, stability and motor control. Five elite athletes were clinically diagnosed by a physical therapist with primary pathologies including adductor-related groin pain (ARGP), femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) with acetabular labral lesion and acute, mechanical low back pain (LBP). Similar subjective, objective findings and overall clinical profiles were identified among all subjects. Common findings aside from the chief complaint included, but were not limited to, decreased hip range of motion (ROM), impaired lumbopelvic motor control and strength, lumbar hypomobility in at least one segment, and a positive hip flexion-adduction-internal rotation (FADIR) special test. A three-phase impairment-based physical therapy program was implemented to resolve the primary complaints and return the subjects to their desired level of function. Acute phase rehabilitation consisted of manual therapy and fundamental motor control exercises. Progression to the sub-acute and terminal phases was based on improved subjective pain reports and progress with functional impairments. As the subjects progress through the rehabilitation phases, the delivery of physical therapy interventions were defined by decreased manual therapies

  2. The life and contribution of Dr. Ronald Gitelman: a pioneer of modern chiropractic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Howard

    2013-03-01

    The life and contribution to chiropractic science of Dr. Ronald Gitelman is reviewed. Sources for this article included review of the notes prepared by Dr. Joseph Keating in his "biography" of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); review of the important articles published by Dr. Gitelman; review of the important projects undertaken by him along with various colleagues; notes from reminiscences obtained from many of these colleagues and discussions with his family. Dr. Gitelman's academic career spanned from 1963 to the late 1980's. During that time, he made foundational contributions to the development of chiropractic science including: developing the Archives (1974), the first collection of scientific articles supporting chiropractic science (which was subsequently published as the Chiropractic Archives Research Collection (CRAC)); delivering one of the few chiropractic papers at the seminal NINCDS conference (1975) and, developing the collaboration between CMCC and Dr. Kirkaldy-Willis at the University of Saskatoon (1976). He practiced in Toronto from 1961 to 2007. Dr. Gitelman was a pioneer in the development of chiropractic science. He died on October 7, 2012.

  3. Chiropractic Integrated Care Pathway for Low Back Pain in Veterans: Results of a Delphi Consensus Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisi, Anthony J; Salsbury, Stacie A; Hawk, Cheryl; Vining, Robert D; Wallace, Robert B; Branson, Richard; Long, Cynthia R; Burgo-Black, A Lucille; Goertz, Christine M

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an integrated care pathway for doctors of chiropractic, primary care providers, and mental health professionals who manage veterans with low back pain, with or without mental health comorbidity, within Department of Veterans Affairs health care facilities. The research method used was a consensus process. A multidisciplinary investigative team reviewed clinical guidelines and Veterans Affairs pain and mental health initiatives to develop seed statements and care algorithms to guide chiropractic management and collaborative care of veterans with low back pain. A 5-member advisory committee approved initial recommendations. Veterans Affairs-based panelists (n = 58) evaluated the pathway via e-mail using a modified RAND/UCLA methodology. Consensus was defined as agreement by 80% of panelists. The modified Delphi process was conducted in July to December 2016. Most (93%) seed statements achieved consensus during the first round, with all statements reaching consensus after 2 rounds. The final care pathway addressed the topics of informed consent, clinical evaluation including history and examination, screening for red flags, documentation, diagnostic imaging, patient-reported outcomes, adverse event reporting, chiropractic treatment frequency and duration standards, tailored approaches to chiropractic care in veteran populations, and clinical presentation of common mental health conditions. Care algorithms outlined chiropractic case management and interprofessional collaboration and referrals between doctors of chiropractic and primary care and mental health providers. This study offers an integrative care pathway that includes chiropractic care for veterans with low back pain. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. An educational campaign to increase chiropractic intern advising roles on patient smoking cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strasser Sheryl M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco use, particularly smoking, is the most preventable cause of death in the United States. More than 400,000 premature deaths are associated with its use and the health care costs are in the billions. All health care provider groups should be concerned with patients who continue to smoke and use tobacco. The US Preventive Services Taskforce and Health People 2010 guidelines encourage providers to counsel smokers on cessation. Current studies, though limited regarding chiropractic advising practices indicate a low engagement rate when it comes to providing cessation information. Objective To test a campaign regarding initial impact aimed at increasing chiropractic interns advising on cessation and delivery of information to smokers on cessation. Discussion Chiropractic interns do engage patients on smoking status and can be encouraged to provide more cessation messages and information to patients. The initial impact assessment of this campaign increased the provision of information to patients by about 25%. The prevalence of smoking among chiropractic patients, particularly at teaching clinics may be lower than the national averages. Conclusion Chiropractic interns can and should be encouraged to advise smokers about cessation. A systematic method of intake information on smoking status is needed and a standardized education protocol for chiropractic colleges is needed. Chiropractic colleges should assess the adequacy of their advising roles and implement changes to increase cessation messages to their patients as soon as possible.

  5. Regional Supply of Chiropractic Care and Visits to Primary Care Physicians for Back and Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew A.; Yakusheva, Olga; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Bynum, Julie P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether availability of chiropractic care affects use of primary care physician (PCP) services is unknown. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 17.7 million older adults who were enrolled in Medicare from 2010 to 2011. We examined the relationship between regional supply of chiropractic care and PCP services using Spearman correlation. Generalized linear models were used to examine the association between regional supply of chiropractic care and number of annual visits to PCPs for back and/or neck pain. Results We found a positive association between regional supply of chiropractic care and PCP services (rs = 0.52; P neck pain was apparent. The number of PCP visits for back and/or neck pain was 8% lower (rate ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.91–0.92) in the quintile with the highest supply of chiropractic care compared to the lowest quintile. We estimate chiropractic care is associated with a reduction of 0.37 million visits to PCPs nationally, at a cost of $83.5 million. Conclusions Greater availability of chiropractic care in some areas may be offsetting PCP services for back and/or neck pain among older adults. (J Am Board Fam Med 2015;28:000–000.) PMID:26152439

  6. A survey of interprofessional education in chiropractic continuing education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Edward M; Lisi, Anthony J

    2014-10-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to describe the state of chiropractic continuing education vis-à-vis interprofessional education (IPE) with medical doctors (MD) in a survey of a sample of US doctors of chiropractic (DC) and through a review of policies. Methods : Forty-five chiropractors with experience in interprofessional settings completed an electronic survey of their experiences and perceptions regarding DC-MD IPE in chiropractic continuing education (CE). The licensing bodies of the 50 US states and the District of Columbia were queried to assess the applicability of continuing medical education (CME) to chiropractic relicensure. Results : The majority (89.1%) of survey respondents who attend CE-only events reported that they rarely to never experienced MD-IPE at these activities. Survey respondents commonly attended CME-only events, and 84.5% stated that they commonly to very commonly experienced MD-IPE at these activities. More than half (26 of 51) of the licensing bodies did not provide sufficient information to determine if CME was applicable to DC relicensure. Thirteen jurisdictions (25.5%) do not, and 12 jurisdictions (23.5%) do accept CME credits for chiropractic relicensure. Conclusion : The majority of integrated practice DCs we surveyed reported little to no IPE occurring at CE-only events, yet significant IPE occurring at CME events. However, we found only 23.5% of chiropractic licensing bodies allow CME credit to apply to chiropractic relicensure. These factors may hinder DC-MD IPE in continuing education.

  7. Jurisprudence and business management course content taught at accredited chiropractic colleges: A comparative audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleberzon, Brian J

    2010-03-01

    the purpose of this study was to conduct a comparative audit of the jurisprudence and business management courses offered at a number of different accredited chiropractic colleges. Faculty members responsible for teaching students jurisprudence and/or business management courses at a number of accredited colleges were contacted and asked to electronically submit their course outlines for review. Of the 62 different topics delivered at the 11 chiropractic colleges surveyed, not one topic was taught at all of them. The following topics were taught at 10 of the 11 respondent chiropractic colleges: business plan development; ethics and codes of conduct and; office staff/employees. Several topics were only taught at one accredited chiropractic college. While most chiropractic colleges provide some education in the areas of jurisprudence and business management, it would appear that there is no consensus opinion or 'model curriculum' on these topics towards which chiropractic programs may align themselves. Based on a literature search, this study is the first of its kind. A more extensive study is required, as well as a Delphi process to determine what should be taught to chiropractic students with respect to jurisprudence and business management in order to protect the public interest.

  8. Concussion assessment and management knowledge among chiropractic fourth year interns and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mohsen; Pichini, Alessandro; Scappaticci, Steven; Savic, Mitchell

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the degree of knowledge chiropractic fourth year interns and post-graduate chiropractic residents have in regard to concussion diagnosis and management. A survey modified from a study conducted by Boggild and Tator (2012), was administered to fourth year chiropractic interns and post-graduate residents via SurveyMonkey.com. Chiropractic fourth year interns and postgraduate chiropractic specialty college residents scored 5.2 and 5.25 out of 9 respectively, which compares well with Bogglid and Tator's reports on medical students and residents. Several knowledge gaps were identified in the sample population. The results from this survey show that the concussion knowledge among Canadian fourth year chiropractic interns and specialty college residents compares favorably with the knowledge of fourth year medical students and residents in diagnosing and managing concussions. Chiropractors appear to possess the skills and knowledge to diagnose and manage concussion equal to their medical counterparts. However, knowledge gaps regarding concussion diagnosis and management were found among chiropractic students and residents.

  9. Chiropractic management of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anette R; Lauridsen, Henrik H; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes and discusses the case of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) characterized by severe vertigo with dizziness, nausea, and nystagmus, treated without the use of spinal manipulation by a doctor of chiropractic. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 46-year......-old woman presented for care with complaints of acute vertigo and dizziness. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: The patient was examined and diagnosed with left posterior canalolithiasis by means of the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. She was treated successfully with the Epley maneuver once and subsequently discharged...

  10. EFFECTIVENESS OF CHIROPRACTIC ADJUSTMENT IN LUMBAR PAIN IN CROSSFIT PRACTITIONERS

    OpenAIRE

    MOEHLECKE, DESIREE; FORGIARINI JUNIOR, LUIZ ALBERTO

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of acute chiropractic adjustment in individuals who practice CrossFit with regard to complaints of low back pain and the joint range of motion in this region. Methods: A randomized clinical trial comprised of CrossFit practitioners from a box in Novo Hamburgo-RS, of both sexes and aged 18 to 40 years who had low back pain at the time of the study. The following tools were used: Semi-structured Anamnesis Questionnaire, Visual Analog Scale, McGill ...

  11. A proposed protocol for hand and table sanitizing in chiropractic clinics and education institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Marion Willard; Ramcharan, Michael; Floyd, Rod; Globe, Gary; Ndetan, Harrison; Williams, Ronald; Ivie, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective By nature, chiropractic is a hands-on profession using manipulation applied to the joints with direct skin-to-skin contacts. Chiropractic tables are designed with a face piece to accommodate the prone patient's head in a neutral position and hand rests to allow for relaxed shoulders and upper spine so treatment is facilitated. The purpose of this article is to present a proposed guideline for hand and treatment table surface sanitizing for the chiropractic profession that is evidence-based and can easily be adopted by teaching institutions and doctors in the field. Methods A review of the chiropractic literature demonstrated that pathogenic microbes are present on treatment tables in teaching clinics at multiple facilities, yet no standardized protocols exist in the United States regarding table sanitizing and hand hygiene in chiropractic clinics or education institutions. This article reviews the scientific literature on the subject by using several search engines, databases, and specific reviews of documents pertaining to the topic including existing general guidelines. Results The literature has several existing guidelines that the authors used to develop a proposed protocol for hand and table sanitizing specific to the chiropractic profession. Recommendations were developed and are presented on hand hygiene and table sanitizing procedures that could lower the risk of infection for both clinical personnel and patients in chiropractic facilities. Conclusion This article offers a protocol for hand and table sanitizing in chiropractic clinics and education institutions. The chiropractic profession should consider adoption of these or similar measures and disseminate them to teaching clinics, institutions, and private practitioners. PMID:19646384

  12. [Economic evaluation of a manual-based, multimodal cognitive behavioural therapy for school avoiding children with psychiatric disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weschenfelder, Ann-Kathrin; Reissner, Volker; Knollmann, Martin; Hebebrand, Johannes; Wasem, Jürgen; Neumann, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Untreated school refusal increases the risk of a premature discontinuation of the educational career. The aim of this study is the economic evaluation of a manual-based treatment for school refusal in comparison to the standard treatment. Within the cost-minimisation analysis, resource use is measured retrospectively for six months using the CSSRI questionnaire. Unit costs for most health care services are derived from published standard prices. Costs are calculated from the societal perspective based on prices compiled in 2011. The cost comparison during the one-year intervention period applies a difference in differences Approach. The most common diagnoses among the 112 participants are phobic and emotional disorders. The average cost per patient during the intervention period amounts to 7197 € (95 %-CI: 4746 € – 10 079 €) for the manual group and 9294 € (95 %-CI: 6313 € – 12 878 €) for the control group. The difference in adjusted costs of 1453 € in favour of the manual group is not statistically relevant. The manual-based treatment is equivalent if not slightly advantageous compared to the standard treatment considering the clinical outcomes and cost of illness.

  13. Role and reliability of passive joint motion assessment: Towards multivariable diagnostics and decision-making in manual therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Trijffel, E.

    2015-01-01

    Manual therapists strongly rely on passive intervertebral motion (PIVM) assessment for making decisions about spinal joint mobilisation and thrust manipulation in patients with neck or low-back pain. However, uncertainty exists about the use and the value of this physical examination procedure

  14. The efficacy of manual therapy and exercise for treating non-specific neck pain: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Benjamin; Hall, Toby; Bossert, Jean; Dugeny, Axel; Cagnie, Barbara; Pitance, Laurent

    2017-11-06

    To review and update the evidence for different forms of manual therapy (MT) and exercise for patients with different stages of non-specific neck pain (NP). MEDLINE, Cochrane-Register-of-Controlled-Trials, PEDro, EMBASE. A qualitative systematic review covering a period from January 2000 to December 2015 was conducted according to updated-guidelines. Specific inclusion criteria only on RCTs were used; including differentiation according to stages of NP (acute - subacute [ASNP] or chronic [CNP]), as well as sub-classification based on type of MT interventions: MT1 (HVLA manipulation); MT2 (mobilization and/or soft-tissue-techniques); MT3 (MT1 + MT2); and MT4 (Mobilization-with-Movement). In each sub-category, MT could be combined or not with exercise and/or usual medical care. Initially 121 studies were identified for potential inclusion. Based on qualitative and quantitative evaluation criteria, 23 RCTs were identified for review. Evidence for ASNP: MODERATE-evidence: In favour of (i) MT1 to the cervical spine (Cx) combined with exercises when compared to MT1 to the thoracic spine (Tx) combined with exercises; (ii) MT3 to the Cx and Tx combined with exercise compared to MT2 to the Cx with exercise or compared to usual medical care for pain and satisfaction with care from short to long-term. Evidence for CNP: STRONG-evidence: Of no difference of efficacy between MT2 at the symptomatic Cx level(s) in comparison to MT2 on asymptomatic Cx level(s) for pain and function. MODERATE to STRONG-evidence: In favour of MT1 and MT3 on Cx and Tx with exercise in comparison to exercise or MT alone for pain, function, satisfaction with care and general-health from short to moderate-terms. MODERATE-evidence: In favour (i) of MT1 as compared to MT2 and MT4, all applied to the Cx, for neck mobility, and pain in the very short term; (ii) of MT2 using sof-tissue-techniques to the Cx and Tx or MT3 to the Cx and Tx in comparison to no-treatment in the short-term for pain and disability

  15. Chiropractic and social justice: a view from the perspective of Beauchamp's principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Social justice in public health involves the process and product of a community acting to fairly distribute advantages and burdens to improve the health of its population and to reasonably take care of the disadvantaged. Although publications are available about chiropractic public health history, programs, and policy, the potential role of chiropractic in social justice has received little attention. This article discusses Beauchamp's 4 principles of social justice and suggests actions that the chiropractic profession may consider to participate in the practice of social justice in the field of public health. Copyright 2010 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The long-term effects of naprapathic manual therapy on back and neck pain - Results from a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohman Tony

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back and neck pain are very common, disabling and recurrent disorders in the general population and the knowledge of long-term effect of treatments are sparse. The aim of this study was to compare the long-term effects (up to one year of naprapathic manual therapy and evidence-based advice on staying active regarding non-specific back and/or neck pain. Naprapathy, a health profession mainly practiced in Sweden, Finland, Norway and in the USA, is characterized by a combination of manual musculoskeletal manipulations, aiming to decrease pain and disability in the neuromusculoskeletal system. Methods Subjects with non-specific pain/disability in the back and/or neck lasting for at least two weeks (n = 409, recruited at public companies in Sweden, were included in this pragmatic randomized controlled trial. The two interventions compared were naprapathic manual therapy such as spinal manipulation/mobilization, massage and stretching, (Index Group, and advice to stay active and on how to cope with pain, provided by a physician (Control Group. Pain intensity, disability and health status were measured by questionnaires. Results 89% completed the 26-week follow-up and 85% the 52-week follow-up. A higher proportion in the Index Group had a clinically important decrease in pain (risk difference (RD = 21%, 95% CI: 10-30 and disability (RD = 11%, 95% CI: 4-22 at 26-week, as well as at 52-week follow-ups (pain: RD = 17%, 95% CI: 7-27 and disability: RD = 17%, 95% CI: 5-28. The differences between the groups in pain and disability considered over one year were statistically significant favoring naprapathy (p ≤ 0.005. There were also significant differences in improvement in bodily pain and social function (subscales of SF-36 health status favoring the Index Group. Conclusions Combined manual therapy, like naprapathy, is effective in the short and in the long term, and might be considered for patients with non-specific back and/or neck

  17. Manual therapy for tension-type headache related to quality of work life and work presenteeism: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzani, Lucas; Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Zurriaga, Rosario; Andersen, Lars L

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the efficacy of manual therapy for tension-type headache (TTH) in restoring workers quality of work life, and how work presenteeism affects this relation. This study is a secondary analysis of a factorial, randomized clinical trial on manual therapy interventions. Altogether, 80 patients (85% women) with TTH and without current symptoms of any other concomitant disease participated. An experienced therapist delivered the treatment: myofascial inhibitory technique (IT), articulatory technique (AT), combined technique (IT and AT), and control group (no treatment). In general, all treatments as compared to our control group had a large effect (f≥.69) in the improvement of participants' quality of work life. Work presenteeism interacted with TTH treatment type's efficacy on participant's quality of work life. The inhibitory technique lead to higher reports of quality of work life than other treatment options only for participants with very low frequency of work presenteeism. In turn, TTH articulatory treatment techniques resulted in higher reports of quality of work life for a high to very high work presenteeism frequency. Articulatory manipulation technique is the more efficient treatment to improve quality of work life when the frequency of work presenteeism is high. Implications for future research and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Do chiropractic college faculty understand informed consent: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hondras Maria A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to survey full-time faculty at a single chiropractic college concerning their knowledge of Institutional Review Board (IRB policies in their institution as they pertain to educational research. Methods All full-time faculty were invited to participate in an anonymous survey. Four scenarios involving educational research were described and respondents were asked to select from three possible courses of action for each. In addition, respondents were queried about their knowledge of IRB policies, how they learned of these policies and about their years of service and departmental assignments. Results The response rate was 55%. In no scenario did the level of correct answers by all respondents score higher than 41% and in most, the scores were closer to just under 1 in 3. Sixty-five percent of respondents indicated they were unsure whether Palmer had any policies in place at all, while 4% felt that no such policies were in place. Just over one-quarter (27% were correct in noting that students can decline consent, while more than half (54% did not know whether there were any procedures governing student consent. Conclusion Palmer faculty have only modest understanding about institutional policies regarding the IRB and human subject research, especially pertaining to educational research. The institution needs to develop methods to provide knowledge and training to faculty. The results from this pilot study will be instrumental in developing better protocols for a study designed to survey the entire chiropractic academic community.

  19. Effectiveness of conservative interventions including exercise, manual therapy and medical management in adults with shoulder impingement: a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuri, Ruedi; Sattelmayer, Martin; Elsig, Simone; Kolly, Chloé; Tal, Amir; Taeymans, Jan; Hilfiker, Roger

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of conservative interventions for pain, function and range of motion in adults with shoulder impingement. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials. Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase and PEDro were searched from inception to January 2017. Randomised controlled trials including participants with shoulder impingement and evaluating at least one conservative intervention against sham or other treatments. For pain, exercise was superior to non-exercise control interventions (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.94, 95% CI -1.69 to -0.19). Specific exercises were superior to generic exercises (SMD -0.65, 95% CI -0.99 to -0.32). Corticosteroid injections were superior to no treatment (SMD -0.65, 95% CI -1.04 to -0.26), and ultrasound guided injections were superior to non-guided injections (SMD -0.51, 95% CI -0.89 to -0.13). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) had a small to moderate SMD of -0.29 (95% CI -0.53 to -0.05) compared with placebo. Manual therapy was superior to placebo (SMD -0.35, 95% CI -0.69 to -0.01). When combined with exercise, manual therapy was superior to exercise alone, but only at the shortest follow-up (SMD -0.32, 95% CI -0.62 to -0.01). Laser was superior to sham laser (SMD -0.88, 95% CI -1.48 to -0.27). Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ECSWT) was superior to sham (-0.39, 95% CI -0.78 to -0.01) and tape was superior to sham (-0.64, 95% CI -1.16 to -0.12), with small to moderate SMDs. Although there was only very low quality evidence, exercise should be considered for patients with shoulder impingement symptoms and tape, ECSWT, laser or manual therapy might be added. NSAIDS and corticosteroids are superior to placebo, but it is unclear how these treatments compare to exercise. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Teaching, leadership, scholarly productivity, and level of activity in the chiropractic profession: a study of graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic radiology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kenneth J; Siordia, Lawrence

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to track the graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) radiology residency program, review their scholarly productivity, and report those involved in teaching and leadership positions. Former LACC residents' career information was identified through publicly available electronic documents including Web sites and social media. PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature databases were searched for chiropractic graduate job surveys, and proportional comparisons were made between the career paths of LACC radiology residency graduates and those of non-residency-trained chiropractors. Of 47 former LACC residents, 28 (60%) have or previously had careers in tertiary (chiropractic) education; and 12 (26%) have attained a department chair position or higher at tertiary teaching institutions. Twenty-two (47%) have or previously had private radiology practices, whereas 11 (23%) have or previously had clinical chiropractic practices. Often, residency graduates hold or have held 2 of these positions at once; and one, all 3. Chapters or books were authored by 13 (28%). Radiology residency LACC graduates are professionally active, particularly in education, and demonstrate scholarly productivity.

  1. Functional disability in patients with low back pain: the mediator role of suffering and beliefs about pain control in patients receiving physical and chiropractic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M Graça; Roios, Edite; Pereira, Marta

    Low back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. There is evidence that depression, anxiety, and external locus of control are negative predictors of functional disability in low back patients. This study focused on the mediator role of suffering and beliefs about pain control in the relationship between psychological morbidity and functional disability in patients receiving physical therapy and chiropractic treatment for chronic low back pain. The sample included 213 patients receiving chiropractic treatment and 125 receiving physical therapy, who answered the following instruments: Beliefs about Pain Control Questionnaire; Inventory of Subjective Experiences of Suffering in Illness; Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire; and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales. Suffering was a mediator in the relationship between depression and functional disability in both treatment groups. Only beliefs related to external chance events mediated the relationship between depression and functional disability in the physical therapy group, but not in the chiropratic teratment group. Intervention should focus on suffering regardless of the type of treatment and target beliefs about pain control, in patients receiving physical therapy treatment since they seem to play a key role in functional disability in patients with low back pain. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Financial attitudes, knowledge, and habits of chiropractic students: A descriptive survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorence, Julie; Lawrence, Dana J.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Goertz, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to describe the financial knowledge, habits and attitudes of chiropractic students. Methods: We designed a cross-sectional survey to measure basic financial knowledge, current financial habits, risk tolerance, and beliefs about future income among 250 students enrolled in business courses at one US chiropractic college. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results: We received 57 questionnaires (23% response rate). Most respondents would accumulate over $125,000 in student loan debt by graduation. Financial knowledge was low (mean 77%). Most respondents (72%) scored as average financial risk takers. Chiropractic students reported recommended short-term habits such as having checking accounts (90%) and health insurance (63%) or paying monthly bills (88%) and credit cards (60%). Few saved money for unplanned expenses (39%) or long-term goals (26%), kept written budgets (32%), or had retirement accounts (19%). Conclusion: These chiropractic students demonstrated inadequate financial literacy and did not engage in many recommended financial habits. PMID:24587498

  3. Self-reported recognition of undiagnosed life threatening conditions in chiropractic practice: a random survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dwain M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to identify the type and frequency of previously undiagnosed life threatening conditions (LTC, based on self-reports of chiropractic physicians, which were first recognized by the chiropractic physician. Additionally this information may have a preliminary role in determining whether chiropractic education provides the knowledge necessary to recognize these events. Methods The study design was a postal, cross-sectional, epidemiological self-administered survey. Two thousand Doctors of Chiropractic in the US were randomly selected from a list of 57878. The survey asked respondents to state the number of cases from the list where they were the first physician to recognize the condition over the course of their practice careers. Space was provided for unlisted conditions. Results The response rate was 29.9%. Respondents represented 11442 years in practice and included 3861 patients with a reported undiagnosed LTC. The most commonly presenting conditions were in rank order: carcinoma, abdominal aneurysm, deep vein thrombosis, stroke, myocardial infarction, subdural hematoma and a large group of other diagnoses. The occurrence of a previously undiagnosed LTC can be expected to present to the chiropractic physician every 2.5 years based on the responding doctors reports. Conclusion Based on this survey chiropractic physicians report encountering undiagnosed LTC’s in the normal course of practice. The findings of this study are of importance to the chiropractic profession and chiropractic education. Increased awareness and emphasis on recognition of LTC is a critical part of the education process and practice life.

  4. Posterior rib fractures in a young infant who received chiropractic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Paria Majd; Greiner, Mary V; Duma, Elena M

    2012-11-01

    We report on a 21-day-old infant with healing posterior rib fractures that were noted after a chiropractic visit for colic. Chiropractors are the third largest group of health care professionals in the United States, and colic is the leading complaint for pediatric chiropractic care. Rib fractures, specifically when posterior, are traditionally considered to be secondary to nonaccidental trauma. Thorough investigation is necessary to rule out bone fragility and genetic disorders, but patient history is key when evaluating unexplained fractures.

  5. A Narrative Review of Lumbar Fusion Surgery With Relevance to Chiropractic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Clinton J; Wakefield, Pamela J; Bub, Glenn A; Toombs, James D

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this narrative review was to describe the most common spinal fusion surgical procedures, address the clinical indications for lumbar fusion in degeneration cases, identify potential complications, and discuss their relevance to chiropractic management of patients after surgical fusion. The PubMed database was searched from the beginning of the record through March 31, 2015, for English language articles related to lumbar fusion or arthrodesis or both and their incidence, procedures, complications, and postoperative chiropractic cases. Articles were retrieved and evaluated for relevance. The bibliographies of selected articles were also reviewed. The most typical lumbar fusion procedures are posterior lumbar interbody fusion, anterior lumbar interbody fusion, transforaminal interbody fusion, and lateral lumbar interbody fusion. Fair level evidence supports lumbar fusion procedures for degenerative spondylolisthesis with instability and for intractable low back pain that has failed conservative care. Complications and development of chronic pain after surgery is common, and these patients frequently present to chiropractic physicians. Several reports describe the potential benefit of chiropractic management with spinal manipulation, flexion-distraction manipulation, and manipulation under anesthesia for postfusion low back pain. There are no published experimental studies related specifically to chiropractic care of postfusion low back pain. This article describes the indications for fusion, common surgical practice, potential complications, and relevant published chiropractic literature. This review includes 10 cases that showed positive benefits from chiropractic manipulation, flexion-distraction, and/or manipulation under anesthesia for postfusion lumbar pain. Chiropractic care may have a role in helping patients in pain who have undergone lumbar fusion surgery.

  6. Chiropractic: Is it Efficient in Treatment of Diseases? Review of Systematic Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Salehi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chiropractic is a complementary medicine that has been growing increasingly in different countries over recent decades. It addresses the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the neuromusculoskeletal system disorders and their effects on the whole body health. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of chiropractic in the treatment of different diseases. To gather data, scientific electronic databases, such as Cochrane, Medline, Google Scholar, and Scirus were searched and all systematic reviews in the field of chiropractic were obtained. Reviews were included if they were specifically concerned with the effectiveness of chiropractic treatment, included evidence from at least one clinical trial, included randomized studies and focused on a specific disease. The research data including the article’s first author’s name, type of disease, intervention type, number and types of research used, meta-analysis, number of participants, and overall results of the study, were extracted, studied and analyzed. Totally, 23 chiropractic systematic reviews were found, and 11 articles met the defined criteria. The results showed the influence of chiropractic on improvement of neck pain, shoulder and neck trigger points, and sport injuries. In the cases of asthma, infant colic, autism spectrum disorder, gastrointestinal problems, fibromyalgia, back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome, there was no conclusive scientific evidence. There is heterogeneity in some of the studies and also limited number of clinical trials in the assessed systematic reviews. Thus, conducting comprehensive studies based on more reliable study designs are highly recommended.

  7. Integrated neuroscience program: an alternative approach to teaching neurosciences to chiropractic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaohua; La Rose, James; Zhang, Niu

    2009-01-01

    Most chiropractic colleges do not offer independent neuroscience courses because of an already crowded curriculum. The Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida has developed and implemented an integrated neuroscience program that incorporates neurosciences into different courses. The goals of the program have been to bring neurosciences to students, excite students about the interrelationship of neuroscience and chiropractic, improve students' understanding of neuroscience, and help the students understand the mechanisms underpinning the chiropractic practice. This study provides a descriptive analysis on how the integrated neuroscience program is taught via students' attitudes toward neuroscience and the comparison of students' perceptions of neuroscience content knowledge at different points in the program. A questionnaire consisting of 58 questions regarding the neuroscience courses was conducted among 339 students. The questionnaire was developed by faculty members who were involved in teaching neuroscience and administered in the classroom by faculty members who were not involved in the study. Student perceptions of their neuroscience knowledge, self-confidence, learning strategies, and knowledge application increased considerably through the quarters, especially among the 2nd-year students. The integrated neuroscience program achieved several of its goals, including an increase in students' confidence, positive attitude, ability to learn, and perception of neuroscience content knowledge. The authors believe that such gains can expand student ability to interpret clinical cases and inspire students to become excited about chiropractic research. The survey provides valuable information for teaching faculty to make the course content more relevant to chiropractic students.

  8. Are chiropractic tests for the lumbo-pelvic spine reliable and valid? A systematic critical literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, L; Leboeuf-Yde, C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the peer-reviewed literature about the reliability and validity of chiropractic tests used to determine the need for spinal manipulative therapy of the lumbo-pelvic spine, taking into account the quality of the studies. DATA SOURCES: The CHIROLARS database......-pelvic spine were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Data quality were assessed independently by the two reviewers, with a quality score based on predefined methodologic criteria. Results of the studies were then evaluated in relation to quality. DATA SYNTHESIS: None of the tests studied had been sufficiently...... evaluated in relation to reliability and validity. Only tests for palpation for pain had consistently acceptable results. Motion palpation of the lumbar spine might be valid but showed poor reliability, whereas motion palpation of the sacroiliac joints seemed to be slightly reliable but was not shown...

  9. Manual-based cognitive behavioral and cognitive rehabilitation therapy for young-onset dementia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonga, Johanne Bjoernstad; Arnevik, Espen Ajo; Werheid, Katja; Ulstein, Ingun Dina

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing attention worldwide to young-onset dementia (YOD) and this group's special challenges and needs. The literature on psychosocial interventions for this population is scarce, and little is known about the specific challenges and benefits of working therapeutically with this group of patients. The aim of this study was to explore if a manual-based structured cognitive behavioral/cognitive rehabilitation program would be beneficial for these patients. One case, a 63-year-old woman with YOD, is presented to illustrate how this intervention can be applied to individual patients to manage depressive symptoms in YOD.

  10. Manual Khalifa Therapy Improves Functional and Morphological Outcome of Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture in the Knee: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ofner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is a high incidence injury usually treated surgically. According to common knowledge, it does not heal spontaneously, although some claim the opposite. Regeneration therapy by Khalifa was developed for injuries of the musculoskeletal system by using specific pressure to the skin. This randomized, controlled, observer-blinded, multicentre study was performed to validate this assumption. Thirty patients with complete ACL rupture, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI verified, were included. Study examinations (e.g., international knee documentation committee (IKDC score were performed at inclusion (t0. Patients were randomized to receive either standardised physiotherapy (ST or additionally 1 hour of Khalifa therapy at the first session (STK. Twenty-four hours later, study examinations were performed again (t1. Three months later control MRI and follow-up examinations were performed (t2. Initial status was comparable between both groups. There was a highly significant difference of mean IKDC score results at t1 and t2. After 3 months, 47% of the STK patients, but no ST patient, demonstrated an end-to-end homogeneous ACL in MRI. Clinical and physical examinations were significantly different in t1 and t2. ACL healing can be improved with manual therapy. Physical activity can be performed without pain and nearly normal range of motion after one treatment of specific pressure.

  11. Theoretical and practical outline of the Copenhagen PACT narrative-based exercise counselling manual to promote physical activity in post-therapy cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midtgaard, Julie

    2013-02-01

    Sedentary behaviour and reduced exercise capacity are potential persisting effects of anti-cancer therapy that may predispose to serious health conditions. It is well-established that physical exercise may prevent some of these problems. However, the extent to which cancer survivors are able to adopt long-term physical activity habits depends largely on their motivation. This theoretical paper aims to outline how researchers and practitioners can draw from Antonovsky's salutogenetic theory and White & Epston's Narrative Therapy to develop and implement intervention efforts centered on promotion of long-term physical activity behaviour, while at the same time increasing the individual cancer survivor's sense of meaning and personal health resources. The Copenhagen PACT (Physical Activity after Cancer Treatment) Study targeting adoption and maintenance of regular physical activity in post-therapy cancer survivors is briefly presented including a brief review of the theoretical rationale behind the psychological component of the intervention, i.e. a narrative-based exercise counselling programme. Subsequently, particular attention is given to the core principles, different components and structure of the counselling manual including sample questions and examples of written documents that have emanated from the individual counselling sessions. The discussion includes consideration of some methodological challenges that arise when attempting to evaluate narrative-based interventions in the context of physical activity promotion in cancer rehabilitation and survivorship care.

  12. Trial Protocol: Cognitive functional therapy compared with combined manual therapy and motor control exercise for people with non-specific chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belache, Fabiana Terra Cunha; Souza, Cíntia Pereira de; Fernandez, Jessica; Castro, Julia; Ferreira, Paula Dos Santos; Rosa, Elizana Rodrigues de Sousa; Araújo, Nathalia Cristina Gimenez de; Reis, Felipe José Jandre; Almeida, Renato Santos de; Nogueira, Leandro Alberto Calazans; Correia, Luís Cláudio Lemos; Meziat-Filho, Ney

    2018-06-11

    Chronic low back pain is a public health problem, and there is strong evidence that it is associated with a complex interaction of biopsychosocial factors. Cognitive functional therapy is an intervention that deals with potentially modifiable multidimensional aspects of pain (eg, provocative cognitive, movement and lifestyle behaviours). There is evidence (from a single randomised, controlled trial) that cognitive functional therapy is better than combined manual therapy and motor control exercise. However, this study had significant methodological shortcomings including the failure to carry out an intention-to-treat analysis and a considerable loss of follow-up of participants. It is important to replicate this study in another domain through a randomised clinical trial with similar objectives but correcting these methodological shortcomings. To investigate the efficacy of cognitive functional therapy compared to combined manual therapy and exercise on pain and disability at 3 months in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. Two-group, randomised, multicentre controlled trial with blinded assessors. One hundred and forty-eight participants with chronic low back pain that has persisted for >3months and no specific spinal pathology will be recruited from the school clinic of the Centro Universitário Augusto Motta and a private clinic in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Four to 10 sessions of cognitive functional therapy. The physiotherapists who will treat the participants in the cognitive functional therapy group have previously attended 2 workshops with two different tutors of the method. Such physiotherapists have completed 106 hours of training, including workshops and patient examinations, as well as conducting a pilot study under the supervision of another physiotherapist with>3 years of clinical experience in cognitive functional therapy. Four to 10 sessions of combined manual therapy and motor control exercises. Participants in the combined

  13. The influence of torque and manual glide path on the defect or separation rate of NiTi rotary instruments in root canal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarrabi M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the effecting factors in prognosis of root canal therapy is accidental procedure as broken files that may be unpreventable. Many manufacturers have designed and marketed various electromotors that can control rotational speed and torque. On the other hand, some studies have recommended applying a manual glide path to diminish contact area between the file and canal walls. The purpose of this study was evaluation of the effect of torque and a manual glide path on defects as separation of Nickel-titanium (NiTi rotary files. Materials and Methods: This ex vivo randomized controlled trial study was carried out on 160 canals of human′s matured molars with mild curvature (15-338. After initial preparation of samples and checking for inclusion criteria, in first group, preparation was carried out with air-driven handpiece, and in group two, Endo IT was used as electromotor. In both groups, Mtwo files with simultaneous technique were used for preparation. Then all data were collected and analyzed with Mann Whitny, Mantel Cox, and t-test. Results: No significant differences between two groups (P < 0.05 were observed. Based on survival analysis, safety probability of files after preparation of nine canals is 64% in group one and 69.9% in group two. There was no significant differences between this safety probability in two groups (P = 0.272. Conclusion: Usage of torque control handpiece is not an important factor, comparing instrumentation technique.

  14. Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and postmodern core☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzon, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to explore the postmodern, postrational, and postconventional core of DD Palmer's self-sense and philosophy. Discussion DD Palmer's self and philosophy can be viewed as a reaction to the self of modernity and its challenges of a fracture between mind and body, spirit, and nature. It is argued that Palmer's solution to these vexing problems facing the modern self was to use postrational and postconventional logic to overcome the dualisms. His philosophy resonates with similar postrational approaches, most notably, the German idealist Schelling. Conclusion It is argued that Palmer was one of the first postrational individuals in America and that chiropractic was an attempt at the first postrational health profession. PMID:22693480

  15. The use of diagnostic coding in chiropractic practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Testern, Cecilie D; Hestbæk, Lise; French, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnostic coding has several potential benefits, including improving the feasibility of data collection for research and clinical audits and providing a common language to improve interdisciplinary collaboration. The primary aim of this study was to determine the views and perspectives......-2 PLUS) provided the 14 chiropractors with some experience in diagnostic coding, followed by an interview on the topic. The interviews were analysed thematically. The participating chiropractors and an independent coder applied ICPC-2 PLUS terms to the diagnoses of 10 patients. Then the level...... of agreement between the chiropractors and the coder was determined and Cohen's Kappa was used to determine the agreement beyond that expected by chance. RESULTS: From the interviews the three emerging themes were: 1) Advantages and disadvantages of using a clinical coding system in chiropractic practice, 2...

  16. Fall risk profile and quality-of-life status of older chiropractic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Kelly R; Noone, Paul L; Short, Krystal; Elley, C Raina; Haavik, Heidi

    2011-02-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of fall risk factors in older chiropractic patients. The secondary aim was to investigate the quality-of-life status of older chiropractic patients and to see whether a history of falling was related to quality-of-life status. A cross-sectional study was conducted at 12 chiropractic practices throughout Auckland, New Zealand, and Melbourne, Australia. The study involved gaining a profile of health status, fall history, and fall risk from active chiropractic patients who were 65 years or older. One hundred ten older chiropractic patients were approached, and 101 agreed to participate in this study (response rate, 91.8%). Thirty-five percent of participants had experienced at least 1 fall in the previous 12 months. Of those that had fallen, 80% had at least a minor injury, with 37% of fallers requiring medical attention and 6% suffering a serious injury. The prevalence of most fall risk factors was consistent with published data for community-dwelling older adults. Quality of life of older chiropractic patients appeared to be good, but fallers reported a lower physical component summary score compared with nonfallers (P = .04). A portion of the older chiropractic patients sampled in this study had a substantial risk of falling. This risk could be assessed on a regular basis for the presence of modifiable fall risk factors, and appropriate advice, given when fall risks are identified. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Structures manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This manual was written as a guide for use by design personnel in the Vermont Agency of Transportation Structures Section. This manual covers the design responsibilities of the Section. It does not cover other functions that are a part of the Structu...

  18. Quality Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Michael

    The quality manual is the “heart” of every management system related to quality. Quality assurance in analytical laboratories is most frequently linked with ISO/IEC 17025, which lists the standard requirements for a quality manual. In this chapter examples are used to demonstrate, how these requirements can be met. But, certainly, there are many other ways to do this.

  19. The effectiveness of manual therapy for the management of musculoskeletal disorders of the upper and lower extremities: a systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southerst, Danielle; Yu, Hainan; Randhawa, Kristi; Côté, Pierre; D'Angelo, Kevin; Shearer, Heather M; Wong, Jessica J; Sutton, Deborah; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Goldgrub, Rachel; Dion, Sarah; Cox, Jocelyn; Menta, Roger; Brown, Courtney K; Stern, Paula J; Stupar, Maja; Carroll, Linda J; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the upper and lower extremities are common in the general population and place a significant burden on the health care system. Manual therapy is recommended by clinical practice guidelines for the management of these injuries; however, there is limited evidence to support its effectiveness. The purpose of our review was to investigate the effectiveness of manual therapy in adults or children with MSDs of the upper or lower extremity. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies, and case-control studies evaluating the effectiveness of manual therapy were eligible. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1990 to 2015. Paired reviewers screened studies for relevance and critically appraised relevant studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Studies with low risk of bias were synthesized following best-evidence synthesis principles. Where available, we computed mean changes between groups, relative risks and 95 % CI. We screened 6047 articles. Seven RCTs were critically appraised and three had low risk of bias. For adults with nonspecific shoulder pain of variable duration, cervicothoracic spinal manipulation and mobilization in addition to usual care may improve self-perceived recovery compared to usual care alone. For adults with subacromial impingement syndrome of variable duration, neck mobilization in addition to a multimodal shoulder program of care provides no added benefit. Finally, for adults with grade I-II ankle sprains of variable duration, lower extremity mobilization in addition to home exercise and advice provides greater short-term improvements in activities and function over home exercise and advice alone. No studies were included that evaluated the effectiveness of manual therapy in children or for the management of other extremity injuries in adults. The current evidence on the effectiveness of manual therapy

  20. Multimodal Chiropractic Care for Pain and Disability in a Patient Diagnosed With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobility Type: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Richard G

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical response to multimodal chiropractic treatment of a patient diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT), and chronic pain. A 22-year-old woman presented with severe chronic neck and low back pain, headaches, and bilateral hand pain and stiffness. In addition to these pain complaints, the patient had a family history of EDS, weekly or daily recurring joint dislocations, and upper and lower extremity joint hypermobility. As a result of her significant history and examination findings, which met the Brighton and Villefranche criteria, she was diagnosed with EDS-HT. Treatment primarily consisted of low force joint manipulative therapy and soft tissue therapy intermittently over 21 months concurrently with conventional and complementary medical care. Multiple outcome questionnaires were administered pragmatically at follow-up intervals of 3, 5½, 8½, 19, and 21 months, including but not limited to the Headache and Neck Disability Indices and the Oswestry Low Back Questionnaire. The patient had clinically meaningful improvements on the Neck Disability Index, the Headache Disability Index, and the Revised Oswestry after 3, 5½, 8½, and 21 months from baseline. This patient with EDS-HT had clinically meaningful decreases in disability, headache, and spine pain after a course of multimodal chiropractic care combined with conventional and complementary medical care.

  1. Manual physical therapy and exercise versus supervised home exercise in the management of patients with inversion ankle sprain: a multicenter randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Joshua A; Mintken, Paul E; McDevitt, Amy; Bieniek, Melanie L; Carpenter, Kristin J; Kulp, Katherine; Whitman, Julie M

    2013-01-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To compare the effectiveness of manual therapy and exercise (MTEX) to a home exercise program (HEP) in the management of individuals with an inversion ankle sprain. An in-clinic exercise program has been found to yield similar outcomes as an HEP for individuals with an inversion ankle sprain. However, no studies have compared an MTEX approach to an HEP. Patients with an inversion ankle sprain completed the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) activities of daily living subscale, the FAAM sports subscale, the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, and the numeric pain rating scale. Patients were randomly assigned to either an MTEX or an HEP treatment group. Outcomes were collected at baseline, 4 weeks, and 6 months. The primary aim (effects of treatment on pain and disability) was examined with a mixed-model analysis of variance. The hypothesis of interest was the 2-way interaction (group by time). Seventy-four patients (mean ± SD age, 35.1 ± 11.0 years; 48.6% female) were randomized into the MTEX group (n = 37) or the HEP group (n = 37). The overall group-by-time interaction for the mixed-model analysis of variance was statistically significant for the FAAM activities of daily living subscale (Pankle sprains. Registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00797368). Therapy, level 1b-.

  2. Abdominal Manual Therapy Repairs Interstitial Cells of Cajal and Increases Colonic c-Kit Expression When Treating Bowel Dysfunction after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of abdominal manual therapy (AMT on bowel dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI, investigating interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs and related c-kit expression. Methods. Model rats were divided as SCI and SCI with drug treatment (intragastric mosapride, low-intensity (SCI + LMT; 50 g, 50 times/min, and high-intensity AMT (SCI + HMT; 100 g, 150 times/min. After 14 days of treatment, weight, improved Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB locomotor score, and intestinal movement were evaluated. Morphological structure of spinal cord and colon tissues were examined. Immunostaining, RT-PCR, and western blot were used to assess c-kit expression. Results. In SCI rats, AMT could not restore BBB, but it significantly increased weight, shortened time to defecation, increased feces amounts, and improved fecal pellet traits and colon histology. AMT improved the number, distribution, and ultrastructure of colonic ICCs, increasing colonic c-kit mRNA and protein levels. Compared with the SCI + Drug and SCI + LMT groups, the SCI + HMT group showed better therapeutic effect in improving intestinal transmission function and promoting c-kit expression. Conclusions. AMT is an effective therapy for recovery of intestinal transmission function. It could repair ICCs and increase c-kit expression in colon tissues after SCI, in a frequency-dependent and pressure-dependent manner.

  3. Chiropractic care and public health : answering difficult questions about safety, care through the lifespan, and community action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre; Hestbaek, Lise; Injeyan, H Stephen; Puhl, Aaron; Green, Bart; Napuli, Jason G; Dunn, Andrew S; Dougherty, Paul; Killinger, Lisa Zaynab; Page, Stacey A; Stites, John S; Ramcharan, Michael; Leach, Robert A; Byrd, Lori D; Redwood, Daniel; Kopansky-Giles, Deborah R

    The purpose of this collaborative summary is to document current chiropractic involvement in the public health movement, reflect on social ecological levels of influence as a profession, and summarize the relationship of chiropractic to the current public health topics of: safety, health issues

  4. Adverse events following cervical manipulative therapy: consensus on classification among Dutch medical specialists, manual therapists, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Hendrikus A; Lakke, Sandra E; Schmitt, Maarten A; Van der Schans, Cees P

    2017-12-01

    To obtain consensus-based agreement on a classification system of adverse events (AE) following cervical spinal manipulation. The classification system should be comprised of clear definitions, include patients' and clinicians' perspectives, and have an acceptable number of categories. Design : A three-round Delphi study. Participants : Thirty Dutch participants (medical specialists, manual therapists, and patients) participated in an online survey. Procedure : Participants inventoried AE and were asked about their preferences for either a three- or a four-category classification system. The identified AE were classified by two analysts following the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). Participants were asked to classify the severity for all AE in relation to the time duration. Consensus occurred in a three-category classification system. There was strong consensus for 16 AE in all severities (no, minor, and major AE) and all three time durations [hours, days, weeks]. The 16 AE included anxiety, flushing, skin rash, fainting, dizziness, coma, altered sensation, muscle tenderness, pain, increased pain during movement, radiating pain, dislocation, fracture, transient ischemic attack, stroke, and death. Mild to strong consensus was reached for 13 AE. A consensus-based classification system of AE is established which includes patients' and clinicians' perspectives and has three categories. The classification comprises a precise description of potential AE in accordance with internationally accepted classifications. After international validation, clinicians and researchers may use this AE classification system to report AE in clinical practice and research.

  5. On-Site Chiropractic Care as an Employee Benefit: A Single-Location Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minicozzi, Salvatore J; Russell, Brent S

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the role of on-site chiropractic care in one corporate environment. A part-time chiropractic practice that provides services to a single company on site, 1 day per week, is described. Most care is oriented toward "wellness," is paid for by the employer, and is limited only by the chiropractor's few weekly hours of on-site availability. With approval from the company, the authors conducted an absenteeism analysis after obtaining ethics approval and consent from employee-patients who received care between 2012 and 2014. Comparisons of absenteeism rates of the sample were compared with lost worktime rates from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics' Labor Force Statistics. Of 40 current employees, 35 used chiropractic services; 17 employee-patients met the inclusion criteria. The lost worktime rates of those using chiropractic services (0.72%, 0.55%, and 0.67%, for 2012, 2013, and 2014, respectively) were lower than corresponding rates from Labor Force Statistics (1.5%, 1.2%, and 1.1%). Absenteeism for the employee-patients was lower than equivalent national figures in this sample of workers. Though these results may or may not be related to the chiropractic care, these findings prompt further investigation into this relationship.

  6. Alternative futures: Fields, boundaries, and divergent professionalisation strategies within the Chiropractic profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Caragh

    2017-10-01

    Sociological studies of the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) occupations have documented the professionalisation strategies these groups use to establish boundaries between themselves and their competitors, including seeking educational accreditation and statutory regulation/licensure. Chiropractic has been particularly successful at professionalising and in Australia and the UK it is taught within public universities. Recent events have threatened chiropractic's university foothold, however, showing that professionalisation needs to be understood as an ongoing process of negotiation. Based on interviews with chiropractors in Australia and the UK, this paper examines the professionalisation strategies deployed by chiropractors within and outside of the university. Highly divergent strategies are identified across different sectors of the profession, relating to defining the chiropractic paradigm, directing education and constructing professional identity. In each domain, chiropractic academics tended to prioritise building the evidence base and becoming more aligned with medicine and other allied health professions. Although some practitioners supported this agenda, others strove to preserve chiropractic's vitalistic philosophy and professional distinction. Following Bourdieu, these intra-professional struggles are interpreted as occurring within a field in which chiropractors compete for different forms of capital, pulled by two opposing poles. The differing orientations and strategies pursued at the two poles of the field point to a number of possible futures for this CAM profession, including a potential split within the profession itself. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of manual therapy versus proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation in dynamic balance, mobility and flexibility in field hockey players. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma V; López-Martínez, Susana; Inglés, Marta; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Marta

    2018-04-22

    To compare the effectiveness of a specific Manual Therapy (MT) protocol applied to field hockey players (FHP), versus a Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) protocol, in the improvement of dynamic balance, active range of movement and lumbar flexibility one-week and four-weeks after the treatment. Randomized controlled trial. Participants were assigned to 2 groups: MT and PNF. 30 min' sessions were performed once a week for three weeks. Three evaluations were performed: basal, one-week and four-weeks post-treatment. University of Valencia (Spain). 22 in MT group and 20 in PNF group. Dynamic Balance, measured with Star Excursion Balance Test; Active Range of Motion (ROM), using a manual goniometer and Lumbar Flexibility, assessed with Fingertip-to-floor test. Both groups significantly improved in lateral and medial dynamic balance one-week post-treatment (p < 0.05); but the improvement in the MT group lasted until the fourth-week after treatment in both reaches (lateral and medial) (p < 0.05). MT group also obtained significant improvements in dorsal flexion of the ankle in the fourth-week post-treatment (p < 0.05) and in lumbar flexibility one-week post-treatment (p < 0.05). MT and PNF improve dynamic balance one-week post-treatment; however, the improvement obtained through MT is maintained four-weeks later. Only MT improves dorsal flexion of the ankle four-weeks post-treatment and lumbar flexibility one-week post-treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Manual lymphatic drainage with comprehensive anti-diabetic therapy (MLD / CDT as a method of treatment of lymphoedema - literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Płoszaj

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema is an accumulation of lymph, i.e stagnation of water and proteins in extracellular space and lymphatic vessel due to impairment of its transportation as an effect of congenital disorders or lymph vessel lesion. The priority in therapeutic approach to lymphedema should be establishing the cause of edema, setting medical diagnosis and treatment method as early as possible. Complex Decongestive Therapy is recommended by International Society of Lymphology and considered as a standard in lympedema treatment irrespective of their stage of development and the cause.

  9. Chiropractic treatment of lateral epicondylitis: a case report utilizing active release techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliedt, Jordan A; Daniels, Clinton J

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the chiropractic management of a case of lateral epicondylitis with active release techniques (ART). A 48-year-old white man presented to a chiropractic clinic with a complaint of left lateral elbow pain that began 2 years previous with insidious onset. The patient reported an inability to play 18 consecutive holes of golf due to the pain. Treatment consisted of 5 sessions of ART (a soft tissue technique that is applied to muscles, fascia, tendons, ligaments, and nerves) applied to the left elbow soft tissue over a duration of 3 weeks. The patient reported an absence of pain and ability to consistently play 18 consecutive holes of golf up to 3 times per week at 4 and 8 weeks post-treatment. This patient with lateral epicondylitis responded favorably to chiropractic treatment using the application of ART, as demonstrated by reduced pain and increased functional outcomes.

  10. Generalizability of a composite student selection procedure at a university-based chiropractic program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Korsholm, Lars; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    , rater and residual effects were estimated for a mixed model with the restricted maximum likelihood method. The reliability of obtained applicant ranks (generalizability coefficients) was calculated for the individual admission criteria and for the composite admission procedure. RESULTS: Very good......PURPOSE: Non-cognitive admission criteria are typically used in chiropractic student selection to supplement grades. The reliability of non-cognitive student admission criteria in chiropractic education has not previously been examined. In addition, very few studies have examined the overall test...... test, and an admission interview. METHODS: Data from 105 Chiropractic applicants from the 2007 admission at the University of Southern Denmark were available for analysis. Each admission parameter was double scored using two random, blinded, and independent raters. Variance components for applicant...

  11. Chiropractic Treatment for Gastrointestinal Problems: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many chiropractors believe that chiropractic treatments are effective for gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of the present systematic review was to critically evaluate the evidence from controlled clinical trials supporting or not supporting this notion. Six electronic databases were searched for relevant studies. No limits were applied to language or publication date. Prospective, controlled, clinical trials of any type of chiropractic treatment for any type of gastrointestinal problem, except infant colic, were included. Only two trials were found – one was a pilot study, and the other had reached a positive conclusion; however, both had serious methodological flaws. There is no supportive evidence that chiropractic is an effective treatment for gastrointestinal disorders.

  12. Outcomes of usual chiropractic, harm & efficacy, the ouch study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that adverse events occur during chiropractic treatment. However, because of these studies design we do not know the frequency and extent of these events when compared to sham treatment. The principal aims of this study are to establish the frequency and severity of adverse effects from short term usual chiropractic treatment of the spine when compared to a sham treatment group. The secondary aim of this study is to establish the efficacy of usual short term chiropractic care for spinal pain when compared to a sham intervention. Methods One hundred and eighty participants will be randomly allocated to either usual chiropractic care or a sham intervention group. To be considered for inclusion the participants must have experienced non-specific spinal pain for at least one week. The study will be conducted at the clinics of registered chiropractors in Western Australia. Participants in each group will receive two treatments at intervals no less than one week. For the usual chiropractic care group, the selection of therapeutic techniques will be left to the chiropractors' discretion. For the sham intervention group, de-tuned ultrasound and de-tuned activator treatment will be applied by the chiropractors to the regions where spinal pain is experienced. Adverse events will be assessed two days after each appointment using a questionnaire developed for this study. The efficacy of short term chiropractic care for spinal pain will be examined at two week follow-up by assessing pain, physical function, minimum acceptable outcome, and satisfaction with care, with the use of the following outcome measures: Numerical Rating Scale, Functional Rating Index, Neck Disability Index, Minimum Acceptable Outcome Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index, and a global measure of treatment satisfaction. The statistician, outcome assessor, and participants will be blinded to treatment allocation. Trial

  13. "Research" and "science" in the first half of the chiropractic century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, J C; Green, B N; Johnson, C D

    1995-01-01

    In the first 50 years of the chiropractic profession, a variety of unorthodox meanings for the terms "research," "science" and related words were in evidence. In harmony with popular conceptions of the day, science was constructed as a relatively static body of knowledge and was thought to reflect the will of God. Research was an ill-defined activity, and acquisition of new knowledge did not involve the experimental methodology that increasingly took hold in biology and medicine in the twentieth century. Chiropractors often viewed science and research as marketing strategies. Clinical data collection, when it occurred at all, was not described in sufficient detail to permit replication. Results were enthusiastically interpreted as indisputable proof of investigators' a priori assumptions about the effectiveness of chiropractic methods. A few in the profession recognized the general lack of understanding of the scientific method and sought reform from within. However, the colleges were unwilling to introduce coursework in research methods. At the end of World War II, the broad-scope national association of chiropractors in the United States established a nonprofit foundation for the purpose of raising funds for chiropractic research and education. Research plans were poorly conceived and grandiose: the first major initiative of the Chiropractic Research Foundation involved a nationwide publicity and fund-raising campaign modeled after the March of Dimes. When these efforts failed and the possibility of establishing free-standing research centers collapsed, the Foundation sought to shift responsibility for research to the schools. The poverty-stricken chiropractic colleges lacked the research sophistication for this task. Several more decades would pass before a sustained research effort and interest in clinical experimentation would become evident in chiropractic.

  14. Training chiropractic students in weight management counseling using standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Cheryl; Ramcharan, Michael; Kruger, Carla LeRiche

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and assess an activity that trained chiropractic students to counsel patients on weight management through the use of standardized patients. This was a descriptive study using mixed methods. Students were trained to apply health behavior theory and the transtheoretical model. Standardized patients were given a case to portray with the students. Students had 15 minutes for the encounter. The encounters were assessed in 2 ways: (1) standardized patients answered a brief questionnaire about the students' performance, and (2) students answered a questionnaire about the utility of the intervention. Numerical data were extracted from the audiovisual management platform, and statistics were computed for each question. Comments made by students and patients were transferred verbatim for content analysis. A total of 102 students took part in the activity. Students' performance in the encounter was uniformly high, with over 90% "yes" responses to all questions except "gave me printed information material" and "discussed the printed material with me." The key issue identified in the comments by standardized patients was that students tended not to connect weight management with their chief complaint (low back pain). Nearly all students (97%) thought the activity would be useful to their future practice, and 97% felt it had increased their confidence in providing weight management counseling. This experiential activity was assessed to be useful to students' future practice and appeared to provide them with skills to successfully communicate with patients on weight management.

  15. Test anxiety and academic performance in chiropractic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Niu; Henderson, Charles N R

    2014-01-01

    Objective : We assessed the level of students' test anxiety, and the relationship between test anxiety and academic performance. Methods : We recruited 166 third-quarter students. The Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI) was administered to all participants. Total scores from written examinations and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) were used as response variables. Results : Multiple regression analysis shows that there was a modest, but statistically significant negative correlation between TAI scores and written exam scores, but not OSCE scores. Worry and emotionality were the best predictive models for written exam scores. Mean total anxiety and emotionality scores for females were significantly higher than those for males, but not worry scores. Conclusion : Moderate-to-high test anxiety was observed in 85% of the chiropractic students examined. However, total test anxiety, as measured by the TAI score, was a very weak predictive model for written exam performance. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that replacing total anxiety (TAI) with worry and emotionality (TAI subscales) produces a much more effective predictive model of written exam performance. Sex, age, highest current academic degree, and ethnicity contributed little additional predictive power in either regression model. Moreover, TAI scores were not found to be statistically significant predictors of physical exam skill performance, as measured by OSCEs.

  16. Conventional Microscopy vs. Computer Imagery in Chiropractic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Christine M; Larzelere, Elizabeth D; Arar, Ilija

    2008-01-01

    As human tissue pathology slides become increasingly difficult to obtain, other methods of teaching microscopy in educational laboratories must be considered. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our students' satisfaction with newly implemented computer imagery based laboratory instruction and to obtain input from their perspective on the advantages and disadvantages of computerized vs. traditional microscope laboratories. This undertaking involved the creation of a new computer laboratory. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease, 7(th)ed, was chosen as the required text which gave students access to the Robbins Pathology website, including complete content of text, Interactive Case Study Companion, and Virtual Microscope. Students had experience with traditional microscopes in their histology and microbiology laboratory courses. Student satisfaction with computer based learning was assessed using a 28 question survey which was administered to three successive trimesters of pathology students (n=193) using the computer survey website Zoomerang. Answers were given on a scale of 1-5 and statistically analyzed using weighted averages. The survey data indicated that students were satisfied with computer based learning activities during pathology laboratory instruction. The most favorable aspect to computer imagery was 24-7 availability (weighted avg. 4.16), followed by clarification offered by accompanying text and captions (weighted avg. 4.08). Although advantages and disadvantages exist in using conventional microscopy and computer imagery, current pathology teaching environments warrant investigation of replacing traditional microscope exercises with computer applications. Chiropractic students supported the adoption of computer-assisted instruction in pathology laboratories.

  17. Leaflet manual of external beam radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: a review of the indications, evidences, and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Chai Hong; Yoon, Won Sup

    2018-01-01

    The use of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which was rarely performed due to liver toxicity with a previous technique, has increased. Palliation of portal vein thrombosis, supplementation for insufficient transarterial chemoembolization, and provision of new curative opportunities using stereotactic body radiotherapy are the potential indications for use of EBRT. The mechanism of EBRT treatment, with its radiobiological and physical perspectives, differs from those of conventional medical treatment or surgery. Therefore, understanding the effects of EBRT may be unfamiliar to physicians other than radiation oncologists, especially in the field of HCC, where EBRT has recently begun to be applied. The first objective of this review was to concisely explain the indications for use of EBRT for HCC for all physicians treating HCC. Therefore, this review focuses on the therapeutic outcomes rather than the detailed biological and physical background. We also reviewed recent clinical trials that may extend the indications for use of EBRT. Finally, we reviewed the current clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of HCC and discuss the current recommendations and future perspectives.

  18. Leaflet manual of external beam radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: a review of the indications, evidences, and clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim CH

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chai Hong Rim, Won Sup Yoon Department of Radiation Oncology, Ansan Hospital, Korea University Medical College, Ansan, Republic of Korea Abstract: The use of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, which was rarely performed due to liver toxicity with a previous technique, has increased. Palliation of portal vein thrombosis, supplementation for insufficient transarterial chemoembolization, and provision of new curative opportunities using stereotactic body radiotherapy are the potential indications for use of EBRT. The mechanism of EBRT treatment, with its radiobiological and physical perspectives, differs from those of conventional medical treatment or surgery. Therefore, understanding the effects of EBRT may be unfamiliar to physicians other than radiation oncologists, especially in the field of HCC, where EBRT has recently begun to be applied. The first objective of this review was to concisely explain the indications for use of EBRT for HCC for all physicians treating HCC. Therefore, this review focuses on the therapeutic outcomes rather than the detailed biological and physical background. We also reviewed recent clinical trials that may extend the indications for use of EBRT. Finally, we reviewed the current clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of HCC and discuss the current recommendations and future perspectives. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, liver neoplasm, external beam radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiotherapy, clinical trials, sorafenib, guidelines

  19. User's manual of a supporting system for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy. JAERI computational dosimetry system

    CERN Document Server

    Kumada, H

    2002-01-01

    A boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with epithermal neutron beam is expected to treat effectively for malignant tumor that is located deeply in the brain. It is indispensable to estimate preliminarily the irradiation dose in the brain of a patient in order to perform the epithermal neutron beam BNCT. Thus, the JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS), which can calculate the dose distributions in the brain, has been developed. JCDS is a software that creates a 3-dimensional head model of a patient by using CT and MRI images and that generates a input data file automatically for calculation neutron flux and gamma-ray dose distribution in the brain by the Monte Carlo code: MCNP, and that displays the dose distribution on the head model for dosimetry by using the MCNP calculation results. JCDS has any advantages as follows; By treating CT data and MRI data which are medical images, a detail three-dimensional model of patient's head is able to be made easily. The three-dimensional head image is editable to ...

  20. User's manual of a supporting system for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy. JAERI computational dosimetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Torii, Yoshiya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-09-01

    A boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with epithermal neutron beam is expected to treat effectively for malignant tumor that is located deeply in the brain. It is indispensable to estimate preliminarily the irradiation dose in the brain of a patient in order to perform the epithermal neutron beam BNCT. Thus, the JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS), which can calculate the dose distributions in the brain, has been developed. JCDS is a software that creates a 3-dimensional head model of a patient by using CT and MRI images and that generates a input data file automatically for calculation neutron flux and gamma-ray dose distribution in the brain by the Monte Carlo code: MCNP, and that displays the dose distribution on the head model for dosimetry by using the MCNP calculation results. JCDS has any advantages as follows; By treating CT data and MRI data which are medical images, a detail three-dimensional model of patient's head is able to be made easily. The three-dimensional head image is editable to simulate the state of a head after its surgical processes such as skin flap opening and bone removal for the BNCT with craniotomy that are being performed in Japan. JCDS can provide information for the Patient Setting System to set the patient in an actual irradiation position swiftly and accurately. This report describes basic design and procedure of dosimetry, operation manual, data and library structure for JCDS (ver.1.0). (author)

  1. Effects of laryngeal manual therapy (LMT) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in vocal folds diadochokinesis of dysphonic women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Larissa Thaís Donalonso; Silverio, Kelly Cristina Alves; Brasolotto, Alcione Ghedini; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus; Carneiro, Christiano Giácomo; Behlau, Mara

    2017-05-15

    To verify and compare the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and laryngeal manual therapy (LMT) on laryngeal diadochokinesis (DDK) of dysphonic women. Twenty women with bilateral vocal nodules participated and were equally divided into: LMT Group - LMT application; TENS Group - TENS application; both groups received 12 sessions of treatment, twice a week, with a duration of 20 minutes each, applied by the same therapist. The women were evaluated as to laryngeal DDK at three moments: diagnostic, pre-treatment, and post-treatment, which produced three groups of measurements. The DDK recording was performed with intersected repetition of vowels /a/ and / i/. The analysis of vowels was performed by the program Motor Speech Profile Advanced (MSP)-KayPentax. The DDK parameters of the three evaluations were compared by means of the paired t-test (p≤0.05). The measurements of laryngeal DDK parameters were similar in the phase without treatment, indicating no individual variability over time. There was no change with respect to the speed of DDK after intervention, but after LMT, DDK of the vowel /i/ was more stable in terms of the duration of the emissions and intensity of emissions repeated. These results show improved coordination of vocal folds movement during phonation. There were no changes in the DDK parameters following TENS. LMT provides greater regularity of movement during laryngeal diadochokinesis in dysphonic women, which extends knowledge on the effect of rebalancing the larynx muscles during phonation, although TENS does not impact laryngeal diadochokinesis.

  2. Comparison of Dry Needling versus Orthopedic Manual Therapy in Patients with Myofascial Chronic Neck Pain: A Single-Blind, Randomized Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Campa-Moran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three interventions for the treatment of myofascial chronic neck pain. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: orthopedic manual therapy (OMT, dry needling and stretching (DN-S, and soft tissue techniques (STT. All groups received two treatment sessions with a 48 h time interval. Outcome measures included neck pain intensity measured using a visual analogue scale, cervical range of motion (ROM, pressure pain threshold for measuring mechanical hyperalgesia, and two self-reported questionnaires (neck disability index and pain catastrophizing scale. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant differences for the group × time interaction for neck disability, neck pain intensity, and pain catastrophizing. The DN-S and OMT groups reduced neck disability. Only the OMT group showed decreases in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing. The cervical ROM increased in OMT (i.e., flexion, side-bending, and rotation and DN-S (i.e., side-bending and rotation groups. Conclusions. The three interventions are all effective in reducing pain intensity. Reduction in mechanical hyperalgesia and pain catastrophizing was only observed in the OMT group. Cervical ROM improved in the DN-S and OMT groups and also neck disability being only clinically relevant for OMT group.

  3. Biosafety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce W.

    2010-05-18

    Work with or potential exposure to biological materials in the course of performing research or other work activities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) must be conducted in a safe, ethical, environmentally sound, and compliant manner. Work must be conducted in accordance with established biosafety standards, the principles and functions of Integrated Safety Management (ISM), this Biosafety Manual, Chapter 26 (Biosafety) of the Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000), and applicable standards and LBNL policies. The purpose of the Biosafety Program is to protect workers, the public, agriculture, and the environment from exposure to biological agents or materials that may cause disease or other detrimental effects in humans, animals, or plants. This manual provides workers; line management; Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Division staff; Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) members; and others with a comprehensive overview of biosafety principles, requirements from biosafety standards, and measures needed to control biological risks in work activities and facilities at LBNL.

  4. An audit of health products and services marketed on chiropractic websites in Alberta and consideration of these practices in the context of chiropractic codes of conduct and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stacey A

    2007-06-01

    Chiropractic's success as a health care profession is evidenced in part by the rising number of practitioners. Paradoxically, this success may start to cost the profession, as the number of consumers may not be increasing proportionally. Fewer patients mean less income for practitioners. Some chiropractors are responding to these pressures by marketing health products, and services. To describe the extent to which Alberta chiropractors with websites sold health products and the extent to which fee discounts/service inducements were advertised. To consider these practices in the context of chiropractic codes of conduct and ethics. Chiropractic websites in the province of Alberta were identified using the online Telus Business Finder and cross-referenced with the Yellow Pages print directories. The websites were searched and an inventory of the health products for sale was recorded. Fee discounts and service inducements were also recorded. 56 websites were identified and reviewed. Just under two-thirds of the chiropractic websites surveyed contained information on health products for sale. Orthotics were sold most often (N = 29 practices; 51.8%), followed by pillows and supports (N = 15: 26.8%), vitamins/nutritional supplements (N = 15; 26.8%) and exercise/rehabilitation products (N = 10; 17.9%). Nine practices (16.1%) offered some type of inducement to potential customers. These included discounts on treatment packages (N = 2; 3.6%), free gait/ posture analyses (N = 2; 3.6%) and free general consultations with the chiropractors (N = 3; 5.4%) The marketing of health care products and services by chiropractors in Alberta is common. Such practices raise ethical considerations for the profession. Professional guidelines vary on the acceptability of these practices. Consumer and practitioner perspectives and practices regarding retailing need to be further examined.

  5. GRACE manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Kawabata, S.; Shimizu, Y.; Kaneko, T.; Kato, K.; Tanaka, H.

    1993-02-01

    This manual is composed of three kinds of objects, theoretical background for calculating the cross section of elementary process, usage and technical details of the GRACE system. Throughout this manual we take the tree level process e + e - → W + W - γ as an example, including the e ± -scalar boson interactions. The real FORTRAN source code for this process is attached in the relevant sections as well as the results of calculation, which might be a great help for understanding the practical use of the system. (J.P.N.)

  6. Feasibility study of short-term effects of chiropractic manipulation on older adults with impaired balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Cheryl; Pfefer, Mark T; Strunk, Richard; Ramcharan, Michael; Uhl, Nathan

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect preliminary information on the effects of chiropractic spinal manipulation on reducing risk of falls in older adults with impaired balance, as assessed by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). This information is necessary to develop a line of investigation into the role of chiropractic care on reduction of fall risk in this population. Randomized, 2-group pretest/posttest design feasibility study with a target sample size of 10 (5 per group), conducted within the outpatient health center of a chiropractic college. Inclusion criteria were as follows: aged 60 years or older, able to stand on one leg One CMT patient dropped out in the seventh week because of a fall at home resulting in a leg fracture. All remaining patients were compliant with treatment protocols. Five of 6 CMT patients and 4 of 5 EX patients had baseline BBS scores risk of falls. At visit 16, 2 CMT and 1 of the 3 remaining EX patients had BBS scores One mild and transient adverse event was noted. Further investigation of the possible role of chiropractic care in reducing fall risk in this population appears feasible.

  7. Utilizing doctors' attitudes toward staff training to inform a chiropractic technology curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Catherine A; Martel, Stacie S

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine attitudes of doctors of chiropractic regarding the importance of staff training in specific skill areas to inform the curriculum management process of a chiropractic technology program. A survey was distributed to registrants of a chiropractic homecoming event. On a 5-point Likert scale, respondents were asked to rate the degree of importance that staff members be trained in specific skills. Descriptive statistics were derived, and a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test differences between groups based on years in practice and level of staff training. Doctors place a high level of importance on oral communication skills and low importance on nutrition and physical examinations. Comparing groups based on years in practice revealed differences in the areas of passive physiotherapies (F = 3.61, p = .015), legal issues/regulations (F = 3.01, p = .032), occupational safety and health regulation (F = 4.27, p = .006), and marketing (F = 2.67, p = .049). Comparing groups based on level of staff training revealed differences in the areas of occupational safety and health regulations (F = 4.56, p = .005) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (F = 4.91, p = .003). With regard to their assistants, doctors of chiropractic tend to place high importance on office skills requiring effective communication and place less importance on clinical skills such as physical examinations and physiotherapy.

  8. Brief screening questions for depression in chiropractic patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Aambakk, Benedicte; Bossen, Sanne

    2014-01-01

    Depression is an important prognostic factor in low back pain (LBP) that appears to be infrequent in chiropractic populations. Identification of depression in few patients would consequently implicate screening of many. It is therefore desirable to have brief screening tools for depression. The o...

  9. VARK Learning Preferences and Mobile Anatomy Software Application Use in Pre-Clinical Chiropractic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Amanda J.; Stomski, Norman J.; Innes, Stanley I.; Armson, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphone ownership and reduced face-to-face teaching time may lead to students making greater use of mobile technologies in their learning. This is the first study to report on the prevalence of mobile gross anatomy software applications (apps) usage in pre-clinical chiropractic students and to ascertain if a relationship exists…

  10. Self-Regulation of a Chiropractic Association through Participatory Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Lorraine A.; Jorgensen, Anna Maria S.; Crowe, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) can be used in the health professions to redefine their roles. This study investigated a small health professional group, the members of The Chiropractic Association Singapore (TCAS), by using a PAR method; researchers and participants gained insights into the self-regulation of a health profession. A…

  11. The Use of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System and the RAND VSQ9 to Measure the Quality of Life and Visit-Specific Satisfaction of Pregnant Patients Under Chiropractic Care Utilizing the Webster Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Joel; Nazarenko, Andrea Lamont; Ohm, Jeanne; Alcantara, Junjoe

    2018-01-01

    To quantify the quality of life (QoL) and visit-specific satisfaction of pregnant women. A prospective cohort within a practice-based research network (PBRN). Setting/Locations: Individual chiropractic offices. Pregnant women (age ≥18 years) attending chiropractic care. Chiropractic care (i.e., The Webster Technique, spinal adjustments, and adjunctive therapies). The RAND VSQ9 to measure visit-specific satisfaction and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS ® )-29 to measure QoL. A convenience sample of 343 pregnant patients (average age = 30.96 years) comprised their study population. They were highly educated with 75% attaining a 2-year associate's degree or higher. The pregnant patients presented for chiropractic care with a mean week of gestation of 25.67 weeks (median = 28 weeks; range = 0-42 weeks) and parity (i.e., the number of live births) of 0.92 live births (median = 1; range = 0-6). From baseline (i.e., at study entrance with minimum first visit) and comparative (i.e., following a course of chiropractic care), the VSQ9 measurements revealed increasingly high satisfaction on the part of the subjects (i.e., the mean difference of baseline minus comparative measures = -0.7322; p < 0.005). The median number of visits (i.e., visits attended) at baseline and comparative measures was 1.00 (standard deviation [SD] = 22.69) and 3.30 (SD = 22.71), respectively. Across outcomes, QoL improved from baseline to comparative measurement after holding constant for visit number and time lapse, trimester of pregnancy, and care provider type. There was a reduction in mean T scores associated with fatigue (p < 0.05), pain interference (p < 0.05), sleep disturbance (p < 0.05), and an improvement in satisfaction with social roles (p < 0.05). A significant decrease was also found with pain interference (p < 0.05). No evidence was found that anxiety (p = 0.1404) or depression (p = 0

  12. Effects of manual therapy and exercise targeting the hips in patients with low-back pain-A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Michael; Cobo-Estevez, Manuel; Neeley, Darren; Pandya, Jeevan; Gunderson, Travis; Cook, Chad

    2017-08-01

    The benefits of providing manual therapy and exercise targeting the hips in individuals with mechanical low-back pain (LBP) are not well established. The objective in this study is to determine whether a formal prescriptive treatment protocol for the hips improves outcomes in patients with a primary complaint of mechanical LBP. Eighty-four (84) subjects (50 males, 46.1 ± 16.2 years) were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: pragmatic treatment of the lumbar spine only (LBP) (n = 39) or pragmatic treatment of the lumbar spine and prescriptive treatment of bilateral hips (LBP + HIP) (n = 45). Pragmatic treatment of the lumbar spine was based upon published clinical guidelines. Prescriptive treatment of the hips involved the use of 3 hip exercises targeting the gluteal musculature and 3 mobilization techniques targeting the hips. Subjects were assessed at baseline, 2 weeks, and at discharge with the following measures: Modified Oswestry Disability Index, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, a global rating of change (GRoC) score, the patient acceptable symptom state (PASS), and patient satisfaction. At 2 weeks, significant differences between groups differences were found in GRoC and patient satisfaction (P < .05) favoring the LBP + HIP group. At discharge, there were significant differences on the Modified Oswestry Disability Index, numeric pain rating scale, GRoC, and patient satisfaction favoring the LBP + HIP group (P < .05). Effect sizes were small to medium. Our findings suggest that a prescriptive treatment of the hips may be of clinical value to individuals presenting with the primary complaint of mechanical LBP. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Manual therapy for the management of pain and limited range of motion in subjects with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixtre, L B; Moreira, R F C; Franchini, G H; Alburquerque-Sendín, F; Oliveira, A B

    2015-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT) on subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this systematic review is to synthetise evidence regarding the isolated effect of MT in improving maximum mouth opening (MMO) and pain in subjects with signs and symptoms of TMD. MEDLINE(®) , Cochrane, Web of Science, SciELO and EMBASE(™) electronic databases were consulted, searching for randomised controlled trials applying MT for TMD compared to other intervention, no intervention or placebo. Two authors independently extracted data, PEDro scale was used to assess risk of bias, and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) was applied to synthetise overall quality of the body of evidence. Treatment effect size was calculated for pain, MMO and pressure pain threshold (PPT). Eight trials were included, seven of high methodological quality. Myofascial release and massage techniques applied on the masticatory muscles are more effective than control (low to moderate evidence) but as effective as toxin botulinum injections (moderate evidence). Upper cervical spine thrust manipulation or mobilisation techniques are more effective than control (low to high evidence), while thoracic manipulations are not. There is moderate-to-high evidence that MT techniques protocols are effective. The methodological heterogeneity across trials protocols frequently contributed to decrease quality of evidence. In conclusion, there is widely varying evidence that MT improves pain, MMO and PPT in subjects with TMD signs and symptoms, depending on the technique. Further studies should consider using standardised evaluations and better study designs to strengthen clinical relevance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Feasibility study of short-term effects of chiropractic manipulation on older adults with impaired balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Cheryl; Pfefer, Mark T.; Strunk, Richard; Ramcharan, Michael; Uhl, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this study was to collect preliminary information on the effects of chiropractic spinal manipulation on reducing risk of falls in older adults with impaired balance, as assessed by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). This information is necessary to develop a line of investigation into the role of chiropractic care on reduction of fall risk in this population. Methods Randomized, 2-group pretest/posttest design feasibility study with a target sample size of 10 (5 per group), conducted within the outpatient health center of a chiropractic college. Inclusion criteria were as follows: aged 60 years or older, able to stand on one leg <5 seconds, and able to attend all sessions. Patients were assigned to chiropractic care (CMT) or supervised exercise (EX) and scheduled for 2 visits per week for 8 weeks. Results A total of 26 people responded to recruitment; and 11 were enrolled: 6 in the CMT and 5 in the EX group. Two patients dropped out at the baseline visit when they were assigned to the EX group. One CMT patient dropped out in the seventh week because of a fall at home resulting in a leg fracture. All remaining patients were compliant with treatment protocols. Five of 6 CMT patients and 4 of 5 EX patients had baseline BBS scores <45, indicating increased risk of falls. At visit 16, 2 CMT and 1 of the 3 remaining EX patients had BBS scores <45. One mild and transient adverse event was noted. Conclusion Further investigation of the possible role of chiropractic care in reducing fall risk in this population appears feasible. PMID:19674706

  15. Human subject research: reporting ethics approval and informed consent in 3 chiropractic journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Dana J

    2011-11-01

    To date, there have been no reports of ethics board approval or informed consent within the chiropractic literature or within chiropractic research. The purpose of this study was to assess the reporting of ethics approval and informed consent in articles published during the 2008 volume year of 3 chiropractic research journals included in PubMed. A quantitative assessment of the articles published in each journal for the 2008 volume year was performed. Information collected included if the article involved human subject research, if it reported ethics board approval, and if informed consent was given to subjects. Data were collected as descriptive statistics (frequency counts and percentages). In aggregate, 50 articles of a total of 143 published involved human subject research (35%). 44 reported ethics board approval (88%), and 28 reported that informed consent had been obtained (56%). Forty-five percent of articles published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics involved human subject research (39/87), of which 95% reported ethics board approval (37/39) and 64% reported informed consent (25/39); 12.5% of articles from the Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association involved human subject research (5/40), of which 80% reported ethics board approval (4/5) and 40% reported informed consent (2/5); and 37.5% of articles published in Chiropractic and Osteopathy involved human subject research (6/16), of which 50% reported ethics board approval (3/6) and 17% reported informed consent (1/6). Overall, most articles reported ethics approval, and more than half reported consent. This was harmonious with research on this topic from other disciplines. This situation indicates a need for continued quality improvement and for better instruction and dissemination of information on these issues to researchers, to manuscript reviewers, to journal editors, and to the readers. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby

  16. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy for Pain and Self-reported Function in Individuals With Patellofemoral Pain: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrode, Brian J; Kietrys, David M; Parrott, J Scott

    2018-05-01

    Study Design Systematic literature review with meta-analysis. Background Management of patellofemoral pain (PFP) may include the utilization of manual therapy (MT) techniques to the patellofemoral joint, surrounding soft tissues, and/or lumbopelvic region. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of MT, used alone or as an adjunct intervention, compared to standard treatment or sham for reducing pain and improving self-reported function in individuals with PFP. Methods An electronic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Ovid, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and CINAHL databases for studies investigating MT for individuals with PFP. Studies published through August 2017 that compared MT (local or remote to the knee), used alone or in combination with other interventions, to control or sham interventions were included. Patient-reported pain and functional outcomes were collected and synthesized. Trials were assessed via the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool, and a meta-analysis of the evidence was performed. Results Nine studies were included in the review, 5 of which were rated as having a low risk of bias. The use of MT, applied to the local knee structure, was associated with favorable short-term changes in self-reported function and pain in individuals with PFP, when compared to a comparison (control or sham) intervention. However, the changes were clinically meaningful only for pain (defined as a 2-cm or 2-point improvement on a visual analog scale or numeric pain-rating scale). The evidence regarding lumbopelvic manipulation was inconclusive for pain improvement in individuals with PFP, based on 3 studies. Conclusion The data from this review cautiously suggest that MT may be helpful in the short term for decreasing pain in patients with PFP. Several studies integrated MT into a comprehensive treatment program. Changes in self-reported function with the inclusion of MT were shown to be significant, but not clinically meaningful. The

  17. The effect of combining manual therapy with exercise for mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Roger M; Wearing, Jaxson; Gonski, Peter; Vemulpad, Subramanyam

    2017-06-17

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of disability and hospital admission. Current management strategies have not been successful in altering the loss of lung function typically seen as the disease progresses. A recent systematic review into the use of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) in the management of COPD concluded that there was low level evidence to support the view that a combination of SMT and exercise had the potential to improve lung function more than exercise alone in people with moderate to severe COPD. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the combination of exercise and manual therapy (MT) that includes SMT produces sustainable improvements in lung function and exercise capacity in people with mild COPD. The study is a randomised controlled trial of 202 people with stable mild COPD. The cohort will be divided into two equal groups matched at baseline. The first group will receive a standardised exercise program. The second group will receive MT that includes SMT plus the same standardised exercise program. Exercise will be administered a total of 36 times over an 18-week period, while MT will be administered in conjunction with exercise a total of 15 times over a 6-week period. The primary outcome measure is lung function (forced expiratory volume in the 1 st second: FEV 1 and forced vital capacity: FVC). The secondary outcome measures are the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), quality of life questionnaire (St George's Respiratory Questionnaire: SGRQ), anxiety and depression levels (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: HADS), frequency of exacerbations, chest wall expansion measurements (tape measurements) and systemic inflammatory biomarker levels. Outcome measurements will be taken by blinded assessors on seven occasions over a 48-week period. Adverse event data will also be gathered at the beginning of each intervention session. This randomised controlled trial is designed to investigate whether the combination

  18. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient......-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. METHODS/DESIGN: This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least...... one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain...

  19. Acupuncture and chiropractic care for chronic pain in an integrated health plan: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeBar Lynn L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial recent research examines the efficacy of many types of complementary and alternative (CAM therapies. However, outcomes associated with the "real-world" use of CAM has been largely overlooked, despite calls for CAM therapies to be studied in the manner in which they are practiced. Americans seek CAM treatments far more often for chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP than for any other condition. Among CAM treatments for CMP, acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C care are among those with the highest acceptance by physician groups and the best evidence to support their use. Further, recent alarming increases in delivery of opioid treatment and surgical interventions for chronic pain--despite their high costs, potential adverse effects, and modest efficacy--suggests the need to evaluate real world outcomes associated with promising non-pharmacological/non-surgical CAM treatments for CMP, which are often well accepted by patients and increasingly used in the community. Methods/Design This multi-phase, mixed methods study will: (1 conduct a retrospective study using information from electronic medical records (EMRs of a large HMO to identify unique clusters of patients with CMP (e.g., those with differing demographics, histories of pain condition, use of allopathic and CAM health services, and comorbidity profiles that may be associated with different propensities for A/C utilization and/or differential outcomes associated with such care; (2 use qualitative interviews to explore allopathic providers' recommendations for A/C and patients' decisions to pursue and retain CAM care; and (3 prospectively evaluate health services/costs and broader clinical and functional outcomes associated with the receipt of A/C relative to carefully matched comparison participants receiving traditional CMP services. Sensitivity analyses will compare methods relying solely on EMR-derived data versus analyses supplementing EMR data with

  20. Acupuncture and chiropractic care for chronic pain in an integrated health plan: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBar, Lynn L; Elder, Charles; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Aickin, Mikel; Deyo, Rick; Meenan, Richard; Dickerson, John; Webster, Jennifer A; Jo Yarborough, Bobbi

    2011-11-25

    Substantial recent research examines the efficacy of many types of complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies. However, outcomes associated with the "real-world" use of CAM has been largely overlooked, despite calls for CAM therapies to be studied in the manner in which they are practiced. Americans seek CAM treatments far more often for chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) than for any other condition. Among CAM treatments for CMP, acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C) care are among those with the highest acceptance by physician groups and the best evidence to support their use. Further, recent alarming increases in delivery of opioid treatment and surgical interventions for chronic pain--despite their high costs, potential adverse effects, and modest efficacy--suggests the need to evaluate real world outcomes associated with promising non-pharmacological/non-surgical CAM treatments for CMP, which are often well accepted by patients and increasingly used in the community. This multi-phase, mixed methods study will: (1) conduct a retrospective study using information from electronic medical records (EMRs) of a large HMO to identify unique clusters of patients with CMP (e.g., those with differing demographics, histories of pain condition, use of allopathic and CAM health services, and comorbidity profiles) that may be associated with different propensities for A/C utilization and/or differential outcomes associated with such care; (2) use qualitative interviews to explore allopathic providers' recommendations for A/C and patients' decisions to pursue and retain CAM care; and (3) prospectively evaluate health services/costs and broader clinical and functional outcomes associated with the receipt of A/C relative to carefully matched comparison participants receiving traditional CMP services. Sensitivity analyses will compare methods relying solely on EMR-derived data versus analyses supplementing EMR data with conventionally collected patient and clinician data

  1. Non-surgical treatment of hip osteoarthritis. Hip school, with or without the addition of manual therapy, in comparison to a minimal control intervention: Protocol for a three-armed randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vach Werner

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip osteoarthritis is a common and chronic condition resulting in pain, functional disability and reduced quality of life. In the early stages of the disease, a combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment is recommended. There is evidence from several trials that exercise therapy is effective. In addition, single trials suggest that patient education in the form of a hip school is a promising intervention and that manual therapy is superior to exercise. Methods/Design This is a randomized clinical trial. Patients with clinical and radiological hip osteoarthritis, 40-80 years of age, and without indication for hip surgery were randomized into 3 groups. The active intervention groups A and B received six weeks of hip school, taught by a physiotherapist, for a total of 5 sessions. In addition, group B received manual therapy consisting of joint manipulation and soft-tissue therapy twice a week for six weeks. Group C received a self-care information leaflet containing advice on "live as usual" and stretching exercises from the hip school. The primary time point for assessing relative effectiveness is at the end of the six weeks intervention period with follow-ups after three and 12 months. Primary outcome measure is pain measured on an eleven-point numeric rating scale. Secondary outcome measures are the hip dysfunction and osteoarthritis outcome score, patient's global perceived effect, patient specific functional scale, general quality of life and hip range of motion. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first randomized clinical trial comparing a patient education program with or without the addition of manual therapy to a minimal intervention for patients with hip osteoarthritis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials NCT01039337

  2. The Swiss Master in Chiropractic Medicine Curriculum: Preparing Graduates to Work Together With Medicine to Improve Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, B Kim; Peterson, Cynthia K

    2016-12-01

    In 2007, chiropractic became 1 of the 5 medical professions in Switzerland. This required a new chiropractic program that was fully integrated within a Swiss medical school. The purpose of this article was to discuss the Master in Chiropractic Medicine (MChiroMed) program at the University of Zürich, including advantages, opportunities, and challenges. In 2008, the MChiroMed program began with its first student cohort. The MChiroMed program is a 6-year Bologna model 2-cycle (bachelor and master) "spiral curriculum," with the first 4 years being fully integrated within the medical curriculum. A review of the main features of the curriculum revealed the advantages, opportunities, and challenges of this program in comparison with other contemporary chiropractic educational programs. Advantages and opportunities include an integrated curriculum within a university, medical school, and musculoskeletal hospital, with their associated human and physical resources. Many opportunities exist for high-level research collaborations. The rigorous entrance qualifications and small student cohorts result in bright, motivated, and enthusiastic students; appropriate assessments; and timely feedback on academic and clinical subjects. Early patient contact in hospitals and clinical facilities encourages the integration of academic theory and clinical practice. The main challenges faced by this program include difficulty recruiting a sufficient number of students because of the rigorous entrance requirements and curriculum overload resulting from undertaking a full medical curriculum and chiropractic modules. The MChiroMed program is a unique chiropractic curriculum that integrates medical and chiropractic education within a spiral curriculum at a world-class Swiss university medical school. The expectation is that graduates, with their expanded diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge, skills, and experience, will become future experts in primary spine care in Switzerland. It is hoped

  3. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    anticipated likelihood of each for this study are included below: Rare but serious (event rate ə %) Fracture to the ribs or hip Nerve injury that may...Award Number: W81-XWH-11-2-0107 TITLE: Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain , Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in...2016 – 02/14/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain , Military Readiness and Smoking

  4. Primary benign tumors in chiropractic practice and the importance of x-ray diagnosis: A report of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jacques C.

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of primary benign bone tumors were diagnosed radiographically in a chiropractic practice. Although primary osseous tumors are somewhat uncommon, their potential presence emphasizes the importance of x-ray diagnosis as an essential adjunct to chiropractic practice. This procedure may preclude underlying lesions before considering treatment of seemingly uncomplicated injuries. Two such cases are presented: unicameral bone cyst and osteochondroma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  5. Selecting and training opinion leaders and best practice collaborators:Experience from the Canadian Chiropractic Guideline Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Bussières, André E.; Maiers, Michele; Grondin, Diane; Brockhusen, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the process for selecting and training chiropractic opinion leaders (OLs) and best practice collaborators (BPCs) to increase the uptake of best practice. Methods: In Phase 1, OLs were identified using a cross-sectional survey among Canadian chiropractic stakeholders. A 10-member committee ranked nominees. Top-ranked nominees were invited to a training workshop. In Phase 2, a national e-survey was administered to 7200 Canadian chiropractors to identify additional OLs an...

  6. Metrication manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, A.F.A.; Digby, R.B.; Thong, S.P.; Lacey, F.

    1978-04-01

    In April 1978 a meeting of senior metrication officers convened by the Commonwealth Science Council of the Commonwealth Secretariat, was held in London. The participants were drawn from Australia, Bangladesh, Britain, Canada, Ghana, Guyana, India, Jamaica, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Trinidad and Tobago. Among other things, the meeting resolved to develop a set of guidelines to assist countries to change to SI and to compile such guidelines in the form of a working manual

  7. The American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians Position Statement on Pre-Participation Examinations: An Expert Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, William J.; Nabhan, Dustin C.; Roecker, Christopher; Kimura, Melissa Nagare; Klein, Andrew; Guimard, Brett; Pierce, Kevin; Helma, Patrick; Nelson, Robert; Bahr, Kelly Shockley; Nelson, Laney; Williams, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper is to present a position statement of best practices for the provision of a safe and high-quality pre-participation examination (PPE) and to provide recommendations on education requirements for doctors of chiropractic providing the PPE. Methods In 2014, the American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians (ACBSP) Board of Directors identified a need to review and update the ACBSP position statements and practice guidelines in order to be current with evolving best practices. Twelve ACBSP certificants, 10 Diplomates of the ACBSP, and 2 Certified Chiropractic Sports Physicians, met in April 2015 to author a pre-participation position statement using an expert consensus process. Panel members excluded anyone with commercial conflicts of interest and included individuals with expertise in clinical sports medicine and the performance of PPEs. A literature review was performed and circulated in advance for use by the panel in addressing the topic. The position statement was written through a consensus process and accepted by the ACBSP Board of Directors in May of 2015. Results The ACBSP Position Statement on Pre-participation Examinations identifies the qualifications and best practices for doctors of chiropractic to perform a PPE. Conclusion This position statement states that doctors of chiropractic with post graduate education and current Diplomates of the ACBSP or Certified Chiropractic Sports Physicians certification have the prerequisite education and qualifying skills to perform PPEs. PMID:26778931

  8. The American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians Position Statement on Pre-Participation Examinations: An Expert Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, William J; Nabhan, Dustin C; Roecker, Christopher; Kimura, Melissa Nagare; Klein, Andrew; Guimard, Brett; Pierce, Kevin; Helma, Patrick; Nelson, Robert; Bahr, Kelly Shockley; Nelson, Laney; Williams, Perry

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a position statement of best practices for the provision of a safe and high-quality pre-participation examination (PPE) and to provide recommendations on education requirements for doctors of chiropractic providing the PPE. In 2014, the American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians (ACBSP) Board of Directors identified a need to review and update the ACBSP position statements and practice guidelines in order to be current with evolving best practices. Twelve ACBSP certificants, 10 Diplomates of the ACBSP, and 2 Certified Chiropractic Sports Physicians, met in April 2015 to author a pre-participation position statement using an expert consensus process. Panel members excluded anyone with commercial conflicts of interest and included individuals with expertise in clinical sports medicine and the performance of PPEs. A literature review was performed and circulated in advance for use by the panel in addressing the topic. The position statement was written through a consensus process and accepted by the ACBSP Board of Directors in May of 2015. The ACBSP Position Statement on Pre-participation Examinations identifies the qualifications and best practices for doctors of chiropractic to perform a PPE. This position statement states that doctors of chiropractic with post graduate education and current Diplomates of the ACBSP or Certified Chiropractic Sports Physicians certification have the prerequisite education and qualifying skills to perform PPEs.

  9. Chiropractic chronic low back pain sufferers and self-report assessment methods. Part II. A reliability study of the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire and the VAS Disability Scales Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboeuf, C; Love, A; Crisp, T C

    1989-04-01

    The subjective complaints of 41 chronic low back pain sufferers attending a chiropractic clinic were assessed twice prior to therapy with a widely used psychological self-report assessment tool, the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire (MHQ) and a newly developed VAS Disability Scales Questionnaire (DISQ), both of which investigate various aspects of certain basic positions and activities. Reliability was generally acceptable with these two questionnaires. Subjects participating in the study were commonly found to score within the normal range on the MHQ, indicating that psychological disturbance was not a major feature of their presentation. However, mild mood disturbance was commonly reported, and a more sensitive tool may need to be developed for this type of mildly affected chronic low back pain sufferers. The DISQ generally indicated subjects were mildly to moderately affected by their low back trouble and that sitting and leisure activities were the most pain provoking. Recommendations for further development of the disability scale are made.

  10. A comparison of manual therapy and active rehabilitation in the treatment of non specific low back pain with particular reference to a patient's Linton & Hallden psychological screening score: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephenson Richard

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical guidelines for the management of back pain frequently recommend 'manual therapy' as a first line intervention, with psychosocial screening and 'active rehabilitation' for those not improving at 6 weeks post onset. The potential for psychosocial factors to predict treatment response and therefore outcome has not been adequately explored. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a study to compare manual therapy and active rehabilitation outcomes for subjects with sub-acute/chronic back pain, investigate whether any difference in outcome was related to psychosocial factors, and to inform the design of a main study. Methods A convenience sample of 39 patients with non-specific low back pain referred to the physiotherapy department of an acute NHS Trust hospital was recruited over a nine month period. Patients completed the Linton and Hallden psychological screening questionnaire (LH and were allocated to a low LH (105 or below or high LH (106 or above scoring group. The low or high LH score was used to sequentially allocate patients to one of two treatment groups – Manual Therapy comprising physiotherapy based on manual means as chosen by the treating therapist or Active Rehabilitation comprising a progressive exercise and education programme – with the first low LH scoring patient being allocated to active rehabilitation and the next to manual therapy and so on. Treatment was administered for eight sessions over a four-week period and outcome measures were taken at baseline and at four weeks. Measures used were the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ, two components of the Short Form McGill (total pain rating index [PRI] and pain intensity via visual analogue scale [VAS], and the LH. Results The manual therapy group demonstrated a greater treatment effect compared with active rehabilitation for RMQ (mean difference 3.6, 95% CI 1.1 – 6.2, p = 0.006 and PRI (7.1, 95% CI 2.0 – 12.2, p = 0

  11. Comparison of the effectiveness of three manual physical therapy techniques in a subgroup of patients with low back pain who satisfy a clinical prediction rule: Study protocol of a randomized clinical trial [NCT00257998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs John D

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently a clinical prediction rule (CPR has been developed and validated that accurately identifies patients with low back pain (LBP that are likely to benefit from a lumbo-pelvic thrust manipulation. The studies that developed and validated the rule used the identical manipulation procedure. However, recent evidence suggests that different manual therapy techniques may result similar outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of three different manual therapy techniques in a subgroup of patient with low back pain that satisfy the CPR. Methods/Design Consecutive patients with LBP referred to physical therapy clinics in one of four geographical locations who satisfy the CPR will be invited to participate in this randomized clinical trial. Subjects who agree to participate will undergo a standard evaluation and complete a number of patient self-report questionnaires including the Oswestry Disability Index (OSW, which will serve as the primary outcome measure. Following the baseline examination patients will be randomly assigned to receive the lumbopelvic manipulation used in the development of the CPR, an alternative lumbar manipulation technique, or non-thrust lumbar mobilization technique for the first 2 visits. Beginning on visit 3, all 3 groups will receive an identical standard exercise program for 3 visits (visits 3,4,5. Outcomes of interest will be captured by a therapist blind to group assignment at 1 week (3rd visit, 4 weeks (6th visit and at a 6-month follow-up. The primary aim of the study will be tested with analysis of variance (ANOVA using the change in OSW score from baseline to 4-weeks (OSWBaseline – OSW4-weeks as the dependent variable. The independent variable will be treatment with three levels (lumbo-pelvic manipulation, alternative lumbar manipulation, lumbar mobilization. Discussion This trial will be the first to investigate the effectiveness of various manual therapy

  12. The immediate effects of two manual therapy techniques on ankle musculoarticular stiffness and dorsiflexion range of motion in people with chronic ankle rigidity: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Benjamin; Hall, Toby; Berwart, Mathilde; Biernaux, Elinor; Detrembleur, Christine

    2017-12-29

    Ankle rigidity is a common musculoskeletal disorder affecting the talocrural joint, which can impair weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion (WBADF) and daily-life in people with or without history of ankle injuries. Our objective was to compare the immediate effects of efficacy of Mulligan Mobilization with Movement (MWM) and Osteopathic Mobilization (OM) for improving ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) and musculoarticular stiffness (MAS) in people with chronic ankle dorsiflexion rigidity. A randomized clinical trial with two arms. Patients were recruited by word of mouth and via social network as well as posters, and analyzed in the neuro musculoskeletal laboratory of the "Université Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve", Brussels, Belgium. 67 men (aged 18-40 years) presenting with potential chronic non-specific and unilateral ankle mobility deficit during WBDF were assessed for eligibility and finally 40 men were included and randomly allocated to single session of either MWM or OM. Two modalities of manual therapy indicated for hypothetic immediate effects in chronic ankle dorsiflexion stiffness, i.e. MWM and OM, were applied during a single session on included patients. Comprised blinding measures of MAS with a specific electromechanical device (namely: Lehmann's device) producing passive oscillatory ankle joint dorsiflexion and with clinical measures of WBADF-ROM as well. A two-way ANOVA revealed a non-significant interaction between both techniques and time for all outcome measures. For measures of MAS: elastic-stiffness (p= 0.37), viscous-stiffness (p= 0.83), total-stiffness (p= 0.58). For WBADF-ROM: toe-wall distance (p= 0.58) and angular ROM (p= 0.68). Small effect sizes between groups were determined with Cohen's d ranging from 0.05 to 0.29. One-way ANOVA demonstrated non-significant difference and small to moderate effects sizes (d= 0.003-0.58) on all outcome measures before and after interventions within both groups. A second two-way ANOVA analyzed the

  13. Effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT manualized program for clinically anxious children: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Mélou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, the prevalence of anxiety disorders is 20%; and children with anxiety are at increased risk for psychopathology throughout adulthood. Recently, a revised version of a cognitive behavioral therapy manualized program called 'Thinking + Doing = Daring' (TDD was developed for children between 8 and 12 years old with an anxiety disorder. The main aim of this project is to conduct a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of TDD. Methods/Design The CBT program will be tested with a RCT with 120 clinically anxious children (8-12 years old referred to one of three mental health care agencies. Children will be randomly assigned to the experimental (N = 60, TDD or to the control condition (N = 60, treatment as usual. The primary outcome measure will be the child's anxiety symptoms level. Secondary outcome measures will be externalizing (e.g. aggression and internalizing problems (e.g. depression. Two potential mediators of change will be examined in the current study: therapeutic alliance and parenting. Mother and child in both the experimental and control condition will be surveyed at baseline, post treatment and after 6 and 12 months (follow-up. It is hypothesized that children in the experimental condition will show a stronger decrease in anxiety symptoms compared to children that receive treatment as usual. Moreover, we expect that a strong therapeutic alliance and decreases in parental control and rejection will contribute to treatment success. Discussion Early treatment for anxiety problems has the potential to not only result in anxiety reductions, but also to prevent future problems such as substance abuse and psychopathology throughout adulthood. Our results will be immediately relevant to practice, since we are partnering with 'real world' community agencies. If the CBT program proves more effective than treatment as usual, it could be implemented in community mental health care

  14. Improvement of lower extremity electrodiagnostic findings following a trial of spinal manipulation and motion-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morningstar Mark W

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar disc herniation is a problem frequently encountered in manual medicine. While manual therapy has shown reasonable success in symptomatic management of these cases, little information is known how manual therapy may affect the structure and function of the lumbar disc itself. In cases where lumbar disc herniation is accompanied by radicular symptoms, electrodiagnostic testing has been used to provide objective clinical information on nerve function. This report examines the treatment rendered for a patient with lower extremity neurological deficit, as diagnosed on electrodiagnostic testing. Patient was treated using spinal manipulation and exercises performed on a Pettibon Wobble Chair™, using electrodiagnostic testing as the primary outcome assessment. Case Presentation An elderly male patient presented to a private spine clinic with right-sided foot drop. He had been prescribed an ankle-foot orthosis for this condition. All sensory, motor, and reflex findings in the right leg and foot were absent. This was validated on prior electromyography and nerve conduction velocity testing, performed by a board certified neurologist. Patient was treated using spinal manipulation twice-weekly and wobble chair exercises three times daily for 90 days total. Following this treatment, the patient was referred for follow-up electrodiagnostic studies. Significant improvements were made in these studies as well as self-rated daily function. Conclusion Motion-based therapies, as part of a comprehensive rehabilitation program, may contribute to the restoration of daily function and the reversal of neurological insult as detected by electrodiagnostic testing. Electrodiagnostic testing may be a useful clinical tool to evaluate the progress of chiropractic patients with lumbar disc herniation and radicular pain syndromes.

  15. Who consults chiropractors in Victoria, Australia?: Reasons for attending, general health and lifestyle habits of chiropractic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charity, Melanie J; Britt, Helena C; Walker, Bruce F; Gunn, Jane M; Forsdike-Young, Kirsty; Polus, Barbara I; French, Simon D

    2016-01-01

    COAST (Chiropractic Observational and Analysis STudy) reported the clinical practices of chiropractors. The aims of this study were to: 1) describe the chiropractic patient demographic and health characteristics; 2) describe patient-stated reasons for visiting a chiropractor; 3) describe chiropractic patient lifestyle characteristics; 4) compare, where possible, chiropractic patient characteristics to the general Australian population. Fifty-two chiropractors in Victoria, Australia, provided information for up to 100 consecutive encounters. If patients attended more than once during the 100 encounters, only data from their first encounter were included in this study. Where possible patient characteristics were compared with the general Australian population. Data were collected from December 2010 to September 2012. Data were provided for 4464 encounters, representing 3287 unique individuals. The majority of chiropractic encounters were for musculoskeletal conditions or for wellness/maintenance. The majority of patient comorbidities were musculoskeletal, circulatory or endocrine/metabolic in nature. Eight hundred chiropractic patients (57 %, 95 % CI: 53-61) described their self-reported health as excellent or very good and 138 patients (10 %, 95 % CI: 8-12) as fair or poor. Seventy-one percent of adult male patients (18 years and older), and 53 % of adult female patients, were overweight or obese. Fourteen percent (n = 188, 95 % CI: 12-16) were current smokers and 27 % (n = 359, 95 % CI: 24-31) did not meet Australian alcohol consumption guidelines. Less than half of the chiropractic patients participated in vigorous exercise at least twice per week. Approximately 20 % ate one serving of vegetables or less each day, and approximately 50 % ate one serve of fruit or less each day. Compared to the general Australian population, chiropractic patients were less likely to smoke, less likely to be obese and more likely to describe their health in positive terms

  16. Reduction of progressive thoracolumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis by chiropractic biophysics® (CBP®) mirror image® methods following failed traditional chiropractic treatment: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Haggard, Joshua S.; Haggard, Jennifer B.; Oakley, Paul A.; Harrison, Deed E.

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To present a case demonstrating the reduction of progressive thoracolumbar scoliosis by incorporating Chiropractic BioPhysics® (CBP®) technique’s mirror image® exercises, traction and blocking procedures based on the ‘non-commutative properties of finite rotation angles under addition’ engineering law. [Subject and Methods] A 15-year-old female presented with a right thoracolumbar scoliosis having a Cobb angle from T5–L3 of 27° and suffering from headaches and lower back pains. Her ...

  17. A qualitative exploration of key informant perspectives regarding the nature and impact of contemporary legislation on professional development: a grounded theory study of chiropractic in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Corrie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct a substantive framework of the manner in which the Danish government interacts with the Danish chiropractic profession and influences professional practice. An exploratory, qualitative study was performed using a substantive grounded theory (GT) approach. Unstructured, face-to-face, individual interviews were conducted during the years 2012 and 2013 and thematically analyzed. Six people were interviewed for this study including a gatekeeper and witness to legislative history, a previous chiropractic political representative and witness to legislative history, a previous Department of Health negotiator and previous administrator of chiropractic affairs and witness to legislative history, a current administrator of chiropractic affairs, an active chiropractic political representative and witness to legislative history, and a chief negotiator for Danish Regional Health Care Services. Open and axial coding yielded 2 themes centering on licensing chiropractors in Denmark and the resultant developmental issues encountered. Through further selective coding, the GT core construct, "chiropractic practice in the Danish heath care system" emerged. The GT highlights the tension between the strategic political importance of legislation and the restrictive nature of the overly specific act currently regulating chiropractic practice. Moreover, the GT also revealed the perceived negative effect that the National Board of Health may exert on clinical practice due to its conservative interpretation of the act. The Danish government is perceived to act as a countervailing power related to chiropractic practice. The derived substantive GT suggests that the Danish government's dualistic action relative to the Danish chiropractic community may inhibit the spontaneous evolution of contemporary Danish chiropractic practice. Although historically narrow legislation may limit chiropractic practice, conservative interpretations by the Danish

  18. The development of contemporary chiropractic education in Denmark: an exploratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Mouton, Johan

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to capture the experience of key stakeholders regarding the development, structure, and influence of the local education program on the Danish chiropractic profession. METHODS: A gatekeeper was initially interviewed, after which a snowball sampling approach...... led to a further 11 respondents being identified. Semistructured interviews were conducted, and computer-assisted thematic analysis was used to interpret data. RESULTS: Seven themes emerged. Two described pertinent historical aspects during the development of the local education, 4 related to status...... quo issues around education at the University of Southern Denmark, and 1 explored perceived health care integration benefits attributable to the chosen model of education. CONCLUSION: The Danish chiropractic profession's incentive to raise its legitimacy lay in the access it stood to gain, through...

  19. Developmental issues in chiropractic: a South African practitioner and patient perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Mouton, Johan

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study explores pertinent aspects of chiropractic practice in contemporary South Africa in terms of the domains of beliefs, philosophy, professional matters, and education. METHODS: Ten practitioners were purposively sampled. From these, 3 were used as gatekeepers to access 6...... in the chiropractor's office. However, some patients seem confused by the lack of health care system integration and consequently display uncertainty of the status the chiropractor can claim professionally and educationally. Practitioners portrayed a view, indicating that chiropractic cannot claim coherence in any...... health care practices as part of the education process and the concomitant perceived lack of exposure especially to black South Africans emerged as interesting and pertinent developmental themes in the local context. CONCLUSIONS: The international discourse related to issues in the domains of philosophy...

  20. Manual for Training Leprosy Rehabilitation Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Masayoshi; Eason, Alice L.

    The purpose of this manual is to introduce the general concepts and techniques in leprosy rehabilitation to physical therapy aides. Because of the lack of well-trained, qualified, physical therapists, the committee on leprosy rehabilitation considers it necessary to publish a teaching manual outlining leprosy rehabilitation for those who work with…

  1. Core and Complementary Chiropractic: Lowering Barriers to Patient Utilization of Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triano, John J; McGregor, Marion

    2016-12-01

    The use of chiropractic services has stalled while interest in accessing manipulation services is rising. The purpose of this paper is to consider this dilemma in the context of the dynamics of professional socialization, surveys of public attitudes, and a potential strategic action. This is a reflection work grounded in the literature on professional socialization and the attitudes held regarding chiropractic in modern society, to include its members, and in original data on training programs. Data were interpreted on the background of the authors' cross-cultural experiences spanning patient care, research, education, and interprofessional collaboration. Recommendation on a strategic action to counter barriers in patient referrals was synthesized. Professional socialization is the process by which society enables professional privilege. Illustration of typical and divergent professional socialization models emerged that explain cognitive dissonance toward the profession. Questions of trust are commensurate with the experiences during patient encounters rather than with a common identity for the profession. Diversity among encounters perpetuates the uncertainty that affects referral sources. Commonality as an anchor for consistent professional identity and socialization through the content of core chiropractic, defined by training and practice, offers a means to offset uncertainty. Complementary chiropractic, analogous to complementary medicine, provides an outlet under professional socialization for the interests to explore additional methods of care. The practice workplace is an effective lever for altering barriers to the use of services. Clarifying rhetoric through conceptualization of core and complementary practices simplifies the socialization dynamic. Further, it takes advantage of accepted cultural semantics in meaningful analogy while continuing to empower practical diversity in care delivery in response to evolving scientific evidence.

  2. Statin induced myopathy presenting as mechanical musculoskeletal pain observed in two chiropractic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rodine, Robert J; Tibbles, Anthony C; Kim, Peter SY; Alikhan, Neetan

    2010-01-01

    Lipid lowering drugs, such as statins, are commonly used to treat approximately 10 million Canadians affected by hypercholesterolemia. The most commonly experienced side-effect of statin medication is muscle pain. Statin induced myopathy consists of a spectrum of myopathic disorders ranging from mild myalgia to fatal rhabdomyolysis. The following is a presentation of 2 cases of statin induced myopathy in patients presenting in a chiropractic setting. In addition, discussion will surround the ...

  3. A qualitative exploration of chiropractic and physiotherapy teachers' experiences and conceptualizations of the educational environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Per J.; Liljedahl, Matilda; Lindquist, Ingrid; Laksov, Klara Bolander

    2018-01-01

    Objective: There has been increasing scholarly interest in the role of environments in health care professional education, and the value of these has been widely acknowledged as an influential factor in educational quality. However, little is known about how teachers experience the environment, and there is a recognizable absence of a perspective from chiropractic and physiotherapy faculties. The aim of this study was to explore and contrast chiropractic and physiotherapy teachers' experiences and conceptualizations of the meaning of the educational environment. Methods: In this qualitative study, we performed semistructured interviews with 14 teachers, purposefully selected to obtain richness, variation, and breadth in the data. The data were analyzed using inductive qualitative content analysis. Results: The most noteworthy findings were, first, that chiropractic teachers experienced the meaning of the environment as motivating a vocational practice and modeling ideal, supporting and managing stressed students, and including students in the community of chiropractors. Physiotherapy teachers experienced the meaning of the environment as putting the pedagogical vision into practice, balancing students' expectations, and providing the prerequisites to grow within the profession. Second, both groups of teachers held common conceptualizations of the constituents of the environment as physical, organizational, relational, communicational, and pedagogical; however, they attached different connotations to these dimensions. Conclusion: The findings conveyed a variance in the experience of the meaning of the educational environment that can be attributed to contextual and cultural differences. PMID:29257707

  4. Perceived stress and fatigue among students in a doctor of chiropractic training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Vosko, Andrew M; Brash, Marissa; Ph, Dr; Philips, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    High levels of stress and fatigue are associated with decreased academic success, well-being, and quality of life. The objective of this research was to quantify levels of perceived stress and fatigue among chiropractic students to identify sources of and student coping mechanisms for perceived stress and fatigue and to identify the relationship between students' perceived stress and fatigue. A survey comprised of the Perceived Stress Scale, the Undergraduate Sources of Stress Survey, and the Piper Fatigue Scale was administered to chiropractic students in their 2nd, 5th, and 8th trimesters of doctoral study. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, 1-way analysis of variance, and linear correlation tests. Students reported having moderate to high levels of stress and fatigue, with higher levels of stress and fatigue seen in women than in men. A nonsignificant difference among stress scores and a significant difference among fatigue scores were observed based on program term. Levels of stress predicted levels of fatigue, and stress was strongly correlated with psychological health, relationships with family members, mood, and need for learning accommodations. Fatigue was strongly correlated with psychological health, academic demands, and conflicts between studies and other activities. There are differences in the reporting of perceived stress and fatigue levels in this chiropractic student population based on gender. The correlation between fatigue and stress also suggests that measures that may alleviate one may likely affect the other.

  5. The implementation of problem-based learning in collaborative groups in a chiropractic program in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Ni Ni; Nadarajah, Vishna Devi V; Win, Daw Khin

    2015-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is usually conducted in small-group learning sessions with approximately eight students per facilitator. In this study, we implemented a modified version of PBL involving collaborative groups in an undergraduate chiropractic program and assessed its pedagogical effectiveness. This study was conducted at the International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and involved the 2012 chiropractic student cohort. Six PBL cases were provided to chiropractic students, consisting of three PBL cases for which learning resources were provided and another three PBL cases for which learning resources were not provided. Group discussions were not continuously supervised, since only one facilitator was present. The students' perceptions of PBL in collaborative groups were assessed with a questionnaire that was divided into three domains: motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work. Thirty of the 31 students (97%) participated in the study. PBL in collaborative groups was significantly associated with positive responses regarding students' motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work (Plearning resources increased motivation and cognitive skills (Plearning resources.

  6. Chiropractic care of a patient with vertebral subluxation and Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Joel; Plaugher, Gregory; Van Wyngarden, Darwin L

    2003-05-01

    To describe the chiropractic care of a patient medically diagnosed with Bell's palsy and discuss issues clinically relevant to this disorder, such as its epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, care, and prognosis. A 49-year-old woman with a medical diagnosis of Bell's palsy sought chiropractic care. Her symptoms included right facial paralysis, extreme phonophobia, pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and neck pain. Signs of cervical vertebral and TMJ subluxations included edema, tenderness, asymmetry of motion and posture, and malalignment detected from plain film radiographs. The patient was cared for with full spine contact-specific, high-velocity, low-amplitude adjustments (Gonstead Technique) to sites of vertebral and occipital subluxations. The patient's left TMJ was also adjusted. The initial symptomatic response to care was positive, and the patient made continued improvements during the 6 months of care. There are indications that patients suffering from Bell's palsy may benefit from a holistic chiropractic approach that not only includes a focus of examination and care of the primary regional areas of complaint (eg, face, TMJ) but also potentially from significant vertebral subluxation concomitants.

  7. Predictors of performance of students in biochemistry in a doctor of chiropractic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kathy; Rabatsky, Ali; Dishman, Veronica; Meseke, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objective : This study investigated the effect of completion of course prerequisites, undergraduate grade point average (GPA), undergraduate degree, and study habits on the performance of students in the biochemistry course at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida. Methods : Students self-reported information regarding academic preparation at the beginning of the semester using a questionnaire. Final exam grade and final course grade were noted and used as measures of performance. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine if number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate GPA, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program were associated significantly with the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course. Results : The number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program did not significantly affect the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course, but undergraduate GPA did. Subsequent univariate analysis and Tukey's post hoc comparisons revealed that students with an undergraduate GPA in the 3.5 to 3.99 range earned significantly higher final course grades than students with an undergraduate GPA in the 2.5 to 2.99 range. Conclusion : No single variable was determined to be a factor that determines student success in biochemistry. The interrelationship between the factors examined warrants further investigation to understand fully how to predict the success of a student in the biochemistry course.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner

    2016-01-01

    suggested that chiropractic care was cost-effective with a probability of 97%, given a threshold value of €30 000 per QALY gained. In both groups, there was an increase in the health-related quality of life, and the mean increases were similar over the 12-month evaluation period. The mean differences......AIMS: To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. METHODS AND RESULTS: 115 adults aged 18-75 years with acute......-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36)) were compared in cost-effectiveness analyses over 12 months from baseline. Mean costs were €2183 lower for the group with chiropractic care, but not statistically significant (95% CI -4410.5 to 43.0). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio...

  9. Pdap Manual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Mølgaard; Larsen, Torben J.

    Pdap, Python Data Analysis Program, is a program for post processing, analysis, visualization and presentation of data e.g. simulation results and measurements. It is intended but not limited to the domain of wind turbines. It combines an intuitive graphical user interface with python scripting...... that allows automation and implementation of custom functions. This manual gives a short introduction to the graphical user interface, describes the mathematical background for some of the functions, describes the scripting API and finally a few examples on how automate analysis via scripting is presented....... The newest version, and more documentation and help on how to used, extend and automate Pdap can be found at the webpage www.hawc2.dk...

  10. The role and position of passive intervertebral motion assessment within clinical reasoning and decision-making in manual physical therapy: a qualitative interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Trijffel, Emiel; Plochg, Thomas; van Hartingsveld, Frank; Lucas, Cees; Oostendorp, Rob A. B.

    2010-01-01

    Passive intervertebral motion (PIVM) assessment is a characterizing skill of manual physical therapists (MPTs) and is important for judgments about impairments in spinal joint function. It is unknown as to why and how MPTs use this mobility testing of spinal motion segments within their clinical

  11. The evidence base for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents: The emperor's new suit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, Lise; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen

    2010-01-01

    studies were included if they investigated the effect of manual therapy on musculoskeletal disorders in children and/or adolescents. The MEDLINE and MANTIS databases were searched, and studies published in English, Danish, Swedish or Norwegian were included.Only three studies were identified that in some...... way attempted to look at the effectiveness of manual therapy for children or adolescents with spinal problems, and none of these was a randomized controlled clinical trial. As for the rest of the musculoskeletal system, only one study of temporomandibular disorder was identified.With this review, we...... on adult musculoskeletal health. Thus, this is an important part of the chiropractors' scope of practice, and the objective of this review is to assess the evidence base for manual treatment of musculoskeletal disorders in children and adolescents.Randomized, quasi-randomized and non-randomized clinical...

  12. A pilot randomised clinical trial of physiotherapy (manual therapy, exercise, and education) for early-onset hip osteoarthritis post-hip arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Joanne; Moore, Kate; Fransen, Marlene; Russell, Trevor; Freke, Matthew; Crossley, Kay M

    2018-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of hip arthroscopy for hip pain, there is no level 1 evidence to support physiotherapy rehabilitation programs following this procedure. The aims of this study were to determine (i) what is the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) investigating a targeted physiotherapy intervention for early-onset hip osteoarthritis (OA) post-hip arthroscopy? and (ii) what are the within-group treatment effects of the physiotherapy intervention and a health-education control group? This study was a pilot single-blind RCT conducted in a private physiotherapy clinic in Hobart, Australia. Patients included 17 volunteers (nine women; age 32 ± 8 years; body mass index = 25.6 ± 5.1 kg/m 2 ) who were recruited 4-14 months post-hip arthroscopy, with chondropathy and/or labral pathology at the time of surgery. Interventions included a physiotherapy treatment program that was semi-standardised and consisted of (i) manual therapy; (ii) hip strengthening and functional retraining; and (iii) health education. Control treatment encompassed individualised health education sessions. The primary outcome measure was feasibility, which was reported as percentage of eligible participants enrolled, adherence with the intervention, and losses to follow-up. The research process was evaluated using interviews, and an estimated sample size for a definitive study is offered. Secondary outcomes included the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and the International Hip Outcome Tool (IHOT-33) patient-reported outcomes. Seventeen out of 48 eligible patients (35%) were randomised. Adherence to the intervention was 100%, with no losses to follow-up. The estimated sample size for a full-scale RCT was 142 patients. The within-group (95% confidence intervals) change scores for the physiotherapy group were HOOS-Symptoms 6 points (-4 to 16); HOOS-Pain 10 points (-2 to 22); HOOS-Activity of Daily Living 8 points (0 to 16); HOOS-Sport 3 points

  13. Creating European guidelines for Chiropractic Incident Reporting and Learning Systems (CIRLS: relevance and structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangler Martin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2009, the heads of the Executive Council of the European Chiropractors' Union (ECU and the European Academy of Chiropractic (EAC involved in the European Committee for Standardization (CEN process for the chiropractic profession, set out to establish European guidelines for the reporting of adverse reactions to chiropractic treatment. There were a number of reasons for this: first, to improve the overall quality of patient care by aiming to reduce the application of potentially harmful interventions and to facilitate the treatment of patients within the context of achieving maximum benefit with a minimum risk of harm; second, to inform the training objectives for the Graduate Education and Continuing Professional Development programmes of all 19 ECU member nations, regarding knowledge and skills to be acquired for maximising patient safety; and third, to develop a guideline on patient safety incident reporting as it is likely to be part of future CEN standards for ECU member nations. Objective To introduce patient safety incident reporting within the context of chiropractic practice in Europe and to help individual countries and their national professional associations to develop or improve reporting and learning systems. Discussion Providing health care of any kind, including the provision of chiropractic treatment, can be a complex and, at times, a risky activity. Safety in healthcare cannot be guaranteed, it can only be improved. One of the most important aspects of any learning and reporting system lies in the appropriate use of the data and information it gathers. Reporting should not just be seen as a vehicle for obtaining information on patient safety issues, but also be utilised as a tool to facilitate learning, advance quality improvement and to ultimately minimise the rate of the occurrence of errors linked to patient care. Conclusions Before a reporting and learning system can be established it has to be clear

  14. Labelling of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Bioconjugates for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy: A Comparison among Manual, Semiautomated, and Fully Automated Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Iori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the hazard due to the radiation exposure, preparation of 90Y- and 177Lu-labelled radiopharmaceuticals is still mainly performed using manual procedures. In the present study the performance of a commercial automatic synthesizer based on disposable cassettes for the labelling of 177Lu- and 90Y-DOTA-conjugated biomolecules (namely, DOTATOC and PSMA-617 was evaluated and compared to a manual and a semiautomated approach. The dose exposure of the operators was evaluated as well. More than 300 clinical preparations of both 90Y- and 177Lu-labelled radiopharmaceuticals have been performed using the three different methods. The mean radiochemical yields for 90Y-DOTATOC were 96.2±4.9%, 90.3±5.6%, and 82.0±8.4%, while for 177Lu-DOTATOC they were 98.3%  ± 0.6, 90.8%  ± 8.3, and 83.1±5.7% when manual, semiautomated, and automated approaches were used, respectively. The mean doses on the whole hands for yttrium-90 preparations were 0.15±0.4 mSv/GBq, 0.04±0.1 mSv/GBq, and 0.11±0.3 mSv/GBq for manual, semiautomated, and automated synthesis, respectively, and for lutetium-177 preparations, they were 0.02±0.008 mSv/GBq, 0.01±0.03 mSv/GBq, and 0.01±0.02 mSv/GBq, respectively. In conclusion, the automated approach guaranteed reliable and reproducible preparations of pharmaceutical grade therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in a decent RCY. The radiation exposure of the operators remained comparable to the manual approach mainly due to the fact that a dedicated shielding was still not available for the system.

  15. Chiropractic physicians: toward a select conceptual understanding of bureaucratic structures and functions in the health care institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Marcel; Kondellas, Bill; Hang, Lam; Fredericks, Janet; Ross, Michael Wv

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to present select concepts and theories of bureaucratic structures and functions so that chiropractic physicians and other health care professionals can use them in their respective practices. The society-culture-personality model can be applied as an organizational instrument for assisting chiropractors in the diagnosis and treatment of their patients irrespective of locality. Society-culture-personality and social meaningful interaction are examined in relationship to the structural and functional aspects of bureaucracy within the health care institution of a society. Implicit in the examination of the health care bureaucratic structures and functions of a society is the focus that chiropractic physicians and chiropractic students learn how to integrate, synthesize, and actualize values and virtues such as empathy, integrity, excellence, diversity, compassion, caring, and understanding with a deep commitment to self-reflection. It is essential that future and current chiropractic physicians be aware of the structural and functional aspects of an organization so that chiropractic and other health care professionals are able to deliver care that involves the ingredients of quality, affordability, availability, accessibility, and continuity for their patients.

  16. Chiropractic physicians: toward a select conceptual understanding of bureaucratic structures and functions in the health care institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Marcel; Kondellas, Bill; Hang, Lam; Fredericks, Janet; Ross, Michael WV

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to present select concepts and theories of bureaucratic structures and functions so that chiropractic physicians and other health care professionals can use them in their respective practices. The society-culture-personality model can be applied as an organizational instrument for assisting chiropractors in the diagnosis and treatment of their patients irrespective of locality. Discussion Society-culture-personality and social meaningful interaction are examined in relationship to the structural and functional aspects of bureaucracy within the health care institution of a society. Implicit in the examination of the health care bureaucratic structures and functions of a society is the focus that chiropractic physicians and chiropractic students learn how to integrate, synthesize, and actualize values and virtues such as empathy, integrity, excellence, diversity, compassion, caring, and understanding with a deep commitment to self-reflection. Conclusion It is essential that future and current chiropractic physicians be aware of the structural and functional aspects of an organization so that chiropractic and other health care professionals are able to deliver care that involves the ingredients of quality, affordability, availability, accessibility, and continuity for their patients. PMID:22693481

  17. Caltrans : construction manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Caltrans intends this manual as a resource for all personnel engaged in contract administration. The manual establishes policies and procedures for the construction phase of Caltrans projects. However, this manual is not a contract document. It impos...

  18. The effects of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT versus Mulligan concept of manual therapy in treating lateral epicondylitis = Efektywność terapii zewnątrzustrojową falą uderzeniową versus terapia manualna w koncepcji Mulligana w leczeniu zapalenia nadkłykcia bocznego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Kocjan

    2016-07-01

    SUMMARY Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT is a conservative treatment in case of many musculoskeletal disorders, including lateral epicondylitis. The aim of the study was the assessment of the efficacy of the shockwave - compare to manual therapy treatment (Mulligan concept in a population of consecutive patients affected by tennis elbow. 26 patients who suffered from chronic persistent tennis elbow were randomly assigned to one of the two treatment groups. Group 1 (n=13, mean age=37,14±10,07 received an extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT; 2,500 shocks, while Group 2 (n=13, mean age= was undergoing manual therapy in Mulligan concept. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE were used. The results of the study presented here shows that ESWT and Mulligan therapy are an effective treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Both groups achieved improvement in all of analysed variables, but in case of Mulligan Concept statistical significant differences were found in 4 from 6 variables. It is concluded that ESWT and Mulligan therapy appears to be a useful non invasive treatment methods that reduces the symptoms of lateral epicondylitis.   Key words: ESWT, mulligan, tennis elbow, lateral epicondylitis.

  19. Pain-related fear of (re-)injury in patients with low back pain: Estimation or measurement in manual therapy primary care practice? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostendorp, Rob A B; Elvers, Hans; Mikolajewska, Emilia; Laekeman, Marjan; Roussel, Nathalie; van der Zanden, Olaf; Nijs, Jo; Samwel, Han

    2017-11-06

    Manual physical therapists (MPTs) working in primary care get limited information about patient's courses of (chronic) low back pain (LBP). Identification of kinesiophobia is mostly based on clinical perception. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the scores with which manual physical therapists in a primary care setting identify kinesiophobia in patients with low back pain, and the patients' self-reported measures of kinesiophobia. The cross-sectional study comprised 104 patients with LBP and 17 MPTs. Patients first independently completed the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK-17). The therapists, blinded to the TSK-scores, rated their perception of a patient's kinesiophobia using the Visual Analogue Scale-Estimation (VAS-est) and the accuracy of their ratings using the Visual Analogue Scale-Accuracy (VAS-ac). Kendall's tau b was used to determine the level of correlation between scores on the TSK-17 and the VAS-est.

  20. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Gudavalli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction.

  1. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stason, William B; Ritter, Grant A; Martin, Timothy; Prottas, Jeffrey; Tompkins, Christopher; Shepard, Donald S

    2016-01-01

    Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or head. The demonstration was conducted in 2005-2007 in selected counties of Illinois, Iowa, and Virginia and the entire states of Maine and New Mexico. Medicare claims were compiled for the preceding year and two demonstration years for the demonstration areas and matched comparison areas. The impact of the demonstration was analyzed through multivariate regression analysis with a difference-in-difference framework. Expanded coverage increased Medicare expenditures by $50 million or 28.5% in users of chiropractic services and by $114 million or 10.4% in all patients treated for NMS conditions in demonstration areas during the two-year period. Results varied widely among demonstration areas ranging from increased costs per user of $485 in Northern Illinois and Chicago counties to decreases in costs per user of $59 in New Mexico and $178 in Scott County, Iowa. The demonstration did not assess possible decreases in costs to other insurers, out-of-pocket payments by patients, the need for and costs of pain medications, or longer term clinical benefits such as avoidance of orthopedic surgical procedures beyond the two-year period of the demonstration. It is possible that other payers or beneficiaries saved money during the demonstration while costs to Medicare were increased.

  2. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Stason

    Full Text Available Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or head.The demonstration was conducted in 2005-2007 in selected counties of Illinois, Iowa, and Virginia and the entire states of Maine and New Mexico. Medicare claims were compiled for the preceding year and two demonstration years for the demonstration areas and matched comparison areas. The impact of the demonstration was analyzed through multivariate regression analysis with a difference-in-difference framework.Expanded coverage increased Medicare expenditures by $50 million or 28.5% in users of chiropractic services and by $114 million or 10.4% in all patients treated for NMS conditions in demonstration areas during the two-year period. Results varied widely among demonstration areas ranging from increased costs per user of $485 in Northern Illinois and Chicago counties to decreases in costs per user of $59 in New Mexico and $178 in Scott County, Iowa.The demonstration did not assess possible decreases in costs to other insurers, out-of-pocket payments by patients, the need for and costs of pain medications, or longer term clinical benefits such as avoidance of orthopedic surgical procedures beyond the two-year period of the demonstration. It is possible that other payers or beneficiaries saved money during the demonstration while costs to Medicare were increased.

  3. Health care encounters in Danish chiropractic practice from a consumer perspectives - a mixed methods investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Boyle, Eleanor; Larsen, Johanne Brinch; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Perceived value is the key ingredient to carving and maintaining a competitive business niche. The opportunities to interact with consumers to understand and enhance perceived value are termed 'touch points'. Due to the out-of-pocket expense incurred by patients, Danish chiropractors are subject to consumer trends and behaviors. The purpose of this investigation was to explore and describe consumer touch points relevant to perceived value through healthcare journeys in chiropractic practices. We designed a convergent parallel, mixed methods study. Our purposive sampling framework identified 11 chiropractic clinics from which we collected observational field notes, video recordings and face-to-face interviews. Data was collected between April 14(th) and June 26(th) 2014. We described the exteriors and interiors of all participant clinics, interviewed 32 staff members, 12 new patients and 36 follow-up patients and finally video recorded 11 new and 24 follow-up consultations. Categorization and analysis led to the emergence six consumer touch point themes: 'the internet', 'the physical environment', 'practice models', 'administrative staff', 'the consultation sequence and timing' and 'a consultation that adds value'. The Internet functions as a tool when choosing/confirming a clinic as appropriate, developing and initial image and managing appointments. The administrative hub appears integral to the shaping of positive consumer experiences outside of the consultation. Clinic location, practice model and interior design may contribute to context effects and thus may influence value perception during the clinical encounter. The duration of hands-on treatment received from the chiropractor is not an apparent consumer focus point. Rather, through a seven stage clinical procedure patients value consultations with clinicians who demonstrate professional competence by effective communication diagnosis/management and facilitating satisfactory treatment outcomes. At least six

  4. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stason, William B.; Ritter, Grant A; Prottas, Jeffrey; Tompkins, Christopher; Shepard, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or head. Methods The demonstration was conducted in 2005–2007 in selected counties of Illinois, Iowa, and Virginia and the entire states of Maine and New Mexico. Medicare claims were compiled for the preceding year and two demonstration years for the demonstration areas and matched comparison areas. The impact of the demonstration was analyzed through multivariate regression analysis with a difference-in-difference framework. Results Expanded coverage increased Medicare expenditures by $50 million or 28.5% in users of chiropractic services and by $114 million or 10.4% in all patients treated for NMS conditions in demonstration areas during the two-year period. Results varied widely among demonstration areas ranging from increased costs per user of $485 in Northern Illinois and Chicago counties to decreases in costs per user of $59 in New Mexico and $178 in Scott County, Iowa. Conclusion The demonstration did not assess possible decreases in costs to other insurers, out-of-pocket payments by patients, the need for and costs of pain medications, or longer term clinical benefits such as avoidance of orthopedic surgical procedures beyond the two-year period of the demonstration. It is possible that other payers or beneficiaries saved money during the demonstration while costs to Medicare were increased. PMID:26928221

  5. Lost and Found, Letters and Methods: Assessing Attitudes toward Chiropractic and Medical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Kern

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes toward traditional and chiropractic medicine were compared using Milgram's lost letter technique. A total of 192 letters were placed on the windshields of vehicles in parking lots at six restaurants and department stores in each of four quadrants of a medium-sized, Southeastern city. These letters were addressed to "Admissions" at either a fictitious Institute of Medicine or Institute of Chiropractic Care. Return addresses included either a male or a female name. Thus, those who found a lost letter were faced with the option of returning or not returning a letter from either a male or a female, addressed to an Institute of traditional or non-traditional medicine. After examining previous studies which had used the lost letter technique, numerous methodological improvements were implemented. For example, letters were randomly assigned to potential drop spots for each of 24 study locations (six study locations in each of four city quadrants, and a Latin square design was used to control for possible order effects in the four study conditions that were implemented. Nearly 65% of the letters (124 of 192 were returned. We found: 1 letters addressed to a fictitious Institute of Chiropractic Care were just as likely to be returned as those addressed to a fictitious Institute of Medicine; 2 letters with female return addresses were as likely to be returned as those with male return addresses; 3 there was no interaction between study conditions; 4 based on what was essentially a replication study, a comparison of the pattern of returns using the first and second cycle of lost letters (n = 96 for each cycle revealed an equivalent pattern of no-difference findings. DOI: 10.2458/azu_jmmss.v1i1.78

  6. A demographic and epidemiological study of a Mexican chiropractic college public clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndetan Harrison T

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Descriptive studies of chiropractic patients are not new, several have been performed in the U.S., Australia, Canada, and Europe. None have been performed in a Latin American country. The purpose of this study is to describe the patients who visited a Mexican chiropractic college public clinic with respect to demographics and clinical characteristics. Methods This study was reviewed and approved by the IRB of Parker College of Chiropractic and the Universidad Estatal del Valle de Ecatepec (UNEVE. Five hundred patient files from the UNEVE public clinic from May 2005 to May 2007 were selected from an approximate total number of 3,700. Information was collected for demographics, chief complaints, associated complaints, and previous care sought. Results The sample comprised 306 (61.2% female. Most files (44.2% were in the age range of 40–59 years (mean of 43.4 years. The most frequent complaints were lumbar pain (29.2% and extremity pain (28.0%, most commonly the knee. Most (62.0% described their complaints as greater than one year. Trauma (46.6% was indicated as the initial cause. Mean VAS score was 6.26/10 with 20% rated at 8/10. Conclusion Demographic results compared closer to studies conducted with private clinicians (females within the ages of 40–59. The primary complaint and duration was similar to previous studies (low back pain and chronic, except in this population the cause was usually initiated by trauma. The most striking features were the higher number of extremity complaints and the marked increased level of VAS score (20% rated as 8/10.

  7. Integrating manual and movement therapy with philosophical counseling for treatment of a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case study that explores the principles of holistic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottingham, J T; Maitland, J

    2000-03-01

    A patient (Travis) suffering from ALS received a holistic principle-based protocol that combined manual-movement techniques with philosophical counseling. After 4 sessions, he exhibited a remarkable improvement in head-neck alignment, balance/mobility, autonomic activity, and worldview for a 2-month span. These changes occurred only after his worldview underwent a shift from a dualistic split of mind and body to a nondualistic orientation. After this 2-month period of improvement, Travis' structural alignment and balance/mobility suddenly deteriorated rapidly. Yet, his enhanced worldview and autonomic tone continued through a final follow-up taken 17 weeks after the initial evaluation.

  8. Complementary and alternative medical therapies for chronic low back pain: What treatments are patients willing to try?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Karen J; Cherkin, Daniel C; Connelly, Maureen T; Erro, Janet; Savetsky, Jacqueline B; Davis, Roger B; Eisenberg, David M

    2004-07-19

    Although back pain is the most common reason patients use complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies, little is known about the willingness of primary care back pain patients to try these therapies. As part of an effort to refine recruitment strategies for clinical trials, we sought to determine if back pain patients are willing to try acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, meditation, and t'ai chi and to learn about their knowledge of, experience with, and perceptions about each of these therapies. We identified English-speaking patients with diagnoses consistent with chronic low back pain using automated visit data from one health care organization in Boston and another in Seattle. We were able to confirm the eligibility status (i.e., current low back pain that had lasted at least 3 months) of 70% of the patients with such diagnoses and all eligible respondents were interviewed. Except for chiropractic, knowledge about these therapies was low. Chiropractic and massage had been used by the largest fractions of respondents (54% and 38%, respectively), mostly for back pain (45% and 24%, respectively). Among prior users of specific CAM therapies for back pain, massage was rated most helpful. Users of chiropractic reported treatment-related "significant discomfort, pain or harm" more often (23%) than users of other therapies (5-16%). Respondents expected massage would be most helpful (median of 7 on a 0 to 10 scale) and meditation least helpful (median of 3) in relieving their current pain. Most respondents indicated they would be "very likely" to try acupuncture, massage, or chiropractic for their back pain if they did not have to pay out of pocket and their physician thought it was a reasonable treatment option. Most patients with chronic back pain in our sample were interested in trying therapeutic options that lie outside the conventional medical spectrum. This highlights the need for additional studies evaluating their effectiveness and suggests that

  9. Inappropriate use of the title 'chiropractor' and term 'chiropractic manipulation' in the peer-reviewed biomedical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenban Adrian B

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The misuse of the title 'chiropractor' and term 'chiropractic manipulation', in relation to injury associated with cervical spine manipulation, have previously been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. The objectives of this study were to - 1 Prospectively monitor the peer-reviewed literature for papers reporting an association between chiropractic, or chiropractic manipulation, and injury; 2 Contact lead authors of papers that report such an association in order to determine the basis upon which the title 'chiropractor' and/or term 'chiropractic manipulation' was used; 3 Document the outcome of submission of letters to the editors of journals wherein the title 'chiropractor', and/or term 'chiropractic manipulation', had been misused and resulted in the over-reporting of chiropractic induced injury. Methods One electronic database (PubMed was monitored prospectively, via monthly PubMed searches, during a 12 month period (June 2003 to May 2004. Once relevant papers were located, they were reviewed. If the qualifications and/or profession of the care provider/s were not apparent, an attempt was made to confirm them via direct e-mail communication with the principal researcher of each respective paper. A letter was then sent to the editor of each involved journal. Results A total of twenty four different cases, spread across six separate publications, were located via the monthly PubMed searches. All twenty four cases took place in one of two European countries. The six publications consisted of four case reports, each containing one patient, one case series, involving twenty relevant cases, and a secondary report that pertained to one of the four case reports. In each of the six publications the authors suggest the care provider was a chiropractor and that each patient received chiropractic manipulation of the cervical spine prior to developing symptoms suggestive of traumatic injury. In two of the four case reports

  10. An exploratory, descriptive study of consumer opinions and behaviors regarding health products sales at 4 chiropractic practices in a large, western Canadian urban center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stacey A; Mbadiwe, Chinyere; McMorland, D Gordon; Grod, Jaroslaw P

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the opinions and behaviors of chiropractic patients in a large, western Canadian urban center regarding the sale of health products by doctors of chiropractic. A brief, descriptive survey consisting of both fixed-choice and open-ended questions was distributed by clinic reception staff at 4 chiropractic offices in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Each practice sold a range of health products, including those relating to musculoskeletal care and nutrition, and served between 275 and 320 clients per week. After a 10-week recruitment interval between January and March 2013, a convenience sample of 103 chiropractic patients was obtained. Most patients supported the sale of health products by doctors of chiropractic (n = 101; 98.1%), and most had made health product purchases from a doctor of chiropractic at some point (n = 73; 70.9%). Products relating to muscular care, exercise/rehabilitation products, and pillows were purchased most often (>40%). Consumers were most supportive of doctors of chiropractic selling products they perceived to be directly related to musculoskeletal care. Some participants believed that there should be limits placed on the range of products sold including the products had to be consistent with the practitioner's area of expertise and had to have some demonstrated level of effectiveness. Primary reasons for health product purchase included the doctor's recommendations, convenience, and perception that the product would improve well-being (>50%). This study found that chiropractic patients were supportive of health product sales by doctors of chiropractic, assuming certain conditions were met. Consumers believed that product sales should be undertaken with integrity and should be consistent with the doctor's area of expertise. Consumer beliefs appeared to impact their purchasing behaviors. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. SU-E-T-357: Semi-Automated Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy (KBRT) Planning for Head-And-Neck Cancer (HNC): Can KBRT Plans Achieve Better Results Than Manual Planning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutzky, C; Grzetic, S; Lo, J; Das, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy Treatment (KBRT) planning can be used to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for new patients using constraints derived from previously manually-planned, geometrically similar patients. We investigate whether KBRT plans can achieve greater dose sparing than manual plans using optimized, organspecific constraint weighting factors. Methods: KBRT planning of HNC radiotherapy cases geometrically matched each new (query) case to one of the 105 clinically approved plans in our database. The dose distribution of the planned match was morphed to fit the querys geometry. Dose-volume constraints extracted from the morphed dose distribution were used to run the IMRT optimization with no user input. In the first version, all constraints were multiplied by a weighting factor of 0.7. The weighting factors were then systematically optimized (in order of OARs with increasing separation from the target) to maximize sparing to each OAR without compromising other OARs. The optimized, second version plans were compared against the first version plans and the clinically approved plans for 45 unilateral/bilateral target cases using the dose metrics: mean, median and maximum (brainstem and cord) doses. Results: Compared to the first version, the second version significantly reduced mean/median contralateral parotid doses (>2Gy) for bilateral cases. Other changes between the two versions were not clinically meaningful. Compared to the original clinical plans, both bilateral and unilateral plans in the second version had lower average dose metrics for 5 of the 6 OARs. Compared to the original plans, the second version achieved dose sparing that was at least as good for all OARs and better for the ipsilateral parotid (bilateral) and oral cavity (bilateral/unilateral). Differences in planning target volume coverage metrics were not clinically significant. Conclusion: HNC-KBRT planning generated IMRT plans with at least equivalent dose sparing to

  12. SU-E-T-357: Semi-Automated Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy (KBRT) Planning for Head-And-Neck Cancer (HNC): Can KBRT Plans Achieve Better Results Than Manual Planning?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutzky, C; Grzetic, S; Lo, J; Das, S [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy Treatment (KBRT) planning can be used to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for new patients using constraints derived from previously manually-planned, geometrically similar patients. We investigate whether KBRT plans can achieve greater dose sparing than manual plans using optimized, organspecific constraint weighting factors. Methods: KBRT planning of HNC radiotherapy cases geometrically matched each new (query) case to one of the 105 clinically approved plans in our database. The dose distribution of the planned match was morphed to fit the querys geometry. Dose-volume constraints extracted from the morphed dose distribution were used to run the IMRT optimization with no user input. In the first version, all constraints were multiplied by a weighting factor of 0.7. The weighting factors were then systematically optimized (in order of OARs with increasing separation from the target) to maximize sparing to each OAR without compromising other OARs. The optimized, second version plans were compared against the first version plans and the clinically approved plans for 45 unilateral/bilateral target cases using the dose metrics: mean, median and maximum (brainstem and cord) doses. Results: Compared to the first version, the second version significantly reduced mean/median contralateral parotid doses (>2Gy) for bilateral cases. Other changes between the two versions were not clinically meaningful. Compared to the original clinical plans, both bilateral and unilateral plans in the second version had lower average dose metrics for 5 of the 6 OARs. Compared to the original plans, the second version achieved dose sparing that was at least as good for all OARs and better for the ipsilateral parotid (bilateral) and oral cavity (bilateral/unilateral). Differences in planning target volume coverage metrics were not clinically significant. Conclusion: HNC-KBRT planning generated IMRT plans with at least equivalent dose sparing to

  13. A New Method for Treatment of Lymphedema of Limbs: Standardized Manual Massage with a New Device Linforoll in Conservative and Surgical Therapy Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Waldemar L; Zaleska, Marzanna; Michelin, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    Edema fluid in lymphedematous limbs should be evacuated to sites where it can be absorbed. It should be moved either to the hypogastrium or arm/scapular regions along tissue channels or implanted silicon channels or through lymphovenous anastomoses. For that purpose, the manual lymphatic drainage of limb is an effective method. Standardization of manual massage applied force and timing becomes necessary. A device with known pressing area and continuously showing the applied force while moving it toward the root of the limb is needed. Moreover, force could be adjusted to the stiffness of the massaged tissues that varies at different levels of the limb. Results from such a device would be repeatable and reproducible by others. In this study we present data on tissue fluid hydromechanics obtained from 20 patients with obstructive limb lymphedema during massage with a massaging roller called Linforoll. Linforoll is composed of a hand piece with roller and pressure sensor connected wireless to the computer displaying the pressure curve of the applied force. Electron microscopy studies for checking eventual tissue changes were done. Linforoll provides the possibilities of: 1) regulating the applied force according to the hydromechanic conditions of the massaged tissues; 2) standardization of massage repeatable in the same patient; 3) decrease of limb volume; 4) evident increase in tissue elasticity; 5) application as a driving force for fluid flow along the surgically implanted tubing and vessels running to the lymphovenous shunts.

  14. An audit of health products advertised for sale on chiropractic Web sites in Canada and consideration of these practices in the context of Canadian chiropractic codes of ethics and conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stacey A; Grod, Jaroslaw P

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the extent to which chiropractors with Web sites practicing in Canada advertise health products for sale and considers this practice in the context of chiropractic codes of ethics and conduct. Chiropractic Web sites in Canada were identified using a public online business directory (Canada 411). The Web sites were searched, and an inventory of the health products for sale was taken. The influences of type of practice and province of practice on the sale of health product were assessed. Textual comments about health product marketing were summarized. National and provincial codes of ethics were reviewed, and the content on health product advertising was summarized. Two hundred eighty-seven Web sites were reviewed. Just more than half of the Web sites contained information on health products for sale (n = 158, 54%). Orthotics were advertised most often (n = 136 practices, 47%), followed by vitamins/nutritional supplements (n = 53, 18%), pillows and supports (n = 40, 14%), and exercise/rehabilitation products (n = 20, 7%). Chiropractors in solo or group chiropractic practices were less likely to advertise health products than those in multidisciplinary practice (P advertise nutritional supplements (P ethics and conduct varied in their guidelines regarding health product sales. Variations in codes of ethics and in the proportions of practitioners advertising health products for sales across the country suggest that opinions may be divided on the acceptability of health product sales. Such practices raise questions and considerations for the chiropractic profession.

  15. The use of a manual-driven group cognitive behavior therapy in a Brazilian sample of obese individuals with binge-eating disorder Utilização de terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo baseada em manual em uma amostra brasileira de indivíduos obesos com transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Duchesne

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of a manual-based cognitive behavior therapy adapted to a group format in a sample of Brazilian obese subjects with binge-eating disorder. METHOD: In an open trial, 21 obese subjects with binge-eating disorder received a group cognitive-behavioral therapy program. Changes in binge-eating frequency, weight, body shape concerns, and depressive symptoms were compared between baseline and the end of the study. RESULTS: The mean frequency of binge-eating episodes significantly decreased from baseline to post-treatment (p OBJETIVO: Avaliar a efetividade da terapia cognitivo-comportamental baseada em um manual adaptado para o formato de grupo em uma amostra brasileira de obesos com transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica. MÉTODO: Em um estudo aberto, 21 pacientes obesos com transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica participaram de um programa da terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo. A freqüência da compulsão alimentar, o peso corporal, o grau de satisfação com a forma corporal e os sintomas depressivos foram avaliados no início do tratamento e no final do estudo. RESULTADOS: Houve uma redução estatisticamente significativa da freqüência média de episódios de compulsão alimentar entre a linha de base e o final do tratamento (p < 0,001, com uma taxa de remissão de episódios no final do estudo de 76,1%. Foi observada, também, uma redução significativa dos sintomas depressivos e da insatisfação com a forma corporal (p < 0,001. Adicionalmente, a perda de peso foi clínica e estatisticamente significativa. CONCLUSÃO: A utilização de terapia cognitivo-comportamental baseada em um manual adaptado para o transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica resultou em melhora significativa da compulsão alimentar, do peso corporal, da preocupação com a forma corporal e dos sintomas depressivos associados ao transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica nessa amostra.

  16. Effects of an exercise and manual therapy program on physical impairments, function and quality-of-life in people with osteoporotic vertebral fracture: a randomised, single-blind controlled pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherburn Margaret

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This randomised, single-blind controlled pilot trial aimed to determine the effectiveness of a physiotherapy program, including exercise and manual therapy, in reducing impairments and improving physical function and health-related quality of life in people with a history of painful osteoporotic vertebral fracture. Methods 20 participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 11 or control (n = 9 group. The intervention group attended individual sessions with an experienced clinician once a week for 10 weeks and performed daily home exercises with adherence monitored by a self-report diary. The control group received no treatment. Blinded assessment was conducted at baseline and 11 weeks. Questionnaires assessed self-reported changes in back pain, physical function, and health-related quality of life. Objective measures of thoracic kyphosis, back and shoulder muscle endurance (Timed Loaded Standing Test, and function (Timed Up and Go test were also taken. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant reductions in pain during movement (mean difference (95% CI -1.8 (-3.5 to -0.1 and at rest (-2.0 (-3.8 to -0.2 and significantly greater improvements in Qualeffo physical function (-4.8 (-9.2 to -0.5 and the Timed Loaded Standing test (46.7 (16.1 to 77.3 secs. For the perceived change in back pain over the 10 weeks, 9/11 (82% participants in the intervention group rated their pain as 'much better' compared with only 1/9 (11% participants in the control group. Conclusion Despite the modest sample size, these results support the benefits of exercise and manual therapy in the clinical management of patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures, but need to be confirmed in a larger sample. Trail registration NCT00638768

  17. The Impact of the Derotational Mobilization of Manual Therapy According to Kaltenborn-Evjenth on the Angle of Trunk Rotation in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis--Pilot Study, Direct Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, Bartosz; Blicharska, Irmina; Błaszczak, Edward; Durmała, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The use of manual therapy in the treatment of scoliosis has been controversial. Scientific reports do not clearly indicate its effectiveness or harmfulness. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of passive and active derotation techniques of manual therapy according to Kaltenborn-Evjent on the reduction of the angle of trunk rotation in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. The study enrolled 33 female patients from the Department of Rehabilitation who were diagnosed with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The patients were divided into two groups according to the curve location (SRS classification). Group A consisted of 17 women, aged 14.±2.4 years, with single-curve scoliosis in the thoracolumbar segment and group B was composed of 16 women, aged 15±2.24 years, with double-curve scoliosis in the thoracic and lumbar segments. In both groups, the angle of trunk rotation, the magnitude of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis were measured twice, before and after each session of derotation techniques. Both groups demonstrated a positive impact of active and passive derotation techniques on the angle of trunk inclination. The greatest difference was observed after a session of active derotation in the patients with lumbar scoliosis. The angle of trunk rotation decreased on average by 4.5°±1.14°. No correlations were found between the curve angle values and the degree of thoracic derotation after the application of these techniques. Derotational mobilization techniques may be a valuable complement to scoliosis treatment methods as they increase their effectiveness.

  18. Learning and Study Strategies Inventory subtests and factors as predictors of National Board of Chiropractic Examiners Part 1 examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Christine M; Dalton, Leanne; Tepe, Rodger E

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to extend research on the relationship between chiropractic students' learning and study strategies and national board examination performance. Sixty-nine first trimester chiropractic students self-administered the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Linear trends tests (for continuous variables) and Mantel-Haenszel trend tests (for categorical variables) were utilized to determine if the 10 LASSI subtests and 3 factors predicted low, medium and high levels of National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) Part 1 scores. Multiple regression was performed to predict overall mean NBCE examination scores using the 3 LASSI factors as predictor variables. Four LASSI subtests (Anxiety, Concentration, Selecting Main Ideas, Test Strategies) and one factor (Goal Orientation) were significantly associated with NBCE examination levels. One factor (Goal Orientation) was a significant predictor of overall mean NBCE examination performance. Learning and study strategies are predictive of NBCE Part 1 examination performance in chiropractic students. The current study found LASSI subtests Anxiety, Concentration, Selecting Main Ideas, and Test Strategies, and the Goal-Orientation factor to be significant predictors of NBCE scores. The LASSI may be useful to educators in preparing students for academic success. Further research is warranted to explore the effects of learning and study strategies training on GPA and NBCE performance.

  19. A eficácia da terapia manual em indivíduos cefaleicos portadores e não-portadores de degeneração cervical: análise de seis casos The effectiveness of manual therapy in indiv iduals with headaches, with and without cervical degeneration: analysis of six cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JGS Morelli

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: As cefaléias do tipo tensional (CTT geralmente são tratadas com fármacos que possuem ações profiláticas. No que se refere ao tratamento fisioterapêutico, vários tipos de procedimentos são relatados e vão desde a eletroterapia e acupuntura até técnicas de tração cervical, de mobilizações vertebrais, alongamentos e relaxamentos. OBJETIVO: Examinar a evolução de seis pacientes com diagnóstico de cefaléia do tipo tensional, submetidos a um protocolo de tratamento fisioterapêutico de terapia manual. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram acompanhados seis indivíduos, três com alterações vertebrais associadas (indivíduos portadores - IP e três sem alterações vertebrais (indivíduos não-portadores - INP, sendo cinco mulheres e um homem, submetidos a um tratamento constituído por dez sessões de tração cervical manual, alongamentos, mobilização vertebral e massagem. FORAM MEDIDOS: a intensidade da dor por meio da escala visual analógica (EVA e o limiar de dor por pressão (LDP no músculo trapézio superior, por meio do algômetro de pressão analógico (PDT - Pain, Diagnostic & Treatment. Os dados, para análise, foram dispostos em um sistema de linha de base múltipla associado a um seguimento. RESULTADOS: Embora o tratamento tenha apresentado resultados eficazes em todos os casos, em relação à intensidade da dor, verificou-se maior dificuldade na remissão completa dos sintomas por parte dos indivíduos não-portadores de alterações vertebrais e, em relação ao LDP, verificou-se que os indivíduos portadores apresentaram melhora acentuada.BACKGROUND: Tension-type headaches (TTH are generally treated with prophylactic medication. With regard to Physical Therapy treatment, many types of procedures have been reported, ranging from electrotherapy and acupuncture to techniques such as cervical traction, vertebral mobilization, stretching and relaxation. OBJECTIVE: To examine the evolution of six patients

  20. Chiropractic wellness on the web: the content and quality of information related to wellness and primary prevention on the Internet

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    Evans Marion

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Internet has become a common source of information for patients wishing to learn about health information. Previous studies found information related to back pain poor and often contradictory to current guidelines. Wellness has become a common topic in the field of chiropractic and accrediting agencies have standards on delivery of wellness-based content in college curricula as well as directives for clinical applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of the information on the Internet using the terms "chiropractic wellness," or "wellness chiropractic". Methods Five commonly used search engines were selected and the first 10 sites found using the strategy above were evaluated by two raters. Demographic assessments of the sites were made along with whether they were Health on the Net Foundation (HON certified, contained standard wellness content, mentioned any Healthy People Focus Areas, and other chiropractic topics. Kappa statistics compared inter-rater agreement. Results Potential patients appeared to be the audience 87% of the time and a private doctor of chiropractic appeared to be the typical site owner. The sites usually promoted the provider. No sites displayed HON certification logo nor did any appear to meet the HON certification criteria. Twenty-six sites (55% promoted regular physical activity in some manner and 18 (38% had information on health risks of tobacco. Four (9% had mental health or stress-reduction content bu